These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Variability in personality expression across contexts: a social network approach.  

PubMed

The current research investigated how the contextual expression of personality differs across interpersonal relationships. Two related studies were conducted with college samples (Study 1: N?=?52, 38 female; Study 2: N?=?111, 72 female). Participants in each study completed a five-factor measure of personality and constructed a social network detailing their 30 most important relationships. Participants used a brief Five-Factor Model scale to rate their personality as they experience it when with each person in their social network. Multiple informants selected from each social network then rated the target participant's personality (Study 1: N?=?227, Study 2: N?=?777). Contextual personality ratings demonstrated incremental validity beyond standard global self-report in predicting specific informants' perceptions. Variability in these contextualized personality ratings was predicted by the position of the other individuals within the social network. Across both studies, participants reported being more extraverted and neurotic, and less conscientious, with more central members of their social networks. Dyadic social network-based assessments of personality provide incremental validity in understanding personality, revealing dynamic patterns of personality variability unobservable with standard assessment techniques. PMID:23551024

Clifton, Allan

2014-04-01

2

Instrumental variables estimates of peer effects in social networks.  

PubMed

Estimating peer effects with observational data is very difficult because of contextual confounding, peer selection, simultaneity bias, and measurement error, etc. In this paper, I show that instrumental variables (IVs) can help to address these problems in order to provide causal estimates of peer effects. Based on data collected from over 4000 students in six middle schools in China, I use the IV methods to estimate peer effects on smoking. My design-based IV approach differs from previous ones in that it helps to construct potentially strong IVs and to directly test possible violation of exogeneity of the IVs. I show that measurement error in smoking can lead to both under- and imprecise estimations of peer effects. Based on a refined measure of smoking, I find consistent evidence for peer effects on smoking. If a student's best friend smoked within the past 30days, the student was about one fifth (as indicated by the OLS estimate) or 40 percentage points (as indicated by the IV estimate) more likely to smoke in the same time period. The findings are robust to a variety of robustness checks. I also show that sharing cigarettes may be a mechanism for peer effects on smoking. A 10% increase in the number of cigarettes smoked by a student's best friend is associated with about 4% increase in the number of cigarettes smoked by the student in the same time period. PMID:25592943

An, Weihua

2015-03-01

3

Semantic Networks and Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To illustrate the need for social network metadata within semantic metadata. Design/methodology/approach: Surveys properties of social networks and the semantic web, suggests that social network analysis applies to semantic content, argues that semantic content is more searchable if social network metadata is merged with semantic web…

Downes, Stephen

2005-01-01

4

Connectibles : tangible social networking  

E-print Network

This thesis presents "Connectibles," an instantiation of a tangible social network, a new type of social network application rooted in physical objects and real world social behavior. This research is inspired by social ...

Kalanithi, Jeevan James

2007-01-01

5

Social Learning in Social Networks  

E-print Network

This paper analyzes a model of social learning in a social network. Agents decide whether or not to adopt a new technology with unknown payoffs based on their prior beliefs and the experiences of their neighbors in the ...

Lamberson, PJ

6

Social skill as determinant of social networks and perceived social support in schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Factors influencing supportive social networks of people with schizophrenia are little understood. Data from 46 outpatients with schizophrenia were analysed using structural equation modelling to test plausible sets of inter-relationships between social skill, social networks, and social support. The data supported a tentative model about the causal relationships between variables. Paths showed that people with greater social skill had larger social networks, but did not necessarily perceive greater support from these networks. Negative symptoms accounted for some of the effect of social skill on social networks. Whereas groups of single-admission and multiple-admission participants did not differ in terms of social skill, social networks, or support, the age of the participants influenced their social skill and the size of their social networks. Younger participants had greater social skill and larger social networks. The results appear to suggest the importance of early intervention for young people with first-episode psychosis. PMID:9516669

Macdonald, E M; Jackson, H J; Hayes, R L; Baglioni, A J; Madden, C

1998-02-01

7

Wayfinding in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the recent explosion of popularity of commercial social-networking sites like Facebook and MySpace, the size of social networks that can be studied scientifically has passed from the scale traditionally studied by sociologists and anthropologists to the scale of networks more typically studied by computer scientists. In this chapter, I will highlight a recent line of computational research into the modeling and analysis of the small-world phenomenon - the observation that typical pairs of people in a social network are connected by very short chains of intermediate friends - and the ability of members of a large social network to collectively find efficient routes to reach individuals in the network. I will survey several recent mathematical models of social networks that account for these phenomena, with an emphasis on both the provable properties of these social-network models and the empirical validation of the models against real large-scale social-network data.

Liben-Nowell, David

8

Social Insect Networks  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Social insect colonies have many of the properties of adaptive networks. The simple rules governing how local interactions among individuals translate into group behaviors are found across social groups, giving social insects the potential to have a profound impact on our understanding of the interplay between network dynamics and social evolution.

Jennifer Fewell (Arizona State University; School of Life Sciences)

2003-09-26

9

Social networking sites.  

PubMed

In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools, social networking and social bookmarking sites, virtual worlds, and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes social networking Web sites and techniques to increase their safe use. PMID:20173583

Wink, Diane M

2010-01-01

10

Tangible Social Network System.  

E-print Network

?? Tangible social network system is a home-based communication solution specifically designed for elders. Former researches indicate that insufficient communication among elders cause several challenges… (more)

Mannapperuma, Chanaka

2010-01-01

11

Social Networks and Entrepreneurship  

Microsoft Academic Search

A central tenet in sociology holds that positions in social structure influence the attitudes, behaviors, and outcomes of the actors occupying those positions. Though this proposition underlies much sociological thinking, perhaps the clearest instantiation of it appears in the literature collectively referred to as 'social network theory'. Research in this area investigates both the structure of the relations between social

Arent Greve; Janet W. Salaff

2003-01-01

12

Trust Maximization in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Trust is a human-related phenomenon in social networks. Trust research on social networks has gained much attention on its usefulness, and on modeling propagations. There is little focus on finding maximum trust in social networks which is particularly important when a social network is oriented by certain tasks. In this paper, we propose a trust maximization algorithm based on the task-oriented social networks.

Zhan, Justin; Fang, Xing

13

Affinity driven social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work we present a model for evolving networks, where the driven force is related to the social affinity between individuals of a population. In the model, a set of individuals initially arranged on a regular ordered network and thus linked with their closest neighbors are allowed to rearrange their connections according to a dynamics closely related to that of the stable marriage problem. We show that the behavior of some topological properties of the resulting networks follows a non trivial pattern.

Ruyú, B.; Kuperman, M. N.

2007-04-01

14

The Social Network Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

Bunus, Peter

15

Social networking and adolescents.  

PubMed

Online social networking is a 21st century innovation increasingly embraced by today's young people. It provides new opportunities for communication that expand an adolescent's world. Yet adults, often suspicious of new trends and technologies initially embraced by youth, often see these new environments as perilous places to visit. These fears have been accentuated by media hype, especially about sexual predators. How dangerous are they? Because the rush to go on these sites is a new phenomenon, research is as yet scant. This review explores current beliefs and knowledge about the dangers of social networking sites. PMID:19492691

Fuld, Gilbert L

2009-04-01

16

Social Network Infiltration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks are websites (or software that distributes media online) where users can distribute content to either a list of friends on that site or to anyone who surfs onto their page, and where those friends can interact and discuss the content. By linking to friends online, the users’ personal content (pictures, songs, favorite movies, diaries, websites, and so on) is dynamically distributed, and can "become viral", that is, get spread rapidly as more people see it and spread it themselves. Social networks are immensely popular around the planet, especially with younger users. The biggest social networks are Facebook and MySpace; an IYA2009 user already exists on Facebook, and one will be created for MySpace (in fact, several NASA satellites such as GLAST and Swift already have successful MySpace pages). Twitter is another network where data distribution is more limited; it is more like a mini-blog, but is very popular. IYA2009 already has a Twitter page, and will be updated more often with relevant information. In this talk I will review the existing social networks, show people how and why they are useful, and give them the tools they need to contribute meaningfully to IYA's online reach.

Plait, Philip

2008-05-01

17

Promoting Social Network Awareness: A Social Network Monitoring System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To increase communication and collaboration opportunities, members of a community must be aware of the social networks that exist within that community. This paper describes a social network monitoring system--the KIWI system--that enables users to register their interactions and visualize their social networks. The system was implemented in a…

Cadima, Rita; Ferreira, Carlos; Monguet, Josep; Ojeda, Jordi; Fernandez, Joaquin

2010-01-01

18

Social Networks and Political Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social networks have been an important area of study in sociology dating back to the classic works of Simmel. The study of\\u000a social networks entails a unique perspective focused on social relations. It also carries a powerful methodological repertoire\\u000a geared toward mapping and analyzing social ties. Political research has greatly benefited from the application of social networks.\\u000a In particular, numerous

Clayton D. Peoples

19

From Photo Networks to Social Networks, Creation and Use of a Social Network Derived with Photos  

E-print Network

From Photo Networks to Social Networks, Creation and Use of a Social Network Derived with Photos and photos have received plenty of attention in the digital age. In this paper, we show how social photos that reveals social attributes. From this photo network, a social network is extracted that can help to build

Boyer, Edmond

20

The malignant social network  

PubMed Central

Tumors contain a vastly complicated cellular network that relies on local communication to execute malignant programs. The molecular cues that are involved in cell-cell adhesion orchestrate large-scale tumor behaviors such as proliferation and invasion. We have recently begun to appreciate that many tumors contain a high degree of cellular heterogeneity and are organized in a cellular hierarchy, with a cancer stem cell (CSC) population identified at the apex in multiple cancer types. CSCs reside in unique microenvironments or niches that are responsible for directing their behavior through cellular interactions between CSCs and stromal cells, generating a malignant social network. Identifying cell-cell adhesion mechanisms in this network has implications for the basic understanding of tumorigenesis and the development of more effective therapies. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of cell-cell adhesion mechanisms used by CSCs and how these local interactions have global consequences for tumor biology. PMID:22796941

Hale, James S.; Li, Meizhang; Lathia, Justin D.

2012-01-01

21

Social Network Visualization in Epidemiology  

PubMed Central

Epidemiological investigations and interventions are increasingly focusing on social networks. Two aspects of social networks are relevant in this regard: the structure of networks and the function of networks. A better understanding of the processes that determine how networks form and how they operate with respect to the spread of behavior holds promise for improving public health. Visualizing social networks is a key to both research and interventions. Network images supplement statistical analyses and allow the identification of groups of people for targeting, the identification of central and peripheral individuals, and the clarification of the macro-structure of the network in a way that should affect public health interventions. People are inter-connected and so their health is inter-connected. Inter-personal health effects in social networks provide a new foundation for public health. PMID:22544996

Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2010-01-01

22

Social Psychology Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With over 11,000 links contained within its pages, the Social Psychology Network site is arguably the largest social psychology database on the Internet. Maintained by Professor Scout Plous of Wesleyan University, the site has been generously supported by the National Science Foundation. Visitors will appreciate the very clean layout of the siteâ??s homepage, as they are presented with a search engine, along with a number of electronic forums, and a listing of related topics. To delve into the siteâ??s contents, visitors may wish to select from any one of the areas on the left-hand side of the homepage, which include listings of doctoral programs in social psychology and teaching resources. There are numerous other options for interested parties, and they lead to such offerings as rankings of doctoral programs in the field and distance learning options in the field. Finally, visitors can also view many of the siteâ??s documents in a number of languages, including Spanish, French, Italian, and German.

Plous, Scott

23

Empathetic Social Choice on Social Networks Amirali Salehi-Abari  

E-print Network

matching on social networks [7, 4]. The influence of social networks on voting behavior has received aggregation (e.g., social welfare maximiza- tion or voting), and develop scalable optimization algorithms Algorithms, Economics, Human Factors, Theory Keywords Social Choice, Social and Economic Networks, Voting

Toronto, University of

24

Signed Networks in Social Media  

E-print Network

Relations between users on social media sites often reflect a mixture of positive (friendly) and negative (antagonistic) interactions. In contrast to the bulk of research on social networks that has focused almost exclusively on positive interpretations of links between people, we study how the interplay between positive and negative relationships affects the structure of on-line social networks. We connect our analyses to theories of signed networks from social psychology. We find that the classical theory of structural balance tends to capture certain common patterns of interaction, but that it is also at odds with some of the fundamental phenomena we observe --- particularly related to the evolving, directed nature of these on-line networks. We then develop an alternate theory of status that better explains the observed edge signs and provides insights into the underlying social mechanisms. Our work provides one of the first large-scale evaluations of theories of signed networks using on-line datasets, as ...

Leskovec, Jure; Kleinberg, Jon

2010-01-01

25

SNIF: social networking in fur  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present SNIF: Social Networking in Fur, a system that allows pet owners to interact through their pets' social networks. SNIF comprises inexpensive hardware that can be unobtrusively and transparently affixed to pet collars and paraphernalia in order to augment pet-to-pet, pet-to-owner, and owner-to-owner interactions. SNIF devices aggregate pertinent environmental, social, and individual information that can be broadcast or addressed

Jonathan Gips; Noah Fields; Philip Liang; Arnaud Pilpré

2005-01-01

26

Different Aspects of Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A social network is a set of people (or organizations or other social entities) connected by a set of social relation- ships, such as friendship, co-working or information exchange. Social network analysis focuses on the analysis of patterns of relationships among people, organizations, states and such social entities. Social network analysis provides both a visual and a mathematical analysis of

Mohsen Jamali; Hassan Abolhassani

2006-01-01

27

Social networks and the development of social skills in cowbirds.  

PubMed

The complex interrelationships among individuals within social environments can exert selection pressures on social skills: those behaviours and cognitive processes that allow animals to manipulate and out-reproduce others. Social complexity can also have a developmental effect on social skills by providing individuals with opportunities to hone their skills by dealing with the challenges posed in within-group interactions. We examined how social skills develop in captive, adult male brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) that were exposed to differing levels of 'social complexity' across a 2-year experiment. After each year, subjects housed in groups with dynamic social structure (where many individuals entered and exited the groups during the year) outcompeted birds who had been housed in static groups. Exposure to dynamic structure subsequently led to substantial changes to the social networks of the home conditions during the breeding season. Static groups were characterized by a predictable relationship between singing and reproductive success that was stable across years. In dynamic conditions, however, males showed significant variability in their dominance status, their courting and even in their mating success. Reproductive success of males varied dramatically across years and was responsive to social learning in adulthood, and socially dynamic environments 'trained' individuals to be better competitors, even at an age when the development of many traits important for breeding (like song quality) had ended. PMID:22641827

White, David J; Gersick, Andrew S; Snyder-Mackler, Noah

2012-07-01

28

Microscopic evolution of social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a detailed study of network evolution by analyzing four large online social networks with full temporal information about node and edge arrivals. For the first time at such a large scale, we study individual node arrival and edge creation processes that collectively lead to macroscopic properties of networks. Using a methodology based on the maximum-likelihood principle, we in-

Jure Leskovec; Lars Backstrom; Ravi Kumar; Andrew Tomkins

2008-01-01

29

Social Science Research Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), this site allows users to freely access thousands of abstracts and full-text research papers. The core of the site is the SSRN Electronic Library, which contains an Abstract Database with over 15,600 entries and an Electronic Paper Collection, which currently contains over 4,200 full-text papers. Users can search title, abstract, and author fields, or browse the journals, which are grouped under the five respective Research Networks that form the SSRN: Accounting, Economics, Latin American, Financial, and Legal Scholarship. Within each journal entry, users may select from several display options to narrow their results and available full-text documents are indicated by a special symbol. Information on each of the five networks, including conference and job announcements, as well as information on subscribing and a list of site licenses, is accessible via a menu panel on the left side of the main page. According to SSEP, access to the abstracts and full-text papers will remain free of charge to all users until \\"the next revision to the web site this winter.\\"

2005-11-02

30

Social Science Research Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), this site allows users to freely access thousands of abstracts and full-text research papers. The core of the site is the SSRN Electronic Library, which contains an Abstract Database with over 15,600 entries and an Electronic Paper Collection, which currently contains over 4,200 full-text papers. Users can search title, abstract, and author fields, or browse the journals, which are grouped under the five respective Research Networks that form the SSRN: Accounting, Economics, Latin American, Financial, and Legal Scholarship. Within each journal entry, users may select from several display options to narrow their results and available full-text documents are indicated by a special symbol. Information on each of the five networks, including conference and job announcements, as well as information on subscribing and a list of site licenses, is accessible via a menu panel on the left side of the main page. According to SSEP, access to the abstracts and full-text papers will remain free of charge to all users until "the next revision to the web site this winter."

31

Sensor networks for social networks  

E-print Network

This thesis outlines the development of software that makes use of Bayesian belief networks and signal processing techniques to make meaningful inferences about real-world phenomena using data obtained from sensor networks. ...

Farry, Michael P. (Michael Patrick)

2006-01-01

32

Introduction to Social Network Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social Network analysis focuses on patterns of relations between and among people, organizations, states, etc. It aims to describe networks of relations as fully as possible, identify prominent patterns in such networks, trace the flow of information through them, and discover what effects these relations and networks have on people and organizations. Social network analysis offers a very promising potential for analyzing human-human interactions in online communities (discussion boards, newsgroups, virtual organizations). This Tutorial provides an overview of this analytic technique and demonstrates how it can be used in Human Computer Interaction (HCI) research and practice, focusing especially on Computer Mediated Communication (CMC). This topic acquires particular importance these days, with the increasing popularity of social networking websites (e.g., youtube, myspace, MMORPGs etc.) and the research interest in studying them.

Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Ang, Chee Siang

33

Line graphs as social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It was demonstrated recently that the line graphs are clustered and assortative. These topological features are known to characterize some social networks [M.E.J. Newman, Y. Park, Why social networks are different from other types of networks, Phys. Rev. E 68 (2003) 036122]; it was argued that this similarity reveals their cliquey character. In the model proposed here, a social network is the line graph of an initial network of families, communities, interest groups, school classes and small companies. These groups play the role of nodes, and individuals are represented by links between these nodes. The picture is supported by the data on the LiveJournal network of about 8×10 6 people.

Krawczyk, M. J.; Muchnik, L.; Ma?ka-Kraso?, A.; Ku?akowski, K.

2011-07-01

34

Centrality measures in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Complex networks represent an extensive variety of systems in nature and human interactions. Networks are graphs that describe the structures of interacting systems and give substantial information about the patterns of connections between the nodes in a particular system. In turn, knowing about the structure of networks and their arrangements enables one to make certain types of predictions about their behavior. With that larger motivation, this thesis research emphasizes different measurement metrics such as degree distribution, assortativity and clustering coefficients, transitivity, modularity, network diameter, and the average path length to associate the configurations of the different networks to determine certain types of behavior. The main focus of this thesis is on social networks, where the assortative patterns of social networks were identified. The various parameters used in the study of the networks were calculated and defined using the software packages Networkx and Gephi. The different types of networks are from the Stanford Network Analysis Project (SNAP) website. In particular, the focus is on using the numerical values of the coefficients to infer differences in the forms of contact in different social networks. The ability to do so has implications for detecting preferences when it comes to the relations between groups of people in social networks. As a result of social networks displaying assortative behaviors, the data indicates that these networks could also project some traits of 'narrow-mindedness' due to the formation of different clusters. Another significant repercussion of this research is the ability of a community to thrive successfully based on the interactions of the people with one another.

Moreau, Michele

35

Some Facts of Social Networks and Crowdsourcing  

E-print Network

penetration N Europe = Min 43 ­ Max 4968 / F = If member of social network Big social networks will get bigger on Online Social Networks · Crowdsourcing #12;Crowdsourcing #12;Crowdsourcing + Internet: Data createdSome Facts of Social Networks and Crowdsourcing Zheng Yang & Wei Xi Tsinghua University & Xi

Yang, Zheng

36

SocialCDN: Caching Techniques for Distributed Social Networks  

E-print Network

fusions of social and vehicular networks. I. INTRODUCTION Popular Online Social Networks (OSN. This revolution in human interaction through social media has brought to the forefront the issues of ownership. Critical among them is the need for a scalable social update dissemination service. A Social Update

Iftode, Liviu

37

MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ESTIMATION FOR SOCIAL NETWORK DYNAMICS  

PubMed Central

A model for network panel data is discussed, based on the assumption that the observed data are discrete observations of a continuous-time Markov process on the space of all directed graphs on a given node set, in which changes in tie variables are independent conditional on the current graph. The model for tie changes is parametric and designed for applications to social network analysis, where the network dynamics can be interpreted as being generated by choices made by the social actors represented by the nodes of the graph. An algorithm for calculating the Maximum Likelihood estimator is presented, based on data augmentation and stochastic approximation. An application to an evolving friendship network is given and a small simulation study is presented which suggests that for small data sets the Maximum Likelihood estimator is more efficient than the earlier proposed Method of Moments estimator. PMID:25419259

Snijders, Tom A.B.; Koskinen, Johan; Schweinberger, Michael

2014-01-01

38

Online Identities and Social Networking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online identities play a critical role in the social web that is taking shape on the Internet. Despite many technical proposals for creating and managing online identities, none has received widespread acceptance. Design and implementation of online identities that are socially acceptable on the Internet remains an open problem. This chapter discusses the interplay between online identities and social networking. Online social networks (OSNs) are growing at a rapid pace and has millions of members in them. While the recent trend is to create explicit OSNs such as Facebook and MySpace, we also have implicit OSNs such as interaction graphs created by email and instant messaging services. Explicit OSNs allow users to create profiles and use them to project their identities on the web. There are many interesting identity related issues in the context of social networking including how OSNs help and hinder the definition of online identities.

Maheswaran, Muthucumaru; Ali, Bader; Ozguven, Hatice; Lord, Julien

39

An algorithmic approach to social networks  

E-print Network

Social networks consist of a set of individuals and some form of social relationship that ties the individuals together. In this thesis, we use algorithmic techniques to study three aspects of social networks: (1) we analyze ...

Liben-Nowell, David

2005-01-01

40

Social Group Dynamics in Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rich set of interactions between individuals in the society results in complex community structure, capturing highly connected\\u000a circles of friends, families, or professional cliques in a social network. Due to the frequent changes in the activity and\\u000a communication patterns of individuals, the associated social and communication network is subject to constant evolution. The\\u000a cohesive groups of people in such

Gergely Palla; Péter Pollner; Albert-László Barabási; Tamás Vicsek

41

Extracting Regular Behaviors from Social Media Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social media network analysis has become very popular in recent years. How do real networks evolve over time? What are the normal evolving behaviors in a social media network? In order to extract behaviors occurring regularly to reveal the microscopic evolving properties in social networks, the evolving process of networks is modeled as stochastic states transition, and the evolving behaviors

Leiming Yan; Jinwei Wang

2011-01-01

42

Computational Statistical Methods for Social Network Models  

PubMed Central

We review the broad range of recent statistical work in social network models, with emphasis on computational aspects of these methods. Particular focus is applied to exponential-family random graph models (ERGM) and latent variable models for data on complete networks observed at a single time point, though we also briefly review many methods for incompletely observed networks and networks observed at multiple time points. Although we mention far more modeling techniques than we can possibly cover in depth, we provide numerous citations to current literature. We illustrate several of the methods on a small, well-known network dataset, Sampson’s monks, providing code where possible so that these analyses may be duplicated. PMID:23828720

Hunter, David R.; Krivitsky, Pavel N.; Schweinberger, Michael

2013-01-01

43

Social networks and the Semantic Web  

E-print Network

Social networks and the Semantic Web Peter Mika Business Informatics group Dept. of Computer technology for the social sciences Social network mining from the Web Semantics-based data management Browsing and visualization Case study Network Analysis of Semantic Web research 2. Network Analysis

Baeza-Yates, Ricardo

44

Mining Social Network for Semantic Advertisement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Networked computers are expanding more and more around the world, and digital social networks becoming of great importance for many people's work and leisure. Emails, Weblogs and Instant Messengers are popular instances of social networks. In this paper, the main target is having an advertisement according to user favorites and interests by mining his\\/her interactions in digital social networks. Briefly,

Pooya Moradian Zadeh; Mohsen Sadighi Moshkenani

2008-01-01

45

Assortative model for social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this Brief Report we present a version of a network growth model, generalized in order to describe the behavior of social networks. The case of study considered is the preprint archive at cul.arxiv.org. Each node corresponds to a scientist, and a link is present whenever two authors wrote a paper together. This graph is a nice example of degree-assortative network, that is, to say a network where sites with similar degree are connected to each other. The model presented is one of the few able to reproduce such behavior, giving some insight on the microscopic dynamics at the basis of the graph structure.

Catanzaro, Michele; Caldarelli, Guido; Pietronero, Luciano

2004-09-01

46

Interests Diffusion in Social Networks  

E-print Network

Understanding cultural phenomena on Social Networks (SNs) and exploiting the implicit knowledge about their members is attracting the interest of different research communities both from the academic and the business side. The community of complexity science is devoting significant efforts to define laws, models, and theories, which, based on acquired knowledge, are able to predict future observations (e.g. success of a product). In the mean time, the semantic web community aims at engineering a new generation of advanced services by defining constructs, models and methods, adding a semantic layer to SNs. In this context, a leapfrog is expected to come from a hybrid approach merging the disciplines above. Along this line, this work focuses on the propagation of individual interests in social networks. The proposed framework consists of the following main components: a method to gather information about the members of the social networks; methods to perform some semantic analysis of the Domain of Interest; a p...

D'Agostino, Gregorio; De Nicola, Antonio; Tucci, Salvatore

2015-01-01

47

Social networking profile correlates of schizotypy.  

PubMed

Social networking sites, such as Facebook, are extremely popular and have become a primary method for socialization and communication. Despite a report of increased use among those on the schizophrenia-spectrum, few details are known about their actual practices. In the current research, undergraduate participants completed measures of schizotypy and personality, and provided access to their Facebook profiles. Information from the profiles were then systematically coded and compared to the questionnaire data. As predicted, social anhedonia (SocAnh) was associated with a decrease in social participation variables, including a decrease in number of friends and number of photos, and an increase in length of time since communication with a friend, but SocAnh was also associated with an increase in profile length. Also, SocAnh was highly correlated with extraversion. Relatedly, extraversion uniquely predicted the number of friends and photos and length of time since communication with a friend. In addition, perceptual aberration/magical ideation (PerMag) was associated with an increased number of "black outs" on Facebook profile print-outs, a measure of paranoia. Overall, results from this naturalistic-like study show that SocAnh and extraversion are associated with decreased social participation and PerMag with increased paranoia related to information on social networking sites. PMID:22796101

Martin, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Drew H; Cicero, David C; Kerns, John G

2012-12-30

48

Networks in Social Policy Problems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1. Introduction M. Scotti and B. Vedres; Part I. Information, Collaboration, Innovation: The Creative Power of Networks: 2. Dissemination of health information within social networks C. Dhanjal, S. Blanchemanche, S. Clemençon, A. Rona-Tas and F. Rossi; 3. Scientific teams and networks change the face of knowledge creation S. Wuchty, J. Spiro, B. F. Jones and B. Uzzi; 4. Structural folds: the innovative potential of overlapping groups B. Vedres and D. Stark; 5. Team formation and performance on nanoHub: a network selection challenge in scientific communities D. Margolin, K. Ognyanova, M. Huang, Y. Huang and N. Contractor; Part II. Influence, Capture, Corruption: Networks Perspectives on Policy Institutions: 6. Modes of coordination of collective action: what actors in policy making? M. Diani; 7. Why skewed distributions of pay for executives is the cause of much grief: puzzles and few answers so far B. Kogut and J.-S. Yang; 8. Networks of institutional capture: a case of business in the State apparatus E. Lazega and L. Mounier; 9. The social and institutional structure of corruption: some typical network configurations of corruption transactions in Hungary Z. Szántó, I. J. Tóth and S. Varga; Part III. Crisis, Extinction, World System Change: Network Dynamics on a Large Scale: 10. How creative elements help the recovery of networks after crisis: lessons from biology A. Mihalik, A. S. Kaposi, I. A. Kovács, T. Nánási, R. Palotai, Á. Rák, M. S. Szalay-Beko and P. Csermely; 11. Networks and globalization policies D. R. White; 12. Network science in ecology: the structure of ecological communities and the biodiversity question A. Bodini, S. Allesina and C. Bondavalli; 13. Supply security in the European natural gas pipeline network M. Scotti and B. Vedres; 14. Conclusions and outlook A.-L. Barabási; Index.

Vedres, Balázs; Scotti, Marco

2012-08-01

49

Enhancing business networks using social network based virtual communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To enhance an entrepreneur's business network through the integration of the social network concepts and design principles of virtual communities. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This study documents the design and initial deployment of a virtual community case, Innovation Information Infrastructure, based on social network concepts. Findings – Basic design principles, deployment strategy, and future directions for social network-based virtual communities

Bih-ru Lea; Wen-bin Yu; Nisha Maguluru; Michael Nichols

2006-01-01

50

INTERACTING WITH SOCIAL NETWORKS TO IMPROVE HEALTHCARE BODY SENSOR NETWORKS  

E-print Network

INTERACTING WITH SOCIAL NETWORKS TO IMPROVE HEALTHCARE BODY SENSOR NETWORKS by DAVID BAUSCHLICHER.........................................................................................3 2.1 Wireless Sensor Networks.............................................................3 2.2 Body Sensor Networks..................................................................5 2.2.1 Energy

Miles, Will

51

Agent collaboration and social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we report on preliminary results for evaluating preferences for collaboration among a group of agents who located in a social network. We have implemented a game of boxes that are pushed into holes in a two dimensional world. We vary rations of boxes and holes as well as individuals awareness and information sharing. Our results corroborate intuitive

R. Sean Bowman; Henry Hexmoor

2005-01-01

52

Semirings for social networks analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the paper four semirings for solving social networks problems are constructed.The closure of relational matrix over geodetic semirings contains for every pair of vertices u and v the length and the number of u ? v geodesics; and for geosetic semiring the length and the set of vertices on u — v geodesics. The algorithms for computing the geodetic

Vladimir Batagelj

1994-01-01

53

Social Networking: Keeping It Clean  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The need to maintain an unpolluted learning environment is no easy task for schools and districts that have incorporated social networking sites into their educational life. The staff and teachers at Blaine High School in Minnesota's Anoka-Hennepin District 11 had been considering the pros and cons of establishing a school Facebook page when the…

Waters, John K.

2011-01-01

54

ONLINE SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYTICS Course Syllabus  

E-print Network

(asymptotic learning) or herding may occur in online social networks. TOPICS Basic social network conceptsONLINE SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYTICS Course Syllabus ECTS: 10 Period: Summer 2013 (17 July - 14 Aug) Level: Master Language of teaching: English Course type: Summer University STADS UVA code: 460122U056

55

Early Adolescent Social Networks and Substance Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the relationships between social network position and the use of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and inhalants in a sample of 1,119 sixth-grade youth. Social network analyses of peer nominations were used to categorize youth as "members" of social groups, "liaisons" between groups, or social "isolates." The results revealed that…

Henry, David B.; Kobus, Kimberly

2007-01-01

56

Who Uses Social Networks? An aggregate study  

E-print Network

between users of social networks What cs492 students say? Social change from industrialisation #12;USA?: The intersection of users' personality and social media use." Computers in Human Behavior 26.2 (2010): 247-253. #12Who Uses Social Networks? An aggregate study Marta Kryven, CGL Talk, July 2014 #12;Generalities

Waterloo, University of

57

Social structure of Facebook networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the social structure of Facebook “friendship” networks at one hundred American colleges and universities at a single point in time, and we examine the roles of user attributes-gender, class year, major, high school, and residence-at these institutions. We investigate the influence of common attributes at the dyad level in terms of assortativity coefficients and regression models. We then examine larger-scale groupings by detecting communities algorithmically and comparing them to network partitions based on user characteristics. We thereby examine the relative importance of different characteristics at different institutions, finding for example that common high school is more important to the social organization of large institutions and that the importance of common major varies significantly between institutions. Our calculations illustrate how microscopic and macroscopic perspectives give complementary insights on the social organization at universities and suggest future studies to investigate such phenomena further.

Traud, Amanda L.; Mucha, Peter J.; Porter, Mason A.

2012-08-01

58

Reconfiguration and search of social networks.  

PubMed

Social networks tend to exhibit some topological characteristics different from regular networks and random networks, such as shorter average path length and higher clustering coefficient, and the node degree of the majority of social networks obeys exponential distribution. Based on the topological characteristics of the real social networks, a new network model which suits to portray the structure of social networks was proposed, and the characteristic parameters of the model were calculated. To find out the relationship between two people in the social network, and using the local information of the social network and the parallel mechanism, a hybrid search strategy based on k-walker random and a high degree was proposed. Simulation results show that the strategy can significantly reduce the average number of search steps, so as to effectively improve the search speed and efficiency. PMID:24574861

Zhang, Lianming; Peng, Aoyuan; Yu, Jianping

2013-01-01

59

Complex social contagion makes networks more vulnerable to disease outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Social network analysis is now widely used to investigate the dynamics of infectious disease spread. Vaccination dramatically disrupts disease transmission on a contact network, and indeed, high vaccination rates can potentially halt disease transmission altogether. Here, we build on mounting evidence that health behaviors - such as vaccination, and refusal thereof - can spread across social networks through a process of complex contagion that requires social reinforcement. Using network simulations that model health behavior and infectious disease spread, we find that under otherwise identical conditions, the process by which the health behavior spreads has a very strong effect on disease outbreak dynamics. This dynamic variability results from differences in the topology within susceptible communities that arise during the health behavior spreading process, which in turn depends on the topology of the overall social network. Our findings point to the importance of health behavior spread in predicting and controlling disease outbreaks. PMID:23712758

Campbell, Ellsworth; Salathé, Marcel

2013-01-01

60

"Hidden" social networks in behavior change interventions.  

PubMed

We investigated whether "hidden" (or unobserved) social networks were evident in a 2011 physical activity behavior change intervention in Belfast, Northern Ireland. Results showed evidence of unobserved social networks in the intervention and illustrated how the network evolved over short periods and affected behavior. Behavior change interventions should account for the interaction among participants (i.e., social networks) and how such interactions affect intervention outcome. PMID:25602895

Hunter, Ruth F; McAneney, Helen; Davis, Michael; Tully, Mark A; Valente, Thomas W; Kee, Frank

2015-03-01

61

Social Insects: A Model System for Network Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social insect colonies (ants, bees, wasps, and termites) show sophisticated collective problem-solving in the face of variable constraints. Individuals exchange information and materials such as food. The resulting network structure and dynamics can inform us about the mechanisms by which the insects achieve particular collective behaviors and these can be transposed to man-made and social networks. We discuss how network analysis can answer important questions about social insects, such as how effective task allocation or information flow is realized. We put forward the idea that network analysis methods are under-utilized in social insect research, and that they can provide novel ways to view the complexity of collective behavior, particularly if network dynamics are taken into account. To illustrate this, we present an example of network tasks performed by ant workers, linked by instances of workers switching from one task to another. We show how temporal network analysis can propose and test new hypotheses on mechanisms of task allocation, and how adding temporal elements to static networks can drastically change results. We discuss the benefits of using social insects as models for complex systems in general. There are multiple opportunities emergent technologies and analysis methods in facilitating research on social insect network. The potential for interdisciplinary work could significantly advance diverse fields such as behavioral ecology, computer sciences, and engineering.

Charbonneau, Daniel; Blonder, Benjamin; Dornhaus, Anna

62

Data in Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Network research relies on a variety of data-sources, depending on the problem-scenario and the questions which the research is trying to answer or inform. In this paper, we analyze some of the data- sources indexed by the sizes of these data-sets and relating them back to the research question, which the data-set is used for. In carrying out such

Anu Vaidyanathan; Malcolm Shore; Mark Billinghurst

2008-01-01

63

Profit Maximization over Social Networks  

E-print Network

Influence maximization is the problem of finding a set of influential users in a social network such that the expected spread of influence under a certain propagation model is maximized. Much of the previous work has neglected the important distinction between social influence and actual product adoption. However, as recognized in the management science literature, an individual who gets influenced by social acquaintances may not necessarily adopt a product (or technology), due, e.g., to monetary concerns. In this work, we distinguish between influence and adoption by explicitly modeling the states of being influenced and of adopting a product. We extend the classical Linear Threshold (LT) model to incorporate prices and valuations, and factor them into users' decision-making process of adopting a product. We show that the expected profit function under our proposed model maintains submodularity under certain conditions, but no longer exhibits monotonicity, unlike the expected influence spread function. To ma...

Lu, Wei

2012-01-01

64

Network Models for Social Influence Processes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Generalizes the p* class of models for social network data to predict individual-level attributes from network ties. The p* family is a class of models for social networks with parameters reflecting a wide variety of possible structural features. Illustrates the models with an empirical example involving a training course, with trainees' reactions…

Robins, Garry; Pattison, Philippa; Elliott, Peter

2001-01-01

65

First-Year Students' Use of Social Network Sites to Reduce the Uncertainty of Anticipatory Socialization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study surveyed 399 incoming first-year students at two colleges in the Midwest on their use of social network sites before college entry and its impact on various dimensions of the first-year experience. Significant correlations were found for two pairs of variables: (a) students who used social network sites before arriving on campus…

Anderson, Isolde K.; Lerstrom, Alan; Tintle, Nathan

2014-01-01

66

Knowledge and Social Networks in Yahoo! Answers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study defines and explores relations between knowledge-seeking and social relationship networks, using data from a popular Q&A social network site. Our theoretical framework draws on Motivation, Common-goods, and Social capital theories to generate an understanding of the interrelationship of the two types of networks. A dataset consisting of 19 months of activity on Q&A Yahoo! Answers provides the basis

Amit Rechavi; Sheizaf Rafaeli

2012-01-01

67

The Vertebrate Social Behavior Network: Evolutionary Themes and Variations  

PubMed Central

Based on a wide variety of data, it is now clear that the brains of birds and teleost (bony) fish possess a core “social behavior network” within the basal forebrain and midbrain that is homologous to the social behavior network of mammals. The nodes of this network are reciprocally connected, contain receptors for sex steroid hormones, and are involved in multiple forms of social behavior. Other hodological features and neuropeptide distributions are likewise very similar across taxa. This evolutionary conservation represents a boon for experiments on phenotypic behavioral variation, as the extraordinary social diversity of teleost fish and songbirds can now be used to generate broadly relevant insights into issues of brain function that are not particularly tractable in other vertebrate groups. Two such lines of research are presented here, each of which addresses functional variation within the network as it relates to divergent patterns of social behavior. In the first set of experiments, we have used a sexually polymorphic fish to demonstrate that natural selection can operate independently on hypothalamic neuroendocrine functions that are relevant for 1) gonadal regulation and 2) sex-typical behavioral modulation. In the second set of experiments, we have exploited the diversity of avian social organizations and ecologies to isolate species-typical group size as a quasi-independent variable. These experiments have shown that specific areas and peptidergic components of the social behavior network possess functional properties that evolve in parallel with divergence and convergence in sociality. PMID:15885690

Goodson, James L.

2008-01-01

68

Social Networks in Health Care: Communication, collaboration and insights  

E-print Network

-to-one media, 2007. #12;Issue Brief: Social Networks in Health Care: Communication, collaboration and insights 2 Business use of social networks Social networks transmit media such as video, web logs (blogs of Online Social Networks: A look at the change in demographics of social network users over time. The Pe

Klein, Ophir

69

Bayesian Networks for Social Modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a body of work developed over the past five years. The work addresses the use of Bayesian network (BN) models for representing and predicting social/organizational behaviors. The topics covered include model construction, validation, and use. These topics show the bulk of the lifetime of such model, beginning with construction, moving to validation and other aspects of model "critiquing", and finally demonstrating how the modeling approach might be used to inform policy analysis. The primary benefits of using a well-developed computational, mathematical, and statistical modeling structure, such as BN, are 1) there are significant computational, theoretical and capability bases on which to build 2) the ability to empirically critique the model, and potentially evaluate competing models for a social/behavioral phenomenon.

Whitney, Paul; White, Amanda; Walsh, Stephen; Dalton, Angela; Brothers, Alan

70

Essays on social networks in development economics  

E-print Network

This thesis examines the role that social networks play in developing economies. The first two chapters analyze econometric issues that arise when researchers work with sampled network data. The final two chapters study ...

Chandrasekhar, Arun Gautham

2012-01-01

71

Meerkat: Community Mining with Dynamic Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Meerkat is a tool for visualization and community mining of social networks. It is being developed to offer novel algorithms and functionality that other tools do not possess. Meerkat's features include navigation through graphical representations of networks, network querying and filtering, a multitude of graphical layout algorithms, community mining using recently developed algorithms, and dynamic network event analysis using recently

Jiyang Chen; Justin Fagnan; Randy Goebel; Reihaneh Rabbany; Farzad Sangi; Mansoureh Takaffoli; Eric Verbeek; Osmar R. Zaïane

2010-01-01

72

Motivations for social networking at work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of a social networking site inside of a large enterprise enables a new method of communication between colleagues, encouraging both personal and professional sharing inside the protected walls of a company intranet. Our analysis of user behavior and interviews presents the case that professionals use internal social networking to build stronger bonds with their weak ties and to

Joan Morris Dimicco; David R. Millen; Werner Geyer; Casey Dugan; Beth Brownholtz; Michael J. Muller

2008-01-01

73

Happiness is assortative in online social networks.  

PubMed

Online social networking communities may exhibit highly complex and adaptive collective behaviors. Since emotions play such an important role in human decision making, how online networks modulate human collective mood states has become a matter of considerable interest. In spite of the increasing societal importance of online social networks, it is unknown whether assortative mixing of psychological states takes place in situations where social ties are mediated solely by online networking services in the absence of physical contact. Here, we show that the general happiness, or subjective well-being (SWB), of Twitter users, as measured from a 6-month record of their individual tweets, is indeed assortative across the Twitter social network. Our results imply that online social networks may be equally subject to the social mechanisms that cause assortative mixing in real social networks and that such assortative mixing takes place at the level of SWB. Given the increasing prevalence of online social networks, their propensity to connect users with similar levels of SWB may be an important factor in how positive and negative sentiments are maintained and spread through human society. Future research may focus on how event-specific mood states can propagate and influence user behavior in "real life." PMID:21554117

Bollen, Johan; Gonçalves, Bruno; Ruan, Guangchen; Mao, Huina

2011-01-01

74

Competitive Influence Maximization in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks often serve as a medium for the diffusion of ideas or innovations. An individual's decision whether to adopt a prod- uct or innovation will be highly dependent on the choices made by the individual's peers or neighbors in the social network. In this work, we study the game of innovation diffusion with multiple competing innova- tions such as

Shishir Bharathi; David Kempe; Mahyar Salek

2007-01-01

75

Finding Experts Using Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Searching an organization's document repositories for experts is a frequently occurred problem in intranet information management. A common method for finding experts in an organization is to use social networks - people are not isolated but connected by various kinds of associations. In organizations, people explicitly send email to one another thus social networks are likely to be contained in

Yupeng Fu; Rongjing Xiang; Yiqun Liu; Min Zhang; Shaoping Ma

2007-01-01

76

Vizster: Visualizing Online Social Networks Jeffrey Heer  

E-print Network

, and online dating services. In 2003, another form of online community acquired stunning popularity: onlineVizster: Visualizing Online Social Networks Jeffrey Heer Computer Science Division University, Berkeley ABSTRACT Recent years have witnessed the dramatic popularity of online social networking services

Hearst, Marti

77

Social Networking on the Semantic Web  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Aims to investigate the way that the semantic web is being used to represent and process social network information. Design/methodology/approach: The Swoogle semantic web search engine was used to construct several large data sets of Resource Description Framework (RDF) documents with social network information that were encoded using the…

Finin, Tim; Ding, Li; Zhou, Lina; Joshi, Anupam

2005-01-01

78

Online Games, Virtual Worlds, and Social Networks  

E-print Network

JOUR 447: Online Games, Virtual Worlds, and Social Networks Virtual Island Making #12;One element how to use the game engine, Unity3D. Following the same instructions, each student creatively designed in the look and design of the virtual islands. JOUR 447: Online Games, Virtual Worlds, and Social Networks

Hemmers, Oliver

79

Network analysis in the social sciences.  

PubMed

Over the past decade, there has been an explosion of interest in network research across the physical and social sciences. For social scientists, the theory of networks has been a gold mine, yielding explanations for social phenomena in a wide variety of disciplines from psychology to economics. Here, we review the kinds of things that social scientists have tried to explain using social network analysis and provide a nutshell description of the basic assumptions, goals, and explanatory mechanisms prevalent in the field. We hope to contribute to a dialogue among researchers from across the physical and social sciences who share a common interest in understanding the antecedents and consequences of network phenomena. PMID:19213908

Borgatti, Stephen P; Mehra, Ajay; Brass, Daniel J; Labianca, Giuseppe

2009-02-13

80

Information Filtering on Coupled Social Networks  

PubMed Central

In this paper, based on the coupled social networks (CSN), we propose a hybrid algorithm to nonlinearly integrate both social and behavior information of online users. Filtering algorithm, based on the coupled social networks, considers the effects of both social similarity and personalized preference. Experimental results based on two real datasets, Epinions and Friendfeed, show that the hybrid pattern can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also enlarge the recommendation coverage while adopting global metric. Further empirical analyses demonstrate that the mutual reinforcement and rich-club phenomenon can also be found in coupled social networks where the identical individuals occupy the core position of the online system. This work may shed some light on the in-depth understanding of the structure and function of coupled social networks. PMID:25003525

Nie, Da-Cheng; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Jun-Lin; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Kui

2014-01-01

81

Unifying Social Networks for Smart Phones  

E-print Network

are operated from an Android device application which provides the user interface for the whole Social Unifier and LinkedIn. The tool developed is a system that has been called Social Unifier, which contains three main networking functionalities. First of all, Social Unifier is built over a NoSQL database system called Borges

82

Learning influence probabilities in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, there has been tremendous interest in the phe- nomenon of influence propagation in social networks. The studies in this area assume they have as input to their prob- lems a social graph with edges labeled with probabilities of influence between users. However, the question of where these probabilities come from or how they can be computed from real social

Amit Goyal; Francesco Bonchi; Laks V. S. Lakshmanan

2010-01-01

83

Davis Social Links: Leveraging Social Networks for Future Internet Communication  

E-print Network

to revoke access to itself (or its identity) if it is being abused. An email address, which al- lows anyDavis Social Links: Leveraging Social Networks for Future Internet Communication Lerone Banks communication ar- chitecture for future Internet designs. We begin with a con- ceptual discussion of how future

California at Davis, University of

84

Social-Tie-Based Information Dissemination in Mobile Opportunistic Social Networks  

E-print Network

Social-Tie-Based Information Dissemination in Mobile Opportunistic Social Networks Yunsheng Wang Opportunistic Social Networks Motivation Social-Tie-based Information Dissemination Tie Strength Calculation the properties of social networks and opportunistic networks #12;Motivation "The Strength of Weak Ties": Mark

Wu, Jie

85

An Introduction to Social Network Data Analytics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The advent of online social networks has been one of the most exciting events in this decade. Many popular online social networks such as Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook have become increasingly popular. In addition, a number of multimedia networks such as Flickr have also seen an increasing level of popularity in recent years. Many such social networks are extremely rich in content, and they typically contain a tremendous amount of content and linkage data which can be leveraged for analysis. The linkage data is essentially the graph structure of the social network and the communications between entities; whereas the content data contains the text, images and other multimedia data in the network. The richness of this network provides unprecedented opportunities for data analytics in the context of social networks. This book provides a data-centric view of online social networks; a topic which has been missing from much of the literature. This chapter provides an overview of the key topics in this field, and their coverage in this book.

Aggarwal, Charu C.

86

Evolutionary Information Diffusion over Social Networks  

E-print Network

Social networks have become ubiquitous in our daily life, as such it has attracted great research interests recently. A key challenge is that it is of extremely large-scale with tremendous information flow, creating the phenomenon of "Big Data". Under such a circumstance, understanding information diffusion over social networks has become an important research issue. Most of the existing works on information diffusion analysis are based on either network structure modeling or empirical approach with dataset mining. However, the information diffusion is also heavily influenced by network users' decisions, actions and their socio-economic connections, which is generally ignored in existing works. In this paper, we propose an evolutionary game theoretic framework to model the dynamic information diffusion process in social networks. Specifically, we analyze the framework in uniform degree and non-uniform degree networks and derive the closed-form expressions of the evolutionary stable network states. Moreover, t...

Jiang, Chunxiao; Liu, K J Ray

2013-01-01

87

Social Networks and Political Participation: How Do Networks Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite great interest in the role of social networks as channels of political mobilization, few studies have examined which types of social networks work more effectively in recruiting political activists. Using the Citizen Participation Study data, this study shows that contrary to the conventional wisdom in the literature, there is little…

Lim, Chaeyoon

2008-01-01

88

Data Leak Aware Crowdsourcing in Social Network  

E-print Network

Harnessing human computation for solving complex problems call spawns the issue of finding the unknown competitive group of solvers. In this paper, we propose an approach called Friendlysourcing to build up teams from social network answering a business call, all the while avoiding partial solution disclosure to competitive groups. The contributions of this paper include (i) a clustering based approach for discovering collaborative and competitive team in social network (ii) a Markov-chain based algorithm for discovering implicit interactions in the social network.

Amor, Iheb Ben; Ouziri, Mourad; Benbernou, Salima; Nadif, Mohamed

2013-01-01

89

How women organize social networks different from men  

E-print Network

Superpositions of social networks, such as communication, friendship, or trade networks, are called multiplex networks, forming the structural backbone of human societies. Novel datasets now allow quantification and ...

Szell, Michael

90

Disease dynamics in a dynamic social network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We develop a framework for simulating a realistic, evolving social network (a city) into which a disease is introduced. We compare our results to prevaccine era measles data for England and Wales, and find that they capture the quantitative and qualitative features of epidemics in populations spanning two orders of magnitude. Our results provide unique insight into how and why the social topology of the contact network influences the propagation of the disease through the population. We argue that network simulation is suitable for concurrently probing contact network dynamics and disease dynamics in ways that prior modeling approaches cannot and it can be extended to the study of less well-documented diseases.

Christensen, Claire; Albert, István; Grenfell, Bryan; Albert, Réka

2010-07-01

91

Social Networks are Encoded in Language  

E-print Network

Knowledge regarding social information is thought to be derived from many different sources, such as interviews and formal relationships. Social networks can likewise be generated from such external information. Recent work has demonstrated that statistical linguistic data can explain findings thought to be explained by external factors alone, such as perceptual relations. The current study explored whether language implicitly comprises information that allows for extracting social networks, by testing the hypothesis that individuals who are socially related together are linguistically talked about together, as well as the hypothesis that individuals who are socially related more are talked about more. In the first analysis using first-order cooccurrences of names of characters in the Harry Potter novels we found that an MDS solution correlated with the actual social network of characters as rated by humans. In a second study using higher-order co-occurrences, a latent semantic analysis (LSA) space was trained on all seven Harry Potter novels. LSA cosine values for all character pairs were obtained, marking their semantic similarity. Again, an MDS analysis comparing the LSA data with the actual social relationships yielded a significant bidimensional regression. These results demonstrate that linguistic information indeed encodes social relationship information and show that implicit information within language can generate social networks.

Sterling Hutchinson; Vivek Datla; Max M. Louwerse

92

An agent model of social network and travel behavior interdependence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Travel is a prerequisite for activities which maintain social and business connections, building the vital social networks which conduct the flow of values, services, and opportunity. This paper presents a multi-agent simulation to study linked geographical and social spaces. The model simultaneously generates a social network and travel behavior by defining social-networking visits as travel activities. Information about space and

Jeremy Hackney; Kay W. Axhausen

93

Cyber threats in social networking websites  

E-print Network

A social network is a social structure made up of individuals or organizations called nodes, which are connected by one or more specific types of interdependency, such as friendship, common interest, and exchange of finance, relationships of beliefs, knowledge or prestige. A cyber threat can be both unintentional and intentional, targeted or non targeted, and it can come from a variety of sources, including foreign nations engaged in espionage and information warfare, criminals, hackers, virus writers, disgruntled employees and contractors working within an organization. Social networking sites are not only to communicate or interact with other people globally, but also one effective way for business promotion. In this paper, we investigate and study the cyber threats in social networking websites. We go through the amassing history of online social websites, classify their types and also discuss the cyber threats, suggest the anti-threats strategies and visualize the future trends of such hoppy popular websi...

Gharibi, Wajeb

2012-01-01

94

Sociapedia : online collaboration over a social network  

E-print Network

This paper introduces Sociapedia, a collaborative social network application that encourages friends to contribute content about each other. Sociapedia is designed upon the same principles that allowed ordinary web users ...

Kedia, Mihir

2009-01-01

95

Diffusion of innovations in social networks  

E-print Network

While social networks do affect diffusion of innovations, the exact nature of these effects are far from clear, and, in many cases, there exist conflicting hypotheses among researchers. In this paper, we focus on the linear ...

Acemoglu, Daron

96

Delivery properties of human social networks  

E-print Network

The recently proposed packet switched network paradigm takes advantage of human social contacts to opportunistically create data paths over time. Our goal is to examine the effect of the human contact process on data ...

Sollins, Karen R.

97

Social Networks in Improvement of Health Care  

PubMed Central

Social network is a social structure made of individuals or organizations associated with one or more types of interdependence (friendship, common interests, work, knowledge, prestige, etc.) which are the “nodes” of the network. Networks can be organized to exchange information, knowledge or financial assistance under the various interest groups in universities, workplaces and associations of citizens. Today the most popular and widely used networks are based on application of the Internet as the main ICT. Depending on the method of connection, their field of activity and expertise of those who participate in certain networks, the network can be classified into the following groups: a) Social Networks with personal physical connectivity (the citizens’ associations, transplant networks, etc.), b) Global social internet network (Facebook, Twitter, Skype), c) specific health internet social network (forums, Health Care Forums, Healthcare Industry Forum), d) The health community internet network of non professionals (DailyStrength, CaringBridge, CarePages, MyFamilyHealth), e) Scientific social internet network (BiomedExperts, ResearchGate, iMedExchange), f) Social internet network which supported professionals (HealthBoards, Spas and Hope Association of Disabled and diabetic Enurgi), g) Scientific medical internet network databases in the system of scientific and technical information (CC, Pubmed/Medline, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, ISI Web Knowledge, EBSCO, Index Copernicus, Social Science Index, etc.). The information in the network are exchanged in real time and in a way that has until recently been impossible in real life of people in the community. Networks allow tens of thousands of specific groups of people performing a series of social, professional and educational activities in the place of living and housing, place of work or other locations where individuals are. Network provides access to information related to education, health, nutrition, drugs, procedures, etc., which gives a special emphasis on public health aspects of information, especially in the field of medicine and health care. The authors of this paper discuss the role and practical importance of social networks in improving the health and solving of health problems without the physical entrance into the health care system. Social networks have their advantages and disadvantages, benefits and costs, especially when it comes to information which within the network set unprofessional people from unreliable sources, without an adequate selection. The ethical aspect of the norms in this segment is still not adequately regulated, so any sanctions for the unauthorized and malicious use of social networks in private and other purposes in order to obtain personal gain at the expense of individuals or groups (sick or healthy, owners of certain businesses and companies, health organizations and pharmaceutical manufacturers, etc.), for which there is still no global or European codes and standards of conduct. Cyber crime is now one of the mostly present types of crime in modern times, as evidenced by numerous scandals that are happening both globally and locally. PMID:23922516

Masic, Izet; Sivic, Suad; Toromanovic, Selim; Borojevic, Tea; Pandza, Haris

2012-01-01

98

Social networks in improvement of health care.  

PubMed

Social network is a social structure made of individuals or organizations associated with one or more types of interdependence (friendship, common interests, work, knowledge, prestige, etc.) which are the "nodes" of the network. Networks can be organized to exchange information, knowledge or financial assistance under the various interest groups in universities, workplaces and associations of citizens. Today the most popular and widely used networks are based on application of the Internet as the main ICT. Depending on the method of connection, their field of activity and expertise of those who participate in certain networks, the network can be classified into the following groups: a) Social Networks with personal physical connectivity (the citizens' associations, transplant networks, etc.), b) Global social internet network (Facebook, Twitter, Skype), c) specific health internet social network (forums, Health Care Forums, Healthcare Industry Forum), d) The health community internet network of non professionals (DailyStrength, CaringBridge, CarePages, MyFamilyHealth), e) Scientific social internet network (BiomedExperts, ResearchGate, iMedExchange), f) Social internet network which supported professionals (HealthBoards, Spas and Hope Association of Disabled and diabetic Enurgi), g) Scientific medical internet network databases in the system of scientific and technical information (CC, Pubmed/Medline, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, ISI Web Knowledge, EBSCO, Index Copernicus, Social Science Index, etc.). The information in the network are exchanged in real time and in a way that has until recently been impossible in real life of people in the community. Networks allow tens of thousands of specific groups of people performing a series of social, professional and educational activities in the place of living and housing, place of work or other locations where individuals are. Network provides access to information related to education, health, nutrition, drugs, procedures, etc., which gives a special emphasis on public health aspects of information, especially in the field of medicine and health care. The authors of this paper discuss the role and practical importance of social networks in improving the health and solving of health problems without the physical entrance into the health care system. Social networks have their advantages and disadvantages, benefits and costs, especially when it comes to information which within the network set unprofessional people from unreliable sources, without an adequate selection. The ethical aspect of the norms in this segment is still not adequately regulated, so any sanctions for the unauthorized and malicious use of social networks in private and other purposes in order to obtain personal gain at the expense of individuals or groups (sick or healthy, owners of certain businesses and companies, health organizations and pharmaceutical manufacturers, etc.), for which there is still no global or European codes and standards of conduct. Cyber crime is now one of the mostly present types of crime in modern times, as evidenced by numerous scandals that are happening both globally and locally. PMID:23922516

Masic, Izet; Sivic, Suad; Toromanovic, Selim; Borojevic, Tea; Pandza, Haris

2012-01-01

99

Enterprise social networks : engaging employees and sustaining participation  

E-print Network

Social relationships pervade every aspect of human life and development of social networks at work is inevitable. Enterprise social networking solutions provide a platform for employees to formally foster these professional ...

Sharma, Payal

2014-01-01

100

The social brain network and autism.  

PubMed

Available research data in Autism suggests the role of a network of brain areas, often known as the 'social brain'. Recent studies highlight the role of genetic mutations as underlying patho-mechanism in Autism. This mini review, discusses the basic concepts behind social brain networks, theory of mind and genetic factors associated with Autism. It critically evaluates and explores the relationship between the behavioral outcomes and genetic factors providing a conceptual framework for understanding of autism. PMID:25206065

Misra, Vivek

2014-04-01

101

Social network analysis and dual rover communications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social network analysis (SNA) refers to the collection of techniques, tools, and methods used in sociometry aiming at the analysis of social networks to investigate decision making, group communication, and the distribution of information. Human factors engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a social network analysis on communication data collected during a 14-day field study operating a dual rover exploration mission to better understand the relationships between certain network groups such as ground control, flight teams, and planetary science. The analysis identified two communication network structures for the continuous communication and Twice-a-Day Communication scenarios as a split network and negotiated network respectfully. The major nodes or groups for the networks' architecture, transmittal status, and information were identified using graphical network mapping, quantitative analysis of subjective impressions, and quantified statistical analysis using Sociometric Statue and Centrality. Post-questionnaire analysis along with interviews revealed advantages and disadvantages of each network structure with team members identifying the need for a more stable continuous communication network, improved robustness of voice loops, and better systems training/capabilities for scientific imagery data and operational data during Twice-a-Day Communications.

Litaker, Harry L.; Howard, Robert L.

2013-10-01

102

Social networking has completely transformed social life in the online world. It has become  

E-print Network

. This article discusses malware infection strategies used by attackers to infect social networking web sites and cons in its own sphere, though, and social networking web sites are no different. Online social networks, being a part of the Web 2.0 world, are prone to attacks and malware infections. Social networks

Enbody, Richard

103

Dynamic Social Networks Logic Zoe Christoff  

E-print Network

- ship/links such as family ties, being colleagues, or "following" on social media sites ­ in other words of the population is in either of two states: infected with the disease or susceptible to it. This type of models be contracted by being in contact with an infected agent. Consider the social network consisting of agents

Amsterdam, University of

104

Creating Socially Networked Knowledge through Interdisciplinary Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We report on the experience of creating a socially networked system, the Research-oriented Social Environment (RoSE), for representing knowledge in the form of relationships between people, documents, and groups. Developed as an intercampus, interdisciplinary project of the University of California, this work reflects on a collaboration between…

Chuk, Eric; Hoetzlein, Rama; Kim, David; Panko, Julia

2012-01-01

105

SNIF: Social Networking In Fur Jonathan Gips  

E-print Network

: Networking through dogs Not content with being man's best friend, dogs also serve as a very strong social Pets function as natural social devices. Walking a dog in the park can lead to conversations that one. There are more than 65 million owned dogs in the United States, with nearly 40% of US households owning at least

106

Motivating contributors in social media networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite recent advancements in user-driven social media platforms, tools for studying user behavior patterns and motivations remain primitive. We highlight the voluntary nature of user contributions and that users can choose when (and when not) to contribute to the common media pool. We use a Game theoretic framework to study the dynamics of a social media network wherein contribution costs

Vivek K. Singh; Ramesh Jain; Mohan S. Kankanhalli

2009-01-01

107

Information asymmetry, social networking site word of mouth, and mobility effects on social commerce in Korea.  

PubMed

The purpose of this research is to examine the issues that affect customers' behavioral character and purchasing behavior. The study proposes a research hypothesis with independent variables that include social presence, trust, and information asymmetry, and the dependent variable purchase decision making, to explain differentiated customer decision making processes in social commerce (S-commerce). To prove the hypothesis, positive verification was performed by focusing on mediating effects through a customer uncertainty variable and moderating effects through mobility and social networking site word of mouth (SNS WOM) variables. The number of studies on customer trends has rapidly increased together with the market size of S-commerce. However, few studies have examined the negative variables that make customers hesitant to make decisions in S-commerce. This study investigates the causes of customer uncertainty and focuses on deducing the control variables that offset this negative relationship. The study finds that in customers' S-commerce purchasing actions, the SNS WOM and mobility variables show control effects between information asymmetry and uncertainty and between trust and uncertainty. Additionally, this research defines the variables related to customer uncertainty that are hidden in S-commerce, and statistically verifies their relationship. The research results can be used in Internet marketing practices to establish marketing mix strategies for customer demand or as research data to predict customer behavior. The results are scientifically meaningful as a precedent for research on customers in S-commerce. PMID:24355038

Hwang, In Jeong; Lee, Bong Gyou; Kim, Ki Youn

2014-02-01

108

Socialized Gaussian Process Model for Human Behavior Prediction in a Health Social Network  

E-print Network

Socialized Gaussian Process Model for Human Behavior Prediction in a Health Social Network Yelong behavior in a social network. In this work, we propose a Socialized Gaussian Process (SGP) for socialized behavior factor and social correlation factor into a unified model, where basic Gaussian Process model

Dou, Dejing

109

How Do Online Social Networks Grow?  

PubMed Central

Online social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and Gowalla allow people to communicate and interact across borders. In past years online social networks have become increasingly important for studying the behavior of individuals, group formation, and the emergence of online societies. Here we focus on the characterization of the average growth of online social networks and try to understand which are possible processes behind seemingly long-range temporal correlated collective behavior. In agreement with recent findings, but in contrast to Gibrat's law of proportionate growth, we find scaling in the average growth rate and its standard deviation. In contrast, Renren and Twitter deviate, however, in certain important aspects significantly from those found in many social and economic systems. Whereas independent methods suggest no significance for temporally long-range correlated behavior for Renren and Twitter, a scaling analysis of the standard deviation does suggest long-range temporal correlated growth in Gowalla. However, we demonstrate that seemingly long-range temporal correlations in the growth of online social networks, such as in Gowalla, can be explained by a decomposition into temporally and spatially independent growth processes with a large variety of entry rates. Our analysis thus suggests that temporally or spatially correlated behavior does not play a major role in the growth of online social networks. PMID:24940744

Zhu, Konglin; Li, Wenzhong; Fu, Xiaoming; Nagler, Jan

2014-01-01

110

Developmental stress predicts social network position.  

PubMed

The quantity and quality of social relationships, as captured by social network analysis, can have major fitness consequences. Various studies have shown that individual differences in social behaviour can be due to variation in exposure to developmental stress. However, whether these developmental differences translate to consistent differences in social network position is not known. We experimentally increased levels of the avian stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) in nestling zebra finches in a fully balanced design. Upon reaching nutritional independence, we released chicks and their families into two free-flying rooms, where we measured daily social networks over five weeks using passive integrated transponder tags. Developmental stress had a significant effect on social behaviour: despite having similar foraging patterns, CORT chicks had weaker associations to their parents than control chicks. Instead, CORT chicks foraged with a greater number of flock mates and were less choosy with whom they foraged, resulting in more central network positions. These findings highlight the importance of taking developmental history into account to understand the drivers of social organization in gregarious species. PMID:25354917

Boogert, Neeltje J; Farine, Damien R; Spencer, Karen A

2014-10-01

111

Developmental stress predicts social network position  

PubMed Central

The quantity and quality of social relationships, as captured by social network analysis, can have major fitness consequences. Various studies have shown that individual differences in social behaviour can be due to variation in exposure to developmental stress. However, whether these developmental differences translate to consistent differences in social network position is not known. We experimentally increased levels of the avian stress hormone corticosterone (CORT) in nestling zebra finches in a fully balanced design. Upon reaching nutritional independence, we released chicks and their families into two free-flying rooms, where we measured daily social networks over five weeks using passive integrated transponder tags. Developmental stress had a significant effect on social behaviour: despite having similar foraging patterns, CORT chicks had weaker associations to their parents than control chicks. Instead, CORT chicks foraged with a greater number of flock mates and were less choosy with whom they foraged, resulting in more central network positions. These findings highlight the importance of taking developmental history into account to understand the drivers of social organization in gregarious species. PMID:25354917

Boogert, Neeltje J.; Farine, Damien R.; Spencer, Karen A.

2014-01-01

112

Hybrid Bayesian Networks with Linear Deterministic Variables  

E-print Network

Conference (UAI-05), 2005, AUAI Press, Arlington, VA. 136 Y X Z Figure 2: A Bayesian Network Representation of the Mixed Distribution for X. this example, Y is a discrete variable with state space ? Y = {1,2,3}, Z is a real-valued variable, and X is a... conditionally deterministic variable whose condi- tional distribution is described as follows: X |{y,z} = y if y =1,2 and X |{y,z} = z if y =3. Potentials of the type described above are used in this paper to represent distributions of variables in hy- brid...

Cobb, Barry R.; Shenoy, Prakash P.

2005-07-01

113

Social Scholarship: Applying Social Networking Technologies to Research Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participatory web-based technologies have the potential to change the way scholars engage in scholarship. One reason Web 2.0 technologies, such as online social networking, are not widely integrated in PreK-12 and postsecondary education is the lack of modeling by educators. Their lack of research-based best practices limits the ability to…

Greenhow, Christine

2009-01-01

114

Googling Social Interactions: Web Search Engine Based Social Network Construction  

E-print Network

July 21, 2010 Copyright: Ã? 2010 Lee et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms Abstract Social network analysis has long been an untiring topic of sociology. However, until the era years, might provide torrents of data sources for such study in this (now and forthcoming) digital era

Ahn, Yong-Yeol

115

65% of online adults use social networking sites  

E-print Network

than social networking tools. Looking at usage on a typical day, 43% of online adults use social-2011 The percentage of all adult internet users who use social networking sites since 2005 Source: Pew Research Center65% of online adults use social networking sites Women maintain their foothold on SNS use and older

Klein, Ophir

116

A Developmental Analysis of Children's Social Support Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although much investigation of adult social support networks has been done, little attention has been paid to children's social support networks. Childhood patterns of social support probably influence adult patterns. A study was conducted to describe the social networks of third through sixth grade children. It also tests the validity of a new…

Kriegler, Julie A.; Bogat, G. Anne

117

Health and the Structure of Adolescent Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much research has explored the role of social networks in promoting health through the provision of social support. However, little work has examined how social networks themselves may be structured by health. This article investigates the link between individuals' health and the characteristics of their social network positions.We first develop…

Haas, Steven A.; Schaefer, David R.; Kornienko, Olga

2010-01-01

118

CPSC 534L:Topics in Data Management Social Networks  

E-print Network

; Big Data and Network Science -- social/ information networks and recommender systems; Data CleaningCPSC 534L:Topics in Data Management ­ Social Networks LaksV.S. Lakshmanan Department of Computer and challenging problems involving social networks (SN) and recommender systems (RS). Modeling Search

Lakshmanan, Laks V.S.

119

Community Structure in Online Collegiate Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networking sites have become increasingly popular with college students. The networks we studied are defined through ``friendships'' indicated by Facebook users from UNC, Oklahoma, Caltech, Georgetown, and Princeton. We apply the tools of network science to study the Facebook networks from these five different universities at a single point in time. We investigate each single-institution network's community structure, which we obtain through partitioning the graph using an eigenvector method. We use both graphical and quantitative tools, including pair-counting methods, which we interpret through statistical analysis and permutation tests to measure the correlations between the network communities and a set of characteristics given by each user (residence, class year, major, and high school). We also analyze the single gender subsets of these networks, and the impact of missing demographical data. Our study allows us to compare the online social networks for the five schools as well as infer differences in offline social interactions. At the schools studied, we were able to define which characteristics of the Facebook users correlate best with friendships.

Traud, Amanda; Kelsic, Eric; Mucha, Peter; Porter, Mason

2009-03-01

120

Interindividual variability in social insects - proximate causes and ultimate consequences.  

PubMed

Individuals within social groups often show consistent differences in behaviour across time and context. Such interindividual differences and the evolutionary challenge they present have recently generated considerable interest. Social insects provide some of the most familiar and spectacular examples of social groups with large interindividual differences. Investigating these within-group differences has a long research tradition, and behavioural variability among the workers of a colony is increasingly regarded as fundamental for a key feature of social insects: division of labour. The goal of this review is to illustrate what we know about both the proximate mechanisms underlying behavioural variability among the workers of a colony and its ultimate consequences; and to highlight the many open questions in this research field. We begin by reviewing the literature on mechanisms that potentially introduce, maintain, and adjust the behavioural differentiation among workers. We highlight the fact that so far, most studies have focused on behavioural variability based on genetic variability, provided by e.g. multiple mating of the queen, while other mechanisms that may be responsible for the behavioural differentiation among workers have been largely neglected. These include maturational, nutritional and environmental influences. We further discuss how feedback provided by the social environment and learning and experience of adult workers provides potent and little-explored sources of differentiation. In a second part, we address what is known about the potential benefits and costs of increased behavioural variability within the workers of a colony. We argue that all studies documenting a benefit of variability so far have done so by manipulating genetic variability, and that a direct test of the effect of behavioural variability on colony productivity has yet to be provided. We emphasize that the costs associated with interindividual variability have been largely overlooked, and that a better knowledge of the cost/benefit balance of behavioural variability is crucial for our understanding of the evolution of the mechanisms underlying the social organization of insect societies. We conclude by highlighting what we believe to be promising but little-explored avenues for future research on how within-colony variability has evolved and is maintained. We emphasize the need for comparative studies and point out that, so far, most studies on interindividual variability have focused on variability in individual response thresholds, while the significance of variability in other parameters of individual response, such as probability and intensity of the response, has been largely overlooked. We propose that these parameters have important consequences for the colony response. Much more research is needed to understand if and how interindividual variability is modulated in order to benefit division of labour, homeostasis and ultimately colony fitness in social insects. PMID:24341677

Jeanson, Raphaël; Weidenmüller, Anja

2014-08-01

121

Three predictive variables of social physique anxiety among gay men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a sociological framework, three variables related to gay men's body image are examined as possible predictors of social physique anxiety: drive for muscularity, internalised homophobia and a new variable, sexual position identity. Internet survey methodology was used to collect usable data from 542 gay men, with a mean age of 33 years. They were mostly White, college educated and

Andrew Reilly; Loriena A. Yancura; Danielle M. Young

2012-01-01

122

Social network predictors of latrine ownership.  

PubMed

Poor sanitation, including the lack of clean functioning toilets, is a major factor contributing to morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases in the developing world. We examine correlates of latrine ownership in rural India with a focus on social network predictors. Participants from 75 villages provided the names of their social contacts as well as their own relevant demographic and household characteristics. Using these measures, we test whether the latrine ownership of an individual's social contacts is a significant predictor of individual latrine ownership. We also investigate whether network centrality significantly predicts latrine ownership, and if so, whether it moderates the relationship between the latrine ownership of the individual and that of her social contacts. Our results show that, controlling for the standard predictors of latrine ownership such as caste, education, and income, individuals are more likely to own latrines if their social contacts own latrines. Interaction models suggest that this relationship is stronger among those of the same caste, the same education, and those with stronger social ties. We also find that more central individuals are more likely to own latrines, but the correlation in latrine ownership between social contacts is strongest among individuals on the periphery of the network. Although more data is needed to determine how much the clustering of latrine ownership may be caused by social influence, the results here suggest that interventions designed to promote latrine ownership should consider focusing on those at the periphery of the network. The reason is that they are 1) less likely to own latrines and 2) more likely to exhibit the same behavior as their social contacts, possibly as a result of the spread of latrine adoption from one person to another. PMID:24726688

Shakya, Holly B; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

2015-01-01

123

Persistent ISR: the social network analysis connection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Persistent surveillance provides decision makers with unprecedented access to multisource data collected from humans and sensor assets around the globe, yet these data exist in the physical world and provide few overt clues to meaning behind actions. In this paper we explore the recent growth in online social networking and ask the questions: 1) can these sites provide value-added information to compliment physical sensing and 2) what are the mechanisms by which these data could inform situational awareness and decision making? In seeking these answers we consider the range of options provided by Social Network Analysis (SNA), and focus especially on the dynamic nature of these networks. In our discussion we focus on the wave of reform experienced by the North African nations in early 2011 known as the Arab Spring. Demonstrators made widespread use of social networking applications to coordinate, document, and publish material to aid their cause. Unlike members of covert social networks who hide their activity and associations, these demonstrators openly posted multimedia information to coordinate activity and stimulate global support. In this paper we provide a review of SNA approaches and consider how one might track network adaptations by capturing temporal and conceptual trends. We identify opportunities and challenges for merging SNA with physical sensor output, and conclude by addressing future challenges in the persistent ISR domain with respect to SNA.

Bowman, Elizabeth K.

2012-06-01

124

Discovering Social Circles in Ego Networks  

E-print Network

People's personal social networks are big and cluttered, and currently there is no good way to automatically organize them. Social networking sites allow users to manually categorize their friends into social circles (e.g. 'circles' on Google+, and 'lists' on Facebook and Twitter), however they are laborious to construct and must be updated whenever a user's network grows. In this paper, we study the novel task of automatically identifying users' social circles. We pose this task as a multi-membership node clustering problem on a user's ego-network, a network of connections between her friends. We develop a model for detecting circles that combines network structure as well as user profile information. For each circle we learn its members and the circle-specific user profile similarity metric. Modeling node membership to multiple circles allows us to detect overlapping as well as hierarchically nested circles. Experiments show that our model accurately identifies circles on a diverse set of data from Facebook...

McAuley, Julian

2012-01-01

125

Cooperation on Social Networks and Its Robustness  

E-print Network

In this work we have used computer models of social-like networks to show by extensive numerical simulations that cooperation in evolutionary games can emerge and be stable on this class of networks. The amounts of cooperation reached are at least as much as in scale-free networks but here the population model is more realistic. Cooperation is robust with respect to different strategy update rules, population dynamics, and payoff computation. Only when straight average payoff is used or there is high strategy or network noise does cooperation decrease in all games and disappear in the Prisoner's Dilemma.

Antonioni, Alberto

2012-01-01

126

Integrating social networks and human social motives to achieve social influence at scale  

PubMed Central

The innovations of science often point to ideas and behaviors that must spread and take root in communities to have impact. Ideas, practices, and behaviors need to go from accepted truths on the part of a few scientists to commonplace beliefs and norms in the minds of the many. Moving from scientific discoveries to public good requires social influence. We introduce a structured influence process (SIP) framework to explain how social networks (i.e., the structure of social influence) and human social motives (i.e., the process of social influence wherein one person’s attitudes and behaviors affect another’s) are used collectively to enact social influence within a community. The SIP framework advances the science of scientific communication by positing social influence events that consider both the “who” and the “how” of social influence. This framework synthesizes core ideas from two bodies of research on social influence. The first is network research on social influence structures, which identifies who are the opinion leaders and who among their network of peers shapes their attitudes and behaviors. The second is research on social influence processes in psychology, which explores how human social motives such as the need for accuracy or the need for affiliation stimulate behavior change. We illustrate the practical implications of the SIP framework by applying it to the case of reducing neonatal mortality in India. PMID:25225373

Contractor, Noshir S.; DeChurch, Leslie A.

2014-01-01

127

Integrating social networks and human social motives to achieve social influence at scale.  

PubMed

The innovations of science often point to ideas and behaviors that must spread and take root in communities to have impact. Ideas, practices, and behaviors need to go from accepted truths on the part of a few scientists to commonplace beliefs and norms in the minds of the many. Moving from scientific discoveries to public good requires social influence. We introduce a structured influence process (SIP) framework to explain how social networks (i.e., the structure of social influence) and human social motives (i.e., the process of social influence wherein one person's attitudes and behaviors affect another's) are used collectively to enact social influence within a community. The SIP framework advances the science of scientific communication by positing social influence events that consider both the "who" and the "how" of social influence. This framework synthesizes core ideas from two bodies of research on social influence. The first is network research on social influence structures, which identifies who are the opinion leaders and who among their network of peers shapes their attitudes and behaviors. The second is research on social influence processes in psychology, which explores how human social motives such as the need for accuracy or the need for affiliation stimulate behavior change. We illustrate the practical implications of the SIP framework by applying it to the case of reducing neonatal mortality in India. PMID:25225373

Contractor, Noshir S; DeChurch, Leslie A

2014-09-16

128

Online and Offline Social Networks: Use of Social Networking Sites by Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networking sites (e.g., MySpace and Facebook) are popular online communication forms among adolescents and emerging adults. Yet little is known about young people's activities on these sites and how their networks of "friends" relate to their other online (e.g., instant messaging) and offline networks. In this study, college students…

Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Reich, Stephanie M.; Waechter, Natalia; Espinoza, Guadalupe

2008-01-01

129

Group colocation behavior in technological social networks  

E-print Network

We analyze two large datasets from technological networks with location and social data: user location records from an online location-based social networking service, and anonymized telecommunications data from a European cellphone operator, in order to investigate the differences between individual and group behavior with respect to physical location. We discover agreements between the two datasets: firstly, that individuals are more likely to meet with one friend at a place they have not visited before, but tend to meet at familiar locations when with a larger group. We also find that groups of individuals are more likely to meet at places that their other friends have visited, and that the type of a place strongly affects the propensity for groups to meet there. These differences between group and solo mobility has potential technological applications, for example, in venue recommendation in location-based social networks.

Brown, Chloë; Noulas, Anastasios; Mascolo, Cecilia; Blondel, Vincent

2014-01-01

130

Group Colocation Behavior in Technological Social Networks  

PubMed Central

We analyze two large datasets from technological networks with location and social data: user location records from an online location-based social networking service, and anonymized telecommunications data from a European cellphone operator, in order to investigate the differences between individual and group behavior with respect to physical location. We discover agreements between the two datasets: firstly, that individuals are more likely to meet with one friend at a place they have not visited before, but tend to meet at familiar locations when with a larger group. We also find that groups of individuals are more likely to meet at places that their other friends have visited, and that the type of a place strongly affects the propensity for groups to meet there. These differences between group and solo mobility has potential technological applications, for example, in venue recommendation in location-based social networks. PMID:25148037

Brown, Chloë; Lathia, Neal; Mascolo, Cecilia; Noulas, Anastasios; Blondel, Vincent

2014-01-01

131

Social contagion theory: examining dynamic social networks and human behavior  

PubMed Central

Here, we review the research we have conducted on social contagion. We describe the methods we have employed (and the assumptions they have entailed) to examine several datasets with complementary strengths and weaknesses, including the Framingham Heart Study, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and other observational and experimental datasets that we and others have collected. We describe the regularities that led us to propose that human social networks may exhibit a ‘three degrees of influence’ property, and we review statistical approaches we have used to characterize interpersonal influence with respect to phenomena as diverse as obesity, smoking, cooperation, and happiness. We do not claim that this work is the final word, but we do believe that it provides some novel, informative, and stimulating evidence regarding social contagion in longitudinally followed networks. Along with other scholars, we are working to develop new methods for identifying causal effects using social network data, and we believe that this area is ripe for statistical development as current methods have known and often unavoidable limitations. PMID:22711416

Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2013-01-01

132

Origin of Peer Influence in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks pervade our everyday lives: we interact, influence, and are influenced by our friends and acquaintances. With the advent of the World Wide Web, large amounts of data on social networks have become available, allowing the quantitative analysis of the distribution of information on them, including behavioral traits and fads. Recent studies of correlations among members of a social network, who exhibit the same trait, have shown that individuals influence not only their direct contacts but also friends' friends, up to a network distance extending beyond their closest peers. Here, we show how such patterns of correlations between peers emerge in networked populations. We use standard models (yet reflecting intrinsically different mechanisms) of information spreading to argue that empirically observed patterns of correlation among peers emerge naturally from a wide range of dynamics, being essentially independent of the type of information, on how it spreads, and even on the class of underlying network that interconnects individuals. Finally, we show that the sparser and clustered the network, the more far reaching the influence of each individual will be.

Pinheiro, Flávio L.; Santos, Marta D.; Santos, Francisco C.; Pacheco, Jorge M.

2014-03-01

133

Origin of peer influence in social networks.  

PubMed

Social networks pervade our everyday lives: we interact, influence, and are influenced by our friends and acquaintances. With the advent of the World Wide Web, large amounts of data on social networks have become available, allowing the quantitative analysis of the distribution of information on them, including behavioral traits and fads. Recent studies of correlations among members of a social network, who exhibit the same trait, have shown that individuals influence not only their direct contacts but also friends' friends, up to a network distance extending beyond their closest peers. Here, we show how such patterns of correlations between peers emerge in networked populations. We use standard models (yet reflecting intrinsically different mechanisms) of information spreading to argue that empirically observed patterns of correlation among peers emerge naturally from a wide range of dynamics, being essentially independent of the type of information, on how it spreads, and even on the class of underlying network that interconnects individuals. Finally, we show that the sparser and clustered the network, the more far reaching the influence of each individual will be. PMID:24655286

Pinheiro, Flávio L; Santos, Marta D; Santos, Francisco C; Pacheco, Jorge M

2014-03-01

134

Effects of Deception in Social Networks  

E-print Network

Honesty plays a crucial role in any situation where organisms exchange information or resources. Dishonesty can thus be expected to have damaging effects on social coherence if agents cannot trust the information or goods they receive. However, a distinction is often drawn between prosocial lies ('white' lies) and antisocial lying (i.e. deception for personal gain), with the former being considered much less destructive than the latter. We use an agent-based model to show that antisocial lying causes social networks to become increasingly fragmented. Antisocial dishonesty thus places strong constraints on the size and cohesion of social communities, providing a major hurdle that organisms have to overcome (e.g. by evolving counter-deception strategies) in order to evolve large, socially cohesive communities. In contrast, 'white' lies can prove to be beneficial in smoothing the flow of interactions and facilitating a larger, more integrated network. Our results demonstrate that these group-level effects can ar...

Iñiguez, Gerardo; Dunbar, Robin; Kaski, Kimmo; Barrio, Rafael A

2014-01-01

135

Social Network Type and Subjective Well-being in a National Sample of Older Americans  

PubMed Central

Purpose:?The study considers the social networks of older Americans, a population for whom there have been few studies of social network type. It also examines associations between network types and well-being indicators: loneliness, anxiety, and happiness.?Design and Methods:?A subsample of persons aged 65 years and older from the first wave of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project was employed (N = 1,462). We applied K-means cluster analysis to derive social network types using 7 criterion variables. In the multivariate stage, the well-being outcomes were regressed on the network type construct and on background and health characteristics by means of logistic regression.?Results:?Five social network types were derived: “diverse,” “friend,” “congregant,” “family,” and “restricted.” Social network type was found to be associated with each of the well-being indicators after adjusting for demographic and health confounders. Respondents embedded in network types characterized by greater social capital tended to exhibit better well-being in terms of less loneliness, less anxiety, and greater happiness.?Implications:?Knowledge about differing network types should make gerontological practitioners more aware of the varying interpersonal milieus in which older people function. Adopting network type assessment as an integral part of intake procedures and tracing network shifts over time can serve as a basis for risk assessment as well as a means for determining the efficacy of interventions. PMID:21097553

Litwin, Howard; Shiovitz-Ezra, Sharon

2011-01-01

136

Social Trust Prediction Using Heterogeneous Networks  

PubMed Central

Along with increasing popularity of social websites, online users rely more on the trustworthiness information to make decisions, extract and filter information, and tag and build connections with other users. However, such social network data often suffer from severe data sparsity and are not able to provide users with enough information. Therefore, trust prediction has emerged as an important topic in social network research. Traditional approaches are primarily based on exploring trust graph topology itself. However, research in sociology and our life experience suggest that people who are in the same social circle often exhibit similar behaviors and tastes. To take advantage of the ancillary information for trust prediction, the challenge then becomes what to transfer and how to transfer. In this article, we address this problem by aggregating heterogeneous social networks and propose a novel joint social networks mining (JSNM) method. Our new joint learning model explores the user-group-level similarity between correlated graphs and simultaneously learns the individual graph structure; therefore, the shared structures and patterns from multiple social networks can be utilized to enhance the prediction tasks. As a result, we not only improve the trust prediction in the target graph but also facilitate other information retrieval tasks in the auxiliary graphs. To optimize the proposed objective function, we use the alternative technique to break down the objective function into several manageable subproblems. We further introduce the auxiliary function to solve the optimization problems with rigorously proved convergence. The extensive experiments have been conducted on both synthetic and real- world data. All empirical results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method. PMID:24729776

HUANG, JIN; NIE, FEIPING; HUANG, HENG; TU, YI-CHENG; LEI, YU

2014-01-01

137

Sentiment analysis on smoking in social networks.  

PubMed

Online social networks play a vital role in daily life to share the opinions or behaviors on different topics. The data of social networks can be used to understand health-related behaviors. In this work, we used Twitter status updates to survey of smoking behaviors among the users. We introduce approach to classify the sentiment of smoke-related tweets into positive and negative tweets. The classifier is based on the Support Vector Machines (SVMs) and can achieve high accuracy up to 86%. PMID:23920892

Sofean, Mustafa; Smith, Matthew

2013-01-01

138

Detecting Emotional Contagion in Massive Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Happiness and other emotions spread between people in direct contact, but it is unclear whether massive online social networks also contribute to this spread. Here, we elaborate a novel method for measuring the contagion of emotional expression. With data from millions of Facebook users, we show that rainfall directly influences the emotional content of their status messages, and it also affects the status messages of friends in other cities who are not experiencing rainfall. For every one person affected directly, rainfall alters the emotional expression of about one to two other people, suggesting that online social networks may magnify the intensity of global emotional synchrony. PMID:24621792

Coviello, Lorenzo; Sohn, Yunkyu; Kramer, Adam D. I.; Marlow, Cameron; Franceschetti, Massimo; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2014-01-01

139

Burstiness and aging in social temporal networks  

E-print Network

The presence of burstiness in temporal social networks, revealed by a power law form of the waiting time distribution of consecutive interactions, is expected to produce aging effects in the corresponding time-integrated network. Here we propose an analytically tractable model, in which interactions among the agents are ruled by a renewal process, and that is able to reproduce this aging behavior. We develop an analytic solution for the topological properties of the integrated network produced by the model, finding that the time translation invariance of the degree distribution is broken. We validate our predictions against numerical simulations, and we check for the presence of aging effects in a empirical temporal network, ruled by bursty social interactions.

Moinet, Antoine; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

2014-01-01

140

EventWeb: towards social life networks.  

PubMed

The Web has changed the way we live, work and socialize. The nodes in the current Web are documents and hence the current World Wide Web is a Document Web. Advances in technology and requirements of emerging applications require formation of a parallel and closely connected Web of events, the EventWeb, in which each node is an event. In this paper, we explore growth of EventWeb as a natural next step in the evolution of the Web with rich multimodal sensory information. Social networks use events extensively and have revolutionized communication among people. Mobile phones, equipped with myriads of sensors and being used by more than 75% of living humans, are bringing the next generation of social networks, not only to connect people with other people, but also to connect people with other people and essential life resources. We call these networks social life networks, and believe that this is the right time to focus efforts to discover and develop technology and infrastructure to design and build these networks and to apply them for solving some essential human problems. PMID:23419853

Jain, Ramesh

2013-03-28

141

TNF-? levels in cancer patients relate to social variables  

PubMed Central

Tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) is an important cytokine associated with tumor regression and increased survival time for cancer patients. Research evidence relates immune factors (e.g., natural killer (NK) cell counts, NK cell lysis, lymphocyte profile, and lymphocyte proliferation) to the frequency and quality of social relations among cancer patients. We hypothesized that disruptions in social relations would be associated with lower TNF-? responses, and conversely, that reports of positive changes in social relations correlate with stronger responses. A prospective design measured changes in social activity and relationship satisfaction with a partner in 44 breast cancer patients at the time of cancer diagnosis, and initial surgery and 12 months later. Results indicated that patients reporting increased social activities or satisfaction exhibited stronger stimulated TNF-? responses. This is the first study to link changes in patient social relations with a cancer-relevant immune variable. PMID:15890493

Marucha, Phillip T.; Crespin, Timothy R.; Shelby, Rebecca A.; Andersen, Barbara L.

2008-01-01

142

Multiagent task allocation in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a new variant of the task allocation problem, where the agents are connected in a social network and tasks\\u000a arrive at the agents distributed over the network. We show that the complexity of this problem remains NP-complete. Moreover, it is not approximable within some factor. In contrast to this, we develop an efficient greedy algorithm\\u000a for this

Mathijs M. de Weerdt; Yingqian Zhang; Tomas Klos

2011-01-01

143

Spreading paths in partially observed social networks  

PubMed Central

Understanding how and how far information, behaviors, or pathogens spread in social networks is an important problem, having implications for both predicting the size of epidemics, as well as for planning effective interventions. There are, however, two main challenges for inferring spreading paths in real-world networks. One is the practical difficulty of observing a dynamic process on a network, and the other is the typical constraint of only partially observing a network. Using a static, structurally realistic social network as a platform for simulations, we juxtapose three distinct paths: (1) the stochastic path taken by a simulated spreading process from source to target; (2) the topologically shortest path in the fully observed network, and hence the single most likely stochastic path, between the two nodes; and (3) the topologically shortest path in a partially observed network. In a sampled network, how closely does the partially observed shortest path (3) emulate the unobserved spreading path (1)? Although partial observation inflates the length of the shortest path, the stochastic nature of the spreading process also frequently derails the dynamic path from the shortest path. We find that the partially observed shortest path does not necessarily give an inflated estimate of the length of the process path; in fact, partial observation may, counterintuitively, make the path seem shorter than it actually is. PMID:22587148

Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Christakis, Nicholas A.

2012-01-01

144

Self-Organizing Flows in Social Networks Nidhi Hegde  

E-print Network

-like microblogging social networks. In such networks the functions of filtering, editing and disseminating news are totally dis- tributed, in contrast to traditional news channels. The efficiency of social filtering

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

145

Spread of Academic Success in a High School Social Network  

PubMed Central

Application of social network analysis to education has revealed how social network positions of K-12 students correlate with their behavior and academic achievements. However, no study has been conducted on how their social network influences their academic progress over time. Here we investigated correlations between high school students’ academic progress over one year and the social environment that surrounds them in their friendship network. We found that students whose friends’ average GPA (Grade Point Average) was greater (or less) than their own had a higher tendency toward increasing (or decreasing) their academic ranking over time, indicating social contagion of academic success taking place in their social network. PMID:23418483

Blansky, Deanna; Kavanaugh, Christina; Boothroyd, Cara; Benson, Brianna; Gallagher, Julie; Endress, John; Sayama, Hiroki

2013-01-01

146

Social networks for lonely objects  

E-print Network

Visions of ubiquitous computing describe a network of devices that quietly supports human goals, but this may also add complexity to an already frustrating relationship between humans and their electronic objects. As we ...

Kestner, John Anthony

2010-01-01

147

Social Networks of Professionals in Health Care Organizations: A Review.  

PubMed

In this article, we provide an overview of social network research in health care, with a focus on social interactions between professionals in organizations. We begin by introducing key concepts defining the social network approach, including network density, centrality, and brokerage. We then review past and current research on the antecedents of health care professionals' social networks-including demographic attributes, professional groups, and organizational arrangements-and their consequences-including satisfaction at work, leadership, behaviors, knowledge transfer, diffusion of innovation, and performance. Finally, we examine future directions for social network research in health care, focusing on micro-macro linkages and network dynamics. PMID:25380607

Tasselli, Stefano

2014-12-01

148

Simulating market dynamics: interactions between consumer psychology and social networks.  

PubMed

Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. In a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation model. The main results indicated that the behavioral rules dominating the artificial consumer's decision making determine the resulting market dynamics, such as fashions, lock-in, and unstable renewal. Results also show the importance of psychological variables like social networks, preferences, and the need for identity to explain the dynamics of markets. In this article we extend this work in two directions. First, we will focus on a more systematic investigation of the effects of different network structures. The previous article was based on Watts and Strogatz's approach, which describes the small-world and clustering characteristics in networks. More recent research demonstrated that many large networks display a scale-free power-law distribution for node connectivity. In terms of market dynamics this may imply that a small proportion of consumers may have an exceptional influence on the consumptive behavior of others (hubs, or early adapters). We show that market dynamics is a self-organized property depending on the interaction between the agents' decision-making process (heuristics), the product characteristics (degree of satisfaction of unit of consumption, visibility), and the structure of interactions between agents (size of network and hubs in a social network). PMID:14761255

Janssen, Marco A; Jager, Wander

2003-01-01

149

Social selection and peer influence in an online social network.  

PubMed

Disentangling the effects of selection and influence is one of social science's greatest unsolved puzzles: Do people befriend others who are similar to them, or do they become more similar to their friends over time? Recent advances in stochastic actor-based modeling, combined with self-reported data on a popular online social network site, allow us to address this question with a greater degree of precision than has heretofore been possible. Using data on the Facebook activity of a cohort of college students over 4 years, we find that students who share certain tastes in music and in movies, but not in books, are significantly likely to befriend one another. Meanwhile, we find little evidence for the diffusion of tastes among Facebook friends-except for tastes in classical/jazz music. These findings shed light on the mechanisms responsible for observed network homogeneity; provide a statistically rigorous assessment of the coevolution of cultural tastes and social relationships; and suggest important qualifications to our understanding of both homophily and contagion as generic social processes. PMID:22184242

Lewis, Kevin; Gonzalez, Marco; Kaufman, Jason

2012-01-01

150

Social selection and peer influence in an online social network  

PubMed Central

Disentangling the effects of selection and influence is one of social science's greatest unsolved puzzles: Do people befriend others who are similar to them, or do they become more similar to their friends over time? Recent advances in stochastic actor-based modeling, combined with self-reported data on a popular online social network site, allow us to address this question with a greater degree of precision than has heretofore been possible. Using data on the Facebook activity of a cohort of college students over 4 years, we find that students who share certain tastes in music and in movies, but not in books, are significantly likely to befriend one another. Meanwhile, we find little evidence for the diffusion of tastes among Facebook friends—except for tastes in classical/jazz music. These findings shed light on the mechanisms responsible for observed network homogeneity; provide a statistically rigorous assessment of the coevolution of cultural tastes and social relationships; and suggest important qualifications to our understanding of both homophily and contagion as generic social processes. PMID:22184242

Lewis, Kevin; Gonzalez, Marco; Kaufman, Jason

2012-01-01

151

Chapter 7 Social network analysis 7.1 Introduction  

E-print Network

wide ranging social and political phenomena on the Islands. Interview participants reported.3). "The social network perspective encompasses theories, models, and applications research questions and quantify political, economic, or social structural environments. #12;Chapter 7

152

Some Social Considerations of Networking.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New technologies of information handling are going to produce fundamental changes in the social structure. If we accept the statement that the book "upset the educational monopoly of the Church," we inevitably wonder what monopolies may tumble in the electronic wake of the computer. We are not dealing with a simple difference of degree but, rather…

Heinich, Robert

153

Behavioural Ecology: Social Networking for Dullards  

E-print Network

house finches can improve their mating success by moving to a different social network, where, and the background, such as strong shadows on a wall. Although I might balk at comparing dull male house finches to the beauty of `The Kitchen Maid', a recent paper [1] suggests that female house finches may think differently

Badyaev, Alex

154

Exploring Social Networking: Developing Critical Literacies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While schools have been using computers within their classrooms for years now, there has been a purposeful ignoring of the growing power of social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many schools ban students from accessing and using sites such as Facebook at school and many English and literacy teachers ignore or deny their value as a teaching…

Watson, Pauline

2012-01-01

155

Ethical Considerations of Social Networking for Counsellors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of online social networking websites has increased among Canadians in recent years. There are many professional and ethical implications for counsellors who use these sites (Boyd, 2007). Although they offer advantages to counsellors, their use can also raise issues around ethical conduct. Because the counselling literature has not yet…

Bratt, William Edgar Vernon

2010-01-01

156

Analysis of tag within online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, tagging systems have been paid increasing attentions from both research communities and system designers. Most popular online social networking sites harness tag for managing and locating contents, for organizing and connecting users, and for recommending and sharing resources. We believe that tag acts like bridge between people and resources. Research on tag and tagging behavior will provide

Chao Wu; Bo Zhou

2009-01-01

157

Using Social Networking in the Library  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With celebrities discussing Twitter on television talk shows, Facebook being used by people to share pictures of their grandchildren, and academic seminars being delivered in Second Life, it is hard to get through a day without being faced with some sort of social networking tool. Librarians often talk about the importance of outreach and of…

Lindsay, Elizabeth Blakesley

2009-01-01

158

The Social Network Classroom Peter Bunus  

E-print Network

messages, playing online games, create blogs or download videos. Table 1. Generational differences in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement likely than other age categories to send and receive email messages, play online games, create blogs

Burns, Peter

159

Social Network Structures among Groundnut Farmers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Groundnut farmers in East Africa have experienced declines in production despite research and extension efforts to increase productivity. This study examined how social network structures related to acquisition of information about new seed varieties and productivity among groundnut farmers in Uganda and Kenya.…

Thuo, Mary; Bell, Alexandra A.; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.; Okello, David K.; Okoko, Evelyn Nasambu; Kidula, Nelson L.; Deom, C. Michael; Puppala, Naveen

2013-01-01

160

The Diffusion of Innovations in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider processes in which new technologies and forms of behavior are transmitted through social and geographic networks Agents adopt behaviors based on a combination of their inherent payoff and their local popularity (the number of neighbors who have adopted them) subject to some random error We characterize the long-run dynamics of such processes in terms of the geometry of

H. PEYTON YOUNG

2000-01-01

161

Book recommendation based on web social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recommender systems play an important role in dealing with web information overload such as book e-commerce. Current recommender systems often generate recommendation on users' opinions on items, and have several fatal weaknesses. With the growth of web social networks, a new kind of information is available: trust rating expressed by an user on another user. The web-based nature of this

Mingjuan Zhou

2010-01-01

162

Social contagion of risk perceptions in environmental management networks.  

PubMed

An important requisite for improving risk communication practice related to contentious environmental issues is having a better theoretical understanding of how risk perceptions function in real-world social systems. Our study applied Scherer and Cho's social network contagion theory of risk perception (SNCTRP) to cormorant management (a contentious environmental management issue) in the Great Lakes Basin to: (1) assess contagion effects on cormorant-related risk perceptions and individual factors believed to influence those perceptions and (2) explore the extent of social contagion in a full network (consisting of interactions between and among experts and laypeople) and three "isolated" models separating different types of interactions from the full network (i.e., expert-to-expert, layperson-to-layperson, and expert-to-layperson). We conducted interviews and administered questionnaires with experts (e.g., natural resource professionals) and laypeople (e.g., recreational and commercial anglers, business owners, bird enthusiasts) engaged in cormorant management in northern Lake Huron (n = 115). Our findings generally support the SNCTRP; however, the scope and scale of social contagion varied considerably based on the variables (e.g., individual risk perception factors), actors (i.e., experts or laypeople), and interactions of interest. Contagion effects were identified more frequently, and were stronger, in the models containing interactions between experts and laypeople than in those models containing only interactions among experts or laypeople. PMID:23231537

Muter, Bret A; Gore, Meredith L; Riley, Shawn J

2013-08-01

163

Differentiating Specialists and Generalists Within College Students' Social Support Networks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An alternative scoring method for the Social Support Questionnaire was used to examine relationships among social network structure, support types and satisfaction determinants. College students' social networks consisted of nuclear, and other, family; friends; and others. Proportion of support network occupied by nuclear family was positively…

Bogat, G. Anne; And Others

1985-01-01

164

Segmentation and Automated Social Hierarchy Detection through Email Network Analysis ?  

E-print Network

Segmentation and Automated Social Hierarchy Detection through Email Network Analysis ? German. Social Network, Enron, Behavior Pro#12;le, Link Mining, Data Mining, Corporate Householding. 1]. ? This work is based on an earlier work: Automated Social Hierarchy Detection through Email Network Analysis

Yang, Junfeng

165

Chic or Social: Visual Popularity Analysis in Online Fashion Networks  

E-print Network

Chic or Social: Visual Popularity Analysis in Online Fashion Networks Kota Yamaguchi Tohoku in social networks. But, how important is this visual content and how does it influ- ence behavior in the network? In this paper we study the effects of visual, textual, and social factors on popularity

Berg, Tamara L.

166

On Sampling Type Distribution from Heterogeneous Social Networks  

E-print Network

and more attention of the data mining com- munity in recent years. By modeling the social networkOn Sampling Type Distribution from Heterogeneous Social Networks Jhao-Yin Li and Mi-Yen Yeh {louisjyli,miyen}@iis.sinica.edu.tw Abstract. Social network analysis has drawn the attention of many

Lin, Jason Yi-Bing

167

Seed and Grow: An Attack Against Anonymized Social Networks  

E-print Network

telecommunication service providers or intelligence agencies a decade ago. Data from social networks, once published is a major concern in dealing with social network data in contexts such as storage, process- ingSeed and Grow: An Attack Against Anonymized Social Networks Wei Peng, Feng Li, Xukai Zou and Jie Wu

Wu, Jie

168

Methods for Coalition Formation in Adaptation-Based Social Networks  

E-print Network

formation in social networks consisting of a graph of interdependent agents allows many choices of which task to select and with whom to partner in the social network. Nodes represent agents and arcsMethods for Coalition Formation in Adaptation-Based Social Networks Levi Barton, Vicki H. Allan

Allan, Vicki H.

169

VIRTUAL SOCIAL NETWORKS AND THEIR UTILIZATION FOR PROMOTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article deals with current knowledge of social media with the focus on social networks. Social media offer great opportunities for businesses. However, in order to use these new business channels in the most effective way, businesses need relevant information. The main purpose of this article is to evaluate the state of utilization of social networks by businesses as well

Robert Stefko; Peter Dorcak; Frantisek Pollak

2011-01-01

170

Representing Excuses in Social Dependence Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we propose a representation of excuses in the context of multiagent systems. We distinguish five classes of excuses, taking as starting point both jurisprudential and philosophical studies about this topic, and we discuss their acceptance criteria. We highlight the following classes of excuses: epistemic excuses, power-based excuses, norm-based excuses, counts as-based excuses and social-based excuses and we represent them using social dependence networks. The acceptance criteria individuate those excuses which success in maintaining the trust of the other agents, e.g. in the context of social networks, excuses based on norms seem better than counts as-based ones in achieving this aim.

Boella, Guido; Broersen, Jan; van der Torre, Leendert; Villata, Serena

171

Diffusion of Innovations over Multiplex Social Networks  

E-print Network

The ways in which an innovation (e.g., new behaviour, idea, technology, product) diffuses among people can determine its success or failure. In this paper, we address the problem of diffusion of innovations over multiplex social networks where the neighbours of a person belong to one or multiple networks (or layers) such as friends, families, or colleagues. To this end, we generalise one of the basic game-theoretic diffusion models, called networked coordination game, for multiplex networks. We present analytical results for this extended model and validate them through a simulation study, finding among other properties a lower bound for the success of an innovation.While simple and leading to intuitively understandable results, to the best of our knowledge this is the first extension of a game-theoretic innovation diffusion model for multiplex networks and as such it provides a basic framework to study more sophisticated innovation dynamics.

Ramezanian, Rasoul; Magnani, Matteo; Montesi, Danilo

2014-01-01

172

Social encounter networks: characterizing Great Britain  

PubMed Central

A major goal of infectious disease epidemiology is to understand and predict the spread of infections within human populations, with the intention of better informing decisions regarding control and intervention. However, the development of fully mechanistic models of transmission requires a quantitative understanding of social interactions and collective properties of social networks. We performed a cross-sectional study of the social contacts on given days for more than 5000 respondents in England, Scotland and Wales, through postal and online survey methods. The survey was designed to elicit detailed and previously unreported measures of the immediate social network of participants relevant to infection spread. Here, we describe individual-level contact patterns, focusing on the range of heterogeneity observed and discuss the correlations between contact patterns and other socio-demographic factors. We find that the distribution of the number of contacts approximates a power-law distribution, but postulate that total contact time (which has a shorter-tailed distribution) is more epidemiologically relevant. We observe that children, public-sector and healthcare workers have the highest number of total contact hours and are therefore most likely to catch and transmit infectious disease. Our study also quantifies the transitive connections made between an individual's contacts (or clustering); this is a key structural characteristic of social networks with important implications for disease transmission and control efficacy. Respondents' networks exhibit high levels of clustering, which varies across social settings and increases with duration, frequency of contact and distance from home. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for the transmission and control of pathogens spread through close contact. PMID:23804621

Danon, Leon; Read, Jonathan M.; House, Thomas A.; Vernon, Matthew C.; Keeling, Matt J.

2013-01-01

173

Social networks among Indigenous peoples in Mexico.  

PubMed

We examine the extent to which social networks among indigenous peoples in Mexico have a significant effect on a variety of human capital investment and economic activities, such as school attendance and work among teenage boys and girls, and migration, welfare participation, employment status, occupation, and sector of employment among adult males and females. Using data from the 10 percent population sample of the 2000 Population and Housing Census of Mexico and the empirical strategy that Bertrand, Luttmer, and Mullainathan (2000) propose, which allows us to take into account the role of municipality and language group fixed effects, we confirm empirically that social network effects play an important role in the economic decisions of indigenous people, especially in rural areas. Our analysis also provides evidence that better access to basic services such as water and electricity increases the size and strength of network effects in rural areas. PMID:21188887

Skoufias, Emmanuel; Lunde, Trine; Patrinos, Harry Anthony

2010-01-01

174

Social Networks among Residents in Recovery Homes  

PubMed Central

Although evidence exists that substance abuse abstinence is enhanced when individuals in recovery are embedded in social networks that are cohesive, few studies examined the network structures underlying recovery home support systems. In two studies, we investigated the mechanisms through which social environments affect health outcomes among two samples of adult residents of recovery homes. Findings from Study 1 (n = 150) indicated that network size and the presence of relationships with other Oxford House (OH) residents both predicted future abstinence. Study 2 (n = 490) included individuals who lived in an OH residence for up to 6 months, and their personal relationship with other house residents predicted future abstinence. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:23956954

Jason, Leonard; Stevens, Ed; Ferrari, Joseph R.; Thompson, Erin; Legler, Ray

2013-01-01

175

Managing Trust in Online Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, there is a dramatic growth in number and popularity of online social networks. There are many networks available with more than 100 million registered users such as Facebook, MySpace, QZone, Windows Live Spaces etc. People may connect, discover and share by using these online social networks. The exponential growth of online communities in the area of social networks attracts the attention of the researchers about the importance of managing trust in online environment. Users of the online social networks may share their experiences and opinions within the networks about an item which may be a product or service. The user faces the problem of evaluating trust in a service or service provider before making a choice. Recommendations may be received through a chain of friends network, so the problem for the user is to be able to evaluate various types of trust opinions and recommendations. This opinion or recommendation has a great influence to choose to use or enjoy the item by the other user of the community. Collaborative filtering system is the most popular method in recommender system. The task in collaborative filtering is to predict the utility of items to a particular user based on a database of user rates from a sample or population of other users. Because of the different taste of different people, they rate differently according to their subjective taste. If two people rate a set of items similarly, they share similar tastes. In the recommender system, this information is used to recommend items that one participant likes, to other persons in the same cluster. But the collaborative filtering system performs poor when there is insufficient previous common rating available between users; commonly known as cost start problem. To overcome the cold start problem and with the dramatic growth of online social networks, trust based approach to recommendation has emerged. This approach assumes a trust network among users and makes recommendations based on the ratings of the users that are directly or indirectly trusted by the target user.

Bhuiyan, Touhid; Josang, Audun; Xu, Yue

176

Informal Learning in Social Networks: A Study of the Orkut Social Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an analytical study which characterises the virtual communities of the Orkut social network, focusing in particular on education, training and technology, in order to understand whether this and other social websites allow the development of informal learning. This empirical study, which is descriptive and exploratory, began…

Lisboa, Eliana Santana; Coutinho, Clara Pereira

2011-01-01

177

The moderating role of attachment anxiety on social network site use intensity and social capital.  

PubMed

This study examined the moderating role of attachment anxiety on the relationship between intensity of social network site use and bridging, bonding, and maintained social capital. Data from 322 undergraduate Chinese students were collected. Hierarchical regression analyses showed positive relationships between online intensity of social network site use and the three types of social capital. Moreover, attachment anxiety moderated the effect of intensity of social network site use on social capital. Specifically, for students with lower attachment anxiety, the relationships between intensity of social network site use and bonding and bridging social capital were stronger than those with higher attachment anxiety. The result suggested that social network sites cannot improve highly anxiously attached individuals' social capital effectively; they may need more face-to-face communications. PMID:23654041

Liu, Haihua; Shi, Junqi; Liu, Yihao; Sheng, Zitong

2013-02-01

178

Cooperative behavior cascades in human social networks  

PubMed Central

Theoretical models suggest that social networks influence the evolution of cooperation, but to date there have been few experimental studies. Observational data suggest that a wide variety of behaviors may spread in human social networks, but subjects in such studies can choose to befriend people with similar behaviors, posing difficulty for causal inference. Here, we exploit a seminal set of laboratory experiments that originally showed that voluntary costly punishment can help sustain cooperation. In these experiments, subjects were randomly assigned to a sequence of different groups to play a series of single-shot public goods games with strangers; this feature allowed us to draw networks of interactions to explore how cooperative and uncooperative behaviors spread from person to person to person. We show that, in both an ordinary public goods game and in a public goods game with punishment, focal individuals are influenced by fellow group members’ contribution behavior in future interactions with other individuals who were not a party to the initial interaction. Furthermore, this influence persists for multiple periods and spreads up to three degrees of separation (from person to person to person to person). The results suggest that each additional contribution a subject makes to the public good in the first period is tripled over the course of the experiment by other subjects who are directly or indirectly influenced to contribute more as a consequence. These results show experimentally that cooperative behavior cascades in human social networks. PMID:20212120

Fowler, James H.; Christakis, Nicholas A.

2010-01-01

179

Leveraging social network information to recognize people  

Microsoft Academic Search

Correctly identifying the observed subjects is an important problem camera networks. Prior art[1, 5] has demonstrated that this data association problem is indeed very difficult when working solely with visual information provided by the cameras, because the appearance of the subjects are highly variable. Visual data provided by surveillance cameras are in general noisy, low resolution, prone to degradation due

Mert Dikmen; Thomas S. Huang

2011-01-01

180

Rapid innovation diffusion in social networks  

PubMed Central

Social and technological innovations often spread through social networks as people respond to what their neighbors are doing. Previous research has identified specific network structures, such as local clustering, that promote rapid diffusion. Here we derive bounds that are independent of network structure and size, such that diffusion is fast whenever the payoff gain from the innovation is sufficiently high and the agents’ responses are sufficiently noisy. We also provide a simple method for computing an upper bound on the expected time it takes for the innovation to become established in any finite network. For example, if agents choose log-linear responses to what their neighbors are doing, it takes on average less than 80 revision periods for the innovation to diffuse widely in any network, provided that the error rate is at least 5% and the payoff gain (relative to the status quo) is at least 150%. Qualitatively similar results hold for other smoothed best-response functions and populations that experience heterogeneous payoff shocks. PMID:25024191

Kreindler, Gabriel E.; Young, H. Peyton

2014-01-01

181

Rapid innovation diffusion in social networks.  

PubMed

Social and technological innovations often spread through social networks as people respond to what their neighbors are doing. Previous research has identified specific network structures, such as local clustering, that promote rapid diffusion. Here we derive bounds that are independent of network structure and size, such that diffusion is fast whenever the payoff gain from the innovation is sufficiently high and the agents' responses are sufficiently noisy. We also provide a simple method for computing an upper bound on the expected time it takes for the innovation to become established in any finite network. For example, if agents choose log-linear responses to what their neighbors are doing, it takes on average less than 80 revision periods for the innovation to diffuse widely in any network, provided that the error rate is at least 5% and the payoff gain (relative to the status quo) is at least 150%. Qualitatively similar results hold for other smoothed best-response functions and populations that experience heterogeneous payoff shocks. PMID:25024191

Kreindler, Gabriel E; Young, H Peyton

2014-07-22

182

Fluctuations and Slow Variables in Genetic Networks  

PubMed Central

Computer simulations of large genetic networks are often extremely time consuming because, in addition to the biologically interesting translation and transcription reactions, many less interesting reactions like DNA binding and dimerizations have to be simulated. It is desirable to use the fact that the latter occur on much faster timescales than the former to eliminate the fast and uninteresting reactions and to obtain effective models of the slow reactions only. We use three examples of self-regulatory networks to show that the usual reduction methods where one obtains a system of equations of the Hill type fail to capture the fluctuations that these networks exhibit due to the small number of molecules; moreover, they may even miss describing the behavior of the average number of proteins. We identify the inclusion of fast-varying variables in the effective description as the cause for the failure of the traditional schemes. We suggest a different effective description, which entails the introduction of an additional species, not present in the original networks, that is slowly varying. We show that this description allows for a very efficient simulation of the reduced system while retaining the correct fluctuations and behavior of the full system. This approach ought to be applicable to a wide range of genetic networks. PMID:12609864

Bundschuh, R.; Hayot, F.; Jayaprakash, C.

2003-01-01

183

Rumor diffusion in an interests-based dynamic social network.  

PubMed

To research rumor diffusion in social friend network, based on interests, a dynamic friend network is proposed, which has the characteristics of clustering and community, and a diffusion model is also proposed. With this friend network and rumor diffusion model, based on the zombie-city model, some simulation experiments to analyze the characteristics of rumor diffusion in social friend networks have been conducted. The results show some interesting observations: (1) positive information may evolve to become a rumor through the diffusion process that people may modify the information by word of mouth; (2) with the same average degree, a random social network has a smaller clustering coefficient and is more beneficial for rumor diffusion than the dynamic friend network; (3) a rumor is spread more widely in a social network with a smaller global clustering coefficient than in a social network with a larger global clustering coefficient; and (4) a network with a smaller clustering coefficient has a larger efficiency. PMID:24453911

Tang, Mingsheng; Mao, Xinjun; Guessoum, Zahia; Zhou, Huiping

2013-01-01

184

Rumor Diffusion in an Interests-Based Dynamic Social Network  

PubMed Central

To research rumor diffusion in social friend network, based on interests, a dynamic friend network is proposed, which has the characteristics of clustering and community, and a diffusion model is also proposed. With this friend network and rumor diffusion model, based on the zombie-city model, some simulation experiments to analyze the characteristics of rumor diffusion in social friend networks have been conducted. The results show some interesting observations: (1) positive information may evolve to become a rumor through the diffusion process that people may modify the information by word of mouth; (2) with the same average degree, a random social network has a smaller clustering coefficient and is more beneficial for rumor diffusion than the dynamic friend network; (3) a rumor is spread more widely in a social network with a smaller global clustering coefficient than in a social network with a larger global clustering coefficient; and (4) a network with a smaller clustering coefficient has a larger efficiency. PMID:24453911

Mao, Xinjun; Guessoum, Zahia; Zhou, Huiping

2013-01-01

185

Cooperative networks overcoming defectors by social influence  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We address the cooperation problem in structured populations by considering the prisoner’s dilemma game as a metaphor of the social interactions between individuals with imitation capacity. We present a new strategy update rule called democratic weighted update where the individual’s behavior is socially influenced by each one of their neighbors. In particular, the capacity of an individual to socially influence other ones is proportional to its accumulated payoff. When in a neighborhood there are cooperators and defectors, the focal player is contradictorily influenced by them and, therefore, the effective social influence is given by the difference of the accumulated payoff of each strategy in its neighborhood. First, by considering the growing process of the network and neglecting mutations, we show the evolution of highly cooperative systems. Then, we broadly show that the social influence allows to overcome the emergence of defectors into highly cooperative systems. In this way, we conclude that in a structured system formed by a growing process, the cooperation evolves if the individuals have an imitation capacity socially influenced by each one of their neighbors. Therefore, here we present a theoretical solution of the cooperation problem among genetically unrelated individuals.

Gomez Portillo, Ignacio

2014-01-01

186

Privacy policies for health social networking sites  

PubMed Central

Health social networking sites (HSNS), virtual communities where users connect with each other around common problems and share relevant health data, have been increasingly adopted by medical professionals and patients. The growing use of HSNS like Sermo and PatientsLikeMe has prompted public concerns about the risks that such online data-sharing platforms pose to the privacy and security of personal health data. This paper articulates a set of privacy risks introduced by social networking in health care and presents a practical example that demonstrates how the risks might be intrinsic to some HSNS. The aim of this study is to identify and sketch the policy implications of using HSNS and how policy makers and stakeholders should elaborate upon them to protect the privacy of online health data. PMID:23599228

Li, Jingquan

2013-01-01

187

Social Network Sites: Definition History and Scholarship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Social network,sites,(SNSs) are increasingly attracting the attention of academic,and,industry researchers intrigued by their affordances and reach.,This special theme section of the,Journal,of Computer-Mediated,Communicationbrings ,together scholarship on these emergent phenomena.,In this introductory article, we describe features of SNSs and propose a comprehensive definition. We then present one perspective on the history of such sites, discussing key changes and developments. After briefly

Danah Boyd; Nicole B. Ellison

2007-01-01

188

Sensing Handshakes for Social Network Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Increasing ones social network and contacts currently is a manual process. Collections of business cards are exchanged or\\u000a notepads are brought around to write down contact details at events such as conferences. These details are not only difficult\\u000a to keep track of but the context in which the details were taken will be forgotten in time. Unfortunately business card exchange

David Haddock; Aaron J. Quigley; Benoit Gaudin

2009-01-01

189

Predicting Group Stability in Online Social Networks Akshay Patil  

E-print Network

the level of member diversity and social activities are critical in maintaining the stability of groups. We Social Networks, Group Stability, Online Communities 1. INTRODUCTION Understanding community structuresPredicting Group Stability in Online Social Networks Akshay Patil Stony Brook University Stony

Gao, Jie

190

Transfer of Training: Adding Insight through Social Network Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews studies which apply a social network perspective to examine transfer of training. The theory behind social networks focuses on the interpersonal mechanisms and social structures that exist among interacting units such as people within an organization. A premise of this perspective is that individual's behaviors and outcomes…

Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien

2013-01-01

191

Social Networking Technologies: A "Poke" for Campus Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Handwritten notes, meeting for coffee, eye contact, a handshake, a smile--are these social practices of yesteryear, soon to be replaced by the "wall posts" and "pokes" of today's social networking technologies? Although advances in social networking technologies allow for new and perhaps more efficient means of learning and communicating, they…

Berg, Joanne; Berquam, Lori; Christoph, Kathy

2007-01-01

192

Do Social Network Characteristics Predict Mammography Screening Practices?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Many breast cancer outreach programs assume that dissemination of information through social networks and provision of social support will promote screening. The authors prospectively examined the relationship between social network characteristics and adherence to screening guidelines. Method: Employed women age 40 years and older…

Allen, Jennifer D.; Stoddard, Anne M.; Sorensen, Glorian

2008-01-01

193

From Sensor Network To Social Network A Study On The Energy Impact In Buildings  

E-print Network

bayesian belief networks and signal processing techniques to make meaningful inferences about real world that constructs social networks that estimates human so- cial activities from sensor network data and analyzesFrom Sensor Network To Social Network­ A Study On The Energy Impact In Buildings Xiaoqian Jiang1

Pratt, Vaughan

194

Database Submission - The Evolving Social Network of Marketing Scholars  

Microsoft Academic Search

The interest in social networks among marketing scholars and practitioners has sharply increased in the last decade. One social network of which network scholars increasingly recognize the unique value is the academic collaboration (coauthor) network. We offer a comprehensive database of the collaboration network among marketing scholars over the last 40 years (available at http:\\/\\/mktsci.pubs.informs.org. Based on the ProQuest database,

Jacob Goldenberg; Barak Libai; Eitan Muller; Stefan Stremersch

2010-01-01

195

Communication Dynamics in Finite Capacity Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In communication networks, structure and dynamics are tightly coupled. The structure controls the flow of information and is itself shaped by the dynamical process of information exchanged between nodes. In order to reconcile structure and dynamics, a generic model, based on the local interaction between nodes, is considered for the communication in large social networks. In agreement with data from a large human organization, we show that the flow is non-Markovian and controlled by the temporal limitations of individuals. We confirm the versatility of our model by predicting simultaneously the degree-dependent node activity, the balance between information input and output of nodes, and the degree distribution. Finally, we quantify the limitations to network analysis when it is based on data sampled over a finite period of time.

Haerter, Jan O.; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Mathiesen, Joachim

2012-10-01

196

Dynamical and bursty interactions in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a modeling framework for dynamical and bursty contact networks made of agents in social interaction. We consider agents’ behavior at short time scales in which the contact network is formed by disconnected cliques of different sizes. At each time a random agent can make a transition from being isolated to being part of a group or vice versa. Different distributions of contact times and intercontact times between individuals are obtained by considering transition probabilities with memory effects, i.e., the transition probabilities for each agent depend both on its state (isolated or interacting) and on the time elapsed since the last change in state. The model lends itself to analytical and numerical investigations. The modeling framework can be easily extended and paves the way for systematic investigations of dynamical processes occurring on rapidly evolving dynamical networks, such as the propagation of an information or spreading of diseases.

Stehlé, Juliette; Barrat, Alain; Bianconi, Ginestra

2010-03-01

197

Recruitment dynamics in adaptive social networks  

PubMed Central

We model recruitment in adaptive social networks in the presence of birth and death processes. Recruitment is characterized by nodes changing their status to that of the recruiting class as a result of contact with recruiting nodes. Only a susceptible subset of nodes can be recruited. The recruiting individuals may adapt their connections in order to improve recruitment capabilities, thus changing the network structure adaptively. We derive a mean field theory to predict the dependence of the growth threshold of the recruiting class on the adaptation parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of adaptation on the recruitment level, as well as on network topology. The theoretical predictions are compared with direct simulations of the full system. We identify two parameter regimes with qualitatively different bifurcation diagrams depending on whether nodes become susceptible frequently (multiple times in their lifetime) or rarely (much less than once per lifetime). PMID:25395989

Shkarayev, Maxim S.; Schwartz, Ira B.; Shaw, Leah B.

2013-01-01

198

Communication dynamics in finite capacity social networks.  

PubMed

In communication networks, structure and dynamics are tightly coupled. The structure controls the flow of information and is itself shaped by the dynamical process of information exchanged between nodes. In order to reconcile structure and dynamics, a generic model, based on the local interaction between nodes, is considered for the communication in large social networks. In agreement with data from a large human organization, we show that the flow is non-Markovian and controlled by the temporal limitations of individuals. We confirm the versatility of our model by predicting simultaneously the degree-dependent node activity, the balance between information input and output of nodes, and the degree distribution. Finally, we quantify the limitations to network analysis when it is based on data sampled over a finite period of time. PMID:23215144

Haerter, Jan O; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Mathiesen, Joachim

2012-10-19

199

Recruitment dynamics in adaptive social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We model recruitment in adaptive social networks in the presence of birth and death processes. Recruitment is characterized by nodes changing their status to that of the recruiting class as a result of contact with recruiting nodes. Only a susceptible subset of nodes can be recruited. The recruiting individuals may adapt their connections in order to improve recruitment capabilities, thus changing the network structure adaptively. We derive a mean-field theory to predict the dependence of the growth threshold of the recruiting class on the adaptation parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of adaptation on the recruitment level, as well as on network topology. The theoretical predictions are compared with direct simulations of the full system. We identify two parameter regimes with qualitatively different bifurcation diagrams depending on whether nodes become susceptible frequently (multiple times in their lifetime) or rarely (much less than once per lifetime).

Shkarayev, Maxim S.; Schwartz, Ira B.; Shaw, Leah B.

2013-06-01

200

The Changing Nature of Suicide Attacks: A Social Network Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To comprehend the developments underlying the suicide attacks of recent years, we suggest that the organizational approach, which until recently was used to explain this phenomenon, should be complemented with a social network perspective. By employing a social network analysis of Palestinian suicide networks, the authors found that, in contrast…

Pedahzur, Ami; Perliger, Arie

2006-01-01

201

Effects of new ventures' social network on knowledge transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effective knowledge transfer in new ventures' social network has been one of many factors crucial to new ventures' survival and growth. This paper explores the effects of new ventures' social network on knowledge transfer. The results show that network structure has significant effects on transferring knowledge to new ventures. High density, greater centrality, heterogeneity and lager size in new ventures'

Yahao Mei; Hongli Liu

2011-01-01

202

Threshold Learning Dynamics in Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Social learning is defined as the ability of a population to aggregate information, a process which must crucially depend on the mechanisms of social interaction. Consumers choosing which product to buy, or voters deciding which option to take with respect to an important issue, typically confront external signals to the information gathered from their contacts. Economic models typically predict that correct social learning occurs in large populations unless some individuals display unbounded influence. We challenge this conclusion by showing that an intuitive threshold process of individual adjustment does not always lead to such social learning. We find, specifically, that three generic regimes exist separated by sharp discontinuous transitions. And only in one of them, where the threshold is within a suitable intermediate range, the population learns the correct information. In the other two, where the threshold is either too high or too low, the system either freezes or enters into persistent flux, respectively. These regimes are generally observed in different social networks (both complex or regular), but limited interaction is found to promote correct learning by enlarging the parameter region where it occurs. PMID:21637714

González-Avella, Juan Carlos; Eguíluz, Victor M.; Marsili, Matteo; Vega-Redondo, Fernado; San Miguel, Maxi

2011-01-01

203

A generational comparison of social networking site use: the influence of age and social identity.  

PubMed

An online survey (N=256) compared social networking site (SNS) use among younger (millennial: 18-29) and older (baby-boomer: 41-64) subscribers focusing on the influence of collective self-esteem and group identity on motives for SNS use. Younger participants reported higher positive collective self-esteem, social networking site use for peer communication, and social compensation. Regardless of age, participants reporting high collective self-esteem and group identity were more likely to use social networking sites for peer communication and social identity gratifications, while those reporting negative collective self-esteem were more likely to use social networking sites for social compensation. The theoretical implications of the strong relationship between social identity gratifications and social compensation are discussed. PMID:22808625

Barker, Valerie

2012-01-01

204

Threshold of SIS Epidemics in Alternate Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We introduce the alternate social networks (ASN) model to study the epidemic threshold of SIS epidemic. The alternate social networks consist of a family network and a public network, mimicking the human contacts during some time (nighttime) and other time (daytime) respectively. Both the family network and the public network are constructed by a set of sub networks which can exhibit small-world properties, scale-free degree distribution or the household structure, representing various types of local interactions among social groups in modern society. Simulations show that the ASN has the essential characteristics of social networks, and the local fully connected structures (households) as well as the existence of local structures (publics) in the public network are two dominating ingredients for the epidemic threshold. Moreover, results show that the epidemic threshold in ASN is independent of the initial condition and the system size.

Ni, Shunjiang; Weng, Wenguo; Fan, Weicheng

2008-03-01

205

The Educational Effects of Rural Adolescents' Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored the social networks and sources of social support for rural high-school adolescents and how these are related to educational and psychological outcomes. We examined quality, frequency. and nature of social relationships of high school students to understand how size, density, heterogeneity, compositional quality of social

Singh, Kusum; Dika, Sandra

2003-01-01

206

From Social Ties to Social Capital: Class Differences in the Relations between Schools and Parent Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focusing on parental networks--a central dimension of social capital--this article uses ethnographic data to examine social-class differences in the relations between families and schools. We detail the characteristics of networks across different classes and then explore the ways that networks come into play when parents are confronted by…

Horvat, Erin McNamara; Weininger, Elliot B.; Lareau, Annette

2003-01-01

207

The Social Fabric of Elementary Schools: A Network Typology of Social Interaction among Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While researchers are currently studying various forms of social network interaction among teachers for their impact on educational policy implementation and practice, knowledge on how various types of networks are interrelated is limited. The goal of this study is to understand the dimensionality that may underlie various types of social networks

Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.; Karsten, Sjoerd; Daly, Alan J.

2012-01-01

208

Open-source social Network Assessment Survey System (NASS)  

E-print Network

The selection of targeted survey questions and the design of survey questionnaires are instrumental in the social networks research. With the accelerating growth of theory and experimental knowledge in the area of social ...

Du, Aaron (Aaron Yinan)

2005-01-01

209

Tie strength in question answer on social network sites  

E-print Network

Asking friends, colleagues, or other trusted people to help answer a question or find information is a familiar and tried-and-true concept. Widespread use of online social networks has made social information seeking easier, ...

Panovich, Katrina Marie

210

Survey on Social Networking Site for Engineering Management Program  

E-print Network

Social Networking Sites (SNSs) such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter have gained much popularity as Web 2.0 technologies and have been widely adopted by different age groups from teenagers to students to working professionals. Consequently, social...

Mokkarala, Rajyalakshmi Sirisha

2012-07-27

211

Infectious Disease Modeling of Social Contagion in Networks  

E-print Network

Many behavioral phenomena have been found to spread interpersonally through social networks, in a manner similar to infectious diseases. An important difference between social contagion and traditional infectious diseases, ...

Hill, Alison Lynn

212

Structural and Cognitive Bottlenecks to Information Access in Social Networks  

E-print Network

Information in networks is non-uniformly distributed, enabling individuals in certain network positions to get preferential access to information. Social scientists have developed influential theories about the role of network structure in information access. These theories were validated through numerous studies, which examined how individuals leverage their social networks for competitive advantage, such as a new job or higher compensation. It is not clear how these theories generalize to online networks, which differ from real-world social networks in important respects, including asymmetry of social links. We address this problem by analyzing how users of the social news aggregator Digg adopt stories recommended by friends, i.e., users they follow. We measure the impact different factors, such as network position and activity rate; have on access to novel information, which in Digg's case means set of distinct news stories. We show that a user can improve his information access by linking to active users,...

Kang, Jeon-Hyung

2013-01-01

213

A social network analysis of customer-level revenue distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis has been a topic of regular interest in the marketing discipline. Previous studies have largely focused\\u000a on similarities in product\\/brand choice decisions within the same social network, often in the context of product innovation\\u000a adoption. Not much is known, however, about the importance of social network effects once customers have been acquired. Using\\u000a the customer base of

Michael Haenlein

2011-01-01

214

Social Butterfly: Social Caches for Distributed Social Networks Lu Han, Badri Nath, Liviu Iftode, S. Muthukrishnan  

E-print Network

. Muthukrishnan Department of Computer Science Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey {luhan, badri, iftode) can overcome several disadvantages of the now popular centralized online social networks personal contents at the place of their choosing such as cloud storage, enterprise servers or personal

Iftode, Liviu

215

A Sensemaking Approach to Visual Analytics of Attribute-Rich Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networks have become more complex, in particular considering the fact that elements in social networks are not only abstract topological nodes and links, but contain rich social attributes and reflecting diverse social relationships. For example, in a co-authorship social network in a scientific community, nodes in the social network, which…

Gou, Liang

2012-01-01

216

Violating Social Norms when Choosing Friends: How Rule-Breakers Affect Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Social networks rely on basic rules of conduct to yield functioning societies in both human and animal populations. As individuals follow established rules, their behavioral decisions shape the social network and give it structure. Using dynamic, self-organizing social network models we demonstrate that defying conventions in a social system can affect multiple levels of social and organizational success independently. Such actions primarily affect actors' own positions within the network, but individuals can also affect the overall structure of a network even without immediately affecting themselves or others. These results indicate that defying the established social norms can help individuals to change the properties of a social system via seemingly neutral behaviors, highlighting the power of rule-breaking behavior to transform convention-based societies, even before direct impacts on individuals can be measured. PMID:22039524

Hock, Karlo; Fefferman, Nina H.

2011-01-01

217

Optimizing Online Social Networks for Information Propagation  

PubMed Central

Online users nowadays are facing serious information overload problem. In recent years, recommender systems have been widely studied to help people find relevant information. Adaptive social recommendation is one of these systems in which the connections in the online social networks are optimized for the information propagation so that users can receive interesting news or stories from their leaders. Validation of such adaptive social recommendation methods in the literature assumes uniform distribution of users' activity frequency. In this paper, our empirical analysis shows that the distribution of online users' activity is actually heterogenous. Accordingly, we propose a more realistic multi-agent model in which users' activity frequency are drawn from a power-law distribution. We find that previous social recommendation methods lead to serious delay of information propagation since many users are connected to inactive leaders. To solve this problem, we design a new similarity measure which takes into account users' activity frequencies. With this similarity measure, the average delay is significantly shortened and the recommendation accuracy is largely improved. PMID:24816894

Chen, Duan-Bing; Wang, Guan-Nan; Zeng, An; Fu, Yan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

2014-01-01

218

Social Networking—Another Breach In The Wall  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the increasing popularity of social networks like Facebook and MySpace, such sites have lately become the favourite destinations for spammers and attackers. Social networks have experienced complex social engineering attacks, massive spam and aggressive malware distribution in the recent past. This paper presents a practical case study of social engineering, malware distribution and phishing attacks against social networking sites that are identified over last few months. It is explained how private data of the users are exposed to attackers and how easily their privacy is compromised as a result of these attacks and their own careless behaviour.

Bamnote, Gajendra; Patil, Gajendra; Shejole, Amol

2010-11-01

219

Analyzing covert social network foundation behind terrorism disaster  

E-print Network

This paper addresses a method to analyze the covert social network foundation hidden behind the terrorism disaster. It is to solve a node discovery problem, which means to discover a node, which functions relevantly in a social network, but escaped from monitoring on the presence and mutual relationship of nodes. The method aims at integrating the expert investigator's prior understanding, insight on the terrorists' social network nature derived from the complex graph theory, and computational data processing. The social network responsible for the 9/11 attack in 2001 is used to execute simulation experiment to evaluate the performance of the method.

Maeno, Yoshiharu

2007-01-01

220

SocialCloud: Using Social Networks for Building Distributed Computing Services  

E-print Network

SocialCloud: Using Social Networks for Building Distributed Computing Services Abedelaziz Mohaisen investigate a new computing paradigm, called SocialCloud, in which computing nodes are governed by social ties existing computing paradigms, such as grid computing and the conventional cloud computing paradigms. We

Kim, Dae-Shik

221

Empathetic Social Choice on Social Networks Amirali Salehi-Abari and Craig Boutilier  

E-print Network

. The influence of social networks on voting behavior has received considerable attention in the social sciences form of classical preference aggregation (e.g., social welfare maximization or certain forms of voting. In fact, arguably most group decision problems, whether social, corporate, or policy-oriented, involve

Toronto, University of

222

Mental Health, School Problems, and Social Networks: Modeling Urban Adolescent Substance Use  

PubMed Central

This study tested a mediation model of the relationship with school problems, social network quality, and substance use with a primary care sample of 301 urban adolescents. It was theorized that social network quality (level of risk or protection in network) would mediate the effects of school problems, accounting for internalizing problems and relations with parents, on substance use. Results of path modeling with AMOS showed that the model provided a very good fit to the data and demonstrated partial mediation effects of social network quality on substance use. The standardized mediated effect of school problems on substance use, mediated by social network quality, was 0.13 (p < .01, 95% CI [.072, .189]). An effect size measure was applied to determine what proportion of the total effect was mediated by the intervening (social network quality) variable and produced a 0.34 effect size. The results highlight the potential preventive role of social network quality in addressing urban adolescent substance use. PMID:21063779

2011-01-01

223

Addressing therapeutic boundaries in social networking.  

PubMed

Facebook is the leading social networking website, with over 500 million users. Prior studies have shown an increasing number of housestaff accessing the site. While Facebook can be used to foster camaraderie, it can also create difficulties in the doctor-patient relationship, especially when boundaries are crossed. This study explored the prevalence of such boundary crossings and offers recommendations for training. An anonymous voluntary survey regarding Facebook use was distributed to current psychiatry residents through the American Psychiatric Association (APA) listserv. Of the 182 respondents, 95.7% had current Facebook profiles, and 9.7% had received friend requests from patients. In addition, 18.7% admitted to viewing patient profiles on Facebook. There is a substantial utilization of Facebook among psychiatric residents as compared with prior studies. Specific guidance regarding social media websites and the potential for ethical difficulties should be offered to trainees. PMID:22397540

Ginory, Almari; Sabatier, Laura Mayol; Eth, Spencer

2012-01-01

224

A social network caught in the Web  

E-print Network

We present an analysis of Club Nexus, an online community at Stanford University. Through the Nexus site we were able to study a reflection of the real world community structure within the student body. We observed and measured social network phenomena such as the small world effect, clustering, and the strength of weak ties. Using the rich profile data provided by the users we were able to deduce the attributes contributing to the formation of friendships, and to determine how the similarity of users decays as the distance between them in the network increases. In addition, we found correlations between a user's personality and their other attributes, as well as interesting correspondences between how users perceive themselves and how they are perceived by others.

Lada A. Adamic; Orkut Buyukkokten; Eytan Adar

2003-01-01

225

Dimensionality of Social Networks Using Motifs and Eigenvalues  

PubMed Central

We consider the dimensionality of social networks, and develop experiments aimed at predicting that dimension. We find that a social network model with nodes and links sampled from an m-dimensional metric space with power-law distributed influence regions best fits samples from real-world networks when m scales logarithmically with the number of nodes of the network. This supports a logarithmic dimension hypothesis, and we provide evidence with two different social networks, Facebook and LinkedIn. Further, we employ two different methods for confirming the hypothesis: the first uses the distribution of motif counts, and the second exploits the eigenvalue distribution. PMID:25188391

Bonato, Anthony; Gleich, David F.; Kim, Myunghwan; Mitsche, Dieter; Pra?at, Pawe?; Tian, Yanhua; Young, Stephen J.

2014-01-01

226

Dimensionality of social networks using motifs and eigenvalues  

E-print Network

We consider the dimensionality of social networks, and develop experiments aimed at predicting that dimension. We find that a social network model with nodes and links sampled from an $m$-dimensional metric space with power-law distributed influence regions best fits samples from real-world networks when $m$ scales logarithmically with the number of nodes of the network. This supports a logarithmic dimension hypothesis, and we provide evidence with two different social networks, Facebook and LinkedIn. Further, we employ two different methods for confirming the hypothesis: the first uses the distribution of motif counts, and the second exploits the eigenvalue distribution.

Bonato, Anthony; Kim, Myunghwan; Mitsche, Dieter; Pra?at, Pawe?; Tian, Amanda; Young, Stephen J

2014-01-01

227

MATH 100 Topic Analyzing Your Social Network Data  

E-print Network

MATH 100 Topic Analyzing Your Social Network Data Lulu Kang E1-105B, lkang2@math, Facebook is big business. It is straightforward to download your own Facebook network data and see which on the collection and analysis of network data. Network data is data on the interactions between things (whether

Fasshauer, Greg

228

Prosocial norms and degree heterogeneity in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide empirical evidence to support the claims that social diversity promotes prosocial behavior. We elicit a real-life social network and its members' adherence to a social norm, namely inequity aversion. The data reveal a positive relationship between subjects' prosociality and several measures of centrality. This result is in line with the theoretical literature that relates the evolution of social norms to the structure of social interactions and argues that central individuals are crucial for the emergence of prosocial behavior.

Ková?ík, Jaromír; Brañas-Garza, Pablo; Cobo-Reyes, Ramón; Espinosa, María Paz; Jiménez, Natalia; Ponti, Giovanni

2012-02-01

229

Local Nash Equilibrium in Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures. PMID:25169150

Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M. A.; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

2014-01-01

230

Assembly effect of groups in online social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the popularity and growth of online social networks, security in these networks becomes a critical problem. Previous works have proved that a virus can spread effectively in social networks. In this paper, groups in social networks are studied. We notice that groups on social network services sites can assemble people with similar characteristics, which may promote virus propagation in these networks. After our analysis, it is found that the use of groups can shorten the distance among users, and hence it would cause faster virus spread. We propose a virus propagation model and simulate it in a group network to show the assembly effect of groups. Our result shows that even with only one random attack, a virus can still spread rapidly, and the direct contact among group members is the reason for fast spreading.

Fan, W.; Yeung, K. H.; Wong, K. Y.

2013-03-01

231

Internet Use and Social Networking among Middle Aged and Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the associations between Internet use and the social networks of adults over 50 years of age were examined. A sample (n = 2284) from the 2004 wave of the "Health and Retirement Survey" was used. In regression models considering a number of control variables, frequency of contact with friends, frequency of contact with family, and…

Hogeboom, David L.; McDermott, Robert J.; Perrin, Karen M.; Osman, Hana; Bell-Ellison, Bethany A.

2010-01-01

232

Raccoon social networks and the potential for disease transmission.  

PubMed

Raccoons are an important vector of rabies and other pathogens. The degree to which these pathogens can spread through a raccoon population should be closely linked to association rates between individual raccoons. Most studies of raccoon sociality have found patterns consistent with low levels of social connectivity within populations, thus the likelihood of direct pathogen transmission between raccoons is theoretically low. We used proximity detecting collars and social network metrics to calculate the degree of social connectivity in an urban raccoon population for purposes of estimating potential pathogen spread. In contrast to previous assumptions, raccoon social association networks were highly connected, and all individuals were connected to one large social network during 15 out of 18 months of study. However, these metrics may overestimate the potential for a pathogen to spread through a population, as many of the social connections were based on relatively short contact periods. To more closely reflect varying probabilities of pathogen spread, we censored the raccoon social networks based on the total amount of time spent in close proximity between two individuals per month. As this time criteria for censoring the social networks increased from one to thirty minutes, corresponding measures of network connectivity declined. These findings demonstrate that raccoon populations are much more tightly connected than would have been predicted based on previous studies, but also point out that additional research is needed to calculate more precise transmission probabilities by infected individuals, and determine how disease infection changes normal social behaviors. PMID:24130746

Hirsch, Ben T; Prange, Suzanne; Hauver, Stephanie A; Gehrt, Stanley D

2013-01-01

233

Combining Topic Models and Social Networks for Chat Data Mining  

E-print Network

Combining Topic Models and Social Networks for Chat Data Mining Ville Tuulos and Henry Tirri July 4, 2004 HIIT TECHNICAL REPORT 2004­13 #12;Combining Topic Models and Social Networks for Chat Data Mining, Helsinki, Finland PO BOX 9800 FI-02015 TKK, Finland http://www.hiit.fi HIIT Technical Reports 2004­13 ISSN

Myllymäki, Petri

234

Privacy Leakage in Mobile Online Social Networks Balachander Krishnamurthy  

E-print Network

growth in "apps" (applications) for mobile devices and many are available for customized interactionPrivacy Leakage in Mobile Online Social Networks Balachander Krishnamurthy AT&T Labs ­ Research USA cew@cs.wpi.edu Abstract Mobile Online Social Networks (mOSNs) have recently grown in popularity

Camesano, Terri

235

Analyzing Implicit Social Networks in Multiplayer Online Games  

E-print Network

1 Analyzing Implicit Social Networks in Multiplayer Online Games Alexandru Iosup, Ruud van de. Contact: {A.Iosup,R.vandeBovenkamp,S.Shen,L.Jia,F.A.Kuipers}@tudelft.nl Abstract--For many networked games enhance user-experience, and extend the success of each game. Un- derstanding the social structure

Kuipers, Fernando A.

236

Bayesian-inference based recommendation in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose a Bayesian-inference based recommendation system for online social networks. In our system, users share their movie ratings with friends. The rating similarity between a pair of friends is measured by a set of conditional probabilities derived from their mutual rating history. A user propagates a movie rating query along the social network to his direct

Xiwang Yang; Yang Guo; Yong Liu

2011-01-01

237

The structure of a large social network Balazs Szendroi  

E-print Network

The structure of a large social network Bal´azs Szendroi University of Washington and University of Utrecht G´abor Cs´anyi and Bal´azs Szendroi, Structure of a large social network cond-mat/0305580

Szendröi, Balázs

238

Social Network Analysis to Evaluate an Interdisciplinary Research Center  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We sought to examine the growth of an interdisciplinary center using social network analysis techniques. Specific aims were to examine the patterns of growth and interdisciplinary connectedness of the Center and to identify the social network characteristics of its productive members. The setting for this study was The Center for Interdisciplinary…

Aboelela, Sally W.; Merrill, Jacqueline A.; Carley, Kathleen M.; Larson, Elaine

2007-01-01

239

Organizational Social Network Research: Core Ideas and Key Debates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the growing popularity of the social network perspective across diverse organizational subject areas, this review examines the coherence of the research tradition (in terms of leading ideas from which the diversity of new research derives) and appraises current directions and controversies. The leading ideas at the heart of the organizational social network research program include: an emphasis on relations

Martin Kilduff; Daniel J. Brass

2010-01-01

240

Social networks and infectious disease: The Colorado Springs study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social network paradigm provides a set of concepts and methods useful for studying the structure of a population through which infectious agents transmitted during close personal contact spread, and an opportunity to develop improved disease control programs. The research discussed was a first attempt to use a social network approach to better understand factors affecting the transmission of a

A. S. Klovdahl; J. J. Potterat; D. E. Woodhouse; J. B. Muth; S. Q. Muth; W. W. Darrow

1994-01-01

241

Clinical issues in social network therapy for clients with schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Social networks are viable foci for therapeutic interventions. A social network therapy program for clients with schizophrenia was developed by a community-based mental health agency. This paper presents four of the most common clinical issues encountered and illustrates each with a case example. PMID:1458822

Wasylenki, D; James, S; Clark, C; Lewis, J; Goering, P; Gillies, L

1992-10-01

242

A New Addiction for Teacher Candidates: Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the transition to being a knowledge-based society, the internet usage has become an irreplaceable part of life. As socials networks have come into our lives, the internet usage has taken a different dimension. People can affiliate to social networks in order to make friends, exchange information, find partners, and to play games. The process…

Cam, Emre; Isbulan, Onur

2012-01-01

243

On the Bursty Evolution of Online Social Networks Sabrina Gaito  

E-print Network

On the Bursty Evolution of Online Social Networks Sabrina Gaito , Matteo Zignani , Gian Paolo Rossi and providers. In particular, dynamics involving edge creation has direct implications on strategies timestamped dataset describing the initial growth and evolution of a large social network in China. We analyze

Zhao, Ben Y.

244

Generating private recommendations in a social trust network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recommender systems have become increasingly important in e-commerce as they can guide customers with finding personalized services and products. A variant of recommender systems that generates recommendations from a set of trusted people is recently getting more attention in social networks. However, people are concerned about their privacy as the information revealed in recommender systems, particularly in social networks, can

Z. Erkin; T. Veugen; R. L. Lagendijk

2011-01-01

245

Individual Strategy Update and Emergence of Cooperation in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we critically study whether social networks can explain the emergence of cooperative behavior. We carry out an extensive simulation program in which we study the most representative social dilemmas. For the Prisoner's Dilemma, it turns out that the emergence of cooperation is dependent on the microdynamics. On the other hand, network clustering mostly facilitates global cooperation in

CARLOS P. ROCA; ANGEL SÁNCHEZ; JOSÉ A. CUESTA

2012-01-01

246

Characterizing Social Response to Urban Earthquakes using Cell-Phone Network Data: The 2012 Oaxaca Earthquake  

E-print Network

The data generated by pervasive infrastructures, and specially cell-phone networks, has been used in the past to improve responses to emergency events such as natural disasters or disease outbreaks. However, very little work has focused on analyzing the social response to an urban earthquake as it takes place. In this paper we present a preliminary study of the social response using the information collected from a cell-phone network during the 2012 Oaxaca earthquake in Mexico. We focus our analysis on four urban environments located between 100-200km away from the epicenter of the earthquake. The social response is analyzed using four different variables: call volume, call duration, social activity and mobility. Initial results indicate a social response characterized by an increase in the number of calls, a decrease in call durations, a moderate increase in the number of people contacted by highly connected citizens and a moderate increase in the mobility.

Benyounes Moumni; Enrique Frias-martinez; Vanessa Frias-martinez

247

Social network extraction and analysis based on multimodal dyadic interaction.  

PubMed

Social interactions are a very important component in people's lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times' Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links' weights are a measure of the "influence" a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network. PMID:22438733

Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

2012-01-01

248

Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction  

PubMed Central

Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network. PMID:22438733

Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

2012-01-01

249

Latino social network dynamics and the Hurricane Katrina disaster.  

PubMed

The aim of this qualitative research was to examine the dynamics of existing and emerging social networks among Latino survivors of Hurricane Katrina. Data were generated through individual, in-depth interviews conducted with 65 Latinos within six months of the storm striking the Gulf Coast of the United States in August 2005. The findings illustrated both the role of social networks in gathering information, making decisions and accessing resources, and how these existing social networks were disrupted and strained by overwhelming needs. Broader structural issues, including poverty and a lack of transportation, combined with marginalised status as immigrants, further constrained access to essential information and resources. In response, new, if temporary, social networks emerged, based primarily on shared nationality, language, and a sense of collective commitment. Practice implications include the need to consider the social network dynamics of marginalised groups in developing innovative strategies to overcome structural barriers to accessing resources essential for disaster preparedness and survival. PMID:21623889

Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K; Barrington, Clare; Lacy, Elaine

2012-01-01

250

Multiple-membership multiple-classification models for social network and group dependences  

PubMed Central

The social network literature on network dependences has largely ignored other sources of dependence, such as the school that a student attends, or the area in which an individual lives. The multilevel modelling literature on school and area dependences has, in turn, largely ignored social networks. To bridge this divide, a multiple-membership multiple-classification modelling approach for jointly investigating social network and group dependences is presented. This allows social network and group dependences on individual responses to be investigated and compared. The approach is used to analyse a subsample of the Adolescent Health Study data set from the USA, where the response variable of interest is individual level educational attainment, and the three individual level covariates are sex, ethnic group and age. Individual, network, school and area dependences are accounted for in the analysis. The network dependences can be accounted for by including the network as a classification in the model, using various network configurations, such as ego-nets and cliques. The results suggest that ignoring the network affects the estimates of variation for the classifications that are included in the random part of the model (school, area and individual), as well as having some influence on the point estimates and standard errors of the estimates of regression coefficients for covariates in the fixed part of the model. From a substantive perspective, this approach provides a flexible and practical way of investigating variation in an individual level response due to social network dependences, and estimating the share of variation of an individual response for network, school and area classifications. PMID:25598585

Tranmer, Mark; Steel, David; Browne, William J

2014-01-01

251

Why social network analysis is important to Air Force applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social network analysis is a powerful tool used to help analysts discover relationships amongst groups of people as well as individuals. It is the mathematics behind such social networks as Facebook and MySpace. These networks alone cause a huge amount of data to be generated and the issue is only compounded once one adds in other electronic media such as e-mails and twitter. In this paper we outline the basics of social network analysis and how it may be used in current and future Air Force applications.

Havig, Paul R.; McIntire, John P.; Geiselman, Eric; Mohd-Zaid, Fairul

2012-06-01

252

Relationships in Reform: The Role of Teachers' Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Scholars have focused their attention on systemic reform as a way to support instructional coherence. These efforts are often layered on to existing social relationships between school staff that are rarely taken into account when enacting reform. Social network theory posits that the structure of social relationships may influence the…

Daly, Alan J.; Moolenaar, Nienke M.; Bolivar, Jose M.; Burke, Peggy

2010-01-01

253

Ring Cohesion in Marriage and Social Networks Douglas R. White  

E-print Network

Ring Cohesion in Marriage and Social Networks Douglas R. White July, 2004 (third draft 3 of social integration are constructed through marriage? Lévi-Strauss (1969 [1949]) classified forms of elementary marriage cycles created by cousin marriage in terms of their implications for social cohesion

White, Douglas R.

254

Constellation: Programming decentralised social networks Anne-Marie Kermarrec1  

E-print Network

Constellation: Programming decentralised social networks Anne-Marie Kermarrec1 1 INRIA Rennes, Constellation, that seeks to simplify the realisa- tion and experimentation with modular social gossip-based applications. Constellation is based on two central obser- vations: (i) future decentralised social

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

255

Analysis of topological characteristics of huge online social networking services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking services are a fast-growing business in the Internet. However, it is unknown if online relationships and their growth patterns are the same as in real-life social net- works. In this paper, we compare the structures of three online social networking services: Cyworld, MySpace, and orkut, each with more than 10 million users, respectively. We have access to complete

Yong-yeol Ahn; Seungyeop Han; Haewoon Kwak; Sue Moon; Hawoong Jeong

2007-01-01

256

Fluid Centrality: A Social Network Analysis of Social-Technical Relations in Computer-Mediated Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, centrality is explored as a measure of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in networked learning. Centrality measure is quite common in performing social network analysis (SNA) and in analysing social cohesion, strength of ties and influence in CMC, and computer-supported collaborative learning research. It argues that measuring…

Enriquez, Judith Guevarra

2010-01-01

257

Increasing Social Capital for Disaster Response through Social Networking Services (SNS) in Japanese Local Governments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers have argued that social networks within a community have positive effects on people's behavior in the four stages of disaster. The Japanese government is testing Social Networking Service (SNS) at the municipal level with the intention to improve community building, democratic processes and disaster management. This paper presents results from two case studies of local SNS in Yatsushiro city,

Alexander R. M. Schellong; J. W. Goethe

258

Understanding Classrooms through Social Network Analysis: A Primer for Social Network Analysis in Education Research  

PubMed Central

Social interactions between students are a major and underexplored part of undergraduate education. Understanding how learning relationships form in undergraduate classrooms, as well as the impacts these relationships have on learning outcomes, can inform educators in unique ways and improve educational reform. Social network analysis (SNA) provides the necessary tool kit for investigating questions involving relational data. We introduce basic concepts in SNA, along with methods for data collection, data processing, and data analysis, using a previously collected example study on an undergraduate biology classroom as a tutorial. We conduct descriptive analyses of the structure of the network of costudying relationships. We explore generative processes that create observed study networks between students and also test for an association between network position and success on exams. We also cover practical issues, such as the unique aspects of human subjects review for network studies. Our aims are to convince readers that using SNA in classroom environments allows rich and informative analyses to take place and to provide some initial tools for doing so, in the process inspiring future educational studies incorporating relational data.

Wiggins, Benjamin L.; Goodreau, Steven M.

2014-01-01

259

Anonymizing Weighted Social Network Graphs Sudipto Das, Omer Egecioglu, Amr El Abbadi  

E-print Network

real social network data sets. I. INTRODUCTION Social Networks have become increasingly popular appli, there has been considerable interest in the analysis of the weighted network model where the social networksAnonymizing Weighted Social Network Graphs Sudipto Das, ¨Omer Egecioglu, Amr El Abbadi Department

California at Santa Barbara, University of

260

Social networks uncovered: 10 tips every plastic surgeon should know.  

PubMed

Understanding online social networks is of critical importance to the plastic surgeon. With knowledge, it becomes apparent that the numerous networks available are similar in their structure, usage, and function. The key is communication between Internet media such that one maximizes exposure to patients. This article focuses on 2 social networking platforms that we feel provide the most utility to plastic surgeons. Ten tips are provided for incorporation of Facebook and Twitter into your practice. PMID:23042902

Dauwe, Phillip; Heller, Justin B; Unger, Jacob G; Graham, Darrell; Rohrich, Rod J

2012-11-01

261

Polarity Related Influence Maximization in Signed Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Influence maximization in social networks has been widely studied motivated by applications like spread of ideas or innovations in a network and viral marketing of products. Current studies focus almost exclusively on unsigned social networks containing only positive relationships (e.g. friend or trust) between users. Influence maximization in signed social networks containing both positive relationships and negative relationships (e.g. foe or distrust) between users is still a challenging problem that has not been studied. Thus, in this paper, we propose the polarity-related influence maximization (PRIM) problem which aims to find the seed node set with maximum positive influence or maximum negative influence in signed social networks. To address the PRIM problem, we first extend the standard Independent Cascade (IC) model to the signed social networks and propose a Polarity-related Independent Cascade (named IC-P) diffusion model. We prove that the influence function of the PRIM problem under the IC-P model is monotonic and submodular Thus, a greedy algorithm can be used to achieve an approximation ratio of 1-1/e for solving the PRIM problem in signed social networks. Experimental results on two signed social network datasets, Epinions and Slashdot, validate that our approximation algorithm for solving the PRIM problem outperforms state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25061986

Li, Dong; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Gupta, Anika; Sycara, Katia; Li, Sheng

2014-01-01

262

Polarity related influence maximization in signed social networks.  

PubMed

Influence maximization in social networks has been widely studied motivated by applications like spread of ideas or innovations in a network and viral marketing of products. Current studies focus almost exclusively on unsigned social networks containing only positive relationships (e.g. friend or trust) between users. Influence maximization in signed social networks containing both positive relationships and negative relationships (e.g. foe or distrust) between users is still a challenging problem that has not been studied. Thus, in this paper, we propose the polarity-related influence maximization (PRIM) problem which aims to find the seed node set with maximum positive influence or maximum negative influence in signed social networks. To address the PRIM problem, we first extend the standard Independent Cascade (IC) model to the signed social networks and propose a Polarity-related Independent Cascade (named IC-P) diffusion model. We prove that the influence function of the PRIM problem under the IC-P model is monotonic and submodular Thus, a greedy algorithm can be used to achieve an approximation ratio of 1-1/e for solving the PRIM problem in signed social networks. Experimental results on two signed social network datasets, Epinions and Slashdot, validate that our approximation algorithm for solving the PRIM problem outperforms state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25061986

Li, Dong; Xu, Zhi-Ming; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Gupta, Anika; Sycara, Katia; Li, Sheng

2014-01-01

263

Predicting Social Links for New Users across Aligned Heterogeneous Social Networks  

E-print Network

Online social networks have gained great success in recent years and many of them involve multiple kinds of nodes and complex relationships. Among these relationships, social links among users are of great importance. Many existing link prediction methods focus on predicting social links that will appear in the future among all users based upon a snapshot of the social network. In real-world social networks, many new users are joining in the service every day. Predicting links for new users are more important. Different from conventional link prediction problems, link prediction for new users are more challenging due to the following reasons: (1) differences in information distributions between new users and the existing active users (i.e., old users); (2) lack of information from the new users in the network. We propose a link prediction method called SCAN-PS (Supervised Cross Aligned Networks link prediction with Personalized Sampling), to solve the link prediction problem for new users with information tra...

Zhang, Jiawei; Yu, Philip S

2013-01-01

264

Social networking sites: a clinical dilemma?  

PubMed

Social networking sites (SNS) are having an increasing influence on patients' lives and doctors are far from certain about how to deal with this new challenge. In our literature search, we could find no research on how doctors could engage positively with SNS to improve patient outcomes or create more patient-led care. We need to acknowledge the fact that a review of a patient's SNS page has the potential to enhance assessment and management, particularly where a corroborant history is hard to attain. As doctors, we need to think clearly about how to adapt our practice in light of this new form of communication; in particular, whether there is a case for engaging with SNS to improve patient care. PMID:24293635

Maughan, Daniel Lawrence; Economou, Alexis

2015-02-01

265

Epidemic spreading in a hierarchical social network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A model of epidemic spreading in a population with a hierarchical structure of interpersonal interactions is described and investigated numerically. The structure of interpersonal connections is based on a scale-free network. Spatial localization of individuals belonging to different social groups, and the mobility of a contemporary community, as well as the effectiveness of different interpersonal interactions, are taken into account. Typical relations characterizing the spreading process, like a range of epidemic and epidemic curves, are discussed. The influence of preventive vaccinations on the spreading process is investigated. The critical value of preventively vaccinated individuals that is sufficient for the suppression of an epidemic is calculated. Our results are compared with solutions of the master equation for the spreading process and good agreement of the character of this process is found.

Grabowski, A.; Kosi?ski, R. A.

2004-09-01

266

Combining qualitative evaluation and social network analysis for the study of classroom social interactions  

E-print Network

appropriate methods of evaluation that let Preprint submitted to Elsevier Science 3 September 2002 #12 on the individual rather than on the social perspective. Therefore, we are now completing the evaluation methodCombining qualitative evaluation and social network analysis for the study of classroom social

Boyer, Edmond

267

Social-Tie-Based Information Dissemination in Mobile Opportunistic Social Networks  

E-print Network

Social-Tie-Based Information Dissemination in Mobile Opportunistic Social Networks Yunsheng Wang a distributed social tie strength calculation mechanism to identify the relationship between each set, The Strength of Weak Ties, the majority of the novel information dissemination is generated by weak ties. We

Wu, Jie

268

Empathetic Social Choice on Social Networks Amirali Salehi-Abari and Craig Boutilier  

E-print Network

's affinity for potential partners. The influence of social networks on voting behavior has received or certain forms of voting), and develop effective algorithms for consensus decision making that we believe, or policy-oriented, involve people at least some of whom are linked via myriad social ties. However, social

Boutilier, Craig

269

Near consensus complex linear and nonlinear social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some of the nodes of complex social networks may support for a given proposal, while the rest of the nodes may be against the given proposal. Even though all the nodes support for or are against the given proposal, the decision certitudes of individual nodes may be different. In this case, the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the majority of the nodes are either higher than or lower than a threshold value. Deriving the near consensus property is a key to the analysis of the behaviors of complex social networks. So far, no result on the behaviors of the complex social networks satisfying the near consensus property has been reported. Hence, it is useful to extend the definition of the exact consensus property to that of a near consensus property and investigate the behaviors of the complex social networks satisfying the near consensus property. This paper extends the definition of exact consensus complex social networks to that of near consensus complex social networks. For complex linear social networks, this paper investigates the relationships among the vectors representing the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes, the influence weight matrix and the set of vectors representing the initial state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes under a given near consensus specification. The above analysis is based on the Eigen theory. For complex nonlinear social networks with certain types of nonlinearities, the relationship between the influence weight matrix and the vectors representing the steady state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes is studied. When a complex nonlinear social network does not achieve the exact consensus property, the optimal near consensus condition that the complex social network can achieve is derived. This problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The total number of nodes that the decision certitudes of the nodes are either higher than or lower than a threshold value is maximized subject to the corresponding near consensus specification. The optimization problem is a nonsmooth optimization problem. The nonsmooth constraints are first approximated by smooth constraints. Then, the approximated optimization problem is solved via a conventional smooth optimization approach. Computer numerical simulation results as well as the comparisons of the behaviors of complex nonlinear social networks to those of the complex linear social networks are presented. The obtained results demonstrate that some complex social networks can satisfy the near consensus property but not the exact consensus property. Also, the conditions for the near consensus property are dependent on the types of nonlinearities, the influence weight matrix and the vectors representing the initial state values of the decision certitudes of the nodes.

Ling, Bingo Wing-Kuen; Ho, Charlotte Yuk-Fan; Wang, Lidong; Teo, Kok-Lay; Tse, Chi K.; Dai, Qingyun

2014-05-01

270

A systematic review protocol: social network analysis of tobacco use  

PubMed Central

Background Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death in the world. Evidence indicates that behaviours such as tobacco use can influence social networks, and that social network structures can influence behaviours. Social network analysis provides a set of analytic tools to undertake methodical analysis of social networks. We will undertake a systematic review to provide a comprehensive synthesis of the literature regarding social network analysis and tobacco use. The review will answer the following research questions: among participants who use tobacco, does social network structure/position influence tobacco use? Does tobacco use influence peer selection? Does peer selection influence tobacco use? Methods We will follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systemic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and search the following databases for relevant articles: CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature); Informit Health Collection; PsycINFO; PubMed/MEDLINE; Scopus/Embase; Web of Science; and the Wiley Online Library. Keywords include tobacco; smoking; smokeless; cigarettes; cigar and ‘social network’ and reference lists of included articles will be hand searched. Studies will be included that provide descriptions of social network analysis of tobacco use. Qualitative, quantitative and mixed method data that meets the inclusion criteria for the review, including methodological rigour, credibility and quality standards, will be synthesized using narrative synthesis. Results will be presented using outcome statistics that address each of the research questions. Discussion This systematic review will provide a timely evidence base on the role of social network analysis of tobacco use, forming a basis for future research, policy and practice in this area. This systematic review will synthesise the evidence, supporting the hypothesis that social network structures can influence tobacco use. This will also include exploring the relationship between social network structure, social network position, peer selection, peer influence and tobacco use across all age groups, and across different demographics. The research will increase our understanding of social networks and their impact on tobacco use, informing policy and practice while highlighting gaps in the literature and areas for further research. PMID:25108616

2014-01-01

271

Individual Choices in Dynamic Networks: An Experiment on Social Preferences  

PubMed Central

Game-theoretic models of network formation typically assume that people create relations so as to maximize their own outcome in the network. Recent experiments on network formation suggest that the assumption of self-interest might be unwarranted and that social preferences, such as altruism and inequality aversion, play a role in the formation of social networks. We developed an experiment to systematically investigate whether people show preferences for outcomes of others during network formation. We find that such preferences play a role when network decisions degenerate to simple two-person decision tasks. In more complex environments, however, we find little evidence for social preferences as a significant decision criterion. Furthermore, we find some evidence for farsighted behavior in network formation. PMID:24732665

van Dolder, Dennie; Buskens, Vincent

2014-01-01

272

Individual choices in dynamic networks: an experiment on social preferences.  

PubMed

Game-theoretic models of network formation typically assume that people create relations so as to maximize their own outcome in the network. Recent experiments on network formation suggest that the assumption of self-interest might be unwarranted and that social preferences, such as altruism and inequality aversion, play a role in the formation of social networks. We developed an experiment to systematically investigate whether people show preferences for outcomes of others during network formation. We find that such preferences play a role when network decisions degenerate to simple two-person decision tasks. In more complex environments, however, we find little evidence for social preferences as a significant decision criterion. Furthermore, we find some evidence for farsighted behavior in network formation. PMID:24732665

van Dolder, Dennie; Buskens, Vincent

2014-01-01

273

SOCIAL NETWORKS, COGNITION AND CULTURE Douglas R. White  

E-print Network

1 SOCIAL NETWORKS, COGNITION AND CULTURE Douglas R. White Blackwell Companion to Handbook of Cognitive Anthropology Eds. D. Kronenfeld, G. Bennardo, V. De Munch, and M. Fischer Networks. Network studies are an important adjunct to further development of cognitive anthropology and theory. When

White, Douglas R.

274

NodeTrix: Hybrid Representation for Analyzing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract: The need to visualize large social networks is growing,as hardware capabilities make analyzing large networks feasible and many new data sets become available. Unfortunately, the visualizations in existing systems do not satisfactorily a nswer the basic dilemma,of being readable both for the global structure of the network and also for detailed analysis of local communities. To address this problem,

Nathalie Henry; Jean-Daniel Fekete; Michael J. Mcguffin

2007-01-01

275

NodeTrix: a Hybrid Visualization of Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need to visualize large social networks is growing as hardware capabilities make analyzing large networks feasible and many new data sets become available. Unfortunately, the visualizations in existing systems do not satisfactorily resolve the basic dilemma of being readable both for the global structure of the network and also for detailed analysis of local communities. To address this problem,

Nathalie Henry; Jean-Daniel Fekete; Michael J. McGuffin

2007-01-01

276

Socioscope: Human Relationship and Behavior Analysis in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we propose a socioscope model for social-network and human-behavior analysis based on mobile- phone call-detail records. Because of the diversity and complexity of human social behavior, no one technique will detect every attribute that arises when humans engage in social behaviors. We use multiple probability and statistical methods for quanti- fying social groups, relationships, and communication patterns

Huiqi Zhang; Ram Dantu; João W. Cangussu

2011-01-01

277

How social networks influence female students' choices to major in engineering  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scope and Method of Study: This study examined how social influence plays a part in female students' choices of college major, specifically engineering instead of science, technology, and math. Social influence may show itself through peers, family members, and teachers and may encompass resources under the umbrella of social capital. The purpose of this study was to examine how female students' social networks, through the lens of social capital, influence her major choice of whether or not to study engineering. The variables of peer influence, parental influence, teacher/counselor influence, perception of engineering, and academic background were addressed in a 52 question, Likert scale survey. This survey has been modified from an instrument previously used by Reyer (2007) at Bradley University. Data collection was completed using the Dillman (2009) tailored design model. Responses were grouped into four main scales of the dependent variables of social influence, encouragement, perceptions of engineering and career motivation. A factor analysis was completed on the four factors as a whole, and individual questions were not be analyzed. Findings and Conclusions: This study addressed the differences in social network support for female freshmen majoring in engineering versus female freshmen majoring in science, technology, or math. Social network support, when working together from all angles of peers, teachers, parents, and teachers/counselors, transforms itself into a new force that is more powerful than the summation of the individual parts. Math and science preparation also contributed to female freshmen choosing to major in engineering instead of choosing to major in science, technology, or math. The STEM pipeline is still weak and ways in which to reinforce it should be examined. Social network support is crucial for female freshmen who are majoring in science, technology, engineering, and math.

Weinland, Kathryn Ann

278

Social Network Analysis: A case study of the Islamist terrorist network  

SciTech Connect

Social Network Analysis is a compilation of methods used to identify and analyze patterns in social network systems. This article serves as a primer on foundational social network concepts and analyses and builds a case study on the global Islamist terrorist network to illustrate the use and usefulness of these methods. The Islamist terrorist network is a system composed of multiple terrorist organizations that are socially connected and work toward the same goals. This research utilizes traditional social network, as well as small-world, and scale-free analyses to characterize this system on individual, network and systemic levels. Leaders in the network are identified based on their positions in the social network and the network structure is categorized. Finally, two vital nodes in the network are removed and this version of the network is compared with the previous version to make implications of strengths, weaknesses and vulnerabilities. The Islamist terrorist network structure is found to be a resilient and efficient structure, even with important social nodes removed. Implications for counterterrorism are given from the results of each analysis.

Medina, Richard M [ORNL

2012-01-01

279

Heart Rate Variability during Social Interactions in Children with and without Psychopathology: A Meta-Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The inability to regulate autonomic activity during social interactions is believed to contribute to social and emotional dysregulation in children. Research has employed heart rate variability (HRV) during both socially engaging and socially disengaging dyadic tasks between children and adults to assess this. Methods: We conducted a…

Shahrestani, Sara; Stewart, Elizabeth M.; Quintana, Daniel S.; Hickie, Ian B.; Guastella, Adam J.

2014-01-01

280

Identifying and tracking dynamic processes in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The detection and tracking of embedded malicious subnets in an active social network can be computationally daunting due to the quantity of transactional data generated in the natural interaction of large numbers of actors comprising a network. In addition, detection of illicit behavior may be further complicated by evasive strategies designed to camouflage the activities of the covert subnet. In this work, we move beyond traditional static methods of social network analysis to develop a set of dynamic process models which encode various modes of behavior in active social networks. These models will serve as the basis for a new application of the Process Query System (PQS) to the identification and tracking of covert dynamic processes in social networks. We present a preliminary result from application of our technique in a real-world data stream-- the Enron email corpus.

Chung, Wayne; Savell, Robert; Schütt, Jan-Peter; Cybenko, George

2006-05-01

281

Quantum network dense coding via continuous-variable graph states  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a dense coding network based on continuous-variable graph state along with its corresponding protocol. A scheme to distill bipartite entanglement between two arbitrary modes in a graph state is provided in order to realize the dense coding network. We also analyze the capacity of network dense coding and provide a method to calculate its maximum mutual information. As an application, we analyze the performance of dense coding in a square lattice graph state network. The result showed that the mutual information of the dense coding is not largely affected by the complexity of the network. We conclude that the performance of dense coding network is very optimistic.

Zhang, Jiahao; He, Guangqiang

2014-08-01

282

Counting on Kin: Social Networks, Social Support, and Child Health Status  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents the results of new data collection in Mexico about the relationship between child well-being and social networks. Two research questions guide the analysis. First, under what conditions do networks generate greater (lesser) support? Second, what kinds of networks are associated with healthier children? We explore the health…

Kana'iaupuni, Shawn Malia; Donato, Katharine M.; Thompson-Colon, Theresa; Stainback, Melissa

2005-01-01

283

The Dynamics of Health Behavior Sentiments on a Large Online Social Network  

E-print Network

Modifiable health behaviors, a leading cause of illness and death in many countries, are often driven by individual beliefs and sentiments about health and disease. Individual behaviors affecting health outcomes are increasingly modulated by social networks, for example through the associations of like-minded individuals - homophily - or through peer influence effects. Using a statistical approach to measure the individual temporal effects of a large number of variables pertaining to social network statistics, we investigate the spread of a health sentiment towards a new vaccine on Twitter, a large online social network. We find that the effects of neighborhood size and exposure intensity are qualitatively very different depending on the type of sentiment. Generally, we find that larger numbers of opinionated neighbors inhibit the expression of sentiments. We also find that exposure to negative sentiment is contagious - by which we merely mean predictive of future negative sentiment expression - while exposur...

Salathé, Marcel; Khandelwal, Shashank; Hunter, David R

2012-01-01

284

Time Allocation in Social Networks: Correlation Between Social Structure and Human Communication Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent research has shown the deep impact of the dynamics of human interactions (or temporal social networks) on the spreading of information, opinion formation, etc. In general, the bursty nature of human interactions lowers the interaction between people to the extent that both the speed and reach of information diffusion are diminished. Using a large database of 20 million users of mobile phone calls we show evidence this effect is not homogeneous in the social network but in fact, there is a large correlation between this effect and the social topological structure around a given individual. In particular, we show that social relations of hubs in a network are relatively weaker from the dynamical point than those that are poorer connected in the information diffusion process. Our results show the importance of the temporal patterns of communication when analyzing and modeling dynamical process on social networks.

Miritello, Giovanna; Lara, Rubén; Moro, Esteban

285

The social network structure of a wild meerkat population: 3. Position of individuals within networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals in social groups interact with numerous other group members in a polyadic network. Interactions can depend on\\u000a the individual's own attributes (age, sex, status etc.), on their partner's attributes, and the group's network of social\\u000a interactions. Previous studies tend to look at a subset of dyadic interactions, focusing on particular classes of individuals.\\u000a We used social network analysis to

J. R. Madden; J. A. Drewe; G. P. Pearce; T. H. Clutton-Brock

286

Online social networking amongst teens: friend or foe?  

PubMed

The impact of Internet communication on adolescent social development is of considerable importance to health professionals, parents and teachers. Online social networking and instant messaging programs are popular utilities amongst a generation of techno-savvy youth. Although these utilities provide varied methods of communication, their social benefits are still in question. This study examined the relationship between online social interaction, perceived social support, self-esteem and psychological distress amongst teens. A total of 400 participants (M(age) = 14.31 years) completed an online survey consisting of parametric and non-parametric measures. No significant relationship was found between online interaction and social support. Time spent interacting online was negatively correlated with self-esteem and psychological distress. While previous research has focused on young adults, this study examines the impact of online social networking on emerging teens. It highlights the need for continued caution in the acceptance of these utilities. PMID:21685655

O'Dea, Bridianne; Campbell, Andrew

2011-01-01

287

Multi-Relational Characterization of Dynamic Social Network Communities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emergence of the mediated social web - a distributed network of participants creating rich media content and engaging in interactive conversations through Internet-based communication technologies - has contributed to the evolution of powerful social, economic and cultural change. Online social network sites and blogs, such as Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and LiveJournal, thrive due to their fundamental sense of "community". The growth of online communities offers both opportunities and challenges for researchers and practitioners. Participation in online communities has been observed to influence people's behavior in diverse ways ranging from financial decision-making to political choices, suggesting the rich potential for diverse applications. However, although studies on the social web have been extensive, discovering communities from online social media remains challenging, due to the interdisciplinary nature of this subject. In this article, we present our recent work on characterization of communities in online social media using computational approaches grounded on the observations from social science.

Lin, Yu-Ru; Sundaram, Hari; Kelliher, Aisling

288

Online social networks—Paradise of computer viruses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social network services have attracted more and more users in recent years. So the security of social networks becomes a critical problem. In this paper, we propose a virus propagation model based on the application network of Facebook, which is the most popular among these social network service providers. We also study the virus propagation with an email virus model and compare the behaviors of a virus spreading on Facebook with the original email network. It is found that Facebook provides the same chance for a virus spreading while it gives a platform for application developers. And a virus will spread faster in the Facebook network if users of Facebook spend more time on it.

Fan, W.; Yeung, K. H.

2011-01-01

289

On investigating social dynamics in tactical opportunistic mobile networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The efficiency of military mobile network operations at the tactical edge is challenging due to the practical Disconnected, Intermittent, and Limited (DIL) environments at the tactical edge which make it hard to maintain persistent end-to-end wireless network connectivity. Opportunistic mobile networks are hence devised to depict such tactical networking scenarios. Social relations among warfighters in tactical opportunistic mobile networks are implicitly represented by their opportunistic contacts via short-range radios, but were inappropriately considered as stationary over time by the conventional wisdom. In this paper, we develop analytical models to probabilistically investigate the temporal dynamics of this social relationship, which is critical to efficient mobile communication in the battlespace. We propose to formulate such dynamics by developing various sociological metrics, including centrality and community, with respect to the opportunistic mobile network contexts. These metrics investigate social dynamics based on the experimentally validated skewness of users' transient contact distributions over time.

Gao, Wei; Li, Yong

2014-06-01

290

Social Balance on Networks: The Dynamics of Friendship and Enmity  

E-print Network

How do social networks evolve when both friendly and unfriendly relations exist? Here we propose a simple dynamics for social networks in which the sense of a relationship can change so as to eliminate imbalanced triads--relationship triangles that contains 1 or 3 unfriendly links. In this dynamics, a friendly link changes to unfriendly or vice versa in an imbalanced triad to make the triad balanced. Such networks undergo a dynamic phase transition from a steady state to "utopia"--all friendly links--as the amount of network friendliness is changed. Basic features of the long-time dynamics and the phase transition are discussed.

T. Antal; P. L. Krapivsky; S. Redner

2006-05-21

291

Anonymizing Weighted Social Network Graphs Sudipto Das, Omer Egecioglu, Amr El Abbadi  

E-print Network

real social network data sets. I. INTRODUCTION Social Networks have become increasingly popular appli these social networks for understanding their structure [1], [2], [3], advertising and marketing [4Anonymizing Weighted Social Network Graphs Sudipto Das, ¨Omer Egecioglu, Amr El Abbadi Department

Egecioglu, Ã?mer

292

62 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL VOLUME 20, NUMBER 1, 2013 SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS WITH CONTENT AND GRAPHS  

E-print Network

in social network analysis. The quantity of content-based data created every day by traditional and social inferences from social networks. Network construction from general, real-world data presents several62 LINCOLN LABORATORY JOURNAL VOLUME 20, NUMBER 1, 2013 SOCIAL NETWORK ANALYSIS WITH CONTENT

293

Classification of Message Spreading in a Heterogeneous Social Network  

E-print Network

Nowadays, social networks such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn become increasingly popular. In fact, they introduced new habits, new ways of communication and they collect every day several information that have different sources. Most existing research works fo-cus on the analysis of homogeneous social networks, i.e. we have a single type of node and link in the network. However, in the real world, social networks offer several types of nodes and links. Hence, with a view to preserve as much information as possible, it is important to consider so-cial networks as heterogeneous and uncertain. The goal of our paper is to classify the social message based on its spreading in the network and the theory of belief functions. The proposed classifier interprets the spread of messages on the network, crossed paths and types of links. We tested our classifier on a real word network that we collected from Twitter, and our experiments show the performance of our belief classifier.

Jendoubi, Siwar; Liétard, Ludovic; Yaghlane, Boutheina Ben

2015-01-01

294

Is There a Role for Social Networking Sites in Education?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace have become popular among millions of users including students of all ages. There are ongoing discussions over the potential of these sites to support teaching and learning, particularly to complement traditional or online classroom activities. This paper explores whether social networking have a place in teaching and learning by investigating how students use these sites and whether they find opportunities to discuss study related activities with their peers. Two small scale studies were carried out in a face-to-face undergraduate course in Singapore and students enrolled in a face-to-face Master’s programme in Brazil. Data were collected using surveys and interviews; findings were mixed. Many of the Brazilian students used social networking sites to both socialize and discuss their studies while the Singaporean students used such sites for social interactions only. The paper discusses these differences and offers suggestions for further research.

Santos, Ieda M.; Hammond, Michael; Durli, Zenilde; Chou, Shiao-Yuh

295

Impact of Social Punishment on Cooperative Behavior in Complex Networks  

PubMed Central

Social punishment is a mechanism by which cooperative individuals spend part of their resources to penalize defectors. In this paper, we study the evolution of cooperation in 2-person evolutionary games on networks when a mechanism for social punishment is introduced. Specifically, we introduce a new kind of role, punisher, which is aimed at reducing the earnings of defectors by applying to them a social fee. Results from numerical simulations show that different equilibria allowing the three strategies to coexist are possible as well as that social punishment further enhance the robustness of cooperation. Our results are confirmed for different network topologies and two evolutionary games. In addition, we analyze the microscopic mechanisms that give rise to the observed macroscopic behaviors in both homogeneous and heterogeneous networks. Our conclusions might provide additional insights for understanding the roots of cooperation in social systems. PMID:24162105

Wang, Zhen; Xia, Cheng-Yi; Meloni, Sandro; Zhou, Chang-Song; Moreno, Yamir

2013-01-01

296

Social network of family caregivers of disabled and dependent patients.  

PubMed

Cross-sectional study that used the Social Network Index and the genogram to assess the social network of 110 family caregivers of dependent patients attended by a Home Care Service in São Paulo, Brazil. Data were analyzed using the test U of Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman correlation. Results were considered statistically significant when p<0,05. Few caregivers participated in activities outside the home and the average number of people they had a bond was 4,4 relatives and 3,6 friends. Caregivers who reported pain and those who had a partner had higher average number of relatives who to trust. The average number of friends was higher in the group that reported use of medication for depression. Total and per capita incomes correlated with the social network. It was found that family members are the primary caregiver's social network. PMID:25517841

Yamashita, Cintia Hitomi; Gaspar, Jaqueline Correia; Amendola, Fernanda; Alvarenga, Márcia Regina Martins; Oliveira, Maria Amélia de Campos

2014-08-01

297

Game-Theoretic Models of Information Overload in Social Networks  

E-print Network

We study the effect of information overload on user engagement in an asymmetric social network like Twitter. We introduce simple game-theoretic models that capture rate competition between celebrities producing updates in ...

Borgs, Christian

298

Use of social network sites for question and answer behavior  

E-print Network

In this thesis, we look at the behavior of posting questions as status updates on popular social network sites like Twitter and Facebook. This question asking behavior is similar to the use of search engines, question and ...

Panovich, Katrina (Katrina Marie)

2011-01-01

299

Mining Heterogeneous Social Networks for Egocentric Information Abstraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social network is a powerful data structure that allows the depiction of relationship information between entities. However, real-world social networks are sometimes too complex for human to pursue further analysis. In this work, an unsupervised mechanism is proposed for egocentric information abstraction in heterogeneous social networks. To achieve this goal, we propose a vector space representation for heterogeneous social networks to identify combination of relations as features and compute statistical dependencies as feature values. These features, either linear or eyelie, intend to capture the semantic information in the surrounding environment of the ego. Then we design three abstraction measures to distill representative and important information to construct the abstracted graphs for visual presentation. The evaluations conducted on a real world movie datasct and an artificial crime dataset demonstrate that the abstractions can indeed retain significant information and facilitate more accurate and efficient human analysis.

Li, Cheng-Te; Lin, Shou-De

300

Social networking for nurse education: Possibilities, perils and pitfalls.  

PubMed

Abstract In this paper, we consider the potential and implications of using social networking sites such as Facebook® in nurse education. The concept of social networking and the use of Facebook will be explored, as will the theoretical constructs specific to the use of online technology and Web 2.0 tools. Theories around Communities of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000), Communities of Practice (Wenger, 1998), Activity Theory (Daniels, Cole, & Wertsch, 2007) and Actor-Network theory (Latour, 1997) will be briefly explored, as will the work of Vygotsky (1978), as applies to the social aspects of learning. Boundary issues, such as if and how faculty and students should or could be connected via social networking sites will also be explored. PMID:25267140

Green, Janet; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

2014-01-01

301

Social networking for nurse education: Possibilities, perils and pitfalls.  

PubMed

Abstract In this paper, we consider the potential and implications of using social networking sites such as Facebook® in nurse education. The concept of social networking and the use of Facebook will be explored, as will the theoretical constructs specific to the use of online technology and web 2.0 tools. Theories around Communities of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson & Archer 2000), Communities of Practice (Wenger 1998), Activity Theory (Daniels, Cole & Wertsch 2007) and Actor Network Theory (Latour 1997) will be briefly explored, as will the work of Vygotsky (1978), as applies to the social aspects of learning. Boundary issues, such as if and how faculty and students should or could be connected via social networking sites will also be explored. PMID:24611647

Green, Janet; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

2014-03-11

302

Online Social Networking Issues Within Academia and Pharmacy Education  

PubMed Central

Online social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace are extremely popular as indicated by the numbers of members and visits to the sites. They allow students to connect with users with similar interests, build and maintain relationships with friends, and feel more connected with their campus. The foremost criticisms of online social networking are that students may open themselves to public scrutiny of their online personas and risk physical safety by revealing excessive personal information. This review outlines issues of online social networking in higher education by drawing upon articles in both the lay press and academic publications. New points for pharmacy educators to consider include the possible emergence of an “e-professionalism” concept; legal and ethical implications of using online postings in admission, discipline, and student safety decisions; how online personas may blend into professional life; and the responsibility for educating students about the risks of online social networking. PMID:18322572

2008-01-01

303

Strategic delay and information exchange in endogenous social networks  

E-print Network

This thesis studies optimal stopping problems for strategic agents in the context of two economic applications: experimentation in a competitive market and information exchange in social networks. The economic agents (firms ...

Bimpikis, Kostas

2010-01-01

304

AntiSocial Networking: Crowdsourcing and the CyberDefence of National Critical Infrastructures  

E-print Network

AntiSocial Networking: Crowdsourcing and the CyberDefence of National Critical Infrastructures statesponsored. This paper identifies three different roles that social networking and social media have Critical Infrastructures, Software Security. 1. Introduction A small number of `mass market

Johnson, Chris

305

Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks.

Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

2014-12-01

306

Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks.  

PubMed

The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks. PMID:25524835

Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

2014-01-01

307

Sampling node group structure of social and information networks  

E-print Network

Lately, network sampling proved as a promising tool for simplifying large real-world networks and thus providing for their faster and more efficient analysis. Still, understanding the changes of network structure and properties under different sampling methods remains incomplete. In this paper, we analyze the presence of characteristic group of nodes (i.e., communities, modules and mixtures of the two) in social and information networks. Moreover, we observe the changes of node group structure under two sampling methods, random node selection based on degree and breadth-first sampling. We show that the sampled information networks contain larger number of mixtures than original networks, while the structure of sampled social networks exhibits stronger characterization by communities. The results also reveal there exist no significant differences in the behavior of both sampling methods. Accordingly, the selection of sampling method impact on the changes of node group structure to a much smaller extent that th...

Blagus, Neli; Šubelj, Lovro

2014-01-01

308

Bidirectional selection between two classes in complex social networks  

PubMed Central

The bidirectional selection between two classes widely emerges in various social lives, such as commercial trading and mate choosing. Until now, the discussions on bidirectional selection in structured human society are quite limited. We demonstrated theoretically that the rate of successfully matching is affected greatly by individuals' neighborhoods in social networks, regardless of the type of networks. Furthermore, it is found that the high average degree of networks contributes to increasing rates of successful matches. The matching performance in different types of networks has been quantitatively investigated, revealing that the small-world networks reinforces the matching rate more than scale-free networks at given average degree. In addition, our analysis is consistent with the modeling result, which provides the theoretical understanding of underlying mechanisms of matching in complex networks. PMID:25524835

Zhou, Bin; He, Zhe; Jiang, Luo-Luo; Wang, Nian-Xin; Wang, Bing-Hong

2014-01-01

309

Using social networking to enhance the EFL classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a small experiment using Social Networking in an English class in an English Medium of Instruction tertiary-level institution in Zhuhai, Southern China. The investigation was carried out both in the classroom and online. Firstly, a Web 2.0 Social Networking Site (SNS) for English learning purposes, AlexCALL, was set up for a case study, and the experiment

Tianchong Wang; Dave Towey

2011-01-01

310

Improving the Readability of Clustered Social Networks using Node Duplication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—Exploring communities,is an important,task in social network,analysis. Such communities,are currently identified using clustering methods to group actors. This approach often leads to actors belonging to one and only one cluster, whereas in real life a person can belong to several communities.,As a solution we propose,duplicating actors in social networks,and discuss potential impact of such a move. Several visual duplication designs,are

Nathalie Henry; Anastasia Bezerianos; Jean-daniel Fekete

2008-01-01

311

Efficient Access Control in Multimedia Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multimedia social networks (MMSNs) have provided a convenient way to share multimedia contents such as images, videos, blogs, etc. Contents shared by a person can be easily accessed by anybody else over the Internet. However, due to various privacy, security, and legal concerns people often want to selectively share the contents only with their friends, family, colleagues, etc. Access control mechanisms play an important role in this situation. With access control mechanisms one can decide the persons who can access a shared content and who cannot. But continuously growing content uploads and accesses, fine grained access control requirements (e.g. different access control parameters for different parts in a picture), and specific access control requirements for multimedia contents can make the time complexity of access control to be very large. So, it is important to study an efficient access control mechanism suitable for MMSNs. In this chapter we present an efficient bit-vector transform based access control mechanism for MMSNs. The proposed approach is also compatible with other requirements of MMSNs, such as access rights modification, content deletion, etc. Mathematical analysis and experimental results show the effectiveness and efficiency of our proposed approach.

Sachan, Amit; Emmanuel, Sabu

312

A Trust Model Based Analysis of Social Networks  

E-print Network

In this paper, we analyse the sustainability of social networks using STrust, our social trust model. The novelty of the model is that it introduces the concept of engagement trust and combines it with the popularity trust to derive the social trust of the community as well as of individual members in the community. This enables the recommender system to use these different types of trust to recommend different things to the community, and identify (and recommend) different roles. For example, it recommends mentors using the engagement trust and leaders using the popularity trust. We then show the utility of the model by analysing data from two types of social networks. We also study the sustainability of a community through our social trust model. We observe that a 5% drop in highly trusted members causes more than a 50% drop in social capital that, in turn, raises the question of sustainability of the community. We report our analysis and its results.

Nepal, Surya; Bista, Sanat Kumar; Sherchan, Wanita

2013-01-01

313

Local Learning in Probabilistic Networks with Hidden Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Probabilistic networks which provide compact descriptions of complex stochastic relationships among several random variables are rapidly be­ coming the tool of choice for uncertain reason­ ing in artificial intelligence We show that net­ works with fixed structure containing hidden vari­ ables can be learned automatically from data using a gradient-desce nt mechanism similar to that used in neural networks We

Stuart J. Russell; John Binder; Daphne Koller; Keiji Kanazawa

1995-01-01

314

Ethnocultural variables and attitudes toward cultural socialization of children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cultural socialization is the transmission of cultural values and norms to one's children. The current study presents a new scale to assess parental socialization attitudes to both the U.S. American culture and the Latino culture. The scale is based on a social cognitive model of cultural socialization and cultural values of independence and interdependence. It was hypothesized that individuals who

Andrea J. Romero; Israel Cuéllar; Robert E. Roberts

2000-01-01

315

Revisiting Social Network Utilization by Physicians-in-Training  

PubMed Central

Objective To measure and compare the frequency and content of online social networking among 2 cohorts of medical students and residents (2007 and 2009). Methods Using the online social networking application Facebook, we evaluated social networking profiles for 2 cohorts of medical students (n ?=? 528) and residents (n ?=? 712) at the University of Florida in Gainesville. Objective measures included existence of a profile, whether it was made private, and whether any personally identifiable information was included. Subjective outcomes included photographic content, affiliated social groups, and personal information not generally disclosed in a doctor-patient encounter. We compared our results to our previously published and reported data from 2007. Results Social networking continues to be common amongst physicians-in-training, with 39.8% of residents and 69.5% of medical students maintaining Facebook accounts. Residents' participation significantly increased (P < .01) when compared to the 2007 data. Individuals in the 2009 cohort had significantly more “friends” (P < .01), belonged to more “groups” (P < .01), and were more likely to limit public access to their profiles through the use of privacy settings (P < .01) than the individuals in the 2007 cohort. Discussion Online social networking application use by physicians-in-training remains common. While most now limit access to their profiles, personal profiles that still allow public access exhibited a few instances of unprofessional behavior. Concerns remain related to the discovery of content in violation of patient privacy and the expansive and impersonal networks of online “friends” who may view profiles. PMID:21975635

Black, Erik W.; Thompson, Lindsay A.; Duff, W. Patrick; Dawson, Kara; Saliba, Heidi; Black, Nicole M. Paradise

2010-01-01

316

Social Networks, Substance Use, and Mental Health in College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The relationship between social network risk (alcohol-using close friends), perceived peer closeness, substance use, and psychiatric symptoms was examined to identify risk and protective features of college students' social context. Participants: Six hundred and seventy undergraduate students enrolled in a large southeastern…

Mason, Michael J.; Zaharakis, Nikola; Benotsch, Eric G.

2014-01-01

317

Tie Strength in Question & Answer on Social Network Sites  

E-print Network

Tie Strength in Question & Answer on Social Network Sites Katrina Panovich, Robert C. Miller, David with opportunities to better observe this process. In this paper, we relate question answering to tie strength of tie strength in question answers. We used previous research on tie strength in social media

318

The Geographies of Social Networks and Innovation in Tourism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tourism firms operate in a business environment in which innovation is important for firm survival. In spite of this, there is an apparent lack of knowledge concerning innovation processes in tourism firms. This article combines considerations about the geographical characteristics of tourism with social innovation network and agglomeration theories so as to develop a theoretical framework of the social innovation

Flemming Sørensen

2007-01-01

319

Technology Acceptance and Social Networking in Distance Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT This study examines the use of integrated communication and engineering design tools in a distributed learning environment We examined students' attitudes toward the technology using two different approaches First, we utilized the technology acceptance model to investigate the attitude formation process Then, to investigate how attitudes changed over time, we applied social information processing model using social network analysis

Jae-shin Lee; Hichang Cho; Geri Gay; Barry Davidson; Anthony R. Ingraffea

2003-01-01

320

Community Discovery in Dynamic, Rich-Context Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

My research interest has been in understanding the human communities formed through interpersonal social activities. Participation in online communities on social network sites such as Twitter has been observed to influence people's behavior in diverse ways including financial decision-making and political choices, suggesting the rich potential…

Lin, Yu-Ru

2010-01-01

321

Social Networks and Depression among Older Puerto Ricans  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Puerto Rican population has excess risk of many health problems like diabetes, cognitive impairment, physical frailty, and disability. They also exhibit high rates of depression symptoms. Research suggests that support from social networks may mediate the effects of social and environmental stre...

322

Social network thresholds in the diffusion of innovations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Threshold models have been postulated as one explanation for the success or failure of collective action and the diffusion of innovations. The present paper creates a social network threshold model of the diffusion of innovations based on the Ryan and Gross (1943) adopter categories: (1) early adopters; (2) early majority; (3) late majority; (4) laggards. This new model uses social

Thomas W. Valente

1996-01-01

323

Introduction to Social Network Analysis (SNA) as an investigative tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social behavior is brought about mainly through social ties and connections. Our contacts with other people shape our view\\u000a of the world, reinforce our identity, and the interactions provide us with all kinds of opportunities and resources to get\\u000a things done. The social capital associated with networks is also one of the primary ways facilitating crime. Therefore, the\\u000a systematic analysis

Renée C. van der Hulst

2009-01-01

324

Mining Social Networks on the Mexican Computer Science Community  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scientific communities around the world are increasingly paying more attention to collaborative networks to ensure they remain competitive, the Computer Science (CS) community is not an exception. Discovering collaboration opportunities is a challenging problem in social networks. Traditional social network analysis allows us to observe which authors are already collaborating, how often they are related to each other, and how many intermediaries exist between two authors. In order to discover the potential collaboration among Mexican CS scholars we built a social network, containing data from 1960 to 2008. We propose to use a clustering algorithm and social network analysis to identify scholars that would be advisable to collaborate. The idea is to identify clusters consisting of authors who are completely disconnected but with opportunities of collaborating given their common research areas. After having clustered the initial social network we built, we analyze the collaboration networks of each cluster to discover new collaboration opportunities based on the conferences where the authors have published. Our analysis was made based on the large-scale DBLP bibliography and the census of Mexican scholars made by REMIDEC.

Ayanegui-Santiago, Huberto; Reyes-Galaviz, Orion F.; Chávez-Aragón, Alberto; Ramírez-Cruz, Federico; Portilla, Alberto; García-Bañuelos, Luciano

325

Social Networks and Cooperation in Hunter-Gatherers  

PubMed Central

Social networks exhibit striking structural regularities1,2, and theory and evidence suggest that they may have played a role in the development of large-scale cooperation in humans3–7. Here, we characterize the social networks of the Hadza, an evolutionarily relevant population of hunter-gatherers8. We show that Hadza networks exhibit important properties also seen in modernized networks, including a skewed degree distribution, degree assortativity, transitivity, reciprocity, geographic decay, and homophily. Moreover, we demonstrate that Hadza camps exhibit high between-group and low within-group variation in public goods game donations. Network ties are also more likely between people who give the same amount, and the similarity in cooperative behaviour extends up to two degrees of separation. Finally, social distance appears to be as important as genetic relatedness and physical proximity in explaining assortativity in cooperation. Our results suggest that certain elements of social network structure may have been present at an early point in human history; that early humans may have formed ties with both kin and non-kin based, in part, on their tendency to cooperate; and that social networks may have contributed to the emergence of cooperation. PMID:22281599

Apicella, Coren L.; Marlowe, Frank W.; Fowler, James H.; Christakis, Nicholas A.

2011-01-01

326

Stories in Networks and Networks in Stories: A Tri-Modal Model for Mixed-Methods Social Network Research on Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social network research on teachers and schools has risen exponentially in recent years as an innovative method to reveal the role of social networks in education. However, scholars are still exploring ways to incorporate traditional quantitative methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) with qualitative approaches to social network research. This…

Baker-Doyle, Kira J.

2015-01-01

327

Generating Predictive Movie Recommendations from Trust in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are growing in number and size, with hundreds of millions of user accounts among them. One added benefit of these networks is that they allow users to encode more information about their relationships than just stating who they know. In this work, we are particularly interested in trust relationships, and how they can be used in designing interfaces.

Jennifer Golbeck

2006-01-01

328

Social Networks and Career Advancement of People with Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although organizational social networks are known to influence career mobility, the specific direction of this influence is different for diverse employee groups. Diversity in organizational network research has been operationalized on various dimensions such as race and ethnicity, age, religion, education, occupation, and gender. Missing in this…

Kulkarni, Mukta

2012-01-01

329

Semantic Social Network Portal for Collaborative Online Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The motivation for this investigation is to apply social networking features to a semantic network portal, which supports the efforts in enterprise training units to up-skill the employee in the company, and facilitates the creation and reuse of knowledge in online communities. Design/methodology/approach: The paper provides an overview…

Neumann, Marco; O'Murchu, Ina; Breslin, John; Decker, Stefan; Hogan, Deirdre; MacDonaill, Ciaran

2005-01-01

330

Finding Overlapping Communities in Social Networks: Toward a Rigorous Approach  

E-print Network

Finding Overlapping Communities in Social Networks: Toward a Rigorous Approach Sanjeev Arora algorithm (b) the assump- tions about the underlying network (c) the (worst-case) running time. The key, Computer Science Department and Center for Computa- tional Intractability. S. Arora: arora

Fiat, Amos

331

Mother's Social Network and Family Language Maintenance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports the results of a social network analysis (SNA) performed on the mother's primary network of interaction in 15 Mexican American families in the city of El Paso, Texas, the neighbourhood of La Villita, in Chicago, and the city of Lincoln, Nebraska. The goal of this study was to examine potential opportunities for Spanish…

Velazquez, Isabel

2013-01-01

332

Open Large-Scale Online Social Network Dyn  

E-print Network

Online social networks have quickly become the most popular destination on the World Wide Web. These networks are still a fairly new form of online human interaction and have gained wide popularity only recently within the past three to four years...

Corlette, Daniel James

2012-07-16

333

Social Network Sites: A Starting Point for Career Development Practitioners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This action research study explores the career influence of social network sites (SNSs) by examining 14 web-based articles that consider the risks and opportunities of SNSs from a job search perspective. Three themes are discussed: user visibility, self-presentation, and network connections. Practical strategies are identified to help career…

Strehlke, Christina

2010-01-01

334

The YouTube Social Network Mirjam Wattenhofer  

E-print Network

The YouTube Social Network Mirjam Wattenhofer Google Zurich mirjam@google.com Roger Wattenhofer ETH Zurich wattenhofer@ethz.ch Zack Zhu ETH Zurich zazhu@ethz.ch Abstract Today, YouTube is the largest user that differentiates it from tradi- tional content broadcasters. This work examines the so- cial network aspect of YouTube

Tomkins, Andrew

335

Modular and hierarchical structure of social contact networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social contact networks exhibit overlapping qualities of communities, hierarchical structure and spatial-correlated nature. We propose a mixing pattern of modular and growing hierarchical structures to reconstruct social contact networks by using an individual’s geospatial distribution information in the real world. The hierarchical structure of social contact networks is defined based on the spatial distance between individuals, and edges among individuals are added in turn from the modular layer to the highest layer. It is a gradual process to construct the hierarchical structure: from the basic modular model up to the global network. The proposed model not only shows hierarchically increasing degree distribution and large clustering coefficients in communities, but also exhibits spatial clustering features of individual distributions. As an evaluation of the method, we reconstruct a hierarchical contact network based on the investigation data of a university. Transmission experiments of influenza H1N1 are carried out on the generated social contact networks, and results show that the constructed network is efficient to reproduce the dynamic process of an outbreak and evaluate interventions. The reproduced spread process exhibits that the spatial clustering of infection is accordant with the clustering of network topology. Moreover, the effect of individual topological character on the spread of influenza is analyzed, and the experiment results indicate that the spread is limited by individual daily contact patterns and local clustering topology rather than individual degree.

Ge, Yuanzheng; Song, Zhichao; Qiu, Xiaogang; Song, Hongbin; Wang, Yong

2013-10-01

336

Detection of anomalous meetings in a social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

When monitoring interactions within a social network, meetings or contacts between different members of the network are recorded. This paper addresses the problem of using the recorded meetings to determine (a) whether each meeting is anomalous and (b) the degree to which each meeting is anomalous. Performing robust statistical analysis on such data is particularly challenging when the number of

Jorge Silva; Rebecca Willett

2008-01-01

337

Grasping the potential of online social networks for foresight  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online Social Networks (OSNs) have gained unprecedented popularity in recent years. OSNs facilitate the interaction among members by providing a dynamic\\/multimodal platform which enables discussions, sharing of multimedia content, organisation of events, etc. These networks comprise millions of members from all continents and from all age groups — although the younger generation is more prominent. OSN dynamics and inherent patterns

Romina Cachia; Ramón Compañó; Olivier Da Costa

2007-01-01

338

Detecting opinion leaders and trends in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today, online social networks in the World Wide Web become increasingly interactive and networked. Web 2.0 technologies provide a multitude of platforms, such as blogs, wikis, and forums where for example consumers can disseminate data about products and manufacturers. This data provides an abundance of information on personal experiences and opinions which are extremely relevant for companies and sales organizations.

Freimut Bodendorf; Carolin Kaiser

2009-01-01

339

Cosmic Deuterium and Social Networking Software  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the education of newcomers to a scientific field and for the convenience of students and workers in the field, it is helpful to have all the basic scientific papers gathered. For the study of deuterium in the Universe, in 2004-5 we set up http://www.cosmicdeuterium.info with clickable links to all the historic and basic papers in the field and to many of the current papers. Cosmic deuterium is especially important because all deuterium in the Universe was formed in the epoch of nucleosynthesis in the first 1000 seconds after the Big Bang, so study of its relative abundance (D:H~1:100,000) gives us information about those first minutes of the Universe's life. Thus the understanding of cosmic deuterium is one of the pillars of modern cosmology, joining the cosmic expansion, the 3 degree cosmic background radiation, and the ripples in that background radiation. Studies of deuterium are also important for understanding Galactic chemical evolution, astrochemistry, interstellar processes, and planetary formation. Some papers had to be scanned while others are available at the Astrophysical Data System, adswww.harvard.edu, or to publishers' Websites. By 2006, social networking software (http:tinyurl.com/ zx5hk) had advanced with popular sites like facebook.com and MySpace.com; the Astrophysical Data System had even set up MyADS. Social tagging software sites like http://del.icio.us have made it easy to share sets of links to papers already available online. We have set up http://del.icio.us/deuterium to provide links to many of the papers on cosmicdeuterium.info, furthering previous del.icio.us work on /eclipses and /plutocharon. It is easy for the site owner to add links to a del.icio.us site; it takes merely clicking on a button on the browser screen once the site is opened and the desired link is viewed in a browser. Categorizing different topics by keywords allows subsets to be easily displayed. The opportunity to expose knowledge and build an ecosystem of web pages that use the functionality of a facebook-type application to capture knowledge collaboratively is considerable. Setting up such a system would marry one of the youngest isotopes with the latest software technologies.

Pasachoff, J. M.; Suer, T.-A.; Lubowich, D. A.; Glaisyer, T.

2006-08-01

340

Social Networking in an Intensive English Program Classroom: A Language Socialization Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This ongoing project seeks to investigate the impact, inside and outside of class, of instruction focused on developing learner awareness of social-networking site (SNS) use in an American Intensive English Program (IEP). With language socialization as an interpretative framework (Duff, in press; Ochs, 1988; Watson-Gegeo, 2004), the project uses a…

Reinhardt, Jonathon; Zander, Victoria

2011-01-01

341

The Relationship between Online Social Networking and Academic and Social Integration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the relationship between online social networking (OSN) and perceptions of academic and social integration for first-year residential students at a rural regional comprehensive university. Students spent an average of 2.5 hours on OSN websites per day, primarily interacting with campus peers, friends and family. There was…

Kord, JoLanna; Wolf-Wendel, Lisa

2009-01-01

342

Students' Participation in Social Networking Sites: Implications for Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social work students have few guidelines to help them evaluate the implication of their posted information on Internet-based social networking sites (SNSs). There is a national trend among employers of human services to cross-check publicly available online information on applicants. Based on data from a survey of 105 baccalaureate and master's…

Mukherjee, Dhrubodhi; Clark, Janet

2012-01-01

343

The Social Network Map as an Instrument for Identifying Social Relations in Deaf Research and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social support has shown itself to be an important factor in many areas in regard to mental health development and conservation. Numerous empirical findings also document its significance in various areas of research into deafness. Questionnaires are only one means of gathering information when we are trying to gain access to the social networks

Hintermair, Manfred

2009-01-01

344

Pinning impulsive synchronization of complex-variable dynamical network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, pinning combining with impulsive control scheme is adopted to investigate the synchronization of complex-variable dynamical network. Based on the Lyapunov function method and mathematical analysis technique, sufficient conditions for achieving synchronization is first analytically derived. This result extends the condition derived for real-variable dynamical network to complex-variable network. Further, adaptive strategy is adopted to relax the restrictions on the impulsive intervals and reduce the control cost. Noticeably, the proposed adaptive pinning impulsive control scheme is universal for different dynamical networks to some extent. The impulsive instants are chosen by solving a series of maximum problems subject to the derived conditions. Several numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the effectiveness and correctness of the derived theoretical results.

Wu, Zhaoyan; Liu, Danfeng; Ye, Qingling

2015-01-01

345

System of Mobile Agents to Model Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a model of mobile agents to construct social networks, based on a system of moving particles by keeping track of the collisions during their permanence in the system. We reproduce not only the degree distribution, clustering coefficient, and shortest path length of a large database of empirical friendship networks recently collected, but also some features related with their community structure. The model is completely characterized by the collision rate, and above a critical collision rate we find the emergence of a giant cluster in the universality class of two-dimensional percolation. Moreover, we propose possible schemes to reproduce other networks of particular social contacts, namely, sexual contacts.

González, Marta C.; Lind, Pedro G.; Herrmann, Hans J.

2006-03-01

346

Mobile human network management and recommendation by probabilistic social mining.  

PubMed

Recently, inferring or sharing of mobile contexts has been actively investigated as cell phones have become more than a communication device. However, most of them focused on utilizing the contexts on social network services, while the means in mining or managing the human network itself were barely considered. In this paper, the SmartPhonebook, which mines users' social connections to manage their relationships by reasoning social and personal contexts, is presented. It works like an artificial assistant which recommends the candidate callees whom the users probably would like to contact in a certain situation. Moreover, it visualizes their social contexts like closeness and relationship with others in order to let the users know their social situations. The proposed method infers the social contexts based on the contact patterns, while it extracts the personal contexts such as the users' emotional states and behaviors from the mobile logs. Here, Bayesian networks are exploited to handle the uncertainties in the mobile environment. The proposed system has been implemented with the MS Windows Mobile 2003 SE Platform on Samsung SPH-M4650 smartphone and has been tested on real-world data. The experimental results showed that the system provides an efficient and informative way for mobile social networking. PMID:21172755

Min, Jun-Ki; Cho, Sung-Bae

2011-06-01

347

Suicide ideation of individuals in online social networks  

E-print Network

Suicide is a major cause of death for adolescents in many countries. The impact of social isolation on suicide in the context of explicit social networks of individuals is relatively unexplored. We statistically examined relationships between suicide ideation and user's characteristics using a large data set obtained from a major social networking service in Japan. We found that the number of user-defined communities to which a user belongs to, the intransitivity (i.e., paucity of triangles including the user), and the fraction of suicidal neighbors in the social network, contributed the most to suicide ideation in this order. Age and gender contributed little. We also found similar results for depressive symptoms.

Masuda, Naoki; Onari, Hiroko

2012-01-01

348

Enhancing topology adaptation in information-sharing social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The advent of the Internet and World Wide Web has led to unprecedent growth of the information available. People usually face the information overload by following a limited number of sources which best fit their interests. It has thus become important to address issues like who gets followed and how to allow people to discover new and better information sources. In this paper we conduct an empirical analysis of different online social networking sites and draw inspiration from its results to present different source selection strategies in an adaptive model for social recommendation. We show that local search rules which enhance the typical topological features of real social communities give rise to network configurations that are globally optimal. These rules create networks which are effective in information diffusion and resemble structures resulting from real social systems.

Cimini, Giulio; Chen, Duanbing; Medo, Matúš; Lü, Linyuan; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Tao

2012-04-01

349

Social Networking Sites: An Adjunctive Treatment Modality for Psychological Problems  

PubMed Central

Background: Social networking is seen as a way to enhance social support and feeling of well-being. The present work explores the potentials of social networking sites as an adjunctive treatment modality for initiating treatment contact as well as for managing psychological problems. Materials and Methods: Interview schedule, Facebook intensity questionnaire were administered on 28 subjects with a combination of 18 males and 10 females. They were taken from the in-patient and out-patient psychiatry setting of the hospital. Results: Facebook was the most popular sites and used to seek emotional support on the basis of the frequent updates of emotional content that users put in their profile; reconciliations, escape from the problems or to manage the loneliness; getting information about illness and its treatment and interaction with experts and also manifested as problematic use. Conclusions: It has implications for developing social networking based adjunctive treatment modality for psychological problems. PMID:25035548

Menon, Indu S.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Chandra, Prabha S.; Thennarasu, K.

2014-01-01

350

Social Networking and Smart Technology: Viable Environmental Communication Tools…?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To what extent do popular social networking channels represent a viable means for disseminating information regarding environmental change to the general public? Are new forms of communication such as YouTube™, Facebook™, MySpace™ and Twitter™ and smart devices such as iPhone™ and BlackBerry™ useful and effective in terms motivating people into social action and behavioural modification; or do they simply pay ‘lip service’ to these pressing environmental issues? This project will explore the background connections between social networking and environmental communication and education; and outline why such tools might be an appropriate way to connect to a broad audience in an efficient and unconventional manner. Further, research will survey the current prevalence of reliable environmental change information on social networking Internet-based media; and finally, suggestions for improved strategies and new directions will be provided.

Montain, J.; Byrne, J. M.

2010-12-01

351

Locating privileged spreaders on an online social network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social media have provided plentiful evidence of their capacity for information diffusion. Fads and rumors but also social unrest and riots travel fast and affect large fractions of the population participating in online social networks (OSNs). This has spurred much research regarding the mechanisms that underlie social contagion, and also who (if any) can unleash system-wide information dissemination. Access to real data, both regarding topology—the network of friendships—and dynamics—the actual way in which OSNs users interact, is crucial to decipher how the former facilitates the latter's success, understood as efficiency in information spreading. With the quantitative analysis that stems from complex network theory, we discuss who (and why) has privileged spreading capabilities when it comes to information diffusion. This is done considering the evolution of an episode of political protest which took place in Spain, spanning one month in 2011.

Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Rivero, Alejandro; Moreno, Yamir

2012-06-01

352

Quality versus quantity of social ties in experimental cooperative networks.  

PubMed

Recent studies suggest that allowing individuals to choose their partners can help to maintain cooperation in human social networks; this behaviour can supplement behavioural reciprocity, whereby humans are influenced to cooperate by peer pressure. However, it is unknown how the rate of forming and breaking social ties affects our capacity to cooperate. Here we use a series of online experiments involving 1,529 unique participants embedded in 90 experimental networks, to show that there is a 'Goldilocks' effect of network dynamism on cooperation. When the rate of change in social ties is too low, subjects choose to have many ties, even if they attach to defectors. When the rate is too high, cooperators cannot detach from defectors as much as defectors re-attach and, hence, subjects resort to behavioural reciprocity and switch their behaviour to defection. Optimal levels of cooperation are achieved at intermediate levels of change in social ties. PMID:24226079

Shirado, Hirokazu; Fu, Feng; Fowler, James H; Christakis, Nicholas A

2013-01-01

353

Quality versus quantity of social ties in experimental cooperative networks  

PubMed Central

Recent studies suggest that allowing individuals to choose their partners can help to maintain cooperation in human social networks; this behaviour can supplement behavioural reciprocity, whereby humans are influenced to cooperate by peer pressure. However, it is unknown how the rate of forming and breaking social ties affects our capacity to cooperate. Here we use a series of online experiments involving 1,529 unique participants embedded in 90 experimental networks, to show that there is a ‘Goldilocks’ effect of network dynamism on cooperation. When the rate of change in social ties is too low, subjects choose to have many ties, even if they attach to defectors. When the rate is too high, cooperators cannot detach from defectors as much as defectors re-attach and, hence, subjects resort to behavioural reciprocity and switch their behaviour to defection. Optimal levels of cooperation are achieved at intermediate levels of change in social ties. PMID:24226079

Shirado, Hirokazu; Fu, Feng; Fowler, James H.; Christakis, Nicholas A.

2013-01-01

354

Mass media influence spreading in social networks with community structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study an extension of Axelrod's model for social influence, in which cultural drift is represented as random perturbations, while mass media are introduced by means of an external field. In this scenario, we investigate how the modular structure of social networks affects the propagation of mass media messages across a society. The community structure of social networks is represented by coupled random networks, in which two random graphs are connected by intercommunity links. Considering inhomogeneous mass media fields, we study the conditions for successful message spreading and find a novel phase diagram in the multidimensional parameter space. These findings show that social modularity effects are of paramount importance for designing successful, cost-effective advertising campaigns.

Candia, Julián; Mazzitello, Karina I.

2008-07-01

355

Networks: Social structure and policy change in U.S. electricity restructuring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research investigates the relationships between a social network perspective and different aspects of policy change. Policy scholars have done little to examine specific mechanisms at the individual level that drive policy learning and influence processes. These processes can affect the adoption (or non-adoption) of policy within policy networks. I argue that a stakeholder's position, their centrality, in a policy network is associated with increased policy learning and influence. Further, these factors have influenced policy decisions in electricity restructuring at the state level. The dissertation adopts two approaches to the question of network structure and policy change. First, from a social structure (i.e. network) perspective, I conduct case studies of Texas, Georgia, and Arkansas---a most-similar case comparison---using institutional analysis, fieldwork, and surveys of electricity restructuring stakeholders. In Texas and Arkansas, stakeholders engaged in collaborative learning experiences, and advocates leveraged their higher centrality to gain influence among key decision-makers in the state network and connect their states to a national network. Alternatively, actors in Georgia had fewer external ties and were entrenched in a more limited set of connections that resulted in problematic and failed policy adoptions. Second, classroom policy simulations are used to support and expand upon the field research. The simulations analyze social structure more completely, with formal quantitative network analysis. They show that central actors excel in learning and have more influence than peripheral players---though influence does not necessarily result in consensus. Important control variables are considered in the simulations that could not be identified in the field research. In both the case studies and simulations, social structure and network position at the individual level clearly emerge as important components of policy change.

Bird, Stephen

356

Models, Entropy and Information of Temporal Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temporal social networks are characterized by heterogeneous duration of contacts, which can either follow a power-law distribution, such as in face-to-face interactions, or a Weibull distribution, such as in mobile-phone communication. Here we model the dynamics of face-to-face interaction and mobile phone communication by a reinforcement dynamics, which explains the data observed in these different types of social interactions. We quantify the information encoded in the dynamics of these networks by the entropy of temporal networks. Finally, we show evidence that human dynamics is able to modulate the information present in social network dynamics when it follows circadian rhythms and when it is interfacing with a new technology such as the mobile-phone communication technology.

Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Márton; Bianconi, Ginestra

357

Empirical Analysis of Attention Behaviors in Online Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studying attention behavior has its social significance because such behavior is considered to lead the evolution of the friendship network. However, this type of behavior in social networks has attracted relatively little attention before, which is mainly because, in reality, such behaviors are always transitory and rarely recorded. In this paper, we collected the attention behaviors as well as the friendship network from Douban database and then carefully studied the attention behaviors in the friendship network as a latent metric space. The revealed similar patterns of attention behavior and friendship suggest that attention behavior may be the pre-stage of friendship to a certain extent, which can be further validated by the fact that pairwise nodes in Douban network connected by attention links beforehand are indeed far more likely to be connected by friendship links in the near future. This phenomenon can also be used to explain the high clustering of many social networks. More interestingly, it seems that attention behaviors are more likely to take place between individuals who have more mutual friends as well as more different friends, which seems a little different from the principles of many link prediction algorithms. Moreover, it is also found that forward attention is preferred to inverse attention, which is quite natural because, usually, an individual must be more interested in others that he is paying attention to than those paying attention to him. All of these findings can be used to guide the design of more appropriate social network models in the future.

Du, Fang; Xuan, Qi; Wu, Tie-Jun

358

Emotional intelligence, personality, social networks, and social perception   

E-print Network

to the emotions of others. In order to test this, a social perception inspection time task was carried out in which participants were required to identify if a face was happy, sad, or angry. The faces used were both Caucasian and Far-East Asian, the hypothesis...

DeBusk, Kendra Portia Adrienne Howard

359

The Dynamics of Health Behavior Sentiments on a Large Online Social Network  

E-print Network

The Dynamics of Health Behavior Sentiments on a Large Online Social Network Marcel Salathé* 1 behaviors affecting health outcomes are increasingly modulated by social networks, for example through on the dynamics of behavioral spread on social networks are strongly content-dependent. Keywords: Social media

Salathé, Marcel

360

Fraud detection on large scale social networks Yaya Sylla (1), (2), Pierre Morizet-Mahoudeaux (1)  

E-print Network

part, we will give some preliminary conclusions. II. SOCIAL MEDIA, SOCIAL NETWORK AND BIG DATA in subnetworks of the internet, particularly on online social networks (OSN). This calls for linking data, whichFraud detection on large scale social networks Yaya Sylla (1), (2), Pierre Morizet-Mahoudeaux (1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

361

Epidemic variability in hierarchical geographical networks with human activity patterns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, some studies have revealed that non-Poissonian statistics of human behaviors stem from the hierarchical geographical network structure. On this view, we focus on epidemic spreading in the hierarchical geographical networks and study how two distinct contact patterns (i.e., homogeneous time delay (HOTD) and heterogeneous time delay (HETD) associated with geographical distance) influence the spreading speed and the variability of outbreaks. We find that, compared with HOTD and null model, correlations between time delay and network hierarchy in HETD remarkably slow down epidemic spreading and result in an upward cascading multi-modal phenomenon. Proportionately, the variability of outbreaks in HETD has the lower value, but several comparable peaks for a long time, which makes the long-term prediction of epidemic spreading hard. When a seed (i.e., the initial infected node) is from the high layers of networks, epidemic spreading is remarkably promoted. Interestingly, distinct trends of variabilities in two contact patterns emerge: high-layer seeds in HOTD result in the lower variabilities, the case of HETD is opposite. More importantly, the variabilities of high-layer seeds in HETD are much greater than that in HOTD, which implies the unpredictability of epidemic spreading in hierarchical geographical networks.

Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Liu, Ying; Tang, Ming

2012-06-01

362

Resolving structural variability in network models and the brain.  

PubMed

Large-scale white matter pathways crisscrossing the cortex create a complex pattern of connectivity that underlies human cognitive function. Generative mechanisms for this architecture have been difficult to identify in part because little is known in general about mechanistic drivers of structured networks. Here we contrast network properties derived from diffusion spectrum imaging data of the human brain with 13 synthetic network models chosen to probe the roles of physical network embedding and temporal network growth. We characterize both the empirical and synthetic networks using familiar graph metrics, but presented here in a more complete statistical form, as scatter plots and distributions, to reveal the full range of variability of each measure across scales in the network. We focus specifically on the degree distribution, degree assortativity, hierarchy, topological Rentian scaling, and topological fractal scaling--in addition to several summary statistics, including the mean clustering coefficient, the shortest path-length, and the network diameter. The models are investigated in a progressive, branching sequence, aimed at capturing different elements thought to be important in the brain, and range from simple random and regular networks, to models that incorporate specific growth rules and constraints. We find that synthetic models that constrain the network nodes to be physically embedded in anatomical brain regions tend to produce distributions that are most similar to the corresponding measurements for the brain. We also find that network models hardcoded to display one network property (e.g., assortativity) do not in general simultaneously display a second (e.g., hierarchy). This relative independence of network properties suggests that multiple neurobiological mechanisms might be at play in the development of human brain network architecture. Together, the network models that we develop and employ provide a potentially useful starting point for the statistical inference of brain network structure from neuroimaging data. PMID:24675546

Klimm, Florian; Bassett, Danielle S; Carlson, Jean M; Mucha, Peter J

2014-03-01

363

Resolving Structural Variability in Network Models and the Brain  

PubMed Central

Large-scale white matter pathways crisscrossing the cortex create a complex pattern of connectivity that underlies human cognitive function. Generative mechanisms for this architecture have been difficult to identify in part because little is known in general about mechanistic drivers of structured networks. Here we contrast network properties derived from diffusion spectrum imaging data of the human brain with 13 synthetic network models chosen to probe the roles of physical network embedding and temporal network growth. We characterize both the empirical and synthetic networks using familiar graph metrics, but presented here in a more complete statistical form, as scatter plots and distributions, to reveal the full range of variability of each measure across scales in the network. We focus specifically on the degree distribution, degree assortativity, hierarchy, topological Rentian scaling, and topological fractal scaling—in addition to several summary statistics, including the mean clustering coefficient, the shortest path-length, and the network diameter. The models are investigated in a progressive, branching sequence, aimed at capturing different elements thought to be important in the brain, and range from simple random and regular networks, to models that incorporate specific growth rules and constraints. We find that synthetic models that constrain the network nodes to be physically embedded in anatomical brain regions tend to produce distributions that are most similar to the corresponding measurements for the brain. We also find that network models hardcoded to display one network property (e.g., assortativity) do not in general simultaneously display a second (e.g., hierarchy). This relative independence of network properties suggests that multiple neurobiological mechanisms might be at play in the development of human brain network architecture. Together, the network models that we develop and employ provide a potentially useful starting point for the statistical inference of brain network structure from neuroimaging data. PMID:24675546

Klimm, Florian; Bassett, Danielle S.; Carlson, Jean M.; Mucha, Peter J.

2014-01-01

364

Social status modulates neural activity in the mentalizing network  

PubMed Central

The current research explored the neural mechanisms linking social status to perceptions of the social world. Two fMRI studies provide converging evidence that individuals lower in social status are more likely to engage neural circuitry often involved in ‘mentalizing’ or thinking about others' thoughts and feelings. Study 1 found that college students' perception of their social status in the university community was related to neural activity in the mentalizing network (e.g., DMPFC, MPFC, precuneus/PCC) while encoding social information, with lower social status predicting greater neural activity in this network. Study 2 demonstrated that socioeconomic status, an objective indicator of global standing, predicted adolescents' neural activity during the processing of threatening faces, with individuals lower in social status displaying greater activity in the DMPFC, previously associated with mentalizing, and the amygdala, previously associated with emotion/salience processing. These studies demonstrate that social status is fundamentally and neurocognitively linked to how people process and navigate their social worlds. PMID:22289808

Muscatell, Keely A.; Morelli, Sylvia A.; Falk, Emily B.; Way, Baldwin M.; Pfeifer, Jennifer H.; Galinsky, Adam D.; Lieberman, Matthew D.; Dapretto, Mirella; Eisenberger, Naomi I.

2013-01-01

365

Social networks in primates: smart and tolerant species have more efficient networks.  

PubMed

Network optimality has been described in genes, proteins and human communicative networks. In the latter, optimality leads to the efficient transmission of information with a minimum number of connections. Whilst studies show that differences in centrality exist in animal networks with central individuals having higher fitness, network efficiency has never been studied in animal groups. Here we studied 78 groups of primates (24 species). We found that group size and neocortex ratio were correlated with network efficiency. Centralisation (whether several individuals are central in the group) and modularity (how a group is clustered) had opposing effects on network efficiency, showing that tolerant species have more efficient networks. Such network properties affecting individual fitness could be shaped by natural selection. Our results are in accordance with the social brain and cultural intelligence hypotheses, which suggest that the importance of network efficiency and information flow through social learning relates to cognitive abilities. PMID:25534964

Pasquaretta, Cristian; Levé, Marine; Claidière, Nicolas; van de Waal, Erica; Whiten, Andrew; MacIntosh, Andrew J J; Pelé, Marie; Bergstrom, Mackenzie L; Borgeaud, Christèle; Brosnan, Sarah F; Crofoot, Margaret C; Fedigan, Linda M; Fichtel, Claudia; Hopper, Lydia M; Mareno, Mary Catherine; Petit, Odile; Schnoell, Anna Viktoria; di Sorrentino, Eugenia Polizzi; Thierry, Bernard; Tiddi, Barbara; Sueur, Cédric

2014-01-01

366

Social networks in primates: smart and tolerant species have more efficient networks  

PubMed Central

Network optimality has been described in genes, proteins and human communicative networks. In the latter, optimality leads to the efficient transmission of information with a minimum number of connections. Whilst studies show that differences in centrality exist in animal networks with central individuals having higher fitness, network efficiency has never been studied in animal groups. Here we studied 78 groups of primates (24 species). We found that group size and neocortex ratio were correlated with network efficiency. Centralisation (whether several individuals are central in the group) and modularity (how a group is clustered) had opposing effects on network efficiency, showing that tolerant species have more efficient networks. Such network properties affecting individual fitness could be shaped by natural selection. Our results are in accordance with the social brain and cultural intelligence hypotheses, which suggest that the importance of network efficiency and information flow through social learning relates to cognitive abilities. PMID:25534964

Pasquaretta, Cristian; Levé, Marine; Claidière, Nicolas; van de Waal, Erica; Whiten, Andrew; MacIntosh, Andrew J. J.; Pelé, Marie; Bergstrom, Mackenzie L.; Borgeaud, Christèle; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Crofoot, Margaret C.; Fedigan, Linda M.; Fichtel, Claudia; Hopper, Lydia M.; Mareno, Mary Catherine; Petit, Odile; Schnoell, Anna Viktoria; di Sorrentino, Eugenia Polizzi; Thierry, Bernard; Tiddi, Barbara; Sueur, Cédric

2014-01-01

367

Analysis of Online Social Networks to Understand Information Sharing Behaviors Through Social Cognitive Theory  

SciTech Connect

Analyzing the contents of online social networks is an effective process for monitoring and understanding peoples behaviors. Since the nature of conversation and information propagation is similar to traditional conversation and learning, one of the popular socio-cognitive methods, social cognitive theory was applied to online social networks to. Two major news topics about colon cancer were chosen to monitor traffic of Twitter messages. The activity of leaders on the issue (i.e., news companies or people will prior Twitter activity on topics related to colon cancer) was monitored. In addition, the activity of followers , people who never discussed the topics before, but replied to the discussions was also monitored. Topics that produce tangible benefits such as positive outcomes from appropriate preventive actions received dramatically more attention and online social media traffic. Such characteristics can be explained with social cognitive theory and thus present opportunities for effective health campaigns.

Yoon, Hong-Jun [ORNL] [ORNL; Tourassi, Georgia [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01

368

Dynamic Evolution Model Based on Social Network Services  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on the analysis of evolutionary characteristics of public opinion in social networking services (SNS), in the paper we propose a dynamic evolution model, in which opinions are coupled with topology. This model shows the clustering phenomenon of opinions in dynamic network evolution. The simulation results show that the model can fit the data from a social network site. The dynamic evolution of networks accelerates the opinion, separation and aggregation. The scale and the number of clusters are influenced by confidence limit and rewiring probability. Dynamic changes of the topology reduce the number of isolated nodes, while the increased confidence limit allows nodes to communicate more sufficiently. The two effects make the distribution of opinion more neutral. The dynamic evolution of networks generates central clusters with high connectivity and high betweenness, which make it difficult to control public opinions in SNS.

Xiong, Xi; Gou, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, Shi-Bin; Zhao, Wen

2013-11-01

369

Online Social Networks for Personal Informatics to Promote Positive Health Behavior  

E-print Network

Online Social Networks for Personal Informatics to Promote Positive Health Behavior Noreen Kamal related to on-line communities and social networks. This will be followed by models or health behavior.ho@ubc.ca ABSTRACT Social network services are becoming increasingly popular, and people are using these networks

British Columbia, University of

370

Innovation: Web 2.0, Online-Communities and Mobile Social Networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, an online social network phenomenon has swept over the Web and the signs say that Social Networking Sites (SNS) are growing in importance not just as places for individuals to communicate, network, and express themselves but also as advertising and marketing vehicles. Combining social networks to the mobile environment is a growing interest as it allows users to be

Cheng-Jung Lee; Chang-Chun Tsai; Shung-Ming Tang; Liang-Kai Wang

2009-01-01

371

Reconstruction of Missing Data in Social Networks Based on Temporal Patterns of Interactions  

E-print Network

in the series of interaction events between agents in a social network. We then develop a reconstruction modelReconstruction of Missing Data in Social Networks Based on Temporal Patterns of Interactions Alexey results to the Los Angeles gang network. Keywords: Social networks, temporal dependence of events, missing

Bertozzi, Andrea L.

372

Social Network Analysis to evaluate organisational networks on sexual health and rights  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are many challenges in evaluating international networks. The use of conventional tools can be difficult and often provides less than useful information. Social Network Analysis offers benefits for network evaluators by allowing for documentation and analysis of inter-relationships between individuals and organisations. This paper describes the use of this approach in the evaluation of a major international project entitled

Roger Drew; Peter Aggleton; Paul Boyce; Helen Chalmers; Clare Maxwell; Saroj Pachauri; Felicity Thomas; Ian Warwick; Kate Wood

2011-01-01

373

Aversive Peer Experiences on Social Networking Sites: Development of the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire (SN-PEQ).  

PubMed

Cyber victimization is an important research area; yet, little is known about aversive peer experiences on social networking sites (SNSs), which are used extensively by youth and host complex social exchanges. Across samples of adolescents (n=216) and young adults (n=214), we developed the Social Networking-Peer Experiences Questionnaire (SN-PEQ), and examined its psychometric properties, distinctiveness from traditional peer victimization, and associations with internalized distress. The SN-PEQ demonstrated strong factorial invariance and a single factor structure that was distinct from other forms of peer victimization. Negative SNS experiences were associated with youths' symptoms of social anxiety and depression, even when controlling for traditional peer victimization. Findings highlight the importance of examining the effects of aversive peer experiences that occur via social media. PMID:24288449

Landoll, Ryan R; La Greca, Annette M; Lai, Betty S

2013-12-01

374

Social networks, time homeless, and social support: A study of men on Skid Row.  

PubMed

Homeless men are frequently unsheltered and isolated, disconnected from supportive organizations and individuals. However, little research has investigated these men's social networks. We investigate the structure and composition of homeless men's social networks, vis-a-vis short- and long-term homelessness with a sample of men drawn randomly from meal lines on Skid Row in Los Angeles. Men continuously homeless for the past six months display networks composed of riskier members when compared to men intermittently homeless during that time. Men who report chronic, long-term homelessness display greater social network fragmentation when compared to non-chronically homeless men. While intermittent homelessness affects network composition in ways that may be addressable with existing interventions, chronic homelessness fragments networks, which may be more difficult to address with those interventions. These findings have implications for access to social support from network members which, in turn, impacts the resources homeless men require from other sources such as the government or NGOs. PMID:24466427

Green, Harold D; Tucker, Joan S; Golinelli, Daniela; Wenzel, Suzanne L

2013-12-18

375

Diversity of social ties in scientific collaboration networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diversity is one of the important perspectives to characterize behaviors of individuals in social networks. It is intuitively believed that diversity of social ties accounts for competition advantage and idea innovation. However, quantitative evidences in a real large social network can be rarely found in the previous research. Thanks to the availability of scientific publication records on WWW; now we can construct a large scientific collaboration network, which provides us a chance to gain insight into the diversity of relationships in a real social network through statistical analysis. In this article, we dedicate our efforts to perform empirical analysis on a scientific collaboration network extracted from DBLP, an online bibliographic database in computer science, in a systematical way, finding the following: distributions of diversity indices tend to decay in an exponential or Gaussian way; diversity indices are not trivially correlated to existing vertex importance measures; authors of diverse social ties tend to connect to each other and these authors are generally more competitive than others.

Shi, Quan; Xu, Bo; Xu, Xiaomin; Xiao, Yanghua; Wang, Wei; Wang, Hengshan

2011-11-01

376

Mining social networks using heat diffusion processes for marketing candidates selection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Network Marketing techniques employ pre-existing social networks to increase brands or products awareness through word-of-mouth promotion. Full understanding of social network marketing and the potential candidates that can thus be marketed to certainly offer lucrative opportu- nities for prospective sellers. Due to the complexity of so- cial networks, few models exist to interpret social network marketing realistically. We propose

Hao Ma; Haixuan Yang; Michael R. Lyu; Irwin King

2008-01-01

377

Social Snapshots: Digital Forensics for Online Social Networks  

E-print Network

approach and its advantages in contrast to traditional techniques that rely on application- specific web Computer Se- curity Applications Conference in December 2011. and recently, a number of publications have networks or cloud services are needed. Interestingly and contrary to our in- tuition, we found little

378

New Superintendents: Trust, Networking, and Social Capital  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This instrumental case study explored how five newly appointed superintendents identified key stakeholders and built trust and social capital with stakeholders in their districts. Stakeholder, trust, and social capital theory were the lenses that guided this study. We utilized a pragmatic research design and thematic data analysis to interpret our…

Ripley, Joan; Mitchell, Roxanne M.; Richman, John A.

2013-01-01

379

The relationship of social network deficits with deficits in social functioning in long-term psychiatric disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been suggested that deficits or impairments in social functioning may explain the depleted support networks of the mentally ill. With this in mind, 145 long-term users of day care psychiatric facilities, 57% of whom had a life-time diagnosis of schizophrenia, were examined to determine whether deficits in social and survival skills explained deficits in their social networks. Compared

T. S. Brugha; J. K. Wing; C. R. Brewin; B. MacCarthy; A. Lesage

1993-01-01

380

Is He Being Bad? Social and Language Brain Networks during Social Judgment in Children with Autism  

PubMed Central

Individuals with autism often violate social rules and have lower accuracy in identifying and explaining inappropriate social behavior. Twelve children with autism (AD) and thirteen children with typical development (TD) participated in this fMRI study of the neurofunctional basis of social judgment. Participants indicated in which of two pictures a boy was being bad (Social condition) or which of two pictures was outdoors (Physical condition). In the within-group Social–Physical comparison, TD children used components of mentalizing and language networks [bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), bilateral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS)], whereas AD children used a network that was primarily right IFG and bilateral pSTS, suggesting reduced use of social and language networks during this social judgment task. A direct group comparison on the Social–Physical contrast showed that the TD group had greater mPFC, bilateral IFG, and left superior temporal pole activity than the AD group. No regions were more active in the AD group than in the group with TD in this comparison. Both groups successfully performed the task, which required minimal language. The groups also performed similarly on eyetracking measures, indicating that the activation results probably reflect the use of a more basic strategy by the autism group rather than performance disparities. Even though language was unnecessary, the children with TD recruited language areas during the social task, suggesting automatic encoding of their knowledge into language; however, this was not the case for the children with autism. These findings support behavioral research indicating that, whereas children with autism may recognize socially inappropriate behavior, they have difficulty using spoken language to explain why it is inappropriate. The fMRI results indicate that AD children may not automatically use language to encode their social understanding, making expression and generalization of this knowledge more difficult. PMID:23082151

Carter, Elizabeth J.; Williams, Diane L.; Minshew, Nancy J.; Lehman, Jill F.

2012-01-01

381

Is he being bad? Social and language brain networks during social judgment in children with autism.  

PubMed

Individuals with autism often violate social rules and have lower accuracy in identifying and explaining inappropriate social behavior. Twelve children with autism (AD) and thirteen children with typical development (TD) participated in this fMRI study of the neurofunctional basis of social judgment. Participants indicated in which of two pictures a boy was being bad (Social condition) or which of two pictures was outdoors (Physical condition). In the within-group Social-Physical comparison, TD children used components of mentalizing and language networks [bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), bilateral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS)], whereas AD children used a network that was primarily right IFG and bilateral pSTS, suggesting reduced use of social and language networks during this social judgment task. A direct group comparison on the Social-Physical contrast showed that the TD group had greater mPFC, bilateral IFG, and left superior temporal pole activity than the AD group. No regions were more active in the AD group than in the group with TD in this comparison. Both groups successfully performed the task, which required minimal language. The groups also performed similarly on eyetracking measures, indicating that the activation results probably reflect the use of a more basic strategy by the autism group rather than performance disparities. Even though language was unnecessary, the children with TD recruited language areas during the social task, suggesting automatic encoding of their knowledge into language; however, this was not the case for the children with autism. These findings support behavioral research indicating that, whereas children with autism may recognize socially inappropriate behavior, they have difficulty using spoken language to explain why it is inappropriate. The fMRI results indicate that AD children may not automatically use language to encode their social understanding, making expression and generalization of this knowledge more difficult. PMID:23082151

Carter, Elizabeth J; Williams, Diane L; Minshew, Nancy J; Lehman, Jill F

2012-01-01

382

Social network dynamics of face-to-face interactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent availability of data describing social networks is changing our understanding of the “microscopic structure” of a social tie. A social tie indeed is an aggregated outcome of many social interactions such as face-to-face conversations or phone calls. Analysis of data on face-to-face interactions shows that such events, as many other human activities, are bursty, with very heterogeneous durations. In this paper we present a model for social interactions at short time scales, aimed at describing contexts such as conference venues in which individuals interact in small groups. We present a detailed analytical and numerical study of the model’s dynamical properties, and show that it reproduces important features of empirical data. The model allows for many generalizations toward an increasingly realistic description of social interactions. In particular, in this paper we investigate the case where the agents have intrinsic heterogeneities in their social behavior, or where dynamic variations of the local number of individuals are included. Finally we propose this model as a very flexible framework to investigate how dynamical processes unfold in social networks.

Zhao, Kun; Stehlé, Juliette; Bianconi, Ginestra; Barrat, Alain

2011-05-01

383

Social Networking for Emergency Management and Public Safety  

SciTech Connect

On March 10, 2010 the workshop titled Social Networking for Emergency Management and Public Safety was held in Seattle, WA. The objective of this workshop was to showcase ways social media networking technologies can be used to support emergency management and public safety operations. The workshop highlighted the current state of social networking and where this dynamic engagement is heading, demonstrated some of the more commonly used technologies, highlighted case studies on how these tools have been used in a variety of jurisdictions and engaged the private sector on how these tools might serve as a conduit for two way communication between with the public sector to address regional recovery issues and decision making.

Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Godinez, Melanie A.

2010-08-31

384

Social-based autonomic routing in opportunistic networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In opportunistic networks end-to-end communication between users does not require a continuous end-to-end path between source and destination. Network protocols are designed to be extremely resilient to events such as long partitions, node disconnections, etc, which are very features of this type of self-organizing ad hoc networks. This is achieved by temporarily storing messages at intermediate nodes, waiting for future opportunities to forward them towards the destination. The mobility of users plays a key role in opportunistic networks. Thus, providing accurate models of mobility patterns is one of the key research areas. In this chapter we firstly focus on this issue, with special emphasis on a class of social-aware models. These models are based on the observation that people move because they are attracted towards other people they have social relationships with, or towards physical places that have special meaning with respect to their social behavior. Another key research area in opportunistic networks is clearly designing routing and forwarding schemes. In this chapter we provide a survey of the main approaches to routing in purely infrastructure-less opportunistic networks, by classifying protocols based on the amount of context information they exploit.We then provide an extensive quantitative comparison between representatives of protocols that do not use any context information, and protocols that manage and exploit a rich set of context information. We mainly focus on the suitability of protocols to adapt to the dynamically changing network features, as resulting from the user movement patterns that are driven by their social behavior. Our results show that context-aware routing is extremely adaptive to dynamic networking scenarios, and, with respect to protocols that do not use any context information, is able to provide similar performance in terms of delay and loss rate, by using just a small fraction of the network resources.

Boldrini, Chiara; Conti, Marco; Passarella, Andrea

385

Computational social network modeling of terrorist recruitment.  

SciTech Connect

The Seldon terrorist model represents a multi-disciplinary approach to developing organization software for the study of terrorist recruitment and group formation. The need to incorporate aspects of social science added a significant contribution to the vision of the resulting Seldon toolkit. The unique addition of and abstract agent category provided a means for capturing social concepts like cliques, mosque, etc. in a manner that represents their social conceptualization and not simply as a physical or economical institution. This paper provides an overview of the Seldon terrorist model developed to study the formation of cliques, which are used as the major recruitment entity for terrorist organizations.

Berry, Nina M.; Turnley, Jessica Glicken (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Smrcka, Julianne D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Ko, Teresa H.; Moy, Timothy David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Wu, Benjamin C.

2004-10-01

386

Discovering Collaborative Cyber Attack Patterns Using Social Network Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper investigates collaborative cyber attacks based on social network analysis. An Attack Social Graph (ASG) is defined to represent cyber attacks on the Internet. Features are extracted from ASGs to analyze collaborative patterns. We use principle component analysis to reduce the feature space, and hierarchical clustering to group attack sources that exhibit similar behavior. Experiments with real world data illustrate that our framework can effectively reduce from large dataset to clusters of attack sources exhibiting critical collaborative patterns.

Du, Haitao; Yang, Shanchieh Jay

387

Encounters with Katrina: Dynamics of Older Adults’ Social Support Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hurricane Katrina forced the evacuation of thousands of people from the storm-ravaged Gulf Coast. Storm-displaced older adults\\u000a faced many challenges during the evacuation process and in the months that followed. In this chapter we examine the dynamics\\u000a of displaced older adults’ social networks during the evacuation and post-Katrina events. We begin with a brief review of\\u000a the literature on social

Karen A. Roberto; Yoshinori Kamo; Tammy Henderson

388

Three essays on social networks and entrepreneurship  

E-print Network

This thesis explores in three essays if, how, and why social relationships have a bearing on outcomes in the entrepreneurial process. The first essay attempts to determine which mechanism drives the children of business ...

Greenberg, Jason, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01

389

Opinion Fluctuations and Disagreement in Social Network  

E-print Network

We study a stochastic gossip model of continuous opinion dynamics in a society consisting of two types of agents: regular agents, who update their beliefs according to information that they receive from their social ...

Acemoglu, Daron

2010-09-23

390

Loss of genetic variability in social spiders: genetic and phylogenetic consequences of population subdivision and inbreeding  

PubMed Central

The consequences of population subdivision and inbreeding have been studied in many organisms, particularly in plants. However, most studies focus on the short-term consequences, such as inbreeding depression. To investigate the consequences of both population fragmentation and inbreeding for genetic variability in the longer term, we here make use of a natural inbreeding experiment in spiders, where sociality and accompanying population subdivision and inbreeding have evolved repeatedly. We use mitochondrial and nuclear data to infer phylogenetic relationships among 170 individuals of Anelosimus spiders representing 23 species. We then compare relative mitochondrial and nuclear genetic variability of the inbred social species and their outbred relatives. We focus on four independently derived social species and four subsocial species, including two outbred–inbred sister species pairs. We find that social species have 50% reduced mitochondrial sequence divergence. As inbreeding is not expected to reduce genetic variability in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome, this suggests the loss of variation due to strong population subdivision, founder effects, small effective population sizes (colonies as individuals) and lineage turnover. Social species have < 10% of the nuclear genetic variability of the outbred species, also suggesting the loss of genetic variability through founder effects and/or inbreeding. Inbred sociality hence may result in reduction in variability through various processes. Sociality in most Anelosimus species probably arose relatively recently (0.1–2 mya), with even the oldest social lineages having failed to diversify. This is consistent with the hypothesis that inbred spider sociality represents an evolutionary dead end. Heterosis underlies a species potential to respond to environmental change and/or disease. Inbreeding and loss of genetic variability may thus limit diversification in social Anelosimus lineages and similarly pose a threat to many wild populations subject to habitat fragmentation or reduced population sizes. PMID:23145542

Agnarsson, I; Avilés, L; Maddison, W P

2013-01-01

391

Sport psychology group consultation using social networking web sites.  

PubMed

A social networking Web site, Facebook, was used to deliver long-term sport psychology consultation services to student-athletes (i.e., soccer players) in 30- to 60-min weekly sessions. Additional short-term team building, group cohesion, communication, anger management, injury rehabilitation, mental toughness, commitment, and leadership workshops were provided. Cohesion and overall relationships between both the student-athletes and the sport psychology consultants benefited from this process. Social networking Web sites offer a practical way of providing sport psychology consulting services that does not require use of major resources. PMID:22867127

Dietrich, Frederick; Shipherd, Amber M; Gershgoren, Lael; Filho, Edson Medeiros; Basevitch, Itay

2012-08-01

392

A Study of Malware Propagation via Online Social Networking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The popularity of online social networks (OSNs) have attracted malware creators who would use OSNs as a platform to propagate automated worms from one user's computer to another's. On the other hand, the topic of malware propagation in OSNs has only been investigated recently. In this chapter, we discuss recent advances on the topic of malware propagation by way of online social networking. In particular, we present three malware propagation techniques in OSNs, namely cross site scripting (XSS), Trojan and clickjacking types, and their characteristics via analytical models and simulations.

Faghani, Mohammad Reza; Nguyen, Uyen Trang

393

Threshold-limited spreading in social networks with multiple initiators  

PubMed Central

A classical model for social-influence-driven opinion change is the threshold model. Here we study cascades of opinion change driven by threshold model dynamics in the case where multiple initiators trigger the cascade, and where all nodes possess the same adoption threshold ?. Specifically, using empirical and stylized models of social networks, we study cascade size as a function of the initiator fraction p. We find that even for arbitrarily high value of ?, there exists a critical initiator fraction pc(?) beyond which the cascade becomes global. Network structure, in particular clustering, plays a significant role in this scenario. Similarly to the case of single-node or single-clique initiators studied previously, we observe that community structure within the network facilitates opinion spread to a larger extent than a homogeneous random network. Finally, we study the efficacy of different initiator selection strategies on the size of the cascade and the cascade window. PMID:23900230

Singh, P.; Sreenivasan, S.; Szymanski, B. K.; Korniss, G.

2013-01-01

394

Overlapping community identification approach in online social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networks have become embedded in our everyday lives so much that we cannot ignore it. One specific area of increased interest in social networks is that of detecting overlapping communities: instead of considering online communities as autonomous islands acting independently, communities are more like sprawling cities bleeding into each other. The assumption that online communities behave more like complex networks creates new challenges, specifically in the area of size and complexity. Algorithms for detecting these overlapping communities need to be fast and accurate. This research proposes method for detecting non-overlapping communities by using a CNM algorithm, which in turn allows us to extrapolate the overlapping networks. In addition, an improved index for closeness centrality is given to classify overlapping nodes. The methods used in this research demonstrate a high classification accuracy in detecting overlapping communities, with a time complexity of O(n2).

Zhang, Xuewu; You, Huangbin; Zhu, William; Qiao, Shaojie; Li, Jianwu; Gutierrez, Louis Alberto; Zhang, Zhuo; Fan, Xinnan

2015-03-01

395

Inferring topologies of complex networks with hidden variables  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Network topology plays a crucial role in determining a network's intrinsic dynamics and function, thus understanding and modeling the topology of a complex network will lead to greater knowledge of its evolutionary mechanisms and to a better understanding of its behaviors. In the past few years, topology identification of complex networks has received increasing interest and wide attention. Many approaches have been developed for this purpose, including synchronization-based identification, information-theoretic methods, and intelligent optimization algorithms. However, inferring interaction patterns from observed dynamical time series is still challenging, especially in the absence of knowledge of nodal dynamics and in the presence of system noise. The purpose of this work is to present a simple and efficient approach to inferring the topologies of such complex networks. The proposed approach is called “piecewise partial Granger causality.” It measures the cause-effect connections of nonlinear time series influenced by hidden variables. One commonly used testing network, two regular networks with a few additional links, and small-world networks are used to evaluate the performance and illustrate the influence of network parameters on the proposed approach. Application to experimental data further demonstrates the validity and robustness of our method.

Wu, Xiaoqun; Wang, Weihan; Zheng, Wei Xing

2012-10-01

396

Viral spreading of daily information in online social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explain a possible mechanism of an information spreading on a network which spreads extremely far from a seed node, namely the viral spreading. On the basis of a model of the information spreading in an online social network, in which the dynamics is expressed as a random multiplicative process of the spreading rates, we will show that the correlation between the spreading rates enhances the chance of the viral spreading, shifting the tipping point at which the spreading goes viral.

Kawamoto, Tatsuro; Hatano, Naomichi

2014-07-01

397

System of Mobile Agents to Model Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a model of mobile agents to construct social networks, based on a\\u000asystem of moving particles by keeping track of the collisions during their\\u000apermanence in the system. We reproduce not only the degree distribution,\\u000aclustering coefficient and shortest path length of a large data base of\\u000aempirical friendship networks recently collected, but also some features\\u000arelated with

Marta C. Gonzalez; Pedro G. Lind; Hans J. Herrmann

2006-01-01

398

Referral Web: combining social networks and collaborative filtering  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper appears in the Communications of the ACM,vol. 40 no. 3, March, 1997.Numerous studies have shown that one of the most the most effective channelsfor dissemination of information and expertise within an organization is itsinformal network of collaborators, colleagues, and friends (Granovetter 1973;Kraut 1990; Wasserman and Galaskiewicz 1994). Indeed, the social network1is as least as important as the official

Henry A. Kautz; Bart Selman; Mehul A. Shah

1997-01-01

399

Birds of a Feather: Homophily in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract Similarity breeds connection. This principle—the homophily,princi- ple—structures network ties of every type, including marriage, friendship, work, advice, support, information transfer, exchange, comembership, and other types of re- lationship. The result is that people’s personal networks,are homogeneous,with regard to many sociodemographic, behavioral, and intrapersonal characteristics. Homophily limits people’s social worlds,in a way,that has powerful,implications for the infor- mation they

Miller McPherson; Lynn Smith-Lovin; James M Cook

2001-01-01

400

Exploring Social-Historical Ties on Location-Based Social Networks Huiji Gao, Jiliang Tang, and Huan Liu  

E-print Network

Exploring Social-Historical Ties on Location-Based Social Networks Huiji Gao, Jiliang Tang approach properly models user's check- ins and shows how social and historical ties can help location prediction. Introduction Social media extends the physical boundary of user activi- ties. As a new type

Liu, Huan

401

On New Characterizations of Social Influence in Social Networks Makan Fardad, Fu Lin, Xi Zhang, and Mihailo R. Jovanovic  

E-print Network

are used to optimally choose a desired number of agents in a social network to serve as social leaders to resource constraints, in order to improve the influence of designated agents or social leaders. We show of our proposed characterizations of social influence in identifying the most influential agents

Fardad, Makan

402

NETWORK TIE FORMATION IN A TWO-MODE NETWORK--IS IT TECHNICAL OR SOCIAL CAPITAL THAT MATTERS?  

E-print Network

1 NETWORK TIE FORMATION IN A TWO-MODE NETWORK--IS IT TECHNICAL OR SOCIAL CAPITAL THAT MATTERS? Anke@pegasus.rutgers.edu #12;2 NETWORK TIE FORMATION IN A TWO-MODE NETWORK--IS IT TECHNICAL OR SOCIAL CAPITAL THAT MATTERS examines tie formation under a process of activity selection, contributions to innovations, within

Lin, Xiaodong

403

Genetic origins of social networks in rhesus macaques  

PubMed Central

Sociality is believed to have evolved as a strategy for animals to cope with their environments. Yet the genetic basis of sociality remains unclear. Here we provide evidence that social network tendencies are heritable in a gregarious primate. The tendency for rhesus macaques, Macaca mulatta, to be tied affiliatively to others via connections mediated by their social partners - analogous to friends of friends in people - demonstrated additive genetic variance. Affiliative tendencies were predicted by genetic variation at two loci involved in serotonergic signalling, although this result did not withstand correction for multiple tests. Aggressive tendencies were also heritable and were related to reproductive output, a fitness proxy. Our findings suggest that, like humans, the skills and temperaments that shape the formation of multi-agent relationships have a genetic basis in nonhuman primates, and, as such, begin to fill the gaps in our understanding of the genetic basis of sociality. PMID:23304433

Brent, Lauren J. N.; Heilbronner, Sarah R.; Horvath, Julie E.; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Robinson, Athy G.; Skene, J. H. Pate; Platt, Michael L.

2013-01-01

404

Discovering Influential Nodes for SIS Models in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We address the problem of efficiently discovering the influential nodes in a social network under the susceptible/infected/susceptible (SIS) model, a diffusion model where nodes are allowed to be activated multiple times. The computational complexity drastically increases because of this multiple activation property. We solve this problem by constructing a layered graph from the original social network with each layer added on top as the time proceeds, and applying the bond percolation with pruning and burnout strategies. We experimentally demonstrate that the proposed method gives much better solutions than the conventional methods that are solely based on the notion of centrality for social network analysis using two large-scale real-world networks (a blog network and a wikipedia network). We further show that the computational complexity of the proposed method is much smaller than the conventional naive probabilistic simulation method by a theoretical analysis and confirm this by experimentation. The properties of the influential nodes discovered are substantially different from those identified by the centrality-based heuristic methods.

Saito, Kazumi; Kimura, Masahiro; Motoda, Hiroshi

405

Evaluation of an Agent-Mediated Social Network Taneem Ibrahim, Aaron Arthurs, and Henry Hexmoor  

E-print Network

Evaluation of an Agent-Mediated Social Network Taneem Ibrahim, Aaron Arthurs, and Henry Hexmoor the experimental results of the strength of the agents' social network. 2. Background Steve Marsh contributed

Hexmoor, Henry

406

MAPPING SOCIAL NETWORK TO SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE TO DETECT STRUCTURE CLASHES IN AGILE SOFTWARE  

E-print Network

MAPPING SOCIAL NETWORK TO SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE TO DETECT STRUCTURE CLASHES IN AGILE SOFTWARE more pronounced in an Agile Software Development environment and managerial intervention is constantly: Agile Software Development, Social Network, Software Architecture. 1 INTRODUCTION Coordination

Vellekoop, Michel

407

The Evolution and Emergence of Integrated Social and Financial Networks with Electronic Transactions  

E-print Network

The Evolution and Emergence of Integrated Social and Financial Networks with Electronic Transactions: A Dynamic Supernetwork Theory for the Modeling, Analysis, and Computation of Financial Flows, we propose a rigorous dynamic supernetwork theory for the in- tegration of social networks

Nagurney, Anna

408

Bayesian Network Models for Local Dependence among Observable Outcome Variables  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Bayesian network models offer a large degree of flexibility for modeling dependence among observables (item outcome variables) from the same task, which may be dependent. This article explores four design patterns for modeling locally dependent observations: (a) no context--ignores dependence among observables; (b) compensatory context--introduces…

Almond, Russell G.; Mulder, Joris; Hemat, Lisa A.; Yan, Duanli

2009-01-01

409

Model Criticism of Bayesian Networks with Latent Variables.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated statistical methods for identifying errors in Bayesian networks (BN) with latent variables, as found in intelligent cognitive assessments. BN, commonly used in artificial intelligence systems, are promising mechanisms for scoring constructed-response examinations. The success of an intelligent assessment or tutoring system…

Williamson, David M.; Mislevy, Robert J.; Almond, Russell G.

410

Seasonal changes in the structure of rhesus macaque social networks  

PubMed Central

Social structure emerges from the patterning of interactions between individuals and plays a critical role in shaping some of the main characteristics of animal populations. The topological features of social structure, such as the extent to which individuals interact in clusters, can influence many biologically important factors, including the persistence of cooperation, and the rate of spread of disease. Yet the extent to which social structure topology fluctuates over relatively short periods of time in relation to social, demographic or environmental events remains unclear. Here, we use social network analysis to examine seasonal changes in the topology of social structures that emerge from socio-positive associations in adult female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Behavioral data for two different association types (grooming, spatial proximity) were collected for females in two free-ranging groups during two seasons: the mating and birth seasons. Stronger dyadic bonds resulted in social structures that were more tightly connected (i.e. of greater density) in the mating season compared to the birth season. Social structures were also more centralized around a subset of individuals, and were more clustered in the mating season than the birth season, although the latter differences were mostly driven by differences in density alone. Our results suggest a degree of temporal variation in the topological features of social structure in this population. Such variation may feed back on interactions, hence affecting the behaviors of individuals, and may therefore be important to take into account in studies of animal behavior. PMID:23565026

Brent, Lauren J.N.; MacLarnon, Ann.; Platt, Michael L.; Semple, Stuart

2012-01-01

411

Improving social bookmark search using personalised latent variable language models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social tagging systems have recently become very popular as a method of categorising information online and have been used to annotate a wide range of different resources. In such systems users are free to choose whatever keywords or \\

Morgan Harvey; Ian Ruthven; Mark James Carman

2011-01-01

412

Social networks, social capital, and mental health While traditionally most studies of the effects of interpersonal relationships on health have focused primarily on social  

E-print Network

Social networks, social capital, and mental health While traditionally most studies of the effects networks are relevant to the epidemiology of mental health, and found that depressive symptoms can spread individuals. In this project we adopt and further extend this network- based perspective on mental health

Banaji,. Murad

413

Different social network and social support characteristics, nervous problems and insomnia: Theoretical and methodological aspects on some results from the population study 'men born in 1914', Malmö, Sweden  

Microsoft Academic Search

A representative sample of 68-year-old men in the Swedish city of Malmö, were interviewed in detail regarding their social network, social support and social influence as a part of an extensive examination of their health status. Emphasis in this paper is put on the definition and operationalization of different social network, social support and social influence characteristics included in a

B. S. Hanson; P.-O. Östergren

1987-01-01

414

Group colocation behavior in technological social networks  

E-print Network

.g. theaters, music venues), College and University (e.g. schools, university buildings), Food (e.g. cafes, restaurants), Nightlife (e.g. bars, clubs), Outdoors and Recreation (e.g. parks, nature spots), Professional (e.g. workplaces), Residence (e.g. homes... , define: 3• num checkins(c) to be the total number of check-ins to category c in the dataset. • num social checkins(c) to be the number of social check-ins to category c. • cats to be the set of all categories defined by Foursquare. Then for each category...

Brown, C.; Lathia, N.; Mascolo, C.; Noulas, A.; Blondel, V.

2014-08-22

415

Social support and individual variability in patterns of haemodynamic reactivity and recovery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although it is generally accepted that laboratory manipulations of social support can moderate cardiovascular reactivity to psychosocial stress, the findings are highly variable and the mechanisms of influence remain to be fully elucidated. We used thoracic impedance cardiography to assess patterns of parasympathetic activation and examine whether social support buffers stress reactivity and\\/or prevents prolonged activation following a stressor. Sixty-one

Trini Closa León; Arie Nouwen; David Sheffield

2007-01-01

416

Contagion of Cooperation in Static and Fluid Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Cooperation is essential for successful human societies. Thus, understanding how cooperative and selfish behaviors spread from person to person is a topic of theoretical and practical importance. Previous laboratory experiments provide clear evidence of social contagion in the domain of cooperation, both in fixed networks and in randomly shuffled networks, but leave open the possibility of asymmetries in the spread of cooperative and selfish behaviors. Additionally, many real human interaction structures are dynamic: we often have control over whom we interact with. Dynamic networks may differ importantly in the goals and strategic considerations they promote, and thus the question of how cooperative and selfish behaviors spread in dynamic networks remains open. Here, we address these questions with data from a social dilemma laboratory experiment. We measure the contagion of both cooperative and selfish behavior over time across three different network structures that vary in the extent to which they afford individuals control over their network ties. We find that in relatively fixed networks, both cooperative and selfish behaviors are contagious. In contrast, in more dynamic networks, selfish behavior is contagious, but cooperative behavior is not: subjects are fairly likely to switch to cooperation regardless of the behavior of their neighbors. We hypothesize that this insensitivity to the behavior of neighbors in dynamic networks is the result of subjects’ desire to attract new cooperative partners: even if many of one’s current neighbors are defectors, it may still make sense to switch to cooperation. We further hypothesize that selfishness remains contagious in dynamic networks because of the well-documented willingness of cooperators to retaliate against selfishness, even when doing so is costly. These results shed light on the contagion of cooperative behavior in fixed and fluid networks, and have implications for influence-based interventions aiming at increasing cooperative behavior. PMID:23840422

Jordan, Jillian J.; Rand, David G.; Arbesman, Samuel; Fowler, James H.; Christakis, Nicholas A.

2013-01-01

417

75 FR 65363 - Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Background: The Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet...funding of basic behavioral and social sciences research (b-BSSR...that focus on basic mechanisms of behavior and social processes that are relevant...

2010-10-22

418

Social Learning Strategies in Networked Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When making decisions, humans can observe many kinds of information about others' activities, but their effects on performance are not well understood. We investigated social learning strategies using a simple problem-solving task in which participants search a complex space, and each can view and imitate others' solutions. Results…

Wisdom, Thomas N.; Song, Xianfeng; Goldstone, Robert L.

2013-01-01

419

Social Networks and Loneliness in Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The long-term care of dementia sufferers has been conceptualized as a chronic stressor because of the growing evidence that the stress of caring for such an individual has adverse effects on caregivers, including significant decrements in social/recreational activities, emotional and physical fatigue, and depressive symptomatology. Because of…

Golden-Kreutz, Deanna M.; And Others

420

Carmen Montana, the General Education Diploma, and Her Social Network.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focuses on the experience of a Black woman who returned to school for her General Education Diploma (GED) certificate. Sees the way she changes her social network of friends and herself over time. Reveals the themes of improved literacy skills, heightened confidence, community activism, and youth leadership, as she circulates in her community and…

Dowdy, J. Kilgour

2001-01-01

421

Lifespan Differences in the Social Networks of Prison Inmates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Socioemotional Selectivity Theory (SST) (Carstensen, 1992, 1993) accounts for lifespan changes in human social networks and for the motivations which underlie those changes. SST is applied in this research with 256 prison inmates and non-inmates, ages 18-84, from Mississippi, Kansas, and New Mexico. Two research questions sought to identify (a)…

Bond, Gary D.; Thompson, Laura A.; Malloy, Daniel M.

2005-01-01

422

Toward Worm Detection in Online Social Networks Pennsylvania State University  

E-print Network

Space in August 2008 [6] [10] [14]. It has generated 56 variants and has infected many other web- sites@cse.psu.edu ABSTRACT Worms propagating in online social networking (OSN) web- sites have become a major security threat to both the web- sites and their users in recent years. Since these worms exhibit unique propagation

Zhu, Sencun

423

Tag Clouds in the Blogosphere: Electronic Literacy and Social Networking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Electronic literacy today is a moving target. How and why people read and write online are evolving at the fast pace of Internet time. One of the most striking developments in the past few years has been how new social networking phenomena on the Web like community tagging, shared bookmarking, and blogs have created convergences between consumers…

Godwin-Jones, Robert

2006-01-01

424

Web Sites for Young Children: Gateway to Online Social Networking?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traffic on Web sites for young children (ages 3-12) has increased exponentially in recent years. Advocates proclaim that they are safe introductions to the Internet and online social networking and teach essential 21st-century skills. Critics note developmental concerns. In this article, we provide basic information about Web sites for young…

Bauman, Sheri; Tatum, Tanisha

2009-01-01

425

Social Networks and the Semantic Web Yahoo! Research Barcelona  

E-print Network

Social Networks and the Semantic Web Peter Mika Yahoo! Research Barcelona Abstract and the Semantic Web field of AI can benefit from each other's models and methods. In the first part. This latter work has received a Best Paper Award at the International Semantic Web Conference (ISWC

Baeza-Yates, Ricardo

426

The Social Networks of Women Experiencing Domestic Violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research literature has demonstrated that battered women living in shelters experience impaired social support. This study examines this phenomenon among battered women living in the community. This study compared a group of pregnant battered women (n=145) and a group of pregnant nonbattered women (n=58) in terms of their structural [e.g., total number of supporters, network members in violent relationships

Alytia A. Levendosky; G. Anne Bogat; Sally A. Theran; Jennifer S. Trotter; Alexander von Eye; William S. Davidson; II

2004-01-01

427

Analysis of Topological Characteristics of Huge Online Social Networking Services  

E-print Network

-1-59593-654-7/07/0005. Cyworld, the largest SNS in South Korea, had already 10 million users 2 years ago, one fourth of the entire population of South Korea. MySpace and orkut, similar social network- ing services, have also more Department of Physics KAIST, Deajeon, Korea yongyeol@gmail.com Seungyeop Han NHN Corp. Korea syhan

Moon, Sue B.

428

BU Social Science Methods Network Inventory of Graduate Methods Courses  

E-print Network

concepts covered in a first statistics course (e.g., CAS MA 613) and presents, in detail, more advancedBU Social Science Methods Network Inventory of Graduate Methods Courses School Course number Course RS 653 Quantitative Research Methods 4 Req. RS 600 Descriptive and inferential statistics most

Goldberg, Bennett

429

Circle-based Recommendation in Online Social Networks Xiwang Yang  

E-print Network

Circle-based Recommendation in Online Social Networks Xiwang Yang ECE Department Polytechnic of"Friends Circles", which refines the domain-oblivious "Friends" con- cept. RS should also benefit from domain-specific "Trust Circles". Intuitively, a user may trust different subsets of friends

Liu, Yong

430

Association of Childhood Abuse with Homeless Women's Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Childhood abuse has been linked to negative sequelae for women later in life including drug and alcohol use and violence as victim or perpetrator and may also affect the development of women's social networks. Childhood abuse is prevalent among at-risk populations of women (such as the homeless) and thus may have a stronger impact on…

Green, Harold D., Jr.; Tucker, Joan S.; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P.; Ryan, Gery W.; Zhou, Annie J.

2012-01-01

431

Teacher Agency in Educational Reform: Lessons from Social Networks Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a context for understanding how social networks among teachers support or constrain school improvement in terms of instructional practice, professional development, and educational reform. It comments on the articles in this special issue, summarizing their contributions to the field. This analysis reveals several important…

Datnow, Amanda

2012-01-01

432

Social Networks and Performance in Distributed Learning Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networks play an essential role in learning environments as a key channel for knowledge sharing and students' support. In distributed learning communities, knowledge sharing does not occur as spontaneously as when a working group shares the same physical space; knowledge sharing depends even more on student informal connections. In this…

Cadima, Rita; Ojeda, Jordi; Monguet, Josep M.

2012-01-01

433

Growing up with Social Networks and Online Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This presentation examines child and adolescent social networking with an emphasis on how this unprecedented form of communication can be used to contribute to healthy growth and development. Most literature about child and adolescent relationships reflects yesterday's world, a time when face-to-face encounters were the only concern. Students saw…

Strom, Paris; Strom, Robert

2012-01-01

434

Social Networking as Educational Tool: A Community of Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networking sites have become such a common part of human culture that educators use them daily--whether it's to post a quick personal update, tweet a thought or great link, or blog to their students about an upcoming assignment. The National Association of Agricultural Educators (NAAE) has taken that concept a step further, however, by…

Fritsch, Julie

2012-01-01

435

Virtual History: A Socially Networked Pedagogy of Enlightenment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Twenty-first-century undergraduates often find eighteenth-century culture difficult to access and, influenced by popular assumptions about the period in current media theory, characterise the century as individualist, underestimating the cultural significance of social networking in literary and political history. Purpose: This study…

Ellison, Katherine; Matthews, Carol

2010-01-01

436

Social Network Analysis: An Overview of Recent Developments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous attempts to describe the "structure" of social systems have failed either because of the researcher's presuppositions about the system or because of his inability to deal with the massive amounts of data that a human system necessarily generates. Recent advances in computer software, Network Analysis Program (NEGOPY). have made it…

Richards, William D., Jr.; Lindsey, Georg

437

The Intersection of Online Social Networking with Medical Professionalism  

PubMed Central

Aim To measure the frequency and content of online social networking among medical students and residents. Methods Using the online network Facebook, we evaluated online profiles of all medical students (n?=?501) and residents (n?=?312) at the University of Florida, Gainesville. Objective measures included the existence of a profile, whether it was made private, and any personally identifiable information. Subjective outcomes included photographic content, affiliated social groups, and personal information not generally disclosed in a doctor–patient encounter. Results Social networking with Facebook is common among medical trainees, with 44.5% having an account. Medical students used it frequently (64.3%) and residents less frequently (12.8%, p?social networking in medical trainees is common in the current culture of emerging professionals, a majority of users allow anyone to view their profile. With a significant proportion having subjectively inappropriate content, ACGME competencies in professionalism must include instruction on the intersection of personal and professional identities. PMID:18612723

Dawson, Kara; Ferdig, Richard; Black, Erik W.; Boyer, J.; Coutts, Jade; Black, Nicole Paradise

2008-01-01

438

Engagement with News Content in Online Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports indicate that as the Internet is displacing traditional news sources, younger users continue to be disconnected from the news. Fortunately, the Internet provides new ways of sharing and discussing news stories with others through social networking sites such as Facebook, which may be important for engaging users in the news they read…

Oeldorf-Hirsch, Anne

2011-01-01

439

Simulations of agents in social networks harvesting a resource  

Microsoft Academic Search

Managing natural resources increasingly requires an understanding not only of the underlying resource dynamics but also the dynamics of human use. In an agent-based model, we simulate agents harvesting a renewable resource, and examine the effect of agents in different social networks on their ability to exploit the resource under different levels of uncertainty. When uncertainty in the resource is

L. R. Little; A. D. McDonald

2007-01-01

440

NFCSocial: Social Networking in Mobility through IMS and NFC  

Microsoft Academic Search

In our article, we present NFCSocial, a mobile application prototype which uses the near field communication (NFC) technology to ease the update of presence information on federated communication systems and social networks. We discuss some technical choices we made in order to use contextual information retrieved via NFC in our application and to connect to an IP multimedia subsystem (IMS)

Antoine Fressancourt; Colombe Hérault; Eric Ptak

2009-01-01

441

27 Migration,Poverty,Security andSocialNetworks:ACentral  

E-print Network

417 27 Migration,Poverty,Security andSocialNetworks:ACentral AmericanPerspective Abelardo Morales introduction to understanding the migra- tion­poverty relationship from a different perspective, i of inequality and as a resource for poverty alleviation strategies, from a Central American perspective

Richner, Heinz

442

Privacy challenges in the online social networking era  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online Social Networking (OSN) services such as Facebook and Twitter are immensely popular. Their users entrust them with sensitive data such as friends lists, pictures and messages. This data can be directly shared with other users or can be handed to the third-party applications for further processing. Our work focuses on on the many privacy and trust issues that OSNs

Amre Shakimov; Landon P. Cox

2011-01-01

443

A collaborative face recognition framework on a social network platform  

Microsoft Academic Search

Face recognition has many useful applications spanning surveillance, law enforcement, information security, smart card and entertainment technologies. Very recently, a learning based face recognition system is also seen to be applied to Web platform combining face recognition and Web service. However, many existing methods which focused on recognition accuracy cannot cope with the new social network platform because the adopted

Kwontaeg Choi; Hyeran Byun; Kar-ann Toh

2008-01-01

444

Social Network Analysis of Terrorist Organizations in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we have tried to derive a linkage map of terrorist organizations in India, using the methods of Social Network Analysis. The presence of links between terrorist organizations has been inferred from media reports of terrorist violence, where the frequency of co-occurrence of names of terrorist organizations has been used as a basis for inferring intensity of links.

Aparna Basu

445

Social network for human-based environmental monitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of a social network for monitoring a geographic area introduces the possibility of realizing new applications. Monitoring wide areas with video-surveillance and remote sensing techniques is extremely expensive in relation to the spatial and temporal resolution. This means involving inhabitants, workers and visitors of parks, urban and heritage wide areas in environmental monitoring process. In this paper the

Alessandro Quarto; Domenico Soldo; A. Giove; A. Amato

2010-01-01

446

Students and Social Networking Sites: The Posting Paradox  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports the results of a field study in which undergraduate students were questioned about their use of social networking sites and the appropriateness of the content that they post. The responses indicate that students routinely post content that they realise is not appropriate for all audiences, especially potential employers.…

Miller, Robert; Parsons, Kristine; Lifer, David

2010-01-01

447

Knowledge Sharing via Social Networking Platforms in Organizations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Knowledge Management Systems have been actively promoted for decades within organizations but have frequently failed to be used. Recently, deployments of enterprise social networking platforms used for knowledge management have become commonplace. These platforms help harness the knowledge of workers by serving as repositories of knowledge as well…

Kettles, Degan

2012-01-01

448

Social Network Analysis in Human Resource Development: A New Methodology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through an exhaustive review of the literature, this article looks at the applicability of social network analysis (SNA) in the field of humanresource development. The literature review revealed that a number of disciplines have adopted this unique methodology, which has assisted in the development of theory. SNA is a methodology for examining the structure among actors, groups, and organizations and

John-Paul Hatala

2006-01-01

449

SoNavNet: a framework for social navigation networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Location-Based Services (LBSs) and Social Networks (SN) have been developed independently with different technologies and for different purposes. However, due to their success with respect to the demand for them and for the reason that they overlap in utilizing \\

Hassan A. Karimi; Benjamin Zimmerman; Alper Ozcelik; Duangduen Roongpiboonsopit

2009-01-01

450

Group Proximity Measure for Recommending Groups in Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are currently, thousands of online social networks (OSN) available, each of which hosts millions of users. Users make new friendship links, join groups on diverse topics, share opinions and thus help in building a big knowledge repository. In this paper we study the problem of defining proximity measure between groups (communities) of OSN. Understanding the proximity among the groups

Barna Saha; Lise Getoor

451

Future employment selection methods: evaluating social networking web sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The use of social networking web sites (SNWs), like Facebook and MySpace, has become extremely popular, particularly with today's emerging workforce. Employers, aware of this phenomenon, have begun to use the personal information available on SNWs to make hiring decisions. The purpose of this paper is to examine the feasibility of using applicant personal information currently available on

Donald H. Kluemper; Peter A. Rosen

2009-01-01

452

LiveS Cube: An Experiment for Mobile Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contacts Address Book (CAB)'s maintenance is a big problem because each user has to deal with hundreds of contact information in his or her address book. Data Lock-in also hurdle their desire to change mobile platform for new applications. In this paper, we solve this problem by exploiting the online social network (OSN), making mobile users maintain their own contacts

Yu-qian Li; Yang Liu; Zhi-fang Liu; Chao Liu; Zhao-Nan Li; Fu-ye Han; Jun Li; Ming Xu; Xin Guan; Zhen Chen

2011-01-01

453

Are social networking profiles reliable indicators of sensational interests?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sensational interests are sometimes reported on the personal profiles of social networking web sites such as Facebook. Can these reports be validated against established psychometric tools used by forensic psychologists? Given that web sites and personal profiles can be used as evidence of a person’s ‘character’ in legal contexts, evaluating their reliability and validity is important. This study evaluated the

Gareth Hagger-Johnson; Vincent Egan; David Stillwell

2011-01-01

454

E-Business Social Network Optimization and Visualization  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes about the optimization of the e-business social network visualization after the searching process. Basically, we found that the current e-business web pages having a low quality of connection between each other. It means that the current search engines are not able to search the relevant result and to show the connections between each Web page and how

Siti Nurkhadijah Aishah Ibrahim; Ali Selamat

2008-01-01

455

Minimizing content provisioning cost in heterogeneous Social Wireless Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces an optimal cooperative caching policy for minimizing electronic content provisioning cost in Social Wireless Networks (SWNET). The SWNETs are typically formed by a collection of mobile devices, such as data enabled phones, net-books, electronic book readers etc., sharing common interests in electronic content, and physically gathering in settings such as University campuses, work places, malls, airports, train

Mahmoud Taghizadeh; Subir Biswas

2011-01-01

456

Social Networks among Early Adolescent Zimbabweans in Extended Families.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined impact of family organization on young adolescent Zimbabweans' perception of their social networks. Found that compared to counterparts in modified extended families, adolescents in traditional extended families perceived higher intimacy from their family; lower intimacy from non-family targets; lower support from parents, other adult…

Harrison, Algea O.; And Others

1997-01-01

457

The socialbot network: when bots socialize for fame and money  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online Social Networks (OSNs) have become an integral part of today's Web. Politicians, celebrities, revolutionists, and others use OSNs as a podium to deliver their message to millions of active web users. Unfortunately, in the wrong hands, OSNs can be used to run astroturf campaigns to spread misinformation and propaganda. Such campaigns usually start off by infiltrating a targeted OSN

Yazan Boshmaf; Ildar Muslukhov; Konstantin Beznosov; Matei Ripeanu

2011-01-01

458

Mobile Search - Social Network Search Using Mobile Devices Demonstration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile search prototype demonstrates the possibilities of social network search in N800 mobile devices. Search is initiated from a N800 mobile device to search the contacts in mobile device's addressbook. The contacts can be other N800 mobile devices running mobile Web server or normal Web servers in the Internet with Drupal content management system. Mobile device users can select which

P. Tiago; N. Kotilainen; M. Vapa

2008-01-01

459

ICCE/ICCAI 2000 Full & Short Papers (Networked Social Learning).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains the following full and short papers on networked social learning from ICCE/ICCAI 2000 (International Conference on Computers in Education/International Conference on Computer-Assisted Instruction): (1)" A European Learning Environment: Reflections on Teaching and Learning in a Multinational Virtual Learning Community" (Brian…

2000

460

Modeling Social Network Relationships via t-Cherry Junction Trees  

E-print Network

Modeling Social Network Relationships via t-Cherry Junction Trees Brian Proulx and Junshan Zhang the underlying structure therein. In this paper, we employ the t-cherry junction tree, a very recent advancement in this approach: 1) the best approximation possible via junction trees belongs to the class of t-cherry junction

Reisslein, Martin

461

CitizensVoice.com Social networks ripe for crime, consequences  

E-print Network

CitizensVoice.com Social networks ripe for crime, consequences limited BY DENIS J. O'MALLEY (STAFF. Scranton detectives issued a court order to Facebook on April 1 seeking records from the victim's Facebook to pursue. But first, investigators must establish that a crime has actually been committed. #12;"Some

Belogay, Eugene A.

462

A Semantics-based Approach to Large-Scale Mobile Social Networking  

E-print Network

Khan # Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011 Abstract Mobile ad hoc social networks are selfA Semantics-based Approach to Large-Scale Mobile Social Networking Juan Li & Hui Wang & Samee Ullah- configuring social networks that connect users using mobile devices, such as laptops, PDAs, and cellular

Li, Juan "Jen"

463

Selective Narrowing of Social Networks across Adulthood is Associated with Improved Emotional Experience in Daily Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Past research has documented age differences in the size and composition of social networks that suggest that networks grow smaller with age and include an increasingly greater proportion of well-known social partners. According to socioemotional selectivity theory, such changes in social network composition serve an antecedent emotion regulatory…

English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

2014-01-01

464

Economy-driven Shaping of Social Networks and Emerging Class Behaviors  

E-print Network

Economy-driven Shaping of Social Networks and Emerging Class Behaviors Philippe Caillou, Frederic [1, 2, 3] or driven by the social network [4, 5, 6]. This paper focuses on the interrelationship between social networks and economic activities. Compared to the state of the art, the main originality

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

465

The Quality of Social Networks: Its Determinants and Impacts on Helping and Volunteering in Macao  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pro-social behaviors serve essential societal functions. This study examines the factors affecting the quality of social networks, in terms of network size and perceived respect. It further explores the role of social networks in enhancing helping intention and helping behaviors. Eight hundred and eighty people were randomly interviewed by phone.…

Tong, Kwok Kit; Hung, Eva P. W.; Yuen, Sze Man

2011-01-01

466

PatientsLikeMe: Empowerment and Representation in a Patient-Centered Social Network  

E-print Network

LikeMe's mixture of social networking and health management tools, we consider the role of online health. Author Keywords Online health communities, social networking, personal health information. INTRODUCTION "disease communities" in which approximately 47,000 patients interact using social networking tools akin

Hayes, Gillian R.

467

Social Network Characteristics of Urban Adolescents in Brief Substance Abuse Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the social network characteristics of 102 urban adolescents in brief substance abuse treatment are described and analyzed longitudinally to examine risk and protective mechanisms. The treatment intervention had one session devoted to social support and networks. Social networks were conceptualized and measured along two dimensions (a risk and a protective dimension) with four categories within each dimension.

Michael Mason

2008-01-01

468

On Link Privacy in Randomizing Social Networks Xiaowei Ying and Xintao Wu  

E-print Network

of perturbation to better protect sensitive links. 2 Related Work Social network analysis has increasing interest work dedicated to privacy preserving social network analysis with the exception of some very recentOn Link Privacy in Randomizing Social Networks Xiaowei Ying and Xintao Wu University of North

Wu, Xintao

469

LibraryThing, Shelfari, Anobii and the Others: Are Book Social Networks Suitable for Astronomy?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper discusses the transition from Web 1.0 to Web 2.0, providing examples of both, with particular regard to Social Networks. The focus will be on Book Social Networks and their main features. Data and evaluation of the examined Book Social Networks will be provided, along with pros and cons of their suitability for use in astronomy libraries.

Martines, F.

2010-10-01

470

Multi-resolution Social Network Community Identification and Maintenance on Big Data Platform  

E-print Network

Multi-resolution Social Network Community Identification and Maintenance on Big Data Platform topics in rich social network content simultaneously. Keywords-community identification; Big Data {korpe,oulusoy}@cs.bilkent.edu.tr Abstract--Community identification in social networks is of great

Ulusoy, �zgür

471

Utilizing Dynamic Molecular Modelling Technique for Predicting Changes in Complex Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a method that utilises dynamic molecular modelling technique to track the changes within complex social network. The users forming a social network are interpreted as large sets of interacting particles. The data for the conducted research was obtained from e-mail communication within Enron company. The social network of employees was extracted and used to evaluate the methodology of

Krzysztof Juszczyszyn; Anna Musial; Katarzyna Musial; Piotr Bródka

2010-01-01

472

Leveraging Social Networks To Motivate Individuals to Reduce their Ecological Footprints  

Microsoft Academic Search

What role can social networking websites play in supporting large-scale group action and change? We are proposing to explore their use in supporting individual reduction in personal energy consumption. Here we summarize some existing uses of social networking on the web and propose an approach that integrates feedback about ecological footprint data into existing social networking sites and Internet portal

Jennifer Mankoff; Deanna Matthews; Susan R. Fussell; Michael Johnson

2007-01-01

473

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SOFTWARE ENGINEERING, MANUSCRIPT ID 1 StakeRare: Using Social Networks and  

E-print Network

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SOFTWARE ENGINEERING, MANUSCRIPT ID 1 StakeRare: Using Social Networks, builds a social network with stakeholders as nodes and their recommendations as links, and prioritises stakeholders using a variety of social network measures to determine their project influence. It then asks

Finkelstein, Anthony

474

Community Discovery in Social Networks via Heterogeneous Link Association Ah-Hwee Tan  

E-print Network

- alyze the performance of GHF-ART on two heterogeneous social network data sets and the promising resultsCommunity Discovery in Social Networks via Heterogeneous Link Association and Fusion Lei Meng Ah-ART), for discov- ering communities in heterogeneous social networks. Differ- ent from existing algorithms, GHF

Tan, Ah-Hwee

475

Airing Your Dirty Laundry: Vertical Integration, Reputational Capital, and Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the relationship between an ethnic-based social network and vertical integration decisions in the laundry services industry. We find that stores in the social network are significantly less likely to vertically integrate than nonmember stores. This has three primary implications. First, the social network may be lowering the costs of using the market more than facilitating in-house production.

Ricard Gil; Wesley R. Hartmann

2009-01-01

476

Adapting to Changing Resource Requirements for Coalition Formation in Self-Organized Social Networks  

E-print Network

.Allan@usu.edu Abstract Coalition formation in social networks, consisting of a graph of interdependent agents, allows many choices of which task to select and with whom to partner in the social network. Agents communicate patterns, and a mismatch of the skills supplied to the skills demanded. Keywords: Agents; Social Network

Allan, Vicki H.

477

System of Mobile Agents to Model Social Networks Marta C. Gonzalez,1,2  

E-print Network

System of Mobile Agents to Model Social Networks Marta C. Gonza´lez,1,2 Pedro G. Lind,1,3 and Hans) We propose a model of mobile agents to construct social networks, based on a system of moving possible schemes to reproduce other networks of particular social contacts, namely, sexual contacts. DOI

Suresh, Subra

478

NESSTAR: Network Social Science Tools and Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The long awaited NESSTAR system, dubbed the "Social Science Dream Machine" by some (see the September 10, 1999 Scout Report), has moved from a beta version into operational mode. Currently, NESSTAR has three main components: 1. NESSTAR Explorer, a search engine for social science data and resources that allows users "to find data across organisational and national boundaries" and browse and download both data and metadata; 2. NESSTAR Publisher, a "collection of tools and resources that enables data publishers and distributors to disseminate data via the Internet;" and 3. an overview of the NESSTAR System Architecture, showing how NESSTAR builds on "state-of-the-art technology like Java, XML, CORBA, etc." Most users will be interested in the Explorer, which currently allows users to retrieve descriptions of data and, in many cases, the data and metadata from the Danish Data Archive, the Finnish Social Science Data Services, the Norweigian Social Science Data Services, and the UK Data Archive. Search options include simple, field, and advanced, and results include information on location, description and accessibility of the data. When data is available it comes up in .html with a framed table of contents. A User Guide is available to help researchers navigate the Explorer. Already, NESSTAR is an excellent resource for instant access to a wide range of social science data, particularly on European topics, and plans are to add more major archives in the future. Caveat: The Macintosh version of NESSTAR Explorer requires a Java 2 virtual machine, but, unfortunately, none are currently available for the Mac OS.

479

Social Network Changes and Life Events across the Life Span: A Meta-Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For researchers and practitioners interested in social relationships, the question remains as to how large social networks typically are, and how their size and composition change across adulthood. On the basis of predictions of socioemotional selectivity theory and social convoy theory, we conducted a meta-analysis on age-related social network

Wrzus, Cornelia; Hanel, Martha; Wagner, Jenny; Neyer, Franz J.

2013-01-01

480

The Peer Context of Adolescent Substance Use: Findings from Social Network Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To examine the peer context of adolescent substance use, social network analysis was used to measure three domains of attributes of peer networks: social embeddedness, social status, and social proximity to substance users. The sample was a panel of 5,104 sixth, seventh, and eighth graders in three public school systems surveyed every 6 months for…

Ennett, Susan T.; Bauman, Karl E.; Hussong, Andrea; Faris, Robert; Foshee, Vangie A.; Cai, Li; DuRant, Robert H.

2006-01-01

481

Social Status and Role Analysis of Palin's Email Network Arizona State University  

E-print Network

corpus does not readily lend itself to social network analysis due to problems such as noisy email dataSocial Status and Role Analysis of Palin's Email Network Xia Hu Arizona State University Tempe, AZ data source to study intricate social structures. Social status and role analysis on a personal email

Liu, Huan

482

Network of Social Groups or Let's have a Party  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a simple model for growing up and depletion of parties due to the permanent communication between the participants of the events. Because of the rapid exchange of information, everybody is able to evaluate its own and all other parties by means of the list of its friends. Therefore, the number of participants at different parties can be changed incessantly. Depending on the depth of the social contacts, which will be characterized by a parameter ?, a stable distribution of party members emerges. At a critical ?c an abrupt depletion of almost all parties is observed and as the consequence all the people are assembled at a single party. The model is based on a hierarchical social network. The probability that a certain person is contacted by another one depends on the social distance introduced within the network and homophily parameter ?.

Brandau, Marian; Trimper, Steffen

483

Information Spread of Emergency Events: Path Searching on Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Emergency has attracted global attentions of government and the public, and it will easily trigger a series of serious social problems if it is not supervised effectively in the dissemination process. In the Internet world, people communicate with each other and form various virtual communities based on social networks, which lead to a complex and fast information spread pattern of emergency events. This paper collects Internet data based on data acquisition and topic detection technology, analyzes the process of information spread on social networks, describes the diffusions and impacts of that information from the perspective of random graph, and finally seeks the key paths through an improved IBF algorithm. Application cases have shown that this algorithm can search the shortest spread paths efficiently, which may help us to guide and control the information dissemination of emergency events on early warning. PMID:24600323

Hu, Hongzhi; Wu, Tunan

2014-01-01

484

Social network structure and HIV infection among injecting drug users in Lithuania: gatekeepers as bridges of infection.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to assess-while controlling for individual risk characteristics-how certain social network structural characteristics (degree, eigenvector, and betweenness centrality) are related to HIV infections. Injecting drug users (N = 299) in Vilnius, Lithuania were recruited using incentivized chain referral sampling for a cross-sectional study. Sociometric social links were established between participants, and UCINET was used to calculate network measures. HIV prevalence was 10 %, and all except two knew they were infected. Of the five variables that remained significant in the final multivariate model, one showed temporal cumulative infection risk (more years since first drug injecting), three reflected informed altruism (always using condoms, less distributive syringe sharing and having not more than one sex partner), and one pointed to the importance of social network structure (betweenness centrality, indicating bridge populations). Loess regression indicates that betweenness may have the highest impact on HIV prevalence (about 60 vs. 20 % estimated HIV prevalence for the highest betweenness centrality values vs. highest age values). This analysis contributes to existing evidence showing both potential informed altruism (or maybe social desirability bias) in connection with HIV infection, and a link between HIV infection risk and the role of bridges within the social network of injecting drug user populations. These findings suggest the importance of harm reduction activities, including confidential testing and counseling, and of social network interventions. PMID:24469223

Gyarmathy, V Anna; Caplinskiene, Irma; Caplinskas, Saulius; Latkin, Carl A

2014-03-01

485

Epidemics in Adaptive Social Networks with Temporary Link Deactivation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Disease spread in a society depends on the topology of the network of social contacts. Moreover, individuals may respond to the epidemic by adapting their contacts to reduce the risk of infection, thus changing the network structure and affecting future disease spread. We propose an adaptation mechanism where healthy individuals may choose to temporarily deactivate their contacts with sick individuals, allowing reactivation once both individuals are healthy. We develop a mean-field description of this system and find two distinct regimes: slow network dynamics, where the adaptation mechanism simply reduces the effective number of contacts per individual, and fast network dynamics, where more efficient adaptation reduces the spread of disease by targeting dangerous connections. Analysis of the bifurcation structure is supported by numerical simulations of disease spread on an adaptive network. The system displays a single parameter-dependent stable steady state and non-monotonic dependence of connectivity on link deactivation rate.

Tunc, Ilker; Shkarayev, Maxim S.; Shaw, Leah B.

2013-04-01

486

Constructing Social Networks from Unstructured Group Dialog in Virtual Worlds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Virtual worlds and massively multi-player online games are rich sources of information about large-scale teams and groups, offering the tantalizing possibility of harvesting data about group formation, social networks, and network evolution. However these environments lack many of the cues that facilitate natural language processing in other conversational settings and different types of social media. Public chat data often features players who speak simultaneously, use jargon and emoticons, and only erratically adhere to conversational norms. In this paper, we present techniques for inferring the existence of social links from unstructured conversational data collected from groups of participants in the Second Life virtual world. We present an algorithm for addressing this problem, Shallow Semantic Temporal Overlap (SSTO), that combines temporal and language information to create directional links between participants, and a second approach that relies on temporal overlap alone to create undirected links between participants. Relying on temporal overlap is noisy, resulting in a low precision and networks with many extraneous links. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can ameliorate this problem by using network modularity optimization to perform community detection in the noisy networks and severing cross-community links. Although using the content of the communications still results in the best performance, community detection is effective as a noise reduction technique for eliminating the extra links created by temporal overlap alone.

Shah, Fahad; Sukthankar, Gita