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1

Self-Reports of Substance Abusers: The Impact of Social Desirability on Social Network Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is important to examine social desirability when interpreting self-report data from substance abusers. Social desirability is the tendency to respond on surveys that make people appear more favorable to others; thus, a strong desire for social approval is related to minimized reports of substance use. In the present study, the relationship between social desirability and different types of social

David R. Groh; Joseph R. Ferrari; Leonard A. Jason

2009-01-01

2

Semantic Networks and Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: To illustrate the need for social network metadata within semantic metadata. Design/methodology/approach: Surveys properties of social networks and the semantic web, suggests that social network analysis applies to semantic content, argues that semantic content is more searchable if social network metadata is merged with semantic web…

Downes, Stephen

2005-01-01

3

The research review of entrepreneur social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

As far as the new paradigm of social network was concerned, the paper began with the background and analyzed the definition of the concept from the standpoint of entrepreneurs. Then it outlined the core of the social network theory, summarized indicators and methods of measurement for the social network, reviewed the study of the social network as independent variables from

Yonghai Yu

2010-01-01

4

Computer Networks As Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer networks are inherently social networks, linking people, organizations, and knowledge. They are social institutions that should not be studied in isolation but as integrated into everyday lives. The proliferation of computer networks has facilitated a deemphasis on group solidarities at work and in the community and afforded a turn to networked societies that are loosely bounded and sparsely knit.

Barry Wellman

2001-01-01

5

Intelligent social network modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given: Web 2.0 has provided for a rapid growth of computer mediated social networks. Many notable Web 2.0 applications such as Facebook, Myspace and LinkedIn are social networks. Social relational networks are becoming an important technology in human behavioral modeling. Our goal here is to enrich the domain of social network modeling by introducing ideas from fuzzy

R. R. Yager

2009-01-01

6

Social network therapies and society: An overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this overview of the preceding papers, the author points to common themes: the complex nature of social network intervention; positive and negative effects; and different network constellations that vary with different clinical problems. The author raises the variables of ethnicity and social change as important variables of network effects which remain to be explained.

Edward F. Foulks

1981-01-01

7

Personal losses and deficiencies in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personal losses or exit events and deficiencies in personal social networks have both been shown to be associated with episodes of depression. This study found no evidence for an inverse correlation between exit events and primary social network variables in depressed psychiatric outpatients and in normal subjects. Social network deficiencies are probably stable over time and although they may increase

Traolach S. Brugha

1984-01-01

8

Intelligent Social Network Modeling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent development of Web 2.0 has provided an enormous increase in human interactions across all corners of the earth. One manifestation of this is the growth of computer mediated social networks. Many notable Web 2.0 applications such as Facebook, Myspace and LinkedIn are social networks. Relational networks are becoming an important technology for modeling these types of social networks

Ronald R. Yager

2009-01-01

9

Intelligent social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Personal homepages, blogs or virtual communities have contributed to the birth of the Social Networks. The success of these platforms will continue to increase while they are able to offer tools and services to improve users' social relationships. The rapid evolution of social networks, the growing business opportunities and the possibility to apply new techniques to a relatively unexplored domain,

Miguel; Angel Moreno; Pablo Muñoz; Daniel Díaz; María Dolores Rodríguez-Moreno

2011-01-01

10

Social networking sites.  

PubMed

In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools, social networking and social bookmarking sites, virtual worlds, and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes social networking Web sites and techniques to increase their safe use. PMID:20173583

Wink, Diane M

11

Social networks: looking ahead  

Microsoft Academic Search

By now, online social networks have become an indispensable part of both online and offline lives of human beings. A large fraction of time spent online by a user is directly influence by the social networks to which he\\/she belongs. This calls for a deeper examination of social networks as large-scale dynamic objects that foster efficient person-person interaction. The goal

Ravi Kumar; Alexander Tuzhilin; Christos Faloutsos; David Jensen; Gueorgi Kossinets; Jure Leskovec; Andrew Tomkins

2008-01-01

12

The Social Network Classroom  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity\\u000a of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper\\u000a presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of\\u000a traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has

Peter Bunus

2010-01-01

13

Social skill as a determinant of social networks and perceived social support in schizophrenia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors influencing supportive social networks of people with schizophrenia are little understood. Data from 46 outpatients with schizophrenia were analysed using structural equation modelling to test plausible sets of inter-relationships between social skill, social networks, and social support. The data supported a tentative model about the causal relationships between variables. Paths showed that people with greater social skill had larger

E. M. Macdonald; H. J. Jackson; R. L. Hayes; A. J. Baglioni; C. Madden

1998-01-01

14

Stop Social Network Pitfalls  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ask a group of teenagers how they spend their spare time and most will mention Facebook, YouTube, World of Warcraft, or Second Life – ‘virtual’ social networks that bring millions of people together online. The benefits of social networks have been touted but what about the pitfalls? Some teens will share everything about themselves to hundreds of online friends, most

K. Michael

2010-01-01

15

Towards Semantic Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer manipulated social networks are usually built from the explicit assertion by users that they have some relation with\\u000a other users or by the implicit evidence of such relations (e.g., co-authoring). However, since the goal of social network\\u000a analysis is to help users to take advantage of these networks, it would be convenient to take more information into account.\\u000a We

Jason J. Jung; Jérôme Euzenat

2007-01-01

16

Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

{Excerpt} Power no longer resides exclusively (if at all) in states, institutions, or large corporations. It is located in the networks that structure society. Social network analysis seeks to understand networks and their participants and has two main focuses: the actors and the relationships between them in a specific social context.\\u000aThe information revolution has given birth to new economies

Olivier Serrat

2009-01-01

17

Privacy in dynamic social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anonymization of social networks before they are published or shared has become an important research question. Recent work on anonymizing social networks has looked at privacy preserving techniques for publishing a single instance of the network. However, social networks evolve and a single instance is inadequate for analyzing the evolution of the social network or for performing any longitudinal data

Smriti Bhagat; Graham Cormode; Balachander Krishnamurthy; Divesh Srivastava

2010-01-01

18

Decentralized Online Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current Online social networks (OSN) are web services run on logically centralized infrastructure. Large OSN sites use content distribution networks and thus distribute some of the load by caching for performance reasons, nevertheless there is a central repository for user and application data. This centralized nature of OSNs has several drawbacks including scalability, privacy, dependence on a provider, need for being online for every transaction, and a lack of locality. There have thus been several efforts toward decentralizing OSNs while retaining the functionalities offered by centralized OSNs. A decentralized online social network (DOSN) is a distributed system for social networking with no or limited dependency on any dedicated central infrastructure. In this chapter we explore the various motivations of a decentralized approach to online social networking, discuss several concrete proposals and types of DOSN as well as challenges and opportunities associated with decentralization.

Datta, Anwitaman; Buchegger, Sonja; Vu, Le-Hung; Strufe, Thorsten; Rzadca, Krzysztof

19

Social network visualization in epidemiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiological investigations and interventions are increasingly focusing on social networks. Two aspects of social networks are relevant in this regard: the structure of networks and the function of networks. A better understanding of the processes that determine how networks form and how they operate with respect to the spread of behavior holds promise for improving public health. Visualizing social networks

Nicholas A. Christakis; James H. Fowler

2009-01-01

20

"I 'Deserve' Success": Academic Entitlement Attitudes and Their Relationships with Course Self-Efficacy, Social Networking, and Demographic Variables  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigated differences in university students' academic entitlement (AE) by demographic group (sex, college class, college generational status) as well as AE's relationship with self-efficacy for college coursework and social networking. It also investigated predictors of AE in first-generation (FG) students and continuing-generation…

Boswell, Stefanie S.

2012-01-01

21

Social Network Change Detection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Changes in observed social networks may signal an underlying change within an organization, and may even predict significant events or behaviors. The breakdown of a team's effectiveness, the emergence of informal leaders, or the preparation of an attack b...

I. A. McCulloh K. M. Carley

2008-01-01

22

Online social networks in economics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes how economists study social networks. While economists borrow from other fields like sociology or computer science, their approach of modeling of social networks is distinguished by the emphasis on the role of choices under constraints. Economists investigate how socioeconomic background and economic incentives affect the structure and composition of social networks. The characteristics of social networks are

Adalbert Mayer

2009-01-01

23

Visualizing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two distinct forms of display have been used to construct images of networks, one based on points and lines and the other on matrices. In most point and line displays the points represent social actors and the lines represent connections among the act ors. In matrix displays the rows and columns both represent social actors and numbers or symbols in

Linton Freeman

2000-01-01

24

Online Advertising in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networks offer opportunities to analyze user behavior and social connectivity and leverage resulting insights for effective online advertising. This chapter focuses on the role of social network information in online display advertising.

Bagherjeiran, Abraham; Bhatt, Rushi P.; Parekh, Rajesh; Chaoji, Vineet

25

Socializing electronics: Secure interactions in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks help us to follow friends and family daily lives. Home devices are rich in user's information so they are appropriate platforms to deploy social network applications. This article addresses two main requirements: content must be adapted to different devices and user's privacy must be respected. To enable social network interaction in home environments and to overcome privacy problems

Daniel Díaz-Sánchez; Andrés Marín; Florina Almenárez; Alberto Cortés

2010-01-01

26

Graphing Your Social Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students analyze their social networks using graph theory. They gather data on their own social relationships, either from Facebook interactions or the interactions they have throughout the course of a day, recording it in Microsoft Excel and using Cytoscape (a free, downloadable application) to generate social network graphs that visually illustrate the key persons (nodes) and connections between them (edges). The nodes in the Cytoscape graphs are color-coded and sized according to the importance of the node (in this activity, nodes are people in students' social networks). After the analysis, the graphs are further examined to see what can be learned from the visual representation. Students gain practice with graph theory vocabulary, including node, edge, betweeness centrality and degree on interaction, and learn about a range of engineering applications of graph theory.

Impart Ret Program

27

The Social Network Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

Bunus, Peter

28

Social networking and adolescents.  

PubMed

Online social networking is a 21st century innovation increasingly embraced by today's young people. It provides new opportunities for communication that expand an adolescent's world. Yet adults, often suspicious of new trends and technologies initially embraced by youth, often see these new environments as perilous places to visit. These fears have been accentuated by media hype, especially about sexual predators. How dangerous are they? Because the rush to go on these sites is a new phenomenon, research is as yet scant. This review explores current beliefs and knowledge about the dangers of social networking sites. PMID:19492691

Fuld, Gilbert L

2009-04-01

29

Social Network Infiltration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks are websites (or software that distributes media online) where users can distribute content to either a list of friends on that site or to anyone who surfs onto their page, and where those friends can interact and discuss the content. By linking to friends online, the users’ personal content (pictures, songs, favorite movies, diaries, websites, and so on) is dynamically distributed, and can "become viral", that is, get spread rapidly as more people see it and spread it themselves. Social networks are immensely popular around the planet, especially with younger users. The biggest social networks are Facebook and MySpace; an IYA2009 user already exists on Facebook, and one will be created for MySpace (in fact, several NASA satellites such as GLAST and Swift already have successful MySpace pages). Twitter is another network where data distribution is more limited; it is more like a mini-blog, but is very popular. IYA2009 already has a Twitter page, and will be updated more often with relevant information. In this talk I will review the existing social networks, show people how and why they are useful, and give them the tools they need to contribute meaningfully to IYA's online reach.

Plait, Philip

2008-05-01

30

Decentralized Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Current Online social networks (OSN) are web services run on logically centralized infrastructure. Large OSN sites use content\\u000a distribution networks and thus distribute some of the load by caching for performance reasons, nevertheless there is a central\\u000a repository for user and application data. This centralized nature of OSNs has several drawbacks including scalability, privacy,\\u000a dependence on a provider, need for

Anwitaman Datta; Sonja Buchegger; Le-Hung Vu; Thorsten Strufe; Krzysztof Rzadca

2010-01-01

31

SOCIAL NETWORKS, INFORMATION, AND COORDINATION The Role of Information and Influence in Social Networks Examining the Association Between Social Network Structure and Job Mobility  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines two mechanisms through which social networks are related to job mobility: (1) access to diverse sources of information about job openings and (2) nonredundant sources of influence. Using data on job changing and social networks among television station managers, we assess the extent to which job information and influence variables mediate the relationship between social network structure

MICHAEL DAVERN; DAVID S. HACHEN

32

Social network and addiction.  

PubMed

In recent decades, the rapid development of innovative Internet-based communication technologies created a new field of academic study among scholars. Particularly, the attention of researchers is focusing on new ways to form relationship-thought social web. Social Network sites constitute a new form of web communities, where people meet and share interests and activities. Due to exponential growth of these sites, an increasing number of scholars are beginning to study the emergent phenomena in order to identify any psychopathological risk related to use of social web, such as addiction. This article examines the recent literature about this issue. PMID:19592725

La Barbera, Daniele; La Paglia, Filippo; Valsavoia, Rosaria

2009-01-01

33

Privacy, Social Network Sites, and Social Relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the growth of the Internet comes a growth in a ubiquitous networked society. Common Web 2.0 applications include a rapidly growing trend for social network sites. Social network sites typically converged different relationship types into one group of “friends.” However, with such vast interconnectivity, convergence of relationships, and information sharing by individual users comes an increased risk of privacy

David J. Houghton; Adam N. Joinson

2010-01-01

34

Promoting social network awareness: A social network monitoring system  

Microsoft Academic Search

To increase communication and collaboration opportunities, members of a community must be aware of the social networks that exist within that community. This paper describes a social network monitoring system – the KIWI system – that enables users to register their interactions and visualize their social networks. The system was implemented in a distributed research community and the results have

Rita Cadima; Carlos Ferreira; Josep Maria Monguet; Jordi Ojeda; Joaquin Fernandez

2010-01-01

35

Promoting Social Network Awareness: A Social Network Monitoring System  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To increase communication and collaboration opportunities, members of a community must be aware of the social networks that exist within that community. This paper describes a social network monitoring system--the KIWI system--that enables users to register their interactions and visualize their social networks. The system was implemented in a…

Cadima, Rita; Ferreira, Carlos; Monguet, Josep; Ojeda, Jordi; Fernandez, Joaquin

2010-01-01

36

Social Network Infiltration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are websites (or software that distributes media online) where users can distribute content to either a list of friends on that site or to anyone who surfs onto their page, and where those friends can interact and discuss the content. By linking to friends online, the users' personal content (pictures, songs, favorite movies, diaries, websites, and so on)

Philip Plait

2008-01-01

37

Anonymizing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advances in technology have made it possible to collect data about individuals and the connections between them, such as email correspondence and friendships. Agencies and researchers who have col- lected such social network data often have a compelling interest in allowing others to analyze the data. However, in many cases the data describes relationships that are private (e.g., email correspondence)

Michael Hay; Gerome Miklau; David Jensen; Philipp Weis; Siddharth Srivastava

38

Globalization and social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Globalization is a universal phenomenon that not only makes domestic economies restructure, but also may impact other areas of local societies. This paper studies the effect of globalization on human relations, in particular on the formation of social networks, both bonding and bridging: I postulate that globalization induces labor market and workplace dynamics that would be destructive. Data come from

Justina A. V. Fischer

2012-01-01

39

Change Detection in Social Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Social network analysis (SNA) has become an important analytic tool for analyzing terrorist networks, friendly command and control structures, and a wide variety of other applications. This project proposes a new method for detecting change in social netw...

D. B. Horn I. McCulloh J. Graham K. Carley M. Webb

2008-01-01

40

Trust Maximization in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Trust is a human-related phenomenon in social networks. Trust research on social networks has gained much attention on its\\u000a usefulness, and on modeling propagations. There is little focus on finding maximum trust in social networks which is particularly\\u000a important when a social network is oriented by certain tasks. In this paper, we propose a trust maximization algorithm based\\u000a on the

Justin Zhan; Xing Fang

2011-01-01

41

Evolve: Analyzing Evolving Social Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Many current social network analytic methods work by analyzing a static aggregate graph, which provides a limited view of the structure and behavior of real-world social networks. Social networks in reality are dynamic and evolve over time as people join ...

S. Macskassy

2012-01-01

42

Analyzing Enterprise Social Media Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Broadening adoption of social media applications within the enterprise offers a new and valuable data source for insight into the social structure of organizations. Social media applications generate networks when employees use features to create \\

Marc Smith; Derek L. Hansen; Eric Gleave

2009-01-01

43

Autonomic analysis of social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern society offers us many ways to socially interact with friends, colleagues, co-workers, etc. In this scenario, our social networks are in constantly changing and interests, objectives, and other things involved in each social interaction can be affected or even remain out of reach. For each change, the social network has to be re-analyzed to show us if the interests

Ricardo Tadeu da Silva; Jano Moreira de Souza; Jonice Oliveira

2011-01-01

44

Psychological dimensions of social networks: A multimethod analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two exploratory studies are reported which sought to iden@ important psychological dimensions of social networks. Both studies investigated the social networks of college students, using as subfects the same 16 male and 16 female students. The first study employed multiple regression to generate predictor variables to students'ratings of satisfaction with their social network. The second study assessed how structurally contrasting

Barton J. Hirsch

1979-01-01

45

Re-Socializing Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

At present, the rapid development of Online Social Networks (OSN) has strong influence on our global community'scommunication patterns. This primarily manifests in an exponentially increasing number of users of Social Network Services (SNS) such as Face book or Twitter. A fundamental problem accompanied by the utilization of OSNs is given by an insufficient guarantee of its users' informational self-determination and

M. Du?rr; Martin Werner; Marco Maier

2010-01-01

46

Online Social Networks: Why Do \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the proliferation of online social networks, there has been a growing interest in understanding why people come and use\\u000a this new type of communication platform. In this paper, we explore the factors that drive people to use online social networks\\u000a (e.g., Facebook). We conceptualize the use of online social networks as intentional social action and examine the relative\\u000a impact

Pui-yee Chiu; Christy M. K. Cheung; Matthew K. O. Lee

2008-01-01

47

Online social network acceptance: a social perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Building upon studies of social psychology and information system literature, this study aims to propose and empirically test a research model that incorporates interpersonal motives (sociability and status) and hedonic motive (perceived enjoyment), and the three processes of social influence: compliance, identification and internalisation, to explain one's intention to use social network (SN) web sites. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The

David C. Li

2011-01-01

48

Introduction to Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Network analysis focuses on patterns of relations between and among people, organizations, states, etc. It aims to\\u000a describe networks of relations as fully as possible, identify prominent patterns in such networks, trace the flow of information\\u000a through them, and discover what effects these relations and networks have on people and organizations. Social network analysis\\u000a offers a very promising potential

Panayiotis Zaphiris; Chee Siang Ang

2009-01-01

49

Social Networks and Occupational Choice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks help workers to find jobs more easily. But those jobs need not be in occupations in which workers can fully exploit their abilities. If so, then social contacts can generate mismatch between a worker's occupational comparative advantage and his actual productivity. As a result, economies that rely extensively on social networks can exhibit low labor force quality and

Samuel Bentolila; Claudio Michelacci; Javier Suarez

50

Online Advertising in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Online social networks offer opportunities to analyze user behavior and social connectivity and leverage resulting insights\\u000a for effective online advertising. This chapter focuses on the role of social network information in online display advertising.

Abraham Bagherjeiran; Rushi P. Bhatt; Rajesh Parekh; Vineet Chaoji

2010-01-01

51

Games and social network structure  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine repeated games played among members of a society who are connected in a social network. Players can observe each others' play, but can only directly affect the payoffs of their social neighbors. We characterize the social network patterns that sustain repeated cooperative equilibrium behavior and are robust in various ways. High levels of cooperation can only be sustained

Matthew O. Jackson

2010-01-01

52

Social Network Visualization in Epidemiology  

PubMed Central

Epidemiological investigations and interventions are increasingly focusing on social networks. Two aspects of social networks are relevant in this regard: the structure of networks and the function of networks. A better understanding of the processes that determine how networks form and how they operate with respect to the spread of behavior holds promise for improving public health. Visualizing social networks is a key to both research and interventions. Network images supplement statistical analyses and allow the identification of groups of people for targeting, the identification of central and peripheral individuals, and the clarification of the macro-structure of the network in a way that should affect public health interventions. People are inter-connected and so their health is inter-connected. Inter-personal health effects in social networks provide a new foundation for public health.

Christakis, Nicholas A.; Fowler, James H.

2010-01-01

53

Social networks and adult social identities: Profiles and correlates of support and rejection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growth of interest in social networks has underscored the need for integrative analyses of network dimensions. A three-pronged strategy to achieve this objective was pursued in a study of 261 married women nurses. First, network variables related to important adult social identities were differentiated. Factor analyses revealed four network interaction factors: work support, work rejection, general support, and general

Barton J. Hirsch; Bruce D. Rapkin

1986-01-01

54

Task force report: Social networks as mediators of social support  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intent of this paper is to present a representative, though not exhaustive, overview of the current literature on social networks, with an emphasis on research linking social networks to psychological adaptation. This overview includes a review of social network concepts; and analysis of the multiple determinants of social networks; an analysis of the varied effects of social networks; and

Roger E. Mitchell; Edison J. Trickett

1980-01-01

55

Data Portability across Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today, social networks are for much more than just having fun with friends. Millions of dollars are being spent to extract\\u000a valuable information out of social networks for marketing purposes. Attaching machine readable semantics to social networks,\\u000a that is absent at present, will lead to a better degree of information extraction. To achieve this goal, user input is required.\\u000a From

Pooyan Balouchian; Atilla Elçi

2009-01-01

56

De-anonymizing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Operators of online social networks are increasingly sharing potentially sensitive information about users and their relationships with advertisers, application developers, and data-mining researchers. Privacy is typically protected by anonymization, i.e., removing names, addresses, etc. We present a framework for analyzing privacy and anonymity in social networks and develop a new re-identification algorithm targeting anonymized social-network graphs. To demonstrate its effectiveness

Arvind Narayanan; Vitaly Shmatikov

2009-01-01

57

SOCIAL NETWORKS AND STATUS ATTAINMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay traces the development of the research enterprise, known as the social resources theory, which formulated and tested a number of proposi- tions concerning the relationships between embedded resources in social networks and socioeconomic attainment. This enterprise, seen in the light of social capital, has accumulated a substantial body of research literature and supported the proposition that social capital,

Nan Lin

1999-01-01

58

Applications of Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A social network [2] is a description of the social structure between actors, mostly persons, groups or organizations. It\\u000a indicates the ways in which they are connected with each other by some relationship such as friendship, kinship, finance exchange\\u000a etc. In a nutshell, when the person uses already known\\/unknown people to create new contacts, it forms social networking.\\u000a The social

P. Santhi Thilagam

59

What Is Special About Social Network Analysis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a short introduction on social network analysis, the main characteristics of social network data as well as the main goals of social network analysis are described. An overview of statistical models for social network data is given, pointing at differences and similarities between the various model classes and introducing the most recent developments in social network modeling.

Marijtje A. J. van Duijn; Jeroen K. Vermunt

2006-01-01

60

Entropy of Dynamical Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Human dynamical social networks encode information and are highly adaptive. To characterize the information encoded in the fast dynamics of social interactions, here we introduce the entropy of dynamical social networks. By analysing a large dataset of phone-call interactions we show evidence that the dynamical social network has an entropy that depends on the time of the day in a typical week-day. Moreover we show evidence for adaptability of human social behavior showing data on duration of phone-call interactions that significantly deviates from the statistics of duration of face-to-face interactions. This adaptability of behavior corresponds to a different information content of the dynamics of social human interactions. We quantify this information by the use of the entropy of dynamical networks on realistic models of social interactions.

Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Marton; Bianconi, Ginestra

2011-01-01

61

Entropy of dynamical social networks.  

PubMed

Human dynamical social networks encode information and are highly adaptive. To characterize the information encoded in the fast dynamics of social interactions, here we introduce the entropy of dynamical social networks. By analysing a large dataset of phone-call interactions we show evidence that the dynamical social network has an entropy that depends on the time of the day in a typical week-day. Moreover we show evidence for adaptability of human social behavior showing data on duration of phone-call interactions that significantly deviates from the statistics of duration of face-to-face interactions. This adaptability of behavior corresponds to a different information content of the dynamics of social human interactions. We quantify this information by the use of the entropy of dynamical networks on realistic models of social interactions. PMID:22194809

Zhao, Kun; Karsai, Márton; Bianconi, Ginestra

2011-12-16

62

Social networks, mobile lives and social inequalities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A central argument of much contemporary literature is that the advent of digital and mobile technologies creates new kinds of mobile lives, new socialities and new ways of relating to the self and others. In this paper I specifically examine how mobile lives unfold through social networks, facilitating the forming and reforming of connections people have with others, near and

John Urry

2012-01-01

63

Nonparametric Relational Learning for Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks usually involve rich collections of objects, which are jointly linked into complex relational networks. Social network analysis has gained in importance due to the growing availability of data on novel social networks, e.g. ci- tation networks, Web 2.0 social networks like facebook, and the hyperlinked internet. Recently, the inflnite hidden rela- tional model (IHRM) has been developed for

Zhao Xu; Volker Tresp; Shipeng Yu; Kai Yu

2008-01-01

64

From photo networks to social networks, creation and use of a social network derived with photos  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the new possibilities in communication and information management, social networks and photos have received plenty of attention in the digital age. In this paper, we show how social photos, captured during family events, representing individuals or groups, can be visualized as a network that reveals social attributes. From this photo network, social network is extracted that can help to

Michel Plantié; Michel Crampes

2010-01-01

65

Social Networks in Labor Markets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research in sociology and economics point to important role for social networks in labor markets. Social contacts mediate propagation of rich and reliable information among indi- viduals and thus help workers find jobs and employers find employees. Recent theoretical advances show that for agents connected through networks employment is positively cor- related across time and agents, unemployment exhibits duration dependence,

Antoni Calvo-Armengol; Yannis M. Ioannides

2005-01-01

66

Detecting spammers on social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking has become a popular way for users to meet and interact online. Users spend a significant amount of time on popular social network platforms (such as Facebook, MySpace, or Twitter), storing and sharing a wealth of personal information. This information, as well as the possibility of contacting thousands of users, also attracts the interest of cybercriminals. For example,

Gianluca Stringhini; Christopher Kruegel; Giovanni Vigna

2010-01-01

67

Rethinking Anonymity for Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explains why existing anonymity models such as k-anonymity cannot be applied to the most common form of private data release on the internet, social network APIs. An alternative anonymity model, PP-anonymity, is presented, which measures the posterior probability of an attacker logically deducing previously unknown private information using a social network API. Finally, the feasibility of such an

Aaron Beach; Mike Gartrell; Richard Han

68

Online social networks and learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This viewpoint essay seeks to argue that young people's online social networking can serve as sites for and supports for student learning in ways not currently assessed. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The two themes presented are based on a select review of the research literature as well as the author's explorations of young people's online social networking practices within MySpace

Christine Greenhow

2011-01-01

69

Social Networking Goes to School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Just a few years ago, social networking meant little more to educators than the headache of determining whether to penalize students for inappropriate activities captured on Facebook or MySpace. Now, teachers and students have an array of social-networking sites and tools--from Ning to VoiceThread and Second Life--to draw on for such serious uses…

Davis, Michelle R.

2010-01-01

70

Managing Uncertainty in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis (SNA) has become a mature scientific field over the last 50 years and is now an area with massive commercial appeal and renewed research interest. In this paper, we argue that new methods for collecting social nework strucuture, and the shift in scale of these networks, introduces a greater degree of imprecision that requires rethinking on how

Eytan Adar; Christopher Re

2007-01-01

71

Diversity in open social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online communities have become become a crucial ingredient of e-business. Supporting open social networks builds strong brands and provides lasting value to the consumer. One function of the community is to recommend new products and services. Open social networks tend to be resilient, adaptive, and broad, but simplistic recommender systems can be 'gamed' by members seeking to promote certain products

Daniel Lemire; Stephen Downes; Sébastien Paquet

2008-01-01

72

Social Networking Goes to School  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Just a few years ago, social networking meant little more to educators than the headache of determining whether to penalize students for inappropriate activities captured on Facebook or MySpace. Now, teachers and students have an array of social-networking sites and tools--from Ning to VoiceThread and Second Life--to draw on for such serious uses…

Davis, Michelle R.

2010-01-01

73

Churn in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past, churn has been identified as an issue across most industry sectors. In its most general sense it refers to the rate of loss of customers from a company's customer base. There is a simple reason for the attention churn attracts: churning customers mean a loss of revenue. Emerging from business spaces like telecommunications (telcom) and broadcast providers, where churn is a major issue, it is also regarded as a crucial problem in many other businesses, such as online games creators, but also online social networks and discussion sites. Companies aim at identifying the risk of churn in its early stages, as it is usually much cheaper to retain a customer than to try to win him or her back. If this risk can be accurately predicted, marketing departments can target customers efficiently with tailored incentives to prevent them from leaving.

Karnstedt, Marcel; Hennessy, Tara; Chan, Jeffrey; Basuchowdhuri, Partha; Hayes, Conor; Strufe, Thorsten

74

Social Science Research Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), this site allows users to freely access thousands of abstracts and full-text research papers. The core of the site is the SSRN Electronic Library, which contains an Abstract Database with over 15,600 entries and an Electronic Paper Collection, which currently contains over 4,200 full-text papers. Users can search title, abstract, and author fields, or browse the journals, which are grouped under the five respective Research Networks that form the SSRN: Accounting, Economics, Latin American, Financial, and Legal Scholarship. Within each journal entry, users may select from several display options to narrow their results and available full-text documents are indicated by a special symbol. Information on each of the five networks, including conference and job announcements, as well as information on subscribing and a list of site licenses, is accessible via a menu panel on the left side of the main page. According to SSEP, access to the abstracts and full-text papers will remain free of charge to all users until "the next revision to the web site this winter."

75

Can Social Networks Assist Analysts Fight Terrorism.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

My primary research question is: can social networks assist analysts fight terrorism. My secondary research questions are as follows. First, how does social networking create linkages. Second, how have social networks been used to solve small problems. Th...

M. V. Ciaramella

2011-01-01

76

Delay-Tolerant Social Networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

To address privacy concerns in current online so- cial networks, we previously proposed to use a peer-to-peer infrastructure and encryption, thereby recreating the features of online social networks in a distributed, provider-less, community-driven, and privacy-preserving way. Once the functionality is dis- tributed, social networks are no longer dependent on Internet connectivity for every transaction - in con- trast to current

Sonja Buchegger

77

Turnout Intention and Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

How can networking affect the turnout in an election? We present a simple model to explain turnout as a result of a dynamic process of formation of the intention to vote within Erdös-Renyi random networks. Citizens have fixed preferences for one of two parties and are embedded in a given social network. They decide whether or not to vote on

Constanza Fosco; Annick Laruelle; Angel Sánchez

2009-01-01

78

Data mining for social network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A social network is defined as a social structure of individuals, who are related (directly or indirectly to each other) based on a common relation of interest, e.g. friendship, trust, etc. Social network analysis is the study of social networks to understand their structure and behavior. Social network analysis has gained prominence due to its use in different applications -

J. Srivastava

2008-01-01

79

Social network analysis of an online dating network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networks can be found everywhere from chatting websites like MSN, blogs such as MySpace to social media such as YouTube and second life. Among them, there is one interesting type of online social networks, online dating network that is growing fast. This paper analyzes an online dating network from social network analysis point of view. Observations are made

Lin Chen; Richi Nayak

2011-01-01

80

Different Aspects of Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A social network is a set of people (or organizations or other social entities) connected by a set of social relation- ships, such as friendship, co-working or information exchange. Social network analysis focuses on the analysis of patterns of relationships among people, organizations, states and such social entities. Social network analysis provides both a visual and a mathematical analysis of

Mohsen Jamali; Hassan Abolhassani

2006-01-01

81

Line graphs as social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It was demonstrated recently that the line graphs are clustered and assortative. These topological features are known to characterize some social networks [M.E.J. Newman, Y. Park, Why social networks are different from other types of networks, Phys. Rev. E 68 (2003) 036122]; it was argued that this similarity reveals their cliquey character. In the model proposed here, a social network is the line graph of an initial network of families, communities, interest groups, school classes and small companies. These groups play the role of nodes, and individuals are represented by links between these nodes. The picture is supported by the data on the LiveJournal network of about 8×106 people.

Krawczyk, M. J.; Muchnik, L.; Ma?ka-Kraso?, A.; Ku?akowski, K.

2011-07-01

82

Applications of Bayesian Belief Networks in Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we discuss the use of Bayesian belief networks as a tool for enhancing social network analysis. Traditional social network analysis (SNA) primarily uses graph-theoretic algorithms to compute properties of nodes in a network. However, these algorithms assume a degree of completeness and reliability of the social network data, which cannot always be assured. Applying Bayesian belief networks

David Koelle; Jonathan Pfautz; Michael Farry; Zach Cox; Geoffrey Catto; Joseph Campolongo

83

Social networking, social network technologies, and the enterprise  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research proposal sets out to investigate the organizational consequences of Corporate Social Networking Technologies (cSNT). Despite the rapid uptake of cSNT very little is known about the uses in and effects of SNT on enterprises. My main contention is that these technologies are embedded within a network of social ties. To understand the interplay between the cSNT and the

Mohammad Hossein Jarrahi

2011-01-01

84

Modeling Social Cascade in the Flickr Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigate social cascades, or how information propagation through social links in the online social networks. Based on the analysis of one of the largest available datasets collected from Flickr social network in detail, we shed light on the propagation pattern and cascade characteristic of the photos over the Flickr social network, We also apply a simple conceptual model that

Bai Yu; Hong Fei

2009-01-01

85

Representing dynamic social networks in discrete event social simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the key structural components of social systems is the social network. The representation of this network structure is key to providing a valid representation of the society under study. The social science concept of homophily provides a conceptual model of how social networks are formed and evolve over time. Previous work described the results of social simulation using

Jonathan K. Alt; Stephen Lieberman

2010-01-01

86

Davis Social Links: Leveraging Social Networks for Future Internet Communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we present a social network based network communication architecture, Davis Social Links (DSL). DSL uses the trust and relationships inherent to human so- cial networks to provide an enhanced communication ar- chitecture for future Internet designs. We begin with a con- ceptual discussion of how future network architectures can leverage social networks. Next, we describe the DSL

Lerone Banks; Prantik Bhattacharyya; Matthew Spear; Shyhtsun Felix Wu

2009-01-01

87

Attachment in Social Networks: Toward an Evolutionary Social Network Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attachment theory is about part of children’s social network, namely the affective relationship with one or a few significant others who are considered stronger or wiser and may serve as a source of protection from danger and a safe haven for exploration of the environment. This attachment relationship emerges from myriads of social interactions during the first few years of

Marinus H. van Ijzendoorn

2005-01-01

88

Perception of Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This paper examines data derived from an application on Facebook.com that investigates the relations among members of their\\u000a online social network. It confirms that online social networks are more often used to maintain weak connections but that a\\u000a subset of users focus on strong connections, determines that connection intensity to both connected people predicts perceptual\\u000a accuracy, and shows that intra-group

Travis Green; Aaron Quigley

89

Social network determinants of depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

The etiology of depression has long been thought to include social environmental factors. To quantitatively explore the novel possibility of person-to-person spread and network-level determination of depressive symptoms, analyses were performed on a densely interconnected social network of 12 067 people assessed repeatedly over 32 years as part of the Framingham Heart Study. Longitudinal statistical models were used to examine

J N Rosenquist; J H Fowler; N A Christakis

2011-01-01

90

Building Social Networks in Persistent Video Surveillance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are a beneficial analysis tool in counterterrorism and counterinsurgent activities. The difficulty lies in the amount of time and resources it takes to construct a social network. By exploiting existing 24-hour overhead persistent video, we can build a social network from vehicle to vehicle and vehicle to building interactions. This paper demonstrates building a social network from vehicle

Daniel T. Schmitt; Stuart H. Kurkowski; Michael J. Mendenhall

2009-01-01

91

Key allocation schemes for private social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we introduce a novel scheme for key management in social networks that is a first step towards the creation of a private social network. A social network graph (i.e., the graph of friendship relationships) is private and social networks are often used to share content, which may be private, amongst its users. In the status quo, the

Keith Byron Frikken; Preethi Srinivas

2009-01-01

92

Positional Analysis in Fuzzy Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis is a methodology used extensively in social and behavioral sciences, as well as in political science, economics, organization theory, and industrial engineering. Positional analysis of a social network aims to find similarities between actors in the network. One of the the most studied notions in the positional analysis of social networks is regular equivalence. According to Borgatti

Tuan-Fang Fan; Churn-Jung Liau; Tsau-Young Lin

2007-01-01

93

Social networks and vaccination decisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We combine information on social networks with medical records and survey data in order to examine how friends affect one’s decision to get vaccinated against the flu. The random assignment of undergraduates to residential halls at a large private university allows us to estimate how peer effects influence health beliefs and vaccination choices. Our results indicate that social exposure to

Neel Rao; Markus M. Möbius; Tanya Rosenblat

2007-01-01

94

Models of Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a deterministic model for on-line social networks (OSNs) based on transitivity and local knowledge in social interactions. In the Iterated Local Transitivity (ILT) model, at each time-step and for every existing node x, a new node appears which joins to the closed neighbour set of x: The ILT model provably satisfles a number of both local and global

Anthony Bonato; Noor Hadi; Paul Horn; Pawel Pralat; Changping Wang

2009-01-01

95

Backbone Discovery in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent years have seen a thriving development of the World Wide Web as the most visible social media which enables people to share opinions, experiences and expertise with each other across the world. People now get involved in many different social networks simultaneously, which are often large intricate web of connections among the massive entities they are made of. As

Nan Du; Bin Wu; Bai Wang

2007-01-01

96

Extracting Regular Behaviors from Social Media Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social media network analysis has become very popular in recent years. How do real networks evolve over time? What are the normal evolving behaviors in a social media network? In order to extract behaviors occurring regularly to reveal the microscopic evolving properties in social networks, the evolving process of networks is modeled as stochastic states transition, and the evolving behaviors

Leiming Yan; Jinwei Wang

2011-01-01

97

Information Technology Capabilities for Digital Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper contributes to the evolving body of knowledge pertaining to the study of digitally-enabled social networks, their usage, and their effects on people, organization, and society. We review the literature on social networks and develop a typology which distinguishes four aspects of digital social networks usage: (i) building and sustaining the network, (ii) observing the network, (iii), extracting the

Camille Grange; Izak Benbasat

2009-01-01

98

Network models for social influence processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper generalizes thep* class of models for social network data to predict individual-level attributes from network ties. Thep* model for social networks permits the modeling of social relationships in terms of particular local relational or network configurations. In this paper we present methods for modeling attribute measures in terms of network ties, and so constructp* models for the patterns

Garry Robins; Philippa Pattison; Peter Elliott

2001-01-01

99

Online Identities and Social Networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Online identities play a critical role in the social web that is taking shape on the Internet. Despite many technical proposals\\u000a for creating and managing online identities, none has received widespread acceptance. Design and implementation of online\\u000a identities that are socially acceptable on the Internet remains an open problem. This chapter discusses the interplay between\\u000a online identities and social networking.

Muthucumaru Maheswaran; Bader Ali; Hatice Ozguven; Julien Lord

2010-01-01

100

A Social Network Analysis of Student Retention Using Archival Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study attempts to determine if a relationship exists between first-to-second-year retention and social network variables for a cohort of first-year students at a small liberal arts college. The social network is reconstructed using not survey data as is most common, but rather using archival data from a student information system. Each…

Eckles, James E.; Stradley, Eric G.

2012-01-01

101

A Social Network Analysis of Student Retention Using Archival Data  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study attempts to determine if a relationship exists between first-to-second-year retention and social network variables for a cohort of first-year students at a small liberal arts college. The social network is reconstructed using not survey data as is most common, but rather using archival data from a student information system. Each…

Eckles, James E.; Stradley, Eric G.

2012-01-01

102

Spinning Multiple Social Networks for Semantic Web  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are important for the Semantic Web. Several means can be used to obtain social networks: using social networking services, aggregating Friend- of-a-Friend (FOAF) documents, mining text informa- tion on the Web or in e-mail messages, and observing face-to-face communication using sensors. Integrating multiple social networks is a key issue for further uti- lization of social networks in the

Yutaka Matsuo; Masahiro Hamasaki; Yoshiyuki Nakamura; Takuichi Nishimura; Kôiti Hasida; Hideaki Takeda; Junichiro Mori; Danushka Bollegala; Mitsuru Ishizuka

2006-01-01

103

Brain networks of social comparison.  

PubMed

Social comparison, that is, the process of comparing oneself to other people, is a ubiquitous social cognitive mechanism; however, so far its neural correlates have remained unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that social comparisons are supported by partly dissociated networks, depending on whether the dimension under comparison concerns a physical or a psychological attribute. We measured brain activity with functional MRI, whereas participants were comparing their own height or intelligence to that of individuals they personally know. Height comparisons were associated with higher activity in a frontoparietal network involved in spatial and numerical cognition. Conversely, intelligence comparisons recruited a network of midline areas that have been previously implicated in the attribution of mental states to oneself and others (Theory of mind). These findings suggest that social comparisons rely on diverse domain-specific mechanisms rather than on one unitary process. PMID:23407275

Kedia, Gayannée; Lindner, Michael; Mussweiler, Thomas; Ihssen, Niklas; Linden, David E J

2013-03-27

104

Social networks and the development of social skills in cowbirds  

PubMed Central

The complex interrelationships among individuals within social environments can exert selection pressures on social skills: those behaviours and cognitive processes that allow animals to manipulate and out-reproduce others. Social complexity can also have a developmental effect on social skills by providing individuals with opportunities to hone their skills by dealing with the challenges posed in within-group interactions. We examined how social skills develop in captive, adult male brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) that were exposed to differing levels of ‘social complexity’ across a 2-year experiment. After each year, subjects housed in groups with dynamic social structure (where many individuals entered and exited the groups during the year) outcompeted birds who had been housed in static groups. Exposure to dynamic structure subsequently led to substantial changes to the social networks of the home conditions during the breeding season. Static groups were characterized by a predictable relationship between singing and reproductive success that was stable across years. In dynamic conditions, however, males showed significant variability in their dominance status, their courting and even in their mating success. Reproductive success of males varied dramatically across years and was responsive to social learning in adulthood, and socially dynamic environments ‘trained’ individuals to be better competitors, even at an age when the development of many traits important for breeding (like song quality) had ended.

White, David J.; Gersick, Andrew S.; Snyder-Mackler, Noah

2012-01-01

105

SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF REDUCING FRICTIONS IN SOCIAL NETWORKING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Can we use the underlying technologies of virtual social networking in a (more) productive way? If we reduce frictions within social networks, caused by distance, inaccessibility, and other factors, can we detect social and economic effects, such as a reduction of transportation costs and a faster spread of knowledge? We want to know how a virtual social network is organised

Mark Schonewille

106

Masculinity, educational achievement and social status: a social network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study utilises a quantitative case study social network approach to explore the connection between masculinity and scholastic achievement in two secondary, all?boys schools in Australia. In both schools two social networks representing social status are explored: the friendship network as a measure of status that includes emotional investment, and the influence network as a measure of status without emotion.

Dean Lusher

2011-01-01

107

Random graph models of social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe some new exactly solvable models of the structure of social networks, based on random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions. We give models both for simple unipartite networks, such as acquaintance networks, and bipartite networks, such as affiliation networks. We compare the predictions of our models to data for a number of real-world social networks and find that in

M. E. J. Newman; D. J. Watts; S. H. Strogatz

2002-01-01

108

Towards Automating Social Engineering Using Social Networking Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

A growing number of people use social networking sites to foster social relationships among each other. While the advantages of the provided services are obvious, drawbacks on a users' privacy and arising implications are often neglected. In this paper we introduce a novel attack called automated social engineering which illustrates how social networking sites can be used for social engineering.

Markus Huber; Stewart Kowalski; Marcus Nohlberg; Simon Tjoa

2009-01-01

109

Deployment of DNIDS in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internet users form social networks as they communicate with each other. Computer worms and viruses exploit these social networks in order to propagate to other users. In this paper we present a new framework aimed at slowing down or even preventing the propagation of computer worms and viruses in social networks. In the first part of the framework a social

Meytal Tubi; Rami Puzis; Yuval Elovici

2007-01-01

110

Intelligent Visualisation of Social Network Analysis Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Network Analysis (SNA) (Scott 1992) is the analysis of network data gathered in a social context. It has been used to examine social phenomena in such diverse areas as local communities, international organizations and sporting clubs. However, while the data collected by Social Network Analysts is eminently computable it has taken until relatively recently for SNA to make it's

Phillip Higgins; Debbie Richards; Mike McGrath

2000-01-01

111

Social Networking Trend in Private University  

Microsoft Academic Search

As an emerging technology, social networking is seen as a potential enabler to share knowledge around difficult and sensitive topics. Social network community (SNC) uses can be evaluated to understand the capability of this technology in breaking down social barriers, engendering trust and enabling wider learning among students. This pilot study is to understand the trend of social networking among

Shahrinaz Ismail

112

Social networks across the SME organizational lifecycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate how social networks evolve as small business enterprises transition across the organizational lifecycle. It aims to give attention to how social identities of small business owners impact social networks and whether social networks improve organizational performance in small firms. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A sample of small to medium-sized enterprise (SME) owners

James W. Peltier; G. M. Naidu

2012-01-01

113

Analysis of social networking privacy policies  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the use of social networks becomes more widespread and commonplace, users are beginning to question how their privacy is protected by social networks. In this paper, we review a privacy taxonomy for data storage polices and models and extend it to support social networking. We then apply the extended taxonomy to the privacy policies of six commonly used social

Leanne Wu; Maryam Majedi; Kambiz Ghazinour; Ken Barker

2010-01-01

114

On Discovering Community Trends in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Real-world social networks (e.g., blogosphere) often evolve over time and thus poses challenges on conventional social network analysis techniques which model the underlying networks as static graphs. In this paper, we are interested in detecting dynamic communities and their trend of evolution in a social network by examining the structural and dynamic patterns of interactions. In doing so, we propose

Jian Li; William K. Cheung; Jiming Liu; C. H. Li

2009-01-01

115

Structure and Evolution of One Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks have been a key subject of research in recent years, because they can help to understand the people's behavior such as information diffusion, decision making and social influence. This paper is devoted to the study of one large-scale social interaction network by carrying out a systematic analysis of network properties and evolution factors. The network properties include degree

Xiaohang Zhang; Yu Du; Jiaqi Liu; Zhiyu Liu

2010-01-01

116

Mining Social Network for Semantic Advertisement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Networked computers are expanding more and more around the world, and digital social networks becoming of great importance for many people's work and leisure. Emails, Weblogs and Instant Messengers are popular instances of social networks. In this paper, the main target is having an advertisement according to user favorites and interests by mining his\\/her interactions in digital social networks. Briefly,

Pooya Moradian Zadeh; Mohsen Sadighi Moshkenani

2008-01-01

117

Understanding Social Networks Properties for Trustworthy Computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ever-increasing popularity of social networks opens new directions for leveraging social networks to build primitives for security and communication, in many contexts. Such primitives utilize the trust in these social networks to ensure collaboration and algorithmic properties exhibited in such networks to argue for the effectiveness of such primitives. Despite the importance of such properties and their quality to

Abedelaziz Mohaisen; Huy Tran; Nicholas Hopper; Yongdae Kim

2011-01-01

118

Modeling social networks from sampled data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Network models are widely used to represent relational information among interacting units and the structural implications of these relations. Recently, social network studies have focused a great deal of attention on random graph models of networks whose nodes represent individual social actors and whose edges represent a specified relationship between the actors. Most inference for social network models assumes that

Mark S. Handcock; Krista J. Gile

2010-01-01

119

Modeling Social Networks with Sampled Data 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Network models are widely used to represent relational information among interacting units and the structural implications of these relations. Recently, social network studies have focused a great deal of attention on random graph models of networks whose nodes represent individual social actors and whose edges represent a specied,relationship between the actors. Most inference for social network models assumes that

Mark S. Handcock

120

Enhancing business networks using social network based virtual communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To enhance an entrepreneur's business network through the integration of the social network concepts and design principles of virtual communities. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This study documents the design and initial deployment of a virtual community case, Innovation Information Infrastructure, based on social network concepts. Findings – Basic design principles, deployment strategy, and future directions for social network-based virtual communities

Bih-ru Lea; Wen-bin Yu; Nisha Maguluru; Michael Nichols

2006-01-01

121

Privacy Amplification with Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are a number of scenarios where users wishing to communicate, share a weak secret. Often, they are also part of a common social network. Connections (edges) from the social network are represented as shared link keys between participants (vertices). We propose mechanisms that utilise the graph topology of such a network, to increase the entropy of weak pre-shared secrets. Our proposal is based on using random walks to identify a chain of common acquaintances between Alice and Bob, each of which contribute entropy to the final key. Our mechanisms exploit one-wayness and convergence properties of Markovian random walks to, firstly, maximize the set of potential entropy contributors, and second, to resist any contribution from dubious sources such as Sybill sub-networks.

Nagaraja, Shishir

122

Extended Identity for Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nowadays we are experiencing the consolidation of social networks (SN). Although there are trends trying to integrate SN platforms. they remain as data silos between each other. Information can't be exchanged between them. In some cases, it would be desirable to connect this scattered information, in order to build a distributed identity. This contribution proposes an architecture for distributed social networking. Based on distributed user-centric identity, our proposal extends it by attaching user information. It also bridges the gap between distributed identity and distributed publishing capabilities.

Tapiador, Antonio; Fumero, Antonio; Salvachúa, Joaquín

123

Skeleton of weighted social network  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the literature of social networks, understanding topological structure is an important scientific issue. In this paper, we construct a network from mobile phone call records and use the cumulative number of calls as a measure of the weight of a social tie. We extract skeletons from the weighted social network on the basis of the weights of ties, and we study their properties. We find that strong ties can support the skeleton in the network by studying the percolation characters. We explore the centrality of w-skeletons based on the correlation between some centrality measures and the skeleton index w of a vertex, and we find that the average centrality of a w-skeleton increases as w increases. We also study the cumulative degree distribution of the successive w-skeletons and find that as w increases, the w-skeleton tends to become more self-similar. Furthermore, fractal characteristics appear in higher w-skeletons. We also explore the global information diffusion efficiency of w-skeletons using simulations, from which we can see that the ties in the high w-skeletons play important roles in information diffusion. Identifying such a simple structure of a w-skeleton is a step forward toward understanding and representing the topological structure of weighted social networks.

Zhang, X.; Zhu, J.

2013-03-01

124

Advertising to a social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Direct advertising—sending promotional messages to individual customers—is increasingly used by marketers as a result of the\\u000a recent improvements in consumer reachability. Most current methods to calculate optimal budgets for such advertising campaigns\\u000a consider customers in isolation and ignore word-of-mouth communication (WOM). When the customer base forms a network (as is\\u000a the case in telecom or social network databases) ignoring WOM

Peter Pal Zubcsek; Miklos Sarvary

2011-01-01

125

Animal social networks: an introduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Network analysis has a long history in the mathematical and social sciences and the aim of this introduction is to provide\\u000a a brief overview of the potential that it holds for the study of animal behaviour. One of the most attractive features of\\u000a the network paradigm is that it provides a single conceptual framework with which we can study the

Jens Krause; David Lusseau; Richard James

2009-01-01

126

Social networks and loss of capital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Economic sociologists and white-collar criminologists offer competing predictions about the outcomes of socially embedded transactions. Economic sociologists stress the protective and beneficial role of social networks. Their evidence shows that social ties improve transaction outcomes. White-collar criminologists focus on the harmful and exploitative role of social networks. Their evidence shows that social ties facilitate successful economic crimes. Our case permits

Wayne E Baker; Robert R Faulkner

2004-01-01

127

Finding influential seed successors in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a dynamic social network, nodes can be removed from the network for some reasons, and consequently affect the behaviors of the network. In this paper, we tackle the challenge of finding a successor node for each removed seed node to maintain the influence spread in the network. Given a social network and a set of seed nodes for influence

Cheng-Te Li; Hsun-Ping Hsieh; Shou-De Lin; Man-Kwan Shan

2012-01-01

128

Modeling Adaptive Behaviors on Growing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adaptive networks appear in biological and social applications. They combine topological evolution of network with dynamics of the network nodes. Considering the friendship network in a community, members tend to choose those who share the similar interests to be their friends. With the growth of the social network, the interests of a member could change with the interests of their

Caihong Sun; Shu Wang

2008-01-01

129

Introduction to Social Network Analysis (Tutorial)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Network analysis focuses on patterns of relations between and among people, organizations, states, etc. It aims to describe networks of rela- tions as fully as possible, identify prominent patterns in such networks, trace the flow of information through them, and discover what effects these relations and networks have on people and organizations. Social network analysis offers a very promising

Panayiotis Zaphiris; Chee Siang Ang

2009-01-01

130

Social Networks' XSS Worms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cross Site Scripting Worms, are malicious programs that propagates through visitors of a website in attempt to infect other visitors progressively. Cross site scripting vulnerabilities are exploited in many forms; one of the common forms is using worms on popular social websites, such as MySpace and Facebook. In this paper first we suggest a general model based on our discussions.

Mohammad Reza Faghani; Hossein Saidi

2009-01-01

131

Why social networks are different from other types of networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We argue that social networks differ from most other types of networks, including technological and biological networks, in two important ways. First, they have nontrivial clustering or network transitivity and second, they show positive correlations, also called assortative mixing, between the degrees of adjacent vertices. Social networks are often divided into groups or communities, and it has recently been suggested

M. E. Newman

2003-01-01

132

Social Snapshots: Digital Forensics for Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recently, academia and law enforcement alike have shown a strong demand for data that is collected from online social networks. In this work, we present a novel method for harvesting such data from social networking websites. Our approach uses a hybrid system that is based on a custom add-on for social networks in combination with a web crawling component. The

Markus Huber; Martin Mulazzani; Manuel Leithner; Sebastian Schrittwieser; Gilbert Wondracek; Edgar R. Weippl

2011-01-01

133

Masculinity, Educational Achievement and Social Status: A Social Network Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study utilises a quantitative case study social network approach to explore the connection between masculinity and scholastic achievement in two secondary, all-boys schools in Australia. In both schools two social networks representing social status are explored: the "friendship" network as a measure of status that includes emotional…

Lusher, Dean

2011-01-01

134

Group Recommendation in Social Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recent years have seen an exponential growth in the use of social networking systems, enabling their users to easily share information with their connections. A typical Facebook user, as an example, might have 300-400 connections that include relatives, f...

N. Chinnam

2011-01-01

135

Social Networking: Keeping It Clean  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The need to maintain an unpolluted learning environment is no easy task for schools and districts that have incorporated social networking sites into their educational life. The staff and teachers at Blaine High School in Minnesota's Anoka-Hennepin District 11 had been considering the pros and cons of establishing a school Facebook page when the…

Waters, John K.

2011-01-01

136

Privacy and Social Networking Sites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|College students are relying on the Internet to make connections with other people every day. As the Internet has developed and grown, so have the capabilities for interaction. Social networking sites, a group of Web sites that provide people with the opportunity to create an online profile and to share that profile with others, are a part of…

Timm, Dianne M.; Duven, Carolyn J.

2008-01-01

137

Reputation for Innovating Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reputation is a fundamental instrument of partner selection. Developed within the domain of electronic auctions, reputation technology is being been imported into other applications, from social networks to institutional evaluation. Its impact on trust enforcement is uncontroversial and its management is of primary concern for entrepreneurs and other economic operators. In the present paper, we will shortly report upon simulation-based

Rosaria Conte; Mario Paolucci; Jordi Sabater-Mir

2008-01-01

138

Social behaviour and network therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper reports on the basic principles of a treatment approach currently being used in a National Multicentre Randomised Controlled Trial of Alcohol Treatments in the United Kingdom (UK Alcohol Treatment Trial). The treatment: Social Behaviour and Network Therapy (SBNT) is novel as a package but has been developed by integrating a number of strategies found to be effective

Alex Copello; Jim Orford; Ray Hodgson; Gillian Tober; Clive Barrett

2002-01-01

139

The social network of hackers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social researchers are facing more and more challenges as criminal networks are expanding in size and moving to the Internet. Many efforts are currently under way to enhance the technical capabilities of researchers working in the field of cybercrimes. Rather than focusing on the technical tools that could enhance research performance, this article focuses on a specific field that has

David Décary-Hétu; Benoit Dupont

2012-01-01

140

Collaborative Intensity in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on collaboration in social networks is largely restricted by a lack of longitudinal data. Approximations of collaborative intensity necessarily rely on the width of collaboration such as the number of papers coauthered by two scientists. In contrast, we discuss precise measures of collaborative intensity with respect to not only the width but also the depth of collaboration. Based on

Klaus Stein; Steffen Blaschke

2009-01-01

141

Cyber stalking: The social impact of social networking technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking technology provides a social, collaborative and interactive platform for Internet users. The advances in social networking technology improve the socialization among Internet users. Users become more open in expressing their thoughts and sharing information, and along the way this contributes to the rise of internet violations. One of the violation faced by the internet users is cyber stalking.

Haryani Haron; F. B. M. Yusof

2010-01-01

142

AlwaySocial: Social Networking in the Real World  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking is nowadays a popular way for people to socialize and network professionally. Currently, social net- working websites provide a mostly online experience whether they are accessed from a computer or a mobile phone. This leads to a chasm between online social activities and those done in the actual world. As there is no direct way to turn an

Nir J. Peer

143

A social collaboration platform for enterprise social networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

The consumer-oriented technologies categorized as social media and social networking are transforming the way that people communicate and accelerating the spread of information. Small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) lack the capability of finance and technology, and can not afford to establish a collaborative portal for partners. With social network service increasing rapidly and being used popularly, an enterprise social

Minbo Lil; Guangyu Chenl; Zhe Zhang; Yi Fu

2012-01-01

144

Social Networking: It's Not What You Think.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This slide presentation reviews some of the current uses of the social networking sites available on the internet. It list some of the skills that are now considered obsolete and reviews the major social networking sites.

K. D. Jones

2010-01-01

145

People Sensemaking with Social Networking Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking websites are evolving into tools for people sensemaking by supporting the process a user goes through to understand who someone is and to determine how and why that user should interact with someone. Author Keywords Sensemaking, social networking.

Joan Morris DiMicco; David R. Millen

2008-01-01

146

Latent Space Approaches to Social Network Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Network models are widely used to represent relational information among interacting units. In studies of social networks, recent emphasis has been placed on random graph models where the nodes usually represent individual social actors and the edges repr...

A. E. Raftery M. S. Handcock P. D. Hoff

2001-01-01

147

Social Network Monitoring of Al-Qaeda.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Social network monitoring is the application of statistical process control charts to changing social network measures over time. Quality engineers use control charts to detect slight changes in industrial manufacturing processes. Once detected, the quali...

I. McCulloh K. Carley M. Webb

2007-01-01

148

Social Networks: Rational Learning and Information Aggregation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This thesis studies the learning problem of a set of agents connected via a general social network. We address the question of how dispersed information spreads in social networks and whether the information is efficiently aggregated in large societies. T...

I. Lobel

2009-01-01

149

Social structure of Facebook networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the social structure of Facebook "friendship" networks at one hundred American colleges and universities at a single point in time, and we examine the roles of user attributes-gender, class year, major, high school, and residence-at these institutions. We investigate the influence of common attributes at the dyad level in terms of assortativity coefficients and regression models. We then examine larger-scale groupings by detecting communities algorithmically and comparing them to network partitions based on user characteristics. We thereby examine the relative importance of different characteristics at different institutions, finding for example that common high school is more important to the social organization of large institutions and that the importance of common major varies significantly between institutions. Our calculations illustrate how microscopic and macroscopic perspectives give complementary insights on the social organization at universities and suggest future studies to investigate such phenomena further.

Traud, Amanda L.; Mucha, Peter J.; Porter, Mason A.

2012-08-01

150

Spreading gossip in social networks.  

PubMed

We study a simple model of information propagation in social networks, where two quantities are introduced: the spread factor, which measures the average maximal reachability of the neighbors of a given node that interchange information among each other, and the spreading time needed for the information to reach such a fraction of nodes. When the information refers to a particular node at which both quantities are measured, the model can be taken as a model for gossip propagation. In this context, we apply the model to real empirical networks of social acquaintances and compare the underlying spreading dynamics with different types of scale-free and small-world networks. We find that the number of friendship connections strongly influences the probability of being gossiped. Finally, we discuss how the spread factor is able to be applied to other situations. PMID:17930316

Lind, Pedro G; da Silva, Luciano R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

2007-09-27

151

Structure of growing social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose some simple models of the growth of social networks, based on three general principles: (1) meetings take place between pairs of individuals at a rate that is high if a pair has one or more mutual friends and low otherwise; (2) acquaintances between pairs of individuals who rarely meet decay over time; (3) there is an upper limit on the number of friendships an individual can maintain. Using computer simulations, we find that models that incorporate all of these features reproduce many of the features of real social networks, including high levels of clustering or network transitivity and strong community structure in which individuals have more links to others within their community than to individuals from other communities.

Jin, Emily M.; Girvan, Michelle; Newman, M. E. J.

2001-10-01

152

Spreading gossip in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study a simple model of information propagation in social networks, where two quantities are introduced: the spread factor, which measures the average maximal reachability of the neighbors of a given node that interchange information among each other, and the spreading time needed for the information to reach such a fraction of nodes. When the information refers to a particular node at which both quantities are measured, the model can be taken as a model for gossip propagation. In this context, we apply the model to real empirical networks of social acquaintances and compare the underlying spreading dynamics with different types of scale-free and small-world networks. We find that the number of friendship connections strongly influences the probability of being gossiped. Finally, we discuss how the spread factor is able to be applied to other situations.

Lind, Pedro G.; da Silva, Luciano R.; Andrade, José S., Jr.; Herrmann, Hans J.

2007-09-01

153

Evolution in Social Networks: A Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a There is much research on social network analysis but only recently did scholars turn their attention to the volatility of\\u000a social networks. An abundance of questions emerged. How does a social network evolve – can we find laws and derive models\\u000a that explain its evolution? How do communities emerge in a social network and how do they expand or shrink?

Myra Spiliopoulou

2011-01-01

154

Theme-Based Mobile Social Network System  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the rapid development of mobile device and wireless network, mobile device becomes an excellent choice for people to access social life here and there all around the clock. However, most of widely used mobile social network systems cannot make the best of mobile device's features and hardly satisfied persons' demands in dynamic realistic social network. So this paper proposes

Jiamei Tang; Sangwook Kim

2011-01-01

155

Forensics Tools for Social Network Security Solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The usage of Social Network Sites has increased rapidly in recent years. Since the success of a Social Network Site depends on the number of users it attracts, there is pressure on providers of Social Network sites to design systems that encourage behavior which increases both the number of users and their connections. However, like any fast- growing technology, security

Janet Cheng; Jennifer Hoffman; Therese LaMarche; Ahmet Tavil; Amit Yavad; Steve Kim

156

Family-Oriented Social Network and Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of internet technology, social network provides a new way of communication, entertainment and gaining information. Nowadays, users whom social network companies aim at are changing from simplification to diversification and specialization. Therefore, how to tap the potential users and market demand furthest becomes an important issue. In this paper, we propose relative-based social network service mechanism. Based

Yanji Chen; Xiaofei Xu; Zhongjie Wang

2012-01-01

157

Enforcing Access Control in Social Network Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Confidentiality and data handling are important issues for social network users. Ideally, access control enforcement should not de- pend on the social networking provider but should be under the control of the user. In this paper, we propose a practical, SNS platform-independent solution, for social network users to control their data. We develop con- cepts that are general enough to

Filipe Beato; Markulf Kohlweiss; Karel Wouters

158

Usability Evaluation of Three Social Networking Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. Social networking sites have quickly become one of the most popular means of online communication. Users can quickly share photos, videos, and communicate to connections via a social networking site. This study evaluated the usability of three of the most popular social networking sites (MySpace, Facebook, and Orkut). Results revealed issues related to confusing terminology, inadequate feedback and error

Barbara S. Chaparro; Doug Fox; Shiva Naidu

2009-01-01

159

Privacy in Online Social Networking at Workplace  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—Employees using social,network sites (SNS) at workplace is a fact. As companies are further embracing social networks, how if at all does this practice affect the work dynamics? While privacy has been a hot topic in online social network research in general, there is little work investigating the privacy aspect of this practice at workplace. This paper aims at starting

Yang Wang; Alfred Kobsa

2009-01-01

160

Measurement and analysis of online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networking sites like Orkut, YouTube, and Flickr are among the most popular sites on the Internet. Users of these sites form a social network, which provides a powerful means of sharing, organizing, and finding con- tent and contacts. The popularity of these sites provides an opportunity to study the characteristics of online social network graphs at large scale.

Alan Mislove; Massimiliano Marcon; P. Krishna Gummadi; Peter Druschel; Bobby Bhattacharjee

2007-01-01

161

Social Networks: Challenges and New Opportunities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are playing an important role in personal as well as corporate environments. However, perceived issues and evolving challenges may hinder further expansion of social networks to meet new opportunities. In this paper, we review inherent concepts and properties of social networks and highlight major analytical evaluation criteria, which are used to identify key findings that reveal degrees of

Kanna Al Falahi; Y. Atif; S. Elnaffar

2010-01-01

162

Personalized Feed Recommendation Service for Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network systems (SNSs) such as Facebook and Twitter have recently attracted millions of users by providing social network based services to support easy message posting, information sharing and inter-friend communication. With the rapid growth of social networks, users of SNSs may easily get overwhelmed by the excessive volume of information feeds and felt challenging to digest and find truly

Huajing Li; Yuan Tian; Wang-Chien Lee; C. Lee Giles; Meng-Chang Chen

2010-01-01

163

International ethnographic observation of social networking sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current research on social networking largely covers US providers. To investigate broader trends, we examine cross-cultural differences in the usage patterns of social networking services with observation and ethnographic interviews in multiple cultures. This appears to be the first systematic investigation of social networking behavior across multiple cultures. We report here on the first four locations with observation and interviews

Christopher N. Chapman; Michal Lahav

2008-01-01

164

Collaboration in the School Social Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social networks are fundamental to all people. Their social network describes how they are connected to others: close relationships, peripheral relationships, and those relationships that help connect them to other people, events, or things. As information specialists, school librarians develop a multidimensional social network that enables them…

Schultz-Jones, Barbara

2009-01-01

165

Growth of the flickr social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networking sites like MySpace, Orkut, and Flickr are among the most popular sites on the Web and continue to experience dramatic growth in their user population. The popularity of these sites offers a unique opportunity to study the dynamics of social networks at scale. Having a proper understanding of how online social networks grow can provide insights into

Alan Mislove; Hema Swetha Koppula; Krishna P. Gummadi; Peter Druschel; Bobby Bhattacharjee

2008-01-01

166

Online social network size is reflected in human brain structure.  

PubMed

The increasing ubiquity of web-based social networking services is a striking feature of modern human society. The degree to which individuals participate in these networks varies substantially for reasons that are unclear. Here, we show a biological basis for such variability by demonstrating that quantitative variation in the number of friends an individual declares on a web-based social networking service reliably predicted grey matter density in the right superior temporal sulcus, left middle temporal gyrus and entorhinal cortex. Such regions have been previously implicated in social perception and associative memory, respectively. We further show that variability in the size of such online friendship networks was significantly correlated with the size of more intimate real-world social groups. However, the brain regions we identified were specifically associated with online social network size, whereas the grey matter density of the amygdala was correlated both with online and real-world social network sizes. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the size of an individual's online social network is closely linked to focal brain structure implicated in social cognition. PMID:22012980

Kanai, R; Bahrami, B; Roylance, R; Rees, G

2011-10-19

167

Online social network size is reflected in human brain structure  

PubMed Central

The increasing ubiquity of web-based social networking services is a striking feature of modern human society. The degree to which individuals participate in these networks varies substantially for reasons that are unclear. Here, we show a biological basis for such variability by demonstrating that quantitative variation in the number of friends an individual declares on a web-based social networking service reliably predicted grey matter density in the right superior temporal sulcus, left middle temporal gyrus and entorhinal cortex. Such regions have been previously implicated in social perception and associative memory, respectively. We further show that variability in the size of such online friendship networks was significantly correlated with the size of more intimate real-world social groups. However, the brain regions we identified were specifically associated with online social network size, whereas the grey matter density of the amygdala was correlated both with online and real-world social network sizes. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the size of an individual's online social network is closely linked to focal brain structure implicated in social cognition.

Kanai, R.; Bahrami, B.; Roylance, R.; Rees, G.

2012-01-01

168

Leveraging social networks for toxicovigilance.  

PubMed

The landscape of drug abuse is shifting. Traditional means of characterizing these changes, such as national surveys or voluntary reporting by frontline clinicians, can miss changes in usage the emergence of novel drugs. Delays in detecting novel drug usage patterns make it difficult to evaluate public policy aimed at altering drug abuse. Increasingly, newer methods to inform frontline providers to recognize symptoms associated with novel drugs or methods of administration are needed. The growth of social networks may address this need. The objective of this manuscript is to introduce tools for using data from social networks to characterize drug abuse. We outline a structured approach to analyze social media in order to capture emerging trends in drug abuse by applying powerful methods from artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, graph theory, and agent-based modeling. First, we describe how to obtain data from social networks such as Twitter using publicly available automated programmatic interfaces. Then, we discuss how to use artificial intelligence techniques to extract content useful for purposes of toxicovigilance. This filtered content can be employed to generate real-time maps of drug usage across geographical regions. Beyond describing the real-time epidemiology of drug abuse, techniques from computational linguistics can uncover ways that drug discussions differ from other online conversations. Next, graph theory can elucidate the structure of networks discussing drug abuse, helping us learn what online interactions promote drug abuse and whether these interactions differ among drugs. Finally, agent-based modeling relates online interactions to psychological archetypes, providing a link between epidemiology and behavior. An analysis of social media discussions about drug abuse patterns with computational linguistics, graph theory, and agent-based modeling permits the real-time monitoring and characterization of trends of drugs of abuse. These tools provide a powerful complement to existing methods of toxicovigilance. PMID:23619711

Chary, Michael; Genes, Nicholas; McKenzie, Andrew; Manini, Alex F

2013-06-01

169

Exploring Learning Pattern in Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The advancement of social blog, Tweeter and Face Book has improvised the broad consumer to influence the public opinion and feasibility of brands. Therefore opinion mining and related verticals are of equal importance in prediction as well as in social networked paradigms. We envisage different learning pattern of learning in social network in the form colouring (a social differentiation task)

Soumya Banerjee; Santi Caballe

2011-01-01

170

Network Analysis in the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last decade, there has been an explosion of interest in network research across the physical and social sciences. For social scientists, the theory of networks has been a goldmine, yielding explanations for social phenomena in a wide variety of disciplines from psychology to economics. In this essay, we review the kinds of things that social scientists have tried

Stephen P. Borgatti; Ajay Mehra; Daniel J. Brass; Giuseppe Labianca

2009-01-01

171

Social Network Sites: Public Private or What?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Social network sites (SNSes) like MySpace, Facebook, and Bebo are ubiquitous and today’s youth are spending a great deal of time using these sites to access public life. How is public life shaped by social technology? How are the properties of mediated publics like social network sites different from unmediated publics? This article seeks to explore the social dynamics

Danah Boyd

2007-01-01

172

Collective privacy management in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Networking is one of the major technological phe- nomena of the Web 2.0, with hundreds of millions of people participating. Social networks enable a form of self expres- sion for users, and help them to socialize and share content with other users. In spite of the fact that content sharing represents one of the prominent features of existing Social

Anna Cinzia Squicciarini; Mohamed Shehab; Federica Paci

2009-01-01

173

Social Network Collaborative Filtering: Preliminary Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a preliminary empirical study comparing methods for collaborative filtering (CF) using explicit consumers' social networks. As user-generated social networks become increasingly important and visible in technology-mediated consumer interactions, we can begin to ask how the rich associated information can be used to improve inference. Theories from social psychology have long discussed that social relationships are likely

Rong Zheng; Anindya Ghose

2007-01-01

174

Temporal distance metrics for social network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis of social and technological networks has at- tracted a lot of attention as social networking applications and mobile sensing devices have given us a wealth of real data. Classic studies looked at analysing static or aggre- gated networks, i.e., networks that do not change over time or built as the results of aggregation of information over a certain

John Tang; Mirco Musolesi; Cecilia Mascolo; Vito Latora

2009-01-01

175

Threshold behavior of incentives in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The advent of large scale online social networks has resulted in a spurt of studies on the user participation in the networks. We consider a query incentive model on social networks, where user's queries are answered through her friendship network and there are `rewards' or `incentives' in the system to answer the queries utilizing ones community. We model the friendship

Nagaraj Kota; Y. Narahari

2010-01-01

176

Positive Affectivity and Accuracy in Social Network Perception  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated how positive affectivity influences people's perception of the patterns of social relationships around them. Positive affectivity was measured as trait positive affect. The outcome variable was accuracy in the perception of informal patterns of social interaction in a group (i.e., the group's network structure). Data on the perception of the relationships of friendship and work-related advice at an

Tiziana Casciaro; Kathleen M. Carley; David Krackhardt

1999-01-01

177

Pseudolikelihood Estimation for Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interest in log-linear modeling for social-network data has grown steadily since Holland and Leinhardt (1981) proposed their p1 model. That model was designed for a single binary relationship (directed graph) representing interactions between individuals. It assumed that interactions between pairs of individuals are mutually independent. Subsequent work has extended the model in various ways, including block-modeling and the case of

David Strauss; Michael Ikeda

1990-01-01

178

Data in Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Network research relies on a variety of data-sources, depending on the problem-scenario and the questions which the research is trying to answer or inform. In this paper, we analyze some of the data- sources indexed by the sizes of these data-sets and relating them back to the research question, which the data-set is used for. In carrying out such

Anu Vaidyanathan; Malcolm Shore; Mark Billinghurst

2008-01-01

179

Women, Social Networks, and HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

HIV\\/AIDS has been a growing problem since the 1980s. The purpose of this study is to understand the relationship between social networks of women and their HIV\\/AIDS status in Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. In-depth interviews were conducted to collect data from 24 women, 14 of whom were HIV positive. A content analysis technique was applied and UCINET software was used to

Wassie Kebede

2012-01-01

180

Text Mining in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks are rich in various kinds of contents such as text and multimedia. The ability to apply text mining algorithms effectively in the context of text data is critical for a wide variety of applications. Social networks require text mining algorithms for a wide variety of applications such as keyword search, classification, and clustering. While search and classification are well known applications for a wide variety of scenarios, social networks have a much richer structure both in terms of text and links. Much of the work in the area uses either purely the text content or purely the linkage structure. However, many recent algorithms use a combination of linkage and content information for mining purposes. In many cases, it turns out that the use of a combination of linkage and content information provides much more effective results than a system which is based purely on either of the two. This paper provides a survey of such algorithms, and the advantages observed by using such algorithms in different scenarios. We also present avenues for future research in this area.

Aggarwal, Charu C.; Wang, Haixun

181

Social Software: Participants' Experience Using Social Networking for Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networking tools used in learning provides instructional design with tools for transformative change in education. This study focused on defining the meanings and essences of social networking through the lived common experiences of 7 college students. The problem of the study was a lack of learner voice in understanding the value of social

Batchelder, Cecil W.

2010-01-01

182

Bowling online: social networking and social capital within the organization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within an organizational setting, social capital facilitates knowledge management processes in that it enables individuals to locate useful information, draw on resources and make contributions to the network. This paper explores the relationship between various dimensions of organizational social capital and the use of an internal social network site (SNS). We hypothesize that the use of a SNS contributes to

Charles Steinfield; Joan Moris DiMicco; Nicole B. Ellison; Cliff Lampe

2009-01-01

183

Leveraging social media networks for classification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social media has reshaped the way in which people interact with each other. The rapid development of participatory web and\\u000a social networking sites like YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook, also brings about many data mining opportunities and novel challenges.\\u000a In particular, we focus on classification tasks with user interaction information in a social network. Networks in social\\u000a media are heterogeneous, consisting

Lei Tang; Huan Liu

184

Protecting Private Information in Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because personal information can be inferred from associations with friends, privacy becomes increasingly important as online\\u000a social network services gain more popularity. Our recent study showed that the causal relations among friends in social networks\\u000a can be modeled by a Bayesian network, and personal attribute values can be inferred with high accuracy from close friends\\u000a in the social network. Based

Jianming He; Wesley W. Chu

2008-01-01

185

An Introduction to Social Network Data Analytics  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The advent of online social networks has been one of the most exciting events in this decade. Many popular online social networks\\u000a such as Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook have become increasingly popular. In addition, a number of multimedia networks such as Flickr have also seen an increasing level of popularity in recent years. Many such social networks are extremely rich

Charu C. Aggarwal

2011-01-01

186

Modeling social networks from sampled data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Network models are widely used to represent relational information among interacting units and the structural implications of these relations. Recently, social network studies have focused a great deal of attention on random graph models of networks whose nodes represent individual social actors and whose edges represent a specified relationship between the actors.\\u000a¶\\u000aMost inference for social network models assumes

Mark S. Handcock; Krista J. Gile

2010-01-01

187

Community Structure in Online Collegiate Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networking sites have become increasingly popular with college students. The networks we studied are defined through ``friendships'' indicated by Facebook users from UNC, Oklahoma, Caltech, Georgetown, and Princeton. We apply the tools of network science to study the Facebook networks from these five different universities at a single point in time. We investigate each single-institution network's community structure,

AMANDA L. TRAUD; ERIC D. KELSIC; PETER J. MUCHA; MASON A. PORTER

2009-01-01

188

Community structure in social and biological networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of recent studies have focused on the statistical properties of networked systems such as social networks and the Worldwide Web. Researchers have concentrated particularly on a few properties that seem to be common to many networks: the small-world property, power-law degree distributions, and network transitivity. In this article, we highlight another property that is found in many networks,

Michelle Girvan; M. E. J. Newman

2002-01-01

189

Social Network Reduction Based on Stability  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis of social networks is concentrated especially on uncovering hidden relations and properties of network members (vertices). Most of the current approaches are focused mainly on different network types and different network coefficients. On one hand, the analysis can be relatively simple, on the other hand some complex approaches to network dynamics can be used. This paper introduces a

Milos Kudelka; Zdenek Horak; Vaclav Snasel; Ajith Abraham

2010-01-01

190

Contact networks in a wild Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) population: using social network analysis to reveal seasonal variability in social behaviour and its implications for transmission of devil facial tumour disease.  

PubMed

The structure of the contact network between individuals has a profound effect on the transmission of infectious disease. Using a novel technology--proximity sensing radio collars--we described the contact network in a population of Tasmanian devils. This largest surviving marsupial carnivore is threatened by a novel infectious cancer. All devils were connected in a single giant component, which would permit disease to spread throughout the network from any single infected individual. Unlike the contact networks for many human diseases, the degree distribution was not highly aggregated. Nevertheless, the empirically derived networks differed from random networks. Contact networks differed between the mating and non-mating seasons, with more extended male-female associations in the mating season and a greater frequency of female-female associations outside the mating season. Our results suggest that there is limited potential to control the disease by targeting highly connected age or sex classes. PMID:19694783

Hamede, Rodrigo K; Bashford, Jim; McCallum, Hamish; Jones, Menna

2009-08-20

191

Complex social contagion makes networks more vulnerable to disease outbreaks  

PubMed Central

Social network analysis is now widely used to investigate the dynamics of infectious disease spread. Vaccination dramatically disrupts disease transmission on a contact network, and indeed, high vaccination rates can potentially halt disease transmission altogether. Here, we build on mounting evidence that health behaviors - such as vaccination, and refusal thereof - can spread across social networks through a process of complex contagion that requires social reinforcement. Using network simulations that model health behavior and infectious disease spread, we find that under otherwise identical conditions, the process by which the health behavior spreads has a very strong effect on disease outbreak dynamics. This dynamic variability results from differences in the topology within susceptible communities that arise during the health behavior spreading process, which in turn depends on the topology of the overall social network. Our findings point to the importance of health behavior spread in predicting and controlling disease outbreaks.

Campbell, Ellsworth; Salathe, Marcel

2013-01-01

192

Complex social contagion makes networks more vulnerable to disease outbreaks.  

PubMed

Social network analysis is now widely used to investigate the dynamics of infectious disease spread. Vaccination dramatically disrupts disease transmission on a contact network, and indeed, high vaccination rates can potentially halt disease transmission altogether. Here, we build on mounting evidence that health behaviors - such as vaccination, and refusal thereof - can spread across social networks through a process of complex contagion that requires social reinforcement. Using network simulations that model health behavior and infectious disease spread, we find that under otherwise identical conditions, the process by which the health behavior spreads has a very strong effect on disease outbreak dynamics. This dynamic variability results from differences in the topology within susceptible communities that arise during the health behavior spreading process, which in turn depends on the topology of the overall social network. Our findings point to the importance of health behavior spread in predicting and controlling disease outbreaks. PMID:23712758

Campbell, Ellsworth; Salathé, Marcel

2013-01-01

193

Networks and cronyism: A social exchange analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

From the perspective of social exchange theory, we explore the downside of social networking. In particular, we discuss the\\u000a impact of network properties on cronyism. We identify two types of network, clique and entrepreneurial, and two forms of competition,\\u000a inter- and intra-network. We argue that network competition generally increases the likelihood of cronyism, and the effect\\u000a of competition on cronyism

Thomas M. Begley; Naresh Khatri; Eric W. K. Tsang

2010-01-01

194

Location Privacy Protection on Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Location information is considered as private in many scenarios. Protecting location information on mobile ad-hoc networks has attracted much research in past years. However, location information protection on social networks has not been paid much attention. In this paper, we present a novel location privacy protection approach on the basis of user messages in social networks. Our approach grants flexibility to users by offering them multiple protecting options. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to protect social network users' location information via text messages. We propose five algorithms for location privacy protection on social networks.

Zhan, Justin; Fang, Xing

195

Modeling Socialness in Dynamic Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Socialness refers to the ability to elicit social in- teraction and social links among people. It is a concept often associated with individuals. Although there are tangible benefits in socialness, there is little research in its modeling. In this paper, we study socialness as a property that can be associated with items, beyond its traditional association with people. We aim

Tuan-Anh Hoang; Ee-Peng Lim; Palakorn Achananuparp; Jing Jiang; Loo-Nin Teow

2011-01-01

196

Social Insects: A Model System for Network Dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social insect colonies (ants, bees, wasps, and termites) show sophisticated collective problem-solving in the face of variable constraints. Individuals exchange information and materials such as food. The resulting network structure and dynamics can inform us about the mechanisms by which the insects achieve particular collective behaviors and these can be transposed to man-made and social networks. We discuss how network analysis can answer important questions about social insects, such as how effective task allocation or information flow is realized. We put forward the idea that network analysis methods are under-utilized in social insect research, and that they can provide novel ways to view the complexity of collective behavior, particularly if network dynamics are taken into account. To illustrate this, we present an example of network tasks performed by ant workers, linked by instances of workers switching from one task to another. We show how temporal network analysis can propose and test new hypotheses on mechanisms of task allocation, and how adding temporal elements to static networks can drastically change results. We discuss the benefits of using social insects as models for complex systems in general. There are multiple opportunities emergent technologies and analysis methods in facilitating research on social insect network. The potential for interdisciplinary work could significantly advance diverse fields such as behavioral ecology, computer sciences, and engineering.

Charbonneau, Daniel; Blonder, Benjamin; Dornhaus, Anna

197

Sentiment community detection in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the increasing popularity of social networking sites and Web 2.0, people are building social relationships and expressing their opinions in the cyberspace. In this study, we introduce several novel methods to identify online communities with similar sentiments in online social networks. Our preliminary experiment on a real-world dataset demonstrates that our proposed method can detect interesting sentiment communities in

Kaiquan Xu; Jiexun Li; Stephen Shaoyi Liao

2011-01-01

198

Partial Social Network Disclosure and Crawlers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The popularity and size of online social networks means the social graph contains valuable data about relationships. Such graph data may be sensitive. Thus, there is a need to protect the data from privacy leaks. On the other hand, public information and crawl ability are needed to support the basic utility and services on top of the social network. We

Suhendry Effendy; Felix Halim; Roland H. C. Yap

2011-01-01

199

Boosting social network connectivity with link revival  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networking platforms have become a popular channel of communications among people. However, most people can only keep in touch with a limited number of friends. This phenomenon results in a low-connectivity social network in terms of communications, which is inefficient for information propagation and social engagement. In this paper, we introduce a new recommendation service, called link revival,

Yuan Tian; Qi He; Qiankun Zhao; Xingjie Liu; Wang-chien Lee

2010-01-01

200

Social network drinking and adult alcohol involvement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Past research shows consistent associations between individuals' drinking patterns and the drinking patterns of their social network members. This association has usually been attributed to the influence of social networks on individual behavior. Recent studies concerning adolescent drinking behavior suggest that such associations may be due, in part, to selection effects in which individuals form social ties with those who

Susan Bullers; M. Lynne Cooper; Marcia Russell

2001-01-01

201

Characterizing user behavior in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Understanding how users behave when they connect to social networking sites creates opportunities for better interface design, richer studies of social interactions, and improved design of content distribution systems. In this paper, we present a,rst of a kind analysis of user workloads in on- line social networks. Our study is based on detailed click- stream data, collected over a

Fabrício Benevenuto; Tiago Rodrigues; Meeyoung Cha; Virgílio A. F. Almeida

2009-01-01

202

Characterizing User Behavior in Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding how users behave when they connect to social networking sites creates opportunities for better interface design, richer studies of social interactions, and improved design of content distribution systems. In this paper, we present a rst of a kind analysis of user workloads in on- line social networks. Our study is based on detailed click- stream data, collected over a

Fabrício Benevenuto; Tiago Rodrigues; Meeyoung Ch; Virgílio Almeida

203

District Policy and Teachers’ Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Policy makers increasingly include provisions aimed at fostering professional community as part of reform initiatives. Yet little is known about the impact of policy on teachers’ professional relations in schools. Drawing theoretically from social capital theory and methodologically from qualitative social network analysis, this article explores how district policies influence teachers’ social networks in eight elementary schools in two districts

Cynthia E. Coburn; Jennifer Lin Russell

2008-01-01

204

Effects of missing data in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We perform sensitivity analyses to assess the impact of missing data on the structural properties of social networks. The social network is conceived of as being generated by a bipartite graph, in which actors are linked together via multiple interaction contexts or affiliations. We discuss three principal missing data mechanisms: network boundary specification (non-inclusion of actors or affiliations), survey non-response,

Gueorgi Kossinets

2003-01-01

205

Localization versus globalization of social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks, a new generation of sites that focus these days on global networks, Internet users are located. Based on online sites such organizations are working and each batch of Internet users with specific characteristics make together. Social networks such as media know that the possibility of achieving a new way to communicate and share content on that have provided

Yasin Hamidi; Yasaman Hamidi; Shahrbanou Mehrbabak

2011-01-01

206

Privacy in Social Networks: A Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this chapter, we survey the literature on privacy in social networks. We focus both on online social networks and online affiliation networks. We formally define the possible privacy breaches and describe the privacy attacks that have been studied. We present definitions of privacy in the context of anonymization together with existing anonymization techniques.

Zheleva, Elena; Getoor, Lise

207

Modeling relationship strength in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous work analyzing social networks has mainly focused on binary friendship relations. However, in online social networks the low cost of link formation can lead to networks with heterogeneous relationship strengths (e.g., acquaintances and best friends mixed together). In this case, the binary friendship indicator pro- vides only a coarse representation of relationship information. In this work, we develop an

Rongjing Xiang; Jennifer Neville; Monica Rogati

2010-01-01

208

Social network influence and market instability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Models of social networks depict individuals’ dependency. They offer a systematic way to capture the connectedness and opinion formations in the complex web of interpersonal influences. This paper studies price stability of a capital market, where the dynamics of participants’ opinion formations is formalized using social network models. Stability condition is derived. It is also identified how network structures are

J.-H. Steffi Yang

2009-01-01

209

Facilitating Social Networks Among Gay Men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are increasingly recognised as being beneficial to health and wellbeing. This paper, drawing from a qualitative study into health services targeted at gay men in London, explores the facilitation by service providers of social networks among gay men. Networks are dependent upon reciprocity among their participants and the study examines how shared narratives can generate a sense of

Bob Cant

2004-01-01

210

Mining hidden community in heterogeneous social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis has attracted much attention in recent years. Community mining is one of the major directions in social network analysis. Most of the existing methods on community mining assume that there is only one kind of relation in the network, and moreover, the mining results are independent of the users' needs or preferences. However, in reality, there exist

Deng Cai; Zheng Shao; Xiaofei He; Xifeng Yan; Jiawei Han

2005-01-01

211

Promoting social networks among Computer Science students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main scientific aim of this study was to investigate how Computer Science students regarded their social networks among study colleagues. The study was conducted at the Research Lab for Educational Technologies (University of Vienna) in order to find connecting factors for improving students' networks by means of curricular design as well as in single courses. Social Networks drawings and

Kathrin Figl; Sonja Kabicher; Katharina Toifl

2008-01-01

212

Perceived user value of social networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networks have raised an interest in the research communities. The privacy issues related to the online so- cial networking are widely studied, but the perceived user value of online social networks has not been researched in large scale. This article tries to address the perceived user value and what is the motivation for people to be a part

Jarkko Rantamäki

213

Social Network Theory and Educational Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"Social Network Theory and Educational Change" offers a provocative and fascinating exploration of how social networks in schools can impede or facilitate the work of education reform. Drawing on the work of leading scholars, the book comprises a series of studies examining networks among teachers and school leaders, contrasting formal and…

Daly, Alan J., Ed.

2010-01-01

214

Social Network Mining with Nonparametric Relational Models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Statistical relational learning (SRL) provides efiective tech- niques to analyze social network data with rich collections of objects and complex networks. Inflnite hidden relational models (IHRMs) introduce nonparametric mixture models into relational learning and have been successful in many relational applications. In this paper we explore the modeling and analysis of complex social networks with IHRMs for com- munity detection,

Zhao Xu; Volker Tresp; Achim Rettinger; Kristian Kersting

2008-01-01

215

Secure friend discovery in mobile social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile social networks extend social networks in the cyberspace into the real world by allowing mobile users to discover and interact with existing and potential friends who happen to be in their physical vicinity. Despite their promise to enable many exciting applications, serious security and privacy concerns have hindered wide adoption of these networks. To address these concerns, in this

Wei Dong; Vacha Dave; Lili Qiu; Yin Zhang

2011-01-01

216

Identity and Search in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social networks have the surprising property of being ``searchable'': Ordinary people are capable of directing messages through their network of acquaintances to reach a specific but distant target person in only a few steps. We present a model that offers an explanation of social network searchability in terms of recognizable personal identities: sets of characteristics measured along a number of social dimensions. Our model defines a class of searchable networks and a method for searching them that may be applicable to many network search problems, including the location of data files in peer-to-peer networks, pages on the World Wide Web, and information in distributed databases.

Watts, Duncan J.; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Newman, M. E. J.

2002-05-01

217

Social Network Analysis of Social Capital in Collaborative Planning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social capital is an important primary outcome of collaborative planning and is deemed a precursor to arriving at successful collaborative planning outcomes such as more effective collective action and both individual and social benefits. Although commonly used definitions of social capital stress the importance of social networks, recent scholarly research tends to overlook the importance of understanding how collaborative efforts

Lynn A. Mandarano

2009-01-01

218

Social networks and infant feeding in Oaxaca, Mexico.  

PubMed

The health benefits of delaying the introduction of complementary foods to infants' diets are widely known. Many studies have shown that mothers with the support of close social network members are more compliant with medical recommendations for infant feeding. In our study, we examine the effects of a broader spectrum of network members (40 people) on mothers' infant feeding decisions. The survey was conducted in Oaxaca, Mexico as part of a follow-up to a nationwide Mexican Social Security Institute survey of infant health. Sixty mothers were interviewed from a stratified random sample of the original respondents. Multivariate tests were used to compare the efficacy of network-level variables for predicting the introduction of 36 foods into infants' diets, when compared with respondent-level variables. The study yields four findings. First, network-level variables were better predictors of the timing of food introduction than socio-demographic variables. Second, mothers with more indigenous networks delayed the introduction of some grains (oatmeal, cereal, noodle soup, rice) and processed pork products (sausage and ham) to the infant's diet longer than mothers with less indigenous networks. Third, mothers who had stronger ties to their networks delayed the introduction of rice and processed pork products (sausage and ham) to the infant's diet longer than mothers who had weaker ties to their networks. Fourth, mothers who heeded the advice of distant network members introduced some grains (rice and cereal) earlier than mothers who did not heed the advice of distant network members. PMID:18336645

Wutich, Amber; McCarty, Christopher

2008-04-01

219

Social networking and inequality: the role of clustered networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper aims to analyse how income inequality affects social networking in 14 European countries. By using the European Community Household Panel, we introduce new evidence to test the network-inequality nexus and construct inequality indexes directly from the microdata as well their decomposition. We explore how total income inequality is related to three specific levels of social networking; then, we

Emanuela DAngelo; Marco Lilla

2010-01-01

220

Bayesian Networks for Social Modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a body of work developed over the past five years. The work addresses the use of Bayesian network (BN) models for representing and predicting social/organizational behaviors. The topics covered include model construction, validation, and use. These topics show the bulk of the lifetime of such model, beginning with construction, moving to validation and other aspects of model "critiquing", and finally demonstrating how the modeling approach might be used to inform policy analysis. The primary benefits of using a well-developed computational, mathematical, and statistical modeling structure, such as BN, are 1) there are significant computational, theoretical and capability bases on which to build 2) the ability to empirically critique the model, and potentially evaluate competing models for a social/behavioral phenomenon.

Whitney, Paul; White, Amanda; Walsh, Stephen; Dalton, Angela; Brothers, Alan

221

Bayesian Networks for Social Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a body of work developed over the past five years. The work addresses the use of Bayesian network (BN) models for representing and predicting social/organizational behaviors. The topics covered include model construction, validation, and use. These topics show the bulk of the lifetime of such model, beginning with construction, moving to validation and other aspects of model ‘critiquing’, and finally demonstrating how the modeling approach might be used to inform policy analysis. To conclude, we discuss limitations of using BN for this activity and suggest remedies to address those limitations. The primary benefits of using a well-developed computational, mathematical, and statistical modeling structure, such as BN, are 1) there are significant computational, theoretical and capability bases on which to build 2) ability to empirically critique the model, and potentially evaluate competing models for a social/behavioral phenomena.

Whitney, Paul D.; White, Amanda M.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Dalton, Angela C.; Brothers, Alan J.

2011-03-28

222

Social networks in cardiovascular disease management.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA. Social networks have a positive association with obesity, smoking cessation and weight loss. This article summarizes studies evaluating the impact of social networks on the management of cardiovascular disease. The 35 studies included in the article describe the impact of social networks on a decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease, depression and mortality. In addition, having a large-sized social network is also associated with better outcomes and improved health. The role of pharmacists is beginning to play an important role in the patient-centered medical home, which needs to be incorporated into social networks. The patient-centered medical home can serve as an adaptive source for social network evolvement. PMID:21155703

Shaya, Fadia T; Yan, Xia; Farshid, Maryam; Barakat, Samer; Jung, Miah; Low, Sara; Fedder, Donald

2010-12-01

223

Social Networks and Social Influences in Adolescence.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Young people are concerned with making and keeping friends, and they invest a great deal of energy in group social life to do so. This book charts the interactions of young people both in and out of school and the role of peers and friends in strengthening social attachments and in establishing social identities. It describes how social

Cotterell, John

224

Challenges for Mobile Social Networking Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents work in progress regarding utilization of social network information for mobile applications. Primarily\\u000a a number of challenges are identified, such as how to mine data from multiple social networks, how to integrate and consolidate\\u000a social networks, and how to manage semantic information for mobile applications. The challenges are discussed from a semantic\\u000a Web perspective using a driving

Juwel Rana; Johan Kristiansson; Josef Hallberg; Kåre Synnes

2009-01-01

225

An Architecture for Mobile Social Networking Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile semantic Web provides a new way of developing context-aware social networking applications. Social networking applications are changing the way of communication by using userpsilas context-information. For example, micro-blogging has become a smart way of conveying the current situation and activity by using user context. There is currently a significant difference between using social networking applications on a static computer

J. Rana; J. Kristiansson; J. Hallberg; K. Synnes

2009-01-01

226

Using Social Networks to Organize Researcher Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Network is being a popular word in WEB 2.0 era. Various social network websites connect us and our friends together.\\u000a A buzzword which describes the idea is “communicate with anyone anywhere”. By using social network websites like Facebook or blog, we can find out the communities which share the same interests with us. In the academic area, people sharing

Xian-ming Xu; Justin Zhan; Hai-tao Zhu

2008-01-01

227

Intelligent social network modeling and analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent development of Web 2.0 has provided for an enormous increase in human interactions across all corners of the earth. One manifestation of this is the growth of computer mediated social networks. Many notable Web 2.0 applications such as Facebook, Myspace and LinkedIn are social networks. Social relational networks are becoming an important technology in human behavioral modeling. Our

R. R. Yager

2008-01-01

228

Privacy-Preserving Collaborative Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A social network is the mapping and measuring of relationships and flows between individuals, groups, organizations, computers,\\u000a web sites, and other information\\/knowledge processing entities. The nodes in the network are the people and groups, while\\u000a the links show relationships or flows between the nodes. Social networks provide both a visual and a mathematical model for\\u000a analyzing of relationships. While social

Justin Zhan; Gary Blosser; Chris Yang; Lisa Singh

2008-01-01

229

Knowledge and Social Networks in Yahoo! Answers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study defines and explores relations between knowledge-seeking and social relationship networks, using data from a popular Q&A social network site. Our theoretical framework draws on Motivation, Common-goods, and Social capital theories to generate an understanding of the interrelationship of the two types of networks. A dataset consisting of 19 months of activity on Q&A Yahoo! Answers provides the basis

Amit Rechavi; Sheizaf Rafaeli

2012-01-01

230

Mining diversity on social media networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fast development of multimedia technology and increasing availability of network bandwidth has given rise to an abundance\\u000a of network data as a result of all the ever-booming social media and social websites in recent years, e.g., Flickr, Youtube,\\u000a MySpace, Facebook, etc. Social network analysis has therefore become a critical problem attracting enthusiasm from both academia\\u000a and industry. However, an

Lu Liu; Feida Zhu; Meng Jiang; Jiawei Han; Lifeng Sun; Shiqiang Yang

2010-01-01

231

Managing Trust in Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In recent years, there is a dramatic growth in number and popularity of online social networks. There are many networks available\\u000a with more than 100 million registered users such as Facebook, MySpace, QZone, Windows Live Spaces etc. People may connect,\\u000a discover and share by using these online social networks. The exponential growth of online communities in the area of social

Touhid Bhuiyan; Audun Josang; Yue Xu

2010-01-01

232

Social Networks and the Nature of Communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

If I had encountered sociologist Barry Wellman and learned about social network analysis when I first wrote about cyberspace\\u000a cultures, I could have saved us all a decade of debate by calling them “online social networks” instead of “virtual communities”.\\u000a Social networks predated the Internet, writing and even speech. Indeed, humans are not the only creature that makes use of

Howard Rheingold

233

The Social Side of Information Networking.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Explores the social issues, including manners, security, crime (fraud), and social control associated with information networking, with emphasis on the Internet. Also addresses the influence of cellular phones, the Internet and other information technologies on society. (GR)|

Katz, James E.

1997-01-01

234

Do Social Networks Support Effective Parenting.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Mothers' social network relationships, their instrumental use of network members and professionals for help, their use of community services and their efficacy with respect to child rearing were examined as predictors of parenting skill. Separate regressi...

J. H. Stevens

1985-01-01

235

HARMONY AND TENSION ON SOCIAL NETWORK SITES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need to maintain harmony among one's social contacts is proposed in this paper to impose constraints on the interconnectivity between users of social network sites (SNS). A particular focus is on the connectivity between different social spheres. It is hypothesized that the type and number of social spheres and technological features of SNS interact such that increased levels of

Jens F. Binder; Andrew Howes; Daniel Smart

2012-01-01

236

System and method for secure social networking  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

A system and method for secure social networking is disclosed. In one embodiment, a social networking site is accessible on the Internet for use by minors that allows for adult supervision and approval for participation on the site, and provides safeguards against abuses and misuse of many social networking sites available today. In another embodiment, a social networking site on the Internet is available for use by minors that permits users to access the Internet only according to guidelines previously approved by adults for each user. The system further comprises a call screening feature that allows incoming and outgoing calls according to guidelines previously approved by adults for each user.

Williams; Robert Gordon (Coral Springs, FL)

2013-10-08

237

The Evolution of Social and Economic Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine the dynamic formation and stochastic evolution of networks connecting individuals. The payoff to an individual from an economic or social activity depends on the network of connections among individuals. Over time individuals form and sever links connecting themselves to other individuals based on the improvement that the resulting network offers them relative to the current network. In addition

Matthew O. Jackson; Alison Watts

2002-01-01

238

Improving Matching Process in Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online dating networks, a type of social network, are gaining popularity. With many people joining and being available in the network, users are overwhelmed with choices when choosing their ideal partners. This problem can be overcome by utilizing recommendation methods. However, traditional recommendation methods are ineffective and inefficient for online dating networks where the dataset is sparse and\\/or large and

Lin Chen; Richi Nayak; Yue Xu

2010-01-01

239

A middleware service for pervasive social networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today's online social networking applications (e.g., Face-book, Twitter, Last.Fm) allow users that are socially close to each other (i.e., users with shared interests) to participate in the collective production and sharing of information (i.e., virtual interactions). Pervasive Social Networking (PSN) is a new vision that aims to complement virtual interactions with physical ones, by enabling users who are both socially

Sonia Ben Mokhtar; Liam McNamara; Licia Capra

2009-01-01

240

Conflicts in Online Social Network Privacy Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social network sites have the potential to fundamentally change the character of our social lives, both on an interpersonal\\u000a and a community level. In the past few years, social network sites have become integrated into the daily practices of millions\\u000a of users. Social applications provide a convenient approach where users can communicate and share their personal information.\\u000a However, privacy and

Zhengping Wu; Yuanyao Liu

241

Reconsidering Social Networks for Enterprise Communication Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking applications leverage valuable information from social graphs and integrate communication capabilities to offer new services. However, currently, these applications are limited to communication capabilities such as click-to-call or click-to-conference. Once the communication session is established the social context and the communication context are not integrated in these services. For social network communication services such integration permits new and

Krishna Kishore Dhara; Venkatesh Krishnaswamy; Taranjeet Singh

2010-01-01

242

Structure and Evolution of Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this work, we consider the evolution of structure within large online social networks. We present a series of measurements\\u000a of two large real networks, one from the friend relation within the Flickr photo sharing application and the other from Yahoo!s\\u000a 360 social network. These networks together comprise in excess of 5 million people and 10 million friendship links, and

Ravi Kumar; Jasmine Novak; Andrew Tomkins

243

Social network analysis and the evaluation of leadership networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leadership development practitioners are increasingly interested in social networks as a way to strengthen relationships among leaders in fields, communities, and organizations. This paper offers a framework for conceptualizing different types of leadership networks and uses case examples to identify outcomes typically associated with each type of network. Evaluating leadership networks is a challenge for the field of leadership development.

Bruce Hoppe; Claire Reinelt

2010-01-01

244

Social Software: Participants' Experience Using Social Networking for Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social networking tools used in learning provides instructional design with tools for transformative change in education. This study focused on defining the meanings and essences of social networking through the lived common experiences of 7 college students. The problem of the study was a lack of learner voice in understanding the value of…

Batchelder, Cecil W.

2010-01-01

245

Variability of contact process in complex networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study numerically how the structures of distinct networks influence the epidemic dynamics in contact process. We first find that the variability difference between homogeneous and heterogeneous networks is very narrow, although the heterogeneous structures can induce the lighter prevalence. Contrary to non-community networks, strong community structures can cause the secondary outbreak of prevalence and two peaks of variability appeared. Especially in the local community, the extraordinarily large variability in early stage of the outbreak makes the prediction of epidemic spreading hard. Importantly, the bridgeness plays a significant role in the predictability, meaning the further distance of the initial seed to the bridgeness, the less accurate the predictability is. Also, we investigate the effect of different disease reaction mechanisms on variability, and find that the different reaction mechanisms will result in the distinct variabilities at the end of epidemic spreading.

Gong, Kai; Tang, Ming; Yang, Hui; Shang, Mingsheng

2011-12-01

246

Set Pair Social Network Analysis Model and Information Mining  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, finding that there was uncertainty existed in the incidence relationship of individuals by analyzed social networks theory. This paper constructed a set pair social network analysis model based on uncertainty of the social network to better learning social network relationship. This simple social network analysis model was applied in a relationship of friend to discover who is most significant.

Chunying, Zhang; Ruitao, Liang; Lu, Liu

247

Spreading in online social networks: The role of social reinforcement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Some epidemic spreading models are usually applied to analyze the propagation of opinions or news. However, the dynamics of epidemic spreading and information or behavior spreading are essentially different in many aspects. Centola's experiments [ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1185231 329, 1194 (2010)] on behavior spreading in online social networks showed that the spreading is faster and broader in regular networks than in random networks. This result contradicts with the former understanding that random networks are preferable for spreading than regular networks. To describe the spreading in online social networks, a unknown-known-approved-exhausted four-status model was proposed, which emphasizes the effect of social reinforcement and assumes that the redundant signals can improve the probability of approval (i.e., the spreading rate). Performing the model on regular and random networks, it is found that our model can well explain the results of Centola's experiments on behavior spreading and some former studies on information spreading in different parameter space. The effects of average degree and network size on behavior spreading process are further analyzed. The results again show the importance of social reinforcement and are accordant with Centola's anticipation that increasing the network size or decreasing the average degree will enlarge the difference of the density of final approved nodes between regular and random networks. Our work complements the former studies on spreading dynamics, especially the spreading in online social networks where the information usually requires individuals' confirmations before being transmitted to others.

Zheng, Muhua; Lü, Linyuan; Zhao, Ming

2013-07-01

248

Badger social networks correlate with tuberculosis infection.  

PubMed

Although disease hosts are classically assumed to interact randomly [1], infection is likely to spread across structured and dynamic contact networks [2]. We used social network analyses to investigate contact patterns of group-living European badgers, Meles meles, which are an important wildlife reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (TB). We found that TB test-positive badgers were socially isolated from their own groups but were more important for flow, potentially of infection, between social groups. The distinctive social position of infected badgers may help explain how social stability mitigates, and social perturbation increases, the spread of infection in badgers. PMID:24156807

Weber, Nicola; Carter, Stephen P; Dall, Sasha R X; Delahay, Richard J; McDonald, Jennifer L; Bearhop, Stuart; McDonald, Robbie A

2013-10-21

249

Social Networks and Mental Health Service Utilisation - a Literature Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks have been shown to be smaller in individuals with severe mental illness than in the general population. Patients' social networks and social support may impact on their utilisation of psychiatric services. This literature review focuses on social networks, social support and mental health service use in patients with mental illness. Most studies suggest that smaller social networks or

Maya Albert; Thomas Becker; Paul Mccrone; Graham Thornicroft

1998-01-01

250

Reverse Social Engineering Attacks in Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social networks are some of the largest and fastest growing online services today. Facebook, for example, has been ranked\\u000a as the second most visited site on the Internet, and has been reporting growth rates as high as 3% per week. One of the key\\u000a features of social networks is the support they provide for finding new friends. For example, social

Danesh Irani; Marco Balduzzi; Davide Balzarotti; Engin Kirda; Calton Pu

2011-01-01

251

Time-sensitive behavior dynamics in multimedia fingerprinting social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multimedia social network is a network infrastructure in which the social network members share multimedia contents with all different purposes. Analyzing user behavior in multime- dia social networks help design more secured and efficient multimedia and networking systems. In this paper, we focus on the colluder social network in multimedia fingerprinting systems in which colluders gain reward by redistributing the

W. Sabrina Lin; H. Vicky Zhao; K. J. Ray Liu

2009-01-01

252

Personality on Social Network Sites: An Application of the Five Factor Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we explore how individual personality characteristics influence online social networking behavior. We use data from an online survey with 1560 respondents from a major Swiss technical university and their corresponding online profiles and friendship networks on a popular Social Network Site (SNS). Apart from sociodemographic variables and questions about SNS usage, we collected survey data on personality

Stefan Wehrli

2008-01-01

253

Finding Experts Using Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Searching an organization's document repositories for experts is a frequently occurred problem in intranet information management. A common method for finding experts in an organization is to use social networks - people are not isolated but connected by various kinds of associations. In organizations, people explicitly send email to one another thus social networks are likely to be contained in

Yupeng Fu; Rongjing Xiang; Yiqun Liu; Min Zhang; Shaoping Ma

2007-01-01

254

Parenthood and social networks : A preliminary view  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from several samples in the United States and England are drawn upon to examine how and to what extent the social networks of parents differ from those of men and women without children. The social contact patterns found to be associated with parenthood involve (1) a shift in the composition of the networks, and especially an increased emphasis on

Muriel Hammer; Linda Gutwirth; Susan L. Phillips

1982-01-01

255

Social networking on the semantic web  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Aims to investigate the way that the semantic web is being used to represent and process social network information. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The Swoogle semantic web search engine was used to construct several large data sets of Resource Description Framework (RDF) documents with social network information that were encoded using the “Friend of a Friend” (FOAF) ontology. The datasets

Tim Finin; Li Ding; Lina Zhou; Anupam Joshi

2005-01-01

256

Finding approximately similar patterns in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis has gained considerable momentum due to its importance to investigative and intelligence analysts. Social networks can provide a wealth of information about behavioral patterns of individuals and groups, and can be successfully deployed to identify individuals or anomalous groups engaged in unlawful activities. Most of the tools at analysts' disposal today employ state of the art visual

Preeti Goel; Lipika Dey

2011-01-01

257

Social Networks and Labor Market Entry Barriers  

Microsoft Academic Search

An entry barrier in the labor market can be an important source of wage inequality. This paper finds that social networks, father's education and political status, and urban household registration status (hukou identity), as well as their own education, experience, age, and gender, help people enter high-wage industries. When contrasting coastal and inland samples, after instrumenting social networks by household

Zhao Chen; Ming Lu; Hiroshi Sato

258

Implementation of a Focused Social Networking Crawler  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking sites are becoming more and more popular and thus there is increased value in attacking and exploiting them. The amount of users on them is attractive in terms of the information they make available. We implement a focused social networking crawler on the popular site, Facebook, in order to exploit user profile information and identify aspects of computer

Alice Leung; Roven Lin; Jesse Ng; Philip Szeto

259

Corporate strategy and the Social Networking phenomena  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Social Networking (SN) phenomena has developed relatively overnight and is continuing to develop at an exponential pace. It allows for innovative new methods of disseminating and collecting information in ways never before dreamed possible by corporate executives. The rise of Social Networking is becoming a disruptive technology for traditional marketing and advertising medium such as radio, television, web page,

Robert L. Johnson

2010-01-01

260

Using social networks to harvest email addresses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking is one of the most popular Internet activities with millions of members from around the world. However, users are unaware of the privacy risks involved. Even if they protect their private information, their name is enough to be used for malicious purposes. In this paper we demonstrate and evaluate how names extracted from social networks can be used

Iasonas Polakis; Georgios Kontaxis; Spiros Antonatos; Eleni Gessiou; Thanasis Petsas; Evangelos P. Markatos

2010-01-01

261

Online social networking: redefining the human web  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – Although the inplementation of online social networking (OSN) within the hospitality industry is relatively new, its parameters possess unique implications for hospitality industry constituencies including guests, staff members, and management. The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution, scope and types of online social networks and potential implications for hospitality businesses. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This paper is

Michael L. Kasavana; Khaldoon Nusair; Katherine Teodosic

2010-01-01

262

Social Networking on the Semantic Web  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Aims to investigate the way that the semantic web is being used to represent and process social network information. Design/methodology/approach: The Swoogle semantic web search engine was used to construct several large data sets of Resource Description Framework (RDF) documents with social network information that were encoded using the…

Finin, Tim; Ding, Li; Zhou, Lina; Joshi, Anupam

2005-01-01

263

Social networking sites and adolescent health.  

PubMed

Social networking sites are popular among and consistently used by adolescents. These sites present benefits as well as risks to adolescent health. Recently, pediatric providers have also considered the benefits and risks of using social networking sites in their own practices. PMID:22643167

Moreno, Megan A; Kolb, Jennifer

2012-04-18

264

Audience Segregation in Social Network Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years research has shown that most social network sites pose serious privacy and security risks for individual users. From the existing analyses of privacy and security risks in social network sites we deduce that one of the biggest categories of privacy risks revolves around the notion of `audience segregation', i.e. the partitioning of different audiences and the compartmentalization

Bibi van den Berg; Ronald Leenes

2010-01-01

265

Revisiting link privacy in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we revisit the problem of the link privacy attack in online social networks. In the link privacy attack, it turns out that by bribing or compromising a small number of nodes (users) in the social network graph, it is possible to obtain complete link information for a much larger fraction of other non-bribed nodes in the graph.

Suhendry Effendy; Roland H. C. Yap; Felix Halim

2012-01-01

266

Lockr: better privacy for social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today's online social networking (OSN) sites do little to pro- tect the privacy of their users' social networking information. Given the highly sensitive nature of the information these sites store, it is understandable that many users feel victim- ized and disempowered by OSN providers' terms of service. This paper presents Lockr, a system that improves the pri- vacy of centralized

Amin Tootoonchian; Stefan Saroiu; Yashar Ganjali; Alec Wolman

2009-01-01

267

Social network privacy and trust concerns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Network Sites (SNS) developed to provide means of interaction and\\/or data sharing between multiple users. The study of online SNS privacy and trust management has few empirical studies and needs to be examined in greater depth. This pilot study evaluates the privacy aspects, trust concerns, and attitudes of young Kuwaiti social network users as well as assesses how these

Maha Faisal; Asmaa Alsumait

2011-01-01

268

College Students' Social Networking Experiences on Facebook  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Millions of contemporary young adults use social networking sites. However, little is known about how much, why, and how they use these sites. In this study, 92 undergraduates completed a diary-like measure each day for a week, reporting daily time use and responding to an activities checklist to assess their use of the popular social networking

Pempek, Tiffany A.; Yermolayeva, Yevdokiya A.; Calvert, Sandra L.

2009-01-01

269

College students' social networking experiences on Facebook  

Microsoft Academic Search

Millions of contemporary young adults use social networking sites. However, little is known about how much, why, and how they use these sites. In this study, 92 undergraduates completed a diary-like measure each day for a week, reporting daily time use and responding to an activities checklist to assess their use of the popular social networking site, Facebook. At the

Tiffany A. Pempek; Yevdokiya A. Yermolayeva; Sandra L. Calvert

2009-01-01

270

Harvesting knowledge from computer mediated social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to focus on how the advantages of computer mediated social networks (CMSN) can be effectively harnessed to create value for organizations in the form of ready knowledge and quick solutions to problems. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A knowledge capture technique – the Delphi technique – was fused into the social networking process. A model was designed to

Oluwafemi S. Ogunseye; Philip K. Adetiloye; Samuel O. Idowu; Olusegun Folorunso; Adio T. Akinwale

2011-01-01

271

Privacy wizards for social networking sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Privacy is an enormous problem in online social networking sites. While sites such as Facebook allow users fine-grained control over who can see their profiles, it is difficult for average users to specify this kind of detailed policy. In this paper, we propose a template for the design of a social networking privacy wizard. The intuition for the design comes

Lujun Fang; Kristen LeFevre

2010-01-01

272

THE INTERNET, SOCIAL NETWORKS AND LONELINESS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data Available) As the Internet has rapidly become a mainstream medium, some studies have found that Internet use is associated with reduced social networks and increased loneliness, whereas other research has suggested virtually the opposite. Still other studies have found no associations at all between Internet use, social networks and level of loneliness. Some authors who have found that the

JEAN-FRANCOIS COGET; YUTAKA YAMAUCHI; MICHAEL SUMAN

2002-01-01

273

35 Perspectives on Online Social Networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are many different perspectives to put on online social networking and it is important to know where one is coming from when talking about social networking and youth. The perspective(s) one has will be very different whether one is a parent with a teenage daughter on MySpace, a marketing executive interested in the target group \\

Malene Charlotte Larsen

2007-01-01

274

Information diffusion through online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid development of online social networks has attracted much attention all over the world. Communications through online communities are becoming prevalent among people of all ages. Though online social networks provide us a platform to share opinions publicly, this mechanism will also lead to the generation of rumors especially in case of emergency. So it is urgent for researchers

Bo Xu; Lu Liu

2010-01-01

275

Asset Pricing Implications of Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent empirical studies suggest that social networks, according to which communi- cation takes place, have a significant impact on traders' financial decisions. Motivated by this evidence, we propose an asset pricing model in which agents communicate informa- tion according to a social network. In the proposed model, agents initially have imper- fect and diverse information about the asset payoff structure.

Han N. Ozsoylev

276

Entrepreneurial Idea Identification through Online Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The increasing use of social network websites may signal a change in the way the next generation of entrepreneurs identify entrepreneurial ideas. An important part of the entrepreneurship literature emphasizes how vital the use of social networks is to entrepreneurial idea identification, opportunity recognition, and ultimately new venture…

Lang, Matthew C.

2010-01-01

277

Middleware for Social Networking on Mobile Devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two significant but independent trends in recent years are the popularity of social networking applications and the adoption of mobile devices, notably smart phones. The current generation of smart phones are pocket computers that, compared to their predecessors, are relatively well resourced. Existing support for social networking tends to take the form of Web-based applications that are accessed from the

Daniel Brooker; Thomas Carey; Ian Warren

2010-01-01

278

Happiness is assortative in online social networks.  

PubMed

Online social networking communities may exhibit highly complex and adaptive collective behaviors. Since emotions play such an important role in human decision making, how online networks modulate human collective mood states has become a matter of considerable interest. In spite of the increasing societal importance of online social networks, it is unknown whether assortative mixing of psychological states takes place in situations where social ties are mediated solely by online networking services in the absence of physical contact. Here, we show that the general happiness, or subjective well-being (SWB), of Twitter users, as measured from a 6-month record of their individual tweets, is indeed assortative across the Twitter social network. Our results imply that online social networks may be equally subject to the social mechanisms that cause assortative mixing in real social networks and that such assortative mixing takes place at the level of SWB. Given the increasing prevalence of online social networks, their propensity to connect users with similar levels of SWB may be an important factor in how positive and negative sentiments are maintained and spread through human society. Future research may focus on how event-specific mood states can propagate and influence user behavior in "real life." PMID:21554117

Bollen, Johan; Gonçalves, Bruno; Ruan, Guangchen; Mao, Huina

2011-05-09

279

Evaluating Social Networking Tools for Distance Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Debates rage about the appropriateness of using social networking in teaching, with arguments ranging from waste of time and distraction from academic goals to needed to reach net generation students. This paper explores a range of current social networking choices and argues that like any tool, it should carefully evaluated in terms of affordances and course goals. Several different tools

Ellen S. Hoffman

2009-01-01

280

Malware propagation in Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social networks are communities of people who share common interests. These types of networks are used by millions of people around the world. The massive adoption of this service among users has made it a popular mean for malicious activities. The aim of this paper is to identify the parameters which are related to malware propagation in online social

Mohammad Reza Faghani; Hossein Saidi

2009-01-01

281

Work in progress - Learning Enabled Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The learning enabled social network seeks to discover how to harness the power of social networking to enhance learning and promote the science, technology, engineering, and math disciplines. Through student-driven, communities of learning, we hope to engage students in authentic problem solving and be accountable to each other for their work. Teachers will participate in the community as equal partners

Robert M. Weiner; Robert D. Hannafin; John Bennett

2008-01-01

282

Social Networking on the Semantic Web  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: Aims to investigate the way that the semantic web is being used to represent and process social network information. Design/methodology/approach: The Swoogle semantic web search engine was used to construct several large data sets of Resource Description Framework (RDF) documents with social network information that were encoded using…

Finin, Tim; Ding, Li; Zhou, Lina; Joshi, Anupam

2005-01-01

283

College Students' Social Networking Experiences on Facebook  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Millions of contemporary young adults use social networking sites. However, little is known about how much, why, and how they use these sites. In this study, 92 undergraduates completed a diary-like measure each day for a week, reporting daily time use and responding to an activities checklist to assess their use of the popular social networking

Pempek, Tiffany A.; Yermolayeva, Yevdokiya A.; Calvert, Sandra L.

2009-01-01

284

Social networking of the Smart Home  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking on the Web has become an integral part of our lives. Merging of computing with physical things enabled the conversion of everyday objects into information appliances. This merging allows Smart Homes to offer new automation possibilities to their residents. We propose utilizing existing social networking infrastructures and their Web-based APIs in order to integrate Smart Homes to the

Andreas Kamilaris; Andreas Pitsillides

2010-01-01

285

Social Network Model Based on Keyword Categorization  

Microsoft Academic Search

A user prole on an online social network is charac- terized by its prole entries (keywords). In this paper, we study the relationship between semantic similarity of user keywords and the social network topology. First, we present a 'forest' model to categorize keywords and dene the notion of distance between keywords across multiple categorization trees (i.e., a forest). Second, we

Prantik Bhattacharyya; Ankush Garg; Shyhtsun Felix Wu

2009-01-01

286

Recovering Social Networks from Contagion Information  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Many algorithms for analyzing social networks assume that the structure of the network is known, but this is not always a\\u000a reasonable assumption. We wish to reconstruct an underlying network given data about how some property, such as disease, has\\u000a spread through the network. Properties may spread through a network in different ways: for instance, an individual may learn\\u000a information

Sucheta Soundarajanand; John E. Hopcroft

2010-01-01

287

Social Networks and Political Participation: How Do Networks Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite great interest in the role of social networks as channels of political mobilization, few studies have examined which types of social networks work more effectively in recruiting political activists. Using the Citizen Participation Study data, this study shows that contrary to the conventional wisdom in the literature, there is little…

Lim, Chaeyoon

2008-01-01

288

Some trust issues in social networks and sensor networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trust and reputation are becoming increasingly important in diverse areas such as search, e-commerce, social media, semantic sensor networks, etc. We review past work and explore future research issues relevant to trust in social\\/sensor networks and interactions. We advocate a balanced, iterative approach to trust that marries both theory and practice. On the theoretical side, we investigate models of trust

Krishnaprasad Thirunarayan; Pramod Anantharam; Cory A. Henson; Amit P. Sheth

2010-01-01

289

Digital Social Network Mining for Topic Discovery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Networked computers are expanding more and more around the world, and digital social networks becoming of great importance for many people's work and leisure. This paper mainly focused on discovering the topic of exchanging information in digital social network. In brief, our method is to use a hierarchical dictionary of related topics and words that mapped to a graph. Then, with comparing the extracted keywords from the context of social network with graph nodes, probability of relation between context and desired topics will be computed. This model can be used in many applications such as advertising, viral marketing and high-risk group detection.

Moradianzadeh, Pooya; Mohi, Maryam; Sadighi Moshkenani, Mohsen

290

Science, Society, and Social Networking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increased use of social networking is changing the way that scientific societies interact with their members and others. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) uses a variety of online networks to engage its members and the broader scientific community. AAAS members and non-members can interact with AAAS staff and each other on AAAS sites on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, as well as blogs and forums on the AAAS website (www.aaas.org). These tools allow scientists to more readily become engaged in policy by providing information on current science policy topics as well as methods of involvement. For example, members and the public can comment on policy-relevant stories from Science magazine’s ScienceInsider blog, download a weekly policy podcast, receive a weekly email update of policy issues affecting the scientific community, or watch a congressional hearing from their computer. AAAS resource websites and outreach programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/) and Science Careers (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org) also provide tools for scientists to become more personally engaged in communicating their findings and involved in the policy process.

White, K. S.; Lohwater, T.

2009-12-01

291

Inferring Trust Relationships in Web-Based Social Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The growth of web-based social networking and the properties of those networks have created great potential for producing intelligent software that integrates a user's social network and preferences. This research focuses on the concept of trust in social...

J. Golbeck J. Hendler

2006-01-01

292

Opinion Dynamics and Learning in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We provide an overview of recent research on belief and opinion dynamics in social networks. We discuss both Bayesian and\\u000a non-Bayesian models of social learning and focus on the implications of the form of learning (e.g., Bayesian vs. non-Bayesian),\\u000a the sources of information (e.g., observation vs. communication), and the structure of social networks in which individuals\\u000a are situated on three

Daron Acemoglu; Asuman Ozdaglar

2011-01-01

293

Social networks and context-aware spam  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks are popular for online communities. This paper evaluates the risk of sophisticated context-aware spam that could result from information sharing on social networks and discusses potential mitigation strategies. Unlike normal spam, context-aware spam would likely have a high click-through rate due to exploitation of authentic social connections. Context-aware spam could lead to more insidious attacks that try to

Garrett Brown; Travis Howe; Micheal Ihbe; Atul Prakash; Kevin Borders

2008-01-01

294

Analysis of Social Networks by Tensor Decomposition  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The Social Web fosters novel applications targeting a more efficient and satisfying user guidance in modern social networks,\\u000a e.g., for identifying thematically focused communities, or finding users with similar interests. Large scale and high diversity\\u000a of users in social networks poses the challenging question of appropriate relevance\\/authority ranking, for producing fine-grained\\u000a and rich descriptions of available partners, e.g., to guide

Sergej Sizov; Steffen Staab; Thomas Franz

2010-01-01

295

Privacy Protection for Social Networking Platforms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking platforms integrate third-party con- tent into social networking sites and give third-party developers access to user data. These open interfaces enable popular site enhancements but pose serious pri- vacy risks by exposing user data to third-party devel- opers. We address the privacy risks associated with so- cial networking APIs by presenting a privacy-by-proxy design for a privacy-preserving API.

Adrienne Felt; David Evans

2008-01-01

296

Location Privacy Protection on Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Location information is considered as private in many scenarios. Protecting location information on mobile ad-hoc networks\\u000a has attracted much research in past years. However, location information protection on social networks has not been paid much\\u000a attention. In this paper, we present a novel location privacy protection approach on the basis of user messages in social\\u000a networks. Our approach grants flexibility

Justin Zhan; Xing Fang

2011-01-01

297

Empirical Analysis of an Evolving Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks evolve over time, driven by the shared activities and affiliations of their members, by similarity of individuals' attributes, and by the closure of short network cycles. We analyzed a dynamic social network comprising 43,553 students, faculty, and staff at a large university, in which interactions between individuals are inferred from time-stamped e-mail headers recorded over one academic year

Gueorgi Kossinets; Duncan J. Watts

2005-01-01

298

Educational Services Recommendation Using Social Network Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this work we propose a framework for courses recommendation. We use a social network approach to discover relations between\\u000a users and discover social networks reflecting the patterns according to which the services are used. The topological analysis\\u000a of this network allows us to detect dense groups of users which tend to use educational. The method for educational services\\u000a and

Krzysztof Juszczyszyn; Agnieszka Prusiewicz

2011-01-01

299

Models of social networks based on social distance attachment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a class of models of social network formation based on a mathematical abstraction of the concept of social distance. Social distance attachment is represented by the tendency of peers to establish acquaintances via a decreasing function of the relative distance in a representative social space. We derive analytical results (corroborated by extensive numerical simulations), showing that the model reproduces the main statistical characteristics of real social networks: large clustering coefficient, positive degree correlations, and the emergence of a hierarchy of communities. The model is confronted with the social network formed by people that shares confidential information using the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) encryption algorithm, the so-called web of trust of PGP.

Boguñá, Marián; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Díaz-Guilera, Albert; Arenas, Alex

2004-11-01

300

Tracking Communities in Dynamic Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of communities in social networks has attracted considerable interest from many disciplines. Most studies have focused on static networks, and in doing so, have neglected the temporal dynamics of the networks and communities. This paper considers the problem of tracking communities over time in dynamic social networks. We propose a method for community tracking using an adaptive evolutionary clustering framework. We apply the method to reveal the temporal evolution of communities in two real data sets. In addition, we obtain a statistic that can be used for identifying change points in the network.

Xu, Kevin S.; Kliger, Mark; Hero, Alfred O.

301

Understanding latent interactions in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Popular online social networks (OSNs) like Facebook and Twitter are changing the way users communicate and interact with the Internet. A deep understanding of user interactions in OSNs can provide important insights into questions of human social behavior, and into the design of social platforms and applications. However, recent studies have shown that a majority of user interactions on OSNs

Jing Jiang; Christo Wilson; Xiao Wang; Peng Huang; Wenpeng Sha; Yafei Dai; Ben Y. Zhao

2010-01-01

302

(Social) networking is coming — Are we ready?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking and media have become a part of everyday life. The phenomenon itself reflects people's need people to be connected, to share, to be members of communities, and to collaborate. Current social media support social interaction and use scalable web-based technologies to implement interactive dialogues. The key role is played by Internet-based applications that provide access to the services

Hannu Jaakkola; Petri Linna; Jaak Henno; Jukka Makela

2011-01-01

303

Network models for social selection processes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present network models for social selection processes, based on the p? class of models. Social selection occurs when individuals form social relationships on the basis of certain characteristics they possess. Similarity is a common hypothesis for selection processes, but one that is usually framed dyadically. Structural balance approaches move beyond dyadic conceptualizations and require more sophisticated modeling. The two-block

Garry Robins; Peter Elliott; Philippa Pattison

2001-01-01

304

Structural equivalence of individuals in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper is to understand the interrelations among relations within concrete social groups. Social structure is sought, not ideal types, although the latter are relevant to interrelations among relations. From a detailed social network, patterns of global relations can be extracted, within which classes of equivalently positioned individuals are delineated. The global patterns are derived algebraically through

François Lorrain; Harrison C. White

1971-01-01

305

Quasi-Networks in Social Relational Systems.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In social sciences it is more or less generally acknowledged that (social) networks seem to be the natural tool in the organization of social activity. The paper focuses on the development of a possible mathematical formulation of the properties of a soci...

R. P. Gilles P. H. M. Ruys S. Jilin

1991-01-01

306

Structure and evolution of online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we consider the evolution of structure within large online social networks. We present a series of measurements of two such networks, together comprising in excess of five million people and ten million friendship links, annotated with metadata capturing the time of every event in the life of the network. Our measurements expose a surprising segmentation of these

Ravi Kumar; Jasmine Novak; Andrew Tomkins

2006-01-01

307

Inferring preference correlations from social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying consumer preferences is a key challenge in customizing electronic commerce sites to individual users. The increasing availability of online social networks provides one approach to this problem: people linked in these networks often share preferences, allowing inference of interest in products based on knowledge of a consumer's network neighbors and their interests. This paper evaluates the beneflts of inference

Tad Hogg

2010-01-01

308

Mining social networks for viral marketing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditionally, social network models have been descriptive, rather than predictive: they are built at a very coarse level, typically with only a few global parameters, and are not useful for making actual predictions of the future behavior of the network. In the past, this was largely due to lack of data: the networks available for experimental study were small and

Pedro Domingos

309

An Introduction to Social Network Data Analytics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The advent of online social networks has been one of the most exciting events in this decade. Many popular online social networks such as Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook have become increasingly popular. In addition, a number of multimedia networks such as Flickr have also seen an increasing level of popularity in recent years. Many such social networks are extremely rich in content, and they typically contain a tremendous amount of content and linkage data which can be leveraged for analysis. The linkage data is essentially the graph structure of the social network and the communications between entities; whereas the content data contains the text, images and other multimedia data in the network. The richness of this network provides unprecedented opportunities for data analytics in the context of social networks. This book provides a data-centric view of online social networks; a topic which has been missing from much of the literature. This chapter provides an overview of the key topics in this field, and their coverage in this book.

Aggarwal, Charu C.

310

Social network schemas and the learning of incomplete networks.  

PubMed

Social networks that are missing relations among some of their members--termed incomplete networks--have been of critical theoretical and empirical interest in sociological research on weak ties and structural holes but typically have been overlooked in social psychological studies of network learning. Five studies tested for schematic processing differences in the encoding and recalling of incomplete networks. In Studies 1 and 2, prior knowledge of missing relations facilitated learning an unfamiliar, incomplete network. Study 3 ruled out differences in general pattern recognition ability as an explanation. Study 4 manipulated the degree of familiarity with missing relations, which produced predicted differences in learning rates. Finally, Study 5 examined how improved learning of an incomplete network affected a strategic organizational choice. The findings suggest that people can become schematic for complex, incomplete social networks. PMID:15841863

Janicik, Gregory A; Larrick, Richard P

2005-02-01

311

Data visualization: From body sensor network to social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sensors can capture very sensitive and valuable information without human intervention and send it to remote location. However, capturing sensory data from a body sensor network (BSN) and sending it to social networks is a challenging task. This is because it requires a number of distributed networks to work together seamlessly. The task becomes more challenging when both the BSN

M. A. Rahman; A. El Saddik; W. Gueaieb

2009-01-01

312

Informal Learning and Identity Formation in Online Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|All students today are increasingly expected to develop technological fluency, digital citizenship, and other twenty-first century competencies despite wide variability in the quality of learning opportunities schools provide. Social network sites (SNSs) available via the internet may provide promising contexts for learning to supplement…

Greenhow, Christine; Robelia, Beth

2009-01-01

313

Social Networking Websites: An Exploratory Study of Student Peer Socializing in an Online LIS Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a survey study investigating how students in an online MLIS program use social networking Websites to socialize with their peers and to develop a professional network. Both general-purpose social networking sites such as Facebook and a school-wide social networking site (SLISLife) are studied. Findings indicate that social networking Websites are the second most popular venue for students'

Lili Luo

2010-01-01

314

Social networks and the risk of gunshot injury.  

PubMed

Direct and indirect exposure to gun violence have considerable consequences on individual health and well-being. However, no study has considered the effects of one's social network on gunshot injury. This study investigates the relationship between an individual's position in a high-risk social network and the probability of being a victim of a fatal or non-fatal gunshot wound by combining observational data from the police with records of fatal and non-fatal gunshot injuries among 763 individuals in Boston's Cape Verdean community. A logistic regression approach is used to analyze the probability of being the victim of a fatal or non-fatal gunshot wound and whether such injury is related to age, gender, race, prior criminal activity, exposure to street gangs and other gunshot victims, density of one's peer network, and the social distance to other gunshot victims. The findings demonstrate that 85 % all of the gunshot injuries in the sample occur within a single social network. Probability of gunshot victimization is related to one's network distance to other gunshot victims: each network association removed from another gunshot victim reduces the odds of gunshot victimization by 25 % (odds ratio = 0.75; 95 % confidence interval, 0.65 to 0.87). This indirect exposure to gunshot victimization exerts an effect above and beyond the saturation of gunshot victimization in one's peer network, age, prior criminal activity, and other individual and network variables. PMID:22714704

Papachristos, Andrew V; Braga, Anthony A; Hureau, David M

2012-12-01

315

Social network media exposure and adolescent eating pathology in Fiji  

PubMed Central

Background Mass media exposure has been associated with an increased risk of eating pathology. It is unknown whether indirect media exposure – such as the proliferation of media exposure in an individual’s social network – is also associated with eating disorders. Aims To test hypotheses that both individual (direct) and social network (indirect) mass media exposures were associated with eating pathology in Fiji. Method We assessed several kinds of mass media exposure, media influence, cultural orientation and eating pathology by self-report among adolescent female ethnic Fijians (n = 523). We fitted a series of multiple regression models of eating pathology, assessed by the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE–Q), in which mass media exposures, sociodemographic characteristics and body mass index were entered as predictors. Results Both direct and indirect mass media exposures were associated with eating pathology in unadjusted analyses, whereas in adjusted analyses only social network media exposure was associated with eating pathology. This result was similar when eating pathology was operationalised as either a continuous or a categorical dependent variable (e.g. odds ratio OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.15–2.23 relating social network media exposure to upper-quartile EDE–Q scores). Subsequent analyses pointed to individual media influence as an important explanatory variable in this association. Conclusions Social network media exposure was associated with eating pathology in this Fijian study sample, independent of direct media exposure and other cultural exposures. Findings warrant further investigation of its health impact in other populations.

Becker, Anne E.; Fay, Kristen E.; Agnew-Blais, Jessica; Khan, A. Nisha; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Gilman, Stephen E.

2011-01-01

316

Privacy Preserving in Social Networks Against Sensitive Edge Disclosure  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of emerging social networks, such as Facebook and MySpace, security and privacy threats arising from social network analysis bring a risk of disclosure of confidential knowledge when the social network data is shared or made public. In addition to the current social network anonymity de-identification techniques, we study a situation, such as in business transaction networks or

Lian Liu; Jie Wang; Jinze Liu; Jun Zhang

317

Privacy Preservation in Social Networks with Sensitive Edge Weights  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of emerging social networks, such as Facebook and MySpace, security and privacy threats arising from social network analysis bring a risk of disclosure of confidential knowledge when the social network data is shared or made public. In addition to the current social network anonymity de-identification techniques, we study a situation, such as in a business transaction network,

Lian Liu; Jie Wang; Jinze Liu; Jun Zhang

2009-01-01

318

Variable Size Genetic Network Programming  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Genetic Network Programming (GNP) is a kind of volutionary methods, which evolves arbitrary directed graph programs. Previously, the program size of GNP was fixed. In the paper, a new method is proposed, where the program size is adaptively changed depending on the frequency of the use of nodes. To control and to decide a program size are important and difficult problems in Evolutionary Computation, especially, a well-known crossover operator tends to cause bloat. We introduce two additional operators, add operator and delete operator, that can change the number of each kind of nodes based on whether a node function is important in the environment or not. Simulation results shows that the proposed method brings about extremely better results compared with ordinary fixed size GNP.

Katagiri, Hironobu; Hirasawa, Kotaro; Hu, Jinglu; Murata, Junichi

319

HIV/AIDS, social capital, and online social networks.  

PubMed

The prospects for online social networks as sites of information-gathering and affiliation for persons with AIDS and others concerned about HIV/AIDS not only represent the latest development in a trend toward circumventing traditional media and official information sources, but also may offer hope for a revitalization of HIV/AIDS discourse in the public sphere. This article provides an overview of three decades of information-seeking on the pandemic and its social and personal implications, as well as case studies of three examples of social networking surrounding HIV/AIDS. It finds preliminary evidence of the formation of strong and weak ties as described in Social Network Theory and suggests that the online accumulation of social capital by opinion leaders could facilitate dissemination of messages on HIV/AIDS awareness and testing. PMID:23844886

Drushel, Bruce E

2013-08-01

320

Relationship Algebra for Computing in Social Networks and Social Network Based Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online communities are the latest phenomena on the Internet. At the heart of each community lies a social network. In this paper, we show a generalized framework to understand and reason in social networks. Previously, researchers have attempted to use inference-specific type of relationships. In this paper, we propose a framework to represent and reason with general case of social

Javed I. Khan; Sajid S. Shaikh

2006-01-01

321

Massive Social Network Analysis: Mining Twitter for Social Good  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks produce an enormous quantity of data. Facebook consists of over 400 million active users sharing over 5 billion pieces of information each month. Analyzing this vast quantity of unstructured data presents challenges for software and hardware. We present GraphCT, a Graph Characterization Toolkit for massive graphs representing social network data. On a 128-processor Cray XMT, GraphCT estimates the

David Ediger; Karl Jiang; Jason Riedy; David A. Bader; Courtney D. Corley; Robert M. Farber; William N. Reynolds

2010-01-01

322

Learning in Hierarchical Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study a social network consisting of agents organized as a hierarchical M-ary rooted tree, common in enterprise and military organizational structures. The goal is to aggregate information to solve a binary hypothesis testing problem. Each agent at a leaf of the tree, and only such an agent, makes a direct measurement of the underlying true hypothesis. The leaf agent then makes a decision and sends it to its supervising agent, at the next level of the tree. Each supervising agent aggregates the decisions from the M members of its group, produces a summary message, and sends it to its supervisor at the next level, and so on. Ultimately, the agent at the root of the tree makes an overall decision. We derive upper and lower bounds for the Type I and II error probabilities associated with this decision with respect to the number of leaf agents, which in turn characterize the converge rates of the Type I, Type II, and total error probabilities. We also provide a message-passing scheme involving non-binary message alphabets and characterize the exponent of the error probability with respect to the message alphabet size.

Zhang, Zhenliang; Chong, Edwin K. P.; Pezeshki, Ali; Moran, William; Howard, Stephen D.

2013-04-01

323

Evolution in Social Networks: A Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is much research on social network analysis but only recently did scholars turn their attention to the volatility of social networks. An abundance of questions emerged. How does a social network evolve - can we find laws and derive models that explain its evolution? How do communities emerge in a social network and how do they expand or shrink? What is a community in an evolving network - can we claim that two communities seen at two distinct timepoints are the same one, even if they have next to no members in common? Research advances have different perspectives: some scholars focus on how evolution manifests itself in a social network, while others investigate how individual communities evolve as new members join and old ones become inactive. There are methods for discovering communities and capturing their changes in time, and methods that consider a community as a smoothly evolving constellation and thus build and adapt models upon that premise. This survey organizes advances on evolution in social networks into a common framework and gives an overview of these different perspectives.

Spiliopoulou, Myra

324

Extended Social Tags: Identity Tags Meet Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a new approach that uses social networks and common sense deduction rules to adapt the description tags of the photos for the current viewer. We exploit social graphs to enrich the tags associated to the concerned persons in the photo by following the different links between people (i.e. viewer and captured people in the photos). The main

Sonia Lajmi; Johann Stan; Hakim Hacid; Elöd Egyed-zsigmond; Pierre Maret

2009-01-01

325

Social network activity and social well-being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has shown a relationship between use of social networking sites and feelings of social capital. However, most studies have relied on self-reports by college students. The goals of the current study are to (1) validate the common self-report scale using empirical data from Facebook, (2) test whether previous findings generalize to older and international populations, and (3) delve

Moira Burke; Cameron Marlow; Thomas M. Lento

2010-01-01

326

Social capital, social network and identity bonds: a reconceptualization  

Microsoft Academic Search

We argue that along with social network analysis researchers can also benefit from looking at the identity bonding perspective. In this paper, by synthetic and critical reviewing literature on related work from sociology and information science, we provide a new theoretical lens that calls attention to the role played by shared identity in creating social capital.

Hao Jiang; John M. Carroll

2009-01-01

327

Women's Social Networks and Birth Attendant Decisions: Application of the Network-Episode Model  

PubMed Central

This paper examines the association of women's social networks with the use of skilled birth attendants in uncomplicated pregnancy and childbirth in Matlab, Bangladesh. The Network-Episode Model was applied to determine if network structure variables (density / kinship homogeneity / strength of ties) together with network content (endorsement for or against a particular type of birth attendant) explain the type of birth attendant used by women above and beyond the variance explained by women's individual attributes. Data were collected by interviewing a representative sample of 246 women, 18–45 years of age, using survey and social network methods between October and December 2008. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations. Results suggest that the structural properties of networks did not add to explanatory value but instead network content or the perceived advice of network members add significantly to the explanation of variation in service use. Testing aggregate network variables at the individual level extends the ability of the individual profile matrix to explain outcomes. Community health education and mobilization interventions attempting to increase demand for skilled attendants need to reflect the centrality of kinship networks to women in Bangladesh and the likelihood of women to heed the advice of their network of advisors with regard to place of birth.

Edmonds, Joyce K.; Hruschka, Daniel; Bernard, H. Russell; Sibley, Lynn

2011-01-01

328

Social network analysis and dual rover communications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social network analysis (SNA) refers to the collection of techniques, tools, and methods used in sociometry aiming at the analysis of social networks to investigate decision making, group communication, and the distribution of information. Human factors engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a social network analysis on communication data collected during a 14-day field study operating a dual rover exploration mission to better understand the relationships between certain network groups such as ground control, flight teams, and planetary science. The analysis identified two communication network structures for the continuous communication and Twice-a-Day Communication scenarios as a split network and negotiated network respectfully. The major nodes or groups for the networks' architecture, transmittal status, and information were identified using graphical network mapping, quantitative analysis of subjective impressions, and quantified statistical analysis using Sociometric Statue and Centrality. Post-questionnaire analysis along with interviews revealed advantages and disadvantages of each network structure with team members identifying the need for a more stable continuous communication network, improved robustness of voice loops, and better systems training/capabilities for scientific imagery data and operational data during Twice-a-Day Communications.

Litaker, Harry L.; Howard, Robert L.

2013-10-01

329

Social Networks in Improvement of Health Care  

PubMed Central

Social network is a social structure made of individuals or organizations associated with one or more types of interdependence (friendship, common interests, work, knowledge, prestige, etc.) which are the “nodes” of the network. Networks can be organized to exchange information, knowledge or financial assistance under the various interest groups in universities, workplaces and associations of citizens. Today the most popular and widely used networks are based on application of the Internet as the main ICT. Depending on the method of connection, their field of activity and expertise of those who participate in certain networks, the network can be classified into the following groups: a) Social Networks with personal physical connectivity (the citizens’ associations, transplant networks, etc.), b) Global social internet network (Facebook, Twitter, Skype), c) specific health internet social network (forums, Health Care Forums, Healthcare Industry Forum), d) The health community internet network of non professionals (DailyStrength, CaringBridge, CarePages, MyFamilyHealth), e) Scientific social internet network (BiomedExperts, ResearchGate, iMedExchange), f) Social internet network which supported professionals (HealthBoards, Spas and Hope Association of Disabled and diabetic Enurgi), g) Scientific medical internet network databases in the system of scientific and technical information (CC, Pubmed/Medline, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, ISI Web Knowledge, EBSCO, Index Copernicus, Social Science Index, etc.). The information in the network are exchanged in real time and in a way that has until recently been impossible in real life of people in the community. Networks allow tens of thousands of specific groups of people performing a series of social, professional and educational activities in the place of living and housing, place of work or other locations where individuals are. Network provides access to information related to education, health, nutrition, drugs, procedures, etc., which gives a special emphasis on public health aspects of information, especially in the field of medicine and health care. The authors of this paper discuss the role and practical importance of social networks in improving the health and solving of health problems without the physical entrance into the health care system. Social networks have their advantages and disadvantages, benefits and costs, especially when it comes to information which within the network set unprofessional people from unreliable sources, without an adequate selection. The ethical aspect of the norms in this segment is still not adequately regulated, so any sanctions for the unauthorized and malicious use of social networks in private and other purposes in order to obtain personal gain at the expense of individuals or groups (sick or healthy, owners of certain businesses and companies, health organizations and pharmaceutical manufacturers, etc.), for which there is still no global or European codes and standards of conduct. Cyber crime is now one of the mostly present types of crime in modern times, as evidenced by numerous scandals that are happening both globally and locally.

Masic, Izet; Sivic, Suad; Toromanovic, Selim; Borojevic, Tea; Pandza, Haris

2012-01-01

330

Social networks in improvement of health care.  

PubMed

Social network is a social structure made of individuals or organizations associated with one or more types of interdependence (friendship, common interests, work, knowledge, prestige, etc.) which are the "nodes" of the network. Networks can be organized to exchange information, knowledge or financial assistance under the various interest groups in universities, workplaces and associations of citizens. Today the most popular and widely used networks are based on application of the Internet as the main ICT. Depending on the method of connection, their field of activity and expertise of those who participate in certain networks, the network can be classified into the following groups: a) Social Networks with personal physical connectivity (the citizens' associations, transplant networks, etc.), b) Global social internet network (Facebook, Twitter, Skype), c) specific health internet social network (forums, Health Care Forums, Healthcare Industry Forum), d) The health community internet network of non professionals (DailyStrength, CaringBridge, CarePages, MyFamilyHealth), e) Scientific social internet network (BiomedExperts, ResearchGate, iMedExchange), f) Social internet network which supported professionals (HealthBoards, Spas and Hope Association of Disabled and diabetic Enurgi), g) Scientific medical internet network databases in the system of scientific and technical information (CC, Pubmed/Medline, Excerpta Medica/EMBASE, ISI Web Knowledge, EBSCO, Index Copernicus, Social Science Index, etc.). The information in the network are exchanged in real time and in a way that has until recently been impossible in real life of people in the community. Networks allow tens of thousands of specific groups of people performing a series of social, professional and educational activities in the place of living and housing, place of work or other locations where individuals are. Network provides access to information related to education, health, nutrition, drugs, procedures, etc., which gives a special emphasis on public health aspects of information, especially in the field of medicine and health care. The authors of this paper discuss the role and practical importance of social networks in improving the health and solving of health problems without the physical entrance into the health care system. Social networks have their advantages and disadvantages, benefits and costs, especially when it comes to information which within the network set unprofessional people from unreliable sources, without an adequate selection. The ethical aspect of the norms in this segment is still not adequately regulated, so any sanctions for the unauthorized and malicious use of social networks in private and other purposes in order to obtain personal gain at the expense of individuals or groups (sick or healthy, owners of certain businesses and companies, health organizations and pharmaceutical manufacturers, etc.), for which there is still no global or European codes and standards of conduct. Cyber crime is now one of the mostly present types of crime in modern times, as evidenced by numerous scandals that are happening both globally and locally. PMID:23922516

Masic, Izet; Sivic, Suad; Toromanovic, Selim; Borojevic, Tea; Pandza, Haris

2012-01-01

331

Running applications efficiently in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past several years, online social networks (OSNs) such as Facebook and MySpace have become extremely popular with Internet users. Such sites are popular with users because they simplify both communication among \\

Roger Curry; Cameron Kiddle; Nayden Markatchev; Rob Simmonds; Tingxi Tan; Martin F. Arlitt; Bruce Walker

2008-01-01

332

Social Networking in Collegiate Public Relations  

Microsoft Academic Search

A guide describing the importance of institutions of higher education implement social networking policies and procedures. The project includes a manual and marketing plan that will be implemented by the author of the project at his employer, Georgia Perimeter College.

Leon Bracey

2010-01-01

333

Brand communities embedded in social networks.  

PubMed

Brand communities represent highly valuable marketing, innovation management, and customer relationship management tools. However, applying successful marketing strategies today, and in the future, also means exploring and seizing the unprecedented opportunities of social network environments. This study combines these two social phenomena which have largely been researched separately, and aims to investigate the existence, functionality and different types of brand communities within social networks. The netnographic approach yields strong evidence of this existence; leading to a better understanding of such embedded brand communities, their peculiarities, and motivational drivers for participation; therefore the findings contribute to theory by combining two separate research streams. Due to the advantages of social networks, brand management is now able to implement brand communities with less time and financial effort; however, choosing the appropriate brand community type, cultivating consumers' interaction, and staying tuned to this social engagement are critical factors to gain anticipated brand outcomes. PMID:23564989

Zaglia, Melanie E

2013-02-01

334

Suicidal behaviour, social networks and psychiatric diagnosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The aim of this investigation was to examine the relationship between social network deficits and the occurrence of suicidal behaviour, and to describe the short-term interpersonal consequences of a suicidal attempt. Two questionnaires, concerned with the extent and self-perceived adequacy of social network, formed the basis of a structured interview. Fifty-two suicide attempters were interviewed within 48 hours of

Elaine E. Hart; Christopher L. Williams; John A. Davidson

1988-01-01

335

Qualitative Analysis of Commercial Social Network Profiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social-networking sites have become an integral part of many users’ daily internet routine. Commercial enterprises have been\\u000a quick to recognize this and are subsequently creating profiles for many of their products and services. Commercial enterprises\\u000a use social network profiles to target and interact with potential customers as well as to provide a gateway for users of the\\u000a product or service

Lester Melendez; Ouri Wolfson; Malek Adjouadi; Naphtali Rishe

2010-01-01

336

Latent Space Approaches to Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Network models,are widely used to represent relational information,among,interacting units. In studies of social networks, recent emphasis has been placed on random graph models where the nodes,usually represent individual social actors and the edges represent the presence,of a specified relation between,actors. vVe develop,a class of models,where,the probability,of a relation between,actors depends,on the positions of individuals in an unobserved,\\

Peter D. Hoff; Adrian E. Raftery; Mark S. Handcock

2002-01-01

337

Intelligent Ubiquitous Services Based on Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A number of studies have been conducted on discovering useful information from social networks among people. Particularly,\\u000a on ubiquitous environment, the social network between people, regarded as the channel for exchanging and propagating their\\u000a contexts, plays a crucial role on being aware of the user contexts. To efficiently discover the contexts of a certain users,\\u000a the contexts of his neighbors

Jason J. Jung

338

A Social Network Model for Academic Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A number of recent studies on social networks are based on a characteristic which includes assortative mixing, high clustering,\\u000a short average path lengths, broad degree distributions and the existence of community structure. Here, a model has been developed\\u000a in the domain of ‘Academic collaboration’ which satisfies all the above characteristics, based on some existing social network\\u000a models. In addition, this

Sreedhar Bhukya

339

Towards Detecting Influential Users in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a One of online social networks’ best marketing strategies is viral advertisement. The influence of users on their friends can\\u000a increase or decrease sales, so businesses are interested in finding influential people and encouraging them to create positive\\u000a influence. Models and techniques have been proposed to facilitate finding influential people, however most fail to address\\u000a common online social network problems such

Amir Afrasiabi Rad; Morad Benyoucef

340

Role of Context in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose to apply a context-based approach used in AI for discussing of social networks and virtual communities in the enterprise area. We point out that making context explicit it is possible to provide a global picture of the main aspects of social networks. A first result of this study is that the explicit consideration of contexts—especially shared contexts—could improve

Patrick Brézillon

2005-01-01

341

Mental Health, School Problems, and Social Networks: Modeling Urban Adolescent Substance Use  

PubMed Central

This study tested a mediation model of the relationship with school problems, social network quality, and substance use with a primary care sample of 301 urban adolescents. It was theorized that social network quality (level of risk or protection in network) would mediate the effects of school problems, accounting for internalizing problems and relations with parents, on substance use. Results of path modeling with AMOS showed that the model provided a very good fit to the data and demonstrated partial mediation effects of social network quality on substance use. The standardized mediated effect of school problems on substance use, mediated by social network quality, was 0.13 (p < .01, 95% CI [.072, .189]). An effect size measure was applied to determine what proportion of the total effect was mediated by the intervening (social network quality) variable and produced a 0.34 effect size. The results highlight the potential preventive role of social network quality in addressing urban adolescent substance use.

2011-01-01

342

Dynamic Social Networking Supporting Location-Based Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile social networking sites have gained popularity among users from all over the world during the past few years. It is a trend to combine location-based information to mobile social networks. A dynamic social networking system based on a dynamic social networking framework is proposed in this paper. The system enables the participants with a common interest to communicate and

Min Li; Zhenjun Du

2009-01-01

343

Analysis of terrorist social networks with fractal views  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network visualization has drawn significant attention over recent years. It creates images of social networks that provide investigators with new insights about network structures and helps them to communicate those insights to others. Visualization facilitates the social network analysis. It supports the investigators to discover patterns of interactions among the social actors including detecting subgroups, identifying central actors and

Christopher C. Yang; Marc Sageman

2009-01-01

344

Social networks integration and privacy preservation using subgraph generalization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intelligence and law enforcement force make use of terrorist and criminal social networks to support their investigations such as identifying suspects, terrorist or criminal subgroups, and their communication patterns. Social networks are valuable resources but it is not easy to obtain information to create a complete terrorist or criminal social network. Missing information in a terrorist or criminal social network

Christopher C. Yang; Xuning Tang

2009-01-01

345

Producing timely recommendations from social networks through targeted search  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been a significant increase in interest and partic- ipation in social networking websites recently. For many users, social networks are indispensable tools for sharing personal information and keeping abreast with updates by their acquaintances. While there has been research on un- derstanding the structure and effects of social networks, re- search on using social networks for developing targeted

Anil Gürsel; Sandip Sen

2009-01-01

346

Analysis on Community Charactristics of Online Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the rapid development of large-scale online social network applications, understanding the community characteristics of online social networks is benefit to improve application performance. Characteristics of communities are studied based on real measurements of You Tube, a popular online social network. Adapt to the huge scale of online social networks, we modify the original community discovery algorithm, the label propagation

Yang Yang; Yuchun Guo; Yanni Ma

2010-01-01

347

From Fiction to Fact: The Impact of CEO Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates the relationship between a CEO’s social network, firm identity, and firm performance. There are two competing theories that predict contradictory outcomes. Following social network theory, one would expect a positive relation between social networks and firm performance, while agency theory in general and Bebchuk’s managerial power approach in particular predicts a negative relationship between social networks and

Thomas Kirchmaier; Konstantinos Stathopoulos

2008-01-01

348

Recruit Similarity and Interaction as Factors Associated with Informal Social Network Formation: A Pilot Study of Informal Socialization at a Naval Training Facility.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report examines some of the social psychological variables which precipitate the formation of informal friendship networks among Navy recruits, as well as other factors which effect the process of socialization into the Navy. The effects of color, phy...

J. C. Fox R. E. Sykes W. J. Graham

1973-01-01

349

Social networks, incentives, and search  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of network structure has grown in significance over the past ten years in the field of information retrieval, stimulated to a great extent by the importance of link analysis in the development of Web search techniques [4]. This body of work has focused primarily on the network that is most clearly visible on the Web: the network of

Jon M. Kleinberg

2006-01-01

350

Geographic constraints on social network groups.  

PubMed

Social groups are fundamental building blocks of human societies. While our social interactions have always been constrained by geography, it has been impossible, due to practical difficulties, to evaluate the nature of this restriction on social group structure. We construct a social network of individuals whose most frequent geographical locations are also known. We also classify the individuals into groups according to a community detection algorithm. We study the variation of geographical span for social groups of varying sizes, and explore the relationship between topological positions and geographic positions of their members. We find that small social groups are geographically very tight, but become much more clumped when the group size exceeds about 30 members. Also, we find no correlation between the topological positions and geographic positions of individuals within network communities. These results suggest that spreading processes face distinct structural and spatial constraints. PMID:21483665

Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Arbesman, Samuel; González, Marta C; Barabási, Albert-László; Christakis, Nicholas A

2011-04-05

351

Social networks and labor market transitions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the influence of social networks on labor market transitions. We develop the first model where social ties and job status coevolve through time. Our key assumption is that the probability of formation of a new tie is greater between two employed individuals than between an employed and an unemployed individual. We show that this assumption generally generates negative

Yann Bramoullé; Gilles Saint-Paul

2010-01-01

352

Social Networks and Labour Market Transitions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the influence of social networks on labour market transitions. We develop the first model where social ties and job status co-evolve through time. Our key assumption is that the probability of formation of a new tie is greater between two employed individuals than between an employed and an unemployed individual. We show that this assumption generates negative duration

Yann Bramoullé; Gilles Saint-Paul

2004-01-01

353

Social Networks and Labor Market Transitions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the influence of social networks on labor market transitions. We develop the first model where social ties and job status coevolve through time. Our key assumption is that the probability of formation of a new tie is greater between two employed individuals than between an employed and an unemployed individual. We show that this assumption generates negative duration

Yann Bramoullé; Gilles Saint-Paul

2004-01-01

354

Social media networking: Facebook and Twitter.  

PubMed

The new wave of marketing and practice promotion will include social media networking. This article will discuss Facebook and Twitter. After reading this article you, will have an understanding of these two important aspects of social media and how you might use Facebook and Twitter in your practice to enhance your communication with your existing patients and attract new patients. PMID:21243885

Schneider, Andrew; Jackson, Rem; Baum, Neil

355

Network analysis in comparative social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay describes the pertinence of Social Network Analysis (SNA) for the social sciences in general, and discusses its methodological and conceptual implications for comparative research in particular. The authors first present a basic summary of the theoretical and methodological assumptions of SNA, followed by a succinct overview of its application to diverse fields of study. They then exemplify in

Eugenia Roldán Vera; Thomas Schupp

2006-01-01

356

Measuring Privacy Risk in Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measuring privacy risk in online social networks is a challenging task. One of the fundamental difficulties is quantifying the amount of information revealed unin- tentionally. We present PrivAware, a tool to detect and report unintended information loss in online social net- works. Our goal is to provide a rudimentary framework to identify privacy risk and provide solutions to reduce information

Justin Becker

357

CORE NETWORKS, SOCIAL ISOLATION, AND NEW MEDIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence from the US General Social Surveys (GSS) suggests that during the past 20 years, people have become increasingly socially isolated and their core discussion networks have become smaller and less diverse. One explanation offered for this trend is the use of mobile phones and the Internet. This study reports on the findings of a 2008 survey that replicates and

Keith N. Hampton; Lauren F. Sessions; Eun Ja Her

2011-01-01

358

Motivating contributors in social media networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite recent advancements in user-driven social media platforms, tools for studying user behavior patterns and motivations remain primitive. We highlight the voluntary nature of user contributions and that users can choose when (and when not) to contribute to the common media pool. We use a Game theoretic framework to study the dynamics of a social media network wherein contribution costs

Vivek K. Singh; Ramesh Jain; Mohan S. Kankanhalli

2009-01-01

359

Unravelling the Social Network: Theory and Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Despite the widespread popularity of social networking sites (SNSs) amongst children and young people in compulsory education, relatively little scholarly work has explored the fundamental issues at stake. This paper makes an original contribution to the field by locating the study of this online activity within the broader terrain of social

Merchant, Guy

2012-01-01

360

Does Industrialization Build or Destroy Social Networks?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article estimates the relationship between changes in industrialization and changes in social networks measures in Indonesia during 1985-97 using repeated cross sections of nationally representative surveys. We analyze a rich set of social interaction measures, including various measures of voluntary associational activity, levels of trust, and informal cooperation. Districts that experienced rapid industrialization showed significant increases in most measures

Edward Miguel; Paul Gertler; David I. Levine

2006-01-01

361

District Policy and Teachers' Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Policy makers increasingly include provisions aimed at fostering professional community as part of reform initiatives. Yet little is known about the impact of policy on teachers' professional relations in schools. Drawing theoretically from social capital theory and methodologically from qualitative social network analysis, this article explores…

Coburn, Cynthia E.; Russell, Jennifer Lin

2008-01-01

362

Online Formative Assessments with Social Network Awareness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social network awareness (SNA) has been used extensively as one of the strategies to increase knowledge sharing and collaboration opportunities. However, most SNA studies either focus on being aware of peer's knowledge context or on social context. This work proposes online formative assessments with SNA, trying to address the problems of online…

Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng

2013-01-01

363

Creating Socially Networked Knowledge through Interdisciplinary Collaboration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|We report on the experience of creating a socially networked system, the Research-oriented Social Environment (RoSE), for representing knowledge in the form of relationships between people, documents, and groups. Developed as an intercampus, interdisciplinary project of the University of California, this work reflects on a collaboration between…

Chuk, Eric; Hoetzlein, Rama; Kim, David; Panko, Julia

2012-01-01

364

Spatial and Social Networks in Organizational Innovation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Research on the enabling factors of innovation has focused on either the social component of organizations or on the spatial dimensions involved in the innovation process. But no one has examined the aggregate consequences of the link from spatial layout, to social networks, to innovation. This project enriches our understanding of how innovation…

Wineman, Jean D.; Kabo, Felichism W.; Davis, Gerald F.

2009-01-01

365

Spatial and Social Networks in Organizational Innovation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on the enabling factors of innovation has focused on either the social component of organizations or on the spatial dimensions involved in the innovation process. But no one has examined the aggregate consequences of the link from spatial layout, to social networks, to innovation. This project enriches our understanding of how innovation works especially in highly innovative organizations by

Jean D. Wineman; Felichism W. Kabo; Gerald F. Davis

2009-01-01

366

Friendster and publicly articulated social networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents ethnographic fieldwork on Friendster, an online dating site utilizing social networks to encourage friend-of-friend connections. I discuss how Friendster applies social theory, how users react to the site, and the tensions that emerge between creator and users when the latter fails to conform to the expectations of the former. By offering this ethnographic piece as an example,

danah michele boyd

2004-01-01

367

Computational Aspects of Analyzing Social Network Dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivated by applications such as the spread of epi- demics and the propagation of influence in social networks, we propose a formal model for analyz- ing the dynamics of such networks. Our model is a stochastic version of discrete dynamical sys- tems. Using this model, we formulate and study the computational complexity of two fundamental problems (called reachability and predecessor

Christopher L. Barrett; Harry B. Hunt III; Madhav V. Marathe; S. S. Ravi; Daniel J. Rosenkrantz; Richard Edwin Stearns; Mayur Thakur

2007-01-01

368

Dense Subgroup Identifying in Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The densest coherent subgraphs can provide valuable knowledge about the underlying internal structure of a social network, and mining frequently occurring coherent subgraphs of a large network has been witnessed several applications and received considerable attention in the graph mining community recently. However, some key players are not always appeared in the clique, therefore, clique detection could not identify some

Ye Conghuan

2011-01-01

369

Role of Game Models in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks help to bring the special interest groups on a common platform to develop their businesses, share common interest, and bridge the communication. Once you are inside this online community, you can begin to create your own interest group network of friends and eliminate members that do not share common interests or goals. Most popular sites to help in

Yenumula B. Reddy

2009-01-01

370

Learning Continuous-Time Social Network Dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate that a number of sociology models for social network dynamics can be viewed as continuous time Bayesian networks (CTBNs). A sampling-based approximate infer- ence method for CTBNs can be used as the basis of an expectation-maximization procedure that achieves better accuracy in estimating the param- eters of the model than the standard method of moments algorithm from the

Yu Fan; Christian R. Shelton

371

Multimedia Information Networks in Social Media  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The popularity of personal digital cameras and online photo/video sharing community has lead to an explosion of multimedia information. Unlike traditional multimedia data, many new multimedia datasets are organized in a structural way, incorporating rich information such as semantic ontology, social interaction, community media, geographical maps, in addition to the multimedia contents by themselves. Studies of such structured multimedia data have resulted in a new research area, which is referred to as Multimedia Information Networks. Multimedia information networks are closely related to social networks, but especially focus on understanding the topics and semantics of the multimedia files in the context of network structure. This chapter reviews different categories of recent systems related to multimedia information networks, summarizes the popular inference methods used in recent works, and discusses the applications related to multimedia information networks. We also discuss a wide range of topics including public datasets, related industrial systems, and potential future research directions in this field.

Cao, Liangliang; Qi, Guojun; Tsai, Shen-Fu; Tsai, Min-Hsuan; Pozo, Andrey Del; Huang, Thomas S.; Zhang, Xuemei; Lim, Suk Hwan

372

Learning and Predicting the Evolution of Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the increasing availability of large social network data, there is also an increasing interest in analyzing how those networks evolve over time. Traditionally, the analysis of social networks has focused only on a single snapshot of a network. Researchers have already verified that social networks follow power-law degree distribution, have a small diameter, and exhibit small-world structure and community

Bjoern Bringmann; Michele Berlingerio; Francesco Bonchi; Aristides Gionis

2010-01-01

373

A social network extraction based on relation analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network services, such as Facebook and Twitter, have recently received great attention. Previous research on social networks has focused on its architecture, that is, the existence of a path between persons in the network. Many studies have analyzed the factors affecting the architecture of the social network. However, studies on the semantic association in the network are rare. Extracting

Sunju Oh; Heon Y. Yeom

2012-01-01

374

Monetary Value of Customer Networks in Mobile Social Networking Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mobile Social Networking Services (SNS) are an emerging trend in which individuals of similar interestscommunicate with one another using mobile phones. In this paper, we calculate the monetary value of customers and their networks in mobile SNS using the official data provided by a service provider. The mobile SNS enable users to create their avatars to communicate with each other

Naohiro Matsumura; Hikaru Yamamoto

2010-01-01

375

A social network analysis of primate groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primate social systems are difficult to characterize, and existing classification schemes have been criticized for being overly\\u000a simplifying, formulated only on a verbal level or partly inconsistent. Social network analysis comprises a collection of analytical\\u000a tools rooted in the framework of graph theory that were developed to study human social interaction patterns. More recently\\u000a these techniques have been successfully applied

Claudia Kasper; Bernhard Voelkl

2009-01-01

376

The relationship between social network, social support and periodontal disease among older Americans  

PubMed Central

Aim The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between social network, social support and periodontal disease among older American adults and to test whether social network and support mediates socioeconomic inequality in periodontal disease. Materials and Methods Data pertaining to participants aged 60 years and over from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001-2004 was used. Periodontal disease variables were extent loss of periodontal attachment ? 3mm, and moderate periodontitis. Social support and networks were indicated by need for emotional support, number of close friends and marital status. Results Widowed and those with lowest number of friends had higher rates of the extent of loss of periodontal attachment (1.27,95%CI:1.03,1.58) and (1.22,95%CI:1.03,1.45), respectively. Marital status and number of friends were not significantly associated with moderate periodontitis after adjusting for behavioural factors. The need for more emotional support was not related to periodontal disease in this analysis. Social networks and support had no impact on socioeconomic inequality in periodontal disease. Conclusion Certain aspects of social network, namely being widowed and having fewer friends were linked to the extent of loss of periodontal attachment but not to the definition of moderate periodontitis, in older adults.

Sabbah, Wael; Tsakos, Georgios; Chandola, Tarani; Newton, Tim; Kawachi, Ichiro; Sheiham, Aubrey; Marmot, Michael G; Watt, Richard G

2011-01-01

377

Using social network analysis to target criminal networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using social network analysis (SNA), we propose a model for targeting criminal networks. The model we present here is a revised\\u000a version of our existing model (Schwartz and Rouselle in IALEIA Journal, 18(1):18–14, 2008), which itself builds on Steve Borgatti’s SNA-based key player approach. Whereas Borgatti’s approach focuses solely on actors’\\u000a network positions, our model also incorporates the relative strength

Daniel M. Schwartz

2009-01-01

378

Analyzing Various Social Networking Approaches for Covert Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The world we live in is a complex socio-technical system and systematically thinking about, representing, modeling and analyzing\\u000a these systems has been made possible by social network analysis approach. A lot of groups or communities do exist in the society\\u000a but the terrorist network has been taken for study in this paper because they consist of networks of individuals that

S. Karthika; S. Bose

379

Social Networking Sites and Our Lives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project takes a critical look into the social impact of widespread use of social networking sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace, and Twitter. Written by Keith Hampton, Lauren Sessions Goulet, Lee Rainie, and Kristen Purcell, this 85-page report was published in June 2011. Visitors can download the report or read it online; the materials here also include the survey questions, along with information about the authors' methodology. The report is divided into five parts, including an introduction and a chapter titled "Who are social networking site users?" There are a number of interesting findings here, including the observation that the number of people using social networking sites has nearly doubled since 2008 and their population has gotten significantly older during that time. The report is well written and full of insights that will be of use to media specialists, sociologists, and those with an interest in how technology affects human interaction.

Hampton, Keith; Sessions Goulet, Lauren; Rainie, Harrison; Purcell, Kristen

380

Cooperation and community structure in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Situations of conflict giving rise to social dilemmas are widespread in society. One way of studying these important phenomena is by using simplified models of individual behavior under conflicting situations such as evolutionary game theory. Starting from the observation that individuals interact through networks of acquaintances, we study the evolution of cooperation on model and real social networks through well known paradigmatic games. Using a new payoff scheme which leaves replicator dynamics invariant, we find that cooperation is sustainable in such networks, even in the difficult case of the prisoner’s dilemma. The evolution and stability of cooperation implies the condensation of game strategies into the existing community structures of the social network in which clusters of cooperators survive thanks to their higher connectivity towards other fellow cooperators.

Luthi, Leslie; Pestelacci, Enea; Tomassini, Marco

2008-02-01

381

Spatializing Social Networks: Using Social Network Analysis to Investigate Geographies of Gang Rivalry, Territoriality, and Violence in Los Angeles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis is an increasingly prominent set of techniques used in a number of social sciences, but the use of the techniques of social network analysis in geography has been challenged because of a perceived lack of geographic nuance or consideration of spatialities of context in social networks. The concept of social position and the associated technique of structural

Steven M. Radil; Colin Flint; George E. Tita

2010-01-01

382

Finding Strong Groups of Friends among Friends in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past few years, the rapid growth and the exponential use of social digital media has led to an increase in popularity of social networks and the emergence of social computing. In general, social networks are structures made of social entities (e.g., individuals) that are linked by some specific types of interdependency such as friendship. Most users of social

Juan J. Cameron; Carson Kai-Sang Leung; Syed K. Tanbeer

2011-01-01

383

Business Success Through Social Networks? A Comment on Social Networks and Business Success  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the literature on entrepreneurship in developing coun- tries, the argument that social networks are an essential factor for entrepreneurial success has been given considerable attention. This article challenges this one-sided view by pointing out negative and restrictive effects of social networks on entrepreneurial success in particular, and on economic development in general. The article is structured as a comment

Henrik Egbert

2009-01-01

384

SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC IMPACT OF INTERNET SOCIAL NETWORKS Survey on Facebook network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rise of social networks has engendered in theory and practice a hot debate on such a weird phenomenon. The various opinions already put forward stress out both the associated benefits and risks encountered by the individual and gender communities. Therefore, we thought it appropriate to approach the social networks on scientific and objective grounds while emphasizing our point of

VALENTIN BICHIR

2011-01-01

385

Personalized tag prediction via social influence in social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Currently, social tagging systems have been adopted by many social websites. As tags help users to browse social content effectively, personalized tag prediction problem becomes important in social networks. In this paper, we present a new generative probabilistic model to solve personalized tag prediction problem. Differently with previous methods, we consider social influence between users and friends into this model. We bring two major contributions: 1) We propose a new probabilistic model which considers in social influence to describe users' actual tagging activities; 2) Based on this model, we propose a new approach to perform personalized tag prediction task. Experimental results on a real-world dataset crawled from Last.fm show that our method outperforms other methods.

Yan, Zhenlei; Zhou, Jie

2011-11-01

386

Signed networks in social media  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations between users on social media sites often reflect a mixture of positive (friendly) and negative (antagonisti c) interactions. In contrast to the bulk of research on social n et- works that has focused almost exclusively on positive inter- pretations of links between people, we study how the inter- play between positive and negative relationships affects t he structure of

Jure Leskovec; Daniel P. Huttenlocher; Jon M. Kleinberg

2010-01-01

387

Community core evolution in mobile social networks.  

PubMed

Community detection in social networks attracts a lot of attention in the recent years. Existing methods always depict the relationship of two nodes using the temporary connection. However, these temporary connections cannot be fully recognized as the real relationships when the history connections among nodes are considered. For example, a casual visit in Facebook cannot be seen as an establishment of friendship. Hence, our question is the following: how to cluster the real friends in mobile social networks? In this paper, we study the problem of detecting the stable community core in mobile social networks. The cumulative stable contact is proposed to depict the relationship among nodes. The whole process is divided into timestamps. Nodes and their connections can be added or removed at each timestamp, and historical contacts are considered when detecting the community core. Also, community cores can be tracked through the incremental computing, which can help to recognize the evolving of community structure. Empirical studies on real-world social networks demonstrate that our proposed method can effectively detect stable community cores in mobile social networks. PMID:24163629

Xu, Hao; Xiao, Weidong; Tang, Daquan; Tang, Jiuyang; Wang, Zhenwen

2013-09-17

388

Community Core Evolution in Mobile Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Community detection in social networks attracts a lot of attention in the recent years. Existing methods always depict the relationship of two nodes using the temporary connection. However, these temporary connections cannot be fully recognized as the real relationships when the history connections among nodes are considered. For example, a casual visit in Facebook cannot be seen as an establishment of friendship. Hence, our question is the following: how to cluster the real friends in mobile social networks? In this paper, we study the problem of detecting the stable community core in mobile social networks. The cumulative stable contact is proposed to depict the relationship among nodes. The whole process is divided into timestamps. Nodes and their connections can be added or removed at each timestamp, and historical contacts are considered when detecting the community core. Also, community cores can be tracked through the incremental computing, which can help to recognize the evolving of community structure. Empirical studies on real-world social networks demonstrate that our proposed method can effectively detect stable community cores in mobile social networks.

Xiao, Weidong; Tang, Jiuyang

2013-01-01

389

Social networking for adolescents with severe haemophilia.  

PubMed

Access to modern treatments allows adolescents with haemophilia to manage their haemophilia at home, with improved treatment outcomes and quality of life, but has reduced peer support and the potential for experiential learning from older peers. Social networking, aided by modern communication technologies, may offer health benefits through peer support. We sought to assess whether or not disease-specific social networking could benefit adolescents with severe haemophilia. A total of 150 adolescents (aged 10-18) with severe haemophilia A or B from 11 UK treatment centres or those who had attended focus groups to explore the potential for a social network designed specifically for their use were surveyed. Teenage boys with severe haemophilia in the UK who responded to an online and paper questionnaire (n = 47; 31% response rate) rarely knew of or socialized with others with haemophilia outside their families. Two-thirds of respondents said they would like to meet others. For 70% of boys, parents were the major source of information about haemophilia, yet more than half said they often had trouble finding answers to their questions. These boys frequently used online social networks to chat with friends. Adolescents with severe haemophilia frequently have limited contact with others and many wish to have greater contact. They may benefit from peer support and experiential learning gained through online social networking. The SixVibe restricted access social network is to be launched in 2011. It includes features designed to promote and facilitate the development of peer-to peer disease management skills for adolescents with severe haemophilia. PMID:22059884

Khair, K; Holland, M; Carrington, S

2011-11-08

390

From Local to Global Dilemmas in Social Networks  

PubMed Central

Social networks affect in such a fundamental way the dynamics of the population they support that the global, population-wide behavior that one observes often bears no relation to the individual processes it stems from. Up to now, linking the global networked dynamics to such individual mechanisms has remained elusive. Here we study the evolution of cooperation in networked populations and let individuals interact via a 2-person Prisoner's Dilemma – a characteristic defection dominant social dilemma of cooperation. We show how homogeneous networks transform a Prisoner's Dilemma into a population-wide evolutionary dynamics that promotes the coexistence between cooperators and defectors, while heterogeneous networks promote their coordination. To this end, we define a dynamic variable that allows us to track the self-organization of cooperators when co-evolving with defectors in networked populations. Using the same variable, we show how the global dynamics — and effective dilemma — co-evolves with the motifs of cooperators in the population, the overall emergence of cooperation depending sensitively on this co-evolution.

Pinheiro, Flavio L.; Pacheco, Jorge M.; Santos, Francisco C.

2012-01-01

391

Persistent ISR: the social network analysis connection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Persistent surveillance provides decision makers with unprecedented access to multisource data collected from humans and sensor assets around the globe, yet these data exist in the physical world and provide few overt clues to meaning behind actions. In this paper we explore the recent growth in online social networking and ask the questions: 1) can these sites provide value-added information to compliment physical sensing and 2) what are the mechanisms by which these data could inform situational awareness and decision making? In seeking these answers we consider the range of options provided by Social Network Analysis (SNA), and focus especially on the dynamic nature of these networks. In our discussion we focus on the wave of reform experienced by the North African nations in early 2011 known as the Arab Spring. Demonstrators made widespread use of social networking applications to coordinate, document, and publish material to aid their cause. Unlike members of covert social networks who hide their activity and associations, these demonstrators openly posted multimedia information to coordinate activity and stimulate global support. In this paper we provide a review of SNA approaches and consider how one might track network adaptations by capturing temporal and conceptual trends. We identify opportunities and challenges for merging SNA with physical sensor output, and conclude by addressing future challenges in the persistent ISR domain with respect to SNA.

Bowman, Elizabeth K.

2012-05-01

392

Social Capital Among Women OffendersExamining the Distribution of Social Networks and Resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies investigating the trials and tribulations of women offenders in the United States are becoming increasingly common. One theme in the literature is that successful reentry of women offenders is dependent on support of social networks. Generally, social theorists posit that a variety of positive outcomes is associated with healthy social networks. For example, networks provide social structural resources (“social

Michael D. Reisig; Kristy Holtfreter; Merry Morash

2002-01-01

393

A Social Network Profile and HIV Risk Among Men on Methadone: Do Social Networks Matter?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper describes structural and HIV-related network characteristics and examines associations between these various social network domains and HIV risk behaviors among a sample of 356 men randomly selected from a methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) in New York City. Multiple logistic regression analyses suggest that (1) a higher level of perceived sexual risk among network members, referred to as

Nabila El-Bassel; Louisa Gilbert; Elwin Wu; Mingway Chang

2006-01-01

394

Online and Offline Social Networks: Use of Social Networking Sites by Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social networking sites (e.g., MySpace and Facebook) are popular online communication forms among adolescents and emerging adults. Yet little is known about young people's activities on these sites and how their networks of "friends" relate to their other online (e.g., instant messaging) and offline networks. In this study, college students…

Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Reich, Stephanie M.; Waechter, Natalia; Espinoza, Guadalupe

2008-01-01

395

Online and Offline Social Networks: Use of Social Networking Sites by Emerging Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social networking sites (e.g., MySpace and Facebook) are popular online communication forms among adolescents and emerging adults. Yet little is known about young people's activities on these sites and how their networks of "friends" relate to their other online (e.g., instant messaging) and offline networks. In this study, college students…

Subrahmanyam, Kaveri; Reich, Stephanie M.; Waechter, Natalia; Espinoza, Guadalupe

2008-01-01

396

Strategic Paradox of Social Networks.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the past few decades, the world witnessed social media s climb from relative obscurity to a primary means of communication for millions of people. Mirroring their civilian counterparts, military organizations and individual service members discover...

R. Cote

2011-01-01

397

Fluctuations and Slow Variables in Genetic Networks  

PubMed Central

Computer simulations of large genetic networks are often extremely time consuming because, in addition to the biologically interesting translation and transcription reactions, many less interesting reactions like DNA binding and dimerizations have to be simulated. It is desirable to use the fact that the latter occur on much faster timescales than the former to eliminate the fast and uninteresting reactions and to obtain effective models of the slow reactions only. We use three examples of self-regulatory networks to show that the usual reduction methods where one obtains a system of equations of the Hill type fail to capture the fluctuations that these networks exhibit due to the small number of molecules; moreover, they may even miss describing the behavior of the average number of proteins. We identify the inclusion of fast-varying variables in the effective description as the cause for the failure of the traditional schemes. We suggest a different effective description, which entails the introduction of an additional species, not present in the original networks, that is slowly varying. We show that this description allows for a very efficient simulation of the reduced system while retaining the correct fluctuations and behavior of the full system. This approach ought to be applicable to a wide range of genetic networks.

Bundschuh, R.; Hayot, F.; Jayaprakash, C.

2003-01-01

398

Integrating older adults into social networking sites through ambient intelligence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Networking sites (SNS) use helps teenagers and younger adults to increase their social network and maintain those offline connections made in their daily activities. However older adults are often left aside from SNS, missing interaction opportunities with the members of their social network. The lack of participation and access to these social capital sources might be relevant because several

Raymundo Cornejo

2010-01-01

399

Finding and Matching Communities in Social Networks Using Data Mining  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid growth in the number of users using social networks and the information that a social network requires about their users make the traditional matching systems insufficiently adept at matching users within social networks. This paper introduces the use of clustering to form communities of users and, then, uses these communities to generate matches. Forming communities within a social

Slah Alsaleh; Richi Nayak; Yue Xu

2011-01-01

400

Understanding Community Dynamics in Online Social Networks: A multidisciplinary review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network systems are significant scaffolds for political, economic, and sociocultural change. This is in part due to the widespread availability of sophisticated network technologies and the concurrent emergence of rich media Web sites. Social network sites provide new opportunities for social-technological research. Since we can inexpensively collect electronic records (over extended periods) of social data spanning diverse populations, it

Hari Sundaram; Yu-Ru Lin; Munmun De Choudhury; Aisling Kelliher

2012-01-01

401

iLink : search and routing in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growth of Web 2.0 and fundamental theoretical breakthroughs have led to an avalanche of interest in social networks. This paper focuses on the problem of modeling how social networks accomplish tasks through peer production style collaboration. We propose a general interaction model for the underlying social networks and then a specific model (iLink for social search and message routing.

Jeffrey Davitz; Jiye Yu; Sugato Basu; David Gutelius; Alexandra Harris

2007-01-01

402

Survey of Trust Based Communications in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking is become important component of our daily lives. People use them to share important personal data. However, most users do not fully realize the security implications of using social networks. Furthermore, social net- works are vulnerable to many security attacks. One major threat remains the alteration of data in social networks. In this paper we review several techniques

Pawat Chomphoosang; Ping Zhang; Arjan Durresi; Leonard Barolli

2011-01-01

403

Analysing the simultaneous dynamics of social networks and individual behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

A natural way to think of social and economic interaction structure is in terms of social networks. Studies of social networks have focused traditionally on the role of networks as opportunities and constraints for the behavior and performance of the actors. The behavior and performance of individual persons and other social actors (e.g., firms, organizations) is conditioned to an important

Tom A. B. Snijders

404

Health and the Structure of Adolescent Social Networks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Much research has explored the role of social networks in promoting health through the provision of social support. However, little work has examined how social networks themselves may be structured by health. This article investigates the link between individuals' health and the characteristics of their social network positions.We first develop…

Haas, Steven A.; Schaefer, David R.; Kornienko, Olga

2010-01-01

405

The Application of Social Network Analysis to Team Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews how current social network analysis might be used to investigate individual and group behavior in sporting teams. Social network analysis methods permit researchers to explore social relations between team members and their individual-level qualities simultaneously. As such, social network analysis can be seen as augmenting existing approaches for the examination of intra-group relations among teams and provide

Dean Lusher; Garry Robins; Peter Kremer

2010-01-01

406

The Application of Social Network Analysis to Team Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article reviews how current social network analysis might be used to investigate individual and group behavior in sporting teams. Social network analysis methods permit researchers to explore social relations between team members and their individual-level qualities simultaneously. As such, social network analysis can be seen as augmenting…

Lusher, Dean; Robins, Garry; Kremer, Peter

2010-01-01

407

On Modularity of Social Network Communities: The Spectral Characterization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The term of social network communities refers to groups of individuals within which social interactions are intense and between which they are weak. A social network community mining problem (SNCMP) can be stated as the problem of finding all such communities from a given social network. A wide variety of applications can be formulated into SNCMPs, ranging from Web intelligence

Bo Yang; Jiming Liu; Jianfeng Feng; Dayou Liu

2008-01-01

408

Social networks as a service in modern enterprises  

Microsoft Academic Search

The power of social networks stems from their ability to capture real-world phenomena such as collaboration, competition, and partnerships. Social networks provide means for enterprises to capture and expose many informal connections between their stakeholders. In this paper, we discuss how social networks could sustain growth and unfold business opportunities in modern enterprises. Furthermore, we study various types of social

Zakaria Maamar; Youakim Badr

2009-01-01

409

Inferring Unobservable Intercommunity Links in Large Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks can be used to model social in- teractions between individuals. In many circumstances, not all interactions between individuals are observed. In such cases, a social network is constructed with the data that has been observed, as this is the best one can do. Recent research has attempted to predict future links in a social network, though this has

Heath Hohwald; Manuel Cebrián; Arturo Canales; Rubén Lara; Nuria Oliver

2009-01-01

410

Informal learning and identity formation in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

All students today are increasingly expected to develop technological fluency, digital citizenship, and other twenty?first century competencies despite wide variability in the quality of learning opportunities schools provide. Social network sites (SNSs) available via the internet may provide promising contexts for learning to supplement school?based experiences. This qualitative study examines how high school students from low?income families in the USA

Christine Greenhow; Beth Robelia

2009-01-01

411

Inferring binary trust relationships in Web-based social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growth of Web-based social networking and the properties of those networks have created great potential for producing intelligent software that integrates a user's social network and preferences. Our research looks particularly at assigning trust in Web-based social networks and investigates how trust information can be mined and integrated into applications. This article introduces a definition of trust suitable for

Jennifer Golbeck; James A. Hendler

2006-01-01

412

Preserving privacy in social networks against subgraph attacks  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the rapid development of internet, explosive growth of social network creates large-scale social network data. In order to discover the potential value of the social network data, many analysis methods have been developed. However, using prior knowledge about the subgraph structure of a given network, it is possible to identify a target node or infer some useful information. In

Tang Chenxing; Wang Xiaodong

2010-01-01

413

Extracting Keyphrases to Represent Relations in Social Networks from Web  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks have recently garnered consider- able interest. With the intention of utilizing so- cial networks for the Semantic Web, several stud- ies have examined automatic extraction of social networks. However, most methods have addressed extraction of the strength of relations. Our goal is extracting the underlying relations between en- tities that are embedded in social networks. To this end,

Junichiro Mori; Mitsuru Ishizuka; Yutaka Matsuo

2007-01-01

414

On Protecting Private Information in Social Networks: AProposal  

Microsoft Academic Search

As online social networks get more popular, it becomes increasingly critical to preserve user privacy in such networks. In this paper, we propose our preliminary results on defining and tackling information aggregation attacks over online social networks. We first introduce three major threats towards private information in online social networks. We conceptually model private information into multilevel and discretionary models.

Bo Luo; Dongwon Lee

2009-01-01

415

Security and privacy in online social networks: A survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking becomes increasingly important due to the recent surge in online interaction. Social network analysis can be used to study the functioning of computer networks, information flow patterns in communities, and emergent behavior of physical and biological systems. In this paper, the mathematical formulation and computational models for security and privacy of social network data are discussed. Several possible

Prateek Joshi; C.-C. Jay Kuo

2011-01-01

416

Privacy-triggered communications in pervasive social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pervasive social networks extend traditional social networking by enabling users to share information in a peer- to-peer fashion using their wireless mobile devices. Contrary to traditional online social networks, privacy protection in such networks depends heavily on users' context (time, location, activity, etc.) and their sensitivity to the shared data and context. Existing privacy-preserving mechanisms do not adapt well to

Murtuza Jadliwala; Julien Freudiger; Imad Aad; Jean-Pierre Hubaux; Valtteri Niemi

2011-01-01

417

A social network activity recommender system for ubiquitous devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing demand to access social networks by mobile devices together with increasing computation power of these mobile devices motivate the need of local recommendation services for social network users. Social networking is generating an incredible amount of information that is sometimes difficult for users to process, especially from mobile phones. Several links, activities, and recommendations are proposed by networked

Andrea Zanda; Ernestina Menasalvas; Santiago Eibe

2011-01-01

418

Mapping Social Networks into P2P Directory Service  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents our approach to use social network information in P2P networks in order to efficiently retrieve relevant information by exploiting existing trust relations of the social network links. The novelty of our work is to demonstrate that only a subset of the whole social network is adequate to build an efficient and reliable service. We use our P2P

L. Zaczek; A. Datta

2009-01-01

419

The impact of social networking on Emirati teenagers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social Networking is a very popular term which refers to online services or websites that focus on building social networks among people who like sharing common interests and activities. It allows people to socialise and network with others in an online environment. This research paper aims to study the positive and the negative impact of Social Networking on Emirati teenagers.

Ayesha Buti; Seama Saleh; Sara Hussain; Amala Rajan

2011-01-01

420

Dynamic Item Recommendation by Topic Modeling for Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The need to identify an approach that recommends items that match users' preferences within social networks has grown in tandem with the increasing number of items appearing within these networks. This research presents a novel technique for item recommendation within social networks that matches user and group interests over time. Users often tag items in social networks with words and

Sang Su Lee; Tagyoung Chung; Dennis McLeod

2011-01-01

421

Defining Friendworks; Communication perspective on Social networks Types  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces friendwork as a new term in social networks studies. A friendwork is a network of friends. It is a specific case of an interpersonal social network. Naming this seemingly well known and familiar group of people as a friendwork facilitates its differentiation from the overall social network, while highlighting this subgroup's specific attributes and dynamics. The focus

Orit Ben-Narush

2009-01-01

422

Ranking Companies on the Web Using Social Network Mining  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks have garnered much attention recently. Several studies have been undertaken to extract social networks among\\u000a people, companies, and so on automatically from the web. For use in social sciences, social networks enable analyses of the\\u000a performance and valuation of companies. This paper describes an attempt to learn ranking of companies from a social network\\u000a that has been mined

Yingzi Jin; Yutaka Matsuo; Mitsuru Ishizuka

423

Spatial Epidemic Modelling in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spread of infectious diseases is highly influenced by the structure of the underlying social network. The target of this study is not the network of acquaintances, but the social mobility network: the daily movement of people between locations, in regions. It was already shown that this kind of network exhibits small world characteristics. The model developed is agent based (ABM) and comprehends a movement model and a infection model. In the movement model, some assumptions are made about its structure and the daily movement is decomposed into four types: neighborhood, intra region, inter region and random. The model is Geographical Information Systems (GIS) based, and uses real data to define its geometry. Because it is a vector model, some optimization techniques were used to increase its efficiency.

Simoes, Joana Margarida

2005-06-01

424

Disclosing Personal Information on Social Networking Sites and Social Support  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the Internet growing faster than ever, online social networking sites (SNS) such as Facebook are becoming more popular. At last count, there were over 845 million active Facebook users who are interacting online. The continued influx of computer technology allows for newer means of communication in order to foster interpersonal relationships and promote self-disclosure (Ledbetter, Mazer, Degroot et al.,

An Mai

2012-01-01

425

Establishing Social Norms for Privacy in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most social networks have implemented extensive and com- plex privacy controls in order to battle the host of privacy concerns that initially plagued their online communities. These privacy controls have taken the form of access restriction, which allow users to construct barri- ers preventing unwanted users from viewing their personal information. However, this system leaves users unprotected in cases in

Ted Kang; Lalana Kagal

426

SocialSearch: enhancing entity search with social network matching  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper introduces the problem of matching people names to their corresponding social network identities such as their Twitter accounts. Existing tools for this purpose build upon naive textual matching and inevitably suffer low precision, due to false positives (e.g., fake impersonator accounts) and false negatives (e.g., accounts using nicknames). To overcome these limitations, we leverage \\

Gae-won You; Seung-won Hwang; Zaiqing Nie; Ji-Rong Wen

2011-01-01

427

Multidimensional Social Network in the Social Recommender System  

Microsoft Academic Search

All online sharing systems gather data that reflects users' collective behavior and their shared activities. This data can be used to extract different kinds of relationships which can be grouped into layers and which are basic components of the multi- dimensional social network (MSN) proposed in the paper. The layers are created on the basis of two types of relations

Przemys?aw Kazienko; Katarzyna Musial; Tomasz Kajdanowicz

2011-01-01

428

The Social Phobia Psychotherapy Research Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the Social Phobia Psychotherapy Research Network. The research program encompasses a coordinated group of studies adopting a standard protocol and an agreed-on set of standardized measures for the assessment and treatment of social phobia (SP). In the central project (study A), a multicenter randomized controlled trial, refined models of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy and manualized short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy

F. Leichsenring; J. Hoyer; M. Beutel; S. Herpertz; W. Hiller; E. Irle; P. Joraschky; H. H. König; T. M. de Liz; B. Nolting; K. Pöhlmann; S. Salzer; H. Schauenburg; U. Stangier; B. Strauss; C. Subic-Wrana; S. Vormfelde; G. Weniger; U. Willutzki; J. Wiltink; E. Leibing

2009-01-01

429

Why People Use Social Networking Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the recent popular social media platforms is the social networking site (SNS). Thus far, few previous studies have\\u000a empirically investigated people’s motivations for SNS usage, especially not outside the U.S. This study combines a large-scale\\u000a quantitative and qualitative research design, by asking 1,200 SNS users an open question regarding their reasons for using\\u000a SNSs. An important conclusion drawn

Petter Bae Brandtzæg; Jan Heim

2009-01-01

430

Monitoring, recognizing and discovering social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work addresses the important problem of the discovery and analysis of social networks from surveillance video. A computer vision approach to this problem is made possible by the proliferation of video data obtained from camera networks, particularly state-of-the-art Pan-Tilt-Zoom (PTZ) and tracking camera systems that have the capability to acquire high-resolution face images as well as tracks of people

Ting Yu; Ser-Nam Lim; Kedar Patwardhan; Nils Krahnstoever

2009-01-01

431

Online Social and Business Networking Communities  

Microsoft Academic Search

http:\\/\\/www.deri.ie\\/ Abstract. The ability to send and retrieve information over the Web using tra- ditional and ubiquitous computing methods has changed the way we work and live. Web portals, as content aggregators, act as gateways to pertinent and up- to-date information. Social networking portals are a recent development, allow- ing a user to create and maintain a network of close

Ina O'murchu; John G. Breslin; Stefan Decker

2004-01-01

432

A social network analysis of acting white  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using social network and interview data, this case study illuminates why acting White did not apply to students at a predominantly Somali African American school in the U.S. Specifically, this case study shows that high-achieving Somali working-class students were not isolated from their peer networks in their school. Furthermore, this study suggests that Acting White may be not applicable to

Na’im Madyun; MooSung Lee; Mustafa Jumale

2010-01-01

433

Efficient search ranking in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In social networks such as Orkut, www.orkut.com, a large portion of the user queries refer to names of other people. Indeed, more than 50% of the queries in Orkut are about names of other users, with an average of 1.8 terms per query. Further, the users usually search for people with whom they maintain relationships in the network. These relationships

Monique V. Vieira; Bruno M. Fonseca; Rodrigo Damazio; Paulo Braz Golgher; Davi De Castro Reis; Berthier A. Ribeiro-neto

2007-01-01

434

Social Networks: Prestige, Centrality, and Influence  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a We deliver a short overview of different centrality measures and influence concepts in social networks, and present the relation-algebraic\\u000a approach to the concepts of power and influence. First, we briefly discuss four kinds of measures of centrality: the ones\\u000a based on degree, closeness, betweenness, and the eigenvector-related measures. We consider centrality of a node and of a network.\\u000a Moreover, we

Agnieszka Rusinowska; Rudolf Berghammer; Harrie De Swart; Michel Grabisch

435

Privacy-Preserving Relationship Path Discovery in Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As social networks sites continue to proliferate and are being used for an increasing variety of purposes, the privacy risks raised by the full access of social networking sites over user data become uncomfortable. A decentralized social network would help alleviate this problem, but offering the functionalities of social networking sites is a distributed manner is a challenging problem. In this paper, we provide techniques to instantiate one of the core functionalities of social networks: discovery of paths between individuals. Our algorithm preserves the privacy of relationship information, and can operate offline during the path discovery phase. We simulate our algorithm on real social network topologies.

Mezzour, Ghita; Perrig, Adrian; Gligor, Virgil; Papadimitratos, Panos

436

Using the ACO algorithm for path searches in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the most important types of applications currently being used to share knowledge across the Internet are social networks.\\u000a In addition to their use in social, professional and organizational spheres, social networks are also frequently utilized\\u000a by researchers in the social sciences, particularly in anthropology and social psychology. In order to obtain information\\u000a related to a particular social network,

Jessica Rivero; Dolores Cuadra; Javier Calle; Pedro Isasi

437

Collecting social network data to study social activity-travel behavior: an egocentric approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a data collection effort designed to incorporate the social dimension in social activity-travel behavior by explicitly studying the link between individuals’ social activities and their social networks. The main hypothesis of the data collection effort is that individuals’ travel behavior is conditional upon their social networks; that is, a key cause of travel behavior is the social

Juan-Antonio Carrasco; Bernie Hogan; Barry Wellman; Eric J Miller

2008-01-01

438

Discrete Opinion Dynamics on Online Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper focuses on the dynamics of binary opinions {+1, -1} on online social networks consisting of heterogeneous actors. In our model, actors update their opinions under the interplay of social influence and self- affirmation, which leads to rich dynamical behaviors on online social networks. We find that the opinion leading to the consensus features an advantage of the initially weighted fraction based on actors' strength over the other, instead of the population. For the role of specific actors, the consensus converges towards the opinion that a small fraction of high-strength actors hold, and individual diversity of self-affirmation slows down the ordering process of consensus. These indicate that high-strength actors play an essential role in opinion formation with strong social influence as well as high persistence. Further investigations show that the initial fraction of high-strength actors to dominate the evolution depends on the heterogeneity of the strength distribution, and less high-strength actors are needed in the case of a smaller exponent of power-law distribution of actors' strength. Our study provides deep insights into the role of social influence and self-affirmation on opinion formation on online social networks.

Hu, Yan-Li; Bai, Liang; Zhang, Wei-Ming

2013-01-01

439

Social Network of Co-occurrence in News Articles  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Networks describe various complex natural systems including social systems. Recent studies have shown that these networks\\u000a share some common properties. While studying complex systems, data collection phase is difficult for social networks compared\\u000a to other networks such as the WWW, Internet, protein or linguistic networks. Many interesting social networks such as movie\\u000a actors’ collaboration, scientific collaboration and sexual contacts have

Arzucan Özgür; Haluk Bingöl

2004-01-01

440

The ancient practice of Chinese social networking: Guanxi and social network theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Chinese concept of Guanxi is a form of social QHWZRUNWKHRU\\\\?WKDWGHÏ ?QHVRQHpVSODFHLQWKH? social structure and provides security, trust and a prescribed role. This essay argues that Eastern Guanxi and recently popularized Western Social Network Theory (SNT) overlap in three ways. First, both imply that information is essential to sustain a social system by prescribing a set of EHKDYLRUVWKDWUHJXODWHWKH?Ì ?RZRILQIRUPDWLRQ? DQGWKDWGHÏ

Scott C. Hammond; Lowell M. Glenn

2004-01-01

441

A framework for analysis of dynamic social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Finding patterns of social interaction within a population has wide-ranging applications including: disease modeling, cultural and information transmission, and behavioral ecol- ogy. Social interactions are often modeled with networks. A key characteristic of social interactions is their continual change. However, most past analyses of social networks are essentially static in that all information about the time that social interactions take

Tanya Y. Berger-wolf; Jared Saia

2006-01-01

442

An Adaptive Evolution Mechanism for Growing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adaptive networks appear in biological and social applications. They combine topological evolution of network with dynamics in the network nodes. Considering the friendship network in a community, members tend to choose those who share the similar interests to be their friends. With the growth of the social network, the interests of a member could change with the interests of their

Wan Liyong

2008-01-01

443

Some Social Considerations of Networking.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|New technologies of information handling are going to produce fundamental changes in the social structure. If we accept the statement that the book "upset the educational monopoly of the Church," we inevitably wonder what monopolies may tumble in the electronic wake of the computer. We are not dealing with a simple difference of degree but,…

Heinich, Robert

444

Racing towards academic social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the driving forces moving Sakai to join the new era of social applications by adopting a content-focused methodology. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The exploration is performed by looking at the way in which the role of content has developed through various phases of the internet, and how educational computing has leveraged those

Ian Boston

2009-01-01

445

Network Analysis of Social Interactions in Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ongoing study of the structure, function, and evolution of individual activity within lab groups is introduced. This study makes extensive use of techniques from social network analysis. These techniques allow rigorous quantification and hypothesis-testing of the interactions inherent in social groups and the impact of intrinsic characteristics of individuals on their social interactions. As these techniques are novel within the physics education research community, an overview of their meaning and application is given. We then present preliminary results from videotaped laboratory groups involving mixed populations of traditional and non-traditional students in an introductory algebra-based physics course.

Warren, Aaron R.

2008-10-01

446

Network Analysis of Social Interactions in Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An ongoing study of the structure, function, and evolution of individual activity within lab groups is introduced. This study makes extensive use of techniques from social network analysis. These techniques allow rigorous quantification and hypothesis-testing of the interactions inherent in social groups and the impact of intrinsic characteristics of individuals on their social interactions. As these techniques are novel within the physics education research community, an overview of their meaning and application is given. We then present preliminary results from videotaped laboratory groups involving mixed populations of traditional and non-traditional students in an introductory algebra-based physics course.

Warren, Aaron R.

2009-01-24

447

Social networks of buying — Likely patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network is the group of individuals who have common interest. Data mining has the greatest attention of research over the past decade. The machine learning field evolved from the broad field of artificial intelligence, in which the machine (computers) can be enabled to think or act as intelligent as humans. Classification is the machine learning problem in which the

M. Mohamed Sathik; A. Abdul Rasheed

2009-01-01

448

Social Networking Tools for Academic Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is an exploratory study investigating the use of social networking tools in academic libraries, examining the extent of their use, library staff's perceptions of their usefulness and challenges, and factors influencing decisions to use or not to use such tools. Invitations to participate in a web-based survey were sent to 140 university…

Chu, Samuel Kai-Wah; Du, Helen S.

2013-01-01

449

Adaptive Bayesian agents: Enabling distributed social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article brings together two views of organisations: res ource-based theories (RBT) and social network analysis (SNA). Resource-based theories stress the importance of tangible assets, as well as less tangible ones, in the competitive advantage and success of organisations. However, they provide little insight into how resources are brought together by an organisation to generate core competencies that provide a

A. Potgieter; K. A. April; R. J. E. Cooke; M. Lockett

2006-01-01

450

Lead users in social networks of children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The goal of this research is to fill the gap in lead users' research under children. An effort is made to analyze the characteristics of lead users in social networks of children. Furthermore, their role in the adoption and diffusion of innovations is examined. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – An experiment is conducted at primary schools in The Netherlands, with children

L. P. Molenmaker; J. Kratzer; M. C. Achterkamp

2008-01-01

451

Happiness is assortative in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networks tend to disproportionally favor connections between individuals with either similar or dissimilar characteristics. This propensity, referred to as assortative mixing or homophily, is expressed as the correlation between attribute values of nearest neighbour vertices in a graph. Recent results indicate that beyond demographic features such as age, sex and race, even psychological states such as \\

Johan Bollen; Bruno Goncalves; Guangchen Ruan; Huina Mao

2011-01-01

452

Conceptualizing Third Space in Networked Social Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

Third space is thinking differently of space beyond the insufficiency of dualism, as in mental and physical space, dismissing the 'either\\/or' manner of binary categorizing to encompass 'both\\/and also' logic. The online social networking is the new space of connectivity and interactions. This paper is an attempt to establish briefly the epistemologies of the 'in between' space and its dynamisms

Chamari Edirisinghe; Ryohei Nakatsu; Johannes Widodo; Adrian David Cheok

2011-01-01

453

Privometer: Privacy protection in social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The increasing popularity of social networks, such as Facebook and Orkut, has raised several privacy concerns. Traditional ways of safeguarding privacy of personal information by hiding sensitive attributes are no longer adequate. Research shows that probabilistic classification techniques can effectively infer such private information. The disclosed sensitive information of friends, group affiliations and even participation in activities, such as tagging

Nilothpal Talukder; Mourad Ouzzani; Ahmed K. Elmagarmid; Hazem Elmeleegy; Mohamed Yakout

2010-01-01

454

Simulation of Online Social Networks with Krowdix  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online Social Networks (OSNs) are a key phenomenon of Internet. Simulations are widely used in their study as means to harness their size and complexity, and to overcome the difficulties to set up experiments in real environments. However, these tools are still limited. They are usually focused on the structure of relationships and emulate changes only from statistical data. This

Diego Blanco-Moreno; Ruben Fuentes-Fernandez; Juan Pavon

2011-01-01

455

Multigraph Sampling of Online Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The popularity of Online Social Networks (OSNs) has skyrocketed within the past decade, with the most popular having at present hundreds of millions of users (a number that continues to grow apace). This success has inspired a number of measurement and characterization studies, as well as studies of the interaction between OSN structure and systems design, and of user behavior

Minas Gjoka; Carter T. Butts; Maciej Kurant; Athina P. Markopoulou

2011-01-01

456

Privacy protection issues in social networking sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking sites (SNS) have become very popular during the past few years, as they allow users to both express their individuality and meet people with similar interests. Nonetheless, there are also many potential threats to privacy associated with these SNS such as identity theft and disclosure of sensitive information. However, many users still are not aware of these threats

Ai Ho; Abdou Maiga; Esma Aïmeur

2009-01-01

457

Social Support Networks and Elderly Health.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document is a summary of a study of the relationship between social support networks and health. The study was conducted among the age sixty and over population in the Lowell, Massachusetts area. A random sample of 300 names was drawn from a census l...

F. T. Gallo

1982-01-01

458

Identifying network attacks from a social perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cyber Defense Laboratory at Western Kentucky University has established a multidisciplinary research team in order to gain a better understanding of the motives and methods of hackers. This involves the collaboration of computer scientists, network analysts, sociologists, and anthropologists. Most research along these lines to date has been performed by technical experts and has failed to consider social research

Lindsay Hopper; Ronald Hopper; Phillip Womble

2009-01-01

459

Optimizing social life using online friend networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an online application which ties to the popular social network Facebook. It aggregates data from other systems, including Yahoo! Local and Google Maps, to provide relevant information to users. This system of systems functions as an add-on to each user's Facebook profile. The user is able to store ratings, reviews, and places where he likes to go.

Sebastian Echegaray; Jafet Morales; Wenbin Luo

2009-01-01

460

De-Anonymizing Dynamic Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online social network data are increasingly made publicly available to third parties. Recent studies show that it is possible to recover sensitive information from the released data and several anonymization techniques have been proposed to protect individual privacy. However, most of the existing defenses have focused on ``one-time'' releases and do not take into consideration the re- publication of dynamic

Xuan Ding; Lan Zhang; Zhiguo Wan; Ming Gu

2011-01-01

461

Security and Privacy in Online Social Networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social Network Services (SNS) are currently drastically revolutionizing the way people interact, thus becoming de facto a predominant service on the web, today.1 The impact of this paradigm change on socioeconomic and technical aspects of collaboration and interaction is comparable to that caused by the deployment of World Wide Web in the 1990s.

Cutillo, Leucio Antonio; Manulis, Mark; Strufe, Thorsten

462

How to Analyze Company Using Social Network?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Every single company or institution wants to utilize its resources in the most efficient way. In order to do so they have to be have good structure. The new way to analyze company structure by utilizing existing within company natural social network and example of its usage on Enron company are presented in this paper.

Palus, Sebastian; Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemys?aw

463

Social Networking Postings: Views from School Principals  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Numerous recent media accounts indicate that teachers are being fired, put on probation, or otherwise censured because of information found on their social networking sites (SNS). While the literature in business, psychology, and pharmacy shows initial investigations of the impact of SNS information on hiring decisions, this area has not been…

Griffin, Marlynn M.; Lake, Robert L.

2012-01-01

464

Protecting Personal Information on Social Networking Sites  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Almost everyone uses social networking sites like Facebook, MySpace, and LinkedIn. Since Facebook is the most popular site in the history of the Internet, this article will focus on how one can protect his/her personal information and how that extends to protecting the private information of others.|

Gallant, David T.

2011-01-01

465

Exploring Social Networking: Developing Critical Literacies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|While schools have been using computers within their classrooms for years now, there has been a purposeful ignoring of the growing power of social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Many schools ban students from accessing and using sites such as Facebook at school and many English and literacy teachers ignore or deny their value as a…

Watson, Pauline

2012-01-01

466

The link prediction problem for social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given a snapshot of a social network, can we infer which new interactions among its members are likely to occur in the near future? We formalize this question as the link prediction problem, and develop approaches to link prediction based on measures the \\

David Liben-Nowell; Jon M. Kleinberg

2003-01-01

467

"Cloudworks": Social Networking for Learning Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Can we apply the best of Web 2.0 principles to an educational context? More specifically can we use this as a means of shifting teaching practice to a culture of sharing learning ideas and designs? This paper describes a new social networking site, "Cloudworks", which aims to provide a mechanism for sharing, discussing and finding learning and…

Conole, Grainne; Culver, Juliette

2009-01-01

468

Social Networking Services in E-Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper is a report on the findings of a study conducted on the use of the social networking service NING in a cross-location e-learning setting named "Net Economy." We describe how we implemented NING as a fundamental part of the setting through a special phase concept and team building approach. With the help of user statistics, we examine…

Weber, Peter; Rothe, Hannes

2012-01-01

469

Social Networking Tools for Academic Libraries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This is an exploratory study investigating the use of social networking tools in academic libraries, examining the extent of their use, library staff's perceptions of their usefulness and challenges, and factors influencing decisions to use or not to use such tools. Invitations to participate in a web-based survey were sent to 140 university…

Chu, Samuel Kai-Wah; Du, Helen S.

2013-01-01

470

The Benefits and Limitations of Social Networking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Center for the Digital Future at the University of Southern California surveys 2,000 households each year to find out how online technology affects Internet users. Findings in the latest report show social networks are increasing and a majority of users report feeling as strongly about their communities online as their real-world communities.…

Strom, Paris; Strom, Robert

2012-01-01

471

A social network caught in the Web  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an analysis of Club Nexus, an online community at Stanford University. Through the Nexus site we were able to study a reflection of the real world community structure within the student body. We observed and measured social network phenomena such as the small world effect, clustering, and the strength of weak ties. Using the rich profile data provided

Lada A. Adamic; Orkut Buyukkokten; Eytan Adar

2003-01-01

472

Ethical Considerations of Social Networking for Counsellors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The use of online social networking websites has increased among Canadians in recent years. There are many professional and ethical implications for counsellors who use these sites (Boyd, 2007). Although they offer advantages to counsellors, their use can also raise issues around ethical conduct. Because the counselling literature has not yet…

Bratt, William Edgar Vernon

2010-01-01

473

The Structure of Growing Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose some simple models of the growth of social networks, based on three general principles: (1) meetings take place between pairs of individuals at a rate which is high if a pair has one or more mutual friends and low otherwise; (2) acquaintances between pairs of individuals who rarely meet decay over time; (3) there is an upper limit

Emily M. Jin; Michelle Girvan; M. E. J. Newman

2001-01-01

474

Video Game Industry as a Social Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The video game market is a complex system where the relationships between game titles and publishers is convoluted. While some publishers are responsible for a large number of titles others seem to be less successful. In an attempt to understand the characteristics and evolution of the video game industry, we analyze the market using social network analysis. For this purpose,

Tony Morelli; Mehmet Hadi Gunes

2012-01-01

475

Social networks, age cohorts and employment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the association of social networks with being in work, contrasting those under age 50 with those over 50 years. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A case study is undertaken of a local labour market in Scotland. Data were collected by interview using a semi-structured questionnaire from 194 people divided into four groups. Data

Kaberi Gayen; Ronald McQuaid; Robert Raeside

2010-01-01

476

Why we ignore social networking advertising  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on college students, users of online social networks, as main sources of information that helps advertisers understand the ways in which advertisements are perceived online. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Results were reached through qualitative research. Personal in-depth interviews, utilizing Zaltman Metaphor Elicitation Technique (ZMET), were conducted among 20 college students. Interviews consisted

Zeljka Hadija; Susan B. Barnes; Neil Hair

2012-01-01

477

Game theoretic models for social network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The existing methods and techniques for social network analysis are inadequate to capture both the behavior (such as rationality and intelligence) of individuals and the strategic interactions that occur among these individuals. Game theory is a natural tool to overcome this inadequacy since it provides rigorous mathematical models of strategic interaction among autonomous, intelligent, and rational agents. Motivated by the

Narahari Yadati; Ramasuri Narayanam

2011-01-01

478

Recruitment dynamics in adaptive social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We model recruitment in adaptive social networks in the presence of birth and death processes. Recruitment is characterized by nodes changing their status to that of the recruiting class as a result of contact with recruiting nodes. Only a susceptible subset of nodes can be recruited. The recruiting individuals may adapt their connections in order to improve recruitment capabilities, thus

Maxim S. Shkarayev; Ira B. Schwartz; Leah B. Shaw

2011-01-01

479

Differentiated Incentive Rewarding for Social Networking Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our ultimate goal is to develop an information diffusion system where individuals are motivated to create content and share it with public. As our first step, in this paper, we present an incentive-rewarding mechanism for social networking services and focus particularly on changing reward assignment ratio considering different risks users perceive when uploading content with different privacy settings: public-open and

Kazufumi Yogo; Ryoichi Shinkuma; Tatsuro Takahashi; Taku Konishi; Satoko Itaya; Shinichi Doi; Keiji Yamada

2010-01-01

480

Social networks and Internet connectivity effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the impact of communication media and the Internet on connectivity between people. Results from a series of social network studies of media use are used as background for exploration of these impacts. These studies explored the use of all available media among members of an academic research group and among distance learners. Asking about media use as

Caroline Haythornthwaite

2005-01-01

481

Measuring profile distance in online social networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online Social Networks (OSNs) provide new ways for people to communicate with one another and to share content. OSNs have become quite popular among the general population but their rapid growth has raised concerns about privacy and security. Many predict that the OSNs of today provide a glimpse of the future Internet infrastructure. Whether or not that will be true

Niklas Lavesson; Henric Johnson

2011-01-01

482

Social applications in the home network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Home devices like set-top boxes and media gateways are a rich source of users' information. They can play a role to facilitate interactions with friends and relatives in social networks. However these interactions have to follow policies to safeguard users' privacy while maintaining the complexity low for the average user. In this article we prototype an architecture based for home

Daniel Diaz-Sanchez; Andres Marin; Florina Almenarez; Alberto Cortes

2010-01-01

483

Using Social Networking in the Library  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|With celebrities discussing Twitter on television talk shows, Facebook being used by people to share pictures of their grandchildren, and academic seminars being delivered in Second Life, it is hard to get through a day without being faced with some sort of social networking tool. Librarians often talk about the importance of outreach and of…

Lindsay, Elizabeth Blakesley

2009-01-01

484

Knowledge Recommendation Based on Social Network Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

In knowledge management systems (KMS), the overabundance of information has forced users to spend more time searching for information that they need. If KMS can discover users' interests and initiatively recommend knowledge which users are interested in, it will greatly improve users' satisfaction. In this paper, based on social network theory, we propose a new method for establishing a knowledge

Bei Fan; Lu Liu; Ming Li; Yin Wu

2008-01-01

485

EMERGING REVENUE MODELS IN SOCIAL NETWORKING PORTALS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines the history of virtual communities and explores the current state of for- profit Web sites that use virtual communities and related strategies to attract visitors. The paper focuses on one type of virtual community Web site that has recently shown the potential to be very profitable, the targeted social networking portal. The paper explores the characteristics of

Gary P. Schneider; Carol M. Bruton

2006-01-01

486

Book recommendation based on web social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recommender systems play an important role in dealing with web information overload such as book e-commerce. Current recommender systems often generate recommendation on users' opinions on items, and have several fatal weaknesses. With the growth of web social networks, a new kind of information is available: trust rating expressed by an user on another user. The web-based nature of this

Mingjuan Zhou

2010-01-01

487

Social networking: the new computer fluency?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a course in online social networking that is flexible enough to meet the needs of most CS0 courses. Two sections of the course were taught at the College of Charleston during the Spring 2009 semester. We describe our experiences, we outline the topics and we offer suggestions on how the topics can meet the objectives of more

Tarsem S. Purewal Jr.

2010-01-01

488

Using social networking to teach new software  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social networking websites are extremely popular among college students. Our project seeks to capitalize on this familiar environment to teach students how to use other computer programs. The first software we are creating with this pedagogy teaches students how to use electronic health record software. Students will be educated via the familiar interface using instructional walkthroughs, teacher led projects, and

Loren Klingman

2009-01-01

489

Social Networking Services in E-Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is a report on the findings of a study conducted on the use of the social networking service NING in a cross-location e-learning setting named "Net Economy." We describe how we implemented NING as a fundamental part of the setting through a special phase concept and team building approach. With the help of user statistics, we examine…

Weber, Peter; Rothe, Hannes

2012-01-01

490

The Benefits and Limitations of Social Networking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Center for the Digital Future at the University of Southern California surveys 2,000 households each year to find out how online technology affects Internet users. Findings in the latest report show social networks are increasing and a majority of users report feeling as strongly about their communities online as their real-world communities.…

Strom, Paris; Strom, Robert

2012-01-01

491

Analysis of an online health social network  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the continued advances of Web 2.0, health-centered Online Social Networks (OSNs) are emerging to provide knowledge and support for those interested in managing their own health. Despite the success of the OSNs for better connecting the users through sharing statuses, photos, blogs, and so on, it is unclear how the users are willing to share health related information and

Xiaoxiao Ma; Guanling Chen; Juntao Xiao

2010-01-01

492

Improving health information access through social networking  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sustaining user participation is a challenge for even the most popular web sites. In this work we report on an effort to increase exposure to, and interaction with, a repository of health based information by coupling the repository with a social networking application. We hypothesize that we can sustain user interaction with a repository and increase nutrition knowledge through content

Jill Freyne; Shlomo Berkovsky; Stephen Kimani; Nilufar Baghaei; Emily Brindal

2010-01-01

493

Sequential Influence Models in Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spread of influence among individuals in a social net- work can be naturally modeled in a probabilistic framework, but it is challenging to reason about differences between var- ious models as well as to relate these models to actual so- cial network data. Here we consider two of the most fun- damental definitions of influence, one based on a

Dan Cosley; Daniel P. Huttenlocher; Jon M. Kleinberg; Xiangyang Lan; Siddharth Suri

2010-01-01

494

Monetizing User Activity on Social Networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this work, we investigate techniques to monitize user ac- tivity on public forums, marketplaces and groups on social network sites. Our approach involves (a) identifying the monetization potential of user posts and (b) eliminating o- topic content in monetizable posts to use the most relevant keywords for advertising. Our rst user study involving 30 users and data from MySpace

Meenakshi Nagarajan; Kamal Baid

2009-01-01

495

Cultural Adapdation Issues in Social Networking Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Such social networking sites as MySpace, Facebook, Cyworld, and Bebo since the moment of their introduction have attracted millions of users, many of whom have integrated these sites into their daily practices. However none of these sites are equally popular across cultures. This article provides overview of research which was carried out up to date in the area of cross-cultural

Elena Vitkauskaite

2011-01-01

496

Text documents as social networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The extraction of keywords and features is a fundamental problem in text data mining. Document processing applications directly depend on the quality and speed of the identification of salient terms and phrases. Applications as disparate as automatic document classification, information visualization, filtering and security policy enforcement all rely on the quality of automatically extracted keywords. Recently, a novel approach to rapid change detection in data streams and documents has been developed. It is based on ideas from image processing and in particular on the Helmholtz Principle from the Gestalt Theory of human perception. By modeling a document as a one-parameter family of graphs with its sentences or paragraphs defining the vertex set and with edges defined by Helmholtz's principle, we demonstrated that for some range of the parameters, the resulting graph becomes a small-world network. In this article we investigate the natural orientation of edges in such small world networks. For two connected sentences, we can say which one is the first and which one is the second, according to their position in a document. This will make such a graph look like a small WWW-type network and PageRank type algorithms will produce interesting ranking of nodes in such a document.

Balinsky, Helen; Balinsky, Alexander; Simske, Steven J.

2012-02-01

497

Social contagion theory: examining dynamic social networks and human behavior.  

PubMed

Here, we review the research we have conducted on social contagion. We describe the methods we have employed (and the assumptions they have entailed) to examine several datasets with complementary strengths and weaknesses, including the Framingham Heart Study, the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, and other observational and experimental datasets that we and others have collected. We describe the regularities that led us to propose that human social networks may exhibit a 'three degrees of influence' property, and we review statistical approaches we have used to characterize interpersonal influence with respect to phenomena as diverse as obesity, smoking, cooperation, and happiness. We do not claim that this work is the final word, but we do believe that it provides some novel, informative, and stimulating evidence regarding social contagion in longitudinally followed networks. Along with other scholars, we are working to develop new methods for identifying causal effects using social network data, and we believe that this area is ripe for statistical development as current methods have known and often unavoidable limitations. PMID:22711416

Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

2012-06-18

498

Who benefits from network analysis: ethics of social network research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The success of social network research (SNR) has led to expectations that in addition to academic research, SNR can introduce people to one another, solve organizational problems, map the epidemiology of AIDS, and catch criminals and terrorists. Since SNR requires that names of both respondents and their contacts be collected and used in most analyses, Institutional Review Boards become very

Charles Kadushin

2005-01-01

499

Understanding online social network usage from a network perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Online Social Networks (OSNs) have already attracted more than half a billion users. However, our understanding of which OSN fea- tures attract and keep the attention of these users is poor. S tudies thus far have relied on surveys or interviews of OSN users or fo- cused on static properties, e. g., the friendship graph, gat hered via sampled crawls.

Fabian Schneider; Anja Feldmann; Balachander Krishnamurthy; Walter Willinger

2009-01-01

500

Weighted Key Player Problem for Social Network Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Social network analysis is a tool set whose uses range from measuring the impact of marketing campaigns to disrupting clandestine terrorist organizations. Social network analysis tools are primarily focused on the structure of relationships between actors...

R. M. McGuire

2011-01-01