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1

Analytical Approaches and Applied Social Sciences.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The basic thesis of the paper is that some fusion between analytical approaches and social sciences is essential for successful application of either to social problems. Achievement of such a fusion is a difficult task, urgently requiring new teaching pro...

Y. Dror

1969-01-01

2

A Laboratory Approach for Social Science Teacher  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory technique for bridging the gap between cognitive and affective processes is reviewed---Richard and Mann's Exploring Social Space. Illustrations from the materials are given, some designed to help students explore theoretical controversies; others to deal with substantive social issues and problems. (Author/RF)

Richard ,Michael P.

1972-01-01

3

Interviewing for Education and Social Science Research: The Gateway Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume introduces a fresh approach to research, using strategies adapted from oral history and educational criticism to traverse the boundaries of human experience, and bring to light matters of concern to education and social science researchers. This narrator-centered method, a by-product of the author's award-winning investigation into the…

Mears, Carolyn Lunsford

2009-01-01

4

A Social Approach to Environmental Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an instructional unit designed to increase student awareness of environmental pollution and the difficulties involved in correcting the situation. Seventh grade science students collected local water samples, tested them, and reported significant pollution to state and federal authorities. Simulation game Dirty Water'' increased student…

Burke, Kevin

1973-01-01

5

Physics and social science - The approach of synergetics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Universally applicable methods originating in statistical physics and synergetics are combined with concepts from social science in order to set up and to apply a model construction concept for the quantitative description of a broad class of collective dynamical phenomena within society. Starting from the decisions of individuals and introducing the concept of dynamical utilities, probabilistic transition rates between attitudes and actions can be constructed. The latter enter the central equation of motion, i.e. the master equation, for the probability distribution over the possible macroconfigurations of society. From the master equation the equations of motion for the expectation values of the macrovariables of society can be derived. These equations are in general nonlinear. Their solutions may include stationary solutions, limit cycles and strange attractors, and with varying trend parameters also phase transitions between different modes of social behaviour can be described. The general model construction approach is subsequently applied to characteristic examples from different social sciences, such as sociology, demography, regional science and economics. These examples refer to collective political opinion formation, to interregional migration of interactive populations, to settlement formation on the micro-, meso- and macroscale, and to nonlinear nonequilibrium economics, including market instabilities.

Weidlich, Wolfgang

1991-05-01

6

A Social Construction Approach to Computer Science Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Computer science education research has mostly focused on cognitive approaches to learning. Cognitive approaches to understanding learning do not account for all the phenomena observed in teaching and learning. A number of apparently successful educational approaches, such as peer assessment, apprentice-based learning and action learning, have…

Machanick, Philip

2007-01-01

7

Theoretical and Methodological Approaches to Social Sciences and Knowledge Management  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This is a unique and groundbreaking collection of questions and answers coming from higher education institutions on diverse fields and across a wide spectrum of countries and cultures. It creates routes for further innovation, collaboration amidst the Sciences (both Natural and Social), the Humanities, and the private and public sectors of…

Lopez-Varela, Asuncion, Ed.

2012-01-01

8

Physics and social science - The approach of synergetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Universally applicable methods originating in statistical physics and synergetics are combined with concepts from social science in order to set up and to apply a model construction concept for the quantitative description of a broad class of collective dynamical phenomena within society. Starting from the decisions of individuals and introducing the concept of dynamical utilities, probabilistic transition rates between attitudes

Wolfgang Weidlich

1991-01-01

9

A social construction approach to computer science education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer science education research has mostly focused on cognitive approaches to learning. Cognitive ap- proaches to understanding learning do not account for all the phenomena observed in teaching and learning. A number of apparently successful educational approaches like peer assessment, apprentice-based learning and ac- tion learning have aspects which are not satisfactorily exp lained by purely cognitive models. On the

Philip Machanick

2007-01-01

10

Social Activism in Elementary Science Education: A Science, Technology, and Society Approach to Teach Global Warming  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As part of a large-scale instructional intervention research, this study examined elementary students' science knowledge and awareness of social activism with regard to an increased greenhouse effect and global warming. The study involved fifth-grade students from five elementary schools of varying demographic makeup in a large urban school…

Lester, Benjamin T.; Ma, Li; Lee, Okhee; Lambert, Julie

2006-01-01

11

A learning community approach to doctoral education in the social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper reports on the findings of a community learning approach to doctoral education involving scholarly writing groups (SWGs) which was developed and implemented in the context of a higher degree research programme within the social sciences in an Australian university. The research evaluated the impact of the teaching intervention on students’ perceptions of the community learning experience, their knowledge

Rachel Parker

2009-01-01

12

Interpretation and Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

James Bohman argues in his book, New Philosophy of Social Science ,t hat it is time to reconceptualize the social sciences and conclusively abandon any illusory aspirations to a unified methodological perspective that might have lingered since Hobbes sought to borrow one from classical mechanics. In addition, Bohman suggests that reflecting on the history of the social sciences and their

Johanna Meehan

1997-01-01

13

Social Science Metapolicy. Some Concepts and Applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper is based on theoretic work on the improvement of policymaking, on the integration of social science into policymaking, and on relations between social science and analytical decision approaches. Empirically and experimentally, it is based on som...

Y. Dror

1970-01-01

14

A Strategic Approach to Urban Research and Development: Social and Behavioral Science Considerations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Committee on Social and Behavioral Urban Research was asked to advise the Housing and Urban Development Department (HUD) on elements of its long-range research and development program (R & D). Federal, state, and local governments have had access to only small amounts of relevant social and behavioral science knowledge or small numbers of…

National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

15

Self-reference and predictive, normative and prescriptive approaches in applications of systems thinking in social sciences-(Survey)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cybernetics, systems thinking or systems theory, have been viewed as instruments of enhancing predictive, normative and prescriptive capabilities of the social sciences, beginning from microscale-management and ending with various reference to the global system. Descriptions, explanations and predictions achieved thanks to various systems ideas were also viewed as supportive for potential governance of social phenomena. The main aim of the paper is to examine what could be the possible applications of modern systems thinking in predictive, normative and prescriptive approaches in modern social sciences, beginning from management theory and ending with global studies. Attention is paid not only to ``classical'' mathematical systems models but also to the role of predictive, normative and prescriptive interpretations of analogies and metaphors associated with application of the classical (``first order cybernetics'') and modern (``second order cybernetics'', ``complexity theory'') systems thinking in social sciences. .

Mesjasz, Czes?aw

2000-05-01

16

Oregon Social Sciences Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The study of the social sciences includes: history, civics, geography, and economics to prepare students for responsible citizenship. The Oregon state standards for social sciences sets out common curriculum goals, content standards, information for Benchmark 1 (grade three), Benchmark 2 (grade five), Benchmark 3 (grade eight), and Certificate of…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

17

Oregon Social Sciences Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of the social sciences includes: history, civics, geography, and economics to prepare students for responsible citizenship. The Oregon state standards for social sciences sets out common curriculum goals, content standards, information for Benchmark 1 (grade three), Benchmark 2 (grade five), Benchmark 3 (grade eight), and Certificate of…

Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

18

An Inquiry-Based Mobile Learning Approach to Enhancing Social Science Learning Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study presents a mobile exploration activity that guides elementary students to learn during a social science activity with digital support from mobile devices and wireless communications. The students are situated in both the real world and the virtual world to extend their learning experiences. The learning activities between the field and…

Shih, Ju-Ling; Chuang, Chien-Wen; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

2010-01-01

19

Social Dynamics of Science  

PubMed Central

The birth and decline of disciplines are critical to science and society. How do scientific disciplines emerge? No quantitative model to date allows us to validate competing theories on the different roles of endogenous processes, such as social collaborations, and exogenous events, such as scientific discoveries. Here we propose an agent-based model in which the evolution of disciplines is guided mainly by social interactions among agents representing scientists. Disciplines emerge from splitting and merging of social communities in a collaboration network. We find that this social model can account for a number of stylized facts about the relationships between disciplines, scholars, and publications. These results provide strong quantitative support for the key role of social interactions in shaping the dynamics of science. While several “science of science” theories exist, this is the first account for the emergence of disciplines that is validated on the basis of empirical data.

Sun, Xiaoling; Kaur, Jasleen; Milojevic, Stasa; Flammini, Alessandro; Menczer, Filippo

2013-01-01

20

Social Dynamics of Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The birth and decline of disciplines are critical to science and society. How do scientific disciplines emerge? No quantitative model to date allows us to validate competing theories on the different roles of endogenous processes, such as social collaborations, and exogenous events, such as scientific discoveries. Here we propose an agent-based model in which the evolution of disciplines is guided mainly by social interactions among agents representing scientists. Disciplines emerge from splitting and merging of social communities in a collaboration network. We find that this social model can account for a number of stylized facts about the relationships between disciplines, scholars, and publications. These results provide strong quantitative support for the key role of social interactions in shaping the dynamics of science. While several ``science of science'' theories exist, this is the first account for the emergence of disciplines that is validated on the basis of empirical data.

Sun, Xiaoling; Kaur, Jasleen; Milojevi?, Staša; Flammini, Alessandro; Menczer, Filippo

2013-01-01

21

Reading Online News Media for Science Content: A Social Psychological Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reading multimodal (popularized) scientific texts is studied predominantly in terms of said-to-be-required technical decoding skills. In this article I suggest that there are other interesting approaches to studying the reading of multimodal (popularized) scientific texts, approaches that are grounded in social psychological concerns. These…

Roth, Wolff-Michael

2010-01-01

22

Reading Online News Media for Science Content: A Social Psychological Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reading multimodal (popularized) scientific texts is studied predominantly in terms of said-to-be-required technical decoding skills. In this article I suggest that there are other interesting approaches to studying the reading of multimodal (popularized) scientific texts, approaches that are grounded in social psychological concerns. These…

Roth, Wolff-Michael

2010-01-01

23

Reading Online News Media for Science Content: A Social Psychological Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reading multimodal (popularized) scientific texts is studied predominantly in terms of said-to-be-required technical decoding skills. In this article I suggest that there are other interesting approaches to studying the reading of multimodal (popularized) scientific texts, approaches that are grounded in social psychological concerns. These concerns include questions of what people read, how much they read, and the purposes and effects

Wolff-Michael Roth

2010-01-01

24

What is ‘social’ about social science?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a report on an Academy of Social Sciences debate held on 15 March 2006. The debate concerned the nature, character and development of the social sciences. Four leading social scientists were asked to reflect upon the nature of the social sciences in the light of various transformations in both intellectual thought and in those processes that seem to

John Urry; Robert Dingwall; Ian Gough; Paul Ormerod; Doreen Massey; John Scott; Nigel Thrift

2007-01-01

25

Translating Basic Behavioral and Social Science Research to Clinical Application: The EVOLVE Mixed Methods Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: To describe a mixed-methods approach to develop and test a basic behavioral science-informed intervention to motivate behavior change in 3 high-risk clinical populations. Our theoretically derived intervention comprised a combination of positive affect and self-affirmation (PA/SA), which we applied to 3 clinical chronic disease…

Peterson, Janey C.; Czajkowski, Susan; Charlson, Mary E.; Link, Alissa R.; Wells, Martin T.; Isen, Alice M.; Mancuso, Carol A.; Allegrante, John P.; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Jobe, Jared B.

2013-01-01

26

Linking Law and Social Studies, Grades 9-12: An Interdisciplinary Approach with Social Studies, Science and Language Arts.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This curriculum guide offers an interdisciplinary approach to law-related education (LRE) intended to assist teachers with introducing LRE into a variety of social studies courses. The guide begins with a definition of LRE, its objectives and methods, and its place in the general school curriculum. The introductory section includes a description…

Armancas-Fisher, Margaret; And Others

27

Science and Social Practice: Action Research and Activity Theory as Socio-Critical Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Action research and activity theory are considered by a number of followers as socio-critical approaches, whereas others do not relate them to social-criticism and use them merely as methods to improve practice. This article searches for general insights in Kurt Lewin's and Lev S. Vygotsky's work into how one proceeds and acts critically. In their…

Langemeyer, Ines

2011-01-01

28

Science and Social Practice: Action Research and Activity Theory as Socio-Critical Approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Action research and activity theory are considered by a number of followers as socio-critical approaches, whereas others do not relate them to social-criticism and use them merely as methods to improve practice. This article searches for general insights in Kurt Lewin's and Lev S. Vygotsky's work into how one proceeds and acts critically. In their methodological writings, different levels of

Ines Langemeyer

2011-01-01

29

Science and Social Practice: Action Research and Activity Theory as Socio-Critical Approaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Action research and activity theory are considered by a number of followers as socio-critical approaches, whereas others do not relate them to social-criticism and use them merely as methods to improve practice. This article searches for general insights in Kurt Lewin's and Lev S. Vygotsky's work into how one proceeds and acts critically. In…

Langemeyer, Ines

2011-01-01

30

Preserving the Whole: A Two-Track Approach to Rescuing Social Science Data and Metadata  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"Preserving the Whole appears as the second publication of the Digital Library Federation and reflects the Federation's interests both in advancing the state of the art of social science data archives and in building the infrastructure necessary for the long-term maintenance of digital information." This 53-page report, published this month, considers migration as a preservation strategy for data currently stored in obsolete technical or deteriorating textual formats and offers conclusions regarding the importance of maintaining file format codebooks and the usefulness of the technically obsolete column binary format in terms of migration and recovery strategies.

Dennis, Martin.; Dionne, Joann.; Green, Ann

2005-11-01

31

Social Implications of Social Science Data Archives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The recent development of large-scale collections of information relevant to the social sciences (commonly referred to as 'social science data archives') is significant for society as well as for the social sciences. It is the purpose of this paper to des...

D. K. Stewart

1967-01-01

32

[Social psychiatry as a social science].  

PubMed

Social Psychiatry mostly is perceived as social epidemiology. But other branches of sociology and social psychology have influenced its history as well, e.g. family sociology and the sociology of institutions. Recently, research in family milieu and social environment has gained some importance. It is demonstrated how research in social psychiatry follows developments in other social sciences. PMID:2447640

Finzen, A

1987-01-01

33

Social Science Information Gateway  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located within the Institute for Learning and Research Technology at the University of Bristol, the Social Science Information Gateway (SOSIG) is an online database of high quality Internet resources that primarily deal with the vast array of social science fields and subfields. Visitors can perform a simple search, or browse through the subject headings offered on the homepage. Each one of these discrete sites has been catalogued and annotated, making it easier to find specific resources quickly. Within each field or subfield, the editors of SOSIG have also listed some of their top choices. One particularly fine feature of the site is the "Grapevine", which offers a place for people in the social sciences to find out (and publicize) information about career opportunities and upcoming events. Visitors can also post their vitas in order to facilitate such opportunities. Finally, it is worth noting that the coverage of events and the like here is particularly strong for the United Kingdom and continental Europe.

2005-11-02

34

Quantitative social science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

General concepts for the quantitative description of the dynamics of social processes are introduced. They allow for embedding social science into the conceptual framework of synergetics. Equations of motion for the socioconfiguration are derived on the stochastic and quasideterministic level. As an application the migration of interacting human populations is treated. The solutions of the nonlinear migratory equations include limit cycles and strange attractors. The empiric evaluation of interregional migratory dynamics is exemplified in the case of Germany.

Weidlich, W.

1987-03-01

35

Social Relations of Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSENCE abroad has prevented me from responding sooner and expressing, as invited, an opinion on the proposals in the article entitled ``Social Relations of Science'' printed in NATURE of April 23. Though to me they come too late and too tainted with officialdom and regimentation to appear to be much more than a wish to be in at the shouting,

Frederick Soddy

1938-01-01

36

Designing and Evaluating Science Teaching Sequences: An Approach Drawing upon the Concept of Learning Demand and a Social Constructivist Perspective on Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviews evidence on the effectiveness of "sequence of teaching activities" on student learning and the design and evaluation of science teaching sequences. Discusses the social constructivist perspective on learning and offers a generalized approach to planning a science teaching sequence. Provides an example of how to plan an instructional…

Leach, John; Scott, Phil

2002-01-01

37

SOCIAL SCIENCE, SOCIAL WORK AND PHARMACY  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an effort to make pharmacy a more patient oriented health profession, pharmacy students at the University of Pittsburgh are required to take a course entitled, Social Sciences in Pharmacy. Besides drawing from the diverse social and behavioral sciences this course also includes material from the field of social work. This article describes the course and the students' reactions to

John H. Kilwein; William T. Hall; Gerald C. St. Denis

1976-01-01

38

Social Sciences Gateways and Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Social Sciences Gateways and Resources collection is comprised of web portals, web sites, and individual digital resources devoted to the interplay of science and the social realm, as well as social-science materials that draw heavily upon or are closely related to the life sciences, physical sciences, mathematics, and/or technology: for example, archaeology, physical anthropology, economics, human geography, linguistics, and psychology. Here may be found materials for educators and learners (early childhood through graduate school), resources intended for the general public, and materials aimed at research communities at the nexus of the social, physical, and life sciences.

2008-03-14

39

Opportunities in Social Science Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The opportunities for social science research change with developments in policy and social science, conservation biology,\\u000a and ecological theory; population dynamics, quantitative methods, laws and current management or governance practices; industry\\u000a operating procedures, social values, institutional change, and funding. This paper identifies opportunities for future social\\u000a science research, and economics in particular, due to developments in economic theory and the

Dale Squires

40

Behavioral Sciences in Secondary Schools: An Inquiry-Oriented Interdisciplinary Approach to the Human Behavioral Sciences in Social Studies. Professional Education Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Trends in secondary-level behavioral science curriculum development, informational background, and strategies for teaching behavioral science concepts are provided in this book. Chapters one through three define the behavioral sciences and examine their changing role and status in social studies education. Chapters four through six develop…

Anderson, Randall C.

41

Social Sciences Framework 1974: Third Time's a Charm  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The author presents the third framework for social sciences curriculum to circulate in California since 1968. Goals are presented for a K-12 social science program which utilizes an interdisciplinary approach and a process-oriented curriculum. (HMD)|

Wampler, Dave

1974-01-01

42

Social science and the Courts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social scientists have increasingly become involved in the submission of amicus curiae or “friend of the court” briefs in legal cases being decided by state and federal courts. This increase has triggered considerable debate about the use of briefs to communicate relevant social science research. This article evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of various methods of summarizing social science research

Ronald Roesch; Stephen L. Golding; Valerie P. Hans; N. Dickon Reppucci

1991-01-01

43

Social Science for a Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication is a collection of social science research and statistical techniques that can help win civil rights court cases. Articles included are: (1) "A Lawyer Looks at Social Science in the Courts"; (2) "How Social Scientists and Lawyers Can Work Together"; (3) "The Nature of Statistics and Research as Used in Civil Rights Litigation";…

Loewen, James W.; And Others

1979-01-01

44

Social Science and Institutional Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|With the growth of the social sciences, there has been increasing interest in use of their products to shed light on, and solve, some of the pressing social problems of our society. This monograph, the first in a series of studies on social change, reports on an analysis of applications of social change theory and research to programs of…

Mayer, Robert R.

45

Social Science Research Council  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded in 1923 (and last reviewed by the Scout Report on November 3, 1998), the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) is an independent non-profit organization with ongoing research projects on every continent, most of which are designed to encourage innovation and to help social scientists engage broader constituencies. Some of the council's key interests include children and armed conflict, economic growth, international migration, and global security and cooperation. From the website, visitors can learn about the most recent project initiatives, which include the initiative on HIV / AIDS, social transformation and emergencies, and humanitarian action. Along with these recent initiatives, visitors may also read about the 30 thematic programs, which are organized into five broad program areas. Graduate students coming to the site will want to definitely take a look at the many fellowship and dissertation funding opportunities offered by the SSRC. Visitors may also browse through the SSRC quarterly publication, Items & Issues, which features essays, roundtables, and other writings by participants in SSRC-sponsored programs.

46

Communicating science in social settings  

PubMed Central

This essay examines the societal dynamics surrounding modern science. It first discusses a number of challenges facing any effort to communicate science in social environments: lay publics with varying levels of preparedness for fully understanding new scientific breakthroughs; the deterioration of traditional media infrastructures; and an increasingly complex set of emerging technologies that are surrounded by a host of ethical, legal, and social considerations. Based on this overview, I discuss four areas in which empirical social science helps clarify intuitive but sometimes faulty assumptions about the social-level mechanisms of science communication and outline an agenda for bench and social scientists—driven by current social-scientific research in the field of science communication—to guide more effective communication efforts at the societal level in the future.

Scheufele, Dietram A.

2013-01-01

47

The Social Sciences as a Domain of Knowledge.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author claims that the nature of the social sciences is to combine interpretive and empirical approaches in an attempt to understand human thought and behavior. He views the domain of social sciences as being different from that of the humanities or the natural sciences. Social scientists test interpretations by considering the extent to which…

Armstrong, Forrest H.

48

The Sociology of Language: An Interdisciplinary Social Science Approach to Language in Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text on the sociology of language, hear defines as "...a focus upon the entire gamut of topics related to the social organization of language behavior," lays the groundwork for the theoretical development of this emerging branch of linguistics. The author proposes that sociolinguists investigate everything concerned with language from the…

Fishman, Joshua A.

49

Inquiring Into Iran: A Case Study Approach to the Social Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author suggests contemporary Iran as an excellent subject for a case study in secondary social studies. He considers some of the issues which students might analyze: journalistic bias toward Iran, pluralism in Iranian society and Islam, sociopolitical factors which affect modernizing nations, and the causes of revolution. (SJL)

Pellicano, Roy R.

1980-01-01

50

Marketing the Social Sciences Ethically.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social sciences in the community college are at a critical point in their history and development. Except for a few statistical aberrations, enrollment in the social sciences and humanities is declining significantly. The idea of marketing a segment of a college's or university's offerings, particularly when it is not tied to a particular problem…

Clavner, Jerry B.

51

From Artificial Societies to New Social Science Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

We identify two distinct themes in social science modelling. One, more specific, approach is that of social simulation which addresses how behaviour of many actors can lead to emergent effects. We argue that this approach, while useful as a tool in social science policy devel- opment, is fundamentally constrained due to the fact that its models are developed within the

Eric Silverman; John Bryden

2007-01-01

52

Democratizing Science Through Social Science Research Partnerships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Science and technology, as rational approaches to problem solving, are driving forces in the promotion of democracy at home and abroad. Science based decision-making is increasingly global as countries share technology, research results, and engage in joint studies on common problems. The widening rift between global wealth and poverty diminishes for many the opportunity for exposure to science, technology and

Jean J. Schensul

2002-01-01

53

Science, Semantics, and Social Change.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social semiotics suggests that social and cultural formations, including the language and practice of science and the ways in which new generations and communities advance them, develop as an integral part of the evolution of social ecosystems. Some recent models of complex dynamic systems in physics, chemistry, and biology focus more on the…

Lemke, J. L.

54

Response: Social Work, Science, Social Impact--Crafting an Integrative Conversation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Shifts in the ways that science is being undertaken and marshaled toward social change argue for a new kind of professional competence. Taking the view that the science of social work is centrally about the relationship of research to social impact, the authors extend Fong's focus on transdisciplinary and translational approaches to science,…

Nurius, Paula S.; Kemp, Susan P.

2012-01-01

55

Social Science Research Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Provided by Social Science Electronic Publishing (SSEP), this site allows users to freely access thousands of abstracts and full-text research papers. The core of the site is the SSRN Electronic Library, which contains an Abstract Database with over 15,600 entries and an Electronic Paper Collection, which currently contains over 4,200 full-text papers. Users can search title, abstract, and author fields, or browse the journals, which are grouped under the five respective Research Networks that form the SSRN: Accounting, Economics, Latin American, Financial, and Legal Scholarship. Within each journal entry, users may select from several display options to narrow their results and available full-text documents are indicated by a special symbol. Information on each of the five networks, including conference and job announcements, as well as information on subscribing and a list of site licenses, is accessible via a menu panel on the left side of the main page. According to SSEP, access to the abstracts and full-text papers will remain free of charge to all users until "the next revision to the web site this winter."

56

Mixed Methods Approaches in Family Science Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complex phenomena of interest to family scientists require the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Researchers across the social sciences are now turning to mixed methods designs that combine these two approaches. Mixed methods research has great promise for addressing family science topics, but only if researchers understand the design options and procedures that accompany this methodological choice. Discussions

Vicki L. Plano Clark; Catherine A. Huddleston-Casas; Susan L. Churchill; Denise ONeil Green; Amanda L. Garrett

2008-01-01

57

Mixed Methods Approaches in Family Science Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The complex phenomena of interest to family scientists require the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches. Researchers across the social sciences are now turning to mixed methods designs that combine these two approaches. Mixed methods research has great promise for addressing family science topics, but only if researchers understand the…

Plano Clark, Vicki L.; Huddleston-Casas, Catherine A.; Churchill, Susan L.; Green, Denise O'Neil; Garrett, Amanda L.

2008-01-01

58

Communications, Social Science, and Humanities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|After researching NASSP's clearinghouse of information on exemplary programs, the writers present a synthesis of instructional strategies and curricular modalities in communications, social science, and humanities. Schools identified are listed at the end of the article. (Editor)|

Brown, Mary S.; Brown, Beverly L.

1974-01-01

59

Creativity: A social approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early thinking in the modern era often regarded creativity as a somewhat asocial means of individual expression, self?realization, and self?fulfillment. However, it also is a socially influenced phenomenon that serves society. A social approach offers the opportunity of distinguishing between large and small amounts of novelty, as well as between “orthodox” and “radical” novelty. Disciplines, teachers, and students differ from

Arthur Cropley

2006-01-01

60

Integration of the biophysical and social sciences using an indicator approach: Addressing water problems at different scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

To be operationally sustainable, any system of environmental management needs to be based on a truly holistic assessment of\\u000a all of the relevant factors influencing it. This is of course a daunting task, demanding as it does detailed and reliable\\u000a data, not only from both the physical and social sciences, but also incorporating some representation of that part of knowledge

Caroline A. Sullivan; Jeremy R Meigh

2007-01-01

61

Optimal Matching and Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This working paper is a reflection on the conditions required to use optimal matching (OM) in social sciences. Despite its striking success in biology, optimal matching was not invented to solve biological questions but computer science ones: OM is a family of distance concepts originating in information and coding theory were it is known under various names among which Hamming,

Laurent Lesnard

2006-01-01

62

Science, technology, and social achievement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Science and technology have had a demonstrably beneficial effect on the quality of individual life in industrialized countries, but the impact on institutional social progress has been less, and maybe even negative. The positive aspects include improvements in health, nutrition, productivity, and a corresponding enrichment of individual lives. Positive social progress has included the change of women and minorities from

Handler

1979-01-01

63

Social science and system design: interdisciplinary collaborations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contributions from the behavioral sciences to the design of computer systems have come primarily from psychology, and have focused on individual cognition. In this symposium, we consider the applicability to system design of approaches that focus on social interaction. The participants comprise pairs of researchers engaged in projects that aim to bring together systematic studies of naturally occurring human activities

Lucy Suchman; William Beeman; Michael Pear; Barbara Fox; Paul Smolensky

1986-01-01

64

Validity and Reliability in Social Science Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this paper, the author aims to provide novice researchers with an understanding of the general problem of validity in social science research and to acquaint them with approaches to developing strong support for the validity of their research. She provides insight into these two important concepts, namely (1) validity; and (2) reliability, and…

Drost, Ellen A.

2011-01-01

65

Time representations in social science  

PubMed Central

Time has long been a major topic of study in social science, as in other sciences or in philosophy. Social scientists have tended to focus on collective representations of time, and on the ways in which these representations shape our everyday experiences. This contribution addresses work from such disciplines as anthropology, sociology and history. It focuses on several of the main theories that have preoccupied specialists in social science, such as the alleged “acceleration” of life and overgrowth of the present in contemporary Western societies, or the distinction between so-called linear and circular conceptions of time. The presentation of these theories is accompanied by some of the critiques they have provoked, in order to enable the reader to form her or his own opinion of them.

Schulz, Yvan

2012-01-01

66

Values, Wellness and the Social Sciences Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Recent initiatives in values education in Australia emphasise the importance of the process of valuing and general methodologies\\u000a that foster this in the classroom. Although a range of strategies are available, this chapter argues that inquiry-based approaches\\u000a in the Social Sciences play a significant role in linking valuing processes with decision-making skills. Collectively, these\\u000a approaches prompt the development of reasoning

Deborah Henderson

67

The future in the social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

How the social sciences conceptualize the future depends in varying measure upon intellectual developments within these sciences, upon competition versus cooperation between them, and upon changes in the surrounding society that alter the role of social science. This article notes that social science has matured into a set of somewhat static disciplines that do not expect to grow rapidly as

W. S. Bainbridge

2003-01-01

68

Science and Social Justice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author was born and raised in rural, northern Mississippi. He went to a local school, the North Pontotoc Attendance Center, from first grade on. The author was always interested in math and science, but, then, he was interested in most all subjects. The expected path that his friends and siblings had followed was clear: attend a junior college…

Gill, Kohl S.

2008-01-01

69

Repositioning social science in natural hazards research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The classical view of social science held by the scientific natural hazards community is that social science is needed in two possible ways: (1) to help with the communication of understanding of natural hazards, grounded in an assumed knowledge deficit or the ‘deficit model' in which it is ‘the public that are assumed to be "deficient", while science is "sufficient" ' (Sturgis and Allum, 2004); or (2) to develop the policy changes needed to address the implications of natural hazards research for human populations. In both of these, social science becomes bolted on to natural hazards research, rather than fully integrated through the research process. In this paper, and using the example of flood risk management, I will show that these two approaches are fundamentally flawed, requiring a radical reformulation of the relationship between natural science and social science, grounded in new interdisciplinary ways of working. My argument has two directions. The first will demonstrate why the reformulation is needed, based upon changing societal expectations over entitlement to scientific knowledge (e.g. Freedom of Information), as well as new emphases on digital dissemination and access to scientists and scientific findings. Taken together, I will present evidence that these drivers are enabling those who live with natural hazards to become much more involved in challenging the assumptions and methods of hazards researchers. Natural hazards research is now subject to much more vociferous scrutiny. The second direction will illustrate how we have responded to this by developing new interdisciplinary ways of doing natural hazards research in which social science methods and public involvement are embedded throughout the research process, from the beginning, during project formulation and framing, through to the end, during delivery of solutions. Rather than public involvement becoming a hindrance to delivering better flood risk management, I will show that the integration of both conventional scientific knowledge with lay or vernacular knowledge, throughout the research process, produces risk management solutions that are more sustainable and more realistic than those that have been attempted before.

Lane, S. N.

2009-04-01

70

The Business of Social Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Asserts that the social science business is here to stay. The use of survey research, of invoking the learned as a form of symbolic action, of obfuscating the realities of limited budget and limited throughput and limited drive by "researching the problem," all provide a flywheel that shows every sign not merely of stability but of acceleration.…

Sternlieb, George

1977-01-01

71

Volunteers and volunteering in leisure: social science perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Leisure has been widely examined within the context of social science theory. This article adopts a broad approach, examining a range of social science disciplines and applying them to specific phenomena located within the leisure field, namely, volunteers and volunteering in leisure settings. In a disciplinary sense, the sociological view focuses upon the conceptualisation of volunteering as leisure, the psychological

Kirsten Holmes; Karen Smith; Tom Baum

2010-01-01

72

Gaga over Google? Scholar in the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – To provide a summary of the main features of Google Scholar. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Reviews, contextualizes and provides a summary of Google Scholar. Findings – This article compares the results of a sample search on “homeschooling in Google Scholar against the results in three fee-based article index databases in the social sciences: PsycINFO, Social Science Citation Index, and ERIC.

Susan Gardner; Susanna Eng

2005-01-01

73

History & Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history, psychology and sociology programs enhance the writing, speaking, critical thinking and problem solving skills that are adaptable to a wide range of occupational pursuits. We teach a Christian philosophy of history, taking a lineal approach that history has a definite beginning with creation and ends when Christ returns to establish His kingdom upon earth. We teach that God

Brenda King

74

The Government's Growing Recognition of Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Important new developments have strengthened the standing of the social sciences in the federal government. Historical analysis emphasizes the recency of the government's recognition of the national contributions of social science re search. Significant progress has been made despite critical fluctuations. Five factors contributing to the more favored governmental position of social science research are (1) chang ing congressional attitudes;

Harry Alpert

1960-01-01

75

The ICPSR and Social Science Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), a unit within the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, is the world's largest social science data archive. The data sets in the ICPRS database give the social sciences librarian/subject specialist an opportunity of providing value-added…

Johnson, Wendell G.

2008-01-01

76

Science, Society, and Social Networking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increased use of social networking is changing the way that scientific societies interact with their members and others. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) uses a variety of online networks to engage its members and the broader scientific community. AAAS members and non-members can interact with AAAS staff and each other on AAAS sites on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, as well as blogs and forums on the AAAS website (www.aaas.org). These tools allow scientists to more readily become engaged in policy by providing information on current science policy topics as well as methods of involvement. For example, members and the public can comment on policy-relevant stories from Science magazine’s ScienceInsider blog, download a weekly policy podcast, receive a weekly email update of policy issues affecting the scientific community, or watch a congressional hearing from their computer. AAAS resource websites and outreach programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/) and Science Careers (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org) also provide tools for scientists to become more personally engaged in communicating their findings and involved in the policy process.

White, K. S.; Lohwater, T.

2009-12-01

77

Animal welfare science—Working at the interface between the natural and social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Animal welfare science has pioneered in interdisciplinary work in many ways. However, this work has mainly taken place among researchers from the natural sciences. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of using broad interdisciplinary approaches to scientific animal welfare questions, including collaboration between the natural and social sciences. The word “interdisciplinary” has been interpreted in various ways; we discuss

Vonne Lund; Grahame Coleman; Stefan Gunnarsson; Michael Calvert Appleby; Katri Karkinen

2006-01-01

78

Girls, science and epistemology: A societal approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the ways in which girls' personal epistemologies are applied and modulated in relationship with scientific disciplinary epistemology in the context of their early science learning. The research takes a societal approach, assuming that both girls' reasoning and scientific disciplinary epistemology are socially constituted, emphasizing the role of gendered discourses, realities and experiences in the construction of girls'

Jennifer M. Arner Welsh

2010-01-01

79

The Four Literatures of Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter reviews bibliometric studies of the social sciences and humanities. SSCI bibliometrics will work reasonably well in economics and psychology, whose literatures share many characteristics with science, and less well in sociology, characterised by a typical social science literature. The premise of the chapter is that quantitative evaluation of research output faces severe methodological difficulties in fields whose literature

Diana Hicks

80

Geography: Information Visualization in the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review of scientific visualization in the social sciences contains an extensive review of recent lit - erature and Internet sources on visualization and discusses the extent to which four key visualization technologies—the World Wide Web, multimedia, virtual reality, and computer graphics—are preva- lent in the different social sciences. The review includes examples taken from political science, psy - chology,

SCOTT ORFORD; RICHARD HARRIS; DANIEL DORLING

1999-01-01

81

FUNCTIONAL EXPLANATION AND EVOLUTIONARY SOCIAL SCIENCE  

Microsoft Academic Search

From their conception to the present, the social sciences have invoked a kind of explanation that looks suspect by the standards of the natural sciences. They explain why social practices exist by reference to the purpose or needs they serve. Yet the purposes invoked are generally not the explicit purposes or needs of any individual but of society or social

Harold Kincaid

82

Genomics and social science : Issues and priorities  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay examines the issues that the ongoing revolution in biosciences and biotechnology pose to social science. A convenient frame for examining these issues is the framework of “thematic priorities” established by the British funding agency for social science, the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). These “thematic priorities” are used to identify major challenges and opportunities that currently confront

Mark Harvey; Andrew McMeekin; Ian Miles

2002-01-01

83

Against rigid boundaries in social science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods, volumes and aims of social science education still remain remarkably consistent from one German university to another. If the social sciences, especially economics, are to gain greater social relevance and acceptance, researchers must not only relate to the broader public, but also promote intercourse within the ivory tower itself. The latter process has been under way successfully for a

Tim Engartner

2009-01-01

84

Social Sciences and Dentistry: A Critical Bibliography.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This bibliographic review of social sciences studies in the field of dentistry is a result of the collaboration of dentists and social and behavioral scientists who volunteered manuscripts to the Commission on Dental Practice of the Federation Dentaire Internationale. The manuscript topics include: (1) social science research on the dental…

Richards, N. David, Ed.; Cohen Lois K., Ed.

85

NTIS as a Social Science Resource.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traces history of National Technical Information Service (NTIS), charting growth into social science information resource. Acquisition criteria and sources of social science information processed by NTIS, indexing practices and subject classifications of interest to social scientists, and relationships between NTIS and Government Printing Office…

Smith, Ruth S.

1983-01-01

86

Evolutionary Theories in Social Sciences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With the stated mission of serving "as the premier information site for scholars interested in evolutionary thought in the social sciences," this site offers materials relating to a broad interdisciplinary field that includes sociobiology, management, evolutionary biology, business history, anthropology, and even mathematics and engineering, among others. The site includes an extensive, discipline-indexed bibliography, book reviews (with authorial replies), abstracts of working papers, a discussion list, conference and symposium news, a listing of researchers with contact information, a listing of links to relevant print and e-journals, and PhD syllabi, including links to course texts from the Kellogg School of Management and the European Doctoral Training Programme on the Economics of Technological and Institutional Change. Note: authors may be contacted through the site for copies of working papers (there is no mention of a fee for these copies). The site is maintained by two social scientists from Northwestern University, Johann Peter Murmann and Joe Fleischhacker.

2005-11-07

87

Archaeology as a social science  

PubMed Central

Because of advances in methods and theory, archaeology now addresses issues central to debates in the social sciences in a far more sophisticated manner than ever before. Coupled with methodological innovations, multiscalar archaeological studies around the world have produced a wealth of new data that provide a unique perspective on long-term changes in human societies, as they document variation in human behavior and institutions before the modern era. We illustrate these points with three examples: changes in human settlements, the roles of markets and states in deep history, and changes in standards of living. Alternative pathways toward complexity suggest how common processes may operate under contrasting ecologies, populations, and economic integration.

Smith, Michael E.; Feinman, Gary M.; Drennan, Robert D.; Earle, Timothy; Morris, Ian

2012-01-01

88

Issues in Social Science Decision-Making.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report summarizes the activities associated with a conference devoted to the methodological grounds for reaching decisions in social science. Eighteen social scientists participated in a two-day seminar devoted to an examination of the procedures rece...

R. J. Hill

1968-01-01

89

Fire Social Science Research: Selected Highlights.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Forest Service Research and Development has a long-standing component of social fire science that since 2000 has expanded significantly. Much of this new work focuses on research that will increase understanding of the social and economic issues connected...

A. Gonzalez-Caban A. Watson E. Mercer R. W. Haynes S. McCaffrey

2007-01-01

90

The financial crisis and the failure of modern social science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The aim of this paper is to explore the lessons offered by the financial crisis about the appropriate epistemological approaches to apply in the study of human affairs in general, and of the financial markets in particular. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper applies a qualitative and historical approach invoking debates in the philosophy of social science to dominant themes

George Bragues

2011-01-01

91

Network Analysis in the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last decade, there has been an explosion of interest in network research across the physical and social sciences. For social scientists, the theory of networks has been a goldmine, yielding explanations for social phenomena in a wide variety of disciplines from psychology to economics. In this essay, we review the kinds of things that social scientists have tried

Stephen P. Borgatti; Ajay Mehra; Daniel J. Brass; Giuseppe Labianca

2009-01-01

92

Social Work and the Behavioral Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between social work and medical sociology is analyzed, utilizing case studies of an academic institution, Harvard University, and a private foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation. Both strongly supported social work during the first decades of the twentieth century, and both changed their focus to social science. Why this change occurred, and its implications for social work and the

Samuel W. Bloom

2000-01-01

93

Social learning analytics: five approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes that Social Learning Analytics (SLA) can be usefully thought of as a subset of learning analytics approaches. SLA focuses on how learners build knowledge together in their cultural and social settings. In the context of online social learning, it takes into account both formal and informal educational environments, including networks and communities. The paper introduces the broad

Rebecca Ferguson; Simon Buckingham Shum

2012-01-01

94

Reading Foucault: Genealogy and Social Science Research Methodology and Ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foucault's work has given rise to an increased methodological sensitivity of the political dangers associated with traditional qualitative approaches in the social sciences. There is a growing awareness that the widespread use of the research interview is not indicative of a deepening insight into the workings of culture, but is part of a broader social technology for its reproduction. In

Wendy Bastalich

2009-01-01

95

Teaching Science with the Social Studies of Science for Equity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Integrating the social studies of science into science education would make explicit the cultures of science, which have been revealed by historians, philosophers, sociologists, and feminist science scholars. These cultures include the institutions of science, the interaction of science and the society in which it is practiced, and the internal culture of science. This pedagogy may be a route to increasing equity in science, by giving women and members of other under-represented groups an appreciation of the factors causing their alienation from the enterprise and the tools to change science for social justice. In this article, I present the theoretical basis of this position, along with the implementation strategies and preliminary assessment for a sophomore level biology course based on this perspective.

Lederman, Muriel

96

Sound science or social hook—a response to Brooker’s application of the focal species approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Brooker [Landscape and Urban Planning, in press] recently published a worked example of the focal species approach using bird assemblages in fragmented landscapes of western Australia. We have some concerns about the scientific validity of the focal species approach. As a threat-based biodiversity surrogate scheme, the focal species approach is likely to suffer from similar deficiencies that have been identified

D. B. Lindenmayer; J. Fischer

2003-01-01

97

Feminist Criticism of the Social Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the feminist criticism of the content, method, and purpose of knowledge about women as defined by the social sciences, and offers a dialectical alternative to conventional analyses. Argues that social science concentrates on the distortion and misinterpretation of women's experience. (CT)|

Westkott, Marcia

1979-01-01

98

Reintegrating the Social Sciences: The Dahlem Group  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social science disciplines see themselves as distinct, with their own territory, their own methods, and their own framework. Within such an environment multidisciplinary work involves enormous conflict and translation problems. This situation is no longer acceptable. Dealing with modern problems requires researchers with broad transdisciplinary knowledge and with the ability to communicate with other social science researchers in a way

David Colander; Roland Kupers; Thomas Lux; Casey Rothschild

2010-01-01

99

Social Science Research Serving Rural America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of articles provides an overview of some of the recent social science research projects performed by state agricultural experiment stations. The examples highlight social science's contribution to problem-solving in rural business, industry, farming, communities, government, education, and families. The following programs are…

Miron, Mary, Ed.

100

Mechanistic Explanations in the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two new concepts have recently made their way into the theoretical market of the social sciences: the concept of mechanism and that of sociological machine. This article offers an analysis of the concept of mechanism and suggests that in itself it is insufficient to rebuild current practice in the social sciences. It then discusses the complementary notion of sociological machine

Diego Rios

2004-01-01

101

Social science in the Cold War.  

PubMed

This essay examines ways in which American social science in the late twentieth century was--and was not--a creature of the Cold War. It identifies important work by historians that calls into question the assumption that all social science during the Cold War amounts to "Cold War social science." These historians attribute significant agency to social scientists, showing how they were enmeshed in both long-running disciplinary discussions and new institutional environments. Key trends in this scholarship include a broadening historical perspective to see social scientists in the Cold War as responding to the ideas of their scholarly predecessors; identifying the institutional legacies of World War II; and examining in close detail the products of extramural--especially governmental--funding. The result is a view of social science in the Cold War in which national security concerns are relevant, but with varied and often unexpected impacts on intellectual life. PMID:20718280

Engerman, David C

2010-06-01

102

Science In a Social CONtext: Teacher's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

Addinell, Sue, Comp.; Solomon, Joan, Comp.

103

A Complexity Science Model of Social Innovation in Social Enterprise  

Microsoft Academic Search

A complexity science-based model for social innovation in social enterprises is presented. The three components of the model include: (1) representing the evolution of social innovation using nonlinear dynamical systems with accompanying parameters and attractors; (2) a cusp catastrophe model of bifurcation or the emergence of a new attractor; (3) the role of emergence in complex systems utilizing recombinatory operations.

Jeffrey Goldstein; James K. Hazy; Joyce Silberstang

2010-01-01

104

Agent-Based Computational Models and Generative Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Agent-based computational modeling is changing the face of social science. In Generative Social Science, Joshua Epstein argues that this powerful, novel technique permits the social sciences to meet a fundamentally new standard of explanation, in which one \\

Joshua M. Epstein

1999-01-01

105

Ecogender: Locating Gender in Environmental Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecofeminism contends that there are important interconnections between the domination of women and the domination of the environment, a perspective that might be expected to attract the interest of environmental social scientists. However, environmental social scientists have largely ignored ecofeminism, despite feminism's increasing incorporation in general social science. This may be attributed to the common contention that ecofeminism suffers from

Damayanti Banerjee; Michael Mayerfeld Bell

2007-01-01

106

Trimodernism and Social Sciences: A Note  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The issues of premodern, modern, and postmodern can often confuse the social scientists because so much is drawn from modernism as the foundation of the social methodologies. Briefly, the author would like to differentiate the three modernism philosophies and indicate how a coalition of the three may apply to social sciences.|

Snell, Joel C.

2012-01-01

107

Contributions of social science to innovation and productivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Argues that the current debate on national productivity and innovation has largely ignored the contributions of social science. In the present article, 3 trends and developments are considered: social science as a decision aid, social science as a source of social technology, and social science as a tool for understanding innovation and productivity. Major inhibiting factors in the use of

Louis G Tornatzky

1982-01-01

108

Sea Changes in Social Science Education: Woods Hole 2000. The Social Science Education Consortium Conference Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The agenda for the Social Science Education Consortium conference at Woods Hole (Massachusetts) was designed to continue a tradition of examining scholarship relative to the social sciences in K-12 education. The content focus for this volume, is political science, economics, and sociology. Following a "Foreword" (Matthew T. Downey; Joseph P.…

White, Charles S., Ed.

109

Drugs, sex and social science: Social science research and health policy in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social science health research in Australia has undergone considerable expansion through government sponsorship of projects that complement or address issues related directly to policy and program concerns. In examining the rationale for supporting social science research, and the difficulties that social scientists often face in return in presenting their work in ways that might optimize funding, the paper first explores

Lenore Manderson

1994-01-01

110

Putting Social Sciences to the Test - Assignments  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The course is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them.

Mit

111

Predictive Non-Equilibrium Social Science.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Non-Equilibrium Social Science (NESS) emphasizes dynamical phenomena, for instance the way political movements emerge or competing organizations interact. This paper argues that predictive analysis is an essential element of NESS, occupying a central role...

C. Johnson K. Glass R. Colbaugh

2012-01-01

112

Artificial societies and generative social science  

Microsoft Academic Search

What is anartificial society? What can such models offer the social sciences in particular? We address these general questions, drawing brief illustrations\\u000a from the specific artificial society we call “Sugarscape.”

Joshua M. Epstein; Robert Axtell

1997-01-01

113

Infobright for Analyzing Social Sciences Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are considerable challenges in analyzing, interpreting, and reporting word-based social sciences data. Infobright data\\u000a warehousing technology was used to analyze a typical data set from the social sciences. Infobright was found to require augmentation\\u000a for analyzing qualitative data provided as short stories by human subjects. A requirements specification for mining data that\\u000a are subject to interpretation is proposed and

Julia Ann Johnson; Genevieve Marie Johnson

114

Ecological Inference in the Social Sciences  

PubMed Central

Ecological inference is a problem of partial identification, and therefore reliable precise conclusions are rarely possible without the collection of individual level (identifying) data. Without such data, sensitivity analyses provide the only recourse. In this paper we review and critique approaches to ecological inference in the social sciences, and describe in detail hierarchical models, which allow both sensitivity analysis and the incorporation of individual level data into an ecological analysis. A crucial element of a sensitivity analysis in such models is prior specification, and we detail how this may be carried out. Furthermore, we demonstrate how the inclusion of a small amount of individual level data can dramatically improve the properties of such estimates.

Glynn, Adam; Wakefield, Jon

2009-01-01

115

Social science in a water observing system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We set forth an argument for the integration of social science research with natural science and engineering research in major research infrastructure investments addressing water science. A program of integrated observation of water resources offers great opportunities to address several environmental "grand challenges" identified by the National Research Council, including climate variability, institutions and resource use, and land use dynamics, and their importance for hydrologic forecasting. We argue that such a program has the potential to advance both water science and the contributing disciplines. However, to realize this potential, it is essential to recognize that social science requires critical infrastructure funding on the scale of advanced research facilities in the natural sciences and engineering.

Braden, John B.; Brown, Daniel G.; Dozier, Jeff; Gober, Patricia; Hughes, Sara M.; Maidment, David R.; Schneider, Sandra L.; Schultz, P. Wesley; Shortle, James S.; Swallow, Stephen K.; Werner, Carol M.

2009-11-01

116

Advanced Hindi Reader in the Social Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This reader contains 25 selections in standard Hindi by recognized authorities in the major fields of social science; namely sociology, anthropology, folklore, economics, and political science. The writings, evenly divided both in content and style, are intended to give the reader a broad perspective of Indian culture. A 128-page Hindi-English…

Vatuk, Ved Prakash

117

The Writing of the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Doing sociology, writing sociology, is to somehow engage with the subjects of the discourse, to give voice to these subjects. It perforce means that our writing should be sensitive to these voices. Literature does this admirably well in one way. Social science can still see itself as a science but that does not mean that it can without question make

Sundar Sarukkai

2007-01-01

118

A Judges' Guide to Using Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

ince the first glimmerings of legal realism early in this century, American courts have been remarkably open to using social science research when that research could help resolve empirical issues that arise in litigation. Increasingly in recent decades, courts have sought out research data on their own when the parties have failed to provide them. Social scientists, for their part,

John Monahan; Laurens Walker

2006-01-01

119

Network analysis in comparative social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay describes the pertinence of Social Network Analysis (SNA) for the social sciences in general, and discusses its methodological and conceptual implications for comparative research in particular. The authors first present a basic summary of the theoretical and methodological assumptions of SNA, followed by a succinct overview of its application to diverse fields of study. They then exemplify in

Eugenia Roldán Vera; Thomas Schupp

2006-01-01

120

Can Social Science Shape the Public Agenda?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although America leads the world in conducting social scientific evaluations of public policies, in the end, social science contributes less to policymaking here than it does in most of Western Europe and Japan. Instead, our research has little bearing on whether a government program lives or dies. Intellectuals typically have tense relationships with men and women of power, but the

Harold L. Wilensky

2005-01-01

121

Contextualising the crowd in contemporary social science  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper situates contemporary social scientific studies of crowd events and crowd behaviour in their historical and ideological context. The original ‘crowd science’ developed from definitions of ‘social problems’ that emerged in the late nineteenth century – in particular the concerns among the French establishment about the threat of the ‘mass’ to ‘civilization’. This, and the surrounding intellectual context, encouraged

John Drury; Clifford Stott

2011-01-01

122

Old Fears Haunt New Social Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In September 1965, not long after news broke about a Pentagon-sponsored program to study social conflict in South America, the Social Science Research Council played host to a meeting on overseas research. Feelings were raw. Opposition to the Vietnam War was mounting, and many scholars worried that the Pentagon's studies of conflict and…

Glenn, David

2008-01-01

123

Promoting social networks among Computer Science students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main scientific aim of this study was to investigate how Computer Science students regarded their social networks among study colleagues. The study was conducted at the Research Lab for Educational Technologies (University of Vienna) in order to find connecting factors for improving students' networks by means of curricular design as well as in single courses. Social Networks drawings and

Kathrin Figl; Sonja Kabicher; Katharina Toifl

2008-01-01

124

Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This is the first of three volumes which comprise a review of the social, psychological, and biological aspects of aging. This volume organizes, evaluates, and interprets research data, concepts, theories, and issues in aging from the perspectives of the various social sciences. Intended for use by researchers, professional practitioners,…

Binstock, Robert H., Ed.; Shanas, Ethel

125

Social Science and Environmental Behaviour  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter seeks to provide a behavioural science per spective on environmental problem analysis and manage ment. Why is\\u000a there a need for such a perspective and what does it involve? How can a behavioural science perspec tive be aligned with a\\u000a physical science perspective? Our emphasis in this chapter will be on the scientific methods available for studying environmental

Linda Steg; Charles Vlek

126

Improving tourism destination governance: a complexity science approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The growing interest in complexity science as a framework for understanding social and economic systems has had, in recent times, an influence on the study of tourism destinations. This paper aims to describe this approach and discuss its theoretical and methodological implications in terms of destination governance. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Traditional research has adopted a reductionist approach to modelling

Rodolfo Baggio; Noel Scott; Chris Cooper

2010-01-01

127

Science Teaching: A Dilemmatic Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, I examine the nature of primary science expertise using an ethnographic and sociocultural approach and a theoretical analysis that conceptualises educational practice in terms of the resolution of dilemmas. Using data from an in-depth investigation of the perspective and practice of a single teacher, I discuss some of the "dilemmas"…

Traianou, Anna

2012-01-01

128

Citizenship and Social Justice in Urban Science Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article describes, and then applies a newly developed framework for classroom citizenship as an entry point into addressing social justice issues in urban science classrooms. The author provides in-depth descriptions of cogenerative dialogues, coteaching, and cosmopolitanism (3Cs), and presents this triad of tools as an approach to…

Emdin, Christopher

2011-01-01

129

The Future of Teaching Research in the Social Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Current literature on teaching research methodology in the social sciences highlights the changing nature of our world in terms of its complexity and diversity, and points to how this affects the way in which we search for answers to related problems (Brew 2003, 3; Tashakkori and Teddlie 2003, 74). New ways of approaching research problems that…

Wagner, C.

2009-01-01

130

E-INFRASTRUCTURE ADOPTION IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is a first attempt to describe and compare the adoption of e-Infrastructure across the UK, continental Europe, and the USA in the social sciences and humanities. A survey of early adopters identified three differences across these countries, each potentially affecting adoption: funding approaches, the technical configuration of projects, and research support. Our findings also suggest that the sustainable

Franz Barjak; Meik Poschen; Rob Procter; Simon Robinson; Gordon Wiegand

2010-01-01

131

[Social support and health: standpoints from the social and human sciences].  

PubMed

This article analyses the themes and conceptual-theoretical approaches of the social support in the literature from important international journals about social sciences and medicine, and in from 1983 to 2005 are analyzed. 259 international and 57 national abstracts was reading for the identification and computing the relations of the social support with health/disease/care. A deeper conceptual analysis about social support and the theories of social science were reported in an intentional sample of 56 international and 18 national texts. The international literature is based on the social psychology, in the several trends of the sociology and of the political science and less in the anthropology. The national literature dialogues less with the psychosocial theories and more with the sociological and anthropological theories. In this latter literature the social support approaches are concerned with social network theories; reciprocity, exchanges and cultural values. It is concluded that different trends guide the conceptual-theoretical analyses of the social support, being the international literature older, wider, more diversified and empirical, but with scarce anthropological production. The national literature is more reflexive them empirical. PMID:22634801

Canesqui, Ana Maria; Barsaglini, Reni Aparecida

2012-05-01

132

Sport and the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sport is one of the most ubiquitous activities of modern contemporary society. The pervasiveness of sport can be seen by the enormous amount of primary and second ary involvement in it by people of all ages and social strata. Sport penetrates into and plays a significant role in all of the social institutions. The functions of play, games, and sport

George H. Sage

1979-01-01

133

Response Functions to Critical Shocks in Social Sciences:  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show that, provided one focuses on properly selected episodes, one can apply to the social sciences the same observational strategy that has proved successful in natural sciences such as astrophysics or geodynamics. For instance, in order to probe the cohesion of a society, one can, in different countries, study the reactions to some huge and sudden exogenous shocks, which we call Dirac shocks. This approach naturally leads to the notion of structural (as opposed or complementary to temporal) forecast. Although structural predictions are by far the most common way to test theories in the natural sciences, they have been much less used in the social sciences. The Dirac shock approach opens the way to testing structural predictions in the social sciences. The examples reported here suggest that critical events are able to reveal pre-existing "cracks" because they probe the social cohesion which is an indicator and predictor of future evolution of the system, and in some cases they foreshadow a bifurcation. We complement our empirical work with numerical simulations of the response function ("damage spreading") to Dirac shocks in the Sznajd model of consensus build-up. We quantify the slow relaxation of the difference between perturbed and unperturbed systems, the conditions under which the consensus is modified by the shock and the large variability from one realization to another.

Roehner, B. M.; Sornette, D.; Andersen, J. V.

134

On the nation-state, the global, and social science  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this essay I trace the nature of the social sciences from their state-centric orthodoxy to a new heterdoxy consequent upon globalization. The mainstream social science trilogy of sociology, economics, and political science neglected questions of space and place because they failed to problematize the embedded statism in which they developed. The social sciences marginalized geography in a nationalization of

P J Taylor

1996-01-01

135

The Social Influence of Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

IT is true that progress was made in certain directions during the ``millenary period of stagnation, '' for example, the improvements in mathematics due to the Arabs. Yet the main fact in the re-birth of science in the sixteenth century is the discovery of the work of the Greeks, especially in geometry, astronomy, and geography. Descartes goes back to Pappus,

F. S. Marvin

1923-01-01

136

Universal Darwinism and evolutionary social science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Save for Anthropologists, few social scientists have been among the participants in the discussions about the appropriate\\u000a structure of a ‘Universal Darwinism’. Yet evolutionary theorizing about cultural, social, and economic phenomena has a long\\u000a tradition, going back well before Darwin. And over the past quarter century significant literatures have grown up concerned\\u000a with the processes of change operating on science,

Richard R. Nelson

2007-01-01

137

Interdisciplinarity, Applied Ethics and Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The bonds between applied ethics and social science seem to become increasingly tight. This does not only manifest itself\\u000a by social scientists and ethicists working together, but also by an increasing attention, from both sides, to the very nature\\u000a of their cooperation. The debate on this topic has been ongoing for more than twenty years, but in the last years

Niels Nijsingh; Marcus Düwell

138

Health, Society, and Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Throughout the United States and elsewhere in the Western world since World War II, there has been a grow ing interest in medicine. As early as the 1930's, popular accounts of scientific developments began to interest lay readers in medical care and innovation. The significant involvement of social and behavioral scientists in medical education and research began a decade ago

Robert Straus; John A. Clausen

1963-01-01

139

A cognitive approach to science policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent work in the social studies of science has emphasized the importance of studying both the social and cognitive aspects of the evolution of scientific specialties and disciplines. This has implications for science policies that aim at the direction of scientific fields toward external goals: the cognitive state and dynamics of the field have to be taken into acount. Such

Arie Rip

1981-01-01

140

Black Families and White Social Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Charges American social science with systematic bias in its treatment of black families so as to exaggerate the amount and kind of pathology of black family life and ignore the health aspects; only black scholars and scientists may correct this idea. (JM)

Billingsley, Andrew

1970-01-01

141

Pedagogical Relationship in Secondary Social Science Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates two high school social science classrooms in order to better understand the pedagogical relationships among teachers, students, and disciplinary content, and how teachers can influence students' opportunities to learn disciplinary literacy. Drawing on conceptual resources from sociocultural theories of learning and…

Girard, Brian James

2010-01-01

142

Victimology: A Social Science in Waiting?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Victimology was first proposed as a social science in the 1940s during a shift in interest in victims to gain a better understanding of crime. The early victimologists focused on the role that victims played in crime, which resulted in the concept that some victims contribute to, or precipitate, their victimisation. Later victimologists focused on the process of victimisation, including

Michael OConnell

2008-01-01

143

Models of deliberation in the social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

AI’s extent could never be restricted to its computational modeling of the mind. The idea of a computational model, one that reserves a place for the processing of information that details how constructions may vary with expended resources, is the kind of idea upon which intellectual empires are built. I am referring to recent incursions in the social sciences, specifically

Ronald Prescott Loui

1995-01-01

144

Contextualism, explanation and the social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Debates about explanation in the social sciences often proceed without any clear idea what an ‘account’ of explanation should do. In this paper I take a stance—what I will call contextualism—that denies there are purely formal and conceptual constraints on explanation and takes standards of explanation to be substantive empirical claims, paradigmatically claims about causation. I then use this standpoint

Harold Kincaid

2004-01-01

145

Africa: A Social Studies and Science Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This packet was designed to help teachers maximize a visit to a zoo's Africa exhibit. The packet provides two levels of activities, grades 3-5, and grades 6-8, for use before, during and after the visit. Activities are designed to enhance skills taught in science, social studies, language arts, reading, art, and math. A multi-grade background…

Holboke, Kathy; And Others

146

Virtual Games in Social Science Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The new technologies make the appearance of highly motivating and dynamic games with different levels of interaction possible, in which large amounts of data, information, procedures and values are included which are intimately bound with the social sciences. We set out from the hypothesis that videogames may become interesting resources for their…

Lopez, Jose M. Cuenca; Caceres, Myriam J. Martin

2010-01-01

147

Social Science Reasoning Using Statistics (ECO 138)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Jack Chizmar, Department of Economics, Illinois State University, outlines how to describe, produce, and draw conclusions from data at ECON 131: Social Science Reasoning Using Statistics. Chizmar provides an engaging introduction to using statistics in addition to sample exams, readings, and the opportunity to comment on the course design.

Chizmar, John F.

148

Causality in the Social and Behavioral Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to acquaint researchers in the quantitative social and behavior sciences with recent advances in causal inference which provide a systematic methodology for defining, estimating, testing, and defending causal claims in experimental and observational studies. These advances are illustrated using a general theory of causation based on nonparametric structural equation models (SEM) - a natural gener- alization of

Judea Pearl

2009-01-01

149

The Social Sciences and Manpower Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The materials presented developed out of a summer manpower research institute which had three general goals: To bring together established as well as promising scholars in the social sciences in a one-week symposium for the purpose of promoting more manpo...

N. A. Palomba E. B. Jakubauskas

1969-01-01

150

What's Wrong With Social Studies of Science?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses two features within influential branches of social studies of science, the adoption of the symmetry principle (first presented by Bloor 1976) and the existence of the experimenter's regress (as put forth mainly by Collins & Pinch 1994). Both are based on the following line of reasoning: in a scientific controversy no-one can decide who is right and

Jesper Jerkert

151

Social sciences and the English language  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article analyses the predominance of the English language in the globalization context, particularly the implications related to the social sciences. It first makes a critical analysis of the literature elaborated by linguists concerning the expansion of the language in the contemporary world, focusing on the evolution of English from an international to a global language. It then discusses the

Renato Ortiz

2006-01-01

152

Virtual Games in Social Science Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The new technologies make the appearance of highly motivating and dynamic games with different levels of interaction possible, in which large amounts of data, information, procedures and values are included which are intimately bound with the social sciences. We set out from the hypothesis that videogames may become interesting resources for…

Lopez, Jose M. Cuenca; Caceres, Myriam J. Martin

2010-01-01

153

Pedagogical Relationship in Secondary Social Science Classrooms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigates two high school social science classrooms in order to better understand the pedagogical relationships among teachers, students, and disciplinary content, and how teachers can influence students' opportunities to learn disciplinary literacy. Drawing on conceptual resources from sociocultural theories of learning and…

Girard, Brian James

2010-01-01

154

Public Administration, Social Science, and Political Association  

Microsoft Academic Search

Public administration writers have placed considerable faith in the power of social science to improve the practice of public administration. This article argues that such faith derives from their vision of the state as a purposive association. However, because we live in what is essentially a civil association rather than a purposive association, there are severe limits on the knowledge

Michael W. Spicer

1998-01-01

155

Africa: A Social Studies and Science Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This packet was designed to help teachers maximize a visit to a zoo's Africa exhibit. The packet provides two levels of activities, grades 3-5, and grades 6-8, for use before, during and after the visit. Activities are designed to enhance skills taught in science, social studies, language arts, reading, art, and math. A multi-grade background…

Holboke, Kathy; And Others

156

Michael Polanyi and the Social Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the author attempts three things: (a) to describe the main beliefs of the "continental empiricist" epistemology that dominated the study of the social sciences in North America since the mid 1930s; (b) to speak of the influence of this epistemology on the dominant or mainstream school in the study of politics; and (c) to propose…

Poirier, Maben Walter

2011-01-01

157

The Social Science Evidence on Bilingual Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the role of social science research evidence in the development of federal and court policy on bilingual education through a review of important court decisions. Assesses the research evidence on policy alternatives for educational programs for non-English speaking students. Provides recommendations for improving educational achievement…

Rossell, Christine H.; Ross, J. Michael

1986-01-01

158

Virtual games in social science education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new technologies make the appearance of highly motivating and dynamic games with different levels of interaction possible, in which large amounts of data, information, procedures and values are included which are intimately bound with the social sciences.We set out from the hypothesis that videogames may become interesting resources for their inclusion in the education processes in formal contexts. Videogames

José M. Cuenca López; Myriam J. Martín Cáceres

2010-01-01

159

Senator Fred Harris's National Social Science Foundation proposal: Reconsidering federal science policy, natural science-social science relations, and American liberalism during the 1960s.  

PubMed

During the 1960s, a growing contingent of left-leaning voices claimed that the social sciences suffered mistreatment and undue constraints within the natural science-dominated federal science establishment. According to these critics, the entrenched scientific pecking order in Washington had an unreasonable commitment to the unity of the sciences, which reinforced unacceptable inequalities between the social and the natural sciences. The most important political figure who advanced this critique, together with a substantial legislative proposal for reform, was the Oklahoma Democratic Senator Fred Harris. Yet histories of science and social science have told us surprisingly little about Harris. Moreover, existing accounts of his effort to create a National Social Science Foundation have misunderstood crucial features of this story. This essay argues that Harris's NSSF proposal developed into a robust, historically unique, and increasingly critical liberal challenge to the post-World War II federal science establishment's treatment of the social sciences as "second-class citizens." PMID:22655338

Solovey, Mark

2012-03-01

160

Approach and Avoidance Social Motives and Goals  

Microsoft Academic Search

It was predicted that approach social motives and goals would be linked to outcomes characterized by the presence of positive social features, and avoidance social motives and goals would be linked to outcomes characterized by the presence of negative social features and that the link between approach motives and outcomes would be mediated by different processes than the link between

Shelly L. Gable

2006-01-01

161

Developing an agenda for social science research into drugs in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a short introduction and overview to a collection of essays designed to provide a starting point in the form of a research agenda towards developing a social science of drugs in sport. It firstly addresses the paucity of social science research on the issues and then summarizes the approach taken to developing a research agenda to guide

Jason Mazanov

2009-01-01

162

Measuring and Maximising Research Impact in Applied Social Science Research Settings. Good Practice Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) approach to measuring impact using examples from its own case studies, as well as showing how to maximise the impact of applied social science research. Applied social science research needs to demonstrate that it is relevant and useful both to public policy and…

Stanwick, John; Hargreaves, Jo

2012-01-01

163

B. F. Skinner and G. H. Mead: on biological science and social science.  

PubMed

Skinner's contributions to psychology provide a unique bridge between psychology conceptualized as a biological science and psychology conceptualized as a social science. Skinner focused on behavior as a naturally occurring biological phenomenon of interest in its own right, functionally related to surrounding events and, in particular (like phylogenesis), subject to selection by its consequences. This essentially biological orientation was further enhanced by Skinner's emphasis on the empirical foundations provided by laboratory-based experimental analyses of behavior, often with nonhuman subjects. Skinner's theoretical writings, however, also have affinity with the traditions of constructionist social science. The verbal behavior of humans is said to be subject, like other behavior, to functional analyses in terms of its environment, in this case its social context. Verbal behavior in turn makes it possible for us to relate to private events, a process that ultimately allows for the development of consciousness, which is thus said to be a social product. Such ideas make contact with aspects of G. H. Mead's social behaviorism and, perhaps of more contemporary impact in psychology, L. Vygotsky's general genetic law of cultural development. Failure to articulate both the biological and the social science aspects of Skinner's theoretical approach to psychology does a disservice to his unique contribution to a discipline that remains fragmented between two intellectual traditions. PMID:2037828

Blackman, D E

1991-03-01

164

B. F. Skinner and G. H. Mead: on biological science and social science.  

PubMed Central

Skinner's contributions to psychology provide a unique bridge between psychology conceptualized as a biological science and psychology conceptualized as a social science. Skinner focused on behavior as a naturally occurring biological phenomenon of interest in its own right, functionally related to surrounding events and, in particular (like phylogenesis), subject to selection by its consequences. This essentially biological orientation was further enhanced by Skinner's emphasis on the empirical foundations provided by laboratory-based experimental analyses of behavior, often with nonhuman subjects. Skinner's theoretical writings, however, also have affinity with the traditions of constructionist social science. The verbal behavior of humans is said to be subject, like other behavior, to functional analyses in terms of its environment, in this case its social context. Verbal behavior in turn makes it possible for us to relate to private events, a process that ultimately allows for the development of consciousness, which is thus said to be a social product. Such ideas make contact with aspects of G. H. Mead's social behaviorism and, perhaps of more contemporary impact in psychology, L. Vygotsky's general genetic law of cultural development. Failure to articulate both the biological and the social science aspects of Skinner's theoretical approach to psychology does a disservice to his unique contribution to a discipline that remains fragmented between two intellectual traditions.

Blackman, D E

1991-01-01

165

A Social Problems Approach to Gerontology in Social Work Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a social problems emphasis to gerontology in social work education which acknowledges the fact that the elderly are handicapped and discriminated against by social values, attitudes, and practices. The traditional integrative approach has been ineffective in educating and sensitizing students to problems and needs of the aged. The social problems emphasis is discussed as related to future

JORDAN I. KOSBERG

1976-01-01

166

Post-conflict societies and the social sciences: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper serves as the Editorial Introduction that heads the special issue on post-conflict societies in the social sciences and it reviews the growing literature on this topic. The field offers an interdisciplinary space not just for the various social sciences to interface, but for social science to encounter theology, philosophy and ethics. The field can be divided into three

John Brewer; Bernadette C. Hayes

2011-01-01

167

Decentring Social Sciences in Practice Through Individual Acts and Choices  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reflects on the significance and relevance of continuing discussions and debates on the `opening up' of the social sciences. It argues that a balanced and comprehensive restructuring of the social sciences today entails a simultaneous attention to the philosophical, intellectual apparatus as well as the administrative and organizational frameworks of social science domains. The actual mechanisms and practices

Vineeta Sinha

2003-01-01

168

Utilization of social science research knowledge in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses three questions: What is the extent of the use of social science research in Canada? Are there differences between the social sciences disciplines regarding extent of use? What are the determinants of utilization of social science research knowledge in Canada? The paper develops and tests an empirical model that derives its dependent and independent variables from prior

Réjean Landry; Nabil Amara; Moktar Lamari

2001-01-01

169

Teaching by Exemplar: On the Dialectical Nature of Social Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social sciences differ from the "hard" sciences because the social sciences are fundamentally dialectical in nature. The use of instructional dramaturgical dialogs can help students appreciate the kind of knowledge social scientists seek and the positive consequences of scholarly conflict. An illustrative dialog between educators and their critics…

Milton, Sande; Bickel, Robert

1983-01-01

170

Environmental disruption: implications for the social sciences  

SciTech Connect

Social scientists and ecologists need to discover that they are united in a common threat that environmental disruption could eliminate civilization as we know it. The public's perception of this disruption is limited to pollution, which makes it even more difficult for the groups to cooperate in addressing the problem. The relationship of ecology to various social sciences, especially economics, is examined to identify common bonds; to explore the conflicts between ecologists and demongraphers, economists, and others; and to acknowledge the limits of ecology. Possible courses of action include interdisplinary study, a tithing of research effort to social problems, and an evaluation of whether we have reached the limit of research benefits on social problems. 22 references. (DCK)

Ehrlich, P.R.

1981-03-01

171

Online Dictionary of the Social Sciences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From "aboriginal peoples" to "xenophobia," the Online Dictionary of the Social Sciences provides concise definitions for approximately 1,000 entries. Disciplines covered include sociology, criminology, political science, and women's studies with a particular focus on Canadian examples, events, and names. The project is the online version of a dictionary created by Gary Parkinson and Robert Drislane and a product of Athabasca University, Canada, and the International Consortium for the Advancement of Academic Publication (ICAAP). The dictionary can be browsed using an alphabetically arranged index or searched using key words; references are also included to guide users to other related entries.

Parkinson, Gary.; Islane, Robert.

172

Applied social science for environmental planning  

SciTech Connect

As regions and communities are increasingly affected by the projects, programs, and policies of disparate government and private groups, the skills of social scientists are being called on to aid in the environmental planning process. This volume presents accounts of the many ways in which the social sciences are contributing to environmental planning. The authors address the transition from theory to practice in environmental planning, local-level contributions to the planning process, socioeconomic development and planning needs, and socioenvironmental planning and mitigation procedures.

Millsap, W.

1983-01-01

173

Ethical issues and ethics reviews in social science research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although the ethics of social science research has not enjoyed as much scholarly attention as the ethics of biomedical research, social scientists continue to debate the relevance of research ethics and ethics review to social science research. Like social scien- tists, biomedical scientists have also objected to ethical review of biomedical research, and much has been gained from the ensuing

Douglas R Wassenaar; Nicole Mamotte

2008-01-01

174

A Student's Guide to Conducting Social Science Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide describes activities, methods, and materials which can be used in conducting a beginning-level social-science research project. Designed for secondary and college students as a laboratory component of a social studies or social science course, it provides ideas for firsthand experience in the methods used by social scientists for their…

Bunker, Barbara Benedict; And Others

175

Social science and bioethics: the way forward.  

PubMed

It is no surprise that bioethics and sociology developed an adversarial relationship: bioethicists value the clear descriptions of ethically charged situations provided by social scientists, but doubt the ability of those trained in social science to logically derive and discern 'the good'. For their part, social scientists - experts in observing and collecting data about the way the world is- find bioethicists ignorant of the ways elegantly crafted solutions to ethical problems get altered when incarnated in varied social and cultural settings. This discipline-centred self-affirmation can be a satisfying exercise, but it offers nothing to the project of promoting more moral medicine and health care. The articles collected in this volume demonstrate the value of collaboration between social scientists and bioethicists. Focusing on four themes found in recent sociological research in bioethics - ethics of research, the creation of moral boundaries, bioethics and social policy, and the bioethical imagination - this anthology offers practical models of co-operative work where the strengths of each discipline are brought together to advance our understanding of bioethical issues and to show the way toward just and effective social policy. PMID:17184411

de Vries, Raymond; Turner, Leigh; Orfali, Kristina; Bosk, Charles

2006-09-01

176

Involving College Students in Social Science Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

1. Abstract: To explore early-undergraduate exposure to hands-on research opportunities, we invited students enrolled in three second-year social science courses at a community college to participate in a cross-cultural fear of crime project. Thirty-three students participated, conducting community interviews, or coding and entering data. The students completed a ten-item questionnaire to assess their experience, indicating that participation increased their understanding

William McConnell; Roger G. Albert; John P. Marton

177

Science and Social Studies in a Nutshell  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This articles discusses three practicum students and how they took students' interests in peanuts and expanded it into a full unit concerning nuts and the history behind them. In addition to observing, classifying, and measuring nuts, the students learned valuable history lessons. The teachers found a successful way to integrate science and social studies while also discovering that learning takes place naturally when the kids find something that they are truly interested in.

Edwards, Linda; Nabors, Martha L.; Janas, Monica; Branscombe, N. A.

2005-03-01

178

Capturing Social Embeddedness: A Constructivist Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

A constructivist approach is applied to characterizing social embeddedness. Social embeddedness is intended as a strong type of social situatedness. It is defined as the extent to which modeling the behavior of an agent requires the inclusion of other agents as individuals rather than as an undif ferentiated whole. Possible consequences of the presence of social embedding and ways to

Bruce Edmonds

1999-01-01

179

Economic and Social Science Research Council  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With its prestigious record of research and service to the broader public sector, the Economic and Social Science Research Council (ESRC) is the UK's prime research funding and training agency that actively addresses both economic and social concerns. As the website notes, the council seeks "to provide high quality research on issues of importance to business, the public sector, and government." From the homepage, visitors can read extensive information about the Council's seven thematic research priorities (which include social stability and exclusion and lifecourse), along with reading about funding opportunities and available postdoctoral research positions with one of the research centres. As with most research organizations, the selection of publications here is quite good, and includes annual reports, transcripts of lectures given on behalf of the Council, best practice guides, and several special reports, such as Britain Towards 2010 and Fit and Fifty?. Finally, the news area of the site contains the archives and current edition of _The Edge_, a magazine about social science research funded by ESRC.

180

THE DILEMMA OF TRUST: A SOCIAL NETWORK BASED APPROACH  

Microsoft Academic Search

Trust is essential in human interaction and this naturally reflects within computer science context, in particular inside internet-based communities. In this work we present an approach based on social networks, which revealed several useful properties, as the small world effect, that can be usefully exploited in addressing the question of trust. We aim at reproducing the behaviour individuals adopt in

V. CARCHIOLO; A. LONGHEU; M. MALGERI; G. MANGIONI; V. NICOSIA

181

An Environmental Approach to Eighth Grade Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report outlines a method of teaching eighth-grade science with an environmental perspective. Areas of study normally found in junior high science curriculum are integrated with environmental concepts. This particular approach to 8th grade science is intended to be process oriented, field oriented, problem oriented, and relevant to the local…

Sargo, Herbert J.

182

Perspectives and challenges of agent-based simulation as a tool for economics and other social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper argues that the agent-based simulation approach is just the one appropriate to the social sciences (includ- ing economics). Although there were many predecessor ap- proaches, which tried to build formal models of social sys- tems, all of them fell short of the peculiar features of the objects of all social sciences: complex systems consisting of numerous autonomous actors

Klaus G. Troitzsch

2009-01-01

183

Girls, science and epistemology: A societal approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examines the ways in which girls' personal epistemologies are applied and modulated in relationship with scientific disciplinary epistemology in the context of their early science learning. The research takes a societal approach, assuming that both girls' reasoning and scientific disciplinary epistemology are socially constituted, emphasizing the role of gendered discourses, realities and experiences in the construction of girls' subjectivities and disciplinary epistemology. Initially, three research scientists were interviewed to provide a naturalized understanding of scientific disciplinary epistemology. Subsequently, over the course of spring semester, seven ninth-grade girls from a small middle-class town participated in a series of in-depth interviews about their reasoning in scientific contexts. The focus of the interview analysis is two-fold. Possible points of connection and contention are examined between the ways in which girls deploy their personal epistemologies and scientific disciplinary epistemology. Individual profiles of each girl are also developed, describing patterns and tensions in her reasoning. This study reveals the intersection between personal and disciplinary epistemology as a productive area for research, and further, shows that examining societal context and personal epistemologies provides new insight into the issues facing girls learning science. Results suggest that there are both significant disjuncts and points of connection between these girls' personal epistemologies and scientific disciplinary epistemology. In particular, the personal understandings of knowledge as perspectival and the role of experience as providing frameworks for thinking which were shown by the girls in this study could be meaningfully used in conjunction with contemporary trends in philosophy of science to enhance understanding of science and scientific disciplinary epistemology.

Arner Welsh, Jennifer M.

184

Socially constructed learning in early childhood science education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper outlines the findings of a study in which the concept of electricity was introduced to young children in a child care centre. Three areas were examined: first, the perceived difficulties associated with the teaching of science to very young children (3 5 year olds); second, a discussion of the approach used to teach electricity to young children, and finally, the study and its findings. When the teaching of electricity (through a unit on torches) followed a socially constructed approach to learning, all of the children were able to connect up a simple electric circuit and talk about the electricity flowing around the circuit.

Fleer, Marilyn

1991-12-01

185

Response: Epistemological Issues of Social Work Science as a Translational Action Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A science-based practice should be caring, there is no dissent about this. But why a social work science? Until now "things are fine," and practice seems to be getting on very well without it!? It is claimed that there is no alternative in its own interest. Social work needs social work science because of the epistemological issues linked to the…

Goppner, Hans-Jurgen

2012-01-01

186

Response: Epistemological Issues of Social Work Science as a Translational Action Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A science-based practice should be caring, there is no dissent about this. But why a social work science? Until now "things are fine," and practice seems to be getting on very well without it!? It is claimed that there is no alternative in its own interest. Social work needs social work science because of the epistemological issues linked to the…

Goppner, Hans-Jurgen

2012-01-01

187

Tool Shock: Technique and Epistemology in the Postwar Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay explores a form of reflexivity peculiar to the postwar social sciences. The mobilization of science in the United States during World War II released across the social sciences a wave of new research tools: mathematical models and calculation techniques ranging from game theory to cybernetics. As this profusion of analytical technologies gathered pace in the early years of

Joel Isaac

2010-01-01

188

The Employment Outlook for Social Science Majors in the South.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This assessment of the future job market for social science graduates is made both generically and separately for certain disciplines. The definition of the social sciences follows the USOE definition and includes: anthropology, archeology, economics, history, geography, political science, sociology, criminology, international relations, urban…

Galambos, Eva C.

189

Feminism and Federally Funded Social Science: Notes from Inside  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order for feminist social science research to influence the transformation of society toward more equitable gender arrangements, it must both be undertaken and be applied in the policy arena. For these to happen, feminist social scientists must be active players in the research policy and funding enterprise, particularly at the federal level. The discussion of how feminist social science

Judith D. Auerbach

2000-01-01

190

Social science research on medical technology: Utility and limitations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Policies could be better devised and better implemented if greater use were made of the social sciences. However, the social sciences have quite often not produced knowledge adequate to permit resolution of pressing social problems. An example of both of these statements is found in the area of policies toward medical technology. Medical technology has become a major public policy

H. David Banta

1983-01-01

191

Social science in Supreme Court criminal cases and briefs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes citations of social science research evidence in 200 criminal cases decided by the Supreme Court and in the briefs filed by the parties and amici curiae in these cases. It also examines the uses of social science authorities in samples of Supreme Court exclusionary rule and jury decisionmaking cases, and accompanying briefs. The correspondence between the social

James R. Acker

1990-01-01

192

The Obama Administration: what can social science offer?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the 2009 Academy of Social Sciences annual debate about prospects for the new United States administration. Just half way into the ‘first hundred days’ of President Barack Obama's term, a panel of social scientists, convened by Philip Davies, Director of the British Library's Eccles Centre for American Studies, addressed the question of what social science could

Philip Davies; Dilys Hill; Andrew Rudalevige; George C. Edwards III; Jenel Virden; Robert Singh

2009-01-01

193

Social Science Research in School Desegregation Cases: A Critical Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Because educational equity is a developing area, courts have little precedent to guide rulings. Extra-legal evidence may help in deciding what the law is. Social science evidence is also invited by the courts because educational equity law is purportedly an instrument of social change. The sophistication of social science research, as well as the…

Rossell, Christine H.

194

Student Empowerment in an Environmental Science Classroom: Toward a Framework for Social Justice Science Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social justice education is undertheorized in science education. Given the wide range of goals and purposes proposed within both social justice education and social justice science education scholarship, these fields require reconciliation. In this paper, I suggest a student empowerment framework for conceptualizing teaching and learning social

Dimick, Alexandra Schindel

2012-01-01

195

Social Identity: A Multidimensional Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study salience, importance, and multidimensional aspects of spontaneous social identities were examined. A Social Identity Survey was developed and administered to an ethnically diverse sample of American undergraduate students. Freely generated, social identities were rank ordered for importance and rated along four conceptually-derived dimensions: emotion, evaluation, importance, and stability. Results showed pattern differences among three groups of highly

Raymond T. Garza; Lawrence G. Herringer

1987-01-01

196

Teaching Science: The Inquiry Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Science Education Standards "Science as Inquiry" recommendations include developing student abilities to conduct inquiry and enhancing students' understandings about scientific inquiry. Standards also call for inquiry-based teaching aimed at understanding subject matter and ability to conduct scientific inquiry. A second-grade lesson…

Pratt, Harold; Hackett, Jay

1998-01-01

197

Approach to Physical Sciences, 1974.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Methods of teaching physics and chemistry, which revolve around the inclusion of high school courses within the overall science curriculum and whose emphasis is on the latest developments in scientific research and technology, were the subject of the thirteenth annual Summer School for Senior Science Teachers. Paper themes are concerned with…

Schwartz, A., Ed.

198

The emergence of social science research on nanotechnology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the development of social science literature focused on the emerging area of nanotechnology. It is guided\\u000a by the exploratory proposition that early social science work on emerging technologies will draw on science and engineering\\u000a literature on the technology in question to frame its investigative activities, but as the technologies and societal investments\\u000a in them progress, social scientists

Philip Shapira; Jan L. Youtie; Alan L. Porter

2010-01-01

199

Graph Theoretical Analysis of Processes in Social Sciences.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this paper the authors discuss the use of the technique of knowledge graphs to survey various processes in social science. The authors also discuss the possibility to use the theory of social atoms to analyze these processes.

C. Hoede H. M. Weening

1997-01-01

200

Social Sciences for the 1980s: From Rhetoric to Reality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Western social science concepts are unproductive in third world situations. The need for decolonization and self-reliance reflects the need for social scientists in developing nations to construct their own research methods and criteria. (KC)

Dube, S. C.

1982-01-01

201

Science and social responsibility in public health.  

PubMed Central

Epidemiologists and environmental health researchers have a joint responsibility to acquire scientific knowledge that matters to public health and to apply the knowledge gained in public health practice. We examine the nature and source of these social responsibilities, discuss a debate in the epidemiological literature on roles and responsibilities, and cite approaches to environmental justice as reflective of them. At one level, responsibility refers to accountability, as in being responsible for actions taken. A deeper meaning of responsibility corresponds to commitment to the pursuit and achievement of a valued end. Epidemiologists are committed to the scientific study of health and disease in human populations and to the application of scientific knowledge to improve the public's health. Responsibility is also closely linked to reliability. Responsible professionals reliably perform the tasks they set for themselves as well as the tasks society expects them to undertake. The defining axiom for our approach is that the health of the public is a social good we commit ourselves to pursue, thus assuming an obligation to contribute to its achievement. Epidemiologists cannot claim to be committed to public health as a social good and not accept the responsibility of ensuring that the knowledge gained in their roles as scientists is used to achieve that good. The social responsibilities of environmental health researchers are conspicuous in the environmental justice movement, for example, in community-based participatory research. Responsibility is an ethical concept particularly well suited to frame many key aspects of the ethics of our profession.

Weed, Douglas L; McKeown, Robert E

2003-01-01

202

Place and Disadvantage: The Need for Reflexive Epistemology in Spatial Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between place and disadvantage, and particularly the question of whether, and how, geographical concentration of disadvantaged households exacerbates disadvantage is of growing concern to social science and urban policy. Despite many calls for a subtle and complex approach to constructing knowledge about these issues, a positivist approach based on statistical indicators, appears to dominate policy making. This approach

Michael Darcy

2007-01-01

203

Social Science Research and Policymaking: Meta-Analysis and Paradox  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to explore some of the non-obvious characteristics of the social science research-social policy (SSRSP) paradigm. We examine some of the underlying as- sumptions of the readily accepted claim that social science research can lead to the creation of rational social policy. We begin by using the framework of meta-analysis as one of the most

Steven I. Miller; Marcel Fredericks; Frank J. Perino

204

A New Way of Thinking about Social Location in Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Durkheimian concept of the density of social relationships may prove more fruitful than the historical materialist notion of a social hierarchy for thinking about the social location of epistemic agents in science. To define a scientist's social location in terms of the density of her professional relationships with other scientists permits…

Schmaus, Warren

2008-01-01

205

Social Networks in the Virtual Science Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility (HFMRF) houses 11 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers. Additionally, the Virtual Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility (VNMRF) provides on-line Internet access to these HFMRF spectrometers. Through the VNMRF and its suite of computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) tools, researchers may collaboratively set the controls of an NMR spectrometer, execute an NMR experiment, acquire data, analyze results, and communicate with other researchers all from the comforts of their home institutions and their own offices. Virtual science laboratories like the VNMRF promote a compelling vision. Consistent with Wulf's notion of a "collaboratory," a virtual science laboratory is a "'center without walls', in which the nation's researchers can perform their research without regard to geographical location." Such a laboratory strives to provide an open research environment in which scientists from different disciplines may collaborate on advanced research using leading-edge instruments and tools, while reducing the physical, organizational, and political boundaries that confront researchers as they amass their collective skills, capabilities, and brainpower to solve the world's most challenging scientific problems. In this article, we describe the social networks that have emerged from the VNMRF and the impacts and influences that CSCW technologies have had upon those networks. The development of social networks depends on various factors including personal and professional objectives, work functions, organizational roles, and afforded collaborative capabilities. As such, our results serve as a useful point of comparison and contrast in the analysis of social networks and CSCW impacts that evolve from scientific contexts as well as from other collaborative settings such as in business and education.

Chin, George; Myers, James D.; Hoyt, David W.

2002-08-01

206

Macro-social marketing and social engineering: a systems approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to show how macro-social marketing and social engineering can be integrated and to illustrate their use by governments as part of a positive social engineering intervention with examples from the Canadian anti-smoking campaign. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – This is a conceptual paper that uses the case of the Canadian anti-smoking campaign to show that

Ann-Marie Kennedy; Andrew Parsons

2012-01-01

207

Curriculum Rhetoric and Social Control: a Perspective on Recent Science Curriculum Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

EnglishThis article outlines an approach towards interpreting the influence of social factors on the directions in which secondary school science curricula have developed. In particular, the influence of the institutional context of comprehensivization on emerging science curriculum materials in Britain in the 1960s is explored. From a survey of curriculum writings of this period, it is suggested that authors have

R. H. Millar

1981-01-01

208

Causation as a Generative Process. The Elaboration of an Idea for the Social Sciences and an Application to an Analysis of an Interdependent Dynamic Social System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The empirical investigation of causal relationships is an important but difficult scientific endeavor. In the social sciences,\\u000a two understandings of causation have guided the empirical analysis of causal relationships: (1) Causation as robust dependence and (2) causation as consequential manipulation. Both approaches clearly have strengths and weaknesses for the social sciences which will be described in detail in this chapter.

Hans-Peter Blossfeld

209

A Musical Approach to Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes an improvised science lesson that grew out of elementary students' interests and questions about music and sound. Students designed, built, and performed with their own musical instruments. (WRM)|

Cali, Simone

1999-01-01

210

Approach to Physical Sciences, 1973.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The summer session course in science is presented. The themes were chemistry of the living environment, and biophysics. Topics discussed include: desalinization by dead and living matter, importance of tetrapyrrolic pigments in biolological systems, photo...

G. E. Chapman

1973-01-01

211

Holistic science: An understanding of science education encompassing ethical and social issues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science has often been viewed, by the majority of our educators and the general public, as being objective and emotionless. Based on this view, our educators teach science in the same manner, objectively and in an abstract form. This manner of teaching has hindered our learners' ability for active learning and distanced them from the subject matter. In this action research, I have examined holistic science pedagogy in conjunction with a constructivism theory. In holistic science pedagogy, scientific knowledge is combined with subjective personal experiences and social issues. There is an interaction between student and scientific data when the student's context, relationships, and lived experiences that play a role in the scientific recognition of the world were incorporated into the learning process. In this pedagogical model, the factual content was viewed from the context of social and ethical implications. By empowering learners with this ability, science knowledge will no longer be exclusive to a select group. This process empowers the general population with the ability to understand scientific knowledge and therefore the ability to make informed decisions based on this knowledge. The goal was to make curriculum developers more conscious of factors that can positively influence the learning process and increase student engagement and understanding within the science classroom. The holistic approach to science pedagogy has enlightened and empowered our adult learners more effectively. Learners became more actively engaged in their own process of learning. Teachers must be willing to listen and implement student suggestions on improving the teaching/learning process. Teachers should be willing to make the effort in connecting with their students by structuring courses so the topics would be relevant to the students in relation to real world and social/ethical and political issues. Holistic science pedagogy strives for social change through the empowerment of adult learners with scientific knowledge. This research has demonstrated that learners can better understand the decision-making process and more easily relate their experiences, and therefore their knowledge, to social/political and ethical issues.

Malekpour, Susan

212

Crossing borders between social and physical sciences in post-event investigations  

Microsoft Academic Search

In natural hazard research social and physical scientists tend to approach post-event investigations within their narrow disciplinary lenses. Efforts that are called trans-disciplinary often add social science but do not integrate it effectively. For example, an economist might be brought in to address a question of \\

I. Ruin; E. Gruntfest; C. Lutoff; S. Anquetin; A. Scolobig; J.-D. Creutin; M. Borga

2009-01-01

213

The uses of social science in the history of dutch social work, 1900–1980  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper the author reviews the history of Dutch social work between 1900 and 1980 and tries to shed light on how Dutch social workers enlisted various insights developed by the social sciences to gain jurisdiction in dealing with social problems. He argues against the simplistic idea that scientific knowledge is merely applied in practical settings such as social

Sjaak Koenis

1999-01-01

214

Incorporating Social Science Concepts in the Analysis of Ethnic Issues in Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis of the complex social problems facing the Latino community is of special concern for multicultural social work. This paper introduces multidisciplinary theoretical models that can help explain how broad social, political, and economic systems shape the social welfare of Latinos. The paper draws on concepts from the social sciences, including sociology anthropology, feminist studies, and ethnic studies. The

Yolanda C. Padilla

1996-01-01

215

Science-Related Social Issues: Challenges for the Social Studies. ERIC Digest No. 16.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background, rationale, and promising practices for teaching about science-related social issues in the science and social studies classroom are presented. Material is divided into five sections, each introduced with a topical question. The first section considers the challenges associated with the pervasive influences of science and technology in…

Patrick, John J.; Remy, Richard C.

216

The Influence of Social Science Theories on the Conceptualization of Poverty in Social Welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Poverty has been a widely explored issue that has been debated across many social science academic disciplines. Due to its multi-dimensional nature, different interpretations of the causes of poverty have been put forth. This analysis examines the theories of poverty from five social science disciplines: psychology, anthropology, sociology, economics, and political science. While some of these ideas have evolved since

Catherine M. Vu

2010-01-01

217

Social Science and/or Social Work: Do We (Should We) Teach Them Both?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Addresses teaching in social work on the basis of two different theories related to social work and social science, noting crucial aspects of each. Notes deep differences between theoretical and applied sciences and discusses ways in which a dynamic complementarity can be achieved in teaching the theoretical and the professional. Applies the…

Frysztacki, Krzysztof

2008-01-01

218

Behavioral and Social Science Research: A National Resource. Part I.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The value, significance, and social utility of basic research in the behavioral and social sciences are examined. Following an introduction in chapter 1, there are 4 major chapters. Chapter 2 discusses how the research terrain has been divided among the disciplines of psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, political science, geography,…

Adams, Robert McC., Ed.; And Others

219

The contribution of new social science research to patient safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social sciences have given much to the science and practice of patient safety, but have more to offer. The purposes of this paper are to give a background to the studies presented in this special issue, and to encourage more social scientist to contribute to this important and rapidly growing field. This is largely preaching to the converted - there

John Ovretveit

2009-01-01

220

Research Ethics in Social Sciences: The Severina's Story Documentary  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Brazil, social science research ethics is a field still under construction and subject to intense dispute. The aim of this paper is to discuss how accepted principles of biomedical research ethics can be incorporated into the ethical review of social sciences, particularly open interviews, ethnographic research, and participant observation. The paper uses a case study—the ethnographic documentary Severina's Story—as

Debora Diniz

2008-01-01

221

Algebraic Systems: Applications in the Behavioral and Social Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A variety of uses of algebra in the behavioral and social sciences is provided along with descriptions of several algebraic systems. This volume is intended to be a sourcebook for theoretical conceptualizations for professionals in the behavioral and social sciences. This publication with its emphasis on description, application, and utility…

Hirshfeld, Stephen F.; Bart, William M.

222

Replicating Text: The Cumulation of Knowledge in Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obtaining a statistically significant result does not necessarily tell us whether we would obtain significant results in other, similar studies, particularly if the original sample sizes were small. This is why we are supposed to replicate experiments. The present study concerns social science events that cannot be repeated by virtue of their being historically situated. Among social science events, many

Robert Hogenraad; Dean P. McKENZIE

1999-01-01

223

Integrating Social Science and Genetics: News from the Political Front  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been growing interest in the use of genetic models to expand the understanding of political preferences, attitudes, and behaviors. Researchers in the social sciences have begun incorporating these models and have revealed that genetic differences account for individual differences in political beliefs, behaviors, and responses to the political environment. The first Integrating Genetics and the Social Sciences Conference,

Peter K. Hatemi; Christopher T. Dawes; Amanda Frost-Keller; Jaime E. Settle; Brad Verhulst

2011-01-01

224

Contrasting origins of the two institutionalisms: the social science context  

Microsoft Academic Search

Work of institutionalists, both old and new, is usually compared to that of other economists. Here it is compared to developments in other social sciences. Old institutionalism is based on a strategy of seeing mankind as product of culture; old institutionalism is part of culture-based twentieth-centry social science. New institutionalism has developed in a peiord when the trend is to

Anne Mayhew

1989-01-01

225

SOCIOLOGY OF EXPECTATION AND THE E-SOCIAL SCIENCE AGENDA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the relevance of sociology of expectation in conceptualizing some of the tensions emerging in the UK context from the attempts to engage communities of social scientists, anthropologists and colleagues in cognate disciplines with e-social science. As the uptake of e-science proceeds fast in many scientific domains – from genetics to physics, from biology to clinical medicine –

Elisa Pieri

2009-01-01

226

Remembering research: memory and methodology in the social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the conceptualisation and use of memory in the social sciences, both as a methodological tool and as an object of research. The article situates memory as a vast potential resource for the social sciences in the exploration of relations between public and private life, agency and power, and the past, present and future. It goes on to

Emily Keightley

2010-01-01

227

The Virtual Knowledge Studio for the Humanities and Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the goals and theoretical underpinning of a new national programme in e-social science in the Netherlands. Recent transformations in communication and information exchange have created new opportunities for researchers in the humanities and social sciences. It is not self-evident, however, in what ways scholars can best use these possibilities while maintaining and further developing their specific roles

Paul Wouters

2005-01-01

228

What future for the European social sciences and humanities?1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article aims to contribute to the literature on sociology of the social sciences, or, in a broader context, to the sociology of knowledge in the tradition of Karl Mannheim. Its main argument is that the future of the social sciences and the humanities depends on two interrelated dimensions: the development of the disciplinary state of the art and openness

Ronald J. Pohoryles; Andreas Schadauer

2009-01-01

229

Effective Pedagogy in Social Sciences. Educational Practices Series-23  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is a synthesis of research on social sciences teaching that has been shown to have a positive effect on a range of desirable student outcomes: cognitive, skills, participatory and affective outcomes. Education in the social sciences plays an important role in developing students' sense of identity and influencing the ways in which…

Sinnema, Claire; Aitken, Graeme

2012-01-01

230

The Reformed Social Sciences to Reform the University: Mission Impossible?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The core argument is that social science must re-examine its mission and praxis in order to be a significant player in future higher education. This article reviews the results and prospects arising from a four-year international project. Originating in Greenwood and Levin's concern about the social sciences, the project, funded by the Ford…

Greenwood, Davydd J.; Levin, Morten

2008-01-01

231

Information Geography: A Bridge between Engineering and the Social Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper presents the metaphor of engineering and the social sciences located on either side of a chasm and connected by the bridge of information geography. Information geography is not an integral part of engineering and is a new field within geography, a social science discipline. The specialty of information geography is one of the newest…

Paradiso, Maria

2006-01-01

232

Effective Pedagogy in Social Sciences. Educational Practices Series-23  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet is a synthesis of research on social sciences teaching that has been shown to have a positive effect on a range of desirable student outcomes: cognitive, skills, participatory and affective outcomes. Education in the social sciences plays an important role in developing students' sense of identity and influencing the ways in which…

Sinnema, Claire; Aitken, Graeme

2012-01-01

233

Sustainability of e-Infrastructures (for the Social Sciences)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the issue of achieving sustainability in e-Social Science and e-Science more generally. We aim to examine what is meant by sustainability and present a conceptual model that can help to illuminate what constellations of technical and social infrastructure underpin current usage and in what areas interventions may be needed to sustain future operation and usage of an

Alex Voss; Rob Procter; Terry Hewitt; Marzieh Asgari-Targhi; Michael Daw; Christian Baun; Wolfgang Gentzsch

234

Towards a social science of drugs in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the role of social science becoming more prominent in drugs in sport research, this essay sets out an agenda designed to provide a starting point for co-ordinated research in the field. The agenda is derived from efforts across the social sciences, including sports philosophy, sociology, economics, law and psychology (health and educational). These disciplinary statements are augmented by a

Jason Mazanov

2009-01-01

235

The Status of Pre-College Science, Mathematics, and Social Science Education: 1955-1975. Volume III: Social Science Education.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is based on a survey of the literature on needs and practices in pre-college social science education for the period 1955 through 1975. The major task of the study was to identify, analyze, and summarize the literature produced during that two...

K. B. Wiley J. Race

1977-01-01

236

Interdisciplinarity and systems science to improve population health: a view from the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research.  

PubMed

Fueled by the rapid pace of discovery, humankind's ability to understand the ultimate causes of preventable common disease burdens and to identify solutions is now reaching a revolutionary tipping point. Achieving optimal health and well-being for all members of society lies as much in the understanding of the factors identified by the behavioral, social, and public health sciences as by the biological ones. Accumulating advances in mathematical modeling, informatics, imaging, sensor technology, and communication tools have stimulated several converging trends in science: an emerging understanding of epigenomic regulation; dramatic successes in achieving population health-behavior changes; and improved scientific rigor in behavioral, social, and economic sciences. Fostering stronger interdisciplinary partnerships to bring together the behavioral-social-ecologic models of multilevel "causes of the causes" and the molecular, cellular, and, ultimately, physiological bases of health and disease will facilitate breakthroughs to improve the public's health. The strategic vision of the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is rooted in a collaborative approach to addressing the complex and multidimensional issues that challenge the public's health. This paper describes OBSSR's four key programmatic directions (next-generation basic science, interdisciplinary research, systems science, and a problem-based focus for population impact) to illustrate how interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary perspectives can foster the vertical integration of research among biological, behavioral, social, and population levels of analysis over the lifespan and across generations. Interdisciplinary and multilevel approaches are critical both to the OBSSR's mission of integrating behavioral and social sciences more fully into the NIH scientific enterprise and to the overall NIH mission of utilizing science in the pursuit of fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems and the application of that knowledge to extend healthy life and reduce the burdens of illness and disability. PMID:18619402

Mabry, Patricia L; Olster, Deborah H; Morgan, Glen D; Abrams, David B

2008-08-01

237

Statistical Structures Underlying Quantum Mechanics and Social Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Common observations of the unpredictability of human behavior and the influence of one question on the answer to another suggest social science experiments are probabilistic and may be mutually incompatible with one another, characteristics attributed to quantum mechanics (as distinguished from classical mechanics). This paper examines this superficial similarity in depth using the Foulis-Randall Operational Statistics language. In contradistinction to physics, social science deals with complex, open systems for which the set of possible experiments is unknowable and outcome interference is a graded phenomenon resulting from the ways the human brain processes information. It is concluded that social science is, in some ways, “less classical” than quantum mechanics, but that generalized “quantum” structures may provide appropriate descriptions of social science experiments. Specific challenges to extending “quantum” structures to social science are identified.

Wright, Ron

2007-08-01

238

Evolution and the Human Population. Science In a Social CONtext.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

Solomon, Joan

239

Technology, Invention and Industry. Science In a Social CONtext.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

Solomon, Joan

240

Ways of Living. Science In a Social CONtext.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

Solomon, Joan

241

Evolution and the Human Population. Science In a Social CONtext.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

Solomon, Joan

242

Ways of Living. Science In a Social CONtext.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

Solomon, Joan

243

The Standard Model in the history of the Natural Sciences, Econometrics, and the social sciences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, scientists appropriated Newton's laws of motion as a model for the conduct of any other field of investigation that would purport to be a science. This early form of a Standard Model eventually informed the basis of analogies for the mathematical expression of phenomena previously studied qualitatively, such as cohesion, affinity, heat, light, electricity, and magnetism. James Clerk Maxwell is known for his repeated use of a formalized version of this method of analogy in lectures, teaching, and the design of experiments. Economists transferring skills learned in physics made use of the Standard Model, especially after Maxwell demonstrated the value of conceiving it in abstract mathematics instead of as a concrete and literal mechanical analogy. Haavelmo's probability approach in econometrics and R. Fisher's Statistical Methods for Research Workers brought a statistical approach to bear on the Standard Model, quietly reversing the perspective of economics and the social sciences relative to that of physics. Where physicists, and Maxwell in particular, intuited scientific method as imposing stringent demands on the quality and interrelations of data, instruments, and theory in the name of inferential and comparative stability, statistical models and methods disconnected theory from data by removing the instrument as an essential component. New possibilities for reconnecting economics and the social sciences to Maxwell's sense of the method of analogy are found in Rasch's probabilistic models for measurement.

Fisher, W. P., Jr.

2010-07-01

244

Policy Science and Social Policy: Implications for the Social Work Curriculum  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper briefly traces the evolution of the policy sciences. It views policy science as a technical policy development discipline. The impediments to successful integration of policy science content into social policy curriculum are analyzed and suggestions to improve utilization are made. The paper suggests that critical analysis and constructive utilization of the techniques of the policy sciences will evolve

BRIAN SEGAL

1976-01-01

245

Evaluation of Life Sciences and Social Sciences Course Books in Term of Societal Sexuality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study aims to evaluate primary school Life Sciences (1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades) and Social Sciences (4th, 5th, and 6th grades) course books in terms of gender discrimination. This study is a descriptive study aiming to evaluate the primary school Life Sciences (1st, 2nd, 3rd grades) and Social Sciences (4th, 5th, and 6th grades) course books…

Aykac, Necdet

2012-01-01

246

Bridging the social and the biomedical: engaging the social and political sciences in HIV research.  

PubMed

This supplement to the Journal of the International AIDS Society focuses on the engagement of the social and political sciences within HIV research and, in particular, maintaining a productive relationship between social and biomedical perspectives on HIV. It responds to a number of concerns raised primarily by social scientists, but also recognized as important by biomedical and public health researchers. These concerns include how best to understand the impact of medical technologies (such as HIV treatments, HIV testing, viral load testing, male circumcision, microbicides, and pre-and post-exposure prophylaxis) on sexual cultures, drug practices, relationships and social networks in different cultural, economic and political contexts. The supplement is also concerned with how we might examine the relationship between HIV prevention and treatment, understand the social and political mobilization required to tackle HIV, and sustain the range of disciplinary approaches needed to inform and guide responses to the global pandemic. The six articles included in the supplement demonstrate the value of fostering high quality social and political research to inform, guide and challenge our collaborative responses to HIV/AIDS. PMID:21968015

Kippax, Susan C; Holt, Martin; Friedman, Samuel R

2011-09-27

247

Teaching Science through a Systems Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on the recommendation of the AAAS and the NRC, middle level science is the rightful introduction for a systems approach, including the study of its parts, subsystems, interconnections, and interrelationships. Dr. Seuss's "The Lorax" provides an excellent opportunity to combine ecological consequences within a systems approach (Sweeney 2001).…

Llewellyn, Douglas; Johnson, Scott

2008-01-01

248

Determinism and the Antiquated Deontology of the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article shows how the social sciences, particularly human geography, rejected hard determinism by the mid-twentieth century largely on the deontological basis that it is irreconcilable with social justice, yet this rejection came just before a burst of creative development in consequentialist theories of social justice that problematize a facile rejection of determinism on moral grounds, a development that has

Clint Ballinger

249

Ageing science, health care and social inclusion of older people  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present preliminary findings from a study of the social, ethical and cultural aspects of ageing science and medicine. The paper draws on a collaborative, ongoing project between life scientists and sociologists, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council's (ESRC) New Dynamics of Ageing Programme1 and the ESRC Centre for the Economic and Social Aspects of

Joanna Latimer; Terence Davis; Mark Bagley; David Kipling

2011-01-01

250

The Social Sciences and Geographic Education: A Reader.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book brings together articles by educators, geographers, social scientists, and those whose competence and interests cross two or more of these fields. Geography as a discipline has played an important part in social studies/social science education. These chapters are representative of current thinking on many facets of the interaction…

Ball, John M., Ed.; And Others

251

Sharing Techniques and Experience in a Collaborative e-Social Science Pilot Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper draws on insights from a collective ethnographic approach in the development of a multidisciplinary and collaborative e-social science project. Our pilot demonstrator explored the multidimensionality of social exclusion with regard to young people, neighborhood and crime, and in so doing developed user-led and data-driven Grid technologies. This collective ethnographic approach fostered reflexive development, which we define as 'situated

Bridgette Wessels; Max Craglia; Robin S. Smith

252

The ERIC Clearinghouse for Social Studies/Social Science Education (ERIC/ChESS)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The ERIC CLEARINGHOUSE FOR SOCIAL STUDIES/SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION (ERIC/ChESS) recently announce its new WWW Site. The site highlights the services of ERIC/ChESS and offers links to valuable Internet resources for social studies education, AskERIC virtual Library, other ERIC clearinghouses, the Indiana University School of Education, and the Social Studies Development Center.

253

Social Psychology, Social Science, and Economics: Twentieth Century Progress and Problems, Twenty-First Century Prospects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Stimulated by social scientists' and especially social psychologists' contributions during World War II, as well as by America's post-war economic and population growth, the period from 1945 to 1970 was widely viewed as a "Golden Age" for American social science. Interdisciplinary social psychology arguably was in the vanguard of these…

House, James S.

2008-01-01

254

Dear Colleague Letter - Director, Division of Social and Economic Sciences (Closes: 10/14/2005)  

NSF Publications Database

... ARLINGTON, VA 22230 Title: Division of Social and Economic Sciences Division Director Employment ... the position of Division Director for Social and Economic Sciences (SES). The Division Director, a ...

255

The Sciences: An Integrated Approach (Second Edition)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is a highly attractive book aimed at non-science majors at American universities and corresponds approximately to A-level in the UK. When one looks at the book in more detail one discovers the influence and capability of computer-controlled publishing. Much of the book is identical to an alternative text, The Physical Sciences: An Integrated Approach reviewed in Physics Education previously

David Lovett

1998-01-01

256

The social shaping approach to technology foresight  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social shaping of technology (SST) approach has been developed as a response and extension to the ideas of techno-economic rationality and linear conceptions of technology development and its consequences. The SST approach seems especially promising in areas of technology where visions are manifold, societal interests conflicting, and applications and markets are non-existing or still under construction. The emerging high

Michael Søgaard Jørgensen; Ulrik Jørgensen; Christian Clausen

2009-01-01

257

Educational Services Recommendation Using Social Network Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this work we propose a framework for courses recommendation. We use a social network approach to discover relations between\\u000a users and discover social networks reflecting the patterns according to which the services are used. The topological analysis\\u000a of this network allows us to detect dense groups of users which tend to use educational. The method for educational services\\u000a and

Krzysztof Juszczyszyn; Agnieszka Prusiewicz

2011-01-01

258

Bad Science and Its Social Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Investigates three types of bad science: (1) cultural prejudice based on scientific errors (polygenism, phrenology, reification through intelligence testing); (2) unethical science (Tuskegee syphilis experiments, tobacco companies and research); and (3) unwitting errors (pesticides, chlorofluorocarbons). (Contains 50 references.) (SK)|

Zeidler, Dana L.; Sadler, Troy D.; Berson, Michael J.; Fogelman, Aimee L.

2002-01-01

259

Putting Social Sciences to the Test - Lecture Notes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The course is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them.

Mit

260

Social Media Accreditation Opens for Orbital Sciences Antares Demo Flight  

NASA Website

NASA is inviting social media users to apply for credentials to attend the launch for the demo flight of Orbital Sciences Corporation's Antares Rocket, currently targeted for no earlier than April 16.

261

Natural science and medicine; social science and medicine: Some methodological controversies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper is in five parts. A discussion of the flaws in social science as seen from the viewpoint of medical science is followed by a consideration of what they hold in common--the shared institutions and ideal programme of Science. The major differences that still remain are then characterized in two further sections; the first concentrates on the issues raised

P. M. Strong; K. McPherson

1982-01-01

262

Towards teaching science for social responsibility: An examination of flaws in science, technology and society  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we continue our search for a socially responsible science education by an examination of the trends in the Science, Technology and Society movement. These trends reflect differing ideological perspectives and result in courses which serve different ends. We identify two major flaws in the movement that inhibits the realization of a schooling in science dedicated to democracy.

Roger T. Cross; Ronald F. Price

1991-01-01

263

Teaching Science Using Stories: The Storyline Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Storytelling is an age-old and powerful means of communication that can be used as an effective teaching strategy in the science classroom. This article describes the authors' experiences implementing the Storyline Approach, an inquiry-based teaching method first introduced by Kieran Egan (1986), in the context of teaching the concept of air…

Isabelle, Aaron D.

2007-01-01

264

The Cornell Theory Center Arts and Social Sciences Gateway  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Cornell Theory Center Arts and Social Sciences Gateway provides links to language arts, foreign languages, the fine arts, social studies, and history. It is aimed at "all K-12 students and educators," and was created by elementary and high school librarians, with help from the Theory Center Information Group. It joins the Theory Center's Math and Science, and Educators Gateways, which have been available since last Spring.

Mancini, Jo-Ann.; Nosanchuk, Barbara.

1997-01-01

265

Pragmatism as a Philosophy of the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article introduces and critically analyses Richard Rorty’s neo-pragmatism as a contribution to the philosophy of social sciences. Although Rorty has written little about philosophy of social sciences as such, it is argued that his overall philosophical position has significant ramifications for this subject area. The first part of the article sets out the implications of Rorty’s neo-pragmatism for various

Patrick Baert

2004-01-01

266

[Constructing a language for social sciences: Condorcet's Tableau historique].  

PubMed

Condorcet started working on "social sciences" many years before the French Revolution. Although published in 1793-1794, his Tableau historique, was first conceived in the 1770s. It examined the necessary conditions for scientific reasoning and scientific languages. Analyzing the obstacles that stood in the way of the development of social sciences, Condorcet used case studies to offer a reflection on the making of a language that would be scientific and accessible to the enlightened citizen as well. PMID:22851416

Schandeler, Jean-Pierre

2012-01-01

267

Quantum mechanics and the social sciences: After hermeneutics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Quantum mechanics is interpreted, in the spirit of Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg, as about physical objects in so far as these are revealed by and within the local, social, and historical process of measurement. An analysis of the hermeneutical aspect of quantum mechanical measurement reveals close analogues with the hermeneutical social/historical sciences. The hermeneutical analysis of science requires the move from the epistemological attitude to an ontological one.

Heelan, Patrick A.

1995-04-01

268

Shaping a Science of Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Social workers provide more social services to populations across the life span than any other human service profession, including psychiatry, nursing, and psychology. The scientific methodologies and the scientific knowledge relevant to social services have expanded dramatically in the last 30 years. Using the two indicators of the total number…

Brekke, John S.

2012-01-01

269

Shaping a Science of Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Social workers provide more social services to populations across the life span than any other human service profession, including psychiatry, nursing, and psychology. The scientific methodologies and the scientific knowledge relevant to social services have expanded dramatically in the last 30 years. Using the two indicators of the total number…

Brekke, John S.

2012-01-01

270

Economics in History and the Social Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Papers presented by social scientists at a 1974 Joint Council seminar designed to assist authors and publishers in improving existing materials or developing new texts in social studies are reproduced in this volume. The seven papers focus on how to integrate economics into elementary and secondary social studies and history courses. The first…

Joint Council on Economic Education, New York, NY.

271

The theory of social functions: challenges for computational social science and multi-agent learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

A basic claim of this paper is that the foundational theoretical problem of the social sciences — the possibility of unconscious, unplanned forms of cooperation and intelligence among intentional agents (the very hard issue of the 'invisible hand', of the 'spontaneous social order' but also of 'social functions') — will eventually be clarified thanks to the contribution of AI (and,

Cristiano Castelfranchi

2001-01-01

272

Graduate Social Work Education: Impact on Social Change And Behavioral Science Orientation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The impact of graduate social work education on the acquisition of a social change and behavioral science orientation on students was studied. A comparison of beginning and ending scores using various measures showed an intensification of commitment to both areas for the whole class. By graduation, casework majors were the least committed to a social change orientation, and community organization

ELFRIEDE G. SCHLESINGER

1976-01-01

273

Revisioning Applied Social Sciences in Chicano/a Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many contemporary Chicana/o scholars have contributed to Chicano studies by focusing their research on social sciences applied to Mexican Americans. Strands of important research that intersect with Chicano studies are reviewed in the areas of psychology, political science, economics, sociology, public health, and education. Communications between…

de la Torre, Adela

2001-01-01

274

Science and Ideology in Economic, Political, and Social Thought  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper has two sources: One is my own research in three broad areas: business cycles, economic measurement and social choice. In all of these fields I attempted to apply the basic precepts of the scientific method as it is understood in the natural sciences. I found that my effort at using natural science methods in economics was met with

Claude Hillinger

2006-01-01

275

Science and Ideology in Economic, Political and Social Thought  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper has two sources: One is my own research in three broad areas: business cycles, economic measurement and social choice. In all of these fields I attempted to apply the basic precepts of the scientific method as it is understood in the natural sciences. I found that my effort at using natural science methods in economics was met with

Claude Hillinger

2008-01-01

276

Science and ideology in economic, political and social thought  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper has two sources: One is my own research in three broad areas: business cycles, economic measurement and social choice. In all of these fields I attempted to apply the basic precepts of the scientific method as it is understood in the natural sciences. I found that my effort at using natural science methods in economics was met with

Claude Hillinger

2007-01-01

277

The instinct debate and the standard social science model  

Microsoft Academic Search

In light of the claim that evolutionary psychology is a ‘new paradigm’, a ‘new science of the mind’ (e.g., Buss 1995; Cosmides and Tooby 2001), this paper reviews the lengthy and intense effort made in the late nineteenth and first quarter of the twentieth century to establish the concept of instinct in psychology and the social sciences. Whilst a single

Simon Jonathan Hampton

2004-01-01

278

Holism versus Reductionism in Modern Social Science Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since an early stage in most of thetechnical sciences, and during the last fewdecades in many of the social sciences,reductionistic research has become a mainstream typeof empirical research. This research, to becharacterised methodologically in this article, hasproven to be very successful in buildinga body of abstract and generalisable theoreticalknowledge, for reasons that are made clearin this article. However, does reductionism

Piet J. M. Verschuren

2001-01-01

279

Advancing the Art of Simulation in the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advancing the state of the art of simulation in the social sciences requires appreciating the unique value of simulation as a third way of doing science, in contrast to both induction and deduction. Simulation can be an effective tool for discovering surprising consequences of simple assumptions. This essay offers advice for doing simulation research, focusing on the programming of a

Robert Axelrod

1997-01-01

280

Team Experiences for Science and Social Studies Preservice Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes how senior-level, preservice teacher certification candidates in secondary science and social science methods classes work in teams to prepare instructional materials on a community-based issue (such as the effect of the deposition of arsenic in a creek and small city lake). Argues that such projects provide valuable learning…

Burlbaw, Lynn M.; Borowiec, Jonathan B.; James, Robert K.

2001-01-01

281

Social Issues: The Potential Contribution of Primary Science and Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the secondary curriculum is often considered an appropriate focus for future-directed studies, elementary science and technology education can contribute significantly to the socialization process. Science education can also help shape youngsters' attitudes and capacity to understand and influence scientific and technological impacts on…

Skamp, Keith

1987-01-01

282

Putting Sociology First—Reconsidering the Role of the Social in `Nature of Science' Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Contrasting two examples from 2005, a creationism-trial and a recent textbook, the article shows two different ways of employing social considerations to demarcate science from non-science. Drawing conclusions from the comparison, and citing some of the leading proponents of science studies, the paper argues for a novel perspective in teaching nature of science (NOS) issues, one that grows out of sociological and anthropological considerations of (scientific) expertise. In contrast to currently dominant epistemic approaches to teach NOS, this view makes it possible to incorporate epistemic and social norms in a unified framework that can alleviate presently problematic aspects of NOS modules, and can help students appreciate science as a privileged form of knowledge-production without becoming scientistic. A pilot module to carry out the above is presented and assessed, showing that a broad sociological starting point is closer to the lifeworld of students, and that traditional epistemic considerations need not be compromised.

Zemplén, Gábor Á.

2009-05-01

283

An Announcement Regarding the New Journal of Abstracts in the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Social Science Research Council announces plans to establish a Journal of Abstracts in the Social Sciences. These plans are the result of five years study by a committee of the Council which has canvassed the situation with respect to the needs, resources, and purposes to be served by a comprehensive abstract service in the social sciences. Social Science Abstracts

F. Stuart Chapin

1928-01-01

284

Computerized Simulation in the Social Sciences: A Survey and Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|After years at the periphery of the social sciences, simulation is now emerging as an important and widely used tool for understanding social phenomena. Through simulation, researchers can identify causal effects, specify critical parameter estimates, and clarify the state of the art with respect to what is understood about how processes evolve…

Garson, G. David

2009-01-01

285

A social science research agenda on the financial crisis  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a need to develop a social science research agenda on finance, financialisation and the financial crisis. The financial crisis was not anticipated by most social scientists. Indeed, the development of new financial instruments was supposed to manage risks effectively. Yet, financialisation has led to devastating effects on the economy and society, creating a deep and widespread recession, with

Sylvia Walby

2010-01-01

286

Energy: A Bibliography of Social Science and Related Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This bibliography contains 2,124 listings pertaining primarily to the social factors involved with energy. Some entries report physical energy information as it relates to social science analysis. Entries are listed by author with a subject index for cross reference. Subject categories include: aesthetic, humanistic, and literary; agriculture;…

Morrison, Denton E.; And Others

287

Higher education, the social sciences and national development in Nigeria  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the current debate about the place of higher education in national development, and evaluates the contribution of social science research and knowledge to development policy and practice. It considers how academics in general and social scientists in particular can collaborate with policy-makers and practitioners to enrich development work, and thereby promote overall national progress. We need to

Geoffrey I. Nwaka

2000-01-01

288

Towards a feminist HCI methodology: social science, feminism, and HCI  

Microsoft Academic Search

With substantial efforts in ubiquitous computing, ICT4D, and sustainable interaction design, among others, HCI is increasingly engaging with matters of social change that go beyond the immediate qualities of interaction. In doing so, HCI takes on scientific and moral concerns. This paper explores the potential for feminist social science to contribute to and potentially benefit from HCI's rising interest in

Shaowen Bardzell; Jeffrey Bardzell

2011-01-01

289

Computerized Simulation in the Social Sciences: A Survey and Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After years at the periphery of the social sciences, simulation is now emerging as an important and widely used tool for understanding social phenomena. Through simulation, researchers can identify causal effects, specify critical parameter estimates, and clarify the state of the art with respect to what is understood about how processes evolve…

Garson, G. David

2009-01-01

290

SOCIAL SCIENCE EVIDENCE IN THE COURTROOM: Daubert and Beyond?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent Supreme Court decisions suggest that judges should conduct a gatekeeping inquiry before admitting testimony that is based on psychology or other social sciences. Perspectives from other areas of applied social research may be of use to psychologists and others as they consider these decisions by the Court. A view of research as \\

Melvin M. Mark

1999-01-01

291

Information science, historical changes and social aspects: a nordic outlook  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyses and discusses some aspects concerning the historical and social context of information science and information institutions. The starting point is a speech on the history of the librarian delivered in 1934 by the Spanish philosopher, José Ortega y Gasset. On the one hand Ortega y Gasset makes a brief analysis of the social need for books and

Anders Ørom

2000-01-01

292

Teaching Science Using Stories: The Storyline Approach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Storytelling is an age-old and powerful means of communication that can be used as an effective teaching strategy in the science classroom. This article describes the authors' experiences implementing the Storyline Approach, an inquiry-based teaching method first introduced by Kieran Egan (1986), in the context of teaching the concept of air pressure to seventh- and eighth-grade students. Also included are story-shaping strategies and history-of-science resources to assist in the creation of your own story.

Isabelle, Aaron D.

2007-10-01

293

Learning to teach science for social justice in urban schools  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study looks at how beginner teachers learn to teach science for social justice in urban schools. The research questions are: (1) what views do beginner teachers hold about teaching science for social justice in urban schools? (2) How do beginner teachers' views about teaching science for social justice develop as part of their learning? In looking at teacher learning, I take a situative perspective that defines learning as increased participation in a community of practice. I use the case study methodology with five teacher participants as the individual units of analysis. In measuring participation, I draw from mathematics education literature that offers three domains of professional practice: Content, pedagogy and professional identity. In addition, I focus on agency as an important component of increased participation from a social justice perspective. My findings reveal two main tensions that arose as teachers considered what it meant to teach science from a social justice perspective: (1) Culturally responsive teaching vs. "real" science and (2) Teaching science as a political act. In negotiating these tensions, teachers drew on a variety of pedagogical and conceptual tools offered in USE that focused on issues of equity, access, place-based pedagogy, student agency, ownership and culture as a toolkit. Further, in looking at how the five participants negotiated these tensions in practice, I describe four variables that either afforded or constrained teacher agency and consequently the development of their own identity and role as socially just educators. These four variables are: (1) Accessing and activating social, human and cultural capital, (2) reconceptualizing culturally responsive pedagogical tools, (3) views of urban youth and (4) context of participation. This study has implications for understanding the dialectical relationship between agency and social justice identity for beginner teachers who are learning how to teach for social justice. Also, it suggests teacher agency as an important domain of professional practice when measuring teacher learning from a situative perspective.

Vora, Purvi

294

Diffusion of latent semantic analysis as a research tool: A social network analysis approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) is a relatively new research tool with a wide range of applications in different fields ranging from discourse analysis to cognitive science, from information retrieval to machine learning and so on. In this paper, we chart the development and diffusion of LSA as a research tool using Social Network Analysis (SNA) approach that reveals the social

Yasar Tonta; Hamid R. Darvish

2010-01-01

295

Social, ethical and technical issues in informatics—An integrated approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines a didactic approach for computer science courses based on the concept of socio-technical Informatics Systems, demonstrating the linkage between computational issues and their manifold social contexts as well as their close relation to social and ethical issues. The analysis of the product–process relationship of software development as a major element of the construction of Informatics Systems leads

Johannes Magenheim; Carsten Schulte

2006-01-01

296

Sport Activity - Systematic Approach to Science, Technology and Art Part One: Supportive Sport Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Today's sport has different aims and forms. It is investigated by many sciences: basic, supportive, real sport sciences. There exist also many technological, cultural and artistic approaches to sport. The paper presents a systematic review of all supportive sciences devoted to sports. There are: humanities, economy, formal and natural sciences, life sciences, health sciences, pathology and medicine. Within humanities there

S. Erdmann

297

Social Science Energy Review: a quarterly publication. Vol. 1, No. 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Yale University Institution for Social and Policy Studies Mapping Project on Energy and the Social Sciences brings together an interdisciplinary group of Yale and visiting faculty, ISPS staff, and Yale graduate students meeting weekly to discuss topics in energy and the social sciences and to study and evaluate the importance for social policy of existing and potential social science

2008-01-01

298

Empathy: A Social Cognitive Neuroscience Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been recent widespread interest in the neural underpinnings of the experience of empathy. In this review, we take a social cognitive neuroscience approach to understanding the existing literature on the neuroscience of empathy. A growing body of work suggests that we come to understand and share in the experiences of others by commonly recruiting the same neural structures

Lian T. Rameson; Matthew D. Lieberman

2009-01-01

299

Social Skills Instruction: A Collaborative Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual and the accompanying videotape are designed to provide a practical way to teach social skills to all students in grades K-8, including students with disabilities, in the classroom and across other school settings. The strategy's collaborative approach was designed for general and special education teachers who are working with other…

Warger, Cynthia L.; Rutherford, Robert, Jr.

300

Modes of Social Science Engagement in Community Infrastructure Design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new space for social science is opening within information infrastructure design projects. These are large-scale, distributed scientific collaborations with the dual goal of building community and technical resources for that community. These endeavors are complex and ambitious combinations of research, information technology deployment, and bringing together of heterogeneous communities (Finholt 2004). It is becoming increasingly common for such projects to seek out the ‘services' of social scientists not only as researchers but also as project participants in building community, organizing collaboration or assisting in the implementation of novel technologies. These are opportunities for social science. In this paper we ask ‘how best to make use of these opportunities?'

Ribes, David; Baker, Karen

301

Integrating systems approaches into pharmaceutical sciences.  

PubMed

During the first week of December 2007, the European Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences (EUFEPS) and BioSim, the major European Network of Excellence on Systems Biology, held a challenging conference on the use of mathematical models in the drug development process. More precisely, the purpose of the conference was to promote the 'Integration of Systems Approaches into Pharmaceutical Sciences' in view of optimising the development of new effective drugs. And a challenge this is, considering both the high attrition rates in the pharmaceutical industry and the failure of finding definitive drug solutions for many of the diseases that plague mankind today. The conference was co-sponsored by the American College of Clinical Pharmacology, the European Center for Pharmaceutical Medicine, and the Swiss Society of Pharmaceutical Sciences and, besides representatives from the European Regulatory Agencies and FDA, the meeting was attended by 75 industrial and some 45 academic participants. PMID:18602464

Westerhoff, Hans V; Mosekilde, Erik; Noe, Christian R; Clemensen, Anne Marie

2008-06-14

302

Seeking a sustainable approach for computational science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many are now questioning whether our current approaches to developing software for science and engineering are sustainable. In particular, can we deliver to society and the nation the full benefits expected from high-performance simulation at the peta and exascales? Or is innovative science being stifled by the increasing complexities of all aspects of our problem space (rapidly changing hardware, software, multidisciplinary physics, etc.)? Focusing on applications in chemistry and materials science, and motivated by the co-design of exascale hardware and software, I will discuss many of these issues including how chemistry has already been forced to adopt solutions that differ quite sharply to those in the mainstream, and how these solutions position us well for the technology transitions now under way. Radical changes in how we compute, going all the way back to the underlying numerical representation and algorithms used for the simulation, also promise great enhancements to both developer productivity and the accuracy of simulations.

Harrison, Robert

2013-03-01

303

Social impacts of the development of science, technology and innovation indicators  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the social impacts of the development of science, technology and innovation indicators. The approach deals separately with the development process and with the use of the indicators that result. Underlying the discussion is an assumption that indicators are a technology, a product, which governs behaviour, is modified by users (outside of the producer community), and develops in

Fred Gault

2011-01-01

304

A Case Study of "Old" Versus "New" Curriculum Materials Use in Elementary Science and Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a case study approach, this paper examines how science and social studies curriculum materials are used in the elementary classroom. The major questions of interest to the study are: What differences in curriculum materials use and classroom activity patterns are evident when old programs are replaced with new ones? To what extent do…

Cornbleth, Catherine

305

A social History of Soviet Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The archive includes a great number of archive materials, recollections, interviews, letters, diaries, bibliography, internet sources concerning history of bolshevik and stalinist purges against scientists in the USSR since 1917 till 1968. The archive is categorized by few divisions: scientists, university teachers, associate professors, professors, members of the Academy of Science of the USSR, Corresponding-Members of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. A great number of research articles and recollections by purged are included. The articles are written not only by historians of science but by scientists also. A great role by P.L. Kapitza in the saving of Soviet science from purges is underlined. The project was realized under the support by SOROS foundation (2000), Russian Foundation for fundamental Research (2002-2004) and Russian State National Foundation (2007).

Tomilin, K. A.

306

What are the Needs in Precollege Science, Mathematics, and Social Science Education. Views from the Field.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report is an analysis by nine education organizations of an earlier seven volume collection of related studies entitled 'The Status of Pre-College Science, Mathematics, and Social Studies Education.' The organizations were: American Association for th...

1980-01-01

307

Conceptual framework for behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research  

PubMed Central

HIV vaccine clinical research occurs within a context where biomedical science and social issues are interlinked. Previous HIV vaccine research has considered behavioral and social issues, but often treated them as independent of clinical research processes. Systematic attention to the intersection of behavioral and social issues within a defined clinical research framework is needed to address gaps, such as those related to participation in trials, completion of trials, and the overall research experience. Rigorous attention to these issues at project inception can inform trial design and conduct by matching research approaches to the context in which trials are to be conducted. Conducting behavioral and social sciences research concurrent with vaccine clinical research is important because it can help identify potential barriers to trial implementation, as well as ultimate acceptance and dissemination of trial results. We therefore propose a conceptual framework for behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research and use examples from the behavioral and social science literature to demonstrate how the model can facilitate identification of significant areas meriting additional exploration. Standardized use of the conceptual framework could improve HIV vaccine clinical research efficiency and relevance.

Lau, Chuen-Yen; Swann, Edith M.; Singh, Sagri; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Meissner, Helen I.; Stansbury, James P.

2011-01-01

308

The national science foundation and support for social science computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nearly two years ago, I spent several months working as a Professional Assistant in the Office of Computing Activities at the National Science Foundation in Washington, D.C. Although my assignment was to develop a concept for a program on \\

Ronald E. Anderson

1974-01-01

309

CESSDA: Council of European Social Science Data Archives  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Council of European Social Science Data Archives (CESSDA) facilitates the distribution of electronic data for social science education and research in Europe. CESSDA promotes data sharing by providing the Integrated Data Catalogue (IDC) at its Website. The multilingual IDC allows users to conduct a broadcast search of up to eleven social science data catalogs located all over the world, including catalogs in Israel, Australia, the US, and Europe. The IDC's simple catalog design--based on a Z39.50-WAIS protocol--and interface make it easy to use. The clearly displayed search results are ordered in accordance to the amount of hits per record in proportion to the total size of the record. Mirrors for the IDC are available in both the UK and Australia to foster quicker searching around the globe. In addition to the IDC, the CESSDA site supplies three clickable international maps that link users to the sites of 32 other data archives.

310

Toward a transnational history of the social sciences.  

PubMed

Historical accounts of the social sciences have too often accepted local or national institutions as a self-evident framework of analysis, instead of considering them as being embedded in transnational relations of various kinds. Evolving patterns of transnational mobility and exchange cut through the neat distinction between the local, the national, and the inter-national, and thus represent an essential component in the dynamics of the social sciences, as well as a fruitful perspective for rethinking their historical development. In this programmatic outline, it is argued that a transnational history of the social sciences may be fruitfully understood on the basis of three general mechanisms, which have structured the transnational flows of people and ideas in decisive ways: (a) the functioning of international scholarly institutions, (b) the transnational mobility of scholars, and (c) the politics of trans-national exchange of nonacademic institutions. The article subsequently examines and illustrates each of these mechanisms. PMID:18409207

Heilbron, Johan; Guilhot, Nicolas; Jeanpierre, Laurent

2008-01-01

311

Social-science Perspectives on Bioethics: Predictive Genetic Testing (PGT) in Asia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this essay, I indicate how social-science approaches can throw light on predictive genetic testing (PGT) in various societal\\u000a contexts. In the first section, I discuss definitions of various forms of PGT, and point out their inherent ambiguity and\\u000a inappropriateness when taken out of an ideal–typical context. In section two, I argue further that an ethics approach proceeding\\u000a from the

Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner

2007-01-01

312

Comparing alternatives to the Web of Science for coverage of the social sciences' literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Web of Science is no longer the only database which offers citation indexing of the social sciences. Scopus, CSA Illumina and Google Scholar are new entrants in this market. The holdings and citation records of these four databases were assessed against two sets of data one drawn from the 2001 Research Assessment Exercise and the other from the International

Michael Norris; Charles Oppenheim

2007-01-01

313

Towards teaching science for social responsibility: An examination of flaws in science, technology and society  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we continue our search for a socially responsible science education by an examination of the trends in the Science,\\u000a Technology and Society movement. These trends reflect differing ideological perspectives and result in courses which serve\\u000a different ends. We identify two major flaws in the movement that inhibits the realization of a schooling in science dedicated\\u000a to democracy.

Roger T. Cross; Ronald F. Price

1991-01-01

314

Reflections on the Disciplinary Gulf between the Natural and Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The general purpose of this essay is to explore key features of the disciplinary gulf between the natural and social sciences, and, in particular, differences in fundamental assumptions concerning the nature and purpose of knowledge. The essay contrasts the claims of the natural sciences to objectivity and universality with those of the social sciences, especially the qualitative social sciences, to

Susan Wright

2006-01-01

315

Linking physics, humanities, and social sciences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville won funding from the federal interagency competition, Leadership Opportunity in Science and Humanities Education, which supported interdisciplinary courses combining the natural sciences and the humanities. The author analyzes her experiences developing a very successful and popular interdisciplinary course, entitled ``The Atomic Era,'' which features a unique combination of physics, sociology and German studies taught jointly by a physicist, a sociologist, and a Germanist. The objectives of the course, the laboratories and demonstrations, instructional goals, !!assignments, organization, testing, student and faculty assessment, expenses, and the special challenges of coordinating three faculty members and a wide variety of topics and perspectives are addressed and analyzed.

Carstens-Wickham, Belinda

2001-02-01

316

Response: From Fish and Bicycles to a Science of Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

John Brekke challenges the field and profession of social work to define and develop the "science of social work". This response to Brekke's paper identifies the premises undergirding a discussion of the science of social work related to (1) a definition of "science";; (2 ) an organizing principle for social work; (3) a recognition that the task…

Marsh, Jeanne Cay

2012-01-01

317

Social Science and the Third World: Constraints on the United States.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order for American social scientists to effectively contribute to international social science, they must confront two challenges. They must come to terms with the problems generated by the fragmentation of the American social science disciplines and with the involvement of American social science with American foreign policy. (IS)

Prewitt, Kenneth

1983-01-01

318

Response: From Fish and Bicycles to a Science of Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|John Brekke challenges the field and profession of social work to define and develop the "science of social work". This response to Brekke's paper identifies the premises undergirding a discussion of the science of social work related to (1) a definition of "science";; (2 ) an organizing principle for social work; (3) a recognition that the task…

Marsh, Jeanne Cay

2012-01-01

319

[The knowledge on health and the social sciences].  

PubMed

In this paper the main question is about the health complete interpretation. It is an epistemological discussion. It starts with the obstacles in the comprehension from several sciences (i.e. phisiology, epidemiology, and sociology) about the health as a social and collective problem. The point is how to do the research and the conceptual interpretation. Finally, the authors explain theirs point of view: the most important is the nature and specificity of the objet health. Not view disciplinary. They show a model to understand the analysis of the health from the social sciences perspective. PMID:8548675

Jarillo Soto, E C; Arroyave Loaiza, M G

320

Social Science Perspectives on Hazards and Vulnerability Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a What makes people and places vulnerable to natural hazards? What technologies and methods are required to assess this vulnerability?\\u000a These questions are used to illustrate the circumstances that place people and localities at risk, and those circumstances\\u000a that enhance or reduce the ability of people and places to respond to environmental threats. Vulnerability science is an emerging\\u000a interdisciplinary perspective that

Susan L. Cutter

321

Social sciences for food and health research.  

PubMed

Healthier eating is a global challenge for chronic disease control. Food and Health Research in Europe (FAHRE) surveyed research structures and programmes in 32 countries, and reviewed research needs and gaps across nine themes. Food processing and safety research, nutrition and molecular research, and disease-based clinical research are strong; but research is weak on determinants of disease and healthier eating through policies and changing behaviours. Biomedical and commercial research for patents contrast with social research for the public interest. More funding and capacity support should go to social research in the food and health sector. PMID:23475806

McCarthy, Mark

2013-03-09

322

Science, Social Work, Prevention: Finding the Intersections  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Over the past 25 years the science of prevention of adolescent health and behavior problems has matured as a result of longitudinal studies of predictors of these problems and controlled studies of preventive interventions focused on those predictors that have revealed efficacious prevention strategies. This article builds on three Aaron Rosen…

Hawkins, J. David

2006-01-01

323

Fragmentation and recombination of the social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of science tells a story of both the advance of knowledge and the multiplication of scientific disciplines in tandem with that advance. The Greeks knew only philosophy, with individual efforts also in the fields of history, music, and mathematics. By the time universities first appear in Europe of the High Middle Ages, there are seven recognized disciplines: logic,

Mattei Dogan; Robert Pahre

1989-01-01

324

Mining Social Networks on the Mexican Computer Science Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scientific communities around the world are increasingly paying more attention to collaborative networks to ensure they remain\\u000a competitive, the Computer Science (CS) community is not an exception. Discovering collaboration opportunities is a challenging\\u000a problem in social networks. Traditional social network analysis allows us to observe which authors are already collaborating,\\u000a how often they are related to each other, and how

Huberto Ayanegui-Santiago; Orion Fausto Reyes-galaviz; Alberto Chávez-Aragón; Federico Ramírez-Cruz; Alberto Portilla; Luciano García-Bañuelos

2009-01-01

325

Computer Simulations: Inelegant Mathematics and Worse Social Science?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of three positively evaluated social science computer simulations is reviewed as a basis for comments on current debates about the utility of social simulations: Colby's treatment of neurotic belief dynamics, the Abelson?Bernstein simulation of fluoridation controversies and Alker's projected computer model of United Nations parliamentary diplomacy.In each case, the non?analytical nature of the computer model is not due

Hayward R. Alker Jr

1974-01-01

326

Situational logic in social science inquiry: From economics to criminology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Karl R. Popper proposed that the method of explanation in economics, or situational logic, should become the general model\\u000a for analyses across the social sciences. This article makes good Popper's proposal by extending situational logic to a social\\u000a problem outside the traditional scope of economics: crime. Specifically, the discussion reviews models developed by economist\\u000a Gary S. Becker and criminologist Ronald

Paul Knepper

2007-01-01

327

The social development model: An integrated approach to delinquency prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a comprehensive developmental approach to preventing youth crime based on the social development model, an integration of social control theory and social learning theory. The model asserts that the most important units of socialization, family, schools, peers, and community, influence behavior sequentially. Positive socialization is achieved when youths have the opportunity within each unit to be involved

J. David Hawkins; Joseph G. Weis

1985-01-01

328

Geographically Referenced Data for Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

An estimated 80% of all information has a spatial reference. Information about households as well as environmental data can be linked to precise locations in the real world. This offers benefits for combining different datasets via the spatial location and, furthermore, spatial indicators such as distance and accessibility can be included in analyses and models. HSpatial patterns of real-world social

Peter Hintze; Tobia Lakes

2009-01-01

329

Eurocentric Social Science and the Chinese Region  

Microsoft Academic Search

European social scientists have identified a ‘new regionalism’ based on the existence of the region as a scale of economic, political and cultural life. This article asks whether these tendencies represent a local European experience, or whether similar movements can be found in China and whether European theorizations speak to the Chinese experience. The article explores the evolution of Chinese

John Tomaney

2010-01-01

330

Black Power and Social Science Research.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A review of the literature from 1961 through 1968 by and about the Black Power movement, indices of militancy, and black-white relations indicated that social research in the black community may encounter greater unwillingness to cooperate as a result of ...

J. D. Symonds

1969-01-01

331

Differences in short-term memory span of social sciences, science and engineering, and business majors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated the difference in the short-term memory span of students of three major groups, namely Social Sciences, Science and Engineering, and Business. This study was designed to answer the following two questions: (1) Is there a difference between short-term memory span, measured by digit span, among the students in or intended for Social Sciences, Science and Engineering, and Business majors? (2) Is there a difference of short-term memory span, measured by word span, among students in or intended for Social Sciences, Science and Engineering, and Business majors? For answering these two questions, inferential and descriptive statistics were used. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the means of the scores of digit span and word span among the three major groups. The means of digit span and word span among the three groups were compared to find out if a statistically significant difference existed among them or not. The observations were recorded at the level of significance at alpha = .05, and highly significant at alpha = .01. The answer to the first question is yes. The results of this study showed a statistically significant difference in the means of the digit span of the three major groups of students in or intended for Social Sciences, Science and Engineering, and Business. The mean scaled score for digit span was 12.88 for Social Sciences, 14.27 for Science and Engineering, and 15.33 for Business majors, respectively. The means of the free recalls word span of the three groups was 7.23 for Social Sciences, 7.89 for Science and Engineering, and 7.12 for Business majors, respectively. No significant difference was observed in the means of the word span of the three groups. In general observations, it is noted that students want to stay in the subjects or majors in which they can perform well or feel comfortable. In addition to this, students are screened in the school system due to levels of performance or selection pressure. Students' academic performances are dependent on their academic environment and on their inherited construct of short-term and long-term memory span. The use of the memory in certain majors, such as Science and Engineering and Business, are more demanding as compared to Social Science majors. For example, for Science and Engineering majors, students need to memorize complex structures and also need to keep larger information at a stretch in their short-term memory to incorporate it into incoming and outgoing information. Of the other memory related constructs, the present study examined only the short-term memory of the students of different majors, and it was found that the students of the Social Sciences had a shorter digit span as compared to the Science and Engineering and Business majors. Business major students had the largest digit span as compared to the Social Sciences and Science and Engineering majors. This supports the idea that memory construct plays a role in the selection of student majors.

Khan, Naeem Ullah

332

The role of social and decision sciences in communicating uncertain climate risks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A major challenge facing climate scientists is explaining to non-specialists the risks and uncertainties surrounding potential changes over the coming years, decades and centuries. Although there are many guidelines for climate communication, there is little empirical evidence of their efficacy, whether for dispassionately explaining the science or for persuading people to act in more sustainable ways. Moreover, climate communication faces new challenges as assessments of climate-related changes confront uncertainty more explicitly and adopt risk-based approaches to evaluating impacts. Given its critical importance, public understanding of climate science deserves the strongest possible communications science to convey the practical implications of large, complex, uncertain physical, biological and social processes. Here, we identify the communications science that is needed to meet this challenge and the ambitious, interdisciplinary initiative that its effective application to climate science requires.

Pidgeon, Nick; Fischhoff, Baruch

2011-04-01

333

Executive Summary: Social Science Education. A Literature Review and Analysis Related to Assessment of Needs and Existing Practices in U.S. Schools in Pre-College Natural Science, Mathematics, and Social Science Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a general analysis of literature related to precollege social science education for the period 1955 to 1975. The study was part of a larger investigation of the literature on needs and practices in precollege science, mathematics, and social science education. Specific objectives of the social science portion of the study were…

Wiley, Karen B.; Race, Jeanne

334

Civic Ecology: Linking Social and Ecological Approaches in Extension  

Microsoft Academic Search

Civic ecology refers to the philosophy and science of community forestry, community gardening, watershed enhancement, and other volunteer-driven restoration practices in cities and elsewhere. Such practices, although often viewed as initiatives to improve a degraded environment, also foster social attributes of resilient social-ecological systems, including volunteer engagement and social connectedness. Civic ecology education refers to the learning, as well as

Marianne E. Krasny; Keith G. Tidball; Ithaca NY

335

Earth System Governance and the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In 2001, the four global change research programs ‘urgently’ called for ‘an ethical framework for global stewardship and strategies\\u000a for Earth System management’. Yet this notion of ‘earth system management’ remains vaguely defined: It is too elusive for\\u000a natural scientists, and too ambitious or too normative for social scientists. In this chapter, I develop an alternative concept\\u000a that is better

Frank Biermann

336

Social network theory in the behavioural sciences: potential applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network theory has made major contributions to our understanding of human social organisation but has found relatively\\u000a little application in the field of animal behaviour. In this review, we identify several broad research areas where the networks\\u000a approach could greatly enhance our understanding of social patterns and processes in animals. The network theory provides\\u000a a quantitative framework that can

J. Krause; D. P. Croft; R. James

2007-01-01

337

American Foundations and Academic Social Science, 1945–1960  

Microsoft Academic Search

DURING the Second World War, social scientists in the United States were called upon to aid the military effort in a variety of ways. The achievements with which they are credited, such as operations research and advances in psychological testing, were rather pale in comparison with those of the natural sciences--the perfection of radar, the atomic bomb, and advances in

Roger L. Geiger

1988-01-01

338

Les sciences sociales, l'économie et l'immigration  

Microsoft Academic Search

[eng] Social sciences, economy and immigration Jacky Fayolle The French economists have taken part in the public debate about immigration less actively than demographers, jurists and sociologists. However economic thought about immigration exists on the international scale for a long time and it is active in some countries, presently particularly in the United States. It proposes a fine vision of

Jacky Fayolle

1999-01-01

339

The Social Sciences in Non-Western Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The involvement of the social sciences in non- Western studies has been growing in spite of the institutional and intellectual conflicts between area studies and disciplinary studies. The process of institutional adaptation is illustrated by reference to the postwar development of non-Western stud ies. The intellectual conflict springs from the fact that the definitions and classifications of major world areas,

Milton Singer

1964-01-01

340

Medical student perceptions of a behavioural and social science curriculum  

PubMed Central

Background In 2006, Oregon Health & Science University began implementing changes to better integrate mental health and social science into the curriculum by addressing the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) 2004 recommendation for the inclusion of six behavioural and social science (BSS) domains: health policy and economics, patient behaviour, physician–patient interaction, mind–body interactions, physician role and behaviour, and social and cultural issues. Methods We conducted three focus groups with a purposive sample of 23 fourth-year medical students who were exposed to 4 years of the new curriculum. Students were asked to reflect upon the adequacy of their BSS training specifically as it related to the six IOM domains. The 90-minute focus groups were recorded, transcribed and analysed. Results Students felt the MS1 and MS2 years of the curriculum presented a strong didactic orientation to behavioural and social science precepts. However, they reported that these principles were not well integrated into clinical care during the second two years. Students identified three opportunities to further the inclusion of BSS in their clinical training: presentation of BSS concepts prior to relevant clinical exposure, consistent BSS skills mentoring in the clinical setting, and improving cultural congruence between aspects of BSS and biomedicine. Conclusions Students exposed to the revised BSS curriculum tend to value its principles; however, modelling and practical training in the application of these principles during the second two years of medical school are needed to reinforce this learning and demonstrate methods of integrating BSS principles into practice.

2011-01-01

341

Bad Science and Its Social Implications: Historical Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper inquires into the topic of bad science and its social implications by examining selected issues aimed at elucidating some of the brute facts of scientific progress. It should be noted that the paper is also situated in at least 3 of the 10 overarching thematic strands that form the basis of the societal studies standards: cultural…

Zeidler, Dana L.; Sadler, Troy D.

342

Children and Television Advertising from a Social Science Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Uses previous reviews on the literature on children and television advertising to trace the short history of research from a social science perspective on advertising directed at children. Examines the dimensions that have come to define the field. Argues that nothing in these studies indicates an increasingly sophisticated perspective of the…

Pecora, Norma

1995-01-01

343

The suicide of the social sciences: causes and effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social sciences have undergone profound changes. The causes of these changes are many, and in this article we discuss the most important ones. First, we discuss the shift to a situation where the American tradition is the norm and European and national traditions are vanishing. Secondly, we discuss the shift from a focus on the empirical context to a

Carin Holmquist; Elisabeth Sundin

2010-01-01

344

Social science and international content in risk analysis courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

An increasing number of institutions, including universities as well as private, governmental and not-for-profit organizations, offer training or courses in risk analysis. Social sciences, especially economics, psychology, philosophy, communications, and sociology are inextricable components of risk analysis praxis. Likewise, the use of risk analysis in developing countries and the international context is widening. In this paper, we evaluate a collection

David M. Hassenzahl; Charles F. Barr

2004-01-01

345

Integrating Social Science with Neuroscience: Potentials and Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

New opportunities for systematic collaboration between neuroscience and social science have opened up in recent years, and some of the potentials and the problems that accompany them are explored with reference to Damasio's work. Systematic collaboration and integration might yield benefits for metatheoretical, theoretical and substantive inquiry, but will be impeded by language, conceptual and methodological problems. Strategies to facilitate

John Cromby

2007-01-01

346

Comparative social science: characteristic problems and changing problem solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article—which also serves as Editorial—seeks to trace some of the fundamental problems that the comparative social and cultural sciences have had to cope with since their emergence and gradual consolidation, in the course of the nineteenth century. To this end, the article adopts a historical line of analysis, which is meant to throw into relief the very succession of

Jürgen Schriewer

2006-01-01

347

Australian Item Bank Program: Social Science Item Bank.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After vigorous review, editing, and trial testing, this item bank was compiled to help secondary school teachers construct objective tests in the social sciences. Anthropology, economics, ethnic and cultural studies, geography, history, legal studies, politics, and sociology are among the topics represented. The bank consists of multiple choice…

Australian Council for Educational Research, Hawthorn.

348

Manufacturing Consistency: Social Science, Rhetoric and Chomsky's Critique  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chomsky's critique of US foreign policy - and the media coverage it generates - has significant theoretical merit, and deserves to be of considerable interest within the social sciences. His analysis rests upon two distinctive positions. First, he claims that capitalism only survives because of the role played by the state, legislatively and administratively, controversially adding that it operates as

Alison Edgley

2009-01-01

349

Research Dissemination in Creative Arts, Humanities and the Social Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|An ethnographic case study of issues related to research performance and promotion of research was conducted within the Creative and Performing Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (AHSS) disciplines of a regional university. The purpose of the study was to explore a variety of ways in which the research work of those disciplines could be made…

Bazeley, Pat

2006-01-01

350

Web Surveys in the Social Sciences: An Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

:There has been a huge increase in the number of social science surveys conducted over the Internet in the last decade, especially in the area of quantitative research. Interest in this method has generated abundant literature, almost all of it in English-speaking world. The present article provides an exhaustive list of the questions raised in the literature by this survey

Elizabeth Wiles-Portier; Didier Frippiat; Nicolas Marquis

2010-01-01

351

How Judges Work: Thinking about Social Science and Law  

Microsoft Academic Search

udge Patricia Wald identifies several impediments to judges' making greater use of social science: they lack time to find, read, and make sense of the research; the research is inacces- sible to nonspecialists and fails to identify clearly the policy impli- cations; too much exists, and only occasionally does one work stand out; and most research findings are qualified and

Sally J. Kenney

2003-01-01

352

Toward expediting the resolution of debates in the social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four reasons for the prevalent delays in resolving debates in the social sciences are discussed. These are the difficulty in clearly answering certain questions for investigation, the inadequacy of common research designs for establishing “firm inferences,”; the lack of methods for reviewing and synthesizing disparate results from different studies of the same topic, and the inappropriateness of present debate arenas

Gregg B. Jackson

1978-01-01

353

Transition, Transformation, and the Social Sciences: Towards a New Paradigm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This paper reviews the first decade of the postcommunist transition debate. It examines some of the major continuities and changes in the social science and policy literature in light of key events and developments of the 1990s. It introduces a distinction between theoretical, policy, and ideological concerns in order to clarify the fundamental dimensions of the debate. It argues

Klaus Müller; Andreas Pickel

354

The Place of Significance Testing in Contemporary Social Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper examines the problems caused by relying solely on statistical significance tests to interpret results in contemporary social science. The place of significance testing in educational research has often been debated. Among the problems in reporting statistical significance are questions of definition and terminology. Problems are also…

Moore, Mary Ann

355

Mass Higher Education and the Social Sciences in Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article aims to contribute to the debate on major changes in tertiary education in Europe over the last 15 years by focusing on mass higher education in Greece and the place of the social sciences in it. It examines the main objectives and effects of the significant educational reform, introduced by the Panhellenic Socialist Party in the early 1980s,

Maria Petmesidou

1998-01-01

356

TEACHING STATISTICS TO UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper highlights the need for teaching statistics with real data in order to make statistics attractive and meaningful to social sciences students. Data coming from current research work are ideal for teaching. Students become interested in statistics and keep their interest as long as statistics is applied to data related to their own fields. Promoting discussion in class around

Oscar Hernández

357

Tuning in to Young Viewers: Social Science Perspectives on Television.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Research indicates that children are especially vulnerable to the effects of television viewing. Taking a psychological, social-science perspective, this book explores how television viewing affects children. Chapter 1, "Introduction," (MacBeth) discusses the issues involved, how researchers go about studying media effects, whether television…

MacBeth, Tannis M., Ed.

358

Using Geography To Integrate Science and Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Focuses on geography in secondary education, offering reasons why geography is becoming more popular in schools. Provides four activities that integrate science and social studies through geography. Includes topics such as ecological disasters, monsoons, the ozone layer, and global warming. (CMK)|

Dircks, Henry

2002-01-01

359

The National Science Foundation: Funding Opportunities for Social Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article introduces the National Science Foundation as a potential funding source for social work researchers and describes the experience of one faculty member in seeking funding from this source. The author provides an overview of the foundation, discusses its programmatic structure, proposal preparation, selection criteria, and review…

Jaskyte, Kristina

2005-01-01

360

Social Sciences and Constitutional Rights--the Consequences of Uncertainty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the theoretical basis of court decisions involving school integration, analyzing the relationship between education, constitutional law, and the social sciences. Concludes that court decisions dealing with the equal protection clause are based on interpretive judgments, rather than on causal judgments drawn from statistical theory. (JG)

Dworkin, Ronald M.

1977-01-01

361

Sexual Orientation and Military Service: A Social Science Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1982, the policy of the U.S. Department of Defense has been that homosexuality is incompatible with military service. In January of 1993, however, President Clinton announced his intention to reverse the military's ban and called for discussion about how best to implement a new, nondiscriminatory policy. This article reviews the social science literature relevant to such a discussion. Empirical

Gregory M. Herek

1993-01-01

362

Television. Innovations: The Social Consequences of Science and Technology Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This module is part of an interdisciplinary program designed to educate the general citizenry regarding the issues of science/technology/society (STS) that have important consequences for both present and future social policies. Specifically, the program provides an opportunity for students to assess the effects of selected technological…

McConnell, Mary C.; And Others

363

Aspects of Ethics As They Affect Social Science Curriculums.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the current interest in values and moral education and briefly comments on how they affect college level social science curricula. Many contemporary educators and scholars hope that a renewed emphasis on moral education will achieve the following goals: (1) introduce normative inquiry into higher learning, in order to…

Gildea, Ray Y.

364

Tuning in to Young Viewers: Social Science Perspectives on Television.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research indicates that children are especially vulnerable to the effects of television viewing. Taking a psychological, social-science perspective, this book explores how television viewing affects children. Chapter 1, "Introduction," (MacBeth) discusses the issues involved, how researchers go about studying media effects, whether television…

MacBeth, Tannis M., Ed.

365

Science, Technology, and Society in the Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Highlights some current resources for teaching science-related social issues in elementary and secondary classrooms from the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) database. Issues covered are varied and include population growth, environmental concerns, bioethical questions, hunger and food resources, water resources, nuclear energy,…

Smiddie, Laura

1990-01-01

366

Great Expectations: Can Social Science Evaluate New Labour's Policies?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The UK Labour government has offered a hand of friendship to the academic research community and to social science in particular. It has rejected anti-intellectualism in government and sought to promote policy made on the basis of evidence. In particular, it has introduced piloting of policies prior to national implementation. This article draws on the experience of four of the

Robert Walker

2001-01-01

367

Making Open Access Work in the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

As open access gains a strong foothold in medical publishing, social science scholars increasingly are looking for outlets to make their own research open access. In STM, publication fees of the major open access journals start at $1,350, with payment often covered as part of grants received from pharmaceutical companies, government, and other organized entities. In contrast, limited grant funding

Hob Brooks; Eric Moran; Jeffrey Carroll; Deborah Ludwig

2012-01-01

368

Multiple causation, indirect measurement and generalizability in the social sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fact that causal laws in the social sciences are most realistically expressed as both multivariate and stochastic has a number of very important implications for indirect measurement and generalizability. It becomes difficult to link theoretical definitions of general constructs in a one-to-one relationship to research operations, with the result that there is conceptual slippage in both experimental and nonexperimental

Hubert M. Blalock

1986-01-01

369

Computers and Privacy in Social Science Data Archives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper is a revised version of the talk which introduced the Panel on Privacy at the Council for Social Science Data Archives (CSSDA) 1968 Annual Conference. A framework for inquiry into issues of computers and privacy is reviewed and categories of co...

R. C. Brictson

1969-01-01

370

The limits of ethnography: combining social sciences for CSCW  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses some of the divergences between social sciences, and proposes the development of hybrid forms of participation in CSCW. It offers a critique of the theoretical isolationism of some ethnomethodological ethnography. It reviews the prospects for interdisciplinary collaboration, and seeks to motivate it with some “core propositions” which expose the inescapable character of the problems (although not necessarily

Dan Shapiro

1994-01-01

371

Data analysis in the social sciences: what about the details?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historically, statistics seems to have been the primary mode of data analysis in the social sciences. It would appear at this time that we are still, to a large extent, using statistical methods developed prior to the advent of the digital computer and that these are now just transposed bodily onto a digital computer to perform the calculations. In this

Geoffrey H. Ball

1965-01-01

372

Re-Thinking Statistics Education for Social Science Majors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many college students majoring in the social sciences find the required statistics course to be dull as well as difficult. Further, they often do not retain much of the material, which limits their success in subsequent courses. We describe a few simple changes, the incorporation of which may enhance student learning. (Contains 1 table.)|

Reid, Howard M.; Mason, Susan E.

2008-01-01

373

On Using GIS to Teach in the Social Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the author discusses how a professor can harness the power of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and use GIS to teach in the social sciences. She shows examples of how GIS can illustrate concepts during lecture or discussion, and provides two specific GIS assignments: one for undergraduate students and the other for graduate…

Harris, Jill S.

2012-01-01

374

On Using GIS to Teach in the Social Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses how a professor can harness the power of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and use GIS to teach in the social sciences. She shows examples of how GIS can illustrate concepts during lecture or discussion, and provides two specific GIS assignments: one for undergraduate students and the other for graduate…

Harris, Jill S.

2012-01-01

375

The National Science Foundation: Funding Opportunities for Social Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article introduces the National Science Foundation as a potential funding source for social work researchers and describes the experience of one faculty member in seeking funding from this source. The author provides an overview of the foundation, discusses its programmatic structure, proposal preparation, selection criteria, and review…

Jaskyte, Kristina

2005-01-01

376

The case for a social science of drugs in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social science began to take a prominent role in drugs in sport research in the early twenty-first century. This development has its roots in the history of drugs in sport, from the ancient Olympics through to the twentieth century, where the question of ‘could’ drugs enhance sporting performance, answered affirmatively, was replaced with whether they ‘should’. The history of drug

Jason Mazanov; Vanessa McDermott

2009-01-01

377

Priors & prejudice : using existing knowledge in social science research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers in the social sciences usually start their research with the formulation of research goals and questions, which, together with studying the existing literature, lead to the formulation of hypotheses. Next, data is collected using experiments or questionnaires and is subsequently analyzed. Finally, conclusions are drawn based on the research findings. Although this procedure is a logical one, more scientific

F. van Wesel

2011-01-01

378

Social Search: A Taxonomy of, and a User-Centred Approach to, Social Web Search  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to introduce the notion of social search as a new concept, drawing upon the patterns of web search behaviour. It aims to: define social search; present a taxonomy of social search; and propose a user-centred social search method. Design/methodology/approach: A mixed method approach was adopted to investigate…

McDonnell, Michael; Shiri, Ali

2011-01-01

379

The Status of Pre-College Science, Mathematics, and Social Science Education: 1955-1975. Volume III: Social Science Education and Appendix.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report is based on a survey of the literature on needs and practices in precollege social science education for the period 1955 through 1975. The major task of the study was to identify, analyze, and summarize the literature produced during that two decade period concerning: (1) the state of and trends in practices in precollege social

Wiley Karen B.; Race, Jeanne

380

Toward critical spatial thinking in the social sciences and humanities  

PubMed Central

The integration of geographically referenced information into the conceptual frameworks and applied uses of the social sciences and humanities has been an ongoing process over the past few centuries. It has gained momentum in recent decades with advances in technologies for computation and visualization and with the arrival of new data sources. This article begins with an overview of this transition, and argues that the spatial integration of information resources and the cross-disciplinary sharing of analysis and representation methodologies are important forces for the integration of scientific and artistic expression, and that they draw on core concepts in spatial (and spatio-temporal) thinking. We do not suggest that this is akin to prior concepts of unified knowledge systems, but we do maintain that the boundaries to knowledge transfer are disintegrating and that our abilities in problem solving for purposes of artistic expression and scientific development are enhanced through spatial perspectives. Moreover, approaches to education at all levels must recognize the need to impart proficiency in the critical and efficient application of these fundamental spatial concepts, if students and researchers are to make use of expanding access to a broadening range of spatialized information and data processing technologies.

Goodchild, Michael F.; Janelle, Donald G.

2010-01-01

381

Science Curriculum: Shot-Gun or Rifle Approach?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Stating that the shotgun approach to the science curriculum which has evolved for general education purposes is inappropriate for occupational programs, the authors report on research to evaluate the science curriculum for relevance to skills needed in various occupations. (MF)

Smith, Arthur DeW.; Hatton, J. T.

1978-01-01

382

Social work research: the state of the art (or science)  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT This paper,provides,a critical review,of current trends,within social work research,methodology.,The paper,identifies,three,influential,contemporary perspectives in social work research -empirical practice, pragmatism and participatory\\/critical research.,It identifies the,different,approaches,taken by each perspective to what should be researched, how it should be researched,and,how,truth,claims,should,be evaluated.,By exploring,the linkages between methodology, social work and wider social and political changes, the paper argues that research is an intensely polit ical

Liz Trinder

1996-01-01

383

SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION CONSORTIUM. PUBLICATION 122, MORALITY.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|THIS POSITION PAPER PRESENTS AN APPROACH TO THE VERY DIFFICULT PROBLEM OF HANDLING VALUES IN THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS, PARTICULARLY IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. IT DISCUSSES THE FOUNDATIONS OF ETHICS AND THE METHODOLOGICAL BASIS FOR MORAL VALUE JUDGMENTS. THE DISCUSSIONS ARE PRESENTED UNDER THREE GENERAL TOPIC AREAS--(1) "PRELIMINARIES" WHICH COVERS THE…

SCRIVEN, MICHAEL

384

Interpretive media study and interpretive social science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Described by their proponents as an alternative to positivistic perspectives on media effects that ignore audience activity, interpretive approaches center on the interpretive processes employed by audience members in their decoding of media content. Meaning is viewed as a product of the interaction between media texts and the varied, at times contradictory, interpretive strategies employed by audience members. This article

Kevin M. Carragee

1990-01-01

385

Psychiatric conditions and the social sciences.  

PubMed

Psychiatric disorders have a distinct shape, come in types and are inherent in Homo sapiens. To a social scientist, disorders exist by stipulation: contingent on a psychiatric frame of reference. Their materiality has meaning only in that framework. What is important is what that material might correspond to in a society's systems of representation and associated institutions. If one assigns disorders some sort of 'objective' reality (a scientific ontology), then one needs to explain what that corresponds to in cultural terms. Moreover, if disorders exist and have an evolutionary history, one has to formulate how they might have been perceived and understood during phases of biological and cultural evolution. The article provides a way to conceptualize meanings psychiatric disorders have had in these two systems of representation and their change during evolution. PMID:16145280

Fabrega, Horacio

386

Using and Developing Measurement Instruments in Science Education: A Rasch Modeling Approach. Science & Engineering Education Sources  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book meets a demand in the science education community for a comprehensive and introductory measurement book in science education. It describes measurement instruments reported in refereed science education research journals, and introduces the Rasch modeling approach to developing measurement instruments in common science assessment…

Liu, Xiufeng

2010-01-01

387

What can the Social Sciences Contribute to the Study of Rtics? Theoretical, Empirical and Substantive Considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article seeks to establish that the social sciences have an important contribution to make to the study of ethics. The discussion is framed around three questions: (i) what theoretical work can the social sciences contribute to the understanding of ethics? (ii) what empirical work can the social sciences contribute to the understanding of ethics? And (iii) how does this

Erica Haimes

2002-01-01

388

Blacklisting Social Science Departments with Poor Ph.D. Submission Rates  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an attempt to reduce the time taken by social science Ph.D. candidates to obtain their degrees, the Economic and Social Science Research Council (ESRC) of the United Kingdom has decided to withhold funds from social science departments of academic institutions with the poorest Ph.D. submission \\

Richard A. Colombo; Donald G. Morrison

1988-01-01

389

Understanding University Reform in Japan through the Prism of the Social Sciences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article looks at current university reforms in Japan through two slightly different social science prisms: how social science methodologies and theories can help us understand those reforms better and how social science teaching in universities will be affected by the current reform processes. (Contains 3 tables and 7 notes.)|

Goodman, Roger

2008-01-01

390

78 FR 15745 - Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Panel for Social and Economic Sciences, 10748. Date and Time...Decision, Risk & Management Sciences (DRMS) Program, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard...Closed) Purpose of Meeting: To direct a site visit to the...

2013-03-12

391

Incorporating data literacy into undergraduate information literacy programs in the social sciences : A pilot project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze the confluence of data literacy with information literacy in an experimental one-unit course taught in the UCLA Department of Sociology, and present the literature on, rationale for, and future of integrating these interrelated literacies into social science courses. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The course was co-taught twice by a librarian

Elizabeth Stephenson; Patti Schifter Caravello

2007-01-01

392

Applying authentic learning to social science: A learning design for an inter-disciplinary sociology subject  

Microsoft Academic Search

As universities move towards more vocationally oriented courses, students expect pedagogic practices that make closer ties to potential workplaces. The pedagogical approach of authentic learning is well suited to this purpose as it proposes an apprenticeship-type model and a model that brings simulated work tasks into the classroom. In the social sciences, authentic learning is under-utilised and under-theorised as these

Fiona Borthwick; Sue Bennett; Geraldine E. Lefoe; Elaine Huber

2007-01-01

393

Size and Growth of Monograph Literature: With Particular Reference to the Social Sciences. Design of Information Systems in the Social Sciences.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study of the size, growth, and composition of the monograph literature of the social sciences, with comparative data from the sciences and humanities, is presented. The objectives and methodology of study are explained, followed by an analysis of global...

1974-01-01

394

[Legacy and promises from the teaching of Social Sciences in the Health field].  

PubMed

The article analyzes the teaching and learning of social sciences in health sciences courses from the perspective of the curriculum and learning generated by research groups and thesis supervision activities. The author conducts a rereading of the classics and main contemporary scientists, based on the subarea's scientific output and her own personal experience as professor, researcher, and thesis supervisor. The article focuses on the tradition and teaching of the classics in social sciences, the main contemporary social theories, social sciences in health with an emphasis on teaching, and observations on the interface between teaching in social sciences and life sciences. The author concludes by highlighting the importance of work by social scientists in the health field and identifies the following problematic points: difficulties in dealing with mediations between the biological and the social; frequent subordination of foundations to techniques; and ideological and common-sense issues in the teaching and appropriation of Social Sciences in Health. PMID:23288069

Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza

2012-12-01

395

Collaboration in computer science: a network science approach. Part I  

Microsoft Academic Search

Co-authorship in publications within a discipline uncovers interesting properties of the analysed field. We represent collaboration in academic papers of computer science in terms of differently grained networks, including those sub-networks that emerge from conference and journal co-authorship only. We take advantage of the network science paraphernalia to take a picture of computer science collaboration including all papers published in

Massimo Franceschet

2010-01-01

396

Contemporary Approaches to Learning Science: Technologically-Mediated Practical Work.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reviews science learning in higher education, specifically in engineering, and the influences of technologically-mediated approaches on the cooperative learning of practical work and science. Discusses reasons for including practical work in science education, implementing practical work in distance education, and using technology and learning…

Scanlon, Eileen; Morris, Erica; Di Paolo, Terry; Cooper, Martyn

2002-01-01

397

Understanding the Science-Learning Environment: A Genetically Sensitive Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Previous studies have shown that environmental influences on school science performance increase in importance from primary to secondary school. Here we assess for the first time the relationship between the science-learning environment and science performance using a genetically sensitive approach to investigate the aetiology of this link. 3000…

Haworth, Claire M. A.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Kovas, Yulia; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

2013-01-01

398

Approaches and Strategies in Next Generation Science Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"Approaches and Strategies in Next Generation Science Learning" examines the challenges involved in the development of modern curriculum models, teaching strategies, and assessments in science education in order to prepare future students in the 21st century economies. This comprehensive collection of research brings together science educators,…

Khine, Myint Swe, Ed.; Saleh, Issa M., Ed.

2013-01-01

399

Barriers and opportunities for integrating social science into natural resource management: lessons from National Estuarine Research Reserves.  

PubMed

The need for cross-disciplinary scientific inquiries that facilitate improved natural resource management outcomes through increased understanding of both the biophysical and human dimensions of management issues has been widely recognized. Despite this broad recognition, a number of obstacles and barriers still sometimes challenge the successful implementation of cross-disciplinary approaches. Improving understanding of these challenges and barriers will help address them and thereby foster appropriate and effective utilization of cross-disciplinary approaches to solve natural resource management challenges. This research uses a case study analysis of the United States National Estuarine Research Reserve System to improve understanding of the critical factors that influence practitioners' decisions related to incorporating social science into their natural resource management work. The case study research is analyzed and evaluated within a Theory of Planned Behavior framework to (1) determine and describe the factors that predict practitioners' intent to incorporate social science into their natural resource related activities and (2) recommend potential strategies for encouraging and enabling cross-disciplinary approaches to natural resource management. The results indicate that National Estuarine Research Reserve practitioners' decisions related to incorporating social science are primarily influenced by (1) confidence in their own capability to incorporate social science into their work and (2) beliefs about whether the outcomes of incorporating social science into their work would be valuable or beneficial. PMID:22903461

Robinson, Patrick; Genskow, Ken; Shaw, Bret; Shepard, Robin

2012-08-19

400

DoD, Social Science, and International Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general cycle of relations between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the university is described with particular reference to the social sciences and international studies: a general decline in amity since World War II, decreased support for DoD objectives, a concern for the effect of DoD priorities on the general research profile, the growth of in-house and nonacademic vendors

Richard D. Lambert

1989-01-01

401

Complexity and the Social Sciences: Insights from complementary theoretical perspectives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of complexity theory crosses many domains thereby reflecting the multidisciplinary perspective inherent within the concept. Within the social sciences, the advent of complexity theory has facilitated a re-examination of the concept of system, `…rejecting old assumptions about equilibrium in favour of the analysis of dynamic processes of systems far from equilibrium, and respecifying the relationship of a system to its environment' (Walby, 2003).

Masys, A. J.

402

Path dependence: a foundational concept for historical social science  

Microsoft Academic Search

This introduction to the concept of path dependence, its pertinence for the development of historical social science, and\\u000a its application in economic analysis and economic history, proceeds from intuitive general ideas about history and historicity\\u000a in narratives. It provides precise definitions of what is meant by describing a dynamical process as being “historical.” Deterministic\\u000a and stochastic formalizations of such dynamical

Paul A. David

2007-01-01

403

Social competence and collaborative guided inquiry science activities: Experiences of students with learning disabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis presents a qualitative investigation of the effects of social competence on the participation of students with learning disabilities (LD) in the science learning processes associated with collaborative, guided inquiry learning. An inclusive Grade 2 classroom provided the setting for the study. Detailed classroom observations were the primary source of data. In addition, the researcher conducted two interviews with the teacher, and collected samples of students' written work. The purpose of the research was to investigate: (a) How do teachers and peers mediate the participation of students with LD in collaborative, guided inquiry science activities, (b) What learning processes do students with LD participate in during collaborative, guided inquiry science activities, and (c) What components of social competence support and constrain the participation of students with LD during collaborative, guided inquiry science activities? The findings of the study suggest five key ideas for research and teaching in collaborative, guided inquiry science in inclusive classrooms. First, using a variety of collaborative learning formats (whole-class, small-group, and pairs) creates more opportunities for the successful participation of diverse students with LD. Second, creating an inclusive community where students feel accepted and valued may enhance the academic and social success of students with LD. Third, careful selection of partners for students with LD is important for a positive learning experience. Students with LD should be partnered with academically successful, socially competent peers; also, this study suggested that students with LD experience more success working collaboratively in pairs rather than in small groups. Fourth, a variety of strategies are needed to promote active participation and positive social interactions for students with and without LD during collaborative, guided inquiry learning. Fifth, adopting a general approach to teaching collaborative inquiry that crosses curriculum borders may enhance success of inclusive teaching practices.

Taylor, Jennifer Anne

404

The value and use of social media as communication tool in the plant sciences  

PubMed Central

Social media now complements many parts of our lives. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and many other social networking sites allow users to share and interact with online content and to connect with like-minded people. Its strengths – rapid dissemination and amplification of content and the ability to lead informal conversations – make it a powerful tool to use in a professional context. This commentary explains the overall concept of social media and offers suggestions on usage and possible types of scientific content. It advises researchers on the potential benefits and how to take a strategic approach towards building a social media presence. It also presents examples of effective social media use within the plant science community. Common reasons for scientists to not engage with social media include the fear of appearing unprofessional, posting something wrong or being misunderstood, or a lack of confidence in their computer skills. With the rapid changes in academic publishing, dissemination and science communication, as well as the rise of ‘altmetrics’ to track online engagement with scientific content, digital literacy will become an essential skill in a scientist’s tool kit.

2013-01-01

405

The value and use of social media as communication tool in the plant sciences.  

PubMed

Social media now complements many parts of our lives. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and many other social networking sites allow users to share and interact with online content and to connect with like-minded people. Its strengths - rapid dissemination and amplification of content and the ability to lead informal conversations - make it a powerful tool to use in a professional context. This commentary explains the overall concept of social media and offers suggestions on usage and possible types of scientific content. It advises researchers on the potential benefits and how to take a strategic approach towards building a social media presence. It also presents examples of effective social media use within the plant science community. Common reasons for scientists to not engage with social media include the fear of appearing unprofessional, posting something wrong or being misunderstood, or a lack of confidence in their computer skills. With the rapid changes in academic publishing, dissemination and science communication, as well as the rise of 'altmetrics' to track online engagement with scientific content, digital literacy will become an essential skill in a scientist's tool kit. PMID:23845168

Osterrieder, Anne

2013-07-11

406

Stable Rules: Science and Social Transmission. Studies in the Learning Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In laying the groundwork for a co-operative scientific inquiry in the field of learning sciences the following five areas of access to the study are considered in this introductory inquiry statement: 1) genetic sociology (symbolic systems and early socialization); 2) experimental ethnography (the effect of literacy on the structure of skill and…

Nathan, Henry

407

Science Student Role: Evidence of Social Structural Norms Specific to School Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sociocultural studies of science education have consistently recognized the dialectic nature of students' agency to create and author positions for themselves and the structural constraints that may influence them. This mixed-methods study explores one particular aspect of these potential constraints: the possibility of a social structure specific…

Shanahan, Marie-Claire; Nieswandt, Martina

2011-01-01

408

Science/Technology/Society: Activities and Resources for Secondary Science and Social Studies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains 45 activities suitable for use in secondary science and social studies classes. Except for the first four activities, which are quick attention getters, all the activities are presented in a standard format. Each begins with an introduction, that provides a brief overview of the activity's content and the teaching strategies…

Singleton, Laurel R., Ed.

409

Feminist Approaches to Science. The Athene Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This collection of papers explores the nature of contemporary science and attempts to further a view of science that is "different, better, feminist, and emancipating." Most of the papers were presented in their original form at a symposium, Feminist Perspectives on Science, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, in April, 1985. Included are:…

Bleier, Ruth, Ed.

410

"Hypothetical machines": the science fiction dreams of Cold War social science.  

PubMed

The introspectometer was a "hypothetical machine" Robert K. Merton introduced in the course of a 1956 how-to manual describing an actual research technique, the focused interview. This technique, in turn, formed the basis of wartime morale research and consumer behavior studies as well as perhaps the most ubiquitous social science tool, the focus group. This essay explores a new perspective on Cold War social science made possible by comparing two kinds of apparatuses: one real, the other imaginary. Even as Merton explored the nightmare potential of such machines, he suggested that the clear aim of social science was to build them or their functional equivalent: recording machines to access a person's experiential stream of reality, with the ability to turn this stream into real-time data. In this way, the introspectometer marks and symbolizes a broader entry during the Cold War of science-fiction-style aspirations into methodological prescriptions and procedural manuals. This essay considers the growth of the genre of methodological visions and revisions, painstakingly argued and absorbed, but punctuated by sci-fi aims to transform "the human" and build newly penetrating machines. It also considers the place of the nearly real-, and the artificial "near-substitute" as part of an experimental urge that animated these sciences. PMID:20718281

Lemov, Rebecca

2010-06-01

411

Subject Information Resources: A Guide to Information Resources in Selected Subject Areas of the Humanities, the Social Sciences, and Pure and Applied Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Intended for use in courses in information resources at Kuring-gai College of Advanced Education, this guide approaches information resources by subject, building on previous information resources courses which concentrated on format. Resources for selected disciplines within the broad subject areas of the humanities, the social sciences, and…

Schmidt, Janine, Ed.

412

Funds of relationality: social bonds and science learners  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this response to Konstantinos Alexakos, Jayson K. Jones, and Victor H. Rodriguez, I will focus primarily on the importance of relationality for the development of a science learner identity. Along the way I will review (1) The cultural dynamics involved with the formation and sustenance of relationships in social life; (2) The methodological advantages of ethnographic inquiry for exploring funds of relationality; (3) The importance of relationality for science innovation throughout the pipeline of scientific training from K-12 schooling all the way through scientific breakthrough; (4) The absolutely vital role that relationality plays in creating a science learner identity. Finally I highlight how collaborative ethnography, in particular, is an excellent tool for seeking out funds of relationality that can be marshaled in the classroom as well as contributing to conceptual advancement in the theoretical vocabulary of relational sociology.

Smardon, Regina

2011-12-01

413

Human Reproduction: Social and Technological Aspects. Innovations: The Social Consequences of Science and Technology Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This module is part of an interdisciplinary program designed to educate the general citizenry regarding the issues of science/technology/society that have important consequences for both present and future social policies. Specifically, the program provides an opportunity for students to assess the effects of selected technological innovations in…

McConnell, Mary C.; And Others

414

Social Studies and Social Sciences: A Fifty-Year Perspective. Bulletin No. 78.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication documents the development of the social studies during the past 50 years. This collection of essays updates major trends in history, political science, sociology, economics, psychology, anthropology, and geography. Unlike two earlier collections, this book has an emphasis on the continuing problems, trends, and issues in both the…

Wronski, Stanley P., Ed.; Bragaw, Donald H., Ed.

415

Civic Ecology: Linking Social and Ecological Approaches in Extension  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Civic ecology refers to the philosophy and science of community forestry, community gardening, watershed enhancement, and other volunteer-driven restoration practices in cities and elsewhere. Such practices, although often viewed as initiatives to improve a degraded environment, also foster social attributes of resilient social-ecological…

Krasny, Marianne E.; Tidball, Keith G.

2010-01-01

416

Understanding India, globalisation and health care systems: a mapping of research in the social sciences.  

PubMed

National and transnational health care systems are rapidly evolving with current processes of globalisation. What is the contribution of the social sciences to an understanding of this field? A structured scoping exercise was conducted to identify relevant literature using the lens of India - a 'rising power' with a rapidly expanding healthcare economy. A five step search and analysis method was employed in order to capture as wide a range of material as possible. Documents published in English that met criteria for a social science contribution were included for review. Via electronic bibliographic databases, websites and hand searches conducted in India, 113 relevant articles, books and reports were identified. These were classified according to topic area, publication date, disciplinary perspective, genre, and theoretical and methodological approaches. Topic areas were identified initially through an inductive approach, then rationalised into seven broad themes. Transnational consumption of health services; the transnational healthcare workforce; the production, consumption and trade in specific health-related commodities, and transnational diffusion of ideas and knowledge have all received attention from social scientists in work related to India. Other themes with smaller volumes of work include new global health governance issues and structures; transnational delivery of health services and the transnational movement of capital. Thirteen disciplines were found represented in our review, with social policy being a clear leader, followed by economics and management studies. Overall this survey of India-related work suggests a young and expanding literature, although hampered by inadequacies in global comparative data, and by difficulties in accessing commercially sensitive information. The field would benefit from further cross-fertilisation between disciplines and greater application of explanatory theory. Literatures around stem cell research and health related commodities provide some excellent examples of illuminating social science. Future research agendas on health systems issues need to include innovative empirical work that captures the dynamics of transnational processes and that links macro-level change to fine-grained observations of social life. PMID:22963264

Bisht, Ramila; Pitchforth, Emma; Murray, Susan F

2012-09-10

417

Physics in Films: A New Approach to Teaching Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past year and a half we have developed an innovative approach to the teaching of `Physical Science', a general education course typically found in the curricula of nearly every college and university. The new approach uses popular movies to illustrate the principles of physical science, analyzing individual scenes against the background of the fundamental physical laws. The impact

Costas J. Efthimiou; Ralph Llewellyn

2004-01-01

418

Automated three-chambered social approach task for mice.  

PubMed

Autism is diagnosed by three major symptom categories: unusual reciprocal social interactions, impaired communication, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Direct social approach in mice has strong face validity to simple social approach behaviors in humans, which are frequently impaired in autism. This unit presents a basic protocol for a standardized, high-throughput social approach test for assaying mouse sociability. Our automated three-chambered social approach task quantifies direct social approach behaviors when a subject mouse is presented with the choice of spending time with either a novel mouse or a novel object. Sociability is defined as the subject mouse spending more time in the chamber containing the novel target mouse than in the chamber containing the inanimate novel object. The Basic Protocol describes procedures for testing one subject at a time in a single apparatus. A Support Protocol addresses data collection. PMID:21732314

Yang, Mu; Silverman, Jill L; Crawley, Jacqueline N

2011-07-01

419

Using an inquiry approach to teach science to secondary school science teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Leaders in science education have actively promoted inquiry science since the 1960s and continue to do so today. The US National Science Education Standards recommend that science instruction and learning should be well grounded in inquiry. In spite of these efforts, however, little has changed in the way science is taught. Teacher-talk and textbooks are still the primary providers of science information for students. The objective of this paper is to: (a) define inquiry as a strategy for teaching science, (b) review the history of inquiry science teaching, and (c) present the Physics by Inquiry model for in-servicing middle school science teachers in order to provide assistance for teachers to successfully implement an inquiry approach to teaching science.

McBride, John W.; Bhatti, Muhammad I.; Hannan, Mohammad A.; Feinberg, Martin

2004-09-01

420

Latent Space Approaches to Social Network Analysis.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Network models are widely used to represent relational information among interacting units. In studies of social networks, recent emphasis has been placed on random graph models where the nodes usually represent individual social actors and the edges repr...

A. E. Raftery M. S. Handcock P. D. Hoff

2001-01-01

421

A social neuroscience approach to self and social categorisation: A new look at an old issue  

Microsoft Academic Search

We take a social neuroscience approach to self and social categorisation in which the current self-categorisation(s) is constructed from relatively stable identity representations stored in memory (such as the significance of one's social identity) through iterative and interactive perceptual and evaluative processing. This approach describes these processes across multiple levels of analysis, linking the effects of self-categorisation and social identity

Jay J. Van Bavel; William A Cunningham

2010-01-01

422

Quantifying Social Class: A Latent Clustering Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bourdieu offers a model of social class that emphasizes class boundaries as the product of “classification struggles” within\\u000a the various fields that comprise social space. The set of relations that define a particular field influence which social,\\u000a economic and cultural resources are important in sorting individuals into class categories. Unfortunately, quantitative research\\u000a has underappreciated the role of social class to

Nathan D. Martin

423

Autonomy in Science Education: A Practical Approach in Attitude Shifting towards Science Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This work describes a 2-year study in teaching school science, based on the stimulation of higher thinking levels in learning science using a highly student-centred and constructivist learning approach. We sought to shift and strengthen students' positive attitudes towards science learning, self-efficacy towards invention, and achievement.…

Jalil, Pasl A.; Abu Sbeih, M. Z.; Boujettif, M.; Barakat, R.

2009-01-01

424

Social Sciences in Asia III: Burma, Mongolia, New Zealand, The Philippines, Singapore. Reports and Papers in the Social Sciences, No. 35.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Part of a series which provides overviews of social science research and teaching in UNESCO member nations, the document focuses on Burma, Mongolia, New Zealand, Philippines, and Singapore. One chapter is devoted to each of the five nations. For each country, the following information is presented: history of social science activity,…

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

425

Normative Approaches to Values in Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

This presentation is part of the Reconsidering Values in Feminist Philosophy of Science track.\\u000aDuring the last three decades feminist philosophers of science have argued that the traditional ideal of value-free science should be replaced because either it is not feasible – or even if it is feasible, it is not a desirable epistemic goal. The traditional ideal of value-free

Kristina Rolin

2010-01-01

426

THEORETICAL APPROACHES TO DISABILITY CONTENT IN SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents an analysis of disability theory and content in the social work curriculum and advances a theoretically expansive approach to disability that is consistent with social work's commitment to diversity and the elimination of oppression. A careful examination of relevant social work literature reveals that disability is generally discussed and treated from a diagnostic perspective. We suggest shifting

Stephen French Gilson; Elizabeth DePoy

2002-01-01

427

Incentive effects of social assistance: A regression discontinuity approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Before 1989, childless social assistance recipients in Quebec under age 30 received much lower benefits than recipients over age 30. We use this sharp discontinuity in policy to estimate the effects of social assistance on various labour market outcomes using a regression discontinuity approach. We find strong evidence that more generous social assistance benefits reduce employment. The estimates exhibit little

Thomas Lemieux; Kevin Milligan

2007-01-01

428

Challenges for Research Ethics and Moral Knowledge Construction in the Applied Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Certain critical accounts of conventional research practices in business and the social sciences are explored in this essay. These accounts derive from alternative social paradigms and their underlying assumptions about appropriate social inquiry and knowledge construction. Among these alternative social paradigms, metatheories, mindscapes, or worldviews are social constructionist, critical, feminist, and postmodern or poststructural thinking. Individuals with these assumptions and

Stephen L. Payne

2000-01-01

429

The social construction of science: a theoretical and empirical investigation of aspects of the institutionalisation of the physical sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis concerns the institutionalisation of the physical sciences. The thesis breaks with the established traditions in the history, philosophy and sociology of sciences by attempting to capture both the cognitive and social dimensions of institutionalisation in one unified analysis. This unification has been achieved through a treatment of research as goal directed social action. This theme has been developed

Tom Jagtenberg

1980-01-01

430

The Nexus of Domestic Violence Reform and Social Science: From Instrument of Social Change to Institutionalized Surveillance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review examines the relationship between social science research and domestic violence activism. It explores how the feminist conception of domestic violence, as formulated early in the movement, has had a resounding influence on the development of both theory and practice. The review demonstrates how social science research has often followed uncritically the path set out by anti–domestic violence activists.

Kristin Bumiller

431

The Nexus of Domestic Violence Reform and Social Science: From Instrument of Social Change to Institutionalized Surveillance  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review examines the relationship between social science research and domestic violence activism. It explores how the feminist conception of domestic violence, as formulated early in the movement, has had a resounding influence on the development of both theory and practice. The review demonstrates how social science research has often followed uncritically the path set out by anti–domestic violence activists.

Kristin Bumiller

2010-01-01

432

The Economics of Environmental Control: A Social Science Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides guidelines for primary and secondary social studies teachers for giving students information about environmental pollution. Economic statistics are cited to illustrate the critical nature of environmental problems and a re-educative'' approach is suggested as being most effective in developing attitudes necessary for problem…

Duncan, W. Jack

1972-01-01

433

Research, Engagement, and Public Bioethics: Promoting Socially Robust Science  

PubMed Central

Citizens today are increasingly expected to be knowledgeable about and prepared to engage with biomedical knowledge. In this article, I wish to reframe this ‘public understanding of science’ project, and place fresh emphasis on public understandings of research: an engagement with the everyday laboratory practices of biomedicine and its associated ethics, rather than of specific scientific facts. This is not based on an assumption that non-scientists are ‘ignorant’ and are thus unable to ‘appropriately’ use or debate science; rather, it is underpinned by an empirically-grounded observation that some individuals may be unfamiliar with certain specificities of particular modes of research and ethical frameworks, and, as a consequence, have their autonomy compromised when invited to participate in biomedical investigations. Drawing on the perspectives of participants in my own sociological research on the social and ethical dimensions of neuroscience, I argue that public understandings of biomedical research and its ethics should be developed both at the community level and within the research moment itself, in order to enhance autonomy and promote more socially robust science. Public bioethics will have play a key role in such an endeavour, and indeed will contribute in important ways to the opening up of new spaces of symmetrical engagement between bioethicists, scientists, and wider publics – and hence to the democratisation of the bioethical enterprise.

Pickersgill, Martyn D.

2012-01-01

434

Understanding the science-learning environment: A genetically sensitive approach  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have shown that environmental influences on school science performance increase in importance from primary to secondary school. Here we assess for the first time the relationship between the science-learning environment and science performance using a genetically sensitive approach to investigate the aetiology of this link. 3000 pairs of 14-year-old twins from the UK Twins Early Development Study reported on their experiences of the science-learning environment and were assessed for their performance in science using a web-based test of scientific enquiry. Multivariate twin analyses were used to investigate the genetic and environmental links between environment and outcome. The most surprising result was that the science-learning environment was almost as heritable (43%) as performance on the science test (50%), and showed negligible shared environmental influence (3%). Genetic links explained most (56%) of the association between learning environment and science outcome, indicating gene–environment correlation.

Haworth, Claire M.A.; Davis, Oliver S.P.; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Kovas, Yulia; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

2013-01-01

435

Understanding the science-learning environment: A genetically sensitive approach.  

PubMed

Previous studies have shown that environmental influences on school science performance increase in importance from primary to secondary school. Here we assess for the first time the relationship between the science-learning environment and science performance using a genetically sensitive approach to investigate the aetiology of this link. 3000 pairs of 14-year-old twins from the UK Twins Early Development Study reported on their experiences of the science-learning environment and were assessed for their performance in science using a web-based test of scientific enquiry. Multivariate twin analyses were used to investigate the genetic and environmental links between environment and outcome. The most surprising result was that the science-learning environment was almost as heritable (43%) as performance on the science test (50%), and showed negligible shared environmental influence (3%). Genetic links explained most (56%) of the association between learning environment and science outcome, indicating gene-environment correlation. PMID:23565044

Haworth, Claire M A; Davis, Oliver S P; Hanscombe, Ken B; Kovas, Yulia; Dale, Philip S; Plomin, Robert

2013-02-01

436

An equilibrium approach to modelling social interaction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this work is to put forward a statistical mechanics theory of social interaction, generalizing econometric discrete choice models. After showing the formal equivalence linking econometric multinomial logit models to equilibrium statical mechanics, a multi-population generalization of the Curie-Weiss model for ferromagnets is considered as a starting point in developing a model capable of describing sudden shifts in aggregate human behaviour. Existence of the thermodynamic limit for the model is shown by an asymptotic sub-additivity method and factorization of correlation functions is proved almost everywhere. The exact solution of the model is provided in the thermodynamical limit by finding converging upper and lower bounds for the system's pressure, and the solution is used to prove an analytic result regarding the number of possible equilibrium states of a two-population system. The work stresses the importance of linking regimes predicted by the model to real phenomena, and to this end it proposes two possible procedures to estimate the model's parameters starting from micro-level data. These are applied to three case studies based on census type data: though these studies are found to be ultimately inconclusive on an empirical level, considerations are drawn that encourage further refinements of the chosen modelling approach.

Gallo, Ignacio

2009-07-01

437

Teaching Science to Children: An Integrated Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed to serve as a comprehensive science methods text for elementary school teachers, this book combines method with content and presents 294 science activities for classroom use. The activities are organized by content areas into 20 chapters and address topics such as sound, weather, plants and animals, oceans, nutrition, and the…

Friedl, Alfred E.

438

Approaches to Classroom-Based Computational Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Computational science includes the use of computer-based modeling and simulation to define and test theories about scientific phenomena. The challenge for educators is to develop techniques for implementing computational science in the classroom. This paper reviews some previous work on the use of simulation alone (without modeling), modeling…

Guzdial, Mark

439

Women's success in science: The role of self-efficacy and resiliency in building social capital  

Microsoft Academic Search

The experiences of seven women pursuing undergraduate degrees in atmospheric sciences are examined through lenses constructed from social science theories of self-efficacy, resiliency and social capital. Each of the women successfully earned a Bachelor's degree in atmospheric sciences in spite of being the minority in a male-dominated field. Examination of individual characteristics and experiences of each woman support the theory

Donna J. Charlevoix-Romine

2008-01-01

440

Social Behaviors and Gender Differences Among Preschoolers: Implications for Science Activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ethnographic studies involving the learning of science by younger children are fewer in number compared with other science education studies. This two-year study focused on the social behaviors and gender differences among preschoolers (4 to 5 years old) engaging in science activities. Findings indicate that the social behaviors of boys and girls were stereotypical. Boys tended to exhibit curiosity, spontaneity,

Josephine M. Shireen Desouza; Charlene M. Czerniak

2002-01-01

441

Society and Culture: Systems Definitions for an Alternative Social Science Paradigm.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two basic concepts of the social sciences--society and culture--are analyzed and new definitions are proposed. Concepts are the basic building blocks of scientific theory. A science with poor concepts will, therefore, be incapable of producing powerful scientific theory. When commonly used social science definitions of society and culture are…

Johnson, Gary R.

442

Middle School Science Teachers' Perceptions of Social Justice: A Study of Two Female Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The focus of this qualitative study is to document two middle school science teachers' perceptions of social justice and how these teachers implement various aspects of social justice in their science instruction. The two teachers teach science in an urban school that serves students from low-income, immigrant, and ethnic minority families. The…

Upadhyay, Bhaskar

2010-01-01

443

Middle School Science Teachers' Perceptions of Social Justice: A Study of Two Female Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The focus of this qualitative study is to document two middle school science teachers' perceptions of social justice and how these teachers implement various aspects of social justice in their science instruction. The two teachers teach science in an urban school that serves students from low-income, immigrant, and ethnic minority families. The…

Upadhyay, Bhaskar

2010-01-01

444

Network-Based Approaches for Measuring Social Capital  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A variety of disciplines, ranging from sociology to public health, have struggled with the conceptualization and measurement\\u000a of social capital. Differences in the approach used to measure social capital may contribute to variations in the observed\\u000a relationships between social capital and individual and population health across studies. As well, the heavy reliance on communitarian\\u000a measures of social capital in public

Cynthia M. Lakon; Dionne C. Godette; John R. Hipp

445

Social sciences research in neglected tropical diseases 2: A bibliographic analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There are strong arguments for social science and interdisciplinary research in the neglected tropical diseases. These diseases represent a rich and dynamic interplay between vector, host, and pathogen which occurs within social, physical and biological contexts. The overwhelming sense, however, is that neglected tropical diseases research is a biomedical endeavour largely excluding the social sciences. The purpose of this

Daniel D Reidpath; Pascale Allotey; Subhash Pokhrel

2011-01-01

446

Trash Conflicts: A Science and Social Studies Curriculum on the Ethics of Disposal. An Interdisciplinary Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed for middle school science and social studies classes, this document is a curriculum on waste disposal. Mathematics and language skills also are incorporated into many of the activities. In the study of trash disposal, science students benefit from understanding the social issues related to the problem. Social studies students need…

Ballin, Amy; And Others

447

Effects of Lawyers' Sociopolitical Attitudes on Their Judgments of Social Science in Legal Decision Making  

Microsoft Academic Search

One theory to explain why courts often ignore relevant social science research is that it often refutes judges' sociopolitical beliefs. Using the death penalty as the exemplar social issue, this study explored whether lawyers' sociopolitical attitudes affect their judgments about the legal relevance of social science research introduced in court cases. Law students and state court judges completed a questionnaire

Richard E. Redding; N. Dickon Reppucci

1999-01-01

448

Effects of academic-industry relations on the professional socialization graduate science students  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study asks if there has been a change in graduate student socialization in the biological sciences given the increased commercialism of life sciences. Drawing on the work of Steven Brint (1994) and Sheila Slaughter and Larry Leslie (1997) and Sheila Slaughter and Gary Rhoades (2004), this study asks if graduate student socialization has shifted emphasis from the social and

Margaret Ann Phillippi Holleman

2005-01-01

449

Implementation of the NCSS Guidelines for Teaching Science-Related Social Issues: Exemplar Lessons.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains the Guidelines for Teaching Science-Related Social Issues adopted in 1982 by the National Council for the Social Studies and 10 examplar lessons each keyed to particular guidelines and drawing upon contemporary issues. The premise upon which the guidelines are based is that science is a social issue and that the examination…

Otto, Robert A., Ed.

450

Compare, contrast, converge? A biography of the Demographic Review of the Social Sciences (2006)  

Microsoft Academic Search

What influence does higher education policy research have on the shape of the academic fields it aims to support? This paper describes the generation and use of policy knowledge about the UK social sciences. It focuses on one case with which the author was closely involved: the Economic and Social Research Council's (ESRC) Demographic Review of the Social Sciences (Mills

David Mills

2008-01-01

451

A Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) Approach Improves Science Process Skills in 4-H Animal Science Participants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) approach was designed for youth who participated in the Minnesota State Fair Livestock interview process. The project and evaluation were designed to determine if the new SET approach increased content knowledge and science process skills in participants. Results revealed that youth participants not…

Clarke, Katie C.

2010-01-01

452

A Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) Approach Improves Science Process Skills in 4-H Animal Science Participants  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A new Science, Engineering and Technology (SET) approach was designed for youth who participated in the Minnesota State Fair Livestock interview process. The project and evaluation were designed to determine if the new SET approach increased content knowledge and science process skills in participants. Results revealed that youth participants not…

Clarke, Katie C.

2010-01-01

453

Social Sciences: Curriculum Guide for Teaching Gifted Students Social Sciences in Grades Seven Through Nine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is a curriculum guide for teaching gifted junior high students social studies. The main purpose of the curriculum is to heighten student awareness of justice and due process of law by means of preparing for and conducting a mock trial of an historical figure. Thirteen cognitive behavioral objectives and five affective objectives are…

Levine, Martin

454

Social Sciences: Curriculum Guide for Teaching Gifted Students Social Sciences in Grades Seven Through Nine.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Presented is a curriculum guide for teaching gifted junior high students social studies. The main purpose of the curriculum is to heighten student awareness of justice and due process of law by means of preparing for and conducting a mock trial of an historical figure. Thirteen cognitive behavioral objectives and five affective objectives are…

Levine, Martin

455

Crossing borders between social and physical sciences in post-event investigations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In natural hazard research social and physical scientists tend to approach post-event investigations within their narrow disciplinary lenses. Efforts that are called trans-disciplinary often add social science but do not integrate it effectively. For example, an economist might be brought in to address a question of "value" without any understanding or interest in the context in which the value will be applied (e.g., Merrell et al. 2002, Simmons and Sutter 2005). At the same time, social scientists would benefit from some knowledge of geology, meteorology, hydrology, forecasting operations, and hazard detection systems in order, for instance, to understand the nature and types of uncertainty in the physical systems. Proactive partnership between social and physical scientists in post-event investigations needs a background knowledge and a preparation about several issues from both sides. Moreover neither physical nor social scientists necessarily understand and appreciate the contributions that they can reciprocally bring to their works. Post-event collaborations between social and physical science are rare. The few examples of multi-disciplinary work, when examined closely, are not integrated collaborative projects but patchwork quilts of a variety of specialists taking separate aspects of an issue. There are examples where social scientists and engineers are engaged in one project, but the efforts tend to include social scientists as an "add on" to an existing physical science investigation. In this way, true integration of information, data and knowledge from different fields is lacking and the result is that neither the physical nor the social science perspectives gain a comprehensive picture of the issue under scrutiny. Looking at the flash flood problem, the atmospheric and hydrological generating mechanisms of the phenomenon are poorly understood, leading to highly uncertain forecasts of and warnings for these events. On the other hand warning and crisis response to such violent and fast events is not a straightforward process. In both the social and physical aspect of the problem, space and time scales involved either in hydro-meteorology, human behavior and social organizations sciences are of crucial importance. Interdisciplinary collaboration is particularly important here because those involved with such events, including scholars, hydrologists, meteorologists, road users, emergency managers and civil security services, all have different time and space frameworks that they use for decision-making, forecasting, warnings and research. This presentation will show examples of original findings that emerged from a successful collaboration among different scientific disciplines. Working with geophysical scientists drives us to analyze social data from a different angle, integrating time and space scales as they are used to do in hydrometeorological research. This comprehensive, coupled natural—human system approach over time and space is rarely used but it has been shown to be especially pertinent to integrate social and physical components of the flash flood risk. (Ruin et al., 2008, Ruin et al., 2009, Creutin et al., 2009). Based on these examples we propose to develop a new network, DELUGE (Disasters Evolving Lessons Using Global Experience), to address trans-disciplinary efforts and capacity building related to post-disaster field techniques to change the post-event field experience enterprise and assure that practitioners, forecasters, researchers, students, and others learn from experience to reduce losses. DELUGE is an interdisciplinary, international network aimed at developing a sustainable community of meteorologists, hydrologists, geographers, anthropologists, engineers, planners, economists, and sociologists working together to create a set of guidelines for post-disaster investigations to reduce losses from short-fuse flood events, particularly flash floods, debris flows and landslides (hereafter termed flash floods). Flash-floods, debris flows, and landslides often develop at sp

Ruin, I.; Gruntfest, E.; Lutoff, C.; Anquetin, S.; Scolobig, A.; Creutin, J.-D.; Borga, M.

2009-04-01

456

“We Learn How to Predict and be a Scientist”: Early Science Experiences and Kindergarten Children's Social Meanings About Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examine kindergarten children's emerging social meanings about science as a function of their participation in integrated science inquiry and literacy activities associated with the Scientific Literacy Project (SLP). We describe changes in 123 SLP kindergarten children's narrative accounts of learning science in school during three different time periods: (a) in September, before the onset of SLP activities; (b) in

Panayota Mantzicopoulos; Ala Samarapungavan; Helen Patrick

2009-01-01

457

Conducting health-related social science research in low income settings: ethical dilemmas faced in Kenya and South Africa  

Microsoft Academic Search

The value of the social sciences is increasingly recognised in health services and clinical research, contributing to an increasing number of multi-disciplinary, multi-method studies. Such studies offer numerous advantages, but also pose particular challenges, including different approaches to or foci in research ethics across disciplines. Drawing on two similar studies conducted in coastal Kenya and in rural South Africa, we

Catherine Molyneux; Jane Goudge; Steve Russell; Jane Chuma; Tebogo Gumede; Lucy Gilson

2009-01-01

458

Unpacking cosmopolitanism for the social sciences: a research agenda. 2006.  

PubMed

This article calls for a re-conceptualization of the social sciences by asking for a cosmopolitan turn. The intellectual undertaking of redefining cosmopolitanism is a trans-disciplinary one, which includes geography, anthropology, ethnology, international relations, international law, political philosophy and political theory, and now sociology and social theory. Methodological nationalism, which subsumes society under the nation-state, has until now made this task almost impossible. The alternative, a 'cosmopolitan outlook', is a contested term and project. Cosmopolitanism must not be equalized with the global (or globalization), with 'world system theory' (Wallerstein), with 'world polity' (Meyer and others), or with 'world-society' (Luhmann). All of those concepts presuppose basic dualisms, such as domestic/foreign or national/international, which in reality have become ambiguous. Methodological cosmopolitanism opens up new horizons by demonstrating how we can make the empirical investigation of border crossings and other transnational phenomena possible. PMID:20092506

Beck, Ulrich; Sznaider, Natan

2010-01-01

459

Unpacking cosmopolitanism for the social sciences: a research agenda.  

PubMed

This article calls for a re-conceptualization of the social sciences by asking for a cosmopolitan turn. The intellectual undertaking of redefining cosmopolitanism is a trans-disciplinary one, which includes geography, anthropology, ethnology, international relations, international law, political philosophy and political theory, and now sociology and social theory. Methodological nationalism, which subsumes society under the nation-state, has until now made this task almost impossible. The alternative, a 'cosmopolitan outlook', is a contested term and project. Cosmopolitanism must not be equalized with the global (or globalization), with 'world system theory' (Wallerstein), with 'world polity' (Meyer and others), or with 'world-society' (Luhmann). All of those concepts presuppose basic dualisms, such as domestic/foreign or national/international, which in reality have become ambiguous. Methodological cosmopolitanism opens up new horizons by demonstrating how we can make the empirical investigation of border crossings and other transnational phenomena possible. PMID:16506994

Beck, Ulrich; Sznaider, Natan

2006-03-01

460

After Sept. 11: Perspectives from the Social Sciences  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This new site from the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) contains essays by well-known social scientists on the events of and following September 11. The site aims to "provide the public and academic community with a deeper level of analysis than can be found on Op-Ed pages or talk shows." Among the more than 35 pieces currently posted are essays by Seyla Benhabib, Olivier Roy, and John Hall. Wide ranging in scope, essays are grouped into seven topic areas -- Globalization, Fundamentalism(s), Terrorism and Democratic Virtues, Competing Narratives, New War?, New World Order?, and Recovery. The site is regularly updated with more material as well. Future plans are to add a teaching guide by mid-January, to help instructors use the essays in lesson plans, and to use some material from the site in a book series that SSRC will launch in 2002.

2001-01-01

461

Human ethics review and social sciences: several emerging ethical issues.  

PubMed

The extension of ethical review to research in the social sciences and humanities has raised a number of new issues for Institutional Ethics Committees. The emergent issues discussed here are: the relationship between subject and researcher, the use of data to which employment gives access, the impact of questionnaires, the impact of sampling techniques, the impact of observation, when the subject is an organisation, and conflicting rights to research. These issues underscore the importance of IECs maintaining a flexible and watchful oversight of research and the impossibility of a simple clutch of rules to guide ethical research in this domain. PMID:15810188

Bouma, G D; Diemer, K

1996-01-01

462

Science for ELLs: Rethinking Our Approach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Many educators feel ill-prepared to meet the academic needs of students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. As educators, we strive to guarantee science education opportunities for all students. Although much remains unknown, current research provides us with crucial strategies to help English Language Learner (ELL) students in the science classroom. Here we look at possible issues in diverse classrooms and offer some ideas to provoke curiosity and confidence in ELL students.

Medina, Amelia; Clark, Douglas B.; Ramirez-Marin, Frank; Medina-Jerez, William

2007-03-01

463

Spaces of speech and places of performance: an outline of a geography of science approach to embryonic stem cell research and diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we develop a geography of science framework to examine the social, scientific and medical dimensions of human embryonic stem cell research. We outline David Livingstone's approach to geographies of science as “sites of speech and locations of locution” to explore the spatial shaping of science and the scientific shaping of space. Drawing upon our ongoing research on

Steven P. Wainwright; Clare Williams

2008-01-01

464

Profiling institutes: Identifying high research performance and social relevance in the social and behavioral sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study focuses on the identification of high output research and high impact research in the social and behavioral sciences.\\u000a A second objective is to monitor developments in research that is related to societal needs and problems. For each topic,\\u000a we identify institutes and authors that have contributed a considerable number of SSCI articles and\\/or several (relatively)\\u000a highly cited articles

A. J. Nederhof; E. Van Wijk

1999-01-01

465

Participation of Primary School Pupils Who Stay at Institution of Social Services and Child Protection Dormitories in Social Science Lessons  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research aims to understand to what extent primary school pupils who stay at the Institution of Social Services and Child Protection dormitories participate in social science lessons. Data were obtained from pupils staying at the Institution of Social Services and Child Protection dormitories and attending primary schools in Istanbul and…

Guven, Sibel; Sahin Taskin, Cigdem

2008-01-01

466

The phenomenological approach to social psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is believed that the social psychologist can profit by noting recent developments in the psychology of perception, since in some respects social psychology today resembles the psychology of perception 35 years ago. At that time the systematic application of the phenomenological method released the psychology of perception from its traditional bonds and started it on a new and fertile

Robert B. MacLeod

1947-01-01

467

Teaching Global History: A Social Studies Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|"Teaching Global History" challenges prospective and beginning social studies teachers to formulate their own views about what is important to know in global history and why. It explains how to organize the curriculum around broad social studies concepts and themes and student questions about humanity, history, and the contemporary world. All…

Singer, Alan J.

2011-01-01

468

Intuition: A Social Cognitive Neuroscience Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review proposes that implicit learning processes are the cognitive substrate of social intuition. This hypothesis is supported by (a) the conceptual correspondence between implicit learning and social intuition (nonverbal communication) and (b) a review of relevant neuropsychological (Huntington's and Parkinson's disease), neuroimaging, neurophysiological, and neuroanatomical data. It is concluded that the caudate and putamen, in the basal ganglia, are

Matthew D. Lieberman

2000-01-01

469

Diversity of Approaches to Structuring University-Based Earth System Science Education  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the past quarter century, the "Earth system science" paradigm has emerged among the interdisciplinary science community, emphasizing interactions among components hitherto considered within separate disciplines: atmosphere (air); hydrosphere (water); biosphere (life); lithosphere (land); anthroposphere (human dimension); and exosphere (solar system and beyond). How should the next generation of Earth system scientists learn to contribute to this interdisciplinary endeavor? There is no one simple answer. The Earth System Science Education program, funded by NASA, has addressed this question by supporting faculty at U.S. universities who develop new courses, curricula and degree programs in their institutional contexts. This report demonstrates the diversity of approaches to structuring university-based Earth system science education, focusing on the 18 current grantees of the Earth System Science Education Program for the 21st Century (ESSE21). One of the most fundamental characteristics is the departmental structure for teaching Earth system science. The "home" departments of the Earth system science faculty range from Earth sciences and physics to agronomy and social work. A brand-new institution created an interdisciplinary Institute for Earth Systems Science and Policy without traditional "parent" departments. Some institutions create new degree programs as majors or as minors while others work within existing degree programs to add or revise courses. A university may also offer multiple strands, such as a degree in the Science of the Earth System and a degree in the Human Dimensions of the Earth System. Defining a career path is extremely important to students considering Earth system science programs and a major institutional challenge for all programs in Earth system science education. How will graduate programs assess prospective students? How will universities and government agencies assess prospective faculty and scientists? How will government agencies allocate funds to interdisciplinary Earth system science and technology? Finally, how should the Earth system science education community evolve?

Aron, J.; Ruzek, M.; Johnson, D. R.

2004-12-01

470

Science of learning is learning of science: why we need a dialectical approach to science education research  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on learning science in informal settings and the formal (sometimes experimental) study of learning in classrooms or psychological laboratories tend to be separate domains, even drawing on different theories and methods. These differences make it difficult to compare knowing and learning observed in one paradigm/context with those observed in the other. Even more interestingly, the scientists studying science learning rarely consider their own learning in relation to the phenomena they study. A dialectical, reflexive approach to learning, however, would theorize the movement of an educational science (its learning and development) as a special and general case—subject matter and method—of the phenomenon of learning (in/of) science. In the dialectical approach to the study of science learning, therefore, subject matter, method, and theory fall together. This allows for a perspective in which not only disparate fields of study—school science learning and learning in everyday life—are integrated but also where the progress in the science of science learning coincides with its topic. Following the articulation of a contradictory situation on comparing learning in different settings, I describe the dialectical approach. As a way of providing a concrete example, I then trace the historical movement of my own research group as it simultaneously and alternately studied science learning in formal and informal settings. I conclude by recommending cultural-historical, dialectical approaches to learning and interaction analysis as a context for fruitful interdisciplinary research on science learning within and across different settings.

Roth, Wolff-Michael

2012-06-01

471

An Alternative to Von Glasersfeld's Subjectivism in Science Education: Deweyan Social Constructivism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses von Glasersfeld's view of constructivism in science and mathematics educational research and practice. Provides a social constructivist alternative to von Glaserfeld's subjectivist constructivism. Discusses the practical art of experimental construction and objectivity in science education. (Author/JRH)

Garrison, Jim

1997-01-01

472

Data Tape User's Manual for the 1977 National Survey of Science, Mathematics and Social Studies Education.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report provides a detailed description and documentation of the six data files prepared as part of the 1977 National Survey of Science, Mathematics and Social Studies Education conducted by the Research Triangle Institute to the National Science Foun...

I. R. Weiss J. Weber

1978-01-01

473

Social Science and Religion: Epistemology, Metaphysics and Considerations of the Public Good  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the relationship between religion and science in terms of the link between social science and religion defined broadly as a commitment to a set of values. It takes as a point of departure Myrdal\\

L. A. Duhs

474

Early Careers of Recent U.S. Social Science PhDs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, we analyse findings of the largest, most comprehensive survey of the career paths of social science PhD graduates to date, "Social Science PhDs--Five+Years Out (SS5)". "SS5" surveyed more than 3,000 graduates of U.S. PhD programmes in six social science fields six to ten years after earning their PhD. The survey collected data on…

Morrison, Emory; Rudd, Elizabeth; Nerad, Maresi

2011-01-01

475

Introduction: The Politics of Engagement between Biodiversity Conservation and the Social Sciences  

Microsoft Academic Search

In scientific endeavour related to biodiversity conservation, the perspectives of the natural sciences have long been dominant. During the last several decades, however, social science research has steadily gained momentum.\\u000aThe major achievement of the social sciences has been to investigate and emphasise the ‘human side’ of biodiversity conservation, ranging from local issues around social exclusion from protected areas and

Bram Büscher; William Wolmer

2007-01-01

476

A Study of Science--A Process Approach Implementation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Discusses the results of a study designed to compare Edmonton Public School Grade 11 students and teachers who were on the program, "Science--A Process Approach", with the Grade 11 students and teachers in the Edmonton system who were studying the provincially authorized science program. (Author/RK)|

Jacknicke, K. G.

1977-01-01

477

FAST: Foundational Approaches in Science Teaching. Instructional Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Foundational Approaches in Science Teaching (FAST) is a program which is intended to facilitate student transition from the general science process programs of elementary schools to the discipline-oriented programs of high school. This guide has been developed to provide an overview of the total program as well as a description of the…

Brantley, L. Reed; And Others

478

Academic and social dimensions of student experience: The high school science classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study I asked how classroom participants defined and acted on academic and social dimensions of classroom life. Because little is known about how students think and feel about classroom experience (Erickson & Schultz, 1992), I focused on their perspectives. In attempting to sort out and report student perspectives, I used a case of one high school science classroom, Mr. Dansen's. Approaching the study of that case much like an anthropologist would, I treated the classroom as a "local world of science with characteristic habits of mind, behaviors, and meaning systems" (Page, 1994, p. 6). I assumed the centrality of meaning in guiding human behavior, accordingly, I used a social constructivist or interpretive theoretical lens. Ethnographic methods were used to document participants' views across a range of strategies: Classroom observations, interviews, a student focus group, a brief questionnaire, and the collection of school and classroom documents. I concluded that curriculum meaning-making is a series of balancing acts. In lessons teachers and students juggle diverse often contradictory academic and social relations. All of the situated activity constructs a fundamental imbalance in classroom experience. Students react to that perceived imbalance. Specifically, three categories of student response were ascertained. One, student isolates or those who withdraw significantly on some academic or social measure, about 45% of students in his class. Two, student enthusiasts; or those most enthusiastic about science and their science teacher, only 5% of students. Three, students who are ambivalent and waffle between engagement and withdrawal, about 50% of students. In sum, students withdrew in large numbers from the educational encounter. The major implication of this research is that students are clear-headed in their assessments of classroom life. Students' interpretations, in turn, directly influence whether or why they find school knowledge important. Thus, this study reveals the importance of considering student input as a legitimate factor in educational equations.

Longo, Ellen O'neil

479

Social and Behavioral Challenges of HIV Vaccines: Implications for Social Work and Social Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

A safe and efficacious HIV vaccine would be a tremendous asset to halting the spread of HIV. Nevertheless, HIV vaccines face a range of social and behavioral challenges that will determine their ultimate contribution to prevention. HIV vaccine development and clinical trials raise thorny social, behavioral, and ethical issues around resource allocation, recruitment and enrollment, trial implementation, and post-trial follow-up

Peter A. Newman

2009-01-01

480

Use of Scopus and Google Scholar to measure social sciences production in four major Spanish universities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large part of Social Sciences and the Humanities do not adapt to international proceedings used in English for scientific\\u000a output on databases such as the Web of Science and Scopus. The aim of this paper is to show the different results obtained\\u000a in scientific work by comparing Social Sciences researchers with those of other sciences in four Spanish universities.

Goio Etxebarria; Mikel Gomez-Uranga

2010-01-01

481

Abandoning evolution. The forgotten history of antievolution activism and the transformation of American social science.  

PubMed

From its inception, antievolution activism has been aimed not only at the natural sciences but also, and almost as often, at the social sciences. Although almost entirely overlooked by scholars, this activism played a significant part in the development of American social science in the early twentieth century. Analyzing public writings and private papers of antievolution activists, academic social scientists, and university officials from the 1920s, this essay recalls this forgotten history, showing how antievolution activism contributed to the abandonment of evolutionary theory and the adoption of a set of secular, scientific, and professional characteristics that have come to define much of modern social science. PMID:23488237

Lienesch, Michael

2012-12-01

482

A humanistic approach to the study of social media: combining social network analysis & case study research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humanistic research into social media is presently diverse in approach, but rich in theoretical underpinnings. It is unsurprising that there is some difficulty in translating often text-based approaches to multi-media rich, rapidly-evolving social networking environments. We explore theoretical issues for studying social media with respect to one popular research methodology: case study research (CSR). Here we examine the challenges that

Ashley Rose Kelly; Meagan Kittle Autry

2011-01-01

483

Investigative Primary Science: A Problem-based Learning Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports on the success of using a problem-based learning approach (PBL) as a pedagogical mode of learning open inquiry science within a traditional four-year undergraduate elementary teacher education program. In 2010, a problem-based learning approach to teaching primary science replaced the traditional content driven syllabus. During the 13 week semester, a cohort of 150 elementary pre-service teachers embarked

Matthew B Etherington

2011-01-01

484

Integrating Social Science into the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network: Social Dimensions of Ecological Change and Ecological Dimensions of Social Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

The integration of the social sciences into long-term ecological research is an urgent priority. To address this need, a group of social, earth, and life scientists associated with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Net- work have articulated a conceptual framework for understanding the human dimensions of ecological change for the LTER Network. This framework ex- plicitly

Charles L. Redman; J. Morgan Grove; Lauren H. Kuby

485

Latent Space Approaches to Social Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Network models,are widely used to represent relational information,among,interacting units. In studies of social networks, recent emphasis has been placed on random graph models where the nodes,usually represent individual social actors and the edges represent the presence,of a specified relation between,actors. vVe develop,a class of models,where,the probability,of a relation between,actors depends,on the positions of individuals in an unobserved,\\

Peter D. Hoff; Adrian E. Raftery; Mark S. Handcock

2002-01-01

486

A BELIEVING SCIENTIST APPROACHES THE SCIENCES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding the relation between science and religion is important and relevant. For various reasons the relation is sometimes one of conflict and sometimes cooperation. The Bible gives several examples of the conflict. Since both theological and scientific interpretations change with advancing knowledge, caution is necessary in basing one's theology on any particular scientific model. Examples of cooperation are also described,

Ben Clausen

487

Establishing a Social Media Presence and Network for the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association (PAESTA)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Spring 2011, the Pennsylvania Earth Science Teachers Association (PAESTA) became an official state chapter of the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA). Established with funds from the National Science Foundation, PAESTA is focused on advancing, extending, improving, and coordinating all levels of Earth Science education in Pennsylvania. Our goal is to reach earth science educators across Pennsylvania and beyond who are not physically co-located. An early priority of this new organization was to establish a web presence (http://www.paesta.psu.edu/) and to build an online community to support PAESTA activities and members. PAESTA exists as a distributed group made up of educators across Pennsylvania. Many initial members were participants in summer Earth and space science workshops held at Penn State University, which has allowed for face-to-face connections and network building. PAESTA will hold sessions and a reception at the Pennsylvania Science Teachers Association annual conference. The work of the group also takes place virtually via the PAESTA organizational website, providing professional development opportunities and Earth Science related teaching resources and links. As PAESTA is still in the very early days of its formation, we are utilizing a variety of social media tools to disseminate information and to promote asynchronous discussions around Earth and space science topics and pedagogy. The site features discussion boards for members and non-members to post comments along a specific topic or theme. For example, each month the PAESTA site features an article from one of the National Science Teacher's Association (NSTA)'s journals and encourages teachers to discuss and apply the pedagogical approach or strategy from the article to their classroom situation. We send email blasts so that members learn about organizational news and professional development opportunities. We also leverage in-person training sessions and conference sessions as a way to build participation and membership in the online PAESTA community. Part of the approach guiding the developing of the virtual community was to provide a number of ways for teachers to access PAESTA content. We needed to find ways to establish a presence in venues where our users regularly go to find information rather than expecting them to visit our website. This includes experiments with a variety of social networking platforms including Facebook and Twitter. We also make use of sites that allow users to collect and share information such as bookmarks (Diigo), citations (Mendeley), and reading lists (Goodreads). Such sites allow us to reach new audiences with an affinity for the content that we are producing who may not otherwise find us. The tension in this approach is in maintaining information and a consistent presence across a variety of platforms. It is too early to tell which social media tools and strategies will be the most effective in creating a sense of community and interactivity among PAESTA members. Monitoring usage statistics and patterns across platforms should assist us in identifying which social media tool(s) will be most effective to continue with the mission of PAESTA.

Guertin, L. A.; Merkel, C.

2011-12-01

488

Assessing policy and practice impacts of social science research: the application of the Payback Framework to assess the Future of Work programme  

Microsoft Academic Search

The UK Economic and Social Research Council funded exploratory evaluation studies to assess the wider impacts on society of various examples of its research. The Payback Framework is a conceptual approach previously used to evaluate impacts from health research. We tested its applicability to social sciences by using an adapted version to assess the impacts of the Future of Work

Lisa Klautzer; Stephen Hanney; Edward Nason; Jennifer Rubin; Jonathan Grant; Steven Wooding

2011-01-01

489

Autonomy in Science Education: A Practical Approach in Attitude Shifting Towards Science Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work describes a 2-year study in teaching school science, based on the stimulation of higher thinking levels in learning science using a highly student-centred and constructivist learning approach. We sought to shift and strengthen students' positive attitudes towards science learning, self-efficacy towards invention, and achievement. Focusing on an important aspect of student's positive attitude towards learning, their preference (like\\/dislike)

Pasl A. Jalil; M. Z. Abu Sbeih; M. Boujettif; R. Barakat

2009-01-01

490

Anticipation of Social Interaction Changes Implicit Approach-Avoidance Behavior of Socially Anxious Individuals.  

PubMed

Earlier research has revealed implicit avoidance of social stimuli in social anxiety (SA). This study investigated such reactions in anticipation of social interaction. High (n = 24) and low (n = 22) SA females were assessed in anticipation of a getting-acquainted conversation (anticipation) and in a no-conversation-expected (neutral) condition. The Face-Turn Approach Avoidance Task was used in which participants responded to profiles of human faces or control stimuli by either pulling (approach) or pushing (avoidance) a joystick. Upon pulling, the stimuli turned toward the participant, while they turned away upon pushing. The results demonstrated the expected decreased approach response to faces in the neutral condition for the high SAs compared to the low SAs group. Unexpectedly, in the anticipation condition the high SAs showed increased approach tendencies to faces whereas, the low SAs demonstrated a decreased approach response. The implicit social approach response of the high SAs in the anticipation condition is discussed. PMID:23144517

Voncken, M J; Rinck, M; Deckers, A; Lange, W-G

2011-10-30

491

Integrating Social Studies and Ethnobotany: A Multicultural Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes a series of four lessons that integrate social studies, language arts, and life science for high school students. Explains that students participate in a wildflower collection activity, interview a person from another culture to collect interesting facts and wild stories, research a flowering plant, and make wildflower bookmarks. (CMK)|

Harrell, Pamela Esprivalo; Forney, Scott

2001-01-01

492

Socially sustainable work organizations : a chaordic systems approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines both theoretical and practical approaches to socially sustainable work organizations. Socially sustainable work organizations have a dynamic ability to function both by repeating accustomed and by devising innovative solutions, and they maintain this operational viability by promoting the functioning capabilities of their stakeholders. The organizational and stakeholder functioning capabilities are founded on complexity stemming from the simultaneous

Mari Kira; Frans M. van Eijnatten

2008-01-01

493

CAREER MOBILITY IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION: A SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY APPROACH  

Microsoft Academic Search

mobility phenomenon. An appealing approach for such an in-depth inquiry into turnover is social learning theory. Social learning theory posits that psychological functioning can be explained in terms of the interaction of personal characteristics, previous behavior (learning) and environmental determinants (Chapman, 1984). This psychological functioning involves valuing certain outcomes, discriminating among situations in terms of their potential to bring about

Tom Grady

1990-01-01

494

Philosophical Approaches of Religious Jewish Science Teachers toward the Teaching of "Controversial" Topics in Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This research examines the problems that religious Jewish science teachers in Israeli high schools have in coping with science subjects (such as geological time) which conflict with their religious beliefs. We do this by characterizing the philosophical approaches within Judaism that such teachers have adopted for dealing with such controversy.…

Dodick, Jeff; Dayan, Aliza; Orion, Nir

2010-01-01

495

A new approach to monitoring the social environment for natural ...  

Treesearch

Research & Development ... Description: This paper describes a new approach for monitoring the social environment for natural ... Content analysis of the media has repeatedly been shown to produce results that are closely correlated with ...

496

An imaging genetics approach to understanding social influence  

PubMed Central

Normative social influences shape nearly every aspect of our lives, yet the biological processes mediating the impact of these social influences on behavior remain incompletely understood. In this Hypothesis, we outline a theoretical framework and an integrative research approach to the study of social influences on the brain and genetic moderators of such effects. First, we review neuroimaging evidence linking social influence and conformity to the brain's reward system. We next review neuroimaging evidence linking social punishment (exclusion) to brain systems involved in the experience of pain, as well as evidence linking exclusion to conformity. We suggest that genetic variants that increase sensitivity to social cues may predispose individuals to be more sensitive to either social rewards or punishments (or potentially both), which in turn increases conformity and susceptibility to normative social influences more broadly. To this end, we review evidence for genetic moderators of neurochemical responses in the brain, and suggest ways in which genes and pharmacology may modulate sensitivity to social influences. We conclude by proposing an integrative imaging genetics approach to the study of brain mediators and genetic modulators of a variety of social influences on human attitudes, beliefs, and actions.

Falk, Emily B.; Way, Baldwin M.; Jasinska, Agnes J.

2012-01-01

497

Building Inclusive Communities: A Social Capital Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Population shifts have changed the face of many Idaho communities, but inclusive relationships among groups can build the social capital required for communities to thrive. University of Idaho Extension developed "Idaho's Journey for Diversity and Human Rights" as a hands-on traveling workshop about past and present issues of human rights and…

Shaklee, Harriet; Laumatia, Laura; Luckey, Brian; Traver, Sue; Nauman, Arlinda; Tifft, Kathee; Liddil, Audrey; Hampton, Carol

2010-01-01

498

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Science Education: A Cognitive Analysis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While many claims have been made about the benefits of interdisciplinary approaches to science education, the contention is that little empirical data exist either to support or refute the claims. The demands of integrated approaches on students or teachers have not been subjected to either theoretical or empirical assessment. This paper presents…

Champagne, Audrey B.; Cornbleth, Catherine

499

One Man's Approach to a Basic Course in Geological Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a twofold approach to teaching basic geology based on five principles to make science accessible to students who think they are bored with or afraid of the subject. The approach focuses on: appealing to the mind (to attack boredom) and appealing to the emotions (to attack fear). (BC)

Gould, Stephen Jay

1984-01-01

500

Approaches To Teaching Science in the Jordanian Primary School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Reports on a study of the influence of different approaches to teaching units from the Jordanian science curriculum on over 600 students from grades 6, 9, and 10. Trains a small sample of male and female teachers in the use of cooperative learning and lecture-demonstration approaches to teaching. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/YDS)|

Qualter, Anne; Abu-Hola, I. R. A.

2000-01-01