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Sample records for society clinical pharmacology

  1. Neonatal clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van de Velde, Marc; van den Anker, John

    2013-01-01

    Effective and safe drug administration in neonates should be based on integrated knowledge on the evolving physiological characteristics of the infant who will receive the drug, and the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of a given drug. Consequently, clinical pharmacology in neonates is as dynamic and diverse as the neonates we admit to our units while covariates explaining the variability are at least as relevant as median estimates. The unique setting of neonatal clinical pharmacology will be highlighted based on the hazards of simple extrapolation of maturational drug clearance when only based on ‘adult’ metabolism (propofol, paracetamol). Secondly, maturational trends are not at the same pace for all maturational processes. This will be illustrated based on the differences between hepatic and renal maturation (tramadol, morphine, midazolam). Finally, pharmacogenetics should be tailored to neonates, not just mirror adult concepts. Because of this diversity, clinical research in the field of neonatal clinical pharmacology is urgently needed, and facilitated through PK/PD modeling. In addition, irrespective of already available data to guide pharmacotherapy, pharmacovigilance is needed to recognize specific side effects. Consequently, paediatric anesthesiologists should consider to contribute to improved pharmacotherapy through clinical trial design and collaboration, as well as reporting on adverse effects of specific drugs. PMID:23617305

  2. Safety Pharmacology Society: 9th Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2010-03-01

    The keynote presentation of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society 9th Annual Meeting addressed the urgency, for pharmaceutical organizations, to implement strategies for effectively communicating drug risks to all concerned stakeholders and, in particular, the general public. The application of chronobiology to SP investigational protocols can improve the search of drug-induced adverse effects. The Distinguished Service Award Lecture reviewed a life-long journey through trials and tribulations in the quest of the ever-distant scientific truth. The revision process of Directive 86/609/EC for improving animal welfare should be conducted with the purpose of maintaining a fair balance among animal protection, human health and research imperatives in order to prevent the migration of pharmaceutical activities outside Europe. Additional topics of interest were the behavioral, metabolic and cardiovascular problems experienced by small animals housed at the standard laboratory temperature. A technology for the automated collection of blood and urine samples in rats implanted with telemetry sensors was presented. Non-clinical, clinical, regulatory and legal aspects of abuse liability were expertly reviewed. The 'degradability' of pharmaceuticals into environment-friendly chemicals should be an actively searched and optimized feature of future pharmaceuticals in order to prevent drug pollution of ecosystems. Transgenic and diseased animal models should be selected whenever they can facilitate the determination of drug-induced adverse effects. SP strategies to investigate the safety of drug combination products were exemplified and analyzed in depth. The future of SP was proposed to lie not in the performance of regulatory studies of pharmacodynamic nature but in developing and early applying an array of screening assays for clearing clinical candidates against known drug-induced organ function injuries. In conclusion, the 2009 SP Society annual meeting offered a wealth of

  3. Clinical pharmacology and malaria.

    PubMed

    Breckenridge, A M; Winstanley, P A

    1997-10-01

    The role of clinical pharmacology in improving the prevention and treatment of malaria is reviewed. A series of general and specific issues is discussed, concentrating on risk-benefit and cost-effectiveness. The techniques of clinical pharmacokinetics play an important role in the optimal use of drugs and this is illustrated by studies on quinine and proguanil. In discussing amodiaquine toxicity, the role of the pharmacologist and the chemist in designing out drug toxicity lends hope for producing a new generation of antimalarial drugs. PMID:9625927

  4. Integrating pharmacology and clinical pharmacology in universities.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Julia C

    2012-06-01

    Continuing development of safe and effective new medicines is critically important for global health, social prosperity and the economy. The drug discovery-development pipeline depends critically on close partnerships between scientists and clinicians and on educational programmes that ensure that the pharmacological workforce, in its broadest sense, is fit for purpose. Here I consider factors that have influenced the development of basic and clinical pharmacology in UK universities over the past 40 years and discuss ways in which basic pharmacologists, clinical pharmacologists and scientists from different disciplines can work together effectively, while retaining their professional identities and fostering developments in their disciplines. Specifically, I propose the establishment of Institutes of Drug Discovery and Development, whose activities could include development and implementation of a translational pharmacology research strategy, drawing on the collective expertise of the membership and the university as whole; provision of a forum for regular seminars and symposia to promote the discipline, encourage collaboration and develop a cohesive community; provision of a research advisory service, covering, for example, data management, applications for ethics permission, clinical trials design, statistics and regulatory affairs; liaison with potential funders and leadership of major funding bids, including funding for doctoral training; provision of advice on intellectual property protection and the commercialization of research; liaison with corporate partners to facilitate collaboration, knowledge transfer and effective translation; and leadership of undergraduate and postgraduate education in basic and clinical pharmacology and related sciences for medical and science students, including continuing professional development and transferable skills. PMID:22360628

  5. Integrating pharmacology and clinical pharmacology in universities

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Julia C

    2012-01-01

    Continuing development of safe and effective new medicines is critically important for global health, social prosperity and the economy. The drug discovery–development pipeline depends critically on close partnerships between scientists and clinicians and on educational programmes that ensure that the pharmacological workforce, in its broadest sense, is fit for purpose. Here I consider factors that have influenced the development of basic and clinical pharmacology in UK universities over the past 40 years and discuss ways in which basic pharmacologists, clinical pharmacologists and scientists from different disciplines can work together effectively, while retaining their professional identities and fostering developments in their disciplines. Specifically, I propose the establishment of Institutes of Drug Discovery and Development, whose activities could include development and implementation of a translational pharmacology research strategy, drawing on the collective expertise of the membership and the university as whole; provision of a forum for regular seminars and symposia to promote the discipline, encourage collaboration and develop a cohesive community; provision of a research advisory service, covering, for example, data management, applications for ethics permission, clinical trials design, statistics and regulatory affairs; liaison with potential funders and leadership of major funding bids, including funding for doctoral training; provision of advice on intellectual property protection and the commercialization of research; liaison with corporate partners to facilitate collaboration, knowledge transfer and effective translation; and leadership of undergraduate and postgraduate education in basic and clinical pharmacology and related sciences for medical and science students, including continuing professional development and transferable skills. PMID:22360628

  6. Clinical pharmacology of bimatoprost.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Louis B

    2005-06-01

    Bimatoprost (Lumigan), Allergan) is a highly efficacious ocular hypotensive agent that provides good diurnal control of intraocular pressure in glaucoma and ocular hypertensive patients. Bimatoprost is a synthetic molecule that is structurally and pharmacologically similar to prostamide F(2), and appears to mimic the activity of the prostamides. Consistent with prostamide-mimetic activity, bimatoprost has potent inherent pharmacological activity in prostamide-sensitive preparations and essentially remains intact in the living primate eye. This is sufficient to explain its potent and efficacious ocular hypotensive activity, and suggests that bimatoprost is a pharmacologically unique compound. PMID:16922657

  7. Clinical pharmacology of deferasirox.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Chiaki

    2014-08-01

    Iron accumulation is a consequence of regular red cell transfusions, and can occur as a result of ineffective erythropoiesis secondary to increased intestinal iron absorption, in patients with various anemias. Without appropriate treatment, iron overload can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Deferasirox is an oral iron chelator effective for reduction of body iron in iron-overloaded patients with transfusion-dependent anemias and non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia, with a well-established safety profile. This review summarizes the clinical pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of deferasirox, and the claims supporting once-daily dosing for effective chelation. Sustained labile plasma iron suppression is observed with no rebound between doses, protecting organs from potential tissue damage. Increased iron excretion positively correlates with increased deferasirox exposure; to optimize iron removal transfusional iron intake, body iron burden and safety parameters should also be considered. Deferasirox dispersible tablets should be taken ≥30 min before food due to an effect of food on bioavailability. Dosing is consistent across pediatric and adult patients and there is no ethnic sensitivity. Dose adjustment is required for patients with hepatic impairment and may be considered upon coadministration with strong uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase inducers or bile acid sequestrants (coadministration should be avoided where possible), and patients should be monitored upon coadministration with cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4/5, CYP2C8, or CYP1A2 substrates. Coadministration with hydroxyurea, a fetal hemoglobin modulator, does not appear to impact deferasirox pharmacokinetics. In summary, a substantial body of clinical and pharmacokinetic data are available for deferasirox to guide its optimal use in multiple patient populations and clinical circumstances. PMID:24996374

  8. [Nomegestrol acetate: clinical pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Lello, S

    2009-10-01

    Progestogens are used in clinical practice in some conditions. Their effects depend on their chemical structure, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, with important differences among various progestogens. Generally, progestins are classified according to their parent molecule, of which often they keep some features. Derivatives of 19-nor-progesterone are characterized by high selectivity of action on progestin receptor. In particular, nomegestrol acetate (NomAc) shows an important progestational potency, neutral gluco-lipid profile, and antigonadotropic activity. It is used for treating menstrual cycle disorders and for hormone replacement therapy in menopause in association with an estrogen. In future, thanks to its antigonadotropic activity, NomAc will be used in estroprogestin combinations in fertile women, thus taking advantage of its tolerability profile and obtaining numerous non-contraceptive benefits as well. PMID:19749678

  9. Clinical pharmacology and vascular risk.

    PubMed

    Silvestrelli, G; Corea, F; Micheli, S; Lanari, A

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment and several drugs of abuse have been associated with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). However, there is a paucity of data on the independent risk of vascular disease (VD) associated with pharmacological treatment and no controlled trials demonstrating a reduction in risk with abstinence. Information about IHD and CVD-related drug abuse is mainly limited to epidemiological studies focused on urban populations. The potential link between some pharmacological treatments (estrogen, some oncologic drugs and some atypical antipsychotics) and cerebrovascular adverse events was analyzed, but disagreement about an association persists. Drugs of abuse, including cocaine, amphetamines and heroin, have been associated with an increased vascular risk. These drugs can cause abrupt changes in blood pressure, vasculitic-type changes, lead to embolization caused by infective endocarditis, and hemostatic and hematologic abnormalities that can result in increased blood viscosity and platelet aggregation. Long-term treatment strategies based on medication, psychological support, and outreach programs play an important role in treatment of drug dependency. In these last years public interest in risk factors for VD has been constantly increasing and the successful identification and management of pharmacological treatment and drug abuse can be challenging. One of the major public health issues for the future will be to focus more on new vascular risk factor recognition and management. The objective of this chapter is to review the relevance of IHD and CVD associated with various pharmacological treatments and drug abuse with focusing on ischemic disease. This chapter reports the clinical evidence of this association and analyzes the experimental role of new drugs as a growing risk factor of VD with the hypothetical new association. In conclusion, in this chapter great attention is paid to evaluating the scientific and real

  10. Argentinean Society of Experimental Pharmacology: Brief history and main scientific contributions to the discipline.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Bruni, Sergio F; Acosta, Gabriela B

    2016-07-01

    Argentina Biomedical Science has been historically strong. The development of Human and Veterinary Pharmacology in our country as a pivotal discipline has been acknowledged worldwide because of the quality of its contributions. Argentinean Society of Experimental Pharmacology (SAFE) is a non- profit association whose research fields include Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology. SAFE main goals are described as follow (a) To meet active researchers for studying concerns regarding Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology (b) To launch an initiative for development of the discipline in mainly our country and other collaborative countries worldwide (c) To spread the pharmacological know-how obtained from different research teams (d) To strengthen relations between pharmacologists (e) To facilitate the presentation and discussion of scientific papers. This current article shows the SAFE's more important scientific contribution to pharmacology through its former research scientists to the present. PMID:26816088

  11. Post-mortem clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ferner, R E

    2008-01-01

    Clinical pharmacology assumes that deductions can be made about the concentrations of drugs from a knowledge of the pharmacokinetic parameters in an individual; and that the effects are related to the measured concentration. Post-mortem changes render the assumptions of clinical pharmacology largely invalid, and make the interpretation of concentrations measured in post-mortem samples difficult or impossible. Qualitative tests can show the presence of substances that were not present in life, and can fail to detect substances that led to death. Quantitative analysis is subject to error in itself, and because post-mortem concentrations vary in largely unpredictable ways with the site and time of sampling, as a result of the phenomenon of post-mortem redistribution. Consequently, compilations of ‘lethal concentrations’ are misleading. There is a lack of adequate studies of the true relationship between fatal events and the concentrations that can be measured subsequently, but without such studies, clinical pharmacologists and others should be wary of interpreting post-mortem measurements. PMID:18637886

  12. Psychostimulants: Basic and Clinical Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    McCreary, Andrew C; Müller, Christian P; Filip, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Substance use disorder, and particularly psychostimulant use disorder, has considerable socioeconomic burden globally. The psychostimulants include several chemical classes, being derivatives of benzoylecgonine, phenethylamine, phenylpropanolamine, or aminoaryloxazoline. Psychostimulant drugs activate the brain reward pathways of the mesoaccumbal system, and continued use leads to persistent neuroplastic and dysfunctional changes of a variety of structures involved in learning and memory, habit-forming learning, salience attribution, and inhibitory control. There are a variety of neurochemical and neurobehavioral changes in psychostimulant addiction, for example, dopaminergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic (5-HT-ergic), and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) changes have all noted. In this chapter, we will review pharmacological changes associated with psychostimulant use and abuse in humans and animals, and on the basis of the best characterized and most widely abused psychostimulants (amphetamines, cocaine) discuss why use transitions into abuse and review basic science and clinical strategies that might assist in treating psychostimulant abuse. PMID:26070753

  13. A brief history of the British Pharmacological Society

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbert, Alan W

    2006-01-01

    The article traces the history of the BPS since its inception in 1931 until the present day. Details are given about the size and nature of the membership and how the governance of the Society has changed during the last 75 years. The emergence of the Clinical Section from within the main Society and the growth of the Society's publications are described. PMID:16402105

  14. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... With the National Cancer Institute for Inaugural Global Pathology Conference March 2016 OneLab Memo ASCP Action Alert - ... 2016 Copyright © 2016 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  15. American Society for Clinical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Science Letter to Council of Deans: State of Pathology Training in Medical School Help Chart the Future ... Need Copyright © 2016 by American Society for Clinical Pathology. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Use About ASCP ...

  16. Prostaglandins: pharmacology and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Karim, S M; Hillier, K

    1974-01-01

    Prostaglandin research has been 1 of the most stimulating features of biomedical investigation in the past decade. Interest developed at a time of expanding knowledge of hormonal and neurohormonal behavior and research work received a tremendous impetus in the early 1960s with the elucidation in Sweden of the chemical structures of prostaglandins, followed by the discovery of their biosynthetic pathways. The original findings of large amounts of prostaglandin in the male accessory genital glands and their secretions, and subsequent discovery in the menstrual and amniotic fluids linked these substances with human production. As a result of further investigation, clinical applications of prostaglandins for the induction of labor and termination of early unwanted pregnancies have been developed. Apart from the functions of the prostaglandins in the reproductive area, they have been shown to have a widespread distribution in the body and produce many different pharmacological effects. Prostaglandins are thought to be involved in the regulation of blood pressure and through their vascular effects have therapeutic potential in the treatment of hypertension and peripheral vascular disease. Through their bronchodilator effect, some prostaglandins may become useful in the treatment of asthma. PMID:4611742

  17. Pharmacometabolomics: implications for clinical pharmacology and systems pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Kaddurah-Daouk, R; Weinshilboum, R M

    2014-02-01

    Metabolomics, the study of metabolism at an "omic" level, has the potential to transform our understanding of mechanisms of drug action and the molecular basis for variation in drug response. It is now possible to define metabolic signatures of drug exposure that can identify pathways involved in both drug efficacy and adverse drug reactions. In addition, the "metabotype," the metabolic "signature" of a patient, is a unique identity that contains information about drug response and disease heterogeneity. The application of metabolomics for the study of drug effects and variation in drug response is creating "pharmacometabolomics," a discipline that will contribute to personalized drug therapy and will complement pharmacogenomics by capturing environmental and microbiome-level influences on response to drug therapy. This field has the potential to transform pharmacology and clinical pharmacology in significant ways and will contribute to efforts for personalized therapy. This overview highlights developments in the new discipline of pharmacometabolomics. PMID:24193171

  18. Clinical pharmacology of old age syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Broadhurst, C; Wilson, K C M; Kinirons, M T; Wagg, A; Dhesi, J K

    2003-01-01

    Several syndromes occur in old age. They are often associated with increased mortality and in all there is a paucity of basic and clinical research. The recent developments in the clinical pharmacology of three common syndromes of old age (delirium, urinary incontinence, and falls) are discussed along with directions for future research. PMID:12919174

  19. Applications of stable isotopes in clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Schellekens, Reinout C A; Stellaard, Frans; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Frijlink, Henderik W; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of the application of stable isotope technology in clinical pharmacology. Three main categories of stable isotope technology can be distinguished in clinical pharmacology. Firstly, it is applied in the assessment of drug pharmacology to determine the pharmacokinetic profile or mode of action of a drug substance. Secondly, stable isotopes may be used for the assessment of drug products or drug delivery systems by determination of parameters such as the bioavailability or the release profile. Thirdly, patients may be assessed in relation to patient-specific drug treatment; this concept is often called personalized medicine. In this article, the application of stable isotope technology in the aforementioned three areas is reviewed, with emphasis on developments over the past 25 years. The applications are illustrated with examples from clinical studies in humans. PMID:21801197

  20. Aripiprazole: from pharmacological profile to clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Di Sciascio, Guido; Riva, Marco Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Clinical experience with aripiprazole has confirmed the effectiveness and the safety of this novel antipsychotic drug in patients with schizophrenia as well as for the treatment of mania in type I bipolar disorder. However the generalization of the results from clinical trials requires further effort in order to address some issues and to overcome incorrect and partial interpretation of the clinical evidence. This article provides some straightforward guidance that may help clinical psychiatrists to translate the mechanism of action of aripiprazole into clinical setting, thus improving the appropriate use of the drug through rational application of its pharmacological profile. Examples of paradigmatic clinical situations are presented and discussed, suggesting possible intervention strategies, which may contribute to achieving the most appropriate use of the pharmacological properties of aripiprazole in real life settings. PMID:26508859

  1. Human pharmacology for addiction medicine: From evidence to clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Quednow, Boris B; Herdener, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUD) are complex and often chronic diseases with negative health outcomes and social consequences. Pharmacological treatment options for SUD can be separated in medications for (i) intoxication, (ii) withdrawal, and (iii) reduction of use together with relapse prevention. This chapter will focus on approved or clinically established pharmacological strategies suited to manage symptoms of withdrawal, and to reduce substance use or to promote abstinence. Hereby SUD involving alcohol, nicotine, stimulants, and opioids are primarily discussed as these substances are considered most harmful for both the individual and the society. Moreover, the pharmacotherapy of SUD related to the use of cannabis, benzodiazepines, and gamma-hydroxybutyrate is also briefly reviewed. Since most approved pharmacological treatment options show only moderate effect sizes especially in the long term, the development of new treatment strategies including new drugs, new combinations of available compounds, and biomarkers for response prediction is still warranted. PMID:26822361

  2. Methods in Clinical Pharmacology Series

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Claire; Young, Graeme C; Cavalier, Tom; Young, Malcolm A

    2014-01-01

    Human radiolabel studies are traditionally conducted to provide a definitive understanding of the human absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties of a drug. However, advances in technology over the past decade have allowed alternative methods to be employed to obtain both clinical ADME and pharmacokinetic (PK) information. These include microdose and microtracer approaches using accelerator mass spectrometry, and the identification and quantification of metabolites in samples from classical human PK studies using technologies suitable for non-radiolabelled drug molecules, namely liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. These recently developed approaches are described here together with relevant examples primarily from experiences gained in support of drug development projects at GlaxoSmithKline. The advantages of these study designs together with their limitations are described. We also discuss special considerations which should be made for a successful outcome to these new approaches and also to the more traditional human radiolabel study in order to maximize knowledge around the human ADME properties of drug molecules. PMID:25041729

  3. Angioedema: Clinical Presentations and Pharmacological Management.

    PubMed

    Collins-Yoder, Angela Smith

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema (AE) is a unique clinical presentation of an unchecked release of bradykinin. The origin of this clinical presentation can be either genetic or acquired. The outcome within the patient is subcutaneous swelling of the lower layers of the epidermis. Symptoms are most often localized to the upper airway or the gastrointestinal tract. A typical course resolves in 5 to 7 days, but in some patients, the clinical manifestations exist up to 6 weeks. Hereditary AE is rare and genetically linked, and typically, the patient has episodes for many years before diagnosis. Episodes of acquired AE may be drug induced, triggered by a specific allergen, or idiopathic. Angioedema can elicit the need for critical care interventions, for advanced airway management, or unnecessary abdominal surgery. The treatment for these patients is evolving as new pharmacological agents are developed. This article addresses subtypes of AE, triggers, pharmacology, and information for interdisciplinary team planning of individualized case management. PMID:27258954

  4. The 20th scientific conference of the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Fox, Howard S

    2014-03-01

    The 20th conference of the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology will be held March 26-29, 2014. It features the latest in research examining the intersection of neuroscience, immunology and pharmacology, relevant for human health and disease. Particular emphases are placed on HIV and other infectious diseases, and abused substances, including illicit drugs and alcohol. PMID:24573530

  5. Cholangiocarcinoma: Biology, Clinical Management, and Pharmacological Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Rocio I. R.

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), or tumor of the biliary tree, is a rare and heterogeneous group of malignancies associated with a very poor prognosis. Depending on their localization along the biliary tree, CCAs are classified as intrahepatic, perihilar, and distal, and these subtypes are now considered different entities that differ in tumor biology, the staging system, management, and prognosis. When diagnosed, an evaluation by a multidisciplinary team is essential; the team must decide on the best therapeutic option. Surgical resection of tumors with negative margins is the best option for all subtypes of CCA, although this is only achieved in less than 50% of cases. Five-year survival rates have increased in the recent past owing to improvements in imaging techniques, which permits resectability to be predicted more accurately, and in surgery. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are relatively ineffective in treating nonoperable tumors and the resistance of CCA to these therapies is a major problem. Although the combination of gemcitabine plus platinum derivatives is the pharmacological treatment most widely used, to date there is no standard chemotherapy, and new combinations with targeted drugs are currently being tested in ongoing clinical trials. This review summarizes the biology, clinical management, and pharmacological perspectives of these complex tumors. PMID:27335842

  6. American Society of Clinical Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Profiling Utilization Registry (TAPUR) Study is a non-randomized clinical trial aiming to describe the performance of ... Profiling Utilization Registry (TAPUR) Study is a non-randomized clinical trial aiming to describe the performance of ...

  7. Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology of Etomidate

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Stuart A.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the unique clinical and molecular pharmacology of etomidate. Among general anesthesia induction drugs, etomidate is the only imidazole, and it has the most favorable therapeutic index for single bolus administration. It also produces a unique toxicity among anesthetic drugs-- inhibition of adrenal steroid synthesis that far outlasts its hypnotic action and that may reduce survival of critically ill patients. The major molecular targets mediating anesthetic effects of etomidate in the central nervous system are specific γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor subtypes. Amino acids forming etomidate binding sites have been identified in transmembrane domains of these proteins. Etomidate binding site structure models for the main enzyme mediating etomidate adrenotoxicity have also been developed. Based on this deepening understanding of molecular targets and actions, new etomidate derivatives are being investigated as potentially improved sedative-hypnotics or for use as highly selective inhibitors of adrenal steroid synthesis. PMID:21263301

  8. Leveraging systems biology approaches in clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Melas, Ioannis N; Kretsos, Kosmas; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling has been adopted in all aspects of drug research and development, from the early phases of target identification and drug discovery to the late-stage clinical trials. The different questions addressed during each stage of drug R&D has led to the emergence of different modeling methodologies. In the research phase, systems biology couples experimental data with elaborate computational modeling techniques to capture lifecycle and effector cellular functions (e.g. metabolism, signaling, transcription regulation, protein synthesis and interaction) and integrates them in quantitative models. These models are subsequently used in various ways, i.e. to identify new targets, generate testable hypotheses, gain insights on the drug's mode of action (MOA), translate preclinical findings, and assess the potential of clinical drug efficacy and toxicity. In the development phase, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling is the established way to determine safe and efficacious doses for testing at increasingly larger, and more pertinent to the target indication, cohorts of subjects. First, the relationship between drug input and its concentration in plasma is established. Second, the relationship between this concentration and desired or undesired PD responses is ascertained. Recognizing that the interface of systems biology with PK/PD will facilitate drug development, systems pharmacology came into existence, combining methods from PK/PD modeling and systems engineering explicitly to account for the implicated mechanisms of the target system in the study of drug–target interactions. Herein, a number of popular system biology methodologies are discussed, which could be leveraged within a systems pharmacology framework to address major issues in drug development. PMID:23983165

  9. Clinical pharmacology of atypical antipsychotics: an update

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, M.C.; Paletta, S.; Maffini, M.; Colasanti, A.; Dragogna, F.; Di Pace, C.; Altamura, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    This review will concentrate on the clinical pharmacology, in particular pharmacodynamic data, related to atypical antipsychotics, clozapine, risperidone, paliperidone, olanzapine, que¬tiapine, amisulpride, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, asenapine, iloperidone, lurasidone and cariprazine. A summary of their acute pharmacokinetics properties are also reported. Four new second-generation antipsychotics are available: iloperidone, asenapine, lurasidone and in the next future cariprazine. Similar to ziprasidone and aripiprazole, these new agents are advisable for the lower propensity to give weight gain and metabolic abnormalities in comparison with older second-generation antipsychotics such as olanzapine or clozapine. Actually lurasidone seems to be best in terms of minimizing unwanted alterations in body weight and metabolic variables. Therapeutic drug monitoring is not strictly necessary for all of the new antipsychotic drugs because there are no unequivocal data supporting a relationship between plasma drug levels and clinical outcomes or side effects. The exception can be represented by clozapine for which plasma levels of 350-420 ng/ml are reported to be associated with an increased probability of a good clinical response. Also for olanzapine an established therapeutic range (20-50 ng/ml) is proposed to yield an optimal response and minimize side effects. PMID:26417330

  10. An agenda for UK clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Jamie J; McDowell, Sarah E

    2012-01-01

    The internet and the World Wide Web have changed the ways that we function. As technologies grow and adapt, there is a huge potential for the internet to affect drug research and development, as well as many other aspects of clinical pharmacology. We review some of the areas of interest to date and discuss some of the potential areas in which internet-based technology can be exploited. Information retrieval from the web by health-care professionals is common, and bringing evidence-based medicine to the bedside affects the care of patients. As a primary research tool the web can provide a vast array of information in generating new ideas or exploring previous research findings. This has facilitated systematic reviewing, for example. The content of the web has become a subject of research in its own right. The web is also widely used as a research facilitator, including enhancement of communication between collaborators, provision of online research tools (such as questionnaires, management of large scale multicentre trials, registration of clinical trials) and distribution of information. Problems include information overload, ignorance of early data that are not indexed in databases, difficulties in keeping web sites up to date and assessing the validity of information retrieved. Some web-based activities are viewed with suspicion, including analysis by pharmaceutical companies of drug information to facilitate direct-to-consumer advertising of novel pharmaceuticals. Use of these technologies will continue to expand in often unexpected ways. Clinical pharmacologists must embrace internet technology and include it as a key priority in their research agenda. PMID:22360652

  11. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society: EEG Guidelines Introduction.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Tammy N; Acharya, Jayant N; Halford, Jonathan J; Kuratani, John D; Sinha, Saurabh R; Stecker, Mark M; Tatum, William O; Drislane, Frank W

    2016-08-01

    This revision to the EEG Guidelines is an update incorporating current EEG technology and practice. "Standards of practice in clinical electroencephalography" (previously Guideline 4) has been removed. It is currently undergoing revision through collaboration among multiple medical societies and will become part of "Qualifications and Responsibilities of Personnel Performing and Interpreting Clinical Neurophysiology Procedures." The remaining guidelines are reordered and renumbered. PMID:27482792

  12. Memantine: pharmacological properties and clinical uses.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir

    2004-09-01

    Memantine is a relatively new drug specially developed for use in moderate-to-severe dementia. It is an uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist and reduces glutamatergic excitotoxicity. Though Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the commonest cause of dementia in the world, there is no "cure" available for the same. Cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil and rivastigmine have been shown to provide symptomatic relief in patients with AD but have no effect on disease progression or survival. Moreover, they are not helpful in more severe stages of dementia. Memantine has been shown to cause modest improvement in clinical symptoms in severe stages of AD and may retard the disease progression. Moreover, it has been shown to be useful in various forms of dementia including AD, vascular dementia and Wernicke-Korsakoff psychosis. It is also the first drug to cause complete disappearance of pendular nystagmus due to multiple sclerosis. The current review focuses on the pharmacological properties of memantine and examines the recent evidence in favor of memantine. PMID:15472417

  13. A manifesto for clinical pharmacology from principles to practice

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2010-01-01

    1 This is a manifesto for UK clinical pharmacology. 2 A clinical pharmacologist is a medically qualified practitioner who teaches, does research, frames policy, and gives information and advice about the actions and proper uses of medicines in humans and implements that knowledge in clinical practice. Those without medical qualifications who practise some aspect of clinical pharmacology could be described as, say, ‘applied pharmacologists’. 3 Clinical pharmacology is operationally defined as a translational discipline in terms of the basic tools of human pharmacology (e.g. receptor pharmacology) and applied pharmacology (e.g. pharmacokinetics) and how they are used in drug discovery and development and in solving practical therapeutic problems in individuals and populations. 4 Clinical pharmacologists are employed by universities, health-care services, private organizations (such as drug companies), and regulatory agencies. They are • mentors and teachers, teaching laboratory science, clinical science, and all aspects of practical drug therapy as underpinned by the science of pharmacology; they write and edit didactic and reference texts; • researchers, covering research described by the operational definition; • clinicians, practising general medicine, clinical toxicology, other medical specialties, and general practice; • policy makers, framing local, national, and international medicines policy, including formularies, licensing of medicines and prescribing policies. 5 The future of clinical pharmacology depends on the expansion and maintenance of a central core of practitioners (employed by universities or health-care services), training clinical pharmacologists to practise in universities, health-care services, private organizations, and regulatory agencies, and training other clinicians in the principles and practice of clinical pharmacology. PMID:20642541

  14. Human Behavioral Pharmacology, Past, Present, and Future: Symposium Presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the Behavioral Pharmacology Society

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D.; Bickel, Warren K.; Yi, Richard; de Wit, Harriet; Higgins, Stephen T.; Wenger, Galen R.; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2010-01-01

    A symposium held at the 50th annual meeting of the Behavioral Pharmacology Society in May 2007 reviewed progress in the human behavioral pharmacology of drug abuse. Studies on drug self-administration in humans are reviewed that assessed reinforcing and subjective effects of drugs of abuse. The close parallels observed between studies in humans and laboratory animals using similar behavioral techniques have broadened our understanding of the complex nature of the pharmacological and behavioral factors controlling drug self-administration. The symposium also addressed the role that individual differences, such as gender, personality, and genotype play in determining the extent of self-administration of illicit drugs in human populations. Knowledge of how these factors influence human drug self-administration has helped validate similar differences observed in laboratory animals. In recognition that drug self-administration is but one of many choices available in the lives of humans, the symposium addressed the ways in which choice behavior can be studied in humans. These choice studies in human drug abusers have opened up new and exciting avenues of research in laboratory animals. Finally, the symposium reviewed behavioral pharmacology studies conducted in drug abuse treatment settings and the therapeutic benefits that have emerged from these studies. PMID:20664330

  15. 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2011-03-01

    The 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society covered numerous topics of educational and practical research interest. Biopolymers - the theme of the keynote address - were presented as essential components of medical devices, diagnostic tools, biosensors, human tissue engineering and pharmaceutical formulations for optimized drug delivery. Toxicology and SP investigators - the topic of the Distinguished Service Award Lecture - were encouraged to collaborate in the development of SP technologies and protocols applicable to toxicology studies. Pharmaceutical companies, originally organizations bearing all risks for developing their portfolios, are increasingly moving towards fully integrated networks which outsource core activities (including SP studies) to large contract research organizations. Future nonclinical data are now expected to be of such high quality and predictability power that they may obviate the need for certain expensive and time-consuming clinical investigations. In this context, SP is called upon to extend its risk assessment purview to areas which currently are not systematically covered, such as drug-induced QRS interval prolongation, negative emotions and feelings (e.g., depression), and minor chronic cardiovascular and metabolic changes (e.g., as produced by drugs for type 2 diabetes) which can be responsible for delayed morbidity and mortality. The recently approved ICH S9 guidance relaxes the traditional regulatory SP package in order to accelerate the clinical access to anticancer drugs for patients with advanced malignancies. The novel FDA 'Animal Rule' guidance proposes that for clinical candidates with well-understood toxicities, marketing approval may be granted exclusively on efficacy data generated in animal studies as human clinical investigations for these types of drugs are either unfeasible or unethical. In conclusion, the core messages of this meeting are that SP should consistently operate according to the 'fit

  16. Clinical Pharmacology in the Adolescent Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    Veal, Gareth J.; Hartford, Christine M.; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented that adolescents and young adults (AYAs) experience a significant cancer burden as well as significant cancer mortality compared with other age groups. The reasons for the disparate outcomes of AYAs and other age groups are not completely understood and are likely to be multifactorial, including a range of sociodemographic issues unique to these individuals as well as differences between adolescents, younger pediatric patients, and adults in the pharmacology of anticancer agents. Because adolescence is a period of transition from childhood to early adulthood, numerous physical, physiologic, cognitive, and behavioral changes occur during this time. In this review, we provide an overview of the unique developmental physiology of the adolescent and explain how these factors and the behavioral characteristics of adolescents may affect the pharmacology of anticancer agents in this patient population. Finally, we describe examples of studies that have assessed the relation between drug disposition and age, focusing on the AYA age group. PMID:20439647

  17. An Overview of Clinical Pharmacology of Ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Bushra, Rabia; Aslam, Nousheen

    2010-01-01

    Ibuprofen was the first member of Propionic acid derivatives introduced in 1969. It is a popular domestic and over the counter analgesic and antipyretic for adults and children. Ibuprofen has been rated as the safest conventional NSAID by spontaneous adverse drug reaction reporting systems in the UK. This article summarizes the main pharmacological effects, therapeutical applications and adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions and food drug interactions of ibuprofen that have been reported especially during the last 10 years. PMID:22043330

  18. The role of clinical pharmacology in molecular genetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.

    1997-01-01

    PROBLEM: Discovering the causes of unusual phenotypes in human subjects is an important aspect of patient-oriented research. MATERIAL: The tools of clinical pharmacology are uniquely useful in addressing these problems. PATIENTS, SUBJECTS, OR CASE HISTORIES: We evaluated a 42-year-old patient with lifelong orthostatic hypotension and ptosis of the eyelids. He underwent a series of biochemical, physiological, and pharmacological tests outlined in this article. RESULTS: These studies indicated that sympathetic innervation was intact but that the sympathetic neurotransmitter was dopamine rather than norepinephrine. These results demonstrated that dopamine-beta-hydroxylase deficiency underlies the clinical abnormalities of this patient. CONCLUSION: In selected individuals with unusual phenotypes, the techniques of clinical chemistry and clinical pharmacology can define the nature of the defect at almost the resolution of the human genome.

  19. Achieving the World Health Organization's vision for clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jennifer H; Henry, David; Gray, Jean; Day, Richard; Bochner, Felix; Ferro, Albert; Pirmohamed, Munir; Mörike, Klaus; Schwab, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Clinical pharmacology is a medical specialty whose practitioners teach, undertake research, frame policy, give information and advice about the actions and proper uses of medicines in humans and implement that knowledge in clinical practice. It involves a combination of several activities: drug discovery and development, training safe prescribers, providing objective and evidence-based therapeutic information to ethics, regulatory and pricing bodies, supporting patient care in an increasingly subspecialized arena where co-morbidities, polypharmacy, altered pharmacokinetics and drug interactions are common and developing and contributing to medicines policies for Governments. Clinical pharmacologists must advocate drug quality and they must also advocate for sustainability of the Discipline. However for this they need appropriate clinical service and training support. This Commentary discusses strategies to ensure the Discipline is supported by teaching, training and policy organizations, to communicate the full benefits of clinical pharmacology services, put a monetary value on clinical pharmacology services and to grow the clinical pharmacology workforce to support a growing clinical, academic and regulatory need. PMID:26466826

  20. Clinical pharmacology training in India: Status and need.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Nilima A; Bachhav, Sagar S; Kulkarni, Laxmikant A; Vijaykumar

    2013-01-01

    Clinical pharmacologists undertake many tasks, and this makes defining a curriculum challenging. This is especially so under the changing circumstances in developing countries, where clinical pharmacology has an expanding role. The clinical pharmacologist may be responsible for conducting ethical clinical trials, supporting the needs of the generic drug industry, providing access to safe, effective and affordable medicines, guiding their rational use, achieving millennium development goals, and supervising medicines management standards for hospital accreditation. Clinical pharmacologists, including those in developing countries, have a great opportunity to contribute to public health and the growth of pharmaceutical industry, but at present, less clinical research is undertaken and fewer clinical trials are done than might be expected. Here we review clinical pharmacology training in India, consider the needs of different professionals contributing to clinical research and medicines utilization, and suggest ways in which current programs can be modified and new programs started. The conclusions are relevant to clinical pharmacology in both the developing and the developed world. PMID:24130374

  1. Clinical pharmacology training in India: Status and need

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Nilima A.; Bachhav, Sagar S.; Kulkarni, Laxmikant A.; Vijaykumar

    2013-01-01

    Clinical pharmacologists undertake many tasks, and this makes defining a curriculum challenging. This is especially so under the changing circumstances in developing countries, where clinical pharmacology has an expanding role. The clinical pharmacologist may be responsible for conducting ethical clinical trials, supporting the needs of the generic drug industry, providing access to safe, effective and affordable medicines, guiding their rational use, achieving millennium development goals, and supervising medicines management standards for hospital accreditation. Clinical pharmacologists, including those in developing countries, have a great opportunity to contribute to public health and the growth of pharmaceutical industry, but at present, less clinical research is undertaken and fewer clinical trials are done than might be expected. Here we review clinical pharmacology training in India, consider the needs of different professionals contributing to clinical research and medicines utilization, and suggest ways in which current programs can be modified and new programs started. The conclusions are relevant to clinical pharmacology in both the developing and the developed world. PMID:24130374

  2. The internet as a tool in clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Castel, Josep-Maria; Figueras, Albert; Vigo, Joan-Miquel

    2006-06-01

    The invention of the internet and the world-wide web was a landmark that has affected many aspects of everyday life, but is so recent and dynamic that many of its potential uses are still being explored. Aside from its purely commercial use as a virtual pharmacy (e-commerce), the internet is useful in at least three aspects related to clinical pharmacology: communication, training and research. In this paper we briefly review several internet applications related to clinical pharmacology and describe, as an example, the logistics of a multicentre research collaboration related to the promotion of rational drug use in the prevention of postpartum haemorrhage. PMID:16722847

  3. Safety pharmacology in 2010 and beyond: survey of significant events of the past 10 years and a roadmap to the immediate-, intermediate- and long-term future in recognition of the tenth anniversary of the Safety Pharmacology Society.

    PubMed

    Bass, Alan S; Vargas, Hugo M; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Kinter, Lewis B; Hammond, Tim; Wallis, Rob; Siegl, Peter K S; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2011-01-01

    In recognition of the tenth anniversary of the Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS), this review summarizes the significant events of the past 10years that have led to the birth, growth and evolution the SPS and presents a roadmap to the immediate-, intermediate- and long-term future of the SPS. The review discusses (i) the rationale for an optimal non-clinical Safety Pharmacology testing, (ii) the evolution of Safety Pharmacology over the last decade, (iii) its impact on drug discovery and development, (iv) the merits of adopting an integrated risk assessment approach, (v) the translation of non-clinical findings to humans and finally (vi) the future challenges and opportunities facing this discipline. Such challenges include the emergence of new molecular targets and new approaches to treat diseases, the rapid development of science and technologies, the growing regulatory concerns and associated number of guidance documents, and the need to train and educate the next generation of safety pharmacologist. PMID:21689769

  4. A Clinical Pharmacology Course for Veterinary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, Lynn Mulcahy

    1983-01-01

    A one-semester, two-credit course is described that was developed cooperatively by the colleges of pharmacy and veterinary medicine at Washington State University to help resolve an acute shortage of clinical pharmacologists in veterinary medicine and veterinary medical education. Course procedures, content, and evaluation are outlined (MSE)

  5. [Mirtazapine--pharmacologic action and clinical advantages].

    PubMed

    Rihmer, Zoltán; Purebl, György

    2009-03-01

    Mirtazapine is an effective antidepressant with unique and special mechanism of action characterized by high response and remission rates, relatively early onest of action and favourable side-effect profile. The present paper reviews some special points of the clinical use of mirtazapine, which is on the market in Hungary for almost 10 years, including its sleep-improving and anxiolytic effets. This review will also touch the management of the most commonly occuring side-effects. PMID:19731817

  6. Quantitative clinical pharmacology is transforming drug regulation.

    PubMed

    Peck, Carl C

    2010-12-01

    Prior to 1970s, development and regulation of new drugs was devoid of a fully quantitative, pathophysiological conceptual foundation. Malcolm Rowland pioneered, in collaboration with colleagues and friends, our modern understanding of drug clearance concepts, and equipped drug development and regulatory scientists with key investigative tools such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, standardized approaches to characterizing drug metabolism, and microdosing. From the 1970s to the present, Malcolm Rowland has contributed to key advances in pharmacokinetics that have had transformational impacts on drug regulatory science. These advances include concepts that have led to the fundamental understanding that mechanistically derived, quantitative variations in drug concentrations, rather than assigned dosage alone, drive pharmacodynamic effects (PKPD)-including disease biomarkers and clinical outcomes. This body of knowledge has transformed drug development and regulatory science theory and practice from naïve empiricism to a mechanism/model-based, quantitative scientific discipline. As a result, it is now possible to incorporate pre-clinical in vitro data on drug physico-chemical properties, metabolizing enzymes, transporters and permeability properties into PBPK-based simulations of expected PK distributions and drug-drug interactions in human populations. The most comprehensive application of PK-PD is in the modeling and simulation of clinical trials in the context of model-based drug development and regulation, imbedded in the "learn-confirm paradigm". Regulatory agencies have embraced these advances and incorporated them into regulatory requirements, approval acceleration pathways and regulatory decisions. These developments are reviewed here, with emphasis on key contributions of Malcolm Rowland that facilitated this transformation. PMID:20978827

  7. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical trial of Ficus racemosa

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rajnish Kumar; Nandy, Bankim Chandra; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta; Saha, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Ficus racemosa is an important medicinal plant, found in India, Australia, and Southeast Asia. It is popularly known as ‘gular.’ It reduces blood glucose concentration due to the presence of β-sitosterol. Many active constituents that have been isolated from various parts of this plant possess useful pharmacological activities. The literature survey proposed that it has multiple pharmacological actions that include antidiabetic, antioxidant, antidiarrhoeal, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antifungal, antibacterial, hypolipidemic, antifilarial, and hepatoprotection. This review article elaborately describes the traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of this plant. We also provide useful structures of the secondary metabolites along with their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data. Some clinical trial data have also been provided in this review. This review would assist researchers to gather scientific information in future. PMID:26009696

  8. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and clinical trial of Ficus racemosa.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rajnish Kumar; Nandy, Bankim Chandra; Maity, Siddhartha; Sarkar, Srimanta; Saha, Sudipta

    2015-01-01

    Ficus racemosa is an important medicinal plant, found in India, Australia, and Southeast Asia. It is popularly known as 'gular.' It reduces blood glucose concentration due to the presence of β-sitosterol. Many active constituents that have been isolated from various parts of this plant possess useful pharmacological activities. The literature survey proposed that it has multiple pharmacological actions that include antidiabetic, antioxidant, antidiarrhoeal, anti-inflammatory, antipyretic, antifungal, antibacterial, hypolipidemic, antifilarial, and hepatoprotection. This review article elaborately describes the traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of this plant. We also provide useful structures of the secondary metabolites along with their nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data. Some clinical trial data have also been provided in this review. This review would assist researchers to gather scientific information in future. PMID:26009696

  9. [Pharmacology].

    PubMed

    González, José; Orero, Ana; Olmo, Vicente; Martínez, David; Prieto, José; Bahlsen, Jose Antonio; Zaragozá, Francisco; Honorato, Jesús

    2011-06-01

    Two of the main characteristics of western societies in the last fifty years have been the medicalization of the human life and the environmental degradation. The first one has forced human being to consider medicines use related to what would be rational, reasonable and well-reasoned. The second one brought us to a new ecologist conscience. In relation to the "human social system", the effects of medication can be considered very positive as a whole, particularly those related to the amazing increase of expectative and quality of life. But, along with those unquestionable beneficial effects, medicines have also caused some negative effects for other biotic and abiotic systems, such as microbian alterations and their undesirable consequences which have involved the massive use of antibiotics in medicine and veterinary, the uncontrolled elimination of millions of doses of all kind of drugs, additives and excipients, etc., as well as atmospheric contamination and degradation of forests and deep oceans which can have been caused by investigation and production of determinated drugs. In this context Pharmacology appears as a scientific discipline that studies the research (R), development (D), production (P), and utilization (U) of drugs and medical substances in relation to the environment. From a farmaecologic perspective the drugs utilization has its development in three main contexts, all of them closely related: prescription quality, farmaceutical care, and patient's active participation in his own disease and treatment. PMID:21666997

  10. [Clinical pharmacology and the selection of drugs].

    PubMed

    Stanulović, M

    1989-01-01

    Yugoslavia has a modern drug legislature and a selective drug market. With about 910 substances and 1250 brand names the number of drugs is among the lowest among the European countries. Most products on the market satisfy high criteria of safety to efficacy ratio. Still, the regional health insurance authorities of the Federal republics of Serbia and of Croatia limited the number of drugs to be reimbursed by the insurance scheme. The reason for this move and its justification is given by--the inertia of the complicated procedure of withdrawal from the market of a drug which is obsolete or considered today not possess the ascribed efficacy, existence of unjustly high expectations regarding the efficacy of certain drugs by both the medical profession and the layman and which lead to overprescribing (i.e. vitamin combinations, laxatives and drugs, cerebrovascular insufficiency), and--the responsibility of the public health administration for setting priorities in spending of the available funds. The allocation of funds available for medicinal drugs have been without any kind of regulation and control until now. The introduction of limitations in the reimbursement of price for certain drugs is the first measure initiated to stimulate the optimal use of drugs. As the optimal drug use is considered the therapy with the most favorable safety/efficacy and cost/efficiency ratios. The other measures available and which ought to be initiated are those based on the drug utilization studies. The prescriptions are already computerized im most settings, so the feedback of information ot the prescribing physicians could be possible after adequate analysis of the data. The team of clinical pharmacologist already active in drug utilization studies is available and ready to meet the challenge of improving therapeutic practices. PMID:2642196

  11. Clinical pharmacology: special safety considerations in drug development and pharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Atuah, Kwame N; Hughes, Dyfrig; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2004-01-01

    The dose of a drug is a major determinant of its safety, and establishing a safe dose of a novel drug is a prime objective during clinical development. The design of pre-marketing clinical trials precludes the representation of important subpopulations such as children, the elderly and people with co-morbidities. Therefore, postmarketing surveillance (PMS) activities are required to monitor the safety profile of drugs in real clinical practice. Furthermore, individual variations in pharmacogenetic profiles, the immune system, drug metabolic pathways and drug-drug interactions are also important factors in the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. Thus, the safety of a drug is a major clinical consideration before and after it is marketed. A multidisciplinary approach is required to enhance the safety profile of drugs at all stages of development, including PMS activities. Clinical pharmacology encompasses a range of disciplines and forms the backbone of drug safety consideration during clinical drug development. In this review we give an overview of the clinical drug development process and consider its limitations. We present a discussion of several aspects of clinical pharmacology and their application to enhancing drug safety. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling provides a method of predicting a clinically safe dose; consideration of drug pharmacokinetics in special populations may enhance safe therapeutics in a wider spectrum of patients, while pharmacogenetics provides the possibility of genotype-specific therapeutics. Pharmacovigilance activities are also discussed. Given the complex nature and unpredictability of type B reactions, PMS activities are crucial in managing the risks drugs pose to the general population. The various aspects of clinical pharmacology discussed make a strong case for this field as the backbone of optimising and promoting safe development and use of drugs. PMID:15154826

  12. Phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric Wei-Chiang; Lye, Phui-Yan; Wong, Siu-Kuin

    2016-01-01

    The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive summary on the botany, utility, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and clinical trials of Morus alba (mulberry or sang shu). The mulberry foliage has remained the primary food for silkworms for centuries. Its leaves have also been used as animal feed for livestock and its fruits have been made into a variety of food products. With flavonoids as major constituents, mulberry leaves possess various biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-diabetic, glucosidase inhibition, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, cardioprotective, and cognitive enhancement activities. Rich in anthocyanins and alkaloids, mulberry fruits have pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-obesity, and hepatoprotective activities. The root bark of mulberry, containing flavonoids, alkaloids and stilbenoids, has antimicrobial, skin-whitening, cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-hyperlipidemic properties. Other pharmacological properties of M. alba include anti-platelet, anxiolytic, anti-asthmatic, anthelmintic, antidepressant, cardioprotective, and immunomodulatory activities. Clinical trials on the efficiency of M. alba extracts in reducing blood glucose and cholesterol levels and enhancing cognitive ability have been conducted. The phytochemistry and pharmacology of the different parts of the mulberry tree confer its traditional and current uses as fodder, food, cosmetics, and medicine. Overall, M. alba is a multi-functional plant with promising medicinal properties. PMID:26850343

  13. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  14. Citalopram--a review of pharmacological and clinical effects.

    PubMed Central

    Bezchlibnyk-Butler, K; Aleksic, I; Kennedy, S H

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide clinicians with a critical evaluation of citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) that has been available in Canada since March 1999. DATA SOURCES: Commercial searches (MEDLINE and BiblioTech) and an "in-house" search (InfoDrug) were used to find published English-language references for clinical and preclinical publications. There was no restriction of publication dates. Primary index terms used were: pharmacological properties, receptors, pharmacological selectivity, pharmacokinetics, age-related pharmacokinetics, sex-related pharmacokinetics, renal dysfunction, hepatic dysfunction, cytochrome activity, drug interactions, adverse reactions, antidepressant switching, precautions, overdose, drug discontinuation, children, geriatric, depression, combination therapy, placebo control, refractory depression, anxiety disorders and medical disorders. STUDY SELECTION: A total of 74 studies were reviewed. Twenty-one of these studies specifically examined the clinical efficacy and tolerability of citalopram in depressive disorders as well as other disorders. In depressive disorders, clinical studies were required to have either placebo or active comparison controls for a minimum of 3 weeks. For other disorders, in the absence of double-blind trials, open-label studies were included. Pharmacological studies were limited to animal studies focusing on citalopram's selectivity and receptor specificity, and positron emission tomography studies were incorporated to include human pharmacological data. Pharmacokinetic studies focused on the metabolism, safety and tolerability of citalopram, specifically with reference to adverse reactions, drug interactions and overdose in addition to citalopram's effect on vulnerable populations, such as children, the elderly and patients with metabolic diseases. DATA EXTRACTION: Data on clinical studies were summarized according to test measures, study duration and outcome of study. Pharmacokinetic and

  15. Amphetamine, past and present--a pharmacological and clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Heal, David J; Smith, Sharon L; Gosden, Jane; Nutt, David J

    2013-06-01

    Amphetamine was discovered over 100 years ago. Since then, it has transformed from a drug that was freely available without prescription as a panacea for a broad range of disorders into a highly restricted Controlled Drug with therapeutic applications restricted to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. This review describes the relationship between chemical structure and pharmacology of amphetamine and its congeners. Amphetamine's diverse pharmacological actions translate not only into therapeutic efficacy, but also into the production of adverse events and liability for recreational abuse. Accordingly, the balance of benefit/risk is the key challenge for its clinical use. The review charts advances in pharmaceutical development from the introduction of once-daily formulations of amphetamine through to lisdexamfetamine, which is the first d-amphetamine prodrug approved for the management of ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. The unusual metabolic route for lisdexamfetamine to deliver d-amphetamine makes an important contribution to its pharmacology. How lisdexamfetamine's distinctive pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile translates into sustained efficacy as a treatment for ADHD and its reduced potential for recreational abuse is also discussed. PMID:23539642

  16. Basic and clinical pharmacology contribution to extend anthelmintic molecules lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lanusse, Carlos; Lifschitz, Adrian; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-08-15

    The correct use of pharmacology-based information is critical to design successful strategies for the future of parasite control in livestock animals. Integrated pharmaco-parasitological research approaches have greatly contributed to optimize drug activity. In an attempt to manage drug resistance in helminths of ruminants, combinations of two or more anthelmintics are being used or promoted, based on the fact that individual worms may have a lower degree of resistance to a multiple component formulation, when each chemical has a different mode of action compared to that observed when a single compound is used. However, as emphasized in the current review, the occurrence of potential pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic interactions between drug components highlights the need for deeper and integrated research to identify the advantages or disadvantages associated with the use of combined drug preparations. This review article provides integrated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic and clinical pharmacology information pertinent to preserve the traditional and modern active ingredients as practical tools for parasite control. Novel pharmacological data on derquantel and monepantel, as representatives of modern anthelmintics for use in livestock, is summarized here. The article also summarizes the pharmaco-parasitological knowledge considered critical to secure and/or extend the lifespan of the recently available novel molecules. PMID:26220023

  17. Pharmacology and Clinical Drug Candidates in Redox Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Ana I.; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Seredenina, Tamara; Kaludercic, Nina; Robledinos-Anton, Natalia; Di Lisa, Fabio; Stocker, Roland; Ghezzi, Pietro; Jaquet, Vincent; Cuadrado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is suggested to be a disease mechanism common to a wide range of disorders affecting human health. However, so far, the pharmacotherapeutic exploitation of this, for example, based on chemical scavenging of pro-oxidant molecules, has been unsuccessful. Recent Advances: An alternative emerging approach is to target the enzymatic sources of disease-relevant oxidative stress. Several such enzymes and isoforms have been identified and linked to different pathologies. For some targets, the respective pharmacology is quite advanced, that is, up to late-stage clinical development or even on the market; for others, drugs are already in clinical use, although not for indications based on oxidative stress, and repurposing seems to be a viable option. Critical Issues: For all other targets, reliable preclinical validation and drug ability are key factors for any translation into the clinic. In this study, specific pharmacological agents with optimal pharmacokinetic profiles are still lacking. Moreover, these enzymes also serve largely unknown physiological functions and their inhibition may lead to unwanted side effects. Future Directions: The current promising data based on new targets, drugs, and drug repurposing are mainly a result of academic efforts. With the availability of optimized compounds and coordinated efforts from academia and industry scientists, unambiguous validation and translation into proof-of-principle studies seem achievable in the very near future, possibly leading towards a new era of redox medicine. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1113–1129. PMID:26415051

  18. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors: From pharmacology to clinical read-outs.

    PubMed

    Patrignani, Paola; Patrono, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is a prototypic cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor. It was synthesized serendipitously from a natural compound, i.e., salicylic acid, with known analgesic activity. This chemical modification, obtained for the first time in an industrial environment in 1897, endowed aspirin with the unique capacity of acetylating and inactivating permanently COX-isozymes. Traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (tNSAIDs) were developed to mimic the pharmacological effects of aspirin, using aspirin-sensitive experimental models of pain and inflammation as the template for screening new chemical entities. Among the tNSAIDs, some were endowed with moderate COX- selectivity (e.g., diclofenac), but no studies of sufficient size and duration were performed to show any clinically relevant difference between different members of the class. Similarly, no serious attempts were made to unravel the mechanisms involved in the shared therapeutic and toxic effects of tNSAIDs until the discovery of COX-2. This led to characterizing their main therapeutic effects as being COX-2-dependent and their gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity as being COX-1-dependent, and provided a rationale for developing a new class of selective COX-2 inhibitors, the coxibs. This review will discuss the clinical pharmacology of tNSAIDs and coxibs, and the clinical read-outs of COX-isozyme inhibition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Oxygenated metabolism of PUFA: analysis and biological relevance." PMID:25263946

  19. Resistance to antimalarial drugs: molecular, pharmacological and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Travassos, Mark A.; Laufer, Miriam K.

    2009-01-01

    One of the greatest obstacles to the control of malaria has been the spread of resistance to drugs used on a large scale. This review provides an update of the current understanding of the molecular basis for antimalarial drug resistance. Parasite intrinsic resistance is just one component that determines the in vivo efficacy of a drug. Human immune responses and pharmacological properties play important roles in determining the clinical outcome of treatment. The emergence and spread of resistance also results from an interplay of these factors. Current efforts to characterize and deter resistance to new combination therapy are also discussed. PMID:19918214

  20. Clinically and pharmacologically relevant interactions of antidiabetic drugs.

    PubMed

    May, Marcus; Schindler, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus often require multifactorial pharmacological treatment due to different comorbidities. An increasing number of concomitantly taken medications elevate the risk of the patient experiencing adverse drug effects or drug interactions. Drug interactions can be divided into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions affecting cytochrome (CYP) enzymes, absorption properties, transporter activities and receptor affinities. Furthermore, nutrition, herbal supplements, patient's age and gender are of clinical importance. Relevant drug interactions are predominantly related to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones and glinides. Although metformin has a very low interaction potential, caution is advised when drugs that impair renal function are used concomitantly. With the exception of saxagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors also show a low interaction potential, but all drugs affecting the drug transporter P-glycoprotein should be used with caution. Incretin mimetics and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors comprise a very low interaction potential and are therefore recommended as an ideal combination partner from the clinical-pharmacologic point of view. PMID:27092232

  1. A Review of Nebivolol Pharmacology and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Fongemie, Justin; Felix-Getzik, Erika

    2015-08-01

    Nebivolol is a highly selective β1-adrenergic receptor antagonist with a pharmacologic profile that differs from those of other drugs in its class. In addition to cardioselectivity mediated via β1 receptor blockade, nebivolol induces nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation by stimulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase via β3 agonism. This vasodilatory mechanism is distinct from those of other vasodilatory β-blockers (carvedilol, labetalol), which are mediated via α-adrenergic receptor blockade. Nebivolol is approved for the treatment of hypertension in the US, and for hypertension and heart failure in Europe. While β-blockers are not recommended within the current US guidelines as first-line therapy for treatment of essential hypertension, nebivolol has shown comparable efficacy to currently recommended therapies in lowering peripheral blood pressure in adults with hypertension with a very low rate of side effects. Nebivolol also has beneficial effects on central blood pressure compared with other β-blockers. Clinical data also suggest that nebivolol may be useful in patients who have experienced erectile dysfunction while on other β-blockers. Here we review the pharmacological profile of nebivolol, the clinical evidence supporting its use in hypertension as monotherapy, add-on, and combination therapy, and the data demonstrating its positive effects on heart failure and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26177892

  2. Alternative strategies in drug development: clinical pharmacological aspects.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J

    1999-12-01

    preclinical and early clinical development as an exploratory stage and phases IIb, III as a confirmatory stage. Preclinical and clinical-pharmacological studies in the exploratory stage of drug development should be designed for decision making in contrast to later clinical trials that require power for proof-of-safety and efficacy. Strategies to improve the quality of decisions in drug development are: the use and integration of new tools and technologies such as pharmacogenomics to improve our knowledge about the origin of the disease and to identify new therapeutic strategies; modelling and simulation of preclinical and clinical trials to bridge the gap between the early stages of the development of a new drug and its potential effects in humans; more sophisticated clinical pharmacokinetics to answer the question if the drug is present at the disease site for a sufficient time and to provide information on concentration-effect-relationships; selecting and evaluating surrogates/biomarkers for safety and efficacy; involvement of the target population as soon as possible; using information technologies to make better use of existing data. The more thorough and profound studies have been carried out during this exploratory stage of development, the earlier a decision can be made on the continuation or discontinuation of further development, thus saving development time and money and assessing and considerably reducing the risk for the patients and increasing the success-rate of the project in the later confirmatory effectiveness trial. Taking responsibility as the link between research and development gives clinical pharmacology a major opportunity to assume a pivotal role in research and development of new drugs. To reach this goal, clinical pharmacology must be fully integrated in the whole process from the candidate selection to its approval. PMID:10599949

  3. A history of the American Society for Clinical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred years ago, in 1909, the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI) held its first annual meeting. The founding members based this new society on a revolutionary approach to research that emphasized newer physiological methods. In 1924 the ASCI started a new journal, the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The ASCI has also held an annual meeting almost every year. The society has long debated who could be a member, with discussions about whether members must be physicians, what sorts of research they could do, and the role of women within the society. The ASCI has also grappled with what else the society should do, especially whether it ought to take a stand on policy issues. ASCI history has reflected changing social, political, and economic contexts, including several wars, concerns about the ethics of biomedical research, massive increases in federal research funding, and an increasingly large and specialized medical environment. PMID:19348041

  4. Clinically and pharmacologically relevant interactions of antidiabetic drugs

    PubMed Central

    May, Marcus; Schindler, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus often require multifactorial pharmacological treatment due to different comorbidities. An increasing number of concomitantly taken medications elevate the risk of the patient experiencing adverse drug effects or drug interactions. Drug interactions can be divided into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions affecting cytochrome (CYP) enzymes, absorption properties, transporter activities and receptor affinities. Furthermore, nutrition, herbal supplements, patient’s age and gender are of clinical importance. Relevant drug interactions are predominantly related to sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones and glinides. Although metformin has a very low interaction potential, caution is advised when drugs that impair renal function are used concomitantly. With the exception of saxagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors also show a low interaction potential, but all drugs affecting the drug transporter P-glycoprotein should be used with caution. Incretin mimetics and sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors comprise a very low interaction potential and are therefore recommended as an ideal combination partner from the clinical–pharmacologic point of view. PMID:27092232

  5. Considerations for clinical pharmacology studies for biologics in emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Damle, Bharat; White, Robert; Wang, Huifen Faye

    2015-03-01

    Registration of innovative biologics in Emerging Markets (EMs) poses many opportunities and challenges. The BRIC-MT countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, Mexico, and Turkey) that are the fastest growing markets and regulators in these countries have imposed certain requirements, including the need for local clinical studies, for registration of biologics. The regulatory landscape in these countries is rapidly evolving, which necessitates an up-to-date understanding of such requirements. There is growing evidence which suggests that race, after accounting for body weight differences, may not influence the pharmacokinetics of biologics to the same extent that it does for small molecules. Thus, the requirements for clinical pharmacology trials in EMs are driven mainly by regulatory needs set forth by local Ministry of Health. In addition to the clinical Phase I to III studies done in the global program that supports registration in large geographies, countries such as China require local single and multiple dose Phase I studies. Participating in global studies with clinical sites within their country may be sufficient for some markets, while other regulators may be satisfied with a Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product. This paper discusses the current requirements for registration of innovative biologics in key EMs. PMID:25707959

  6. CNS pharmacology and clinical therapeutic effects of oxiracetam.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Menon, G N; Songar, A; Itil, K Z

    1986-01-01

    Oxiracetam, a new substance found to be a nootropic in experimental pharmacological studies, was tested in three clinical trials: a single rising dose tolerance and dose-finding study with quantitative pharmaco-electroencephalogram (pharmaco-EEG) and quantitative pharmacopsychology in healthy volunteers; a dose-finding study, at three dose levels for 3 months, with quantitative pharmaco-EEG in mild to moderate dementia patients; and a safety and efficacy study with increasing dosages for 12 weeks with subjective and objective tests in elderly patients with dementia. In single and repeated oral dosages up to 2,400 mg, oxiracetam is a safe compound. According to HZI Data Bank Classification Systems, oxiracetam is a vigilance-enhancing compound with some effects on spontaneous memory. The therapeutic effect of oxiracetam can be discriminated from placebo, and in comparison with piracetam, oxiracetam exhibits greater improvement in memory factor. PMID:3594458

  7. Antiemetics: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Ethan; Prestrud, Ann Alexis; Hesketh, Paul J.; Kris, Mark G.; Feyer, Petra C.; Somerfield, Mark R.; Chesney, Maurice; Clark-Snow, Rebecca Anne; Flaherty, Anne Marie; Freundlich, Barbara; Morrow, Gary; Rao, Kamakshi V.; Schwartz,, Rowena N.; Lyman, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guideline for antiemetics in oncology. Methods A systematic review of the medical literature was completed to inform this update. MEDLINE, the Cochrane Collaboration Library, and meeting materials from ASCO and the Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer were all searched. Primary outcomes of interest were complete response and rates of any vomiting or nausea. Results Thirty-seven trials met prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria for this systematic review. Two systematic reviews from the Cochrane Collaboration were identified; one surveyed the pediatric literature. The other compared the relative efficacy of the 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists. Recommendations Combined anthracycline and cyclophosphamide regimens were reclassified as highly emetic. Patients who receive this combination or any highly emetic agents should receive a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist. A large trial validated the equivalency of fosaprepitant, a single-day intravenous formulation, with aprepitant; either therapy is appropriate. Preferential use of palonosetron is recommended for moderate emetic risk regimens, combined with dexamethasone. For low-risk agents, patients can be offered dexamethasone before the first dose of chemotherapy. Patients undergoing high emetic risk radiation therapy should receive a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist before each fraction and for 24 hours after treatment and may receive a 5-day course of dexamethasone during fractions 1 to 5. The Update Committee noted the importance of continued symptom monitoring throughout therapy. Clinicians underestimate the incidence of nausea, which is not as well controlled as emesis. PMID:21947834

  8. A Master of Science Degree in (Clinical) Pharmacology at the University of the Pacific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirachi, Donald Y.; Jones, Judith K.

    1976-01-01

    A prototype program leading to a clinically-oriented Master of Science degree in pharmacology is described. It differs from a clinical residency program, does not give a wide clinical medicine exposure, and is heavily oriented towards pharmacology and research, thereby developing students with scientific perspectives who can work as consultants.…

  9. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to improve cognitive dysfunction and functional ability in clinical depression--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Baune, Bernhard T; Renger, Lisa

    2014-09-30

    Cognitive dysfunction is of clinical significance and exerts longstanding implication on patients׳ function. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of cognitive dysfunction are emerging. This review evaluates pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of cognitive impairment primarily in the domains of memory, attention, processing speed and executive function in clinical depression. A total of 35 studies were retrieved from Pubmed, PsycInfo and Scopus after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results show that various classes of antidepressants exert improving effects on cognitive function across several cognitive domains. Specifically, studies suggest that SSRIs, the SSRE tianeptine, the SNRI duloxetine, vortioxetine and other antidepressants such as bupropion and moclobemide may exert certain improving effects on cognitive function in depression, such as in learning and memory and executive function. Class-specific cognitive domains or specific dose-response relationships were not identified yet. The few non-pharmacological studies conducted employing cognitive orientated treatments and cognitive remediation therapy show promising results for the improvement of cognitive impairment in depression. However, several methodological constraints of studies limit generalizability of the results and caution the interpretation. Future direction should consider the development of a neuropsychological consensus cognitive battery to support the discovery, clinical assessment, comparison of studies and registration of new agents in clinical depression. PMID:24863864

  10. Edoxaban: a focused review of its clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2014-07-21

    Long-term anticoagulation treatment with warfarin has been associated with a number of limitations in clinical practice and there is a need for more convenient long-term anticoagulation treatment. One of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants in development is edoxaban, a factor Xa inhibitor that is administered once daily. The pharmacological properties of edoxaban have various advantages in anticoagulant therapy. Edoxaban quickly reaches peak plasma concentrations in 1.5 h, has a half-life of 10-14 h, has relatively high bioavailability of 62% and exhibits highly selective, competitive, concentration-dependent inhibition of human factor Xa. The plasma concentrations of edoxaban are also closely correlated with suppression of thrombin generation and a range of platelet activation parameters (fragment 1+2, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and β-thromboglobulin), which edoxaban has been shown to rapidly inhibit. The anticoagulant activity of edoxaban is not affected by food intake or ethnicity and a number of drug-drug interaction studies have been performed. Co-administration of edoxaban with strong P-glycoprotein inhibitors, such as dronedarone, quinidine, and verapamil requires edoxaban dose-reduction by 50% to avoid the risk of over-exposure. The exposure of edoxaban may also increase in patients with a body weight ≤60 kg and moderate renal impairment. This meant a dose-reduction strategy in patients at risk of over-exposure was utilized in Phase III clinical studies. In conclusion, the pharmacological properties of edoxaban provide rapid and specific inhibition of factor Xa, which is closely related to plasma concentrations. Given the limitations with long-term warfarin therapy, once-daily edoxaban may provide a convenient long-term alternative for patients. PMID:24810388

  11. Differences between opioids: pharmacological, experimental, clinical and economical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Asbjørn M; Jensen, Rasmus D; Nielsen, Lecia M; Droney, Joanne; Christrup, Lona L; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Riley, Julia; Dahan, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies comparing the response and side effects of various opioids have not been able to show robust differences between drugs. Hence, recommendations of the regulatory authorities have been driven by costs with a general tendency in many countries to restrict physician's use of opioids to morphine. Although this approach is recognized as cost-effective in most cases there is solid evidence that, on an individual patient basis, opioids are not all equal. Therefore it is important to have an armamentarium of strong analgesics in clinical practice to ensure a personalized approach in patients who do not respond to standard treatment. In this review we highlight differences between opioids in human studies from a pharmacological, experimental, clinical and health economics point of view. We provide evidence that individuals respond differently to opioids, and that general differences between classes of opioids exist. We recommend that this recognition is used to individualize treatment in difficult cases allowing physicians to have a wide range of treatment options. In the end this will reduce pain and side effects, leading to improved quality of life for the patient and reduce the exploding pain related costs. PMID:22554450

  12. A review and critical analysis of professional societies' guidelines for pharmacologic management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vigersky, Robert A

    2012-06-01

    The development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), which are promulgated by various sponsoring organizations to provide direction to clinicians for management of complex problems, generally adhere to a set of key principles. To reassure the users of their scientific and ethical validity, these include the use of a system to rate the quality of evidence on which the guideline is based and the divulgence of any conflicts of interest (COI) among members of the panel developing the guidelines. I analyzed the CPGs for pharmacologic management of patients with type 2 diabetes written by the two US professional societies that developed such guidelines (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists [AACE] and the American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes [ADA/EASD]) to assess their adherence to these principles of guideline development and to compare them with regard to simplicity, consideration of costs, and peer review status. To put the existence of COIs in these guidelines into context, I also reviewed the COIs from government-sponsored panels that developed diabetes CPGs. The results of this analysis suggest that both the AACE and ADA/EASD guidelines should be regarded as consensus documents rather than true CPGs, since neither guideline employed evidence grading. COI was extremely common among the members of both CPG panels from professional organizations, as well in the CPG panels with government sponsorship. In addition, the nature and extent of external peer review of these guidelines is unclear. Given these limitations, the AACE and ADA/EASD CPGs for diabetes management should be regarded as advisory at best, rather than prescriptive or authoritative, especially in view of their noncompliance with key principles of guideline development. PMID:22422437

  13. Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Bolay, Hayrunnisa; Durham, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Headache treatment has been based primarily on experiences with non-specific drugs such as analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or drugs that were originally developed to treat other diseases, such as beta-blockers and anticonvulsant medications. A better understanding of the basic pathophysiological mechanisms of migraine and other types of headache has led to the development over the past two decades of more target-specific drugs. Since activation of the trigeminovascular system and neurogenic inflammation are thought to play important roles in migraine pathophysiology, experimental studies modeling those events successfully predicted targets for selective development of pharmacological agents to treat migraine. Basically, there are two fundamental strategies for the treatment of migraine, abortive or preventive, based to a large degree on the frequency of attacks. The triptans, which exhibit potency towards selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptors expressed on trigeminal nerves, remain the most effective drugs for the abortive treatment of migraine. However, numerous preventive medications are currently available that modulate the excitability of the nervous system, particularly the cerebral cortex. In this chapter, the pharmacology of commercially available medications as well as drugs in development that prevent or abort headache attacks will be discussed. PMID:20816410

  14. [Topical cyclosporine in ophthalmology: Pharmacology and clinical indications].

    PubMed

    Levy, O; Labbé, A; Borderie, V; Laroche, L; Bouheraoua, N

    2016-03-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a cyclic undecapeptide, which is an immunosuppressive drug in the calcineurin inhibitor class. CsA was initially used as a systemic immunosuppressant to minimize rejection of solid organ transplants. In ophthalmology, topically applied CsA was first used to inhibit corneal allograft rejection in the 1980s and later in various inflammatory ocular surface disorders (OSD). Currently, topical ophthalmic CsA is available as a licensed commercial emulsion or is prepared by hospital pharmacies with concentration ranging from 0.05 to 2%. Many of its pharmacological effects on the ocular surface are direct consequences of its ability to inhibit T ciclosporine activation and apoptosis. Topical CsA differs from topical steroids in its favourable local and systemic tolerability at the concentrations used. Most clinical studies have evaluated topical CsA in moderate to severe dry eye disease (DED) and demonstrated its efficacy for improvement of signs and symptoms, thus providing the sole indication for market approval and treatment protocols. For the other indications - corneal graft rejection, blepharitis, allergic or viral keratitis, and ocular surface disease due to graft versus host disease or post-operative DED - evidence-based medicine remains unclear due to the lack of major randomized controlled trials. Despite the lack of standardized protocols or market approval for these conditions, numerous studies suggest clinical efficacy. PMID:26997607

  15. 21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. 320.28 Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. Correlation of...

  16. 21 CFR 320.28 - Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. 320.28 Section 320.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Correlation of bioavailability with an acute pharmacological effect or clinical evidence. Correlation of...

  17. Clinical pharmacology of fentanyl in preterm infants. A review.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Gian Maria

    2015-06-01

    Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is very important in anesthetic practice because of its relatively short time to peak analgesic effect and the rapid termination of action after small bolus doses. The objective of this survey is to review the clinical pharmacology of fentanyl in preterm infants. The bibliographic search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases as search engines. In addition, the books Neofax: A manual of drugs used in neonatal care and Neonatal formulary were consulted. Fentanyl is N-dealkylated by CYP3A4 into the inactive norfentanyl. Fentanyl may be administered as bolus doses or as a continuous infusion. In neonates, there is a remarkable interindividual variability in the kinetic parameters. In neonates, fentanyl half-life ranges from 317 minutes to 1266 minutes and in adults it is 222 minutes. Respiratory depression occurs when fentanyl doses are >5 μg/kg. Chest wall rigidity may occur in neonates and occasionally is associated with laryngospasm. Tolerance to fentanyl may develop after prolonged use of this drug. Significant withdrawal symptoms have been reported in infants treated with continuous infusion for 5 days or longer. Fentanyl is an extremely potent analgesic and is the opioid analgesic most frequently used in the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:25176283

  18. Multiple System Atrophy. Using Clinical Pharmacology to Reveal Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Jens; Shibao, Cyndya; Biaggioni, Italo

    2015-01-01

    Despite similarities in their clinical presentation, patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) have residual sympathetic tone and intact post-ganglionic noradrenergic fibers, whereas patients with pure autonomic failure (PAF) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) have efferent post-ganglionic autonomic denervation. These differences are apparent biochemically, with near normal plasma norepinephrine in MSA but very low levels in PAF, and in neurophysiological testing. These differences are also reflected in the response patients have to drugs that interact with the autonomic nervous system. E.g., the ganglionic blocker trimethaphan reduce residual sympathetic tone and lower blood pressure in MSA but less so in PAF. Conversely, the α2-antagonist yohimbine produces a greater increase in blood pressure in MSA compared to PAF, although significant overlap exists. In normal subjects the norepinephrine reuptake (NET) inhibitor atomoxetine has little effect on blood pressure because the peripheral effects of NET inhibition that result in noradrenergic vasoconstriction, are counteracted by the increase in brain norepinephrine which reduces sympathetic outflow (a clonidine-like effect). In patients with autonomic failure and intact peripheral noradrenergic fibers only the peripheral vasoconstriction is apparent. This translates to a significant pressor effect of atomoxetine in MSA, but not in PAF patients. Thus, pharmacological probes can be used to understand the pathophysiology of the different forms of autonomic failure, assist in the diagnosis, and aid in the management of orthostatic hypotension. PMID:25757803

  19. Multiple system atrophy: using clinical pharmacology to reveal pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Jens; Shibao, Cyndya; Biaggioni, Italo

    2015-02-01

    Despite similarities in their clinical presentation, patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) have residual sympathetic tone and intact post-ganglionic noradrenergic fibers, whereas patients with pure autonomic failure (PAF) and Parkinson disease have efferent post-ganglionic autonomic denervation. These differences are apparent biochemically, as well as in neurophysiological testing, with near normal plasma norephrine in MSA but very low levels in PAF. These differences are also reflected in the response patients have to drugs that interact with the autonomic nervous system. For example, the ganglionic blocker trimethaphan reduces residual sympathetic tone and lowers blood pressure in MSA, but less so in PAF. Conversely, the α2-antagonist yohimbine produces a greater increase in blood pressure in MSA compared to PAF, although significant overlap exists. In normal subjects, the norepinephrine reuptake (NET) inhibitor atomoxetine has little effect on blood pressure because the peripheral effects of NET inhibition that result in noradrenergic vasoconstriction are counteracted by the increase in brain norepinephrine, which reduces sympathetic outflow (a clonidine-like effect). In patients with autonomic failure and intact peripheral noradrenergic fibers, only the peripheral vasoconstriction is apparent. This translates to a significant pressor effect of atomoxetine in MSA, but not in PAF patients. Thus, pharmacological probes can be used to understand the pathophysiology of the different forms of autonomic failure, assist in the diagnosis, and aid in the management of orthostatic hypotension. PMID:25757803

  20. Role of Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology in Pediatric Approval and Labeling.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Nitin; Bhattaram, Atul; Earp, Justin C; Florian, Jeffry; Krudys, Kevin; Lee, Jee Eun; Lee, Joo Yeon; Liu, Jiang; Mulugeta, Yeruk; Yu, Jingyu; Zhao, Ping; Sinha, Vikram

    2016-07-01

    Dose selection is one of the key decisions made during drug development in pediatrics. There are regulatory initiatives that promote the use of model-based drug development in pediatrics. Pharmacometrics or quantitative clinical pharmacology enables development of models that can describe factors affecting pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics in pediatric patients. This manuscript describes some examples in which pharmacometric analysis was used to support approval and labeling in pediatrics. In particular, the role of pharmacokinetic (PK) comparison of pediatric PK to adults and utilization of dose/exposure-response analysis for dose selection are highlighted. Dose selection for esomeprazole in pediatrics was based on PK matching to adults, whereas for adalimumab, exposure-response, PK, efficacy, and safety data together were useful to recommend doses for pediatric Crohn's disease. For vigabatrin, demonstration of similar dose-response between pediatrics and adults allowed for selection of a pediatric dose. Based on model-based pharmacokinetic simulations and safety data from darunavir pediatric clinical studies with a twice-daily regimen, different once-daily dosing regimens for treatment-naïve human immunodeficiency virus 1-infected pediatric subjects 3 to <12 years of age were evaluated. The role of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling (PBPK) in predicting pediatric PK is rapidly evolving. However, regulatory review experiences and an understanding of the state of science indicate that there is a lack of established predictive performance of PBPK in pediatric PK prediction. Moving forward, pharmacometrics will continue to play a key role in pediatric drug development contributing toward decisions pertaining to dose selection, trial designs, and assessing disease similarity to adults to support extrapolation of efficacy. PMID:27079249

  1. Methamphetamine: An Update on Epidemiology, Pharmacology, Clinical Phenomenology, and Treatment Literature

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Kelly E.; Ray, Lara A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite initial reports of a decline in use in the early 2000s, methamphetamine remains a significant public health concern with known neurotoxic and neurocognitive effects to the user. The goal of this review is to update the literature on methamphetamine use and addiction since its assent to peak popularity in 1990s. Methods Specifically, we first review recent epidemiological reports with a focus on methamphetamine accessibility, changes in use and disorder prevalence rates over time, and accurate estimates of the associated burden of care to the individual and society. Second, we review methamphetamine pharmacology literature with emphasis on the structural and functional neurotoxic effects associated with repeated use of the drug. Third, we briefly outline the findings on methamphetamine-related neurocognitive deficits as assessed via behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms. Lastly, we review the clinical presentation of methamphetamine addiction and the evidence supporting the available psychosocial and pharmacological treatments within the context of an addiction biology framework. Conclusion Taken together, this review provides a broad-based update of the available literature covering methamphetamine research over the past two decades and concludes with recommendations for future research. PMID:25176528

  2. Good clinical practice: a nuisance, a help or a necessity for clinical pharmacology?

    PubMed Central

    Sweatman, John

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the impact of good clinical practice (GCP) on clinical pharmacology with particular reference to the new European Union Clinical Trial Directive. The Directive will be applied to both commercial and noncommercial studies on medicinal products for human use. The Directive requires that GCP should be used in all clinical trials except noninterventional studies. GCP is likely to follow the International Conference on Harmonization GCP guidelines in many aspects. GCP will enforce tighter guidelines on ethical aspects of a clinical study. Higher standards will be required in terms of comprehensive documentation for the clinical protocol, record keeping, training, and facilities including computers. Quality assurance and inspections will ensure that these standards are achieved. The additional requirements of GCP are discussed and any advantage to the study subject. The impact of the new Directive within the Research Governance Framework of the UK Department of Health is reviewed. PMID:12534634

  3. The current status and trend of clinical pharmacology in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several international forums for promoting clinical pharmacology in developing countries have been held since 1980, and several clinical pharmacology programmes targeting developing countries were instituted such that the status of clinical pharmacology in developing countries is not where it was 50 years ago. Therefore, a survey and an appraisal of the literature on the current status of clinical pharmacology in developing countries were undertaken with a hope that it would enable development of appropriate strategies for further promotion of clinical pharmacology in these countries. Methods First, nine determinants (or enabling factors) for running a successful clinical pharmacology programme were identified, i.e., disease burden, drug situation, economic growth, clinical pharmacology activities, recognition, human capital, government support, international collaboration, and support for traditional/alternative medicines. These factors were then evaluated with regard to their current status in the developing countries that responded to an electronic questionnaire, and their historical perspective, using the literature appraisal. From these, a projected trend was constructed with recommendations on the way forward. Results Clinical pharmacology services, research and teaching in developing countries have improved over the past 50 years with over 90% of countries having the appropriate policies for regulation and rational use of medicines in place. Unfortunately, policy implementation remains a challenge, owing to a worsening disease burden and drug situation, versus fewer clinical pharmacologists and other competing priorities for the national budgets. This has led to a preference for training ‘a physician clinical pharmacologist’ in programmes emphasizing local relevancy and for a shorter time, and the training of other professionals in therapeutics for endemic diseases (task shifting), as the most promising strategies of ensuring rational use of

  4. Children with schizophrenia: clinical picture and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Masi, Gabriele; Mucci, Maria; Pari, Cinzia

    2006-01-01

    these clinical patterns, such as multidimensionally impaired disorder and multiple complex developmental disorder. In the context of a multimodal approach, including behavioral, social, scholastic and familial interventions, a pharmacological treatment is usually the core treatment. Available experience from the few controlled studies, open studies and case reports on pharmacotherapy in children with schizophrenia aged <12 years is critically analysed in this review, with particular reference to the use of atypical antipsychotics in clinical practice. To date, the major evidence supports the efficacy of risperidone and olanzapine, while clozapine seems an effective option in treatment-refractory cases. Published experience with newer atypical antipsychotics (quetiapine, ziprasidone, aripiprazole) is still lacking in this age range. Safety data (namely extrapyramidal symptoms, weight gain, hyperprolactinaemia, haematological adverse effects, seizures, hepatotoxicity, metabolic effects, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and cardiovascular effects) are reviewed and discussed, along with strategies for management. PMID:16999454

  5. Performance of Clinical Nurse Educators in Teaching Pharmacology and Medication Management: Nursing Students’ Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Ghamari Zare, Zohre; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background Pharmacological knowledge and medication management skills of student nurses greatly depend on the clinical nurse educators’ performance in this critical issue. However, the Iranian nurse educators’ performance in teaching pharmacology and medication management are not adequately studied. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the nursing students’ perceptions on the status of clinical pharmaceutical and medication management education. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on all 152 nursing students registered in the seventh and eighth semesters at the Qom and Naragh branches of Islamic Azad University, and Kashan University of Medical Sciences in 2013 - 2014 academic year. The students’ perceptions on the performance of clinical nurse educators in teaching pharmacology and medication management were assessed using a researcher made questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of 31 items regarding clinical educators’ performance in teaching pharmacology and medication management and two questions about students’ satisfaction with their level of knowledge and skills in pharmacology and medication management. Descriptive statistics was employed and analysis of variance was performed to compare the mean of scores of teaching pharmacology and medication management in the three universities. Results Among a total of 152 subjects, 82.9% were female and their mean age was 22.57 ± 1.55 years. According to the students, instructors had the weakest performance in the three items of teaching pharmacology and medication management based on the students’ learning needs, teaching medication management through a patient-centered method and teaching pharmacology and medication management based on the course plan. The students’ satisfaction regarding their own knowledge and skill of pharmacology and medication management was at medium level. Conclusions Nursing students gave a relatively low score in several aspects of

  6. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  7. An Endocrine Pharmacology Course for the Clinically-Oriented Pharmacy Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahwan, Ralf G.

    1976-01-01

    In view of trends in clinical pharmacy education, the role of the traditional basic sciences has to be reassessed. An endocrine pharmacology course comprised of 49 clock-hours and open for professional undergraduate and graduate credit is described that blends basic and applied pharmacology. (LBH)

  8. Survey of Clinical Pharmacology Programs in U.S. and Canadian Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Fisher, James W.

    1980-01-01

    A survey is reported that was undertaken by the Association for Medical School Pharmacology to assess the status of developing clinical pharmacology programs in medical schools in the United States and Canada and to determine why some schools have been unable to mount such programs. Survey questions are included. (Author/JMD)

  9. Facilitating comfort for hospitalized patients using non-pharmacological measures: preliminary development of clinical practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anne M; Davies, Anne; Griffiths, Gareth

    2009-06-01

    Nurses often use non-pharmacological measures to facilitate comfort for patients within the hospital setting. However, guidelines for use of these measures are commonly inadequate or absent. This paper presents 12 clinical practice guidelines that were developed from the findings of a literature review into non-pharmacological measures that are thought to facilitate patient comfort. The non-pharmacological measures addressed in these guidelines are: Aromotherapy, Distraction, Guided Imagery, Laughter, Massage, Music, Reiki, Heat or Cold, Meditation, Reflexology, Reposition and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation. These are preliminary guidelines for the use of non-pharmacological measures and further research and development of such guidelines is recommended. PMID:19531072

  10. Prevention and treatment of traveler's diarrhea: a clinical pharmacological approach.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C; Rampal, P

    1995-01-01

    Diarrhea represents a major health problem for travelers to developing countries. Although the syndrome is usually self-limited and recovery occurs in the majority of cases without any specific form of therapy, there is a need for safe and effective ways of preventing and treating it. Since the syndrome is most often caused by an infection acquired by ingesting fecally contaminated food or beverages, precautions regarding dietary habits remain the cornerstone of prophylaxis, but dietary self-restrictions do not always translate to reduced rates of diarrheal illness. Administration of probiotics (e.g. lactobacilli or Saccharomyces boulardii) and immunoprophylaxis with the newer oral cholera vaccines have been tried with promising results. Antimicrobials remain, however, the most successful form of prophylaxis, being effective in up to 90% of travelers. For those with impaired health who will take prophylaxis, systemic agents with proved efficacy should be recommended. For other otherwise healthy persons, poorly absorbed agents are preferable in order to avoid the serious, albeit rare, toxicity of systemic drugs. The key factor in the management of acute watery traveler's diarrhea, particularly in infants and young children, is the restoration of water and electrolyte balance. This does not reduce the duration of the illness but will limit dehydration and prevent acidosis. Many patients will require no additional therapy, whereas some will need pharmacologic treatment to shorten the duration of diarrhea or to relieve the accompanying symptoms, like abdominal discomfort, nausea and vomiting. A typical 3- to 5-day illness can be reduced to approximately 1 day by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) combination. Some other systemic antimicrobials have been successfully used but, during the last few years, the 4-fluoroquinolone drugs have received considerable attention and have been shown to be highly effective in reducing the duration of traveler's diarrhea. These

  11. [Clinical-pharmacological aspects to accelerate the development process from the preclinical to the clinical phase/1st communication: The contribution of clinical pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    To improve the transition from research to development a critical evaluation of the individual project by research and disease area teams is required to include input from pharmacology, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, galenics, clinical pharmacology, clinical as well as regulatory experts and marketing. Decisions on the individual development strategy should be made prior to the start of development and all projects should be reviewed at predefined stages throughout the product development life cycle. This ensures consistency of decision-making not only during the development of individual products but throughout the entire development pipeline. Studies in the exploratory stage of drug development should be designed for decision making in contrast to later clinical trials in the confirmatory stage that require power for proof-of-safety and proof-of-efficacy. The more thorough and profound studies have been carried out during this exploratory stage of drug development, the earlier a decision can be made on the continuation or discontinuation of further development, thus saving development time and money and assessing and considerably reducing the risk for the patients and increasing the success rate of the project in the later confirmatory effectiveness trial with an adequate number of subjects receiving the new therapy under typical conditions of use. Strategies which may be helpful to improve the quality of decisions in drug discovery and drug development are: discovery experiments should be done to critically evaluate the compound, the "killer" experiments should be done as early as possible, continuous effort on preclinical disease models is necessary to improve predictability of efficacy in patients ("humanized" research): genomic technology should be used to identify novel, disease-related targets and to characterise preclinical test systems, improvement of knowledge and experience concerning the relevance of new technologies for the clinical picture; genotyping

  12. Treatment of Cushing's Syndrome: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Lynnette K.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Findling, James W.; Murad, M. Hassan; Newell-Price, John; Savage, Martin O.; Tabarin, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective is to formulate clinical practice guidelines for treating Cushing's syndrome. Participants: Participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The European Society for Endocrinology co-sponsored the guideline. Evidence: The Task Force used the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned three systematic reviews and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. Consensus Process: The Task Force achieved consensus through one group meeting, several conference calls, and numerous e-mail communications. Committees and members of The Endocrine Society and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Conclusions: Treatment of Cushing's syndrome is essential to reduce mortality and associated comorbidities. Effective treatment includes the normalization of cortisol levels or action. It also includes the normalization of comorbidities via directly treating the cause of Cushing's syndrome and by adjunctive treatments (eg, antihypertensives). Surgical resection of the causal lesion(s) is generally the first-line approach. The choice of second-line treatments, including medication, bilateral adrenalectomy, and radiation therapy (for corticotrope tumors), must be individualized to each patient. PMID:26222757

  13. Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain: Revised consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, DE; Boulanger, A; Clark, AJ; Clarke, H; Dao, T; Finley, GA; Furlan, A; Gilron, I; Gordon, A; Morley-Forster, PK; Sessle, BJ; Squire, P; Stinson, J; Taenzer, P; Velly, A; Ware, MA; Weinberg, EL; Williamson, OD

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain (NeP), redefined as pain caused by a lesion or a disease of the somatosensory system, is a disabling condition that affects approximately two million Canadians. OBJECTIVE: To review the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews related to the pharmacological management of NeP to develop a revised evidence-based consensus statement on its management. METHODS: RCTs, systematic reviews and existing guidelines on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting in May 2012 and updated until September 2013. Medications were recommended in the consensus statement if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound RCT (class I or class II) showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment were based on the degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety and ease of use. RESULTS: Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are gabapentinoids (gabapentin and pregabalin), tricyclic antidepressants and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as second-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Cannabinoids are now recommended as third-line treatments. Recommended fourth-line treatments include methadone, anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy (eg, lamotrigine, lacos-amide), tapentadol and botulinum toxin. There is support for some analgesic combinations in selected NeP conditions. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines provide an updated, stepwise approach to the pharmacological management of NeP. Treatment should be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Additional studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes and treatment of pediatric, geriatric and central NeP. PMID:25479151

  14. 77 FR 1696 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... pharmacology aspects of pediatric clinical trial design and dosing to optimize pediatric drug development. FDA will seek input on how to strategically inform pediatric clinical trial design and dosing by utilizing... happen in a clinical trial with pediatric patients when a particular dose of a drug is used. FDA...

  15. Prescribing and the core curriculum for tomorrow's doctors: BPS curriculum in clinical pharmacology and prescribing for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Sarah; Maxwell, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Prescribing is one of the commonest tasks expected of new doctors and is a complex process involving a mixture of knowledge, judgement and skills. Preparing graduates to be prescribers is one of the greatest challenges of modern undergraduate medical education and there is some evidence to suggest that training could be improved. The aims of this article are (i) to review some of the challenges of delivering effective prescribing education, (ii) to provide a clear statement of the learning outcomes in clinical pharmacology and prescribing that should be expected of all medical graduates and (iii) to describe a curriculum that might enable students to achieve these outcomes. We build on the previous curriculum recommendations of the British Pharmacological Society and take into account those of other key bodies, notably the General Medical Council. We have also reviewed relevant evidence from the literature and set our work in the context of recent trends in medical education. We divide our recommended learning objectives into four sections: principles of clinical pharmacology, essential drugs, essential therapeutic problems and prescribing skills. Although these will not necessarily be accepted universally we believe that they will help those who design and map undergraduate curricula to explore potential gaps and identify improvements. PMID:22288524

  16. World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety, obsessive-compulsive and post-traumatic stress disorders - first revision.

    PubMed

    Bandelow, Borwin; Zohar, Joseph; Hollander, Eric; Kasper, Siegfried; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Zohar, Joseph; Hollander, Eric; Kasper, Siegfried; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Bandelow, Borwin; Allgulander, Christer; Ayuso-Gutierrez, José; Baldwin, David S; Buenvicius, Robertas; Cassano, Giovanni; Fineberg, Naomi; Gabriels, Loes; Hindmarch, Ian; Kaiya, Hisanobu; Klein, Donald F; Lader, Malcolm; Lecrubier, Yves; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Liebowitz, Michael R; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Marazziti, Donatella; Miguel, Euripedes C; Oh, Kang Seob; Preter, Maurice; Rupprecht, Rainer; Sato, Mitsumoto; Starcevic, Vladan; Stein, Dan J; van Ameringen, Michael; Vega, Johann

    2008-01-01

    In this report, which is an update of a guideline published in 2002 (Bandelow et al. 2002, World J Biol Psychiatry 3:171), recommendations for the pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are presented. Since the publication of the first version of this guideline, a substantial number of new randomized controlled studies of anxiolytics have been published. In particular, more relapse prevention studies are now available that show sustained efficacy of anxiolytic drugs. The recommendations, developed by the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Task Force for the Pharmacological Treatment of Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive and Post-traumatic Stress Disorders, a consensus panel of 30 international experts, are now based on 510 published randomized, placebo- or comparator-controlled clinical studies (RCTs) and 130 open studies and case reports. First-line treatments for these disorders are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and the calcium channel modulator pregabalin. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are equally effective for some disorders, but many are less well tolerated than the SSRIs/SNRIs. In treatment-resistant cases, benzodiazepines may be used when the patient does not have a history of substance abuse disorders. Potential treatment options for patients unresponsive to standard treatments are described in this overview. Although these guidelines focus on medications, non-pharmacological were also considered. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and other variants of behaviour therapy have been sufficiently investigated in controlled studies in patients with anxiety disorders, OCD, and PTSD to support them being recommended either alone or in combination with the above medicines. PMID:18949648

  17. Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain – Consensus statement and guidelines from the Canadian Pain Society

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, DE; Clark, AJ; Gilron, I; Ware, MA; Watson, CPN; Sessle, BJ; Coderre, T; Morley-Forster, PK; Stinson, J; Boulanger, A; Peng, P; Finley, GA; Taenzer, P; Squire, P; Dion, D; Cholkan, A; Gilani, A; Gordon, A; Henry, J; Jovey, R; Lynch, M; Mailis-Gagnon, A; Panju, A; Rollman, GB; Velly, A

    2007-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NeP), generated by disorders of the peripheral and central nervous system, can be particularly severe and disabling. Prevalence estimates indicate that 2% to 3% of the population in the developed world suffer from NeP, which suggests that up to one million Canadians have this disabling condition. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of NeP are therefore urgently needed. Randomized, controlled trials, systematic reviews and existing guidelines focusing on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications are recommended in the guidelines if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound, randomized, controlled trial showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment are based on degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety, ease of use and cost-effectiveness. Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are certain antidepressants (tricyclics) and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin). Second-line treatments recommended are serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and topical lidocaine. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as third-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Recommended fourth-line treatments include cannabinoids, methadone and anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy, such as lamotrigine, topiramate and valproic acid. Treatment must be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Further studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes, and treatment of pediatric and central NeP. PMID:17372630

  18. The Clinical Pharmacology of Intranasal l-Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Mendelson, John E; McGlothlin, Dana; Harris, Debra S; Foster, Elyse; Everhart, Tom; Jacob, Peyton; Jones, Reese T

    2008-01-01

    Background We studied the pharmacology of l-methamphetamine, the less abused isomer, when used as a nasal decongestant. Methods 12 subjects self-administered l-methamphetamine from a nonprescription inhaler at the recommended dose (16 inhalations over 6 hours) then at 2 and 4 (32 and 64 inhalations) times this dose. In a separate session intravenous phenylephrine (200 μg) and l-methamphetamine (5 mg) were given to define alpha agonist pharmacology and bioavailability. Physiological, cardiovascular, pharmacokinetic, and subjective effects were measured. Results Plasma l-methamphetamine levels were often below the level of quantification so bioavailability was estimated by comparing urinary excretion of the intravenous and inhaled doses, yielding delivered dose estimates of 74.0 ± 56.1, 124.7 ± 106.6, and 268.1 ± 220.5 μg for ascending exposures (mean 4.2 ± 3.3 μg/inhalation). Physiological changes were minimal and not dose-dependent. Small decreases in stroke volume and cardiac output suggesting mild cardiodepression were seen. Conclusion Inhaled l-methamphetamine delivered from a non-prescription product produced minimal effects but may be a cardiodepressant. PMID:18644153

  19. Clinical relevance of cyclic GMP modulators: A translational success story of network pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Oettrich, J M; Dao, V T; Frijhoff, J; Kleikers, Pwm; Casas, A I; Hobbs, A J; Schmidt, H H H W

    2016-04-01

    Therapies that modulate cyclic guanosine-3'-5'-monophosphate (cGMP) have emerged as one of the most successful areas in recent drug discovery and clinical pharmacology. Historically, their focus has been on cardiovascular disease phenotypes; however, cGMP's relevance is likely to go beyond this rather limited organ-based set of indications. Moreover, the multitude of targets and their apparent interchangeability is a proof-of-concept of network pharmacology. PMID:26765222

  20. Report of the Canadian Hypertension Society Consensus Conference: 3. Pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rey, E; LeLorier, J; Burgess, E; Lange, I R; Leduc, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide Canadian physicians with evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacologic treatment of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. OPTIONS: No medication, or treatment with antihypertensive or anticonvulsant drugs. OUTCOMES: Prevention of maternal complications, and prevention of perinatal complications and death. EVIDENCE: Pertinent articles published from 1962 to September 1996 retrieved from the Pregnancy and Childbirth Module of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and from MEDLINE; additional articles retrieved through a manual search of bibliographies; and expert opinion. Recommendations were graded according to levels of evidence. VALUES: Maternal and fetal well-being were equally valued, with the belief that treatment side effects should be minimized. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Reduction in the rate of adverse perinatal outcomes, including death. Potential side effects of antihypertensive drugs include placental hypoperfusion, intrauterine growth retardation and long-term effects on the infant. RECOMMENDATIONS: A systolic blood pressure greater than 169 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure greater than 109 mm Hg in a pregnant woman should be considered an emergency and pharmacologic treatment with hydralazine, labetalol or nifedipine started. Otherwise, the thresholds at which to start antihypertensive treatment are a systolic pressure of 140 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure of 90 mm Hg in women with gestational hypertension without proteinuria or pre-existing hypertension before 28 weeks' gestation, those with gestational hypertension and proteinuria or symptoms at any time during the pregnancy, those with pre-existing hypertension and underlying conditions or target-organ damage, and those with pre-existing hypertension and superimposed gestational hypertension. The thresholds in other circumstances are a systolic pressure of 150 mm Hg or a diastolic pressure of 95 mm Hg. For nonsevere hypertension, methyldopa is the first-line drug; labetalol

  1. In vitro pharmacological profiling of R406 identifies molecular targets underlying the clinical effects of fostamatinib

    PubMed Central

    Rolf, Michael G; Curwen, Jon O; Veldman-Jones, Margaret; Eberlein, Cath; Wang, Jianyan; Harmer, Alex; Hellawell, Caroline J; Braddock, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Off-target pharmacology may contribute to both adverse and beneficial effects of a new drug. In vitro pharmacological profiling is often applied early in drug discovery; there are fewer reports addressing the relevance of broad profiles to clinical adverse effects. Here, we have characterized the pharmacological profile of the active metabolite of fostamatinib, R406, linking an understanding of drug selectivity to the increase in blood pressure observed in clinical studies. R406 was profiled in a broad range of in vitro assays to generate a comprehensive pharmacological profile and key targets were further investigated using functional and cellular assay systems. A combination of traditional literature searches and text-mining approaches established potential mechanistic links between the profile of R406 and clinical side effects. R406 was selective outside the kinase domain, with only antagonist activity at the adenosine A3 receptor in the range relevant to clinical effects. R406 was less selective in the kinase domain, having activity at many protein kinases at therapeutically relevant concentrations when tested in multiple in vitro systems. Systematic literature analyses identified KDR as the probable target underlying the blood pressure increase observed in patients. While the in vitro pharmacological profile of R406 suggests a lack of selectivity among kinases, a combination of classical searching and text-mining approaches rationalized the complex profile establishing linkage between off-target pharmacology and clinically observed effects. These results demonstrate the utility of in vitro pharmacological profiling for a compound in late-stage clinical development. PMID:26516587

  2. In vitro pharmacological profiling of R406 identifies molecular targets underlying the clinical effects of fostamatinib.

    PubMed

    Rolf, Michael G; Curwen, Jon O; Veldman-Jones, Margaret; Eberlein, Cath; Wang, Jianyan; Harmer, Alex; Hellawell, Caroline J; Braddock, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Off-target pharmacology may contribute to both adverse and beneficial effects of a new drug. In vitro pharmacological profiling is often applied early in drug discovery; there are fewer reports addressing the relevance of broad profiles to clinical adverse effects. Here, we have characterized the pharmacological profile of the active metabolite of fostamatinib, R406, linking an understanding of drug selectivity to the increase in blood pressure observed in clinical studies. R406 was profiled in a broad range of in vitro assays to generate a comprehensive pharmacological profile and key targets were further investigated using functional and cellular assay systems. A combination of traditional literature searches and text-mining approaches established potential mechanistic links between the profile of R406 and clinical side effects. R406 was selective outside the kinase domain, with only antagonist activity at the adenosine A3 receptor in the range relevant to clinical effects. R406 was less selective in the kinase domain, having activity at many protein kinases at therapeutically relevant concentrations when tested in multiple in vitro systems. Systematic literature analyses identified KDR as the probable target underlying the blood pressure increase observed in patients. While the in vitro pharmacological profile of R406 suggests a lack of selectivity among kinases, a combination of classical searching and text-mining approaches rationalized the complex profile establishing linkage between off-target pharmacology and clinically observed effects. These results demonstrate the utility of in vitro pharmacological profiling for a compound in late-stage clinical development. PMID:26516587

  3. The clinical research office of the endourological society audit committee.

    PubMed

    Preminger, Glenn M; Alken, Peter; Habuchi, Tomonori; Wijkstra, Hessel; Skolarikos, Andreas; Yin, Chan-Jun

    2011-11-01

    The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) conducts large-scale, international, multicenter clinical trials in the field of endourology. One of the major challenges that these trials pose is to ensure that data collected remotely and online within a very short time frame are valid and reliable. This editorial describes a formal process for auditing the data by the CROES Audit Committee. The audit process presented is largely based on an automatic scoring system, which takes into consideration several parameters to determine the quality of the data and of the participating institution. This process is dynamic in nature and offers live monitoring of both patient data and study centers. PMID:22010950

  4. [Refraining from futile medical treatment in clinical practice. Directives of the Polish pediatric society].

    PubMed

    Glusiec, W; Sak, J; Pawlikowski, J

    2014-08-01

    The continuous development of medicine increases the possibility of sustaining life functions, which frequently leads to prolonging the patient's agony or exposing him/her to unnecessary suffering. The application of some medical procedures, technical equipment and pharmacological measures that prolong the process of dying in terminally ill children may be a sign of therapeutic obstinacy. Such actions are not an outcome of concern for the welfare of young patients and violate their dignity. In the interest of incurable and terminally ill children and considering the needs of physicians who have to make difficult clinical decisions, the Polish Pediatric Society (PPS) ratified the guidelines concerning abandoning and withdrawal of overzealous therapy. The objective of this article was to present the Italian medical society, Polish rules for refraining from overzealous therapy in pediatrics. The commentary to the Directive include the remarks on the dubious concept of "therapeutic obstinacy". Following fragments of the article characterize Polish ideas on terminally ill children's rights, the current situation of these children in medical care, and the origins and character of the document approved by the PPS. The complementation of the commentary are remarks made by a team of experts that develop guidelines which apply to specific clinical problems associated with the care of terminally ill children. This article is yet another voice in the wide debate on the moral imperative of refraining from therapeutic obstinacy in medical practice. PMID:25198569

  5. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVIII. Histamine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Panula, Pertti; Chazot, Paul L; Cowart, Marlon; Gutzmer, Ralf; Leurs, Rob; Liu, Wai L S; Stark, Holger; Thurmond, Robin L; Haas, Helmut L

    2015-07-01

    Histamine is a developmentally highly conserved autacoid found in most vertebrate tissues. Its physiological functions are mediated by four 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) that are all targets of pharmacological intervention. The receptors display molecular heterogeneity and constitutive activity. H1R antagonists are long known antiallergic and sedating drugs, whereas the H2R was identified in the 1970s and led to the development of H2R-antagonists that revolutionized stomach ulcer treatment. The crystal structure of ligand-bound H1R has rendered it possible to design new ligands with novel properties. The H3R is an autoreceptor and heteroreceptor providing negative feedback on histaminergic and inhibition on other neurons. A block of these actions promotes waking. The H4R occurs on immuncompetent cells and the development of anti-inflammatory drugs is anticipated. PMID:26084539

  6. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVIII. Histamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chazot, Paul L.; Cowart, Marlon; Gutzmer, Ralf; Leurs, Rob; Liu, Wai L. S.; Stark, Holger; Thurmond, Robin L.; Haas, Helmut L.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a developmentally highly conserved autacoid found in most vertebrate tissues. Its physiological functions are mediated by four 7-transmembrane G protein–coupled receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, H4R) that are all targets of pharmacological intervention. The receptors display molecular heterogeneity and constitutive activity. H1R antagonists are long known antiallergic and sedating drugs, whereas the H2R was identified in the 1970s and led to the development of H2R-antagonists that revolutionized stomach ulcer treatment. The crystal structure of ligand-bound H1R has rendered it possible to design new ligands with novel properties. The H3R is an autoreceptor and heteroreceptor providing negative feedback on histaminergic and inhibition on other neurons. A block of these actions promotes waking. The H4R occurs on immuncompetent cells and the development of anti-inflammatory drugs is anticipated. PMID:26084539

  7. The pharmacologic and clinical effects of medical cannabis.

    PubMed

    Borgelt, Laura M; Franson, Kari L; Nussbaum, Abraham M; Wang, George S

    2013-02-01

    Cannabis, or marijuana, has been used for medicinal purposes for many years. Several types of cannabinoid medicines are available in the United States and Canada. Dronabinol (schedule III), nabilone (schedule II), and nabiximols (not U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved) are cannabis-derived pharmaceuticals. Medical cannabis or medical marijuana, a leafy plant cultivated for the production of its leaves and flowering tops, is a schedule I drug, but patients obtain it through cannabis dispensaries and statewide programs. The effect that cannabinoid compounds have on the cannabinoid receptors (CB(1) and CB(2) ) found in the brain can create varying pharmacologic responses based on formulation and patient characteristics. The cannabinoid Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol has been determined to have the primary psychoactive effects; the effects of several other key cannabinoid compounds have yet to be fully elucidated. Dronabinol and nabilone are indicated for the treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy and of anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. However, pain and muscle spasms are the most common reasons that medical cannabis is being recommended. Studies of medical cannabis show significant improvement in various types of pain and muscle spasticity. Reported adverse effects are typically not serious, with the most common being dizziness. Safety concerns regarding cannabis include the increased risk of developing schizophrenia with adolescent use, impairments in memory and cognition, accidental pediatric ingestions, and lack of safety packaging for medical cannabis formulations. This article will describe the pharmacology of cannabis, effects of various dosage formulations, therapeutics benefits and risks of cannabis for pain and muscle spasm, and safety concerns of medical cannabis use. PMID:23386598

  8. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... Society of Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA). The conference on FDA's clinical trial requirements is... relationships among FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards...

  9. Lithium: a review of pharmacology, clinical uses, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Oruch, Ramadhan; Elderbi, Mahmoud A; Khattab, Hassan A; Pryme, Ian F; Lund, Anders

    2014-10-01

    A radical drug treatment for bipolar affective disorder (BD) is currently unavailable. This is attributed to the fact that the precise pathophysiology of this ailment is unclear though a genetic factor is an essential element in etiology. Dissimilar to other serious psychiatric categories such as psychoses and major depression the forecast of this disease is unpredictable. There is a high suicidal risk among BD affected individuals. In this review we will consider lithium, the drug of choice in treatment of this disorder with special emphasis on pharmacology and toxicity. We have also elucidated the alternatives to lithium, since it has a wide spectrum of side-effects. Lithium is known to interact with many types of drugs used to treat different ailments in humans. This could cause either augmentation or minimization of the therapeutic action, causing secondary undesired effects of the agent. This necessitates a search for other alternatives and/or different combinations to lithium in order to decrease the range of unwanted effects for which it has received discredit. These alternatives should be potent mood stabilizers as monotherapy so as to avoid polypharmacy. If not, one should find the best combination of drugs (synergistic agents) such that the lithium dose can be minimized, thereby securing a more potent drug therapy. This study also focuses on the provision of instruction to psychiatric care givers, such as junior doctors in residency, nurses in psychiatric units, psychiatric emergency personnel and, additionally, medical and pharmacy students. PMID:24991789

  10. Anthelmintics. A comparative review of their clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    de Silva, N; Guyatt, H; Bundy, D

    1997-05-01

    Virtually all the important helminth infections in humans can be treated with one of 5 anthelmintics currently in use: albendazole, mebendazole, diethylcarbamazine, ivermectin and praziquantel. These drugs are vital not only for the treatment of individual infections, but also useful in controlling transmission of the more common infections. This article reviews briefly the pharmacology of these 5 drugs, and then discusses current issues in the use of anthelmintics in the treatment and/or control of soil-transmitted nematode infections, filariasis, onchocerciasis, schistosomiasis (and other trematode infections), neurocysticercosis and hydatidosis. Mebendazole and albendazole are most effective against intestinal nematodes, but are contraindicated during the first trimester of pregnancy. The efficacy of prolonged therapy with these 2 drugs for treatment of larval cestode infections has not yet been established. Diethylcarbamazine is widely used to treat and control lymphatic filariasis, but adverse effects related to death of microfilariae or damage to adult worms may be marked. While ivermectin has been used in the treatment of patients with onchocerciasis, it is also undergoing investigation against lymphatic filariae. Praziquantel, used to treat schistosome infections, is also effective in other trematode infections and adult cestode infections. PMID:9129865

  11. Dabigatran in atrial fibrillation: pharmacology and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ezekowitz, Michael D; Nagarakanti, Rangadham

    2011-12-01

    The central pharmacologic approach to stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has recently changed with the approval of dabigatran by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Dabigatran is an oral anticoagulant that belongs to the class of direct thrombin inhibitors. Dabigatran has predictable pharmacokinetics, without significant drug and food interactions, rapid onset, and requires twice-daily administration without the need for monitoring. The only drug contraindicated with dabigatran is rifampin. In the Randomized Evaluation of Long-Term Anticoagulation Therapy (RE-LY) trial, dabigatran at a dose of 150 mg bid is statistically superior to warfarin in preventing strokes and systemic embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation and has a lower non-statistically significant rate of major bleeding. There is significantly lower rate of intracranial bleeding. The FDA recently approved the 150-mg bid dose for patients with a creatinine clearance above 30 mL/min and 75 mg bid for use in patients with a creatinine clearance of 15 to 30 mL/min. A prespecified subanalysis in both warfarin-experienced and warfarin-naive subgroups mirrored the main results. For cardioversions, a post hoc analysis showed that the rate of thromboembolism and major bleeding within 30 days of cardioversion for dabigatran 150 mg bid was low and comparable to that of warfarin, with or without transesophageal echocardiography guidance. Dabigatran, therefore, is the first novel anticoagulant to offer an alternative to warfarin. PMID:21717198

  12. Clinical pharmacology of non opioid analgesics in neonates.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, K; de Hoon, J; Van Overmeire, B; Devlieger, H

    2005-01-01

    An integrated approach of neonatal analgesia starts with the systematic evaluation of pain and should be followed by effective interventions, mainly based on the appropriate (i.e. safe and effective) administration of analgesics. In contrast to the more potent opioids, data on the pharmacokinetics and -dynamics of non-opioid analgesics in this specific population are still rare or even lacking. We therefore evaluated various aspects of developmental pharmacology of non-opioid analgesics (paracetamol, ibuprofen, acetylsalicyl acid) in neonates. We first performed a single dose propacetamol study in preterm and term neonates. Based on these preliminary findings, a repeated dose administration scheme was developed and tested and maturational aspects from preterm till teenage were documented. Although non-selective COX-inhibitors might be effective in the treatment of postoperative or inflammatory pain syndromes in neonates, potential efficacy should be balanced against the drugs' safety profile. Neonatal renal clearance strongly depends on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and GFR itself strongly depends on the vaso-dilatative of prostaglandins on the afferent arterioli. We therefore evaluated the impact of the administration of ibuprofen or acetylsalicylic acid on renal clearance in preterm infants and hereby used amikacin clearance as a surrogate marker. We hereby documented the negative effect of ibuprofen on glomerular filtration rate in preterm infants up to 34 weeks and we were able to show that ibuprofen and acetylsalicylic acid had an equal impact on the glomerular filtration rate. PMID:16408826

  13. Pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation: pharmacological principles and clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, Henri-Jean; Luquiens, Amandine; Berlin, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strategies for assisting smoking cessation include behavioural counselling to enhance motivation and to support attempts to quit and pharmacological intervention to reduce nicotine reinforcement and withdrawal from nicotine. Three drugs are currently used as first line pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation, nicotine replacement therapy, bupropion and varenicline. Compared with placebo, the drug effect varies from 2.27 (95% CI 2.02, 2.55) for varenicline, 1.69 (95% CI 1.53, 1.85) for bupropion and 1.60 (95% CI 1.53, 1.68) for any form of nicotine replacement therapy. Despite some controversy regarding the safety of bupropion and varenicline, regulatory agencies consider these drugs as having a favourable benefit/risk profile. However, given the high rate of psychiatric comorbidity in dependent smokers, practitioners should closely monitor patients for neuropsychiatric symptoms. Second-line pharmacotherapies include nortriptyline and clonidine. This review also offers an overview of pipeline developments and issues related to smoking cessation in special populations such as persons with psychiatric comorbidity and pregnant and adolescent smokers. PMID:23488726

  14. Rosuvastatin: A Review of the Pharmacology and Clinical Effectiveness in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Luvai, Ahai; Mbagaya, Wycliffe; Hall, Alistair S.; Barth, Julian H.

    2012-01-01

    Rosuvastatin is a new generation HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor which exhibits some unique pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic properties. It has low extrahepatic tissue penetration, low potential for CYP3A4 interactions and substantial LDL-C lowering capacity and therefore has distinct advantages. We conducted a Medline literature search to identify rosuvastatin papers published in English. In this review, we outline the pharmacology of rosuvastatin, highlighting its efficacy and safety. We also review the major clinical trials with reference to primary and secondary prevention, familial hypercholesterolaemia and comparison with other statins. Finally we address its place in clinical practice. PMID:22442638

  15. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made. PMID:26641959

  16. Clinical pharmacology of novel anti-Alzheimer disease modifying medications.

    PubMed

    Caraci, Filippo; Bosco, Paolo; Leggio, Gian Marco; Malaguarnera, Michele; Drago, Filippo; Bucolo, Claudio; Salomone, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, efforts have been directed to develop "disease-modifying" medications to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD), able to halt or slow the pathological process. Because the earlier the treatment starts, the greater is the possibility of efficacy, it is important to set up biomarkers for early diagnosis of functional brain abnormalities, before the clinical manifestation of the overt disease. Up to now, strategies to develop disease-modifying drugs have mainly targeted β amyloid (Aβ, accumulation, aggregation, clearance) and/or tau protein (phosphorylation and aggregation). Active and passive immunotherapy is the main strategy aimed at increasing Aβ clearance. Unfortunately several candidate diseasemodifying drugs have failed in phase III clinical trials conducted in mild to moderate AD. More recently, in phase III studies, bapineuzumab has been discontinued because it did not prove clinically effective (despite its significant effect on biomarkers), while solaneuzumab has been found effective in slowing AD progression. Several methological problems have been recently pointed out to explain the lack of clinical efficacy of novel disease-modifying drug-treatments; moreover, new insights in pathophysiology of AD give the premise to develop novel drug targeting. Clinical trials recently completed and/or still ongoing are discussed in the present review. PMID:23931438

  17. Perchlorate Clinical Pharmacology and Human Health: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie Porat; Braverman, Lewis E.; Lamm, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Potassium perchlorate has been used at various times during the last 50 years to treat hyperthyroidism. Since World War II ammonium perchlorate has been used as a propellant for rockets. In 1997, the assay sensitivity for perchlorate in water was improved from 0.4 mg/L (ppm) to 4 µg/L (ppb). As a result, public water supplies in Southern California were found to contain perchlorate ions in the range of 5 to 8 ppb, and those in Southern Nevada were found to contain 5 to 24 ppb. Research programs have been developed to assess the safety or risk from these exposures and to assist state and regulatory agencies in setting a reasonable safe level for perchlorate in drinking water. This report reviews the evidence on the human health effects of perchlorate exposure. Perchlorate is a competitive inhibitor of iodine uptake. All of its pharmacologic effects at current therapeutic levels or lower are associated with inhibition of the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) on the thyroid follicular cell membrane. A review of the medical and occupational studies has been undertaken to identify perchlorate exposure levels at which thyroid hormone levels may be reduced or thyrotropin levels increased. This exposure level may begin in the 35 to 100 mg/d range. Volunteer studies have been designed to determine the exposure levels at which perchlorate begins to affect iodine uptake in humans. Such effects may begin at levels of approximately 1 mg/d. Environmental studies have assessed the thyroidal health of newborns and adults at current environmental exposures to perchlorate and have concluded that the present levels appear to be safe. Whereas additional studies are underway both in laboratory animals and in the field, it appears that a safe level can be established for perchlorate in water and that regulatory agencies and others are now trying to determine that level. PMID:11477312

  18. [Transdermal buprenorphine: a current overview of pharmacological and clinical data].

    PubMed

    Faymonville, M E; Libbrecht, D

    2008-11-01

    Our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of chronic pain progresses; the complexity of the problem justifies our need for new molecules and new ways of administration that will help to further optimise and better individualize our pharmacologic therapies. Whereas acute pain can be considered an alarm signal, chronic pain constitutes, per se, a syndrome that requires a meticulous selection of the analgesic drug(s). Since pain is permanent, the continuous administration of the analgesic is recommended rather than an on demand administration. Transdermic modes of administration are of value for the treatment of chronic pain because they allow a progressive delivery of the active compound together with the maintenance of stable plasma levels of the drug. Buprenorphine is a semi-synthetic opioid that is available in the sublingual, injectable, or transdermic forms. The matrix patch of buprenorphine represents a major asset for the treatment of chronic pain, whether it be cancerous in origin, or not. Its efficacy and safety have been clearly demonstrated in randomised double blind trials as well as in post-marketing surveillance observations. Buprenorphine, administered as a transdermal therapeutic system, induces a dose-related pain relief, whatever the nature of the pain and the age of the patient. Buprenorphine also exerts an analgesic action on neuropathic pain. It differs from other opioids by its affinity as a partial agonist on mu and kappa receptors, and as a complete agonist of ORL-1 receptors. Therefore, transdermal buprenorphine will be useful to all physicians having to control severe pain by powerful opioids. PMID:19112993

  19. [Pharmacological properties of vortioxetine and its pre-clinical consequences].

    PubMed

    David, D J; Tritschler, L; Guilloux, J-P; Gardier, A M; Sanchez, C; Gaillard, R

    2016-02-01

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are extensively used for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). SSRIs are defined as indirect receptor agonists since the activation of postsynaptic receptors is a consequence of an increase in extracellular concentrations of serotonin (5-HT) mediated by the blockade of serotonin transporter. The activation of some serotoninergic receptors (5-HT1A, post-synaptic, 5-HT1B post-synaptic, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT4), but not all (5-HT1A, pre-synaptic, 5-HT1B pre-synaptic, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT3, and probably 5-HT6), induces anxiolytic/antidepressive - like effects. Targetting specifically some of them could potentially improve the onset of action and/or efficacy and/or prevent MD relapse. Vortioxetine (Brintellix, 1- [2-(2,4-dimethylphenyl-sulfanyl)-phenyl]-piperazine) is a novel multi-target antidepressant drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and by European Medicines Agency. Its properties are markedly different from the extensively prescribed SSRIs. Compared to the SSRIs, vortioxetine is defined as a multimodal antidepressant drug since it is not only a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, but also a 5-HT1D, 5-HT3, 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist and 5-HT1A receptor agonist. This specific pharmacological profile enables vortioxetine to affect not only the serotoninergic and noradrenergic systems, but also the histaminergic, cholinergic, gamma-butyric acid (GABA) ergic and glutamatergic ones. Thus, vortioxetine not only induces antidepressant-like or anxiolytic-like activity but also improves cognitive parameters in several animal models. Indeed, vortioxetine was shown to improve working memory, episodic memory, cognitive flexibility and spatial memory in young adult rodents and also in old animal models. These specific effects of the vortioxetine are of interest considering that cognitive dysfunction is a common comorbidity to MDD. Altogether, even though this molecule still

  20. Clinical pharmacology information in summaries of product characteristics and package inserts.

    PubMed

    Arguello, B; Fernandez-Llimos, F

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the clinical pharmacology information provided in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) of European drugs compared with their package inserts. A list of the 150 most prescribed drugs at the local Health Service was assessed. To analyze clinical pharmacology information contained in package inserts and SPCs, Spyker's systematized scoring approach was used (scoring from 0 to 2). Ninety-one SPCs (84.3%) and 108 package inserts were obtained. The mean score for core information provided in the package inserts was 7.94 (confidence interval (CI) 95 %: 7.34-8.53), whereas for the SPCs it was 17.62 (CI 95 %: 16.48-18.75; 35.2% of the maximum). One core information item and two extra credit items were not contained in any of the SPCs. In the European Union the clinical pharmacology information found in SPCs is clearly insufficient. An improved access to and regular review of the SPCs might substantially improve the access and quality of clinical pharmacology and other prescribing information. PMID:17410119

  1. 78 FR 58315 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  2. 76 FR 38188 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  3. 76 FR 3912 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  4. 75 FR 10488 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  5. 75 FR 11551 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  6. 76 FR 38668 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  7. 75 FR 8368 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  8. 77 FR 42746 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  9. 78 FR 58314 - Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Advisory Committee for Pharmaceutical Science and Clinical Pharmacology; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration...

  10. Cannabis and cannabinoids: pharmacology and rationale for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, R G

    1999-10-01

    It is now known that there are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors. These are CB1 receptors, present mainly on central and peripheral neurones, and CB2 receptors, present mainly on immune cells. Endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists ('endocannabinoids') have also been identified. The discovery of this 'endogenous cannabinoid system' has led to the development of selective CB1 and CB2 receptor ligands and fueled renewed interest in the clinical potential of cannabinoids. Two cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists are already used clinically, as antiemetics or as appetite stimulants. These are D 9 - tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and nabilone. Other possible uses for CB1 receptor agonists include the suppression of muscle spasm/spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury, the relief of chronic pain and the management of glaucoma and bronchial asthma. CB1 receptor antagonists may also have clinical applications, e. g. as appetite suppressants and in the management of schizophrenia or disorders of cognition and memory. So too may CB2 receptor ligands and drugs that activate cannabinoid receptors indirectly by augmenting endocannabinoid levels at cannabinoid receptors. When taken orally, THC seems to undergo variable absorption and to have a narrow 'therapeutic window' (dose range in which it is effective without producing significant unwanted effects). This makes it difficult to predict an oral dose that will be both effective and tolerable to a patient and indicates a need for better cannabinoid formulations and modes of administration. For the therapeutic potential of cannabis or CB1 receptor agonists to be fully exploited, it will be important to establish objectively and conclusively (a) whether these agents have efficacy against selected symptoms that is of clinical significance and, if so, whether the benefits outweigh the risks, (b) whether cannabis has therapeutic advantages over individual cannabinoids, (c) whether there is a need for

  11. Pharmacological agents currently in clinical trials for disorders in neurogastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal, gastrointestinal, and colonic diseases resulting from disorders of the motor and sensory functions represent almost half the patients presenting to gastroenterologists. There have been significant advances in understanding the mechanisms of these disorders, through basic and translational research, and in targeting the receptors or mediators involved, through clinical trials involving biomarkers and patient responses. These advances have led to relief of patients’ symptoms and improved quality of life, although there are still significant unmet needs. This article reviews the pipeline of medications in development for esophageal sensorimotor disorders, gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, chronic constipation (including opioid-induced constipation), and visceral pain. PMID:24084743

  12. [Responsibilities of clinical pharmacology in the early phase of drug development].

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J

    2000-05-01

    The path of a new drug from the idea to the product may be divided into 2 phases, namely drug discovery and drug development. Due to the scientific progress new and simple methods could be developed to determine the biological efficacy of a large number of compounds. During the first part of drug development necessary requirements for the first use in man are met by performing preclinical pharmacological, toxicological and pharmacokinetic investigations in the animal and in in-vitro testing. After a first clinical-pharmacological profile of the new substance has been established during phase I on the basis of which a decision for the continuation of the clinical trial is made, the aim of phases II and III is now to answer the important questions of the therapeutic efficacy and tolerability in a large number of patients with the target indication. Due to the continuously increasing time and costs of drug development, drug development should be streamlined combining preclinical and early clinical phases as an exploratory stage and later clinical development as a confirmatory stage. The development and appropriate use of surrogates and models may be helpful to determine drug actions in human and to assist in dose selection as the main requirement for a successful large clinical trial in the confirmatory stage. Identifying the genes responsible for the huge variations in how different patients respond to a drug, in terms of both the product's effectiveness and its side effects, and genotyping patients before including in large clinical trials may prevent selecting the wrong patient population and avoid expensive repetition of these studies. Taking responsibility as the link between research and development gives clinical pharmacology a major opportunity to assume a pivotal role in drug development. To reach this goal, clinical pharmacology must be fully integrated in the whole process of drug development from the candidate selection until the approval. PMID:10851846

  13. [Responsibilities of clinical pharmacology in the early phase of drug development].

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, J

    1999-05-15

    The path of a new drug from the idea to the product may be divided into 2 phases, namely drug discovery and drug development. Due to the scientific progress new and simple methods could be developed to determine the biological efficacy of a large number of compounds. During the first part of drug development necessary requirements for the first use in man are met by performing preclinical pharmacological, toxicological and pharmacokinetic investigations in the animal and in in-vitro testing. After a first clinical-pharmacological profile of the new substance has been established during phase I on the basis of which a decision for the continuation of the clinical trial is made, the aim of phases II and III is now to answer the important questions of the therapeutic efficacy and tolerability in a large number of patients with the target indication. Due to the continuously increasing time and costs of drug development, drug development should be streamlined combining preclinical and early clinical phases as an exploratory stage and later clinical development as a confirmatory stage. The development and appropriate use of surrogates and models may be helpful to determine drug actions in human and to assist in dose selection as the main requirement for a successful large clinical trial in the confirmatory stage. Identifying the genes responsible for the huge variations in how different patients respond to a drug, in terms of both the product's effectiveness and its side effects, and genotyping patients before including in large clinical trials may prevent selecting the wrong patient population and avoid expensive repetition of these studies. Taking responsibility as the link between research and development gives clinical pharmacology a major opportunity to assume a pivotal role in drug development. To reach this goal, clinical pharmacology must be fully integrated in the whole process of drug development from the candidate selection until the approval. PMID:10408193

  14. [Main progress on studies of pharmacological activities and clinical applications of Guizhi Fuling capsule].

    PubMed

    Su, Zhen-zhen; Li, Na; Cao, Liang; Wang, Tuan-jie; Zhang, Chen-feng; Ding, Gang; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Xiao, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Guizhi Fuling capsule is a traditional Chinese medicine composed of five kinds of medicinal plants, Cinnamomi Ramulus, Poria, Moutan Cortex, Persicae Semen, and Paeoniae Radix Alba. Pharmacology studies have shown that Guizhi Fuling capsule has many activities: anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-tumor, regulating smooth muscle, endocrine regulation and enhancing immunity. It achieved obvious effects in the treatment of uterine fibroids, pelvic inflammatory disease, dysmenorrheal, endometriosis, ovarian cysts, breast hyperplasia and other gynecological diseases. This paper reviewed the main progress on studies of pharmacological activities and clinical applications of Guizhi Fuling capsule in recent years. PMID:26226732

  15. Impulse Control Disorders: Updated Review of Clinical Characteristics and Pharmacological Management

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Liana; Odlaug, Brian L.; Grant, Jon E.

    2011-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) are characterized by urges and behaviors that are excessive and/or harmful to oneself or others and cause significant impairment in social and occupational functioning, as well as legal and financial difficulties. ICDs are relatively common psychiatric conditions, yet are poorly understood by the general public, clinicians, and individuals struggling with the disorder. Although ICD treatment research is limited, studies have shown ICDs may respond well to pharmacological treatment. This article presents a brief overview about the clinical characteristics of ICDs and pharmacological treatment options for individuals with ICDs. PMID:21556272

  16. Comparative Human Oral Clinical Pharmacology of Cefadroxil, Cephalexin, and Cephradine

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Morris; Jackson, Andre; Ximenes, Jose; De Menezes, Jairo Perche

    1977-01-01

    At equivalent oral doses, cefadroxil has a longer serum half-life, slower urinary excretion rate, greater area under the serum level versus time curve than cephalexin or cephradine, and peak serum concentrations that are 75 to 80% those of cephalexin. The calculated, apparent in vivo volume of distribution of cefadroxil is greater than that of cephalexin. These properties infer greater persistence of cefadroxil in serum and urine and more prolonged in vivo bacterial exposure to cefadroxil than to cephalexin or cephradine. Neither cefadroxil nor cephalexin demonstrates drug accumulation on repeated administration. The serum levels achieved by cefadroxil are unaffected by food. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefadroxil are supportive of the development of clinical efficacy data which could indicate that cefadroxil could be administered at 12-h intervals. PMID:848940

  17. [Pharmacological and clinical evalutation of nasal obstruction: application to xylometazoline].

    PubMed

    Pradalier, André

    2006-01-01

    Nasal obstruction, a prominent feature of rhinitis, may be quantified in humans by haemodynamic techniques (measuring local blood flux), static methods (measuring the geometry of nasal cavities) and dynamic methods (assessing the patency of nasal airways through the measure of resistance to air flow). These methods demonstrated the nasal decongestant activity of xylometazoline in healthy volunteers and rhinitis patients. Controlled double-blind studies established the clinical efficacy of xylometazoline in infectious and allergic (seasonal and perennial) rhinitis versus placebo and in comparison with various reference substances. The effects on nasal epithelium ciliary activity which are observed in vitro are modest and even less pronounced in vivo owing to dilution in situ and protective physiological processes. PMID:16792148

  18. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutic drug monitoring of zonisamide.

    PubMed

    Mimaki, T

    1998-12-01

    Zonisamide (1,2-benzisoxazole-3-methanesulfonamide) is a new antiepileptic drug developed in Japan. This compound is insoluble in water, and it is available in tablet and powder form. In experimental animals, this compound has been found to have a strong inhibitory effect on convulsions of cortical origin because it suppresses focal spiking and the spread of secondary generalized seizures. In humans, a series of double-blind, placebo-controlled studies revealed the efficacy of zonisamide for patients with refractory partial seizures and for selected patients with infantile spasms. Its antiepileptic mechanism of action remains unclear, but it is likely to involve blockade of both sodium and T-type calcium channels. Oral bioavailability of zonisamide is excellent in healthy human volunteers. Zonisamide is slowly absorbed and has a mean tmax of 5 to 6 hours. Almost 100% of it is absorbed; there is no difference in bioavailability between tablets and powder. Zonisamide concentrations are highest in erythrocytes and then in whole blood and plasma. It is approximately 40% to 60% bound to plasma proteins, primarily albumin. Its volume distribution is 0.9 to 1.4 L/kg. In adults, the elimination half-life is between 50 and 62 hours, and it takes as long as 2 weeks to reach steady state. The dose-serum level correlation is linear up to doses of 10 to 15 mg/kg per day, and the therapeutic range is 10 to 40 microg/ml. However, the relationship between serum zonisamide levels, clinical response, and adverse effects appears weak. Concurrent enzyme-inducing anticonvulsants such as phenytoin, carbamazepine, or barbiturates stimulate zonisamide metabolism and decrease serum zonisamide levels at steady state. Although zonisamide has been reported to increase the serum levels of phenytoin and carbamazepine in some patients, the interactions of zonisamide with other antiepileptic drugs seem to be of minor clinical relevance. A pilot study of zonisamide suppositories revealed that it

  19. Pharmacological and clinical overview of cloperastine in treatment of cough

    PubMed Central

    Catania, Maria Antonietta; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Cough constitutes an impressive expression of the normal defense mechanisms of the respiratory system. Productive cough associated with catarrh is an important protective system for the lung because it favors the upward movement of secretions and foreign bodies to the larynx and mouth. Cough may also appear without bronchial secretions, as dry cough, which may be persistent when inflammatory disease is chronic or when, in the early stages of respiratory disease, bronchial secretions are not yet fluid. Sometimes bronchitis-induced cough does not significantly affect quality of life, whilst in other cases cough may become so intense as to impair daily activities severely, resulting in permanent disability. This type of cough is one of the most frequent reasons for seeking medical advice. The use of cough suppressants may be appropriate for reaching a precise diagnosis and when dry cough is persistent. Cloperastine has been investigated in various types of cough and, unlike codeine, has been shown to possess dual activity. It also acts as a mild bronchorelaxant and has antihistaminic activity, without acting on the central nervous system or the respiratory center. Here we review the preclinical and clinical evidence of the efficacy and tolerability of cloperastine. PMID:21445282

  20. Tissue selectivity of ospemifene: pharmacologic profile and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Lauri; Unkila, Mikko

    2013-12-11

    The multifactorial consequences of menopausal estrogen deficiency affect numerous tissues throughout the body. Supplemental hormonal therapies carry the burden of a risk/benefit ratio that must be highly individualized. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are estrogen receptor (ER) agonist/antagonists designed to induce benefits comparable with estrogen while minimizing adverse effects. Here, we review the estrogen agonist/antagonist profile of ospemifene, a novel triphenylethylene derivative recently approved to treat dyspareunia, a symptom of vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA) due to menopause, both preclinically and clinically. Ospemifene binds ERα and ERβ with approximately equal affinities. In preclinical models, ospemifene increased vaginal and uterine epithelial thickness and mucification to the same extent as estrogen. Ospemifene did not induce endometrial hyperplasia in animal models; there also was no stimulatory effect on endometrial cells. In rat and human mammary cells in vitro, ospemifene evokes a dose-dependent inhibition on estrogen-induced cell responses and cell proliferation, supporting an antiestrogenic effect in breast. In contrast, ospemifene has an estrogenic effect on bone, as seen by improved bone mineral density, strength, mass, and histomorphometry in preclinical models, consistent with improvements in markers of bone resorption and formation in postmenopausal women. Based on the preclinical evidence, ospemifene has beneficial estrogen-like effects on the vaginal epithelium, preliminary evidence to support a neutral endometrial profile, antiproliferative effects in breast, and estrogenic effects in bone. Taken together, especially regarding estrogen-like effects on the vaginal epithelium, ospemifene presents a profile of tissue-specific effects that appear novel among available SERMs and well-suited for the treatment of VVA. PMID:24055829

  1. A Critical Overview on the Pharmacological and Clinical Aspects of Popular Satureja Species.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Fereshteh; Ghavidel, Fatemeh; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2016-06-01

    Throughout the world, various parts of most Satureja species are traditionally used to treat patients with various diseases and complications. As for the presence of different classes of metabolites in Satureja and their numerous ethnomedical and ethnopharmacological applications, many species have been pharmacologically evaluated. The current work aimed to compile information from pharmacological studies on this savory for further investigations. The keyword Satureja was searched through Scopus and PubMed up to January 1, 2016. We found nearly 55 papers that dealt with the pharmacology of Satureja. We found that 13 species had been evaluated pharmacologically and that Satureja khuzestanica, Satureja bachtiarica, Satureja montana and Satureja hortensis appeared to be the most active, both clinically and phytopharmacologically. Regarding the content of rich essential oil, most evaluations were concerned with the antimicrobial properties. However, the antioxidant, antidiabetic and anticholesterolemic properties of the studied species were found to be good. In addition to the pharmacological activities that have been indentified for some species, opportunities still exist to assess the effectiveness of other well-known species. If different Satureja species are to have extensive ethnopharmacological applications, comprehensive assessments of the acute and chronic toxicities, as well as the teratogenicity, of those plants are needed. PMID:27342885

  2. A Blended Learning Course Design in Clinical Pharmacology for Post-graduate Dental Students

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Paul-Erik Lillholm; Mikalsen, Øyvind; Lygre, Henning; Solheim, Einar; Schjøtt, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Postgraduate courses in clinical pharmacology are important for dentists to be updated on drug therapy and information related to their clinical practice, as well as knowledge of relevant adverse effects and interactions. A traditional approach with classroom delivery as the only method to teaching and learning has shortcomings regarding flexibility, individual learning preferences, and problem based learning (PBL) activities compared to online environments. This study examines a five week postgraduate course in clinical pharmacology with 15 hours of lectures and online learning activities, i.e. blended course design. Six postgraduate dental students participated and at the end of the course they were interviewed. Our findings emphasize that a blended learning course design can be successfully used in postgraduate dental education. Key matters for discussion were time flexibility and location convenience, change in teacher’s role, rein-forced learning strategies towards professional needs, scarcity in online communication, and proposed future utilization of e-learning components. PMID:23248716

  3. A Blended Learning Course Design in Clinical Pharmacology for Post-graduate Dental Students.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Paul-Erik Lillholm; Mikalsen, Oyvind; Lygre, Henning; Solheim, Einar; Schjøtt, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Postgraduate courses in clinical pharmacology are important for dentists to be updated on drug therapy and information related to their clinical practice, as well as knowledge of relevant adverse effects and interactions. A traditional approach with classroom delivery as the only method to teaching and learning has shortcomings regarding flexibility, individual learning preferences, and problem based learning (PBL) activities compared to online environments. This study examines a five week postgraduate course in clinical pharmacology with 15 hours of lectures and online learning activities, i.e. blended course design. Six postgraduate dental students participated and at the end of the course they were interviewed. Our findings emphasize that a blended learning course design can be successfully used in postgraduate dental education. Key matters for discussion were time flexibility and location convenience, change in teacher's role, rein-forced learning strategies towards professional needs, scarcity in online communication, and proposed future utilization of e-learning components. PMID:23248716

  4. Bryophyllum pinnatum and Related Species Used in Anthroposophic Medicine: Constituents, Pharmacological Activities, and Clinical Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Fürer, Karin; Simões-Wüst, Ana Paula; von Mandach, Ursula; Hamburger, Matthias; Potterat, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Bryophyllum pinnatum (syn. Kalanchoe pinnata) is a succulent perennial plant native to Madagascar that was introduced in anthroposophic medicine in the early 20th century. In recent years, we conducted a large collaborative project to provide reliable data on the chemical composition, pharmacological properties, and clinical efficacy of Bryophyllum. Here, we comprehensively review the phytochemistry, as well as the pharmacological and clinical data. As to the pharmacology, special emphasis is given to properties related to the use in anthroposophic medicine as a treatment for "hyperactivity diseases", such as preterm labor, restlessness, and sleep disorders. Studies suggesting that B. pinnatum may become a new treatment option for overactive bladder syndrome are also reviewed. Tolerability is addressed, and toxicological data are discussed in conjunction with the presence of potentially toxic bufadienolides in Bryophyllum species. The few data available on two related species with medicinal uses, Bryophyllum daigremontianum and Bryophyllum delagoense, have also been included. Taken together, current data support the use of B. pinnatum for the mentioned indications, but further studies are needed to fully understand the modes of action, and to identify the pharmacologically active constituents. PMID:27220081

  5. Bioactive components and pharmacological action of Wikstroemia indica (L.) C. A. Mey and its clinical application.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Min; Zhu, Liang; Jiang, Jian-Guo; Yang, Li; Wang, Ding-Yong

    2009-12-01

    Wikstroemia indica (L.) C. A. Mey. is a member of family Thymelaeaceae and mainly distributes in middle and southeast part of China. As a traditional Chinese herb, this plant has long been employed as antipyretics, detoxicants, expectorants, vermifuges as well as aborticides in clinic practice. However, its use has mainly been based on empirical findings during hundreds and thousands of years. Recent studies indicated that W. indica contains abundant active components including flavonoids, biflavonoids, coumarins, lignans, volatile oils, polysaccharides etc. This paper provides a comprehensive review of pharmacological relevant compounds of W. indica that have been characterized to date, and introduce the research progresses supporting its pharmacological action and clinical application. Particular attention has been given to antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and antifertility effects. Some examples of clinical applications of prepared W. indica in treatment of various diseases are outlined. Finally, the trend and necessity of future research, such as quantification of individual constituents extracted from W. indica and the assessment of their pharmacological activities in human body are proposed. PMID:19939213

  6. American Clinical Magnetoencephalography Society Clinical Practice Guideline 2: Presurgical Functional Brain Mapping Using Magnetic Evoked Fields*

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Richard C.; Funke, Michael E.; Bowyer, Susan M.; Lewine, Jeffrey D.; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Bagić, Anto I.

    2012-01-01

    The following are “minimum standards” for the routine clinical recording of magnetic evoked fields (MEFs) in all age-groups. Practicing at minimum standards should not be the goal of a magnetoencephalography (MEG) center but rather a starting level for continued improvement. Minimum standards meet only the most basic responsibilities to the patient and the referring physician. These minimum standards have been put forth to improve standardization of procedures, to facilitate interchange of recordings and reports among laboratories in the United States, and to confirm the expectations of referring physicians. Recommendations regarding Laboratory (Center) Environment and Preparation for MEG Recordings are detailed in the American Clinical Magnetoencephalography Society Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) 1 : Recording and Analysis of Spontaneous Cerebral Activity, except for its EEG aspect that is not considered necessary (although may be helpful in trained hands) for MEFs (presurgical functional brain mapping). PMID:21811122

  7. Optimizing oncology therapeutics through quantitative translational and clinical pharmacology: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, K; Friberg, L E; Ouellet, D; Mettetal, J T; Stein, A; Trocóniz, I F; Bruno, R; Mehrotra, N; Gobburu, J; Mould, D R

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in biomedical research that have deepened our understanding of cancer hallmarks, resulting in the discovery and development of targeted therapies, the success rates of oncology drug development remain low. Opportunities remain for objective dose selection informed by exposure-response understanding to optimize the benefit-risk balance of novel therapies for cancer patients. This review article discusses the principles and applications of modeling and simulation approaches across the lifecycle of development of oncology therapeutics. Illustrative examples are used to convey the value gained from integration of quantitative clinical pharmacology strategies from the preclinical-translational phase through confirmatory clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety. PMID:25670382

  8. Relaxin for the Treatment of Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: Pharmacology, Mechanisms of Action, and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tien M H; Goland, Sorel; Elkayam, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Acute heart failure remains a major cause of morbidity, and its treatment requires an increasing investment of the health care system. Whereas success in treating chronic heart failure has been achieved over the last decades, several pharmacological approaches for acute heart failure have been introduced but have failed to demonstrate any clinical benefit. Serelaxin is a recombinant human relaxin-2 vasoactive peptide that causes systemic and renal vasodilation. Data suggest that the clinical benefits may be attributable to a potential combination of multiple actions of serelaxin, including improving systemic, cardiac, and renal hemodynamics, and protecting cells and organs from damage via neurohormonal, anti-inflammatory, antiremodeling, antifibrotic, anti-ischemic, and proangiogenic effects. Recently, a number of clinical trials have demonstrated that serelaxin infusion over 48 hours improved dyspnea with more rapid relief of congestion during the first days after admission for heart failure. In addition, administration of serelaxin diminished cardiac, renal, and hepatic damage, which were associated with improved long-term mortality. Available data support substantial clinical benefits and significant promise for serelaxin as a treatment option for patients with acute heart failure. This review focuses on the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of serelaxin and provides a detailed discussion of the clinical evidence for this novel therapy in acute heart failure. PMID:26331289

  9. Pharmacology of dextromethorphan: Relevance to dextromethorphan/quinidine (Nuedexta®) clinical use.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Charles P; Traynelis, Stephen F; Siffert, Joao; Pope, Laura E; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2016-08-01

    Dextromethorphan (DM) has been used for more than 50years as an over-the-counter antitussive. Studies have revealed a complex pharmacology of DM with mechanisms beyond blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and inhibition of glutamate excitotoxicity, likely contributing to its pharmacological activity and clinical potential. DM is rapidly metabolized to dextrorphan, which has hampered the exploration of DM therapy separate from its metabolites. Coadministration of DM with a low dose of quinidine inhibits DM metabolism, yields greater bioavailability and enables more specific testing of the therapeutic properties of DM apart from its metabolites. The development of the drug combination DM hydrobromide and quinidine sulfate (DM/Q), with subsequent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration for pseudobulbar affect, led to renewed interest in understanding DM pharmacology. This review summarizes the interactions of DM with brain receptors and transporters and also considers its metabolic and pharmacokinetic properties. To assess the potential clinical relevance of these interactions, we provide an analysis comparing DM activity from in vitro functional assays with the estimated free drug DM concentrations in the brain following oral DM/Q administration. The findings suggest that DM/Q likely inhibits serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake and also blocks NMDA receptors with rapid kinetics. Use of DM/Q may also antagonize nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, particularly those composed of α3β4 subunits, and cause agonist activity at sigma-1 receptors. PMID:27139517

  10. Generalizability of Pharmacological and Psychotherapy Clinical Trial Results for Borderline Personality Disorder to Community Samples

    PubMed Central

    Hoertel, Nicolas; López, Saioa; Wang, Shuai; González-Pinto, Ana; Limosin, Frédéric; Blanco, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background The present study sought to quantify the generalizability of clinical trial results in individuals with a DSM-IV diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) to a large representative community sample. Method Data were derived from the 2004–2005 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a large nationally representative sample of 34,653 adults from the United States population. We applied a standard set of exclusion criteria representative of pharmacological and psychotherapy clinical trials to all adults with a DSM-IV diagnosis of BPD (n = 2,231). Our aim was to assess how many participants with BPD would not fulfill typical eligibility criteria. Results We found that more than seven out of ten respondents in a typical pharmacological efficacy trial and more than five out of ten participants in a typical psychotherapy efficacy trial would have been excluded by at least one criterion. Having a current history of alcohol or drug use disorder and a lifetime history of bipolar disorder explained a large proportion of ineligibility in both pharmacological and psychotherapy efficacy trials. Discussion Clinical trials should carefully consider the impact of exclusion criteria on the generalizability of their results. As required by CONSORT guidelines, reporting exclusion rate estimate and reasons of eligibility should be mandatory in both clinical trials and meta-analyses. As treatment trials of borderline personality disorder move from efficacy to effectiveness to better inform clinical practice, the eligibility rate must be increased by imposing less stringent eligibility criteria to allow for more generalizable results. PMID:25580674

  11. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Saraiya, Mona; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22418039

  12. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22422631

  13. Pharmacological means of reducing human drug dependence: a selective and narrative review of the clinical literature

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Ku

    2014-01-01

    Substance abuse or addictive disorder is a global problem. A greater understanding of the associated changes in brain pathophysiology supports the notion that pharmacological treatments are part of the necessary treatment options. Craving is a core symptom of addictive disorder. It refers to a strong desire to use drugs again either to re-experience positive effects or to diminish negative experiences. Currently there are a number of medicines that are effective in the treatment of addictive disorders. These medications can either be for substitution (same pharmacological effect as the abused substance) or anticraving (decrease the craving of the abused substance). In this MEDLNE based review, specific compounds (naltrexone, acamprosate, topiramate, disulfiram, baclofen, N-acetylcysteine and bupropion) were selected that are known to diminish desire to use (anticraving effect) and that have been trialled for a number of different substance addictive disorders. Their therapeutic potential in clinical practice is discussed in light of their efficacy. PMID:23701272

  14. Pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and tolerability of phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors: impact of human pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Tenor, Hermann; Hatzelmann, Armin; Beume, Rolf; Lahu, Gezim; Zech, Karl; Bethke, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Since more than two decades anti-inflammatory effects of inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-4 have been described in numerous cellular and animal studies and were finally confirmed in clinical trials. The path from an early, pioneering study with Ro20-1724 showing reduction of psoriatric plaque size in 1979 to modern PDE4 inhibitors such as oral apremilast in development for psoriasis, the inhaled PDE4 inhibitor GSK256066 in development for asthma and COPD and finally roflumilast, the first PDE4 inhibitor approved and currently marketed as an oral, once-daily remedy for severe COPD was marked by large progress in chemical optimization based on improved understanding of PDE4 biology and drug-like properties determining the appropriate pharmacokinetic profile. In this chapter aspects of the pharmacology and clinical efficacy of PDE4 inhibitors, which have been in clinical development over the years are summarized with specific emphasis on their clinical pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:21695636

  15. [Pharmacological treatment of dementia: when, how and for how long. Recommendations of the Working Group on Dementia of the Catalan Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Daniel; Formiga, Francesc; Fort, Isabel; Robles, María José; Barranco, Elena; Cubí, Dolors

    2012-01-01

    Dementia in general--and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in particular--are bound to loom large among the most acute healthcare, social, and public health problems of the 21st century. AD shows a degenerative progression that can be slowed down--yet not halted--by today's most widely accepted specific treatments (those based on cholinesterase inhibitors as well as those using memantine). There is enough evidence to consider these treatments advisable for the mild, moderate and severe phases of the illness. However, in the final stage of the disease, a decision has to be made on whether to withdraw such treatment or not. In this paper, the Working Group on Dementia for the Catalan Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology reviews the use of these specific pharmacological treatments for AD, and, drawing on the scientific evidence thus gathered, makes a series of recommendations on when, how, and for how long, the currently existing specific pharmacological treatments should be used. PMID:22633250

  16. Berberine: New Insights from Pharmacological Aspects to Clinical Evidences in the Management of Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Caliceti, Cristiana; Franco, Placido; Spinozzi, Silvia; Roda, Aldo; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is a quaternary ammonium salt from the protoberberine group of isoquinoline alkaloids found in such plants as gender Berberis. Berberine is recognised to improve glucose and lipid metabolism disorders and preliminary clinical evidences suggest the ability of berberine to reduce endothelial inflammation improving vascular health, even in patients already affected by cardiovascular diseases, suggesting a possible interesting role of berberine and its metabolites in clinical practice. However, its physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetic, and metabolism are not fully elucidated and contradictory data have been reported. This review provides a summary regarding the pharmacological and biological features of berberine, with a focus on berberine as well as their pharmacologically active metabolites and the different mechanisms underlying their activities in order to clarify the correct use of berberine supplementation, alone or in association with other nutraceuticals, for the management of metabolic disorders associated to increased cardiovascular disease risk. A particular attention has also been given to the available clinical trials assessing its short- and middle- term use tolerability, safety and efficacy in various conditions, such as dyslipidaemia, impaired fasting glucose, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27063256

  17. Pharmacologic Comparison of Clinical Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors in a Rat Model of Acute Secretory Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Prinsen, Michael J.; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A.; Arnett, Stacy D.; Tajfirouz, Deena; Ruminski, Peter G.; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R.; Ji, Yuhua; Neckermann, Georg; Choy, Robert K. M.; de Hostos, Eugenio; Meyers, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan) is a neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor with known antidiarrheal activity in animals and humans; however, in humans, it suffers from shortcomings that might be improved with newer drugs in this class that have progressed to the clinic for nonenteric disease indications. To identify potentially superior NEP inhibitors with immediate clinical utility for diarrhea treatment, we compared their efficacy and pharmacologic properties in a rat intestinal hypersecretion model. Racecadotril and seven other clinical-stage inhibitors of NEP were obtained or synthesized. Enzyme potency and specificity were compared using purified peptidases. Compounds were orally administered to rats before administration of castor oil to induce diarrhea. Stool weight was recorded over 4 hours. To assess other pharmacologic properties, select compounds were orally administered to normal or castor oil–treated rats, blood and tissue samples collected at multiple time points, and active compound concentrations determined by mass spectroscopy. NEP enzyme activity was measured in tissue homogenates. Three previously untested clinical NEP inhibitors delayed diarrhea onset and reduced total stool output, with little or no effect on intestinal motility assessed by the charcoal meal test. Each was shown to be a potent, highly specific inhibitor of NEP. Each exhibited greater suppression of NEP activity in intestinal and nonintestinal tissues than did racecadotril and sustained this inhibition longer. These results suggest that newer clinical-stage NEP inhibitors originally developed for other indications may be directly repositioned for treatment of acute secretory diarrhea and offer advantages over racecadotril, such as less frequent dosing and potentially improved efficacy. PMID:26907621

  18. Pharmacologic Comparison of Clinical Neutral Endopeptidase Inhibitors in a Rat Model of Acute Secretory Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Griggs, David W; Prinsen, Michael J; Oliva, Jonathan; Campbell, Mary A; Arnett, Stacy D; Tajfirouz, Deena; Ruminski, Peter G; Yu, Ying; Bond, Brian R; Ji, Yuhua; Neckermann, Georg; Choy, Robert K M; de Hostos, Eugenio; Meyers, Marvin J

    2016-05-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan) is a neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibitor with known antidiarrheal activity in animals and humans; however, in humans, it suffers from shortcomings that might be improved with newer drugs in this class that have progressed to the clinic for nonenteric disease indications. To identify potentially superior NEP inhibitors with immediate clinical utility for diarrhea treatment, we compared their efficacy and pharmacologic properties in a rat intestinal hypersecretion model. Racecadotril and seven other clinical-stage inhibitors of NEP were obtained or synthesized. Enzyme potency and specificity were compared using purified peptidases. Compounds were orally administered to rats before administration of castor oil to induce diarrhea. Stool weight was recorded over 4 hours. To assess other pharmacologic properties, select compounds were orally administered to normal or castor oil-treated rats, blood and tissue samples collected at multiple time points, and active compound concentrations determined by mass spectroscopy. NEP enzyme activity was measured in tissue homogenates. Three previously untested clinical NEP inhibitors delayed diarrhea onset and reduced total stool output, with little or no effect on intestinal motility assessed by the charcoal meal test. Each was shown to be a potent, highly specific inhibitor of NEP. Each exhibited greater suppression of NEP activity in intestinal and nonintestinal tissues than did racecadotril and sustained this inhibition longer. These results suggest that newer clinical-stage NEP inhibitors originally developed for other indications may be directly repositioned for treatment of acute secretory diarrhea and offer advantages over racecadotril, such as less frequent dosing and potentially improved efficacy. PMID:26907621

  19. American Clinical Neurophysiology Society Guideline 7: Guidelines for EEG Reporting.

    PubMed

    Tatum, William O; Olga, Selioutski; Ochoa, Juan G; Munger Clary, Heidi; Cheek, Janna; Drislane, Frank; Tsuchida, Tammy N

    2016-08-01

    This EEG Guideline incorporates the practice of structuring a report of results obtained during routine adult electroencephalography. It is intended to reflect one of the current practices in reporting an EEG and serves as a revision of the previous guideline entitled "Writing an EEG Report." The goal of this guideline is not only to convey clinically relevant information, but also to improve interrater reliability for clinical and research use by standardizing the format of EEG reports. With this in mind, there is expanded documentation of the patient history to include more relevant clinical information that can affect the EEG recording and interpretation. Recommendations for the technical conditions of the recording are also enhanced to include post hoc review parameters and type of EEG recording. Sleep feature documentation is also expanded upon. More descriptive terms are included for background features and interictal discharges that are concordant with efforts to standardize terminology. In the clinical correlation section, examples of common clinical scenarios are now provided that encourages uniformity in reporting. Including digital samples of abnormal waveforms is now readily available with current EEG recording systems and may be beneficial in augmenting reports when controversial waveforms or important features are encountered. PMID:27482790

  20. Longitudinal clinical course following pharmacological treatment of methamphetamine psychosis which persists after long-term abstinence.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Kazufumi

    2006-08-01

    The present article investigated clinical symptoms and their longitudinal clinical course following pharmacological treatment in 32 female incarcerated patients suffering from methamphetamine (METH) psychosis who were referred to psychiatric consultation. The length of METH-abuse periods of the patients ranged from 2 to 31 years. A total of 31 patients suffered from psychosis at abstinence after 5-31 months from the self-injection of METH. Nine of these 31 patients experienced episodes of psychotic relapse. The following symptoms were observed: auditory hallucination (29 cases), delusion of persecution (29 cases), thought broadcasting (24 cases), visual hallucination (22 cases), depressive mood (29 cases), and suicidal idea (22 cases). Patients exhibited symptoms of psychosis and depression, which persisted for more than several months despite commencement of administration of antipsychotics and antidepressants. There were significant correlations among length of periods required for improvement in total Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) scores, and BPRS subscale scores representing positive symptoms and depression/anxiety dimensions. Three groups of patients, according to severity of positive and depressive/anxiety symptoms, showed apparent differences in prognoses during pharmacological treatment. Average degree of extrapyramidal symptoms significantly correlated with average daily dose of antipsychotics and length-of-treatment period required for improvement in BPRS subscale scores representing positive symptom dimension. These results suggest that both psychotic and affective symptoms are involved in therapeutic response and prognosis of METH psychosis. PMID:17105910

  1. Recommendations for Obesity Clinical Trials in Cancer Survivors: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    PubMed

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Hershman, Dawn; Ballard, Rachel M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Courneya, Kerry S; Daniels, Elvan C; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Frank, Elizabeth S; Goodwin, Pamela J; Irwin, Melinda L; Levit, Laura A; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Minasian, Lori M; O'Rourke, Mark A; Pierce, John P; Stein, Kevin D; Thomson, Cynthia A; Hudis, Clifford A

    2015-11-20

    Observational evidence has established a relationship between obesity and cancer risk and outcomes. Interventional studies have demonstrated the feasibility and benefits of lifestyle change after cancer diagnosis, and guidelines recommend weight management and regular physical activity in cancer survivors; however, lifestyle interventions are not a routine part of cancer care. The ASCO Research Summit on Advancing Obesity Clinical Trials in Cancer Survivors sought to identify the knowledge gaps that clinical trials addressing energy balance factors in cancer survivors have not answered and to develop a roadmap for the design and implementation of studies with the potential to generate data that could lead to the evidence-based incorporation of weight management and physical activity programs into standard oncology practice. Recommendations highlight the need for large-scale trials evaluating the impact of energy balance interventions on cancer outcomes, as well as the concurrent conduct of studies focused on dissemination and implementation of interventions in diverse populations of cancer survivors, including answering critical questions about the degree of benefit in key subgroups of survivors. Other considerations include the importance of incorporating economic metrics into energy balance intervention trials, the need to establish intermediate biomarkers, and the importance of integrating traditional and nontraditional funding sources. Establishing lifestyle change after cancer diagnosis as a routine part of cancer care will require a multipronged effort to overcome barriers related to study development, funding, and stakeholder engagement. Given the prevalence of obesity and inactivity in cancer survivors in the United States and elsewhere, energy balance interventions hold the potential to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality in millions of patients, and it is essential that we move forward in determining their role in cancer care with the same care and

  2. Clinical practices in the pharmacological treatment of comorbid psychopathology in adolescents with alcohol use disorders.

    PubMed

    Clark, Duncan B; Wood, D Scott; Cornelius, Jack R; Bukstein, Oscar G; Martin, Christopher S

    2003-12-01

    This study examined the use of psychiatric medications in 277 adolescents in treatment for alcohol use disorders. Subjects were recruited from addictions treatment sites, psychiatric programs, and juvenile justice settings. Characteristics studied included the use of and indications for specific medications, changes in clinical practices from 1991 through 2000, and continuation of psychopharmacological treatment over a 1-year followup period. Among adolescents taking psychiatric medications at baseline (n = 51), indicated DSM-IV mental disorders were typically present, use of antidepressants was most common (n = 41), benzodiazepine prescription was rare, and about one third reported continuing pharmacological treatment at one-year followup. In those with comorbid major depressive disorder and alcohol use disorders (n = 110), antidepressant medication use increased significantly from 18% to 55% over the decade studied. The treatment setting did not significantly influence antidepressant prescribing practices. The common and increasing use of psychiatric medications in this population emphasizes the urgent need for empirically based clinical guidelines. PMID:14693259

  3. Prescription Writing in Small Groups as a Clinical Pharmacology Educational Intervention: Perceptions of Preclerkship Medical Students.

    PubMed

    James, Henry; Tayem, Yasin I Y; Al Khaja, K A J; Veeramuthu, Sindhan; Sequeira, Reginald P

    2016-08-01

    Medical students do not perform well in writing prescriptions, and the 3 variables-learner, teacher, and instructional method-are held responsible to various degrees. The objective of this clinical pharmacology educational intervention was to improve medical students' perceptions, motivation, and participation in prescription-writing sessions. The study participants were second-year medical students of the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences of the Arabian Gulf University, Bahrain. Two prescription-writing sessions were conducted using clinical case scenarios based on problems the students had studied as part of the problem-based learning curriculum. At the end of the respiratory system subunit, the training was conducted in small groups, each facilitated by a tutor. At the end of the cardiovascular system subunit, the training was conducted in a traditional large-group classroom setting. Data were collected with the help of a questionnaire at the end of each session and a focus group discussion. A majority of the students (95.3% ± 2.4%) perceived the small-group method better for teaching and learning of all aspects of prescription writing: analyzing the clinical case scenario, applying clinical pharmacology knowledge for therapeutic reasoning, using a formulary for searching relevant prescribing information, and in writing a complete prescription. Students also endorsed the small-group method for better interaction among themselves and with the tutor and for the ease of asking questions and clarifying doubts. In view of the principles of adult learning, where motivation and interaction are important, teaching and learning prescription writing in small groups deserve a serious consideration in medical curricula. PMID:26677798

  4. Social pharmacology: expanding horizons.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Rituparna; Alloza, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    In the current modern and global society, social changes are in constant evolution due to scientific progress (technology, culture, customs, and hygiene) and produce the freedom in individuals to take decisions by themselves or with their doctors toward drug consumption. In the arena of marketed drug products which includes society, individual, administration, and pharmaceutical industry, the young discipline emerged is social pharmacology or sociopharmacology. This science arises from clinical pharmacology, and deals with different parameters, which are important in creating knowledge on marketed drugs. However, the scope of "social pharmacology" is not covered by the so-called "Phase IV" alone, but it is the science that handles the postmarketing knowledge of drugs. The social pharmacology studies the "life cycle" of any marketed pharmaceutical product in the social terrain, and evaluates the effects of the real environment under circumstances totally different in the drug development process. Therefore, there are far-reaching horizons, plural, and shared predictions among health professionals and other, for beneficial use of a drug, toward maximizing the benefits of therapy, while minimizing negative social consequences. PMID:24987168

  5. Review of Clinical Pharmacology of Aloe vera L. in the Treatment of Psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Miroddi, Marco; Navarra, Michele; Calapai, Fabrizio; Mancari, Ferdinando; Giofrè, Salvatore Vincenzo; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Calapai, Gioacchino

    2015-05-01

    Aloe vera L., is a plant used worldwide as folk remedy for the treatment of various ailments, including skin disorders. Its gel is present in cosmetics, medicinal products and food supplements. Psoriasis, an immune-mediated chronic inflammatory disease, involving mainly the skin, affects about the 2-3% of general population. Conventional pharmacological treatments for psoriasis can have limited effectiveness and can cause adverse reactions. For this reason often psoriatic patients look for alternative treatments based on natural products containing Aloe vera. We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials assessing effectiveness and safety of aloe for the treatment of psoriasis. Clinical studies published in English were considered; a total of four clinical trials met inclusion criteria. Studies were also evaluated by using the Jadad scale and Consort Statement in Reporting Clinical trials of Herbal Medicine Intervention. Quality and methodological accuracy of considered studies varied considerably, and some crucial information to reproduce clinical results was missing. We conclude that administration of aloe as cutaneous treatment is generally well tolerated, as no serious side effects were reported. Results on the effectiveness of Aloe vera are contradictory; our analysis reveals the presence of methodological gaps preventing to reach final conclusions. PMID:25756474

  6. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIII. Nomenclature for the Formyl Peptide Receptor (FPR) Family

    PubMed Central

    YE, RICHARD D.; BOULAY, FRANÇOIS; WANG, JI MING; DAHLGREN, CLAES; GERARD, CRAIG; PARMENTIER, MARC; SERHAN, CHARLES N.; MURPHY, PHILIP M.

    2009-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a small group of seven-transmembrane domain, G protein-coupled receptors that are expressed mainly by mammalian phagocytic leukocytes and are known to be important in host defense and inflammation. The three human FPRs (FPR1, FPR2/ALX, and FPR3) share significant sequence homology and are encoded by clustered genes. Collectively, these receptors bind an extraordinarily numerous and structurally diverse group of agonistic ligands, including N-formyl and nonformyl peptides of different composition, that chemoattract and activate phagocytes. N-formyl peptides, which are encoded in nature only by bacterial and mitochondrial genes and result from obligatory initiation of bacterial and mitochondrial protein synthesis with N-formylmethionine, is the only ligand class common to all three human receptors. Surprisingly, the endogenous anti-inflammatory peptide annexin 1 and its N-terminal fragments also bind human FPR1 and FPR2/ALX, and the anti-inflammatory eicosanoid lipoxin A4 is an agonist at FPR2/ALX. In comparison, fewer agonists have been identified for FPR3, the third member in this receptor family. Structural and functional studies of the FPRs have produced important information for understanding the general pharmacological principles governing all leukocyte chemoattractant receptors. This article aims to provide an overview of the discovery and pharmacological characterization of FPRs, to introduce an International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR)-recommended nomenclature, and to discuss unmet challenges, including the mechanisms used by these receptors to bind diverse ligands and mediate different biological functions. PMID:19498085

  7. Comparative Evaluation of American Cancer Society and American Lung Association Smoking Cessation Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lando, Harry A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared the effectiveness of the American Cancer Society's "FreshStart," the American Lung Association's "Freedom from Smoking," and a laboratory smoking cessation clinic. A one-year followup favored the more intensive laboratory and "Freedom from Smoking" clinics over the "FreshStart" method. (FMW)

  8. When a man encounters a woman, Satan is also present: clinical relationships in Bedouin society.

    PubMed

    Mass, M; al-Krenawi, A

    1994-07-01

    Professional encounters in Bedouin society between male therapists and their female clients are discussed in terms of the conflict between clinical precepts and Bedouin codes of social conduct. The effects of the conflict on the transference relationship are examined by means of case presentations, and rules of conduct acceptable in both the professional realm and Bedouin society are proposed as an avenue toward resolution. PMID:7977659

  9. Avanafil for erectile dysfunction in elderly and younger adults: differential pharmacology and clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Eric G; Tan, Ronny BW; Rittenberg, Daniel; Hellstrom, Wayne J

    2014-01-01

    The treatment modalities of erectile dysfunction range from oral pharmacotherapy to intracavernosal injections, intraurethral pellets, vacuum erectile devices, and the surgical option of penile prosthesis insertion. Oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors still remain the preferred treatment for patients since they are the least invasive, not to mention that they can be prescribed by non-urologists. Due to these factors, there has been development of newer drugs with fewer side effects. This is a review of the second generation phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, avanafil, looking into its pharmacology as well as its clinical utility. Avanafil’s faster onset and shorter duration of action has made it preferred as compared to other PDE5 inhibitors for patients with multiple comorbidities. PMID:25210457

  10. Beta-blockers in heart failure: are pharmacological differences clinically important?

    PubMed

    Metra, Marco; Cas, Livio Dei; di Lenarda, Andrea; Poole-Wilson, Philip

    2004-04-01

    Beta-blockers are not an homogeneous group of agents. Only three beta-blockers, carvedilol, bisoprolol and metoprolol succinate, have had favorable effects on prognosis in controlled clinical trials in the patients with chronic heart failure. However, pharmacological differences exist between them. Metoprolol and bisoprolol are selective for beta(1)-adrenergic receptors while carvedilol blocks also beta(2)-, and alpha(1)- adrenergic receptors, and has associated antioxidant, anti-endothelin and antiproliferative properties. In COMET carvedilol was associated with a significant reduction in mortality compared to metoprolol tartrate further showing that different beta-blockers may have different effects on the outcome. These differences may be related to the ancillary properties of carvedilol or to its broader antiadrenergic profile. However, also more effective and prolonged blockade of beta1 adrenergic receptors may occur with carvedilol compared to metoprolol. PMID:15516860

  11. Teaching application of clinical pharmacology skills using unusual observations from clozapine overdoses.

    PubMed

    Pollak, P Timothy; Shafer, Steven L

    2004-02-01

    Massive drug overdoses provide a unique opportunity to observe human pharmacokinetic data not otherwise ethically available. They can also provide practical examples for teaching thoughtful application of the principles of clinical pharmacology. Following a case of clozapine overdose in which onset of toxicity was delayed by 72 hours, a probable explanation was found in an exploration of three cases with unusual concentration-time profiles and revealed unexpected implications for the management of clozapine overdoses. The authors systematically addressed the possible mechanisms proposed in the literature for an unusual plateau in concentrations observed in three clozapine overdoses. The effects that the most commonly suggested explanations (i.e., delayed absorption and saturated or impaired metabolism) would have on both clozapine and norclozapine concentrations were then modeled using the data available from those three cases to provide an objective illustration for comparison. This exercise was then used as a teaching seminar, leading students through the steps required to reach a logical explanation for the observed delayed toxicity and to consider the implications for therapy. Delayed absorption best predicted the sustained serum clozapine and norclozapine concentrations observed in three cases, and modeling suggests that much of the drug remains in the gut, available for absorption for days following an overdose. As a seminar, the exercise provides students with a practical example of the value of systematically ruling out possible explanations by considering what effects various pharmacokinetic alterations would have on observed data. Absorption following massive clozapine overdose appears fundamentally different from that with conventional dosing. This suggests a potential for delayed or prolonged toxicity, extending well beyond the time frame predicted by its half-life, unless aggressive and sustained efforts are applied to remove clozapine from the gut

  12. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXV. Nomenclature, Classification, and Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Melatonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Delagrange, Philippe; Krause, Diana N.; Sugden, David; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Olcese, James

    2010-01-01

    The hormone melatonin (5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine) is synthesized primarily in the pineal gland and retina, and in several peripheral tissues and organs. In the circulation, the concentration of melatonin follows a circadian rhythm, with high levels at night providing timing cues to target tissues endowed with melatonin receptors. Melatonin receptors receive and translate melatonin's message to influence daily and seasonal rhythms of physiology and behavior. The melatonin message is translated through activation of two G protein-coupled receptors, MT1 and MT2, that are potential therapeutic targets in disorders ranging from insomnia and circadian sleep disorders to depression, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. This review summarizes the steps taken since melatonin's discovery by Aaron Lerner in 1958 to functionally characterize, clone, and localize receptors in mammalian tissues. The pharmacological and molecular properties of the receptors are described as well as current efforts to discover and develop ligands for treatment of a number of illnesses, including sleep disorders, depression, and cancer. PMID:20605968

  13. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVII. G Protein–Coupled Estrogen Receptor and Its Pharmacologic Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are critical mediators of multiple and diverse physiologic effects throughout the body in both sexes, including the reproductive, cardiovascular, endocrine, nervous, and immune systems. As such, alterations in estrogen function play important roles in many diseases and pathophysiological conditions (including cancer), exemplified by the lower prevalence of many diseases in premenopausal women. Estrogens mediate their effects through multiple cellular receptors, including the nuclear receptor family (ERα and ERβ) and the G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) family (GPR30/G protein–coupled estrogen receptor [GPER]). Although both receptor families can initiate rapid cell signaling and transcriptional regulation, the nuclear receptors are traditionally associated with regulating gene expression, whereas GPCRs are recognized as mediating rapid cellular signaling. Estrogen-activated pathways are not only the target of multiple therapeutic agents (e.g., tamoxifen, fulvestrant, raloxifene, and aromatase inhibitors) but are also affected by a plethora of phyto- and xeno-estrogens (e.g., genistein, coumestrol, bisphenol A, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). Because of the existence of multiple estrogen receptors with overlapping ligand specificities, expression patterns, and signaling pathways, the roles of the individual receptors with respect to the diverse array of endogenous and exogenous ligands have been challenging to ascertain. The identification of GPER-selective ligands however has led to a much greater understanding of the roles of this receptor in normal physiology and disease as well as its interactions with the classic estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ and their signaling pathways. In this review, we describe the history and characterization of GPER over the past 15 years focusing on the pharmacology of steroidal and nonsteroidal compounds that have been employed to unravel the biology of this most recently recognized estrogen receptor. PMID

  14. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B.; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A.; Harty, Breanne L.; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C.; Monk, Kelly R.; Peeters, Miriam C.; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W.; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A.; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W.; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. PMID:25713288

  15. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIV. Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Jörg; Aust, Gabriela; Araç, Demet; Engel, Felix B; Formstone, Caroline; Fredriksson, Robert; Hall, Randy A; Harty, Breanne L; Kirchhoff, Christiane; Knapp, Barbara; Krishnan, Arunkumar; Liebscher, Ines; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Martinelli, David C; Monk, Kelly R; Peeters, Miriam C; Piao, Xianhua; Prömel, Simone; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schwartz, Thue W; Singer, Kathleen; Stacey, Martin; Ushkaryov, Yuri A; Vallon, Mario; Wolfrum, Uwe; Wright, Mathew W; Xu, Lei; Langenhan, Tobias; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-01-01

    The Adhesion family forms a large branch of the pharmacologically important superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As Adhesion GPCRs increasingly receive attention from a wide spectrum of biomedical fields, the Adhesion GPCR Consortium, together with the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification, proposes a unified nomenclature for Adhesion GPCRs. The new names have ADGR as common dominator followed by a letter and a number to denote each subfamily and subtype, respectively. The new names, with old and alternative names within parentheses, are: ADGRA1 (GPR123), ADGRA2 (GPR124), ADGRA3 (GPR125), ADGRB1 (BAI1), ADGRB2 (BAI2), ADGRB3 (BAI3), ADGRC1 (CELSR1), ADGRC2 (CELSR2), ADGRC3 (CELSR3), ADGRD1 (GPR133), ADGRD2 (GPR144), ADGRE1 (EMR1, F4/80), ADGRE2 (EMR2), ADGRE3 (EMR3), ADGRE4 (EMR4), ADGRE5 (CD97), ADGRF1 (GPR110), ADGRF2 (GPR111), ADGRF3 (GPR113), ADGRF4 (GPR115), ADGRF5 (GPR116, Ig-Hepta), ADGRG1 (GPR56), ADGRG2 (GPR64, HE6), ADGRG3 (GPR97), ADGRG4 (GPR112), ADGRG5 (GPR114), ADGRG6 (GPR126), ADGRG7 (GPR128), ADGRL1 (latrophilin-1, CIRL-1, CL1), ADGRL2 (latrophilin-2, CIRL-2, CL2), ADGRL3 (latrophilin-3, CIRL-3, CL3), ADGRL4 (ELTD1, ETL), and ADGRV1 (VLGR1, GPR98). This review covers all major biologic aspects of Adhesion GPCRs, including evolutionary origins, interaction partners, signaling, expression, physiologic functions, and therapeutic potential. PMID:25713288

  16. How should training of graduates in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics be delivered and assessed?

    PubMed

    Jackson, Peter

    2012-06-01

    The UK postgraduate curriculum in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics (CPT) incorporates the common competencies required of all physicians and shows how trainees from other specialties, including primary care, can train in CPT. Various models of training and assessment are possible. Evolution of the current system to meet new challenges would maintain an established tradition, with a ready source of training funds. However, this would require greater input from all consultants in CPT, including the training and assessment of trainees. A joint venture with the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine would have the advantage, if the Faculty agreed, of introducing ready-made curriculum modules and assessment tools that have been accepted by the General Medical Council. However, extra modules relevant to CPT would have to be constructed to complement the common areas already in the pharmaceutical medicine curriculum, and there would be a perceived loss of the independence that clinical pharmacologists currently enjoy when making decisions about manufacturers' products. Abandoning externally approved training in CPT would allow the specialty to devise its own training and assessment in the necessary skills. Critically, however, this would impair the status of the specialty and would incur loss of financial support from postgraduate Deaneries. To attract high-calibre trainees, we must completely define CPT training and assessment structures. Most clinical pharmacologists seem to prefer to allow the current structures to evolve under external guidance. However, this will not succeed unless all trained clinical pharmacologists contribute to development of both the curriculum and specific assessment tools, and open their teaching and assessment skills to scrutiny. PMID:22360893

  17. Cato Guldberg and Peter Waage, the history of the Law of Mass Action, and its relevance to clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ferner, Robin E; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2016-01-01

    We have traced the historical link between the Law of Mass Action and clinical pharmacology. The Law evolved from the work of the French chemist Claude Louis Berthollet, was first formulated by Cato Guldberg and Peter Waage in 1864 and later clarified by the Dutch chemist Jacobus van 't Hoff in 1877. It has profoundly influenced our qualitative and quantitative understanding of a number of physiological and pharmacological phenomena. According to the Law of Mass Action, the velocity of a chemical reaction depends on the concentrations of the reactants. At equilibrium the concentrations of the chemicals involved bear a constant relation to each other, described by the equilibrium constant, K. The Law of Mass Action is relevant to various physiological and pharmacological concepts, including concentration-effect curves, dose-response curves, and ligand-receptor binding curves, all of which are important in describing the pharmacological actions of medications, the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, which describes the binding of medications to proteins, activation curves for transmembrane ion transport, enzyme inhibition and the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, which describes the relation between pH, as a measure of acidity and the concentrations of the contributory acids and bases. Guldberg and Waage recognized the importance of dynamic equilibrium, while others failed to do so. Their ideas, over 150 years old, are embedded in and still relevant to clinical pharmacology. Here we explain the ideas and in a subsequent paper show how they are relevant to understanding adverse drug reactions. PMID:26174880

  18. Direct pharmacological assessment of clinically acquired models as a strategy to overcome resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Benes, Cyril H

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a study using cell lines established from biopsies of clinically resistant non-small cell lung cancers with the aim of discovering therapeutic strategies to overcome acquired resistance. Our results indicate that pharmacological assessment of tumor material might efficiently complement genetic profiling in the future path toward personalized medicine. PMID:27308520

  19. Direct pharmacological assessment of clinically acquired models as a strategy to overcome resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Benes, Cyril H

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a study using cell lines established from biopsies of clinically resistant non-small cell lung cancers with the aim of discovering therapeutic strategies to overcome acquired resistance. Our results indicate that pharmacological assessment of tumor material might efficiently complement genetic profiling in the future path toward personalized medicine. PMID:27308520

  20. The clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of ulipristal acetate for the treatment of uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Oliver; Zobrist, R Howard; Gotteland, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign hormone-sensitive tumors of uterine smooth muscle cells leading to heavy menstrual bleeding and pelvic pain. Ulipristal acetate (UPA) is an emerging medical treatment of fibroids with the potential to be used for long-term treatment. In this context, the present article summarizes UPA's main clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. Ulipristal acetate has good oral bioavailability and a half-life allowing one single oral administration per day for the management of fibroids. As a steroid, UPA is a substrate for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 but does not act as an inducer or inhibitor of the CYP system or transporter proteins. With the exception of drugs modulating CYP3A4 activity, risks of drug-drug interactions with UPA are unlikely. In conclusion, besides its pharmacodynamic characteristics, UPA shows favorable PK properties that contribute to a good efficacy-safety ratio for the long-term management of uterine fibroids in clinical practice. PMID:25228633

  1. Clinical pharmacology of tyrosine kinase inhibitors becoming generic drugs: the regulatory perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, billions have been spent and huge efforts have been taken in basic and clinical cancer research [CA Cancer J Clin 63: 11-30]. About a decade ago, the arms race between drugs and cancer cells reached a new level by introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) into pharmacological anti-cancer therapy. According to their molecular mechanism of action, TKI in contrast to so-called “classic” or “conventional” cytostatics belong to the group of targeted cancer medicines, characterized by accurately fitting with biological structures (i.e. active centers of kinases). Numerous (partly orphan) indications are covered by this new class of substances. Approximately ten years after the first substances of this class of medicines were authorized, patent protection will end within the next years. The following article covers clinical meaning and regulatory status of anti-cancer TKI and gives an outlook to what is expected from the introduction of generic anti-cancer TKI. PMID:24502453

  2. Clinically Relevant Pharmacological Strategies That Reverse MDMA-Induced Brain Hyperthermia Potentiated by Social Interaction.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    MDMA-induced hyperthermia is highly variable, unpredictable, and greatly potentiated by the social and environmental conditions of recreational drug use. Current strategies to treat pathological MDMA-induced hyperthermia in humans are palliative and marginally effective, and there are no specific pharmacological treatments to counteract this potentially life-threatening condition. Here, we tested the efficacy of mixed adrenoceptor blockers carvedilol and labetalol, and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, in reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia. We injected rats with a moderate non-toxic dose of MDMA (9 mg/kg) during social interaction, and we administered potential treatment drugs after the development of robust hyperthermia (>2.5 °C), thus mimicking the clinical situation of acute MDMA intoxication. Brain temperature was our primary focus, but we also simultaneously recorded temperatures from the deep temporal muscle and skin, allowing us to determine the basic physiological mechanisms of the treatment drug action. Carvedilol was modestly effective in attenuating MDMA-induced hyperthermia by moderately inhibiting skin vasoconstriction, and labetalol was ineffective. In contrast, clozapine induced a marked and immediate reversal of MDMA-induced hyperthermia via inhibition of brain metabolic activation and blockade of skin vasoconstriction. Our findings suggest that clozapine, and related centrally acting drugs, might be highly effective for reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia in emergency clinical situations, with possible life-saving results. PMID:26105141

  3. Treating lysosomal storage diseases with pharmacological chaperones: from concept to clinics

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of genetic disorders due to defects in any aspect of lysosomal biology. During the past two decades, different approaches have been introduced for the treatment of these conditions. Among them, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) represented a major advance and is used successfully in the treatment of some of these disorders. However, ERT has limitations such as insufficient biodistribution of recombinant enzymes and high costs. An emerging strategy for the treatment of LSDs is pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT), based on the use of chaperone molecules that assist the folding of mutated enzymes and improve their stability and lysosomal trafficking. After proof-of-concept studies, PCT is now being translated into clinical applications for Fabry, Gaucher and Pompe disease. This approach, however, can only be applied to patients carrying chaperone-responsive mutations. The recent demonstration of a synergistic effect of chaperones and ERT expands the applications of PCT and prompts a re-evaluation of their therapeutic use and potential. This review discusses the strengths and drawbacks of the potential therapies available for LSDs and proposes that future research should be directed towards the development of treatment protocols based on the combination of different therapies to improve the clinical outcome of LSD patients. PMID:20049730

  4. The Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetics of Ulipristal Acetate for the Treatment of Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Oliver; Zobrist, R. Howard

    2014-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign hormone-sensitive tumors of uterine smooth muscle cells leading to heavy menstrual bleeding and pelvic pain. Ulipristal acetate (UPA) is an emerging medical treatment of fibroids with the potential to be used for long-term treatment. In this context, the present article summarizes UPA’s main clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. Ulipristal acetate has good oral bioavailability and a half-life allowing one single oral administration per day for the management of fibroids. As a steroid, UPA is a substrate for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 but does not act as an inducer or inhibitor of the CYP system or transporter proteins. With the exception of drugs modulating CYP3A4 activity, risks of drug–drug interactions with UPA are unlikely. In conclusion, besides its pharmacodynamic characteristics, UPA shows favorable PK properties that contribute to a good efficacy–safety ratio for the long-term management of uterine fibroids in clinical practice. PMID:25228633

  5. Pharmacological Chaperone Therapy: Preclinical Development, Clinical Translation, and Prospects for the Treatment of Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of inborn metabolic diseases caused by mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in different lysosomal functions, in most instances acidic hydrolases. Different therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat these disorders. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT) is an emerging approach based on small-molecule ligands that selectively bind and stabilize mutant enzymes, increase their cellular levels, and improve lysosomal trafficking and activity. Compared to other approaches, PCT shows advantages, particularly in terms of oral administration, broad biodistribution, and positive impact on patients' quality of life. After preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, PCT is now being translated in the first clinical trials, either as monotherapy or in combination with enzyme replacement therapy, for some of the most prevalent LSDs. For some LSDs, the results of the first clinical trials are encouraging and warrant further development. Future research in the field of PCT will be directed toward the identification of novel chaperones, including new allosteric drugs, and the exploitation of synergies between chaperone treatment and other therapeutic approaches. PMID:25881001

  6. Social Pharmacology: Expanding horizons

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Rituparna; Alloza, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    In the current modern and global society, social changes are in constant evolution due to scientific progress (technology, culture, customs, and hygiene) and produce the freedom in individuals to take decisions by themselves or with their doctors toward drug consumption. In the arena of marketed drug products which includes society, individual, administration, and pharmaceutical industry, the young discipline emerged is social pharmacology or sociopharmacology. This science arises from clinical pharmacology, and deals with different parameters, which are important in creating knowledge on marketed drugs. However, the scope of “social pharmacology” is not covered by the so-called “Phase IV” alone, but it is the science that handles the postmarketing knowledge of drugs. The social pharmacology studies the “life cycle” of any marketed pharmaceutical product in the social terrain, and evaluates the effects of the real environment under circumstances totally different in the drug development process. Therefore, there are far-reaching horizons, plural, and shared predictions among health professionals and other, for beneficial use of a drug, toward maximizing the benefits of therapy, while minimizing negative social consequences. PMID:24987168

  7. A Humanized Clinically Calibrated Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Model for Hypokinetic Motor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Patrick; Spiros, Athan; Geerts, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of Parkinson's disease with dopamine-centric approaches such as L-DOPA and dopamine agonists, although very successful, is in need of alternative treatment strategies, both in terms of disease modification and symptom management. Various non-dopaminergic treatment approaches did not result in a clear clinical benefit, despite showing a clear effect in preclinical animal models. In addition, polypharmacy is common, sometimes leading to unintended effects on non-motor cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. To explore novel targets for symptomatic treatment and possible synergistic pharmacodynamic effects between different drugs, we developed a computer-based Quantitative Systems Pharmacology (QSP) platform of the closed cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical basal ganglia loop of the dorsal motor circuit. This mechanism-based simulation platform is based on the known neuro-anatomy and neurophysiology of the basal ganglia and explicitly incorporates domain expertise in a formalized way. The calculated beta/gamma power ratio of the local field potential in the subthalamic nucleus correlates well (R (2) = 0.71) with clinically observed extra-pyramidal symptoms triggered by antipsychotics during schizophrenia treatment (43 drug-dose combinations). When incorporating Parkinsonian (PD) pathology and reported compensatory changes, the computer model suggests a major increase in b/g ratio (corresponding to bradykinesia and rigidity) from a dopamine depletion of 70% onward. The correlation between the outcome of the QSP model and the reported changes in UPDRS III Motor Part for 22 placebo-normalized drug-dose combinations is R (2) = 0.84. The model also correctly recapitulates the lack of clinical benefit for perampanel, MK-0567 and flupirtine and offers a hypothesis for the translational disconnect. Finally, using human PET imaging studies with placebo response, the computer model predicts well the placebo response for chronic treatment, but not for acute

  8. Maintaining Life-saving Testing for Patients With Infectious Diseases: Infectious Diseases Society of America, American Society for Microbiology, and Pan American Society for Clinical Virology Recommendations on the Regulation of Laboratory-developed Tests.

    PubMed

    Caliendo, Angela M; Couturier, Marc R; Ginocchio, Christine C; Hanson, Kimberly E; Miller, Melissa B; Walker, Kimberly E; Frank, Gregory M

    2016-07-15

    In 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed to regulate laboratory-developed tests (LDTs)-diagnostics designed, manufactured, and used within a single laboratory. The Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Society for Microbiology, and the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology recognize that the FDA is committed to protecting patients. However, our societies are concerned that the proposed regulations will limit access to testing and negatively impact infectious diseases (ID) LDTs. In this joint commentary, our societies discuss why LDTs are critical for ID patient care, hospital infection control, and public health responses. We also highlight how the FDA's proposed regulation of LDTs could impair patient access to life-saving tests and stifle innovation in ID diagnostics. Finally, our societies make specific recommendations for the FDA's consideration to reduce the burden of the proposed new rules on clinical laboratories and protect patients' access to state-of-the art, quality LDTs. PMID:27118790

  9. Chronic neuropathic facial pain after intense pulsed light hair removal. Clinical features and pharmacological management

    PubMed Central

    Párraga-Manzol, Gabriela; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Moreno-Arias, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) photodepilation is usually performed as a hair removal method. The treatment is recommended to be indicated by a physician, depending on each patient and on its characteristics. However, the use of laser devices by medical laypersons is frequent and it can suppose a risk of damage for the patients. Most side effects associated to IPL photodepilation are transient, minimal and disappear without sequelae. However, permanent side effects can occur. Some of the complications are laser related but many of them are caused by an operator error or mismanagement. In this work, we report a clinical case of a patient that developed a chronic neuropathic facial pain following IPL hair removal for unwanted hair in the upper lip. The specific diagnosis was painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy, reference 13.1.2.3 according to the International Headache Society (IHS). Key words:Neuropathic facial pain, photodepilation, intense pulse light. PMID:26535105

  10. Concordance of preclinical and clinical pharmacology and toxicology of monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins: soluble targets

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Pauline L; Bugelski, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and fusion proteins directed towards soluble targets make an important contribution to the treatment of disease. The purpose of this review was to correlate the clinical and preclinical data on the 14 currently approved mAbs and fusion proteins targeted to soluble targets. The principal sources used to gather data were: the peer reviewed Literature; European Medicines Agency ‘Scientific Discussions’ and United States Food and Drug Administration ‘Pharmacology/Toxicology Reviews’ and package inserts (United States Prescribing Information). Data on the following approved biopharmaceuticals were included: adalimumab, anakinra, bevacizumab, canakinumab, certolizumab pegol, denosumab, eculizumab, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab, omalizumab, ranibizumab, rilonacept and ustekinumab. Some related biopharmaceuticals in late-stage development were also included for comparison. Good concordance with human pharmacodynamics was found for both non-human primates (NHPs) receiving the human biopharmaceutical and mice receiving rodent homologues (surrogates). In contrast, there was limited concordance for human adverse effects in genetically deficient mice, mice receiving surrogates or NHPs receiving the human pharmaceutical. In summary, the results of this survey show that although both mice and NHPs have good predictive value for human pharmacodynamics, neither species have good predictive value for human adverse effects. No evidence that NHPs have superior predictive value was found. PMID:22168335

  11. Good publication practices in clinical pharmacology: transparency, evidence-based medicine and the 7-D assessment*

    PubMed Central

    Woodcock, Barry G.; Luger, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Transparency and evidence-based medicine are cornerstones of good publication practices (GPP), and concern publishers, editors, research investigators, and reviewers alike. Methods for implementing these principles within the framework of GPP are described. The main aspects include obtaining a Manuscript Agreement Contract, a Statement on Transparency of Authorship and a Declaration of Conflicts of Interest from the authors. Assessing whether a manuscript meets the requirements of EBM is demonstrated using the “7-D assessment”. The main purpose of this tool is to established that the (1) right Design, (2) right Diagnosis, (3) right Drug molecule, (4) right Dosage, (5) right Data, (6) right Deductions, and (7) right Documentation have been implemented in order to meet the objectives of the investigation. If the findings from any one of these assessments is questionable, the compliance of the research with EBM principles will be weakened and the reviewers and editors will make recommendations to the publisher accordingly. The guidelines described will help to provide a fair and transparent process of scientific publication and foster the freedom of clinical pharmacological research. PMID:26329349

  12. A Systemic Review on Aloe arborescens Pharmacological Profile: Biological Activities and Pilot Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Singab, Abdel-Naser B; El-Hefnawy, Hala M; Esmat, Ahmed; Gad, Haidy A; Nazeam, Jilan A

    2015-12-01

    Since ancient times, plants and herbal preparations have been used as medicine. Research carried out in the last few decades has verified several such claims. Aloe arborescens Miller, belonging to the Aloe genus (Family Asphodelaceae), is one of the main varieties of Aloe used worldwide. The popularity of the plant in traditional medicine for several ailments (antitumor, immunomodulatory, antiinflammatory, antiulcer, antimicrobial and antifungal activity) focused the investigator's interest on this plant. Most importantly, the reported studies have shown the plant effectiveness on various cancer types such as liver, colon, duodenal, skin, pancreatic, intestinal, lung and kidney types. These multiple biological actions make Aloe an important resource for developing new natural therapies. However, the biological activities of isolated compounds such as glycoprotein, polysaccharides, enzyme and phenolics were insufficient. Considering all these, this contribution provides a systematic review outlining the evidence on the biological efficacy of the plant including the pharmacology and the related mechanisms of action, with specific attention to the various safety precautions, and preclinical and clinical studies, indicating the future research prospects of this plant. PMID:26768148

  13. Purinergic neuromuscular transmission in the gastrointestinal tract; functional basis for future clinical and pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Marcel; Clavé, Pere; Accarino, Anna; Gallego, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Nerve-mediated relaxation is necessary for the correct accomplishment of gastrointestinal (GI) motility. In the GI tract, NO and a purine are probably released by the same inhibitory motor neuron as inhibitory co-transmitters. The P2Y1 receptor has been recently identified as the receptor responsible for purinergic smooth muscle hyperpolarization and relaxation in the human gut. This finding has been confirmed in P2Y1-deficient mice where purinergic neurotransmission is absent and transit time impaired. However, the mechanisms responsible for nerve-mediated relaxation, including the identification of the purinergic neurotransmitter(s) itself, are still debatable. Possibly different mechanisms of nerve-mediated relaxation are present in the GI tract. Functional demonstration of purinergic neuromuscular transmission has not been correlated with structural studies. Labelling of purinergic neurons is still experimental and is not performed in routine pathology studies from human samples, even when possible neuromuscular impairment is suspected. Accordingly, the contribution of purinergic neurotransmission in neuromuscular diseases affecting GI motility is not known. In this review, we have focused on the physiological mechanisms responsible for nerve-mediated purinergic relaxation providing the functional basis for possible future clinical and pharmacological studies on GI motility targeting purine receptors. PMID:24910216

  14. The influence of clinical and pharmacological factors on enuresis treatment with imipramine.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández de Gatta, M M; Galindo, P; Rey, F; Gutierrez, J; Tamayo, M; García, M J; Domínguez-Gil, A

    1990-01-01

    1. The aim of this study has been to evaluate the response to imipramine treatment in enuretic children through the use of a series of clinical and pharmacological variables and by applying a multivariate (principal components) analysis technique. 2. The study was carried out on 146 children whose ages ranged from 5 to 14 years, and who received variable doses of imipramine (12.5 to 100 mg day-1). 3. The quantitative variables analyzed were: drug dosage, serum levels of imipramine and its metabolite desipramine, the relationship between them both, the duration of treatment, age and weight. 4. The qualitative variables were: compliance, presence of side-effects, enuretic and/or psychiatric antecedents, intelligence quotient (I.Q.), the existence (or absence) of related pathologies, sex, and the type of enuresis. 5. The response to treatment was quantified by means of the percentage of decrease in frequency of enuresis as compared with the initial frequency. 6. The results obtained show that the variables which are most associated with the reduction of enuresis are, in decreasing order: the dosage of imipramine administered, the duration of treatment, compliance and the level/dose ratio for the sum of the drug and metabolite levels. PMID:2271368

  15. The influence of clinical and pharmacological factors on enuresis treatment with imipramine.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Gatta, M M; Galindo, P; Rey, F; Gutierrez, J; Tamayo, M; García, M J; Domínguez-Gil, A

    1990-11-01

    1. The aim of this study has been to evaluate the response to imipramine treatment in enuretic children through the use of a series of clinical and pharmacological variables and by applying a multivariate (principal components) analysis technique. 2. The study was carried out on 146 children whose ages ranged from 5 to 14 years, and who received variable doses of imipramine (12.5 to 100 mg day-1). 3. The quantitative variables analyzed were: drug dosage, serum levels of imipramine and its metabolite desipramine, the relationship between them both, the duration of treatment, age and weight. 4. The qualitative variables were: compliance, presence of side-effects, enuretic and/or psychiatric antecedents, intelligence quotient (I.Q.), the existence (or absence) of related pathologies, sex, and the type of enuresis. 5. The response to treatment was quantified by means of the percentage of decrease in frequency of enuresis as compared with the initial frequency. 6. The results obtained show that the variables which are most associated with the reduction of enuresis are, in decreasing order: the dosage of imipramine administered, the duration of treatment, compliance and the level/dose ratio for the sum of the drug and metabolite levels. PMID:2271368

  16. A review on clinical management and pharmacological therapy on hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT).

    PubMed

    Zarrabeitia, Roberto; Albiñana, Virginia; Salcedo, Matilde; Señaris-Gonzalez, B; Fernandez-Forcelledo, Jose-Luis; Botella, Luisa-Maria

    2010-07-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, is an autosomal dominant rare disease characterized by localized angiodysplasia. This is manifested as epistaxis, mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal telangiectases, and arteriovenous malformations in the pulmonary, cerebral or hepatic circulation. The prevalence is between 1 in 5,000 to 8,000, although it is higher in some regions. The most frequent clinical manifestation of HHT is epistaxis, normally from light to moderate from the 4(th) decade of life. However, many patients show severe epistaxis which may interfere with their quality of life. The epistaxis is due to telangiectasia on the nasal mucosa. These are focally dilated postcapilar venules, which in advanced phases show many layers of smooth muscle cells without elastic fibers, and very frequently directly connect with dilated arterioles. As a consequence of these vascular alterations, telangiectases are very sensitive to slight trauma and even to the friction with the air when breathing, which gives rise to nose bleeds. Unfortunately, there is no optimal pharmacological treatment for the epistaxis in HHT. The use of antifibrinolytic agents for the treatment of HHT has been studied recently by our group as an effective relief for nasal and gastric haemorrhages. This work represents a systematic review and the beginning of a systematic laboratory work we are now conducting in our lab to screen for "orphan drugs" as therapeutic agents in HHT. In this context, the use of hormones, immunosuppresants and anti-angiogenic agents are under preclinical study in our laboratory. PMID:19485912

  17. Evaluation of impact of teaching clinical pharmacology and rational therapeutics to medical undergraduates and interns

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mira K; Panchal, Jigar R; Shah, Samdih; Iyer, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To find out the impact of teaching clinical pharmacology and rational therapeutics (CPT) to medical undergraduates (UGs) and interns. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, prospective study was conducted on three UGs batches and interns using two pretested validated structured questionnaires, modified from the work of Tobaiqy et al. The study was approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. ANOVA and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. The value of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 379 UGs and 96 interns participated in this study. Mean knowledge score of interns was significantly reduced as compared to UGs (P < 0.0001). A significant increase in confidence for unsupervised prescribing of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (99%), oral rehydration salt, iron salts was perceived among interns as compared to UGs (P < 0.05). However, 63.5% confessed problems in selection of drugs, drug–drug interactions, prescribing in special patient population. Although they were confident prescribing fixed dose combination for adult patients (89.5%), majority were hesitant to prescribe opioids (77%), steroids (76%), vaccines (75%), and antihypertensives (62%). Conclusion: The theoretical CPT teaching transfers knowledge to UGs; however, it is not retained in internship and does not adequately prepare interns to prescribe safe and rational drugs. PMID:27563589

  18. Evolving paradigms in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Huard, J; Mu, X; Lu, A

    2016-08-01

    Progressive muscle weakness and degeneration due to the lack of dystrophin eventually leads to the loss of independent ambulation by the middle of the patient's second decade, and a fatal outcome due to cardiac or respiratory failure by the third decade. More specifically, loss of sarcolemmal dystrophin and the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein (DAG) complex promotes muscle fiber damage during muscle contraction. This process results in an efflux of creatine kinase (CK), an influx of calcium ions, and the recruitment of T cells, macrophages, and mast cells to the damaged muscle, causing progressive myofiber necrosis. For the last 20 years, the major goal in the development of therapeutic approaches to alleviate muscle weakness in DMD has been centered on the restoration of dystrophin or proteins that are analogous to dystrophin, such as utrophin, through a variety of modalities including cell therapy, gene therapy, gene correction, and the highly promising techniques utilizing CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Despite the development of new therapeutic options, there still exist numerous challenges that we must face with regard to these new strategies and, consequently, we still do not have any feasible options available to ultimately slow the progression of this devastating disease. The purpose of this article is to highlight the current knowledge and advancements in the evolving paradigms in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics for this devastating musculoskeletal disease. PMID:27071500

  19. Progestogens Used in Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy: Differences in Their Pharmacological Properties, Intracellular Actions, and Clinical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Hapgood, Janet P.; Winer, Sharon; Mishell, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The safety of progestogens as a class has come under increased scrutiny after the publication of data from the Women's Health Initiative trial, particularly with respect to breast cancer and cardiovascular disease risk, despite the fact that only one progestogen, medroxyprogesterone acetate, was used in this study. Inconsistency in nomenclature has also caused confusion between synthetic progestogens, defined here by the term progestin, and natural progesterone. Although all progestogens by definition have progestational activity, they also have a divergent range of other properties that can translate to very different clinical effects. Endometrial protection is the primary reason for prescribing a progestogen concomitantly with postmenopausal estrogen therapy in women with a uterus, but several progestogens are known to have a range of other potentially beneficial effects, for example on the nervous and cardiovascular systems. Because women remain suspicious of the progestogen component of postmenopausal hormone therapy in the light of the Women's Health Initiative trial, practitioners should not ignore the potential benefits to their patients of some progestogens by considering them to be a single pharmacological class. There is a lack of understanding of the differences between progestins and progesterone and between individual progestins differing in their effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems, the breast, and bone. This review elucidates the differences between the substantial number of individual progestogens employed in postmenopausal hormone therapy, including both progestins and progesterone. We conclude that these differences in chemical structure, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, affinity, potency, and efficacy via steroid receptors, intracellular action, and biological and clinical effects confirm the absence of a class effect of progestogens. PMID:23238854

  20. Pharmacological targeting of dopamine D3 receptors: Possible clinical applications of selective drugs.

    PubMed

    Pich, Emilio Merlo; Collo, Ginetta

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine D3 receptors have been pharmacologically engaged in humans since the development of the first antipsychotics and ergot-derivative dopamine (DA) agonists, even without knowing it. These agents were generally non-selective, developed primarily to target D2 receptors. In the last 10 years the understanding of the clinical implication of D3 receptors has been progressing also due to the identification of D3 gene polymorphisms, the use of more selective PET ligands such as [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO and the learning regarding the clinical use of the D3-preferential D2/D3 agonists ropinirole and pramipexole. A new specific neuroplasticity role of D3 receptor regarding dendrite arborisation outgrowth in dopaminergic neurons was also proposed to support, at least in part, the slowing of disease observed in subjects with Parkinson׳s Disease treated with DA agonists. Similar mechanisms could be at the basis of the antidepressant-like effects observed with DA agonists when co-administered with standard of care. Severe adverse event occurring with the use of anti-parkinsonian DA agonists in predisposed subjects, i.e., impulse control disorders, are now suggested to be putatively related to overactive D3 receptors. Not surprisingly, blockade of D3 receptors was proposed as treatment for addictive disorders, a goal that could be potentially achieved by repositioning buspirone, an anxiolytic drug with D3-preferential antagonistic features, or with novel selective D3 antagonists or partial agonists currently in development for schizophrenia. At the moment ABT-925 is the only selective D3 antagonist tested in schizophrenic patients in Phase II, showing an intriguing cognitive enhancing effects supported by preclinical data. Finally, exploratory pharmacogenetic analysis suggested that ABT-925 could be effective in a subpopulation of patients with a polymorphism on the D3 receptor, opening to a possible personalised medicine approach. PMID:26298833

  1. Clinical pharmacology study of cariprazine (MP-214) in patients with schizophrenia (12-week treatment)

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tadakatsu; Kubota, Tomoko; Iwakaji, Atsushi; Imada, Masayoshi; Kapás, Margit; Morio, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cariprazine is a potent dopamine D3-preferring D3/D2 receptor partial agonist in development for the treatment of schizophrenia, bipolar mania, and depression. Pharmacokinetics of cariprazine and the two clinically relevant metabolites (desmethyl- and didesmethyl-cariprazine) was evaluated in a clinical pharmacology study. Methods This was a multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, fixed-dose (3, 6, or 9 mg/day) study of 28-week duration (≤4-week observation, 12-week open-label treatment, and 12-week follow-up). Once-daily cariprazine was administered to 38 adult patients with schizophrenia. The pharmacokinetics of cariprazine, metabolites, and total active moieties (sum of cariprazine and two metabolites) was evaluated; efficacy and safety were also assessed. Results Steady state was reached within 1–2 weeks for cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine, 4 weeks for didesmethyl-cariprazine, and 3 weeks for total active moieties. Cariprazine and desmethyl-cariprazine levels decreased >90% within 1 week after the last dose, didesmethyl-cariprazine decreased ~50% at 1 week, and total active moieties decreased ~90% within 4 weeks. Terminal half-lives of cariprazine, desmethyl-cariprazine, and didesmethyl-cariprazine ranged from 31.6 to 68.4, 29.7 to 37.5, and 314 to 446 hours, respectively. Effective half-life (calculated from time to steady state) of total active moieties was ~1 week. Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was 97.4%; 15.8% of patients discontinued due to adverse events. No abnormal laboratory values or major differences from baseline in extrapyramidal symptoms were observed. Conclusion Cariprazine and its active metabolites reached steady state within 4 weeks, and exposure was dose proportional over the range of 3–9 mg/day. Once-daily cariprazine was generally well tolerated in adult patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26834462

  2. An integrated clinical pharmacology approach for deriving dosing recommendations in a regulatory setting: review of recent cases in psychiatry drugs.

    PubMed

    Younis, Islam R; Rogers, Hobart; Zhang, Huixia; Zhu, Hao; Uppoor, Ramana S; Mehta, Mehul U

    2013-10-01

    Clinical pharmacology as an interdisciplinary science is unique in its capacity and the diversity of the methods and approaches it can provide to derive dosing recommendations in various subpopulations. This article illustrates cases where an integrated clinical pharmacology approach was used to derive dosing recommendations for psychiatry drugs within regulatory settings. The integrated approach is based on the view that once a drug is shown to be effective in the general population, it is reasonable to take into consideration other relevant findings and the use of alternative scientific tools and analysis to derive dosing recommendations in specific populations. The method provides useful means to solve the challenges of the paucity of available data and lead to clear dosing instructions. This in turn expands the benefits of any given drug to all individuals in which the drug is likely to be effective. PMID:23842865

  3. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXVII. Kisspeptin Receptor Nomenclature, Distribution, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Helen R.; Maguire, Janet J.; Colledge, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Kisspeptins are members of the Arg-Phe amide family of peptides, which have been identified as endogenous ligands for a G-protein-coupled receptor encoded by a gene originally called GPR54 (also known as AXOR12 or hOT7T175). After this pairing, the gene has been renamed KISS1R. The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification recommends that the official name for the receptor is the kisspeptin receptor to follow the convention of naming the receptor protein after the endogenous ligand. The endogenous ligand was initially called metastin, after its role as a metastasis suppressor, and is now referred to as kisspeptin-54 (KP-54), a C-terminally amidated 54-amino acid peptide cleaved from the 145-amino acid gene product. Shorter C-terminal cleavage fragments [KP-14, KP-13 and KP-10 (the smallest active fragment)] are also biologically active. Both receptor and peptide are widely expressed in human, rat, and mouse; the receptor sequence shares more than 80% homology in these species. Activation of the kisspeptin receptor by kisspeptin is via coupling to Gq/11 and the phospholipase C pathway, causing Ca2+ mobilization. Mutations in the KISS1R gene result in hypogonadotropic hypogonadotropism, and targeted disruption of Kiss1r in mice reproduces this phenotype, which led to the discovery of the remarkable ability of the kisspeptin receptor to act as a molecular switch for puberty. In addition to regulating the reproductive axis, the kisspeptin receptor is also implicated in cancer, placentation, diabetes, and the cardiovascular system. PMID:21079036

  4. Phosphoinositide system-linked serotonin receptor subtypes and their pharmacological properties and clinical correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, S C; Davis, J M; Pandey, G N

    1995-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission represents a complex mechanism involving pre- and post-synaptic events and distinct 5-HT receptor subtypes. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors have been classified into several categories, and they are termed as 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 type receptors. 5-HT1 receptors have been further subdivided into 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT1E and 5-HT1F. 5-HT2 receptors have been divided into 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptors. All 5-HT2 receptor subtypes are linked to the multifunctional phosphoinositide (PI) signalling system. 5-HT3 receptors are considered ion-gated receptors and are also linked to the PI signalling system by an unknown mechanism. The 5-HT2A receptor subtype is the most widely studied of the 5-HT receptors in psychiatric disorders (for example, suicide, depression and schizophrenia) as well as in relation to the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. The roles of 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors in psychiatric disorders are less clear. These 5-HT receptors also play an important role in alcoholism. It has been shown that 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 antagonists cause attenuation of alcohol intake in animals and humans. However, the exact mechanisms are unknown. The recent cloning of the cDNAs for 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors provides the opportunity to explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for the alterations in these receptors during illness as well as pharmacotherapy. This review article will focus on the current research into the pharmacological properties, molecular biology, and clinical correlates of 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:7786883

  5. The Diagnosis of Cushing's Syndrome: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Lynnette K.; Biller, Beverly M. K.; Findling, James W.; Newell-Price, John; Savage, Martin O.; Stewart, Paul M.; Montori, Victor M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to develop clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. Participants: The Task Force included a chair, selected by the Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS) of The Endocrine Society, five additional experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The Task Force received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence and discussions. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society's CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage the Task Force incorporated needed changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: After excluding exogenous glucocorticoid use, we recommend testing for Cushing's syndrome in patients with multiple and progressive features compatible with the syndrome, particularly those with a high discriminatory value, and patients with adrenal incidentaloma. We recommend initial use of one test with high diagnostic accuracy (urine cortisol, late night salivary cortisol, 1 mg overnight or 2 mg 48-h dexamethasone suppression test). We recommend that patients with an abnormal result see an endocrinologist and undergo a second test, either one of the above or, in some cases, a serum midnight cortisol or dexamethasone-CRH test. Patients with concordant abnormal results should undergo testing for the cause of Cushing's syndrome. Patients with concordant normal results should not undergo further evaluation. We recommend additional testing in patients with discordant results, normal responses suspected of cyclic hypercortisolism, or initially normal responses who accumulate additional features over time. PMID:18334580

  6. Pharmacological and clinical dilemmas of prescribing in co-morbid adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de los Cobos, José; Siñol, Núria; Pérez, Víctor; Trujols, Joan

    2014-01-01

    The present article reviews whether available efficacy and safety data support the pharmacological treatment of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in patients with concurrent substance use disorders (SUD). Arguments for and against treating adult ADHD with active SUD are discussed. Findings from 19 large open studies and controlled clinical trials show that the use of atomoxetine or extended-release methylphenidate formulations, together with psychological therapy, yield promising though inconclusive results about short term efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of adult ADHD in patients with SUD and no other severe mental disorders. However, the efficacy of these drugs is scant or lacking for treating concurrent SUD. No serious safety issues have been associated with these drugs in patients with co-morbid SUD-ADHD, given their low risk of abuse and favourable side effect and drug–drug interaction profile. The decision to treat adult ADHD in the context of active SUD depends on various factors, some directly related to SUD-ADHD co-morbidity (e.g. degree of diagnostic uncertainty for ADHD) and other factors related to the clinical expertise of the medical staff and availability of adequate resources (e.g. the means to monitor compliance with pharmacological treatment). Our recommendation is that clinical decisions be individualized and based on a careful analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of pharmacological treatment for ADHD on a case-by-case basis in the context of active SUD. PMID:23216449

  7. The "Commitment Model" for Clinical Ethics Consultations: Society's Involvement in the Solution of Individual Cases.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Véronique; Spranzi, Marta; Foureur, Nicolas; Brunet, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Several approaches to clinical ethics consultation (CEC) exist in medical practice and are widely discussed in the clinical ethics literature; different models of CECs are classified according to their methods, goals, and consultant's attitude. Although the "facilitation" model has been endorsed by the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) and is described in an influential manual, alternative approaches, such as advocacy, moral expertise, mediation, and engagement are practiced and defended in the clinical ethics field. Our Clinical Ethics Center in Paris was founded in 2002 in the wake of the Patients' Rights Act, and to date it is the largest center that provides consultation services in France. In this article we shall describe and defend our own approach to clinical ethics consultation, which we call the "Commitment Model," in comparison with other existing models. Indeed commitment implies, among other meanings, continuity through time, a series of coherent actions, and the realization of important social goals. By drawing on a recent consultation case, we shall describe the main steps of our consultation procedure: interviews with major stakeholders, including patients and proxies; case conferences; and follow up. We shall show why we have chosen the term "commitment" to represent our approach at three different but interrelated levels: commitment towards patients, within the case conference group, and towards society as a whole. PMID:26752382

  8. Thiopurine treatment in inflammatory bowel disease: clinical pharmacology and implication of pharmacogenetically guided dosing.

    PubMed

    Teml, Alexander; Schaeffeler, Elke; Herrlinger, Klaus R; Klotz, Ulrich; Schwab, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    This review summarises clinical pharmacological aspects of thiopurines in the treatment of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Current knowledge of pharmacogenetically guided dosing is discussed for individualisation of thiopurine therapy, particularly to avoid severe adverse effects. Both azathioprine and mercaptopurine are pro-drugs that undergo extensive metabolism. The catabolic enzyme thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) is polymorphically expressed, and currently 23 genetic variants have been described. On the basis of an excellent phenotype-genotype correlation for TPMT, genotyping has become a safe and reliable tool for determination of a patient's individual phenotype. Thiopurine-related adverse drug reactions are frequent, ranging from 5% up to 40%, in both a dose-dependent and -independent manner. IBD patients with low TPMT activity are at high risk of developing severe haematotoxicity if pharmacogenetically guided dosing is not performed. Based on several cost-benefit analyses, assessment of TPMT activity is recommended prior to thiopurine therapy in patients with IBD. The underlying mechanisms of azathioprine/mercaptopurine-related hepatotoxicity, pancreatitis and azathioprine intolerance are still unknown. Although the therapeutic response appears to be related to 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN) concentrations above a threshold of 230-260 pmol per 8 x 10(8) red blood cells, at present therapeutic drug monitoring of 6-TGN can be recommended only to estimate patients' compliance.Drug-drug interactions between azathioprine/mercaptopurine and aminosalicylates, diuretics, NSAIDs, warfarin and infliximab are discussed. The concomitant use of allopurinol without dosage adjustment of azathioprine/mercaptopurine leads to clinically relevant severe haematotoxicity due to elevated thiopurine levels. Several studies indicate that thiopurine therapy in IBD during pregnancy is safe. Thus, azathioprine/mercaptopurine should not be withdrawn in strictly

  9. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    PubMed

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-03-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria. PMID:25648701

  10. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    PubMed

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-01-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria. PMID:25735589

  11. Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society.

    PubMed

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-03-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria. PMID:25553948

  12. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    PubMed

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-01-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria. PMID:25752863

  13. Outcomes of pharmacological management of nocturia with non-antidiuretic agents: does statistically significant equal clinically significant?

    PubMed

    Smith, Ariana L; Wein, Alan J

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the statistical and clinical efficacy of the pharmacological treatments of nocturia using non-antidiuretic agents. A literature review of treatments of nocturia specifically addressing the impact of alpha blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARI) and antimuscarinics on reduction in nocturnal voids. Despite commonly reported statistically significant results, nocturia has shown a poor clinical response to traditional therapies for benign prostatic hyperplasia including alpha blockers and 5ARI. Similarly, nocturia has shown a poor clinical response to traditional therapies for overactive bladder including antimuscarinics. Statistical success has been achieved in some groups with a variety of alpha blockers and antimuscarinic agents, but the clinical significance of these changes is doubtful. It is likely that other types of therapy will need to be employed in order to achieve a clinically significant reduction in nocturia. PMID:21518417

  14. Early history of electroencephalography and establishment of the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society.

    PubMed

    Stone, James L; Hughes, John R

    2013-02-01

    The field of electroencephalography (EEG) had its origin with the discovery of recordable electrical potentials from activated nerves and muscles of animals and in the last quarter of the 19th century from the cerebral cortex of animals. By the 1920s, Hans Berger, a neuropsychiatrist from Germany, recorded potentials from the scalp of patients with skull defects and, a few years later, with more sensitive equipment from intact subjects. Concurrently, the introduction of electronic vacuum tube amplification and the cathode ray oscilloscope was made by American physiologists or "axonologists," interested in peripheral nerve recordings. Berger's findings were independently confirmed in early 1934 by Lord Adrian in England and by Hallowell Davis at Harvard, in the United States. In the United States, the earliest contributions to human EEG were made by Hallowell Davis, Herbert H. Jasper, Frederic A. Gibbs, William Lennox, and Alfred L. Loomis. Remarkable progress in the development of EEG as a useful clinical tool followed the 1935 report by the Harvard group on the electrographic and clinical correlations in patients with absence (petit mal) seizures and altered states of consciousness. Technical aspects of the EEG and additional clinical EEG correlations were elucidated by the above investigators and a number of others. Further study led to gatherings of the EEG pioneers at Loomis' laboratory in New York (1935-1939), Regional EEG society formation, and the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society in 1946. PMID:23377440

  15. Pharmacological Treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Shier, Anna C.; Reichenbacher, Thomas; Ghuman, Harinder S.; Ghuman, Jaswinder K.

    2013-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurobehavioral disorder of childhood that can result in significant functional impairment, and if not adequately treated can lead to impaired quality of life. Pharmacotherapy is considered the first-line treatment for ADHD in children and adolescents. We review both recent literature and seminal studies regarding the pharmacological treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents. There is ample evidence for the efficacy and safety of both stimulants and non-stimulants in the treatment of ADHD. We review important aspects of evaluation and assessment and discuss first-line pharmacological treatments and as well as when to consider using alternative pharmacological agents. Treatment approaches to manage frequently seen comorbid disorders with ADHD are also covered. PMID:23650474

  16. Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Stefan R.; Allolio, Bruno; Arlt, Wiebke; Barthel, Andreas; Don-Wauchope, Andrew; Hammer, Gary D.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Merke, Deborah P.; Murad, M. Hassan; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Torpy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This clinical practice guideline addresses the diagnosis and treatment of primary adrenal insufficiency. Participants: The Task Force included a chair, selected by The Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee of the Endocrine Society, eight additional clinicians experienced with the disease, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The co-sponsoring associations (European Society of Endocrinology and the American Association for Clinical Chemistry) had participating members. The Task Force received no corporate funding or remuneration in connection with this review. Evidence: This evidence-based guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to determine the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Consensus Process: The evidence used to formulate recommendations was derived from two commissioned systematic reviews as well as other published systematic reviews and studies identified by the Task Force. The guideline was reviewed and approved sequentially by the Endocrine Society's Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and the Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: We recommend diagnostic tests for the exclusion of primary adrenal insufficiency in all patients with indicative clinical symptoms or signs. In particular, we suggest a low diagnostic (and therapeutic) threshold in acutely ill patients, as well as in patients with predisposing factors. This is also recommended for pregnant women with unexplained persistent nausea, fatigue, and hypotension. We recommend a short corticotropin test (250 μg) as the “gold standard” diagnostic tool to establish the diagnosis. If a short corticotropin test is not possible in the first instance, we recommend an initial screening procedure comprising the measurement of morning plasma ACTH

  17. Development of a computer-based instructional system in pharmacokinetics: efficacy in clinical pharmacology teaching for senior medical students.

    PubMed

    Feldman, R D; Schoenwald, R; Kane, J

    1989-02-01

    The teaching of pharmacokinetics is acknowledged to be a key aspect of the core curriculum in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, but is also widely acknowledged to be a very difficult part of the curriculum to teach. In order to assess the potential efficacy of interactive computer instruction in clinical pharmacokinetics we have developed a prototype computer-based instructional package. The courseware contains a comprehensive learning system including tutorial, simulation, and problem solving components. To determine the efficacy of this approach we randomly assigned senior medical student volunteers enrolled in the fourth year clinical pharmacology and therapeutics course to receive conventional teaching in clinical pharmacokinetics and/or adjuctive teaching using the computer-based instructional system. There was a high degree of acceptance of the program and over the short term of the trial those students using the computer program scored significantly higher [35%, P less than 0.05] on the mid-term pharmacokinetics quiz. The data suggests that a computerized instructional system in pharmacokinetics may significantly improve the teaching of clinical pharmacokinetics to medical students. PMID:2654201

  18. β3-Adrenoceptor agonists for overactive bladder syndrome: Role of translational pharmacology in a repositioning clinical drug development project.

    PubMed

    Michel, Martin C; Korstanje, Cees

    2016-03-01

    β3-Adrenoceptor agonists were originally considered as a promising drug class for the treatment of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes. When these development efforts failed, they were repositioned for the treatment of the overactive bladder syndrome. Based on the example of the β3-adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron, but also taking into consideration evidence obtained with ritobegron and solabegron, we discuss challenges facing a translational pharmacology program accompanying clinical drug development for a first-in-class molecule. Challenges included generic ones such as ligand selectivity, species differences and drug target gene polymorphisms. Challenges that are more specific included changing concepts of the underlying pathophysiology of the target condition while clinical development was under way; moreover, a paucity of public domain tools for the study of the drug target and aspects of receptor agonists as drugs had to be addressed. Nonetheless, a successful first-in-class launch was accomplished. Looking back at this translational pharmacology program, we conclude that a specifically tailored and highly flexible approach is required. However, several of the lessons learned may also be applicable to translational pharmacology programs in other indications. PMID:26808167

  19. [Clinical practice guidelines of the Spanish Society of Cardiology on stable angina].

    PubMed

    Fernández Palomeque, C; Bardají Mayor, J L; Concha Ruiz, M; Cordo Mollar, J C; Cosín Aguilar, J; Magriñá Ballara, J; Melgares Moreno, R

    2000-07-01

    Stable angina pectoris is the most common clinical manifestation of chronic ischemic heart disease, the prognosis of which depends on many factors. The authors have analyzed the incidence, evolution and prognosis of this problem in Spain and have reviewed the methods to determine the diagnosis and degree of clinical severity. A careful clinical history, an electrocardiogram, and the evaluation of the severity of the ischemia and left ventricle systolic function are, in most cases, useful to determine the degree of disease severity and establish the prognosis. In other cases, more sophisticated or complex diagnostic techniques such as perfusion tests, stress echocardiography and lastly coronary arteriography, which is the only method currently available to study coronary anatomy are required to carry out an adequate study of the patient. At present, the therapeutic arsenal for the treatment of ischemic coronary disease is extensive, from both a pharmacological and revascularization point of view. Nonetheless it is essential to carry out aggressive therapy to control the risk factors. The decision as to the type of treatment required mainly depends on the severity of the ischemia and in the case of revascularization, on the clinical and anatomical factors as well as on the preferences of the patient and the experience and results of the medical-surgical group involved in the therapy of these patients. PMID:10944995

  20. American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Howard H; Chuang, Linus T; duPont, Nefertiti C; Eng, Cathy; Foxhall, Lewis E; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Blanke, Charles D

    2016-05-20

    American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the leading medical professional oncology society, is committed to lessening the burden of cancer and as such will promote underused interventions that have the potential to save millions of lives through cancer prevention. As the main providers of cancer care worldwide, our patients, their families, and our communities look to us for guidance regarding all things cancer related, including cancer prevention. Through this statement and accompanying recommendations, ASCO hopes to increase awareness of the tremendous global impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) -caused cancers, refocus the discussion of HPV vaccination on its likely ability to prevent millions of cancer deaths, and increase HPV vaccination uptake via greater involvement of oncology professionals in ensuring accurate public discourse about HPV vaccination and calling for the implementation of concrete strategies to address barriers to vaccine access and acceptance. PMID:27069078

  1. Quality Assessment of Clinical Practice Guidelines Developed by Professional Societies in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yaşar, Ilknur; Kahveci, Rabia; Baydar Artantaş, Aylin; Ayhan Başer, Duygu; Gökşin Cihan, Fatma; Şencan, Irfan; Koç, Esra Meltem; Özkara, Adem

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are systematically developed statements to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate healthcare for specific clinical circumstances. There is a limited number of studies on guidelines in Turkey. The quality of Ministry of Health guidelines have formerly been assessed whereas there is no information on the other guidelines developed in the country. Aim This study aims to assess the quality of CPGs that are developed by professional societies that work for the health sector in Turkey, and compare the findings with international guidelines. Methodology Professional societies that work for the health sector were determined by using the data obtained from the Ministry of Internal Affairs. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined for selecting the CPGs. Guidelines containing recommendations about disease management to the doctors, accessible online, developed within the past 5 years, citing references for recommendations, about the diseases over 1% prevalence according to the “Statistical Yearbook of Turkey 2012” were included in the study. The quality of CPGs were assessed with the AGREE II instrument, which is an internationally recognized tool for this purpose. Four independent reviewers, who did not participate in the development of the selected guidelines and were trained in CPG appraisal, used the AGREE instrument for assessment of the selected guidelines. Findings 47 professional societies were defined which provided access to CPGs in their websites; 3 of them were only open to members so these could not be reached. 8 CPGs from 7 societies were selected from a total of 401 CPGs from 44 societies. The mean scores of the domains of the guidelines which were assessed by the AGREE II tool were; Scope and purpose: 64%, stakeholder involvement: 37.9%, rigour of development: 35.3%, clarity and presentation: 77.9%, applicability: 49.0% and editorial independence: 46.0%. Conclusion This is the first

  2. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, The Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, and The American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Bypass—Temperature Management during Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Richard; Baker, Robert A.; Likosky, Donald S.; Grigore, Alina; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Shore-Lesserson, Linda; Hammon, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: To improve our understanding of the evidence-based literature supporting temperature management during adult cardiopulmonary bypass, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiology and the American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology tasked the authors to conduct a review of the peer-reviewed literature, including 1) optimal site for temperature monitoring, 2) avoidance of hyperthermia, 3) peak cooling temperature gradient and cooling rate, and 4) peak warming temperature gradient and rewarming rate. Authors adopted the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association method for development clinical practice guidelines, and arrived at the following recommendation. PMID:26543248

  3. Reducing medication errors and increasing patient safety: case studies in clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, David M

    2003-07-01

    Today, reducing medication errors and improving patient safety have become common topics of discussion for the president of the United States, federal and state legislators, the insurance industry, pharmaceutical companies, health care professionals, and patients. But this is not news to clinical pharmacologists. Improving the judicious use of medications and minimizing adverse drug reactions have always been key areas of research and study for those working in clinical pharmacology. However, added to the older terms of adverse drug reactions and rational therapeutics, the now politically correct expression of medication error has emerged. Focusing on the word error has drawn attention to "prevention" and what can be done to minimize mistakes and improve patient safety. Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary has several definitions of error, but the one that seems to be most appropriate in the context of medication errors is "an act that through ingnorance, deficiency, or accident departs from or fails to achieve what should be done." What should be done is generally known as "the five rights": the right drug, right dose, right route, right time, and right patient. One can make an error of omission (failure to act correctly) or an error of commission (acted incorrectly). This article now summarizes what is currently known about medication errors and translates the information into case studies illustrating common scenarios leading to medication errors. Each case is analyzed to provide insight into how the medication error could have been prevented. "System errors" are described, and the application of failure mode effect analysis (FMEA) is presented to determine the part of the "safety net" that failed. Examples of reengineering the system to make it more "error proof" are presented. An error can be prevented. However, the practice of medicine, pharmacy, and nursing in the hospital setting is very complicated, and so many steps occur from "pen to patient" that there

  4. Evaluation and Treatment of Hypertriglyceridemia: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Lars; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Anne C.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Sacks, Frank; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Stalenhoef, Anton F. H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to develop clinical practice guidelines on hypertriglyceridemia. Participants: The Task Force included a chair selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), five additional experts in the field, and a methodologist. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence, e-mail discussion, conference calls, and one in-person meeting. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society's CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: The Task Force recommends that the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridemia be based on fasting levels, that mild and moderate hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of 150–999 mg/dl) be diagnosed to aid in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk, and that severe and very severe hypertriglyceridemia (triglycerides of > 1000 mg/dl) be considered a risk for pancreatitis. The Task Force also recommends that patients with hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for secondary causes of hyperlipidemia and that subjects with primary hypertriglyceridemia be evaluated for family history of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. The Task Force recommends that the treatment goal in patients with moderate hypertriglyceridemia be a non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in agreement with National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel guidelines. The initial treatment should be lifestyle therapy; a combination of diet modification and drug therapy may also be considered. In patients with severe or very severe hypertriglyceridemia, a fibrate should be used as a first-line agent. PMID:22962670

  5. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement on Clinical Pathways in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Zon, Robin T; Frame, James N; Neuss, Michael N; Page, Ray D; Wollins, Dana S; Stranne, Steven; Bosserman, Linda D

    2016-03-01

    The use of clinical pathways in oncology care is increasingly important to patients and oncology providers as a tool for enhancing both quality and value. However, with increasing adoption of pathways into oncology practice, concerns have been raised by ASCO members and other stakeholders. These include the process being used for pathway development, the administrative burdens on oncology practices of reporting on pathway adherence, and understanding the true impact of pathway use on patient health outcomes. To address these concerns, ASCO's Board of Directors established a Task Force on Clinical Pathways, charged with articulating a set of recommendations to improve the development of oncology pathways and processes, allowing the demonstration of pathway concordance in a manner that promotes evidence-based, high-value care respecting input from patients, payers, and providers. These recommendations have been approved and adopted by ASCO's Board of Directors on August 12, 2015, and are presented herein. PMID:26759491

  6. The American Society of Clinical Oncology's Efforts to Support Global Cancer Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; El-Saghir, Nagi S; Cufer, Tanja; Cazap, Eduardo; de Guzman, Roselle; Othieno-Abinya, Nicholas Anthony; Sanchez, Jose Angel; Pyle, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Despite much progress in the management of malignant diseases, the number of new cases and cancer-related deaths continues to rise around the world. More than half of new cases occur in economically developing countries, where more than two thirds of cancer deaths are expected. However, implementation of all necessary steps to accomplish the dissemination of state-of-the-art prevention, diagnosis, and management will require increased allocation of resources, and, more importantly, harmonization of the efforts of hundreds of national and international public health agencies, policy-setting bodies, governments, pharmaceutical companies, and philanthropic organizations. More than 30% of the members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reside and practice outside US borders, and more than half of attendees at all of the scientific congresses and symposia organized by ASCO are international. As cancer has become an increasingly global disease, ASCO has evolved as a global organization. The ASCO Board of Directors currently includes members from France, Brazil, and Canada. In 2013, the ASCO Board of Directors identified a number of strategic priorities for the future. Recognizing the importance of non-US members to the society, their first strategic priority was improving the society's service to non-US members and defining these members' identity in the international oncology community. This article reviews current ASCO activities in the international arena and its future plans in global oncology. PMID:26578614

  7. Pharmacological Modulation of Lung Carcinogenesis in Smokers: Preclinical and Clinical Evidence.

    PubMed

    De Flora, Silvio; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Micale, Rosanna T; Steele, Vernon E; Balansky, Roumen

    2016-02-01

    Many drugs in common use possess pleiotropic properties that make them capable of interfering with carcinogenesis mechanisms. We discuss here the ability of pharmacological agents to mitigate the pulmonary carcinogenicity of mainstream cigarette smoke. The evaluated agents include anti-inflammatory drugs (budesonide, celecoxib, aspirin, naproxen, licofelone), antidiabetic drugs (metformin, pioglitazone), antineoplastic agents (lapatinib, bexarotene, vorinostat), and other drugs and supplements (phenethyl isothiocyanate, myo-inositol, N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, berry extracts). These drugs have been evaluated in mouse models mimicking interventions either in current smokers or in ex-smokers, or in prenatal chemoprevention. They display a broad spectrum of activities by attenuating either smoke-induced preneoplastic lesions or benign tumors and/or malignant tumors. Together with epidemiological data, these findings provide useful information to predict the potential effects of pharmacological agents in smokers. PMID:26726119

  8. Pharmacological relapse prevention in alcohol dependence: from animal models to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Boening, J A; Lesch, O M; Spanagel, R; Wolffgramm, J; Narita, M; Sinclair, D; Mason, B J; Wiesbeck, G A

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a symposium at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chairs were Jobst August-Ludwig Boening and Otto Michel Lesch. The presentations were (1) Pharmacological validation of a new animal model of alcoholism, by Rainer Spanagel; (2) Persisting loss of control as main criterion for alcohol addiction in rats and mice, by Jochen Wolffgramm; (3) Role of NMDA receptor subunits associated with protein kinase C in the prevention of alcohol dependence, by Minoru Narita; (4) Long-term follow up of continued naltrexone treatment, by David Sinclair; (5) Pharmacological treatment trials with dopaminergic and serotonergic substances: Myths or facts? by Gerhard A. Wiesbeck; and (6) Methodology and behavioral therapy of the U.S. acamprosate study, by Barbara J. Mason. PMID:11391061

  9. Application of a utility analysis to evaluate a novel assessment tool for clinically oriented physiology and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Nicholas; Asmar, Abdo; Gorman, Laurel; Gros, Bernard; Harris, David; Howard, Thomas; Hussain, Mujtaba; Salazar, Sergio; Kibble, Jonathan D

    2016-09-01

    Multiple-choice questions are a gold-standard tool in medical school for assessment of knowledge and are the mainstay of licensing examinations. However, multiple-choice questions items can be criticized for lacking the ability to test higher-order learning or integrative thinking across multiple disciplines. Our objective was to develop a novel assessment that would address understanding of pathophysiology and pharmacology, evaluate learning at the levels of application, evaluation and synthesis, and allow students to demonstrate clinical reasoning. The rubric assesses student writeups of clinical case problems. The method is based on the physician's traditional postencounter Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan note. Students were required to correctly identify subjective and objective findings in authentic clinical case problems, to ascribe pathophysiological as well as pharmacological mechanisms to these findings, and to justify a list of differential diagnoses. A utility analysis was undertaken to evaluate the new assessment tool by appraising its reliability, validity, feasibility, cost effectiveness, acceptability, and educational impact using a mixed-method approach. The Subjective, Objective, Assessment and Plan assessment tool scored highly in terms of validity and educational impact and had acceptable levels of statistical reliability but was limited in terms of acceptance, feasibility, and cost effectiveness due to high time demands on expert graders and workload concerns from students. We conclude by making suggestions for improving the tool and recommend deployment of the instrument for low-stakes summative assessment or formative assessment. PMID:27445277

  10. Pharmacological treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis – preclinical and clinical studies of pirfenidone, nintedanib, and N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Myllärniemi, Marjukka; Kaarteenaho, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    Three recent clinical trials on the pharmacologic treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) mark a new chapter in the management of patients suffering from this very severe fibrotic lung disease. This review article summarizes the published investigations on the preclinical studies of three novel IPF drugs, namely pirfenidone, nintedanib, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). In addition, the study protocols, differences, and the main findings in the recent clinical trials of these pharmacological treatments are reviewed. The strategy for drug development and the timeline from the discovery to the clinical use have been very different in these regimens. Pirfenidone was discovered in 1976 but only recently received approval in most countries, and even now its exact mechanism of action is unknown. On the contrary, nintedanib (BIBF1120) was identified in large drug screening tests as a very specific inhibitor of certain tyrosine kinases, but no published data on preclinical tests existed until 2014. NAC, a mucolytic drug with an antioxidant mechanism of action was claimed to possess distinct antifibrotic properties in several experimental models but proved to be ineffective in a recent randomized placebo-controlled trial. At present, no curative treatment is available for IPF. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of IPF as well as relevant preclinical tests including animal models and in vitro experiments on human lung cells are needed to promote the development of therapeutic drugs. PMID:26557253

  11. A renaissance in marine pharmacology: from preclinical curiosity to clinical reality.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Keith B; Mayer, Alejandro M S

    2009-09-01

    Marine pharmacology, the pharmacology of marine natural products, has been for some time more associated with marine natural products chemistry rather than mainstay pharmacology. However, in recent years a renaissance has occurred in this area of research, and has seen the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approval in 2004 of Prialt (ziconotide, omega-conotoxin MVIIA) the synthetic equivalent of a conopeptide found in marine snails, used for the management of severe chronic pain. Furthermore Yondelis) (trabectedin, ET-743) an antitumor agent scovered in a marine colonial tunicate, and now produced synthetically, receiving Orphan Drug designation from the European Commission (EC) and FDA for soft tissue sarcomas and ovarian cancer and its registration in 2007 in the EU for the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma. The approval/marketing of so few marine natural products has come after many years of research primarily by the academic community and the sporadic involvement of major pharmaceutical companies. This commentary, through the opinions provided by several leaders in the marine natural products field, will examine the potential reasons and perceptions from both the academic and pharmaceutical communities regarding the development of marine natural products as viable therapeutic entities. PMID:19393227

  12. Molecular targets of Chinese herbs: a clinical study of hepatoma based on network pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Niu, Yang-Yang; Duan, Dan-Dan; Yang, Xue; Hao, Jian; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Chen, Dan; Wang, Ke-Xin; Qin, Xue-Mei; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat tumors for years and has been demonstrated to be effective. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of herbs remain unclear. This study aims to ascertain molecular targets of herbs prolonging survival time of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on network pharmacology, and to establish a research method for accurate treatment of TCM. The survival benefit of TCM treatment with Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) was proved by Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis among 288 patients. The correlation between herbs and survival time was performed by bivariate correlation analysis. Network pharmacology method was utilized to construct the active ingredient-target networks of herbs that were responsible for the beneficial effects against HCC. Cox regression analysis showed CHM was an independent favorable prognostic factor. The median survival time was 13 months and the 5-year overall survival rates were 2.61% in the TCM group, while there were 6 months, 0 in the non-TCM group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that 8 herbs closely associated with prognosis. Network pharmacology analysis revealed that the 8 herbs regulated multiple HCC relative genes, among which the genes affected proliferation (KRAS, AKT2, MAPK), metastasis (SRC, MMP), angiogenesis (PTGS2) and apoptosis (CASP3) etc. PMID:27143508

  13. Molecular targets of Chinese herbs: a clinical study of hepatoma based on network pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Wang, Xiao-dong; Niu, Yang-yang; Duan, Dan-dan; Yang, Xue; Hao, Jian; Zhu, Cui-hong; Chen, Dan; Wang, Ke-xin; Qin, Xue-mei; Wu, Xiong-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used to treat tumors for years and has been demonstrated to be effective. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of herbs remain unclear. This study aims to ascertain molecular targets of herbs prolonging survival time of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on network pharmacology, and to establish a research method for accurate treatment of TCM. The survival benefit of TCM treatment with Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) was proved by Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression analysis among 288 patients. The correlation between herbs and survival time was performed by bivariate correlation analysis. Network pharmacology method was utilized to construct the active ingredient-target networks of herbs that were responsible for the beneficial effects against HCC. Cox regression analysis showed CHM was an independent favorable prognostic factor. The median survival time was 13 months and the 5-year overall survival rates were 2.61% in the TCM group, while there were 6 months, 0 in the non-TCM group. Correlation analysis demonstrated that 8 herbs closely associated with prognosis. Network pharmacology analysis revealed that the 8 herbs regulated multiple HCC relative genes, among which the genes affected proliferation (KRAS, AKT2, MAPK), metastasis (SRC, MMP), angiogenesis (PTGS2) and apoptosis (CASP3) etc. PMID:27143508

  14. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.; Azziz, Ricardo; Baskin, Laurence S.; Ghizzoni, Lucia; Hensle, Terry W.; Merke, Deborah P.; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; Miller, Walter L.; Montori, Victor M.; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Ritzen, Martin; White, Perrin C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We developed clinical practice guidelines for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Participants: The Task Force included a chair, selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), ten additional clinicians experienced in treating CAH, a methodologist, and a medical writer. Additional experts were also consulted. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence and discussions. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society’s CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: We recommend universal newborn screening for severe steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency followed by confirmatory tests. We recommend that prenatal treatment of CAH continue to be regarded as experimental. The diagnosis rests on clinical and hormonal data; genotyping is reserved for equivocal cases and genetic counseling. Glucocorticoid dosage should be minimized to avoid iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. Mineralocorticoids and, in infants, supplemental sodium are recommended in classic CAH patients. We recommend against the routine use of experimental therapies to promote growth and delay puberty; we suggest patients avoid adrenalectomy. Surgical guidelines emphasize early single-stage genital repair for severely virilized girls, performed by experienced surgeons. Clinicians should consider patients’ quality of life, consulting mental health professionals as appropriate. At the transition to adulthood, we recommend monitoring for potential complications of CAH. Finally, we recommend judicious use of medication during pregnancy and in symptomatic patients with nonclassic CAH. PMID:20823466

  15. Role of American Society of Clinical Oncology in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jyoti D; Galsky, Matthew D; Chagpar, Anees B; Pyle, Doug; Loehrer, Patrick J

    2011-08-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is a global community of health care professionals whose stated purpose is to "make a world of difference" by improving cancer care around the world. Unfortunately, cancer survival rates vary significantly among countries with differing financial and infrastructural resources. Because ASCO is a professional oncology society committed to conquering cancer through research, education, prevention, and delivery of high-quality patient care, it is ideally suited to address this issue. ASCO could bring together oncology professionals and other necessary stakeholders from around the world to improve cancer care and lessen suffering for patients worldwide. As part of the ongoing commitment of ASCO to the future of cancer care, the Leadership Development Program was created to foster the leadership skills of early and midcareer oncologists and provide these participants with a working knowledge of the depth and breadth of the organization. As participants in the inaugural class of the ASCO Leadership Development Program, we were charged with investigating how ASCO might favorably affect cancer prevention and treatment in resource-poor countries in a cost-effective, scalable, and sustainable fashion. ASCO can significantly influence cancer care in low- and middle-income countries through a comprehensive approach that promotes cancer awareness and education, improves clinical practice by identifying and removing barriers to delivery of quality cancer care, and fosters innovation to initiate novel solutions to complex problems. PMID:21709190

  16. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University.

    PubMed

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Phelps, Mitch A; Neidecker, Marjorie V; Apseloff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program - one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology - that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions. PMID:25018660

  17. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Phelps, Mitch A; Neidecker, Marjorie V; Apseloff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program – one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology – that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions. PMID:25018660

  18. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Brady, Mark F.; Coleman, Robert L.; Einstein, Mark H.; Monk, Bradley J.; Mannel, Robert S.; Thigpen, J. Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A.; Villella, Jeannine A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. Methods A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Results Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Conclusions Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect

  19. [Clinical and therapeutic management of respiratory tract infections. Consensus document of the Andalusian Infectious Diseases Society and the Andalusian Family and Community Medicine Society].

    PubMed

    Cordero Matía, Elisa; de Dios Alcántara Bellón, Juan; Caballero Granado, Javier; de la Torre Lima, Javier; Girón González, José Antonio; Lama Herrera, Carmen; Morán Rodríguez, Ana; Zapata López, Angel

    2007-04-01

    Respiratory tract infections are frequent and they are one of the commonest causes of antibiotic prescription. However, there are few clinical guidelines that consider this group of infections. This document has been written by the Andalusian Infectious Diseases Society and the Andalusian Family and Community Medicine Society. The primary objective has been to define the recommendations for the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of respiratory tract infections apart from pneumonia. The clinical syndromes evaluated have been: a) pharyngitis; b) sinusitis; c) acute otitis media and otitis externa; d) acute bronchitis, laryngitis, epiglottitis; e) acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis; and f) respiratory infectious in patients with bronchiectasis. This document has focused on immunocompetent patients. PMID:17386221

  20. Improving the Evidence Base for Treating Older Adults With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    PubMed

    Hurria, Arti; Levit, Laura A; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya G; Muss, Hyman B; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Magnuson, Allison; Lichtman, Stuart M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Tew, William P; Postow, Michael A; Cohen, Harvey J

    2015-11-10

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a subcommittee to develop recommendations on improving the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer in response to a critical need identified by the Institute of Medicine. Older adults experience the majority of cancer diagnoses and deaths and make up the majority of cancer survivors. Older adults are also the fastest growing segment of the US population. However, the evidence base for treating this population is sparse, because older adults are underrepresented in clinical trials, and trials designed specifically for older adults are rare. The result is that clinicians have less evidence on how to treat older adults, who represent the majority of patients with cancer. Clinicians and patients are forced to extrapolate from trials conducted in younger, healthier populations when developing treatment plans. This has created a dearth of knowledge regarding the risk of toxicity in the average older patient and about key end points of importance to older adults. ASCO makes five recommendations to improve evidence generation in this population: (1) Use clinical trials to improve the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer, (2) leverage research designs and infrastructure for generating evidence on older adults with cancer, (3) increase US Food and Drug Administration authority to incentivize and require research involving older adults with cancer, (4) increase clinicians' recruitment of older adults with cancer to clinical trials, and (5) use journal policies to improve researchers' reporting on the age distribution and health risk profiles of research participants. PMID:26195697

  1. The use of functional neuroimaging to evaluate psychological and other non-pharmacological treatments for clinical pain.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Karin B; Berna, Chantal; Loggia, Marco L; Wasan, Ajay D; Edwards, Robert R; Gollub, Randy L

    2012-06-29

    A large number of studies have provided evidence for the efficacy of psychological and other non-pharmacological interventions in the treatment of chronic pain. While these methods are increasingly used to treat pain, remarkably few studies focused on the exploration of their neural correlates. The aim of this article was to review the findings from neuroimaging studies that evaluated the neural response to distraction-based techniques, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), clinical hypnosis, mental imagery, physical therapy/exercise, biofeedback, and mirror therapy. To date, the results from studies that used neuroimaging to evaluate these methods have not been conclusive and the experimental methods have been suboptimal for assessing clinical pain. Still, several different psychological and non-pharmacological treatment modalities were associated with increased pain-related activations of executive cognitive brain regions, such as the ventral- and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. There was also evidence for decreased pain-related activations in afferent pain regions and limbic structures. If future studies will address the technical and methodological challenges of today's experiments, neuroimaging might have the potential of segregating the neural mechanisms of different treatment interventions and elucidate predictive and mediating factors for successful treatment outcomes. Evaluations of treatment-related brain changes (functional and structural) might also allow for sub-grouping of patients and help to develop individualized treatments. PMID:22445888

  2. The Second Insubria Autumn School on Neuroimmune Pharmacology: Repurposing Established Drugs for Novel Indications.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Marco; Marino, Franca

    2016-03-01

    The Second Insubria Autumn School on Neuroimmune Pharmacology was held at the University of Insubria in Varese (Italy) in November 16th-20th 2015, under the auspices of the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology, the Italian Society of Pharmacology, and the Italian Association for Neuroimmunology. The School was dedicated to the repurposing of established drugs for novel indications, considering the enormous opportunities for drug repositioning provided by the prominent innovative and interdisciplinary approaches peculiar to neuroimmune pharmacology. More than 40 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from 12 european universities, research institutes and hospitals attended the School, and lectures were given by 20 internationally acknowledged experts in the fields of basic and clinical neurosciences, immunology, and pharmacology. A poster session provided young researchers the opportunity to present their results, and the best poster was given the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology Young Investigator Award. PMID:26670166

  3. Clinical cancer advances 2011: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Benowitz, Steven I; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Chang, Susan Marina; Dreyer, Zoann Eckert; Janne, Pasi A; Ko, Andrew H; Masters, Greg A; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Patel, Jyoti D; Roth, Bruce J; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Seidman, Andrew D; Tap, William D; Temel, Jennifer S; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Kris, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    A message from ASCO'S President. It has been forty years since President Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act of 1971, which many view as the nation's declaration of the "War on Cancer." The bill has led to major investments in cancer research and significant increases in cancer survival. Today, two-thirds of patients survive at least five years after being diagnosed with cancer compared with just half of all diagnosed patients surviving five years after diagnosis in 1975. The research advances detailed in this year's Clinical Cancer Advances demonstrate that improvements in cancer screening, treatment, and prevention save and improve lives. But although much progress has been made, cancer remains one of the world's most serious health problems. In the United States, the disease is expected to become the nation's leading cause of death in the years ahead as our population ages. I believe we can accelerate the pace of progress, provided that everyone involved in cancer care works together to achieve this goal. It is this viewpoint that has shaped the theme for my presidential term: Collaborating to Conquer Cancer. In practice, this means that physicians and researchers must learn from every patient's experience, ensure greater collaboration between members of a patient's medical team, and involve more patients in the search for cures through clinical trials. Cancer advocates, insurers, and government agencies also have important roles to play. Today, we have an incredible opportunity to improve the quality of cancer care by drawing lessons from the real-world experiences of patients. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is taking the lead in this area, in part through innovative use of health information technology. In addition to our existing quality initiatives, ASCO is working with partners to develop a comprehensive rapid-learning system for cancer care. When complete, this system will provide physicians with personalized, real

  4. [Clinical-pharmacological aspects to accelerate the development process from the preclinical to the clinical phase/2nd communication: promising strategies].

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    To improve the transition from research to development a critical evaluation of the individual project by research and disease area teams is required to include input from pharmacology, toxicology, pharmacokinetics, galenics, clinical pharmacology, clinical as well as regulatory experts and marketing. Decisions on the individual development strategy should be made prior to the start of development and all projects should be reviewed at predefined stages throughout the product development life cycle. This ensures consistency of decision-making not only during the development of individual products but throughout the entire development pipeline. Studies in the exploratory stage of drug development should be designed for decision making in contrast to later clinical trials in the confirmatory stage that require power for proof-of-safety and proof-of-efficacy. The more thorough and profound studies have been carried out during this exploratory stage of drug development, the earlier a decision can be made on the continuation or discontinuation of further development, thus saving development time and money and assessing and considerably reducing the risk for the patients and increasing the success rate of the project in the later confirmatory effectiveness trial with an adequate number of subjects receiving the new therapy under typical conditions of use. Strategies which may be helpful to improve the quality of decisions in drug discovery and drug development are: discovery experiments should be done to critically evaluate the compound, the "killer" experiments should be done as early as possible, continuous effort on preclinical disease models is necessary to improve predictability of efficacy in patients ("humanized" research): genomic technology should be used to identify novel, disease-related targets and to characterise preclinical test systems, improvement of knowledge and experience concerning the relevance of new technologies for the clinical picture, genotyping

  5. Setting high-impact clinical research priorities for the Society for Vascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kraiss, Larry W; Conte, Michael S; Geary, Randolph L; Kibbe, Melina; Ozaki, C Keith

    2013-02-01

    With the overall goal of enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of vascular care, the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) recently completed a process by which it identified its top clinical research priorities to address critical gaps in knowledge guiding practitioners in prevention and treatment of vascular disease. After a survey of the SVS membership, a panel of SVS committee members and opinion leaders considered 53 distinct research questions through a structured process that resulted in identification of nine clinical issues that were felt to merit immediate attention by vascular investigators and external funding agencies. These are, in order of priority: (1) define optimal management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis, (2) compare the effectiveness of medical vs invasive treatment (open or endovascular) of vasculogenic claudication, (3) compare effectiveness of open vs endovascular infrainguinal revascularization as initial treatment of critical limb ischemia, (4) develop and compare the effectiveness of clinical strategies to reduce cardiovascular and other perioperative complications (eg, wound) after vascular intervention, (5) compare the effectiveness of strategies to enhance arteriovenous fistula maturation and durability, (6) develop best practices for management of chronic venous ulcer, (7) define optimal adjunctive medical therapy to enhance the success of lower extremity revascularization, (8) identify and evaluate medical therapy to prevent abdominal aortic aneurysm growth, and (9) evaluate ultrasound vs computed tomographic angiography surveillance after endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:23337859

  6. Pharmacology and clinical potential of guanylyl cyclase C agonists in the treatment of ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pitari, Giovanni M

    2013-01-01

    Agonists of the transmembrane intestinal receptor guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) have recently attracted interest as promising human therapeutics. Peptide ligands that can specifically induce GCC signaling in the intestine include endogenous hormones guanylin and uroguanylin, diarrheagenic bacterial enterotoxins (ST), and synthetic drugs linaclotide, plecanatide, and SP-333. These agonists bind to GCC at intestinal epithelial surfaces and activate the receptor’s intracellular catalytic domain, an event initiating discrete biological responses upon conversion of guanosine-5′-triphosphate to cyclic guanosine monophosphate. A principal action of GCC agonists in the colon is the promotion of mucosal homeostasis and its dependent barrier function. Herein, GCC agonists are being developed as new medications to treat inflammatory bowel diseases, pathological conditions characterized by mucosal barrier hyperpermeability, abnormal immune reactions, and chronic local inflammation. This review will present important concepts underlying the pharmacology and therapeutic utility of GCC agonists for patients with ulcerative colitis, one of the most prevalent inflammatory bowel disease disorders. PMID:23637522

  7. [Clinical aspects of pharmacological treatment of diabetic neuropathy - cooperation with neurologists and diabetologists].

    PubMed

    Janíčková Žďárská, Denisa; Kvapil, Milan

    2016-03-01

    The development and progression of symptomatic diabetic neuropathy (SDN) is linked to hyperglycemia. The effort to improve compensation of diabetes mellitus during therapy is therefore very important. This is where the cooperation between the diabetologist and neurologist within therapy plays an important role. The pharmaco-logical therapy of symptomatic sensitive peripheral diabetic neuropathy is difficult and with a less than satisfactory effect. A variety of active substances is used in symptomatic therapy, primarily designed for intervention in other pathological conditions. The recommended guidelines include antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opiates and their derivatives. However this therapy brings with it a relatively high incidence of adverse effects which detract from patients adherence to treatment. Very good results are reached by the therapy with thioctacid. PMID:27180665

  8. Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology of Andrographis paniculata and Its Major Bioactive Phytoconstituent Andrographolide

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Lee, Jie-Jen; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata (Burm. F) Nees, generally known as “king of bitters,” is an herbaceous plant in the family Acanthaceae. In China, India, Thailand, and Malaysia, this plant has been widely used for treating sore throat, flu, and upper respiratory tract infections. Andrographolide, a major bioactive chemical constituent of the plant, has shown anticancer potential in various investigations. Andrographolide and its derivatives have anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models asthma, stroke, and arthritis. In recent years, pharmaceutical chemists have synthesized numerous andrographolide derivatives, which exhibit essential pharmacological activities such as those that are anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antitumor, antidiabetic, anti-HIV, antifeedant, and antiviral. However, what is noteworthy about this paper is summarizing the effects of andrographolide against cardiovascular disease, platelet activation, infertility, and NF-κB activation. Therefore, this paper is intended to provide evidence reported in relevant literature on qualitative research to assist scientists in isolating and characterizing bioactive compounds. PMID:23634174

  9. Trace Amines and the Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1: Pharmacology, Neurochemistry, and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yue; Asif-Malik, Aman; Canales, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic amines are a collection of endogenous molecules that play pivotal roles as neurotransmitters and hormones. In addition to the "classical" biogenic amines resulting from decarboxylation of aromatic acids, including dopamine (DA), norepinephrine, epinephrine, serotonin (5-HT), and histamine, other biogenic amines, present at much lower concentrations in the central nervous system (CNS), and hence referred to as "trace" amines (TAs), are now recognized to play significant neurophysiological and behavioral functions. At the turn of the century, the discovery of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), a phylogenetically conserved G protein-coupled receptor that is responsive to both TAs, such as β-phenylethylamine, octopamine, and tyramine, and structurally-related amphetamines, unveiled mechanisms of action for TAs other than interference with aminergic pathways, laying the foundations for deciphering the functional significance of TAs and its mammalian CNS receptor, TAAR1. Although, its molecular interactions and downstream targets have not been fully elucidated, TAAR1 activation triggers accumulation of intracellular cAMP, modulates PKA and PKC signaling and interferes with the β-arrestin2-dependent pathway via G protein-independent mechanisms. TAAR1 is uniquely positioned to exert direct control over DA and 5-HT neuronal firing and release, which has profound implications for understanding the pathophysiology of, and therefore designing more efficacious therapeutic interventions for, a range of neuropsychiatric disorders that involve aminergic dysregulation, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, mood disorders, and addiction. Indeed, the recent development of novel pharmacological tools targeting TAAR1 has uncovered the remarkable potential of TAAR1-based medications as new generation pharmacotherapies in neuropsychiatry. This review summarizes recent developments in the study of TAs and TAAR1, their intricate neurochemistry and

  10. Trace Amines and the Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1: Pharmacology, Neurochemistry, and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yue; Asif-Malik, Aman; Canales, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenic amines are a collection of endogenous molecules that play pivotal roles as neurotransmitters and hormones. In addition to the “classical” biogenic amines resulting from decarboxylation of aromatic acids, including dopamine (DA), norepinephrine, epinephrine, serotonin (5-HT), and histamine, other biogenic amines, present at much lower concentrations in the central nervous system (CNS), and hence referred to as “trace” amines (TAs), are now recognized to play significant neurophysiological and behavioral functions. At the turn of the century, the discovery of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1), a phylogenetically conserved G protein-coupled receptor that is responsive to both TAs, such as β-phenylethylamine, octopamine, and tyramine, and structurally-related amphetamines, unveiled mechanisms of action for TAs other than interference with aminergic pathways, laying the foundations for deciphering the functional significance of TAs and its mammalian CNS receptor, TAAR1. Although, its molecular interactions and downstream targets have not been fully elucidated, TAAR1 activation triggers accumulation of intracellular cAMP, modulates PKA and PKC signaling and interferes with the β-arrestin2-dependent pathway via G protein-independent mechanisms. TAAR1 is uniquely positioned to exert direct control over DA and 5-HT neuronal firing and release, which has profound implications for understanding the pathophysiology of, and therefore designing more efficacious therapeutic interventions for, a range of neuropsychiatric disorders that involve aminergic dysregulation, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, mood disorders, and addiction. Indeed, the recent development of novel pharmacological tools targeting TAAR1 has uncovered the remarkable potential of TAAR1-based medications as new generation pharmacotherapies in neuropsychiatry. This review summarizes recent developments in the study of TAs and TAAR1, their intricate neurochemistry and

  11. Clinical Pharmacology Quality Assurance (CPQA) Program: Models for Longitudinal Analysis of Antiretroviral (ARV) Proficiency Testing for International Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Robin; Rosenkranz, Susan L.; Taylor, Charlene R.; Pande, Poonam G.; Siminski, Suzanne M.; Jenny, Richard W.; Morse, Gene D.

    2013-01-01

    Among National Institutes of Health (NIH) HIV Research Networks conducting multicenter trials, samples from protocols that span several years are analyzed at multiple clinical pharmacology laboratories (CPLs) for multiple antiretrovirals (ARV). Drug assay data are, in turn, entered into study-specific datasets that are used for pharmacokinetic analyses, merged to conduct cross-protocol pharmacokinetic analysis and integrated with pharmacogenomics research to investigate pharmacokinetic-pharmacogenetic associations. The CPLs participate in a semi-annual proficiency testing (PT) program implemented by the Clinical Pharmacology Quality Assurance (CPQA) program. Using results from multiple PT rounds, longitudinal analyses of recovery are reflective of accuracy and precision within/across laboratories. The objectives of this longitudinal analysis of PT across multiple CPLs were to develop and test statistical models that longitudinally: (1)assess the precision and accuracy of concentrations reported by individual CPLs; (2)determine factors associated with round-specific and long-term assay accuracy, precision and bias using a new regression model. A measure of absolute recovery is explored as a simultaneous measure of accuracy and precision. Overall, the analysis outcomes assured 97% accuracy (±20% of the final target concentration of all (21)drug concentration results reported for clinical trial samples by multiple CPLs).Using the CLIA acceptance of meeting criteria for ≥2/3 consecutive rounds, all ten laboratories that participated in three or more rounds per analyte maintained CLIA proficiency. Significant associations were present between magnitude of error and CPL (Kruskal Wallis [KW]p<0.001), and ARV (KW p<0.001). PMID:24052065

  12. Preclinical development and clinical translation of a PSMA-targeted docetaxel nanoparticle with a differentiated pharmacological profile.

    PubMed

    Hrkach, Jeffrey; Von Hoff, Daniel; Mukkaram Ali, Mir; Andrianova, Elizaveta; Auer, Jason; Campbell, Tarikh; De Witt, David; Figa, Michael; Figueiredo, Maria; Horhota, Allen; Low, Susan; McDonnell, Kevin; Peeke, Erick; Retnarajan, Beadle; Sabnis, Abhimanyu; Schnipper, Edward; Song, Jeffrey J; Song, Young Ho; Summa, Jason; Tompsett, Douglas; Troiano, Greg; Van Geen Hoven, Tina; Wright, Jim; LoRusso, Patricia; Kantoff, Philip W; Bander, Neil H; Sweeney, Christopher; Farokhzad, Omid C; Langer, Robert; Zale, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    We describe the development and clinical translation of a targeted polymeric nanoparticle (TNP) containing the chemotherapeutic docetaxel (DTXL) for the treatment of patients with solid tumors. DTXL-TNP is targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen, a clinically validated tumor antigen expressed on prostate cancer cells and on the neovasculature of most nonprostate solid tumors. DTXL-TNP was developed from a combinatorial library of more than 100 TNP formulations varying with respect to particle size, targeting ligand density, surface hydrophilicity, drug loading, and drug release properties. Pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution studies in rats showed that the NPs had a blood circulation half-life of about 20 hours and minimal liver accumulation. In tumor-bearing mice, DTXL-TNP exhibited markedly enhanced tumor accumulation at 12 hours and prolonged tumor growth suppression compared to a solvent-based DTXL formulation (sb-DTXL). In tumor-bearing mice, rats, and nonhuman primates, DTXL-TNP displayed pharmacokinetic characteristics consistent with prolonged circulation of NPs in the vascular compartment and controlled release of DTXL, with total DTXL plasma concentrations remaining at least 100-fold higher than sb-DTXL for more than 24 hours. Finally, initial clinical data in patients with advanced solid tumors indicated that DTXL-TNP displays a pharmacological profile differentiated from sb-DTXL, including pharmacokinetics characteristics consistent with preclinical data and cases of tumor shrinkage at doses below the sb-DTXL dose typically used in the clinic. PMID:22491949

  13. Advancing Clinical Practice and Policy through Guidelines. The Role of the American Thoracic Society

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    In the face of an overwhelmingly large and growing medical literature, providers often turn to clinical practice guidelines to inform the decisions they make with patients. By systematically appraising the evidence and providing transparent recommendations for practice, guidelines have the potential to improve both bedside decision-making and health policy. This potential has not been fully realized because most guidelines lack transparency, are tainted by conflicts of interest, or fail to employ rigorous methods to appraise the evidence. To address the shortcomings of past guidelines, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published recommendations for trustworthy guidelines, effectively setting the “gold standard” for what constitutes a high-quality guideline. Along with many other groups that develop guidelines, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) is rapidly evolving processes for development and implementation to meet many of the IOM standards. This Pulmonary Perspective describes the rapidly changing landscape of clinical practice guidelines, the role of the ATS in this landscape, and the activities the ATS is engaged in to ensure that the guidelines it produces are of the highest quality with the broadest impact. PMID:23392437

  14. 2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Galgiani, John N; Ampel, Neil M; Blair, Janis E; Catanzaro, Antonino; Geertsma, Francesca; Hoover, Susan E; Johnson, Royce H; Kusne, Shimon; Lisse, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Joel D; Meyerson, Shari L; Raksin, Patricia B; Siever, John; Stevens, David A; Sunenshine, Rebecca; Theodore, Nicholas

    2016-09-15

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. Infectious Diseases Society of America considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.Coccidioidomycosis, also known as San Joaquin Valley fever, is a systemic infection endemic to parts of the southwestern United States and elsewhere in the Western Hemisphere. Residence in and recent travel to these areas are critical elements for the accurate recognition of patients who develop this infection. In this practice guideline, we have organized our recommendations to address actionable questions concerning the entire spectrum of clinical syndromes. These can range from initial pulmonary infection, which eventually resolves whether or not antifungal therapy is administered, to a variety of pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications. Additional recommendations address management of coccidioidomycosis occurring for special at-risk populations. Finally, preemptive management strategies are outlined in certain at-risk populations and after unintentional laboratory exposure. PMID:27470238

  15. Epoetin zeta in the management of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease, differential pharmacology and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Davis-Ajami, Mary Lynn; Wu, Jun; Downton, Katherine; Ludeman, Emilie; Noxon, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Epoetin zeta was granted marketing authorization in October 2007 by the European Medicines Agency as a recombinant human erythropoietin erythropoiesis-stimulating agent to treat symptomatic anemia of renal origin in adult and pediatric patients on hemodialysis and adults on peritoneal dialysis, as well as for symptomatic renal anemia in adult patients with renal insufficiency not yet on dialysis. Currently, epoetin zeta can be administered either subcutaneously or intravenously to correct for hemoglobin concentrations ≤10 g/dL (6.2 mmol/L) or with dose adjustment to maintain hemoglobin levels at desired levels not in excess of 12 g/dL (7.5 mmol/L). This review article focuses on epoetin zeta indications in chronic kidney disease, its use in managing anemia of renal origin, and discusses its pharmacology and clinical utility. PMID:24790409

  16. MP29-02 for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis: a review of clinical pharmacology, efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Berger, William E

    2013-09-01

    This review presents the pharmacology, clinical efficacy and safety of MP29-02 (Dymista®), a unique product for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis is often thought of more as a nuisance than a meaningful medical condition, and the health impact of allergic rhinitis can easily be underestimated. As a result, allergic rhinitis can be undertreated, expectations for relief may not be met, and patients may be left dissatisfied and non-compliant with their medications. MP29-02 is the only currently available allergic rhinitis medication to provide potent early-phase histamine-receptor blocking and long-term anti-inflammatory effects in a single intranasal formulation and delivery system that represents an advance in the therapy of allergic rhinitis, in particular for patients with moderate-to-severe disease. PMID:24070043

  17. ITI-007 in the treatment of schizophrenia: from novel pharmacology to clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert E; Correll, Christoph U

    2016-06-01

    ITI-007 is an investigational drug being developed for schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric/neurodegenerative diseases. ITI-007 has a unique pharmacological profile, combining potent 5-HT2a receptor antagonism with cell-type-specific dopamine and glutamate receptor modulation, plus serotonin reuptake inhibition. At dopamine-D2 receptors, ITI-007 acts as a post-synaptic antagonist and pre-synaptic partial agonist. Additionally, ITI-007 stimulates phosphorylation of glutamatergic NMDA-NR2B receptors, downstream of dopamine-D1 receptor intracellular signaling. Based on a large, placebo and risperidone controlled, Phase-II trial, ITI-007 60 mg was shown to be effective in reducing symptoms in patients with acutely exacerbated schizophrenia. The antipsychotic efficacy of ITI-007 60 mg in this patient population was confirmed in a recently completed Phase III study. ITI-007 was associated with minimal safety risk compared to risperidone (Phase II study) or placebo (both studies) for neuromotor disturbances, prolactin changes, weight gain and metabolic abnormalities. A second 6-week, placebo and risperidone-controlled Phase-III trial in acutely exacerbated schizophrenia is ongoing. PMID:27042868

  18. Guidelines for the use of allergen immunotherapy. Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    by positive results of skin tests and for whom avoidance of the allergen and drug therapy are not sufficiently effective. VALIDATION: These guidelines are similar to others being developed in the United States and recommended by the Joint Council of Allergy and Immunology and the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. SPONSOR: These guidelines were developed by a working group of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; no funding was received from any other source. PMID:7728690

  19. Methodological innovations expand the safety pharmacology horizon.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, M K; Curtis, M J

    2012-09-01

    Almost uniquely in pharmacology, drug safety assessment is driven by the need for elaboration and validation of methods for detecting drug actions. This is the 9th consecutive year that the Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods (JPTM) has published themed issues arising from the annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS). The SPS is now past its 10th year as a distinct (from pharmacology to toxicology) discipline that integrates safety pharmacologists from industry with those in academia and the various global regulatory authorities. The themes of the 2011 meeting were (i) the bridging of safety assessment of a new chemical entity (NCE) between all the parties involved, (ii) applied technologies and (iii) translation. This issue of JPTM reflects these themes. The content is informed by the regulatory guidance documents (S7A and S7B) that apply prior to first in human (FIH) studies, which emphasize the importance of seeking model validation. The manuscripts encompass a broad spectrum of safety pharmacology topics including application of state-of-the-art techniques for study conduct and data processing and evaluation. This includes some exciting novel integrated core battery study designs, refinements in hemodynamic assessment, arrhythmia analysis algorithms, and additionally an overview of safety immunopharmacology, and a brief survey discussing similarities and differences in business models that pharmaceutical companies employ in safety pharmacology, together with SPS recommendations on 'best practice' for the conduct of a non-clinical cardiovascular assessment of a NCE. PMID:22617368

  20. The clinical pharmacology of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of malignancy; have the magic bullets arrived?

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Barrett W; Ernstoff, Marc S

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) are proteins in the immunoglobulin family that bind to specific protein epitope targets on cancer and stromal cells, allowing them to be successfully exploited as therapeutic agents. The prototype Mabs were produced from fusion of mouse B lymphocytes and mouse myeloma cells and were entirely murine in sequence. Subsequent advances in technology have allowed for humanized Mabs, which have different pharmacokinetic properties than murine Mabs in humans. Mabs antitumour activity is mediated through direct interaction with specific target molecules, deployment of immune cytotoxic pathways, or through chaperoning cytotoxic agents to tumour. Mabs are typically administered intravenously, are generally well tolerated and can have powerful anticancer activity. Humanized Mabs have a t1/2 in human sera of 2–3 weeks, which determines the frequency of administration. At present, nine clinically approved Mabs are used in the treatment of human cancer, and many others are in clinical trials. We discuss the pharmacology, clinical indications, and toxicity of the currently available anticancer Mabs in this review. PMID:18503606

  1. Quantitative clinical pharmacology for size and age scaling in pediatric drug development: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Samant, Tanay S; Mangal, Naveen; Lukacova, Viera; Schmidt, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    The establishment of drug dosing in children is often hindered by the lack of actual pediatric efficacy and safety data. To overcome this limitation, scaling approaches are frequently employed to leverage adult clinical information for informing pediatric dosing. The objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the different scaling approaches used in pediatric pharmacotherapy as well as their proper implementation in drug development and clinical use. We will start out with a brief overview of the current regulatory requirements in pediatric drug development, followed by a review of the most commonly employed scaling approaches in increasing order of complexity ranging from simple body weight-based dosing to physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling approaches. Each of the presented approaches has advantages and limitations, which will be highlighted throughout the course of the review by the use of clinically-relevant examples. The choice of the approach employed consequently depends on the clinical question at hand and the availability of sufficient clinical data. The main effort while establishing and qualifying these scaling approaches should be directed towards the development of safe and effective dosing regimens in children rather than identifying the best model, ie models should be fit for purpose. PMID:26009792

  2. An introduction to clinical research and drug development for pharmacy and pharmacology graduate students.

    PubMed

    Smith, Judith A

    2002-08-01

    Recently at the University of Houston College of Pharmacy, a new course was introduced to provide an overview of each phase of drug development research, from the initial chemistry assays and cell biologystudies to animal experiments and finally clinical trials for drug approval. The course, entitled "Clinical Research and Drug Development," is a three-credit elective introduced this past yearfor the entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) students and graduate students during the summer session at the college. Overall, the intent of this course is to develop students' interest in the topic of clinical research and drug development and provide a foundation of knowledge of basic research skills used in the drug development process. The approach for this course was to break the topics into three general modules: laboratory techniques, both analytical and cell biology/molecular, used in the drug development process; aspects of clinical research process; and writing grants and protocols. Throughout the course, students were strongly encouraged to consider pursuing independent research projects to help continue to develop their research skills in preparation for postgraduate training. As a result, on completion of the course, four students requested an opportunity to complete an independent research project. This course has introduced the various components of drug development and of conducting clinical research to students in the PharmD and graduate programs at the University of Houston College of Pharmacy. PMID:12162468

  3. Paving the critical path: how can clinical pharmacology help achieve the vision?

    PubMed

    Lesko, L J

    2007-02-01

    It has been almost 3 years since the launch of the FDA critical path initiative following the publication of the paper "Innovation or Stagnation: Challenges and Opportunities on the Critical Path of New Medical Product Development." The initiative was intended to create an urgency with the drug development enterprise to address the so-called "productivity problem" in modern drug development. Clinical pharmacologists are strategically aligned with solutions designed to reduce late phase clinical trial failures to show adequate efficacy and/or safety. This article reviews some of the ways that clinical pharmacologists can lead and implement change in the drug development process. It includes a discussion of model-based, semi-mechanistic drug development, drug/disease models that facilitate informed clinical trial designs and optimal dosing, the qualification process and criteria for new biomarkers and surrogate endpoints, approaches to streamlining clinical trials and new types of interaction between industry and FDA such as the end-of-phase 2A and voluntary genomic data submission meetings respectively. PMID:17259944

  4. Pharmacologic Evidence to Support Clinical Decision Making for Peripartum Methadone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, D. L.; Perel, J. M.; Helsel, J. C.; Hanusa, B. H.; Romkes, M.; Nukui, T.; Friedman, C. R.; Wisner, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Limited pharmacological data are available to guide methadone treatment during pregnancy and postpartum. Objectives Study goals were to: 1) Characterize changes in methadone dose across childbearing, 2) Determine enantiomer-specific methadone withdrawal kinetics from steady-state during late pregnancy, 3) Assess enantiomer-specific changes in methadone level/dose (L/D) ratios across childbearing, and 4) Explore relationships between CYP2B6, CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 single nucleotide polymorphisms and maternal dose, plasma concentration and L/D. Methods Methadone dose changes and timed plasma samples were obtained for women on methadone (n=25) followed prospectively from third trimester of pregnancy to three months postpartum. Results Participants were primarily white, Medicaid insured and multiparous. All women increased their dose from first to end of second trimester (mean peak increase=23 mg/day); 71% of women increased from second trimester to delivery (mean peak increase=19 mg/day). Half took a higher dose 3 months postpartum than at delivery despite significantly larger clearance during late pregnancy. Third trimester enantiomer-specific methadone half-lives (range R-methadone 14.7-24.9 hours; S-methadone 8.02-18.9 hours) were about half of those reported in non-pregnant populations. In 3 women with weekly 24-hour methadone levels after delivery, L/D increased within 1-2 weeks after delivery. Women with the CYP2B6 Q172 variant GT genotype have consistently higher L/D values for S-methadone across both pregnancy and postpartum. Conclusions Most women require increases in methadone dose across pregnancy. Given the shorter half-life and larger clearances during pregnancy, many pregnant women may benefit from split methadone dosing. L/D increases quickly after delivery and doses should be lowered rapidly after delivery. PMID:22926004

  5. Recent Clinical Trials of Pharmacologic Cardiovascular Interventions in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: An Update.

    PubMed

    Nataatmadja, Melissa; Cho, Yeoungjee; Fahim, Magid; Johnson, David W

    2016-01-01

    As a consequence of both traditional and non-traditional risk factors, cardiovascular disease is over-represented, and the leading cause of mortality, among patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Whilst recommendations for reducing cardiovascular risk in the general population exist, their applicability to the CKD population is questionable due to the exclusion of CKD patients from the majority of contemporary cardiovascular interventional studies. The aim of this review is to critically evaluate the literature regarding pharmacologic cardiovascular interventions in patients with CKD, with an emphasis on studies published since our 2008 review. Interventions discussed include erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (TREAT, U.S. Normal Hematocrit, CHOIR, CREATE, Palmer meta-analysis); statins (SHARP, AURORA, PPP, 4D, ALERT); Fibrates (VA-HIT); Folic Acid (ASFAST, US FOLIC acid trial, HOST); Antihypertensive Agents, Including Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers, Beta-blockers and Combination therapy (Cice et al, FOSDIAL, Agarwal et al, ONTARGET); sevelamer (DCOR); Cinacalcet (ADVANCE, EVOLVE, Cunningham meta-analysis); Anti-oxidants (SPACE, HOPE, ATIC); Aspirin (HOT study re-analysis); vitamin D analogues (PRIMO); and multidisciplinary intervention (LANDMARK). Unfortunately, there remains a paucity of evidence in this area and a large number of methodologically poor quality studies with negative results. It is possible that these interventions do not have the same positive effect in CKD patients due to differences in the pathogenesis driving cardiovascular disease burden, such as altered bone metabolism and calcific vascular disease. Further well-designed studies with appropriately selected study populations and patient level outcomes are required. Until such time, physicians must consider on an individual patient basis the appropriateness of these interventions. PMID:26497837

  6. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  7. Clinical guidelines on central venous catheterisation. Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine.

    PubMed

    Frykholm, P; Pikwer, A; Hammarskjöld, F; Larsson, A T; Lindgren, S; Lindwall, R; Taxbro, K; Oberg, F; Acosta, S; Akeson, J

    2014-05-01

    Safe and reliable venous access is mandatory in modern health care, but central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, This paper describes current Swedish guidelines for clinical management of CVCs The guidelines supply updated recommendations that may be useful in other countries as well. Literature retrieval in the Cochrane and Pubmed databases, of papers written in English or Swedish and pertaining to CVC management, was done by members of a task force of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Consensus meetings were held throughout the review process to allow all parts of the guidelines to be embraced by all contributors. All of the content was carefully scored according to criteria by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. We aimed at producing useful and reliable guidelines on bleeding diathesis, vascular approach, ultrasonic guidance, catheter tip positioning, prevention and management of associated trauma and infection, and specific training and follow-up. A structured patient history focused on bleeding should be taken prior to insertion of a CVCs. The right internal jugular vein should primarily be chosen for insertion of a wide-bore CVC. Catheter tip positioning in the right atrium or lower third of the superior caval vein should be verified for long-term use. Ultrasonic guidance should be used for catheterisation by the internal jugular or femoral veins and may also be used for insertion via the subclavian veins or the veins of the upper limb. The operator inserting a CVC should wear cap, mask, and sterile gown and gloves. For long-term intravenous access, tunnelled CVC or subcutaneous venous ports are preferred. Intravenous position of the catheter tip should be verified by clinical or radiological methods after insertion and before each use. Simulator-assisted training of CVC insertion should precede bedside training in patients. Units inserting and managing CVC should

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services. PMID:26324357

  9. Biochemical and pharmacological characterization of AZD1981, an orally available selective DP2 antagonist in clinical development for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, JA; Bell, FM; Akam, E; Marshall, C; Dainty, IA; Heinemann, A; Dougall, IG; Bonnert, RV; Sargent, CA

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The discovery of DP2 as a second receptor for PGD2 has prompted the search for antagonists as potential novel therapies based on the associations between PGD2 and disease. Here we describe the biochemical and pharmacological properties of 4-(acetylamino)-3-[(4-chlorophenyl)thio]-2-methyl-1H-indole-1-acetic acid (AZD1981), a novel DP2 receptor antagonist. Experimental Approach Binding to DP2, functional receptor pharmacology and selectivity were studied in both human and animal systems. Key Results AZD1981 displaced radio-labelled PGD2 from human recombinant DP2 with high potency (pIC50 = 8.4). Binding was reversible, non-competitive and highly selective against a panel of more than 340 other enzymes and receptors, including DP1 (>1000-fold selective). AZD1981 inhibited DP2-mediated shape change and CD11b up-regulation in human eosinophils, shape change in basophils and chemotaxis of human eosinophils and Th2 cells with similar potency. AZD1981 exhibited good cross-species binding activity against mouse, rat, guinea pig, rabbit and dog DP2. Evaluation in mouse, rat or rabbit cell systems was not possible as they did not respond to DP2 agonists. Agonist responses were seen in guinea pig and dog, and AZD1981 blocked DP2-mediated eosinophil shape change. Such responses were more robust in the guinea pig, where AZD1981 also blocked DP2-dependent eosinophil emigration from bone marrow. Conclusions and Implications AZD1981 is a DP2 antagonist that blocks functional responses in eosinophils, Th2 cells and basophils. It exhibited similar potency irrespective of the cell type, DP2 agonist or species used. This selective orally active agent is currently under clinical evaluation as a potential therapeutic agent in respiratory diseases including asthma. PMID:23146091

  10. Clinical and Pharmacological Aspects of Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases in Childhood: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Spalice, Alberto; Parisi, Pasquale; Papetti, Laura; Nicita, Francesco; Ursitti, Fabiana; Del Balzo, Francesca; Properzi, Enrico; Verrotti, Alberto; Ruggieri, Martino; Iannetti, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases comprise a spectrum of disorders affecting the myelin of the central and peripheral nervous system. These diseases can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, radiological, laboratory and pathological findings. Recent studies have contributed to current awareness that inflammatory demyelinating diseases are not restricted to the adult age group, but are more common in pediatric age than previously believed. Some of pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases carry an unfavorable long-term prognosis but appropriate treatments can improve the outcome. The possibility of physical and cognitive disability resulting from these diseases, highlights the urgent need for therapeutic strategies for neurorehabilitation, neuroregeneration, and neurorepair. This review discusses characteristics of primary demyelinating diseases more frequently observed in childhood, focusing on epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatments. PMID:21119885

  11. Clinical and pharmacological aspects of inflammatory demyelinating diseases in childhood: an update.

    PubMed

    Spalice, Alberto; Parisi, Pasquale; Papetti, Laura; Nicita, Francesco; Ursitti, Fabiana; Del Balzo, Francesca; Properzi, Enrico; Verrotti, Alberto; Ruggieri, Martino; Iannetti, Paola

    2010-06-01

    Inflammatory demyelinating diseases comprise a spectrum of disorders affecting the myelin of the central and peripheral nervous system. These diseases can usually be differentiated on the basis of clinical, radiological, laboratory and pathological findings. Recent studies have contributed to current awareness that inflammatory demyelinating diseases are not restricted to the adult age group, but are more common in pediatric age than previously believed. Some of pediatric inflammatory demyelinating diseases carry an unfavorable long-term prognosis but appropriate treatments can improve the outcome. The possibility of physical and cognitive disability resulting from these diseases, highlights the urgent need for therapeutic strategies for neurorehabilitation, neuroregeneration, and neurorepair. This review discusses characteristics of primary demyelinating diseases more frequently observed in childhood, focusing on epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatments. PMID:21119885

  12. [LACTRIMS consensus document for the pharmacological treatment of the multiple sclerosis and its clinical variants].

    PubMed

    Abad, P; Nogales-Gaete, J; Rivera, V; Cristiano, E; Hamuy, F; Oehninger, C; Alvarenga, R M P; Tenembaum, S

    2012-12-16

    INTRODUCTION. Multiple sclerosis (MS) it is not considered any more a rare disease in Latin America. Most of the Latin American countries have reported moderate or lower prevalence data. However only very few countries have developed therapeutic guidelines. LACTRIMS prepared this consensus document with specific recommendations for the treatment of the disease. DEVELOPMENT. Experts on treatment and clinical research on MS were invited by LACTRIMS in order to generate a initial document to be discussed in Quito, Ecuador. Several groups were organized in relation of the different clinical variants. These groups were coordinated by experts leaders and prepared a preliminary document that was discussed in Quito during July 8th and 9th, 2011. Finally the final version was submitted to the members and delegates of LACTRIMS in most of the Latin American countries who were able to make modifications and suggest changes to the final manuscript. CONCLUSIONS. Based on the different evidence levels and the AGREE criteria, the clinical variants were reviewed and recommendations were made for the use of drugs and different modifying disease therapeutic agents. PMID:23233142

  13. Clinical Outcome among Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients in a Multi-Ethnic Society in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Han Wen; Lee, Shan Hui; Chee, Jeremy; Tham, Ivan; Goh, Boon Cher; Chao, Siew Shuen; Ong, Yew Kwang; Loh, Kwok Seng; Lim, Chwee Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) is endemic among Chinese populations in Southeast Asia. However, the outcomes of non-Chinese NPC patients in Singapore are not well reported. Aim To determine if non-Chinese NPC patients have a different prognosis and examine the clinical outcomes of NPC patients in a multi-ethnic society. Methods Retrospective chart review of 558 NPC patients treated at a single academic tertiary hospital from 2002 to 2012. Survival and recurrence rates were analysed and predictive factors identified using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression model. Results Our cohort comprised 409 males (73.3%) and 149 females (26.7%) with a median age of 52 years. There were 476 Chinese (85.3%), 57 Malays (10.2%), and 25 of other ethnic groups (4.5%). Non-Chinese patients were more likely to be associated with advanced nodal disease at initial presentation (p = 0.049), compared with the Chinese. However, there were no statistical differences in their overall survival (OS) or disease specific survival (DSS) (p = 0.934 and p = 0.857 respectively). The 3-year and 5-year cohort OS and DSS rates were 79.3%, 70.7%, and 83.2%, 77.4% respectively. Advanced age (p<0.001), N2 disease (p = 0.036), N3 disease (p<0.001), and metastatic disease (p<0.001) at presentation were independently associated with poor overall survival. N2 disease (p = 0.032), N3 disease (p<0.001) and metastatic disease (p<0.001) were also independently associated with poor DSS. No predictive factors were associated with loco-regional recurrence after definitive treatment. Advanced age (p = 0.044), N2 disease (p = 0.033) and N3 disease (p<0.001) were independently associated with distant relapse. Conclusion In a multi-ethnic society in Singapore, non-Chinese are more likely to present with advanced nodal disease. This however did not translate into poorer survival outcomes. Older patients with N2 or N3 disease are associated with a higher risk of distant relapse and poor overall survival

  14. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXI. Nomenclature and Classification of Adenosine Receptors—An Update

    PubMed Central

    IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Linden, Joel; Müller, Christa E.

    2011-01-01

    In the 10 years since our previous International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology report on the nomenclature and classification of adenosine receptors, no developments have led to major changes in the recommendations. However, there have been so many other developments that an update is needed. The fact that the structure of one of the adenosine receptors has recently been solved has already led to new ways of in silico screening of ligands. The evidence that adenosine receptors can form homo- and heteromultimers has accumulated, but the functional significance of such complexes remains unclear. The availability of mice with genetic modification of all the adenosine receptors has led to a clarification of the functional roles of adenosine, and to excellent means to study the specificity of drugs. There are also interesting associations between disease and structural variants in one or more of the adenosine receptors. Several new selective agonists and antagonists have become available. They provide improved possibilities for receptor classification. There are also developments hinting at the usefulness of allosteric modulators. Many drugs targeting adenosine receptors are in clinical trials, but the established therapeutic use is still very limited. PMID:21303899

  15. Health Disparities in Endocrine Disorders: Biological, Clinical, and Nonclinical Factors—An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A.; Chin, Marshall H.; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L.; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E.; Anton, Blair

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on biological, clinical, and nonclinical contributors to race/ethnic and sex disparities in endocrine disorders and to identify current gaps in knowledge as a focus for future research needs. Participants in Development of Scientific Statement: The Endocrine Society's Scientific Statement Task Force (SSTF) selected the leader of the statement development group (S.H.G.). She selected an eight-member writing group with expertise in endocrinology and health disparities, which was approved by the Society. All discussions regarding the scientific statement content occurred via teleconference or written correspondence. No funding was provided to any expert or peer reviewer, and all participants volunteered their time to prepare this Scientific Statement. Evidence: The primary sources of data on global disease prevalence are from the World Health Organization. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed identified U.S. population-based studies. Search strategies combining Medical Subject Headings terms and keyword terms and phrases defined two concepts: 1) racial, ethnic, and sex differences including specific populations; and 2) the specific endocrine disorder or condition. The search identified systematic reviews, meta-analyses, large cohort and population-based studies, and original studies focusing on the prevalence and determinants of disparities in endocrine disorders. Consensus Process: The writing group focused on population differences in the highly prevalent endocrine diseases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and related conditions (prediabetes and diabetic complications), gestational diabetes, metabolic syndrome with a focus on obesity and dyslipidemia, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency. Authors reviewed and synthesized evidence in their areas of expertise. The final statement incorporated responses to several levels of review: 1) comments of the SSTF and the

  16. Oxidative Stress and Respiratory System: Pharmacological and Clinical Reappraisal of N-Acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Santus, Pierachille; Corsico, Angelo; Solidoro, Paolo; Braido, Fulvio; Di Marco, Fabiano

    2014-01-01

    The large surface area for gas exchange makes the respiratory system particularly susceptible to oxidative stress-mediated injury. Both endogenous and exogenous pro-oxidants (e.g. cigarette smoke) trigger activation of leukocytes and host defenses. These mechanisms interact in a “multilevel cycle” responsible for the control of the oxidant/antioxidant homeostasis. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidants (e.g. reduced glutathione [GSH]) in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but the contribution of oxidative stress to the pathophysiology of COPD is generally only minimally discussed. The aim of this review was to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases, particularly COPD, and to examine the available clinical and experimental evidence on the use of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of GSH, as an adjunct to standard therapy for the treatment of COPD. The proposed concept of “multilevel cycle” helps understand the relationship between respiratory diseases and oxidative stress, thus clarifying the rationale for using NAC in COPD. Until recently, antioxidant drugs such as NAC have been regarded only as mucolytic agents. Nevertheless, several clinical trials indicate that NAC may reduce the rate of COPD exacerbations and improve small airways function. The most plausible explanation for the beneficial effects observed in patients with COPD treated with NAC lies in the mucolytic and antioxidant effects of this drug. Modulation of bronchial inflammation by NAC may further account for these favorable clinical results. PMID:24787454

  17. Clinical pharmacology of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors indicated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wu; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Tianxin; Zhang, Xueji; Yang, Yin-Xue; Duan, Wei; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-10-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are a class of oral antidiabetic drugs that improve glycaemic control without causing weight gain or increasing hypoglycaemic risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The eight available DPP-4 inhibitors, including alogliptin, anagliptin, gemigliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin, teneligliptin, and vildagliptin, are small molecules used orally with identical mechanism of action and similar safety profiles in patients with T2DM. DPP-4 inhibitors may be used as monotherapy or in double or triple combination with other oral glucose-lowering agents such as metformin, thiazolidinediones, or sulfonylureas. Although DPP-4 inhibitors have the same mode of action, they differ by some important pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties that may be clinically relevant in some patients. The main differences between the eight gliptins include: potency, target selectivity, oral bioavailability, elimination half-life, binding to plasma proteins, metabolic pathways, formation of active metabolite(s), main excretion routes, dosage adjustment for renal and liver insufficiency, and potential drug-drug interactions. The off-target inhibition of selective DPP-4 inhibitors is responsible for multiorgan toxicities such as immune dysfunction, impaired healing, and skin reactions. As a drug class, the DPP-4 inhibitors have become accepted in clinical practice due to their excellent tolerability profile, with a low risk of hypoglycaemia, a neutral effect on body weight, and once-daily dosing. It is unknown if DPP-4 inhibitors can prevent disease progression. More clinical studies are needed to validate the optimal regimens of DPP-4 inhibitors for the management of T2DM when their potential toxicities are closely monitored. PMID:26173919

  18. Nefazodone. A review of its pharmacology and clinical efficacy in the management of major depression.

    PubMed

    Davis, R; Whittington, R; Bryson, H M

    1997-04-01

    Nefazodone hydrochloride is a phenylpiperazine antidepressant with a mechanism of action that is distinct from those of other currently available drugs. It potently and selectively blocks postsynaptic serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) 5-HT2A receptors and moderately inhibits serotonin and noradrenaline (norepinephrine) reuptake. In short term clinical trials of 6 or 8 weeks' duration, nefazodone produced clinical improvements that were significantly greater than those with placebo and similar to those achieved with imipramine, and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline. The optimum therapeutic dosage of nefazodone appears to be between 300 and 600 mg/day. Limited long term data suggest that nefazodone is effective in preventing relapse of depression in patients treated for up to 1 year. Analyses of pooled clinical trial results indicate that nefazodone and imipramine produces similar and significant improvements on anxiety- and agitation-related rating scales compared with placebo in patients with major depression. Short term tolerability data indicate that nefazodone has a lower incidence of adverse anticholinergic, antihistaminergic and adrenergic effects than imipramine. Compared with SSRIs, nefazodone causes fewer activating symptoms, adverse gastrointestinal effects (nausea, diarrhoea, anorexia) and adverse effects on sexual function, but is associated with more dizziness, dry mouth, constipation, visual disturbances and confusion. Available data also suggest that nefazodone is not associated with abnormal weight gain, seizures, priapism or significant sleep disruption, and appears to be relatively safe in overdosage. Nefazodone inhibits the cytochrome P450 3A4 isoenzyme and thus has the potential to interact with a number of drugs. Further long term and comparative studies will provide a more accurate assessment of the relative place of nefazodone in the management of major depression. Nonetheless

  19. Isavuconazole: Pharmacology, Pharmacodynamics, and Current Clinical Experience with a New Triazole Antifungal Agent.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Jeffrey M; Marx, Kayleigh R; Nishimoto, Andrew T; Rogers, P David

    2015-11-01

    Coinciding with the continually increasing population of immunocompromised patients worldwide, the incidence of invasive fungal infections has grown over the past 4 decades. Unfortunately, infections caused by both yeasts such as Candida and molds such as Aspergillus or Mucorales remain associated with unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. In addition, the available antifungals with proven efficacy in the treatment of these infections remain severely limited. Although previously available second-generation triazole antifungals have significantly expanded the spectrum of the triazole antifungal class, these agents are laden with shortcomings in their safety profiles as well as formulation and pharmacokinetic challenges. Isavuconazole, administered as the prodrug isavuconazonium, is the latest second-generation triazole antifungal to receive U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval. Approved for the treatment of both invasive aspergillosis and invasive mucormycosis, and currently under investigation for the treatment of candidemia and invasive candidiasis, isavuconazole may have therapeutic advantages over its predecessors. With clinically relevant antifungal potency against a broad range of yeasts, dimorphic fungi, and molds, isavuconazole has a spectrum of activity reminiscent of the polyene amphotericin B. Moreover, clinical experience thus far has revealed isavuconazole to be associated with fewer toxicities than voriconazole, even when administered without therapeutic drug monitoring. These characteristics, in an agent available in both a highly bioavailable oral and a β-cyclodextrin-free intravenous formulation, will likely make isavuconazole a welcome addition to the triazole class of antifungals. PMID:26598096

  20. Thuja occidentalis (Arbor vitae): A Review of its Pharmaceutical, Pharmacological and Clinical Properties

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Arbor vitae (Thuja occidentalis L.) is a native European tree widely used in homeopathy and evidence-based phytotherapy. Many reviews and monographs have been published on the herbal substance's description, mode of action and clinical use. However, no comprehensive evidence-based review is available. Therefore, our aim was to search MEDLINE databases and survey manufacturers for further details or unpublished data. This review presents the botany, ethnobotany and phytochemistry, especially the different contents of essential oil (Thujone) in relation to different extraction procedures of this medicinal plant. Thuja's antiviral action and immunopharmacological potential, such as stimulatory and co-stimulatory effects on cytokine and antibody production and activation of macrophages and other immunocompetent cells, have been evaluated in numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. Although no controlled trials have been conducted on Thuja occ alone, many clinical studies have been performed with a herbal medicinal product containing a special extract of Thuja occ and other immunostimulants, demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy and safety in respiratory tract infections. PMID:15841280

  1. Thuja occidentalis (Arbor vitae): A Review of its Pharmaceutical, Pharmacological and Clinical Properties.

    PubMed

    Naser, Belal; Bodinet, Cornelia; Tegtmeier, Martin; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2005-03-01

    Arbor vitae (Thuja occidentalis L.) is a native European tree widely used in homeopathy and evidence-based phytotherapy. Many reviews and monographs have been published on the herbal substance's description, mode of action and clinical use. However, no comprehensive evidence-based review is available. Therefore, our aim was to search MEDLINE databases and survey manufacturers for further details or unpublished data. This review presents the botany, ethnobotany and phytochemistry, especially the different contents of essential oil (Thujone) in relation to different extraction procedures of this medicinal plant. Thuja's antiviral action and immunopharmacological potential, such as stimulatory and co-stimulatory effects on cytokine and antibody production and activation of macrophages and other immunocompetent cells, have been evaluated in numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. Although no controlled trials have been conducted on Thuja occ alone, many clinical studies have been performed with a herbal medicinal product containing a special extract of Thuja occ and other immunostimulants, demonstrating its therapeutic efficacy and safety in respiratory tract infections. PMID:15841280

  2. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement update: genetic testing for cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    2003-06-15

    As the leading organization representing cancer specialists involved in patient care and clinical research, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reaffirms its commitment to integrating cancer risk assessment and management, including molecular analysis of cancer predisposition genes, into the practice of oncology and preventive medicine. The primary goal of this effort is to foster expanded access to, and continued advances in, medical care provided to patients and families affected by hereditary cancer syndromes. The 1996 ASCO Statement on Genetic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility set forth specific recommendations relating to clinical practice, research needs, educational opportunities, requirement for informed consent, indications for genetic testing, regulation of laboratories, and protection from discrimination, as well as access to and reimbursement for cancer genetics services. In updating this Statement, ASCO endorses the following principles: Indications for Genetic Testing: ASCO recommends that genetic testing be offered when 1) the individual has personal or family history features suggestive of a genetic cancer susceptibility condition, 2) the test can be adequately interpreted, and 3) the results will aid in diagnosis or influence the medical or surgical management of the patient or family members at hereditary risk of cancer. ASCO recommends that genetic testing only be done in the setting of pre- and post-test counseling, which should include discussion of possible risks and benefits of cancer early detection and prevention modalities. Special Issues in Testing Children for Cancer Susceptibility: ASCO recommends that the decision to offer testing to potentially affected children should take into account the availability of evidence-based risk-reduction strategies and the probability of developing a malignancy during childhood. Where risk-reduction strategies are available or cancer predominantly develops in childhood, ASCO believes that

  3. Inside the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: part 2 - prostate and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Buti, Sebastiano; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Bersanelli, Melissa; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Moscone West Building, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7-9 January 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco (CA, USA), from 7 to 9 January 2016, focused on 'patient-centric care: translating research to results'. Every year, this meeting is a must for anyone studying genitourinary tumors to keep abreast of the most recent innovations in this field, exchange views on behaviors customarily adopted in daily clinical practice and discuss future topics of scientific research. This two-part report highlights the key themes presented at the 2016 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, with part 1 reporting the main novelties of kidney cancer and part 2 discussing the most relevant issues which have emerged for bladder and prostate tumors. PMID:27312584

  4. American Society of Clinical Oncology Position Statement on Obesity and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Burger, Robert A.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Fabian, Carol J.; Gucalp, Ayca; Hershman, Dawn L.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Jones, Lee W.; Kakarala, Madhuri; Ness, Kirsten K.; Merrill, Janette K.; Wollins, Dana S.; Hudis, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    Rates of obesity have increased significantly over the last three decades in the United States and globally. In addition to contributing to heart disease and diabetes, obesity is a major unrecognized risk factor for cancer. Obesity is associated with worsened prognosis after cancer diagnosis and also negatively affects the delivery of systemic therapy, contributes to morbidity of cancer treatment, and may raise the risk of second malignancies and comorbidities. Research shows that the time after a cancer diagnosis can serve as a teachable moment to motivate individuals to adopt risk-reducing behaviors. For this reason, the oncology care team—the providers with whom a patient has the closest relationships in the critical period after a cancer diagnosis—is in a unique position to help patients lose weight and make other healthy lifestyle changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology is committed to reducing the impact of obesity on cancer and has established a multipronged initiative to accomplish this goal by 1) increasing education and awareness of the evidence linking obesity and cancer; 2) providing tools and resources to help oncology providers address obesity with their patients; 3) building and fostering a robust research agenda to better understand the pathophysiology of energy balance alterations, evaluate the impact of behavior change on cancer outcomes, and determine the best methods to help cancer survivors make effective and useful changes in lifestyle behaviors; and 4) advocating for policy and systems change to address societal factors contributing to obesity and improve access to weight management services for patients with cancer. PMID:25273035

  5. Critical Update of the 2010 Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guidelines for Male Hypogonadism: A Systematic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Seftel, Allen D; Kathrins, Martin; Niederberger, Craig

    2015-08-01

    "Testosterone Therapy in Men With Androgen Deficiency Syndromes: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline" (Guidelines), published in 2010, serves as an important guide for the treatment of hypogonadal men. Using the Guidelines as a basis, we searched for the most recent level 1 evidence that continues to support the recommendations or provide an impetus to modify all or some of them. We performed a systematic analysis with a PubMed query from January 1, 2010, through March 2, 2015, using the following key words: testosterone/deficiency, testosterone/therapeutic use, cardiovascular, morbidity, mortality, screening, sexual function, lower urinary tract symptoms, obstructive sleep apnea, prostate cancer, fertility, bone mineral density, osteoporosis, quality of life, cognitive, erectile dysfunction, and adverse effects. We identified 17 trials representing level 1 evidence that specifically addressed recommendations made in the Guidelines. Trials examining outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in men with severe lower urinary tract symptoms and untreated obstructive sleep apnea were identified, potentially refuting the current dogma against treatment in the setting of these conditions. Hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome were examined in several trials, demonstrating the beneficial effects of therapy on sexual function and insulin sensitivity. Several trials served as reinforcing evidence for the beneficial effects of testosterone therapy on osteoporosis, muscle strength, and symptoms of frailty. As in the Guidelines, inconsistent effects on quality of life, well-being, and erectile function were also noted in publications. Despite controversies surrounding cardiovascular morbidity and treatment in the setting of prostate cancer, no studies examining these issues as primary end points were identified. The low number of eligible studies since 2010 is a limitation of this analysis. PMID:26205546

  6. A review of the pharmacology and clinical application of alfaxalone in cats.

    PubMed

    Warne, Leon N; Beths, Thierry; Whittem, Ted; Carter, Jennifer E; Bauquier, Sébastien H

    2015-02-01

    Alfaxalone-2-hydroxpropyl-β-cyclodextrin (alfaxalone-HPCD) was first marketed for veterinary use in Australia in 2001 and has since progressively became available throughout the world, including the USA, where in 2012 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) registration was granted. Despite the growing body of published works and increasing global availability of alfaxalone-HPCD, the accumulating evidence for its use in cats has not been thoroughly reviewed. The purpose of this review is: (1) to detail the pharmacokinetic properties of alfaxalone-HPCD in cats; (2) to assess the pharmacodynamic properties of alfaxalone-HPCD, including its cardiovascular, respiratory, central nervous system, neuromuscular, hepatic, renal, haematological, blood-biochemical, analgesic and endocrine effects; and (3) to consider the clinical application of alfaxalone-HPCD for sedation, induction and maintenance of anaesthesia in cats. Based on the published literature, alfaxalone-HPCD provides a good alternative to the existing intravenous anaesthetic options for healthy cats. PMID:25582797

  7. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVI. Pattern Recognition Receptors in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Selinda; Ferguson, Brian; Symmons, Martyn F.; Boyle, Joseph P.; Monie, Tom P.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Toll, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, as the first described pattern recognition receptor (PRR) in 1996, many families of these receptors have been discovered and characterized. PRRs play critically important roles in pathogen recognition to initiate innate immune responses that ultimately link to the generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of PRRs leads to the induction of immune and inflammatory genes, including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. It is increasingly clear that many PRRs are linked to a range of inflammatory, infectious, immune, and chronic degenerative diseases. Several drugs to modulate PRR activity are already in clinical trials and many more are likely to appear in the near future. Here, we review the different families of mammalian PRRs, the ligands they recognize, the mechanisms of activation, their role in disease, and the potential of targeting these proteins to develop the anti-inflammatory therapeutics of the future. PMID:25829385

  8. [Pharmacological and pharmacokinetic features and clinical effects of pitavastatin (Livalo Tablet)].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Fujino, Hideki; Kanazawa, Mizuho; Tamaki, Taro; Sato, Fumiyasu; Suzuki, Mikio; Kitahara, Masaki

    2004-05-01

    Today 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are the most often prescribed drugs among the therapeutics for hypercholesterolemia. Pitavastatin is a novel statin that has been developed entirely in Japan from the biological screening to clinical studies persuing more efficatious statin than hitherto known. Preclinical studies on drug metabolism revealed that pitavastatin is distributed selectively to the liver, excreted into bile without metabolic modification, and efficiently re-circulates to the liver to show a prolonged plasma half-life. In guinea pigs, pitavastatin enhanced hepatic LDL receptor activity and reduced VLDL secretion in a liver perfusion study, and it lowered plasma total cholesterol (TC) levels at 0.3 mg/kg and triglyceride (TG) levels at 1 mg/kg, respectively, and more. From these results, pitavastatin is assumed to lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) by promoting LDL receptor expression and further potentiate the cholesterol-lowering effect and exert TG-lowering effect by reducing VLDL secretion. (14)C-Pitavastatin is metabolized with CYP2C9 to 8-hydroxy derivative, but its Vmax /Km was about 2 micro l/min/mg, about 1/8 to 1/100 in comparison to the reported values of other statins, indicating that pitavastatin is hardly metabolized. Also, other human P450 species were not inhibited by pitavastatin. Therefore, pitavastatin is considered to have little interaction with drugs through P450. In the summarized clinical results with 862 patients, pitavastatin lowered TC and LDL-C by 28% and 40%, respectively. There was no difference in the frequency of side effects and no serious adverse effect was observed for pitavastatin. Pitavastatin possesses superior plasma lipid-improving effects, induces little drug interaction, and is expected to make a good contribution to the medication of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:15118259

  9. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of long-acting bronchodilators in COPD - focus on olodaterol.

    PubMed

    Matera, Maria Gabriella; Ora, Josuel; Cazzola, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Olodaterol (BI 1744 CL) is a novel, once-daily long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) designed with the aim of improving β2-adrenoreceptor selectivity and intrinsic activity. Phase III pivotal trials have documented that olodaterol Respimat Soft Mist inhaler 5 μg induces fast onset of bronchodilation, comparable with formoterol at day 1. Moreover, significant lung function improvements have been documented up to 48 weeks in patients with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Olodaterol was generally well tolerated and had an acceptable cardiovascular and respiratory adverse event profile. Regrettably, the clinical development of olodaterol is however still too partial to draw any firm conclusions on the positioning of this ultra-LABA as monotherapy in the management of COPD. Waiting for further data on the impact of olodaterol on different patient-reported outcomes, which however are widely available for indacaterol, and mainly for a head-to-head comparison between these two ultra-LABAs and between olodaterol long-acting antimuscarinic antagonists other than tiotropium, we believe it is correct to follow the clinical indications of indacaterol also for olodaterol. In any case, the parallel bronchodilating modes of action of olodaterol and tiotropium make them an attractive combination in COPD. The results from the ongoing large TOviTO Phase III trial program have documented the efficacy and safety of olodaterol/tiotropium fixed-dose combination as maintenance therapy in patients with moderate to very severe COPD. In particular, olodaterol/tiotropium fixed-dose combination provides a convincing alternative for patients remaining symptomatic with olodaterol monotherapy. PMID:26676161

  10. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of long-acting bronchodilators in COPD – focus on olodaterol

    PubMed Central

    Matera, Maria Gabriella; Ora, Josuel; Cazzola, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Olodaterol (BI 1744 CL) is a novel, once-daily long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) designed with the aim of improving β2-adrenoreceptor selectivity and intrinsic activity. Phase III pivotal trials have documented that olodaterol Respimat Soft Mist inhaler 5 μg induces fast onset of bronchodilation, comparable with formoterol at day 1. Moreover, significant lung function improvements have been documented up to 48 weeks in patients with moderate to very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Olodaterol was generally well tolerated and had an acceptable cardiovascular and respiratory adverse event profile. Regrettably, the clinical development of olodaterol is however still too partial to draw any firm conclusions on the positioning of this ultra-LABA as monotherapy in the management of COPD. Waiting for further data on the impact of olodaterol on different patient-reported outcomes, which however are widely available for indacaterol, and mainly for a head-to-head comparison between these two ultra-LABAs and between olodaterol long-acting antimuscarinic antagonists other than tiotropium, we believe it is correct to follow the clinical indications of indacaterol also for olodaterol. In any case, the parallel bronchodilating modes of action of olodaterol and tiotropium make them an attractive combination in COPD. The results from the ongoing large TOviTO Phase III trial program have documented the efficacy and safety of olodaterol/tiotropium fixed-dose combination as maintenance therapy in patients with moderate to very severe COPD. In particular, olodaterol/tiotropium fixed-dose combination provides a convincing alternative for patients remaining symptomatic with olodaterol monotherapy. PMID:26676161

  11. A Humanized Clinically Calibrated Quantitative Systems Pharmacology Model for Hypokinetic Motor Symptoms in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Patrick; Spiros, Athan; Geerts, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of Parkinson’s disease with dopamine-centric approaches such as L-DOPA and dopamine agonists, although very successful, is in need of alternative treatment strategies, both in terms of disease modification and symptom management. Various non-dopaminergic treatment approaches did not result in a clear clinical benefit, despite showing a clear effect in preclinical animal models. In addition, polypharmacy is common, sometimes leading to unintended effects on non-motor cognitive and psychiatric symptoms. To explore novel targets for symptomatic treatment and possible synergistic pharmacodynamic effects between different drugs, we developed a computer-based Quantitative Systems Pharmacology (QSP) platform of the closed cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical basal ganglia loop of the dorsal motor circuit. This mechanism-based simulation platform is based on the known neuro-anatomy and neurophysiology of the basal ganglia and explicitly incorporates domain expertise in a formalized way. The calculated beta/gamma power ratio of the local field potential in the subthalamic nucleus correlates well (R2 = 0.71) with clinically observed extra-pyramidal symptoms triggered by antipsychotics during schizophrenia treatment (43 drug-dose combinations). When incorporating Parkinsonian (PD) pathology and reported compensatory changes, the computer model suggests a major increase in b/g ratio (corresponding to bradykinesia and rigidity) from a dopamine depletion of 70% onward. The correlation between the outcome of the QSP model and the reported changes in UPDRS III Motor Part for 22 placebo-normalized drug-dose combinations is R2 = 0.84. The model also correctly recapitulates the lack of clinical benefit for perampanel, MK-0567 and flupirtine and offers a hypothesis for the translational disconnect. Finally, using human PET imaging studies with placebo response, the computer model predicts well the placebo response for chronic treatment, but not for acute

  12. Interpretation and use of FRAX in clinical practice - position paper of the International Osteoporosis Foundation and the International Society for Clinical Densitometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) appointed a joint Task Force to develop resource documents in order to make recommendations on how to improve FRAX and better inform clinicians who use FRAX. The Task Force met in November...

  13. Are the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women misguided? A commentary.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged; Guay, Andre T; Spark, Richard F

    2007-09-01

    The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women (henceforth referred to as the Guidelines) do not necessarily represent the opinion held by the many health-care professionals and clinicians who are specialized in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of women's health in androgen insufficiency states. The recommendations provided in the published Guidelines are neither accurate nor complete. We disagree with the therapeutic nihilism promoted by these Guidelines. The members of the Guidelines Panel (henceforth referred to as the Panel), in their own disclaimer, stated that the Guidelines do not establish a standard of care. Based on data available in the contemporary literature, on the role of androgens in women's health, we provide in this commentary a point-by-point discussion of the arguments made by the Panel in arriving at their recommendations. It is our view that the Guidelines are not based on the preponderance of scientific evidence. Health-care professionals, physicians, and scientists often disagree when determining how best to address and manage new and emerging clinical issues. This is where we stand now as we endeavor to understand the role of androgens in a woman's health and welfare. Indeed, some basic facts are not in contention. All agree that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) production from the adrenal gland begins during the preteen years, peaks in the mid 20s, then declines progressively over time. In contrast, ovarian androgen (i.e., testosterone) secretion commences at puberty, is sustained during a woman's peak reproductive years and declines as a woman ages, with a more rapid and steep decrease after surgical menopause. However, there are ample data to suggest that adrenal androgens play a role in the development of axillary and pubic hair, and that testosterone is critical for women's libido and sexual function. We take this opportunity to invite members of the Panel on Androgen Therapy in Women to discuss

  14. Late-onset ankylosing spondylitis and related spondylarthropathies: clinical and radiological characteristics and pharmacological treatment options.

    PubMed

    Toussirot, Eric; Wendling, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is the prototype of related diseases commonly called spondylarthropathies which include reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, arthritis associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (enteropathic arthritis) and undifferentiated spondylarthropathies. Ankylosing spondylitis and spondylarthropathies are generally observed in young patients but can be observed later in life or in persons >50 years of age. All the spondylarthropathy subgroups are represented in the elderly with some features particular to this age group. Indeed, radiological aspects of ankylosing spondylitis may be difficult to interpret because of the radiological changes induced by aging. Late-onset peripheral spondylarthropathies are characterised by severe disease, marked elevation of laboratory parameters of inflammation, oligoarthritis involving the lower limbs and oedema of the extremities. Psoriatic arthritis is more severe in the elderly and is associated with worse outcomes than in young patients. The clinical presentation of undifferentiated spondylarthropathy is as varied in the elderly as in young and middle-aged adults. Reactive arthritis and enteropathic arthritis are observed in the elderly more rarely. The effects of aging on drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics, together with the existence of co-morbidities and polypharmacy, are responsible for difficulties in the therapeutic management of late-onset ankylosing spondylitis or spondylarthropathies. Indeed, NSAIDs should be used with caution in older patients because of the high risk of serious gastrointestinal complications. Sulfasalazine and methotrexate have been used as disease-controlling drugs but did not prove very effective. Pamidronate and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antagonists offer a therapeutic alternative but have not been specifically tested in the elderly. Pamidronate has been tested in young-onset ankylosing spondylitis and spondylarthropathies with conflicting results but can be used in

  15. Pharmacological aspects and potential new clinical applications of ketamine: reevaluation of an old drug.

    PubMed

    Aroni, Filippia; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Dontas, Ismene; Pourzitaki, Chryssa; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2009-08-01

    Ketamine, the phencyclidine derivative described in 1965, is an intravenous anesthetic with a variety of applications. The enthusiasm following its initial release subsided due to side effects from the central nervous system. New anesthetics limited the role of ketamine in anesthetic practice. However, its hemodynamically stable profile, along with its beneficial respiratory properties and analgesic potency, rendered the drug invaluable in battlefield medicine, sedation of the uncooperative child, analgesia, and sedation in burn units. Reevaluation, though, of analgesic properties of ketamine resulted in new interest regarding its use in perioperative and chronic pain management. Moreover, recent studies in the effects of the substance on intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow led to revising the recommendation against its use in brain injury. Furthermore, the bronchodilating effects of the substance led to increasing interest for potential use in asthma treatment. In addition, separation of the 2 enantiomers and subsequent separate studies indicated beneficial results of the S(+) one. Thus, new controlled multicentered clinical trials are to be conducted to justify approval for new uses of ketamine and take advantage of its unique range of applications. PMID:19546251

  16. Pharmacology and clinical potential of vortioxetine in the treatment of major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Enric; Perez, Victor; Artigas, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Vortioxetine is a new multimodal action antidepressant with two types of action: serotonin transporter (SERT) blockade and a strong affinity for several serotoninergic receptors. It is an antagonist of the 5-HT3 and 5-HT7 receptors, a partial agonist of 5-HT1B, and an agonist of 5-HT1A. Its combined action on SERT and four subtypes of serotoninergic receptors increases the extracellular concentration of serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline. Twelve clinical trials have been carried out, nine of which had positive results versus placebo. When active comparators were included in the study design, no significant differences were found except in one study in which the efficacy of vortioxetine was superior to the comparator (agomelatine) in depression resistant to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI)/serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) treatment. Tolerability studies indicate that the drug does not cause any important problems on blood tests, vital signs, or on electrocardiography. The lack of weight gain and induction of metabolic syndrome and the lack of significant changes in the QTc are especially important. The incidence rate of sexual dysfunction is low and similar to placebo in various trials. Similarly, cognitive function remains intact with vortioxetine. PMID:25075188

  17. Clinical/pharmacological aspect of adenosine A2A receptor antagonist for dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Tomoyuki; Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine replacement therapy using the dopamine precursor, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA), with a peripheral dopa decarboxylase inhibitor is the most effective treatment currently available for the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the long-term use of dopaminergic therapies for PD is often limited by the development of motor response complications, such as dyskinesia. Adenosine A2A receptors are a promising nondopaminergic target for the treatment of PD. The treatment of motor response complications involves combinations of regular and controlled release L-DOPA, perhaps with the addition of a COMT inhibitor or the use of a longer-acting dopamine agonist. However, when dyskinesia is already established, the increase in dopaminergic load produced by the addition of a dopamine agonist can result in an increase in the severity and duration of dyskinesia. Currently, there are no well-tolerated antidyskinesia agents available. Amantadine, which may exert its effects through the inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, shows some effects on established dyskinesia. Dyskinesia has a negative impact on the quality of life of patients, sometimes being more disabling than PD itself. Although some patients prefer experiencing dyskinesia than being in the OFF state and unable to move, alternative, more effective therapies are still required for severe disabling dyskinesia to afford patients an improved quality of life while in the ON state. The mechanisms causing and maintaining the dyskinesia have not been clarified. The application of a nondopaminergic approach to modify the basal ganglial activity would be helpful to better understand and treat dyskinesia. The use of an adenosine A2A receptor may provide one such approach. In this literature review, we will summarize the current knowledge from both clinical and nonclinical studies on the effects of adenosine A2A receptor blockade on dyskinesia. PMID:25175964

  18. [New Indings in Methotrexate Pharmacology -  Diagnostic Possibilities and Impact on Clinical Care].

    PubMed

    Řiháček, M; Pilatova, K; Štěrba, J; Pilný, R; Valík, D

    2015-01-01

    Methotrexate is an anti-cancer drug used to treat several malignancies including pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and choriocarcinoma. Despite recent advances in cancer chemotherapy, it remains a mainstay of therapy since its discovery in the early second half of the previous century. Moreover, low-dose methotrexate is a gold standard antirheumatic drug in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, systemic scleroderma and other autoimmune disorders. Side effects of methotrexate treatment are well known and described; however, their occurrence may often be unpredictable due to lack of specific biomarkers of toxicity. Methotrexate plasma levels are routinely monitored by therapeutic drug monitoring, nevertheless, occurrence and concentrations of its metabolites are not measured. During methotrexate treatment 7- hydroxymethotrexate and 2,4- diamino- N10- mehylpteroic acid appear in plasma. The latter can further be hydroxylated and glucuronidated resulting in five possible extracellular methotrexate metabolites. In addition, methotrexate is intracellularly converted to its active polyglutamylated forms. Therapeutic efficacy is dependent on formation of methotrexate polyglutamates as it keeps intracellular pool of the drug and enhances its affinity towards various target enzymes. In this study, we describe pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of methotrexate metabolites. We also review methotrexate blood brain barrier transport to cerebrospinal fluid regarding its use in the prevention of leukemic central nervous system involvement and management of methotrexate toxicity with the use of carboxypeptidase- G2. Finally, we discuss laboratory methods for monitoring methotrexate metabolites and benefits of simultaneous determination of methotrexate and metabolites as possible biomarkers of therapeutic efficacy and clinical toxicity. PMID:26062617

  19. Concordance of preclinical and clinical pharmacology and toxicology of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins: cell surface targets

    PubMed Central

    Bugelski, Peter J; Martin, Pauline L

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and fusion proteins directed towards cell surface targets make an important contribution to the treatment of disease. The purpose of this review was to correlate the clinical and preclinical data on the 15 currently approved mAbs and fusion proteins targeted to the cell surface. The principal sources used to gather data were: the peer reviewed Literature; European Medicines Agency ‘Scientific Discussions’; and the US Food and Drug Administration ‘Pharmacology/Toxicology Reviews’ and package inserts (United States Prescribing Information). Data on the 15 approved biopharmaceuticals were included: abatacept; abciximab; alefacept; alemtuzumab; basiliximab; cetuximab; daclizumab; efalizumab; ipilimumab; muromonab; natalizumab; panitumumab; rituximab; tocilizumab; and trastuzumab. For statistical analysis of concordance, data from these 15 were combined with data on the approved mAbs and fusion proteins directed towards soluble targets. Good concordance with human pharmacodynamics was found for mice receiving surrogates or non-human primates (NHPs) receiving the human pharmaceutical. In contrast, there was poor concordance for human pharmacodynamics in genetically deficient mice and for human adverse effects in all three test systems. No evidence that NHPs have superior predictive value was found. PMID:22168282

  20. Pharmacology and clinical efficacy of dimethyl fumarate (BG-12) for treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Serena; Tortorella, Carla; Gasperini, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The last two decades have seen the introduction of several therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS). These therapies are intended to work at different levels of the disease, typically targeting direct symptom management, brief corticosteroid administration for acute exacerbations, and the regular use of disease-modifying drugs. Nevertheless, in clinical practice, disease-modifying drugs or immunosuppressive treatments are frequently associated with suboptimal response in terms of efficacy and several side effects leading to poor patient adherence, so the proportion of relapsing–remitting MS patients not adequately responding to disease-modifying therapy have been reported to range from 7% to 49%. Natalizumab and fingolimod are the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved agents that have been added to the MS treatment armamentarium, but their use is limited by a less known safety profile and recognized specific risk. Thus, there is an important need for new therapeutic strategies, especially those that may offer greater patient satisfaction and safer risk profile in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes. A number of potential therapies for MS are now in late-stage development. Effective, safe, and well-tolerated therapies may improve compliance and empower patients with a level of independence not presently possible. To meet these characteristics, most of these therapies are oral compounds. Herein, we review the pharmacology and efficacy of dimethyl fumarate (BG-12) to date and its role in the evolving marketplace. PMID:24707183

  1. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Inhibitors: a Comprehensive Review of the Pharmacology, Mechanism of Action, Substrate Specificity, and Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Koppaka, Vindhya; Thompson, David C.; Chen, Ying; Ellermann, Manuel; Nicolaou, Kyriacos C.; Juvonen, Risto O.; Petersen, Dennis; Deitrich, Richard A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) belong to a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in the metabolism of aldehydes of both endogenous and exogenous derivation. The human ALDH superfamily comprises 19 isozymes that possess important physiological and toxicological functions. The ALDH1A subfamily plays a pivotal role in embryogenesis and development by mediating retinoic acid signaling. ALDH2, as a key enzyme that oxidizes acetaldehyde, is crucial for alcohol metabolism. ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are lens and corneal crystallins, which are essential elements of the cellular defense mechanism against ultraviolet radiation-induced damage in ocular tissues. Many ALDH isozymes are important in oxidizing reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and thereby help maintain cellular homeostasis. Increased expression and activity of ALDH isozymes have been reported in various human cancers and are associated with cancer relapse. As a direct consequence of their significant physiological and toxicological roles, inhibitors of the ALDH enzymes have been developed to treat human diseases. This review summarizes known ALDH inhibitors, their mechanisms of action, isozyme selectivity, potency, and clinical uses. The purpose of this review is to 1) establish the current status of pharmacological inhibition of the ALDHs, 2) provide a rationale for the continued development of ALDH isozyme-selective inhibitors, and 3) identify the challenges and potential therapeutic rewards associated with the creation of such agents. PMID:22544865

  2. Principles of Safety Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Pugsley, M K; Authier, S; Curtis, M J

    2008-01-01

    Safety Pharmacology is a rapidly developing discipline that uses the basic principles of pharmacology in a regulatory-driven process to generate data to inform risk/benefit assessment. The aim of Safety Pharmacology is to characterize the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic (PK/PD) relationship of a drug's adverse effects using continuously evolving methodology. Unlike toxicology, Safety Pharmacology includes within its remit a regulatory requirement to predict the risk of rare lethal events. This gives Safety Pharmacology its unique character. The key issues for Safety Pharmacology are detection of an adverse effect liability, projection of the data into safety margin calculation and finally clinical safety monitoring. This article sets out to explain the drivers for Safety Pharmacology so that the wider pharmacology community is better placed to understand the discipline. It concludes with a summary of principles that may help inform future resolution of unmet needs (especially establishing model validation for accurate risk assessment). Subsequent articles in this issue of the journal address specific aspects of Safety Pharmacology to explore the issues of model choice, the burden of proof and to highlight areas of intensive activity (such as testing for drug-induced rare event liability, and the challenge of testing the safety of so-called biologics (antibodies, gene therapy and so on.). PMID:18604233

  3. Clinical pharmacology of lumiracoxib: a selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rordorf, Christiane M; Choi, Les; Marshall, Paul; Mangold, James B

    2005-01-01

    of lumiracoxib dose in these subjects. Lumiracoxib is selective for COX-2 compared with COX-1 in the human whole blood assay with a ratio of 515 : 1 in healthy subjects and in patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. COX-2 selectivity was confirmed by a lack of inhibition of arachidonic acid and collagen-induced platelet aggregation. COX-2 selectivity of lumiracoxib is associated with a reduced incidence of gastroduodenal erosions compared with naproxen and a lack of effect on both small and large bowel permeability. Lumiracoxib does not exhibit any clinically meaningful interactions with a range of commonly used medications including aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), fluconazole, an ethinylestradiol- and levonorgestrel-containing oral contraceptive, omeprazole, the antacid Maalox, methotrexate and warfarin (although, as in common practice, routine monitoring of coagulation is recommended when lumiracoxib is co-administered with warfarin). As such, dose adjustments are not required when co-administering these agents with lumiracoxib. In addition, moderate hepatic impairment and mild to moderate renal impairment do not appear to influence lumiracoxib exposure. PMID:16372823

  4. Report on the 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeul Hong; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jung Shin; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Ho Yeong; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cho, Kyung Sam

    2013-04-01

    The 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012) in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association, was held on June 13 to 15 (3 days) 2012 at COEX Convention and Exhibition Center in Seoul, Korea. ACOS has a 20-year history starting from the first conference in Osaka, Japan, which was chaired by Prof. Tetsuo Taguchi and the ACOS conferences have since been conducted in Asian countries every 2 years. Under the theme of "Work Together to Make a Difference for Cancer Therapy in Asia", the 10th ACOS was prepared to discuss various subjects through a high-quality academic program, exhibition, and social events. The ACOS 2012 Committee was composed of the ACOS Organizing Committee, Honorary Advisors, Local Advisors, and ACOS 2012 Organizing Committee. The comprehensive academic program had a total of 92 sessions (3 Plenary Lectures, 1 Award Lectures, 1 Memorial Lectures, 9 Special Lectures, 15 Symposia, 1 Debate & Summary Sessions, 1 Case Conferences, 19 Educational Lectures, 1 Research & Development Session, 18 Satellite Symposia, 9 Meet the Professors, 14 Oral Presentations) and a total 292 presentations were delivered throughout the entire program. Amongst Free Papers, 462 research papers (110 oral presentations and 352 poster presentations) were selected to be presented. This conference was the largest of all ACOS conferences in its scale with around 1,500 participants from 30 countries. Furthermore, despite strict new financial policies and requirements governing fundraising alongside global economic stagnation, a total of 14 companies participated as sponsors and an additional 35 companies purchased 76 exhibition booths. Lastly, the conference social events provided attendees with a variety of opportunities to experience and enjoy Korea's rich culture and traditions during the Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception, Invitee Dinner, Banquet, and Closing Ceremony. Overall, ACOS 2012 reinforced and promoted

  5. Clinical pharmacology of DP-b99 in healthy volunteers: First administration to humans

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Gilad; Angel, Itzchak; Kozak, Alex

    2005-01-01

    Aims To investigate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of DP-b99 in healthy volunteers. DP-b99 is a newly developed lipophilic, cell permeable derivative of BAPTA (1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid), which selectively modulates the distribution of metal ions in hydrophobic milieu, and is in clinical development as a neuroprotectant for cerebral ischaemic stroke. To our knowledge no BAPTA derivative has ever been administered to man. Here we report the first human administration of DP-b99 in a phase I, two-part, double-blind, randomized placebo controlled study, with single IV doses of 0.003–1.0 mg kg−1 day−1 DP-b99 (part 1) or multiple ascending doses of 0.03–1.0 mg kg−1 day−1 DP-b99 over 4 days (part 2). Methods A double-blind, dose escalating tolerability study of DP-b99 in normal (young – aged between 18 and 40 years and elderly – aged between 65 and 85 years) healthy adult male volunteers was conducted. Part 1 of the study investigated single administration of ascending intravenous doses, and part 2 examined the effects of ascending doses given repeatedly over 4 days. Twenty-four young volunteers in part 1 received single dose administrations and 26 young volunteers in part 2 received repeated ascending dose administrations of either intravenous DP-b99 or placebo. Subsequently, 10 elderly volunteers received repeated intravenous DP-b99 (1 mg kg−1) or placebo in part 2 over 4 days. Adverse events were identified by either subject self reporting or based upon laboratory parameters (blood chemistry, complete blood cell count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin (PTT), physical examination, vital signs (blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory rate, body temperature) and urinalysis. A comprehensive set of cardiovascular parameters was assessed as well (blood pressure, 12 lead-ECG recordings and continuous bedside cardiac monitoring for 6 h on day 1). Results The administration of DP-b99 up

  6. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCI. structure, function, and pharmacology of acid-sensing ion channels and the epithelial Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Kellenberger, Stephan; Schild, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) and the acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) form subfamilies within the ENaC/degenerin family of Na(+) channels. ENaC mediates transepithelial Na(+) transport, thereby contributing to Na(+) homeostasis and the maintenance of blood pressure and the airway surface liquid level. ASICs are H(+)-activated channels found in central and peripheral neurons, where their activation induces neuronal depolarization. ASICs are involved in pain sensation, the expression of fear, and neurodegeneration after ischemia, making them potentially interesting drug targets. This review summarizes the biophysical properties, cellular functions, and physiologic and pathologic roles of the ASIC and ENaC subfamilies. The analysis of the homologies between ENaC and ASICs and the relation between functional and structural information shows many parallels between these channels, suggesting that some mechanisms that control channel activity are shared between ASICs and ENaC. The available crystal structures and the discovery of animal toxins acting on ASICs provide a unique opportunity to address the molecular mechanisms of ENaC and ASIC function to identify novel strategies for the modulation of these channels by pharmacologic ligands. PMID:25287517

  7. Overweight children and adolescents: a clinical report of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Baker, Susan; Barlow, Sarah; Cochran, William; Fuchs, George; Klish, William; Krebs, Nancy; Strauss, Richard; Tershakovec, Andrew; Udall, John

    2005-05-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity are major health problems with immediate and long-term consequences of staggering magnitude. Despite this, there are few preventive and therapeutic strategies of proven effectiveness available to public health and clinical practitioners. Accruing such evidence is currently and appropriately a health policy priority, but there is an urgent need to intervene even before comprehensive solutions are fully established. The aim of this Clinical Report on Overweight Children and Adolescents is to present information on current understanding of pathogenesis and treatment of overweight and obesity. We report on the epidemiology, molecular biology and medical conditions associated with overweight; on dietary, exercise, behavioral, pharmacological and surgical treatments; and on the primary prevention of overweight in children and adolescents. PMID:15861011

  8. 8th Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and 7th Clinical Engineering Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, Gustavo Javier; Ballarin, Virginia L.

    2011-12-01

    In September 2011, the Eighteenth Edition of the Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and Seventh Clinical Engineering Meeting were held in Mar del Plata, Argetina. The Mar del Plata SABI Regional and the School of Engineering of the Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata invited All bioengineers, engineers, physicists, mathematicians, biologists, physicians and health professionals working in the field of Bioengineering to participate in this event. The overall objectives of the Conference were: To provide discussion of scientific research results in Bioengineering and Clinical Engineering. To promote technological development experiences. To strengthen the institutional and scientific communication links in the area of Bioengineering, mainly between Universities of Latin America. To encourage students, teachers, researchers and professionals to establish exchanges of experiences and knowledge. To provide biomedical engineering technology solutions to the society and contributing ideas for low cost care. Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE SABI 2011 Chair Dra Virginia L Ballarin Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Co-Chair Dra Teresita R Cuadrado Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Local Comittee Dr Gustavo Abraham Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Josefina Ballarre Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dr Eduardo Blotta Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Agustina Bouchet Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Marcel Brun Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Silvia Ceré Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Mariela Azul Gonzalez Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Lucia Isabel Passoni Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Juan Ignacio Pastore Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Adriana Scandurra Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE

  9. 78 FR 55728 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... workshop regarding FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research professional... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  10. Flupirtine: Clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Harish, S; Bhuvana, K; Bengalorkar, Girish M; Kumar, Tn

    2012-04-01

    Flupirtine is neither an opioid nor a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) producing its analgesic action through blockade of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. It is devoid of adverse effects of routinely used analgesic drugs, but is equally efficacious in reducing pain sensation. It has a distinctive mechanism of action, exerting a dual therapeutic effect with both analgesic and muscle relaxant properties that has utility in the treatment of pain, including that associated with muscle tension. PMID:22557738

  11. Ehlers-Danlos Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scientific Board Staff Volunteer Leaders The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Our History ... Message Boards Patient Resource Library The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Loose Connections ...

  12. Papillary cannulation and sphincterotomy techniques at ERCP: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Testoni, Pier Alberto; Mariani, Alberto; Aabakken, Lars; Arvanitakis, Marianna; Bories, Erwan; Costamagna, Guido; Devière, Jacques; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Giovannini, Marc; Gyokeres, Tibor; Hafner, Michael; Halttunen, Jorma; Hassan, Cesare; Lopes, Luis; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Tham, Tony C; Tringali, Andrea; van Hooft, Jeanin; Williams, Earl J

    2016-07-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It provides practical advice on how to achieve successful cannulation and sphincterotomy at minimum risk to the patient. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations 1 ESGE suggests that difficult biliary cannulation is defined by the presence of one or more of the following: more than 5 contacts with the papilla whilst attempting to cannulate; more than 5 minutes spent attempting to cannulate following visualization of the papilla; more than one unintended pancreatic duct cannulation or opacification (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). 2 ESGE recommends the guidewire-assisted technique for primary biliary cannulation, since it reduces the risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). 3 ESGE recommends using pancreatic guidewire (PGW)-assisted biliary cannulation in patients where biliary cannulation is difficult and repeated unintentional access to the main pancreatic duct occurs (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). ESGE recommends attempting prophylactic pancreatic stenting in all patients with PGW-assisted attempts at biliary cannulation (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). 4 ESGE recommends needle-knife fistulotomy as the preferred technique for precutting (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). ESGE suggests that precutting should be used only by endoscopists who achieve selective biliary cannulation in more than 80 % of cases using standard cannulation techniques (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). When access to the pancreatic duct is easy to obtain, ESGE suggests placement of a pancreatic stent prior to precutting (moderate quality evidence, weak recommendation). 5 ESGE recommends that in patients with a small papilla

  13. 8th Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and 7th Clinical Engineering Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meschino, Gustavo Javier; Ballarin, Virginia L.

    2011-12-01

    In September 2011, the Eighteenth Edition of the Argentinean Bioengineering Society Conference (SABI 2011) and Seventh Clinical Engineering Meeting were held in Mar del Plata, Argetina. The Mar del Plata SABI Regional and the School of Engineering of the Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata invited All bioengineers, engineers, physicists, mathematicians, biologists, physicians and health professionals working in the field of Bioengineering to participate in this event. The overall objectives of the Conference were: To provide discussion of scientific research results in Bioengineering and Clinical Engineering. To promote technological development experiences. To strengthen the institutional and scientific communication links in the area of Bioengineering, mainly between Universities of Latin America. To encourage students, teachers, researchers and professionals to establish exchanges of experiences and knowledge. To provide biomedical engineering technology solutions to the society and contributing ideas for low cost care. Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE SABI 2011 Chair Dra Virginia L Ballarin Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Co-Chair Dra Teresita R Cuadrado Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Local Comittee Dr Gustavo Abraham Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Josefina Ballarre Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dr Eduardo Blotta Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Agustina Bouchet Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Marcel Brun Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dra Silvia Ceré Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Mariela Azul Gonzalez Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Lucia Isabel Passoni Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata Dr Juan Ignacio Pastore Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata - CONICET Dra Adriana Scandurra Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata SCIENTIFIC ADVISORY COMMITTEE

  14. Trends in Twitter Use by Physicians at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, 2010 and 2011

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Aafia; Glodé, L. Michael; Gillman, Matt; Miller, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Social media channels such as Twitter are gaining increasing acceptance as mechanisms for instantaneous scientific dialogue. Professional medical societies such as ASCO are using social media to expand the reach of scientific communications at and around their scientific meetings. This article examines the how Twitter use by oncologists expanded at the ASCO Annual Meetings from 2010 to 2011. Methods: In both years, tweets that were specifically generated by physicians and that incorporated the official meeting hashtag were harvested from the public domain, and a discourse analysis was performed by three independent raters. Follow-up surveys were conducted to assess physician attitudes toward Twitter and its potential role in clinical practice. Results: A combined total of 12,644 tweets were analyzed for 2010 and 2011. Although the number of physicians authoring tweets was small (14 in 2010, 34 in 2011), this group generated nearly 29% of the total meeting dialogue examined in this analysis in 2010 and 23% in 2011. Physicians used Twitter for reporting clinical news from scientific sessions, for discussions of treatment issues, for promotion, and to provide social commentary. The tangible impact of Twitter discussions on clinical practice remains unclear. Conclusion: Despite the 140-character limit, Twitter was successfully used by physicians at the 2010 and 2011 ASCO Annual Meetings to engage in clinical discussions, whether or not an author was on site as a live attendee. Twitter usage grew significantly from 2010 to 2011. Professional societies should monitor these phenomena to enhance annual meeting attendee user experience. PMID:22942812

  15. Accreditation and postgraduate training in European countries: an FESCC survey. Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Blaton, V

    2001-07-20

    The mission of the Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry is to support and promote clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine in Europe, to aid communication between the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) and National Scientific Societies, to develop education and quality in the discipline, and to encourage young scientists to take an active role in these activities. One recent initiative of the Federation was a survey on accreditation of medical laboratories and training in laboratory medicine in Europe. Among European countries, three promote accreditation according to EN 45001, several countries apply systems based on professional and nationally defined standards (e.g. CPA in the UK) and other countries are moving to define accreditation standards at a national level. Data on vocational training demonstrate that this is based on a postgraduate education with duration ranging from 6 months to 11 years; in most countries the average length of university education is 5 years and that of postgraduate training is 4 years. A great difference, moreover, exists regarding the polyvalent versus monovalent training. Taken together, these data indicate that a great effort should be made by the Federation for promoting harmonization and coordination in Europe. PMID:11438289

  16. Ocular pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Novack, Gary D; Robin, Alan L

    2016-05-01

    Ophthalmic diseases include both those analogous to systemic diseases (eg, inflammation, infection, neuronal degeneration) and not analogous (eg, cataract, myopia). Many anterior segment diseases are treated pharmacologically through eye drops, which have an implied therapeutic index of local therapy. Unlike oral dosage forms administered for systemic diseases, eyedrops require patients not only to adhere to treatment, but to be able to accurately perform-ie, instill drops correctly. Anatomical and physiological barriers make topical delivery to the anterior chamber challenging-in some cases more challenging than absorption through the skin, nasal passages, or gut. Treatment of the posterior segment (eg, vitreous, retina, choroid, and optic nerve) is more challenging due to additional barriers. Recently, intravitreal injections have become a standard of care with biologics for the treatment of macular degeneration and other diseases. Although the eye has esterases, hydroxylases, and transporters, it has relatively little CYP450 enzymes. Because it is challenging to obtain drug concentrations at the target site, ocular clinical pharmacokinetics, and thus pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic interactions, are rarely available. Ophthalmic pharmaceuticals require consideration of solubility, physiological pH, and osmolarity, as well as sterility and stability, which in turn requires optimal pharmaceutics. Although applied locally, ocular medications may be absorbed systemically, which results in morbidity and mortality (eg, systemic hypotension, bronchospasm, and bradycardia). PMID:26360129

  17. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Clinical Practice Guidelines on Arterial Conduits for Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    PubMed

    Aldea, Gabriel S; Bakaeen, Faisal G; Pal, Jay; Fremes, Stephen; Head, Stuart J; Sabik, Joseph; Rosengart, Todd; Kappetein, A Pieter; Thourani, Vinod H; Firestone, Scott; Mitchell, John D

    2016-02-01

    Internal thoracic arteries (ITAs) should be used to bypass the left anterior descending (LAD) artery when bypass of the LAD is indicated (class of recommendation [COR] I, level of evidence [LOE] B). As an adjunct to left internal thoracic artery (LITA), a second arterial graft (right ITA or radial artery [RA]) should be considered in appropriate patients (COR IIa, LOE B). Use of bilateral ITAs (BITAs) should be considered in patients who do not have an excessive risk of sternal complications (COR IIa, LOE B). To reduce the risk of sternal infection with BITA, skeletonized grafts should be considered (COR IIa, LOE B), smoking cessation is recommended (COR I, LOE C), glycemic control should be considered (COR IIa, LOE B), and enhanced sternal stabilization may be considered (COR IIb, LOE C). As an adjunct to LITA to LAD (or in patients with inadequate LITA grafts), use of a RA graft is reasonable when grafting coronary targets with severe stenoses (COR IIa, LOE: B). When RA grafts are used, it is reasonable to use pharmacologic agents to reduce acute intraoperative and perioperative spasm (COR IIa, LOE C). The right gastroepiploic artery may be considered in patients with poor conduit options or as an adjunct to more complete arterial revascularization (COR IIb, LOE B). Use of arterial grafts (specific targets, number, and type) should be a part of the discussion of the heart team in determining the optimal approach for each patient (COR I, LOE C). PMID:26680310

  18. Health Care Rationing in a Just Society: The Clinical Effectiveness Model.

    PubMed

    Weisleder, Pedro

    2015-09-01

    Representing 18% of gross domestic product, and projected to increase to 20% by 2022, health care costs in the United States are an unsustainable expense. The clinical effectiveness model of cost containment is an ethical and self-sustaining paradigm that can assist bending the health care-cost curve. As envisioned by Buyx et al, clinically effective care is aimed at making the practice of medicine more explicitly evidence based with the goals of improving clinical success, efficiency, and value. I provide a vision for applying the clinical effectiveness model to the American health care system. I illustrate its use with 2 examples from the practice of child neurology: DOC-band (helmet therapy) for the treatment of positional plagiocephaly-relatively inexpensive but ineffective, and adrenocorticotropic hormone for the treatment of infantile spasms-expensive but effective. PMID:26358431

  19. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Mohammed; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alghamdi, Khalid; Murshid, Esam; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Ahmad, Imran; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Alsharm, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor-node-metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors. PMID:27141181

  20. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Alghamdi, Khalid; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Murshid, Esam; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Ahmad, Imran; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Alsharm, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and healthcare policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with RCC. PMID:27141180

  1. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abusamra, Ashraf; Murshid, Esam; Kushi, Hussain; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Rabah, Danny; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alghamdi, Khalid; Alsharm, Abdullah; Ahmad, Imran

    2016-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi oncology society and Saudi urological association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate to. PMID:27141178

  2. The National Cancer Institute–American Society of Clinical Oncology Cancer Trial Accrual Symposium: Summary and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Denicoff, Andrea M.; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Grubbs, Stephen S.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Comis, Robert L.; Devine, Peggy; Dilts, David M.; Duff, Michelle E.; Ford, Jean G.; Joffe, Steven; Schapira, Lidia; Weinfurt, Kevin P.; Michaels, Margo; Raghavan, Derek; Richmond, Ellen S.; Zon, Robin; Albrecht, Terrance L.; Bookman, Michael A.; Dowlati, Afshin; Enos, Rebecca A.; Fouad, Mona N.; Good, Marjorie; Hicks, William J.; Loehrer, Patrick J.; Lyss, Alan P.; Wolff, Steven N.; Wujcik, Debra M.; Meropol, Neal J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Many challenges to clinical trial accrual exist, resulting in studies with inadequate enrollment and potentially delaying answers to important scientific and clinical questions. Methods: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) cosponsored the Cancer Trial Accrual Symposium: Science and Solutions on April 29-30, 2010 to examine the state of accrual science related to patient/community, physician/provider, and site/organizational influences, and identify new interventions to facilitate clinical trial enrollment. The symposium featured breakout sessions, plenary sessions, and a poster session including 100 abstracts. Among the 358 attendees were clinical investigators, researchers of accrual strategies, research administrators, nurses, research coordinators, patient advocates, and educators. A bibliography of the accrual literature in these three major areas was provided to participants in advance of the meeting. After the symposium, the literature in these areas was revisited to determine if the symposium recommendations remained relevant within the context of the current literature. Results: Few rigorously conducted studies have tested interventions to address challenges to clinical trials accrual. Attendees developed recommendations for improving accrual and identified priority areas for future accrual research at the patient/community, physician/provider, and site/organizational levels. Current literature continues to support the symposium recommendations. Conclusions: A combination of approaches addressing both the multifactorial nature of accrual challenges and the characteristics of the target population may be needed to improve accrual to cancer clinical trials. Recommendations for best practices and for future research developed from the symposium are provided. PMID:24130252

  3. Lithium: updated human knowledge using an evidence-based approach. Part II: Clinical pharmacology and therapeutic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Etienne Marc; Aubry, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    After a single dose, lithium, usually given as carbonate, reaches a peak plasma concentration at 1.0-2.0 hours for standard-release dosage forms, and 4-5 hours for sustained-release forms. Its bioavailability is 80-100%, its total clearance 10-40 mL/min and its elimination half-life is 18-36 hours. Use of the sustained-release formulation results in 30-50% reductions in peak plasma concentrations without major changes in the area under the plasma concentration curve. Lithium distribution to the brain, evaluated using 7Li magnetic resonance spectroscopy, showed brain concentrations to be approximately half those in serum, occasionally increasing to 75-80%. Brain concentrations were weakly correlated with serum concentrations. Lithium is almost exclusively excreted via the kidney as a free ion and lithium clearance is considered to decrease with aging. No gender- or race-related differences in kinetics have been demonstrated. Renal insufficiency is associated with a considerable reduction in renal clearance of lithium and is considered a contraindication to its use, especially if a sodium-poor diet is required. During the last months of pregnancy, lithium clearance increases by 30-50% as a result of an increase in glomerular filtration rate. Lithium also passes freely from maternal plasma into breast milk. Numerous kinetic interactions have been described for lithium, usually involving a decrease in the drug's clearance and therefore increasing its potential toxicity. Clinical pharmacology studies performed in healthy volunteers have investigated a possible effect of lithium on cognitive functions. Most of these studies reported a slight, negative effect on vigilance, alertness, learning and short-term memory after long-term administration only. Because of the narrow therapeutic range of lithium, therapeutic monitoring is the basis for optimal use and administration of this drug. Lithium dosages should be adjusted on the basis of the serum concentration drawn

  4. British Fertility Society Policy and Practice Committee: adjuvants in IVF: evidence for good clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Nardo, Luciano G; El-Toukhy, Tarek; Stewart, Jane; Balen, Adam H; Potdar, Neelam

    2015-03-01

    Optimisation of the environment favourable for satisfactory ovarian response to stimulation and successful embryo implantation remains at the core of assisted conception programmes. The evidence base for the routine use of different adjuvants, alone or in combination, for women undergoing their first in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment cycle and for those with poor prognosis is inadequate. The aim of this document is to update the last review of the available literature carried out by the British Fertility Society Policy and Practice Committee (BFS P&P) published in 2009 and to provide fertility professionals with evidence-based guidance and recommendations regarding the use of immunotherapy, vasodilators, uterine relaxants, aspirin, heparin, growth hormone, dehydroepiandrosterone, oestrogen and metformin as adjuvants in IVF. Unfortunately despite the lapse of 5 years since the last publication, there is still a lack of robust evidence for most of the adjuvants searched and large well-designed randomised controlled trials are still needed. One possible exception is metformin, which seems to have a positive effect in women with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing IVF. Patients who are given other adjuvants on an empirical basis should always be informed of the lack of evidence and the potential side effects. PMID:25531921

  5. The Infectious Diseases Society of America Lyme guidelines: a cautionary tale about the development of clinical practice guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Flawed clinical practice guidelines may compromise patient care. Commercial conflicts of interest on panels that write treatment guidelines are particularly problematic, because panelists may have conflicting agendas that influence guideline recommendations. Historically, there has been no legal remedy for conflicts of interest on guidelines panels. However, in May 2008, the Attorney General of Connecticut concluded a ground-breaking antitrust investigation into the development of Lyme disease treatment guidelines by one of the largest medical societies in the United States, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Although the investigation found significant flaws in the IDSA guidelines development process, the subsequent review of the guidelines mandated by the settlement was compromised by a lack of impartiality at various stages of the IDSA review process. This article will examine the interplay between the recent calls for guidelines reform, the ethical canons of medicine, and due process considerations under antitrust laws as they apply to the formulation of the IDSA Lyme disease treatment guidelines. The article will also discuss pitfalls in the implementation of the IDSA antitrust settlement that should be avoided in the future. PMID:20529367

  6. Clinical use of pulse oximetry: official guidelines from the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Pretto, Jeffrey J; Roebuck, Teanau; Beckert, Lutz; Hamilton, Garun

    2014-01-01

    Pulse oximetry provides a simple, non-invasive approximation of arterial oxygenation in a wide variety of clinical settings including emergency and critical-care medicine, hospital-based and ambulatory care, perioperative monitoring, inpatient and outpatient settings, and for specific diagnostic applications. Pulse oximetry is of utility in perinatal, paediatric, adult and geriatric populations but may require use of age-specific sensors in these groups. It plays a role in the monitoring and treatment of respiratory dysfunction by detecting hypoxaemia and is effective in guiding oxygen therapy in both adult and paediatric populations. Pulse oximetry does not provide information about the adequacy of ventilation or about precise arterial oxygenation, particularly when arterial oxygen levels are very high or very low. Arterial blood gas analysis is the gold standard in these settings. Pulse oximetry may be inaccurate as a marker of oxygenation in the presence of dyshaemoglobinaemias such as carbon monoxide poisoning or methaemoglobinaemia where arterial oxygen saturation values will be overestimated. Technical considerations such as sensor position, signal averaging time and data sampling rates may influence clinical interpretation of pulse oximetry readings. PMID:24251722

  7. The Lebanese Society for Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) guidelines for adult community-acquired pneumonia (Cap) in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Moghnieh, Rima; Yared Sakr, Nadine; Kanj, Souha S; Musharrafieh, Umayya; Husni, Rula; Jradeh, Mona; Al-Awar, Ghassan; Matar, Madona; Jureij, Wafa; Antoine, Saad; Azar, Eid; Abi Hanna, Pierre; Minari, Afaf; Hammoud, Jamale; Kfoury, Joumana; Mahfouz, Tahsin; Abou Chakra, Diaa; Zaatari, Mohamad; Tabbarah, Zuhayr A

    2014-01-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality which is managed by different disciplines in a heterogeneous fashion. Development of consensus guidelines to standardize these wide variations in care has become a prime objective. The Lebanese Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (LSIDCM) convened to set Lebanese national guidelines for the management of CAP since it is a major and a prevalent disease affecting the Lebanese population. These guidelines, besides being helpful in direct clinical practice, play a major role in establishing stewardship programs in hospitals in an effort to contain antimicrobial resistance on the national level. These guidelines are intended for primary care practitioners and emergency medicine physicians. They constitute an appropriate starting point for specialists' consultation being based on the available local epidemiological and resistance data. This document includes the following: 1/ Rationale and scope of the guidelines; 2/ Microbiology of CAP based on Lebanese data; 3/ Clinical presentation and diagnostic workup of CAP; 4/ Management and prevention strategies based on the IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines, 2007, and the ESCMID Guidelines, 2011, and tailored to the microbiological data in Lebanon; 5/ Comparison to regional guidelines. The recommendations made in this document were graded based on the strength of the evidence as in the 2007 IDSA/ATS Consensus Guidelines. Hopefully, these guidelines will be an important step towards standardization of CAP care in Lebanon and set the agenda for further research in this area. PMID:24684125

  8. Position statement: introduction, methods, and participants. The Writing Group for the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) Position Development Conference.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    Following publication of the proceedings from the first Position Development Conference (PDC) of the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD), members of the ISCD Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) addressed additional topics of interest in the field of bone densitometry. These topics were addressed at a subsequent PDC, which was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, July 25-27, 2003. Five topics were chosen for discussion: (1) the diagnosis of osteoporosis in men, premenopausal women, and children; (2) technical standardization for dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA); (3) indications for bone densitometry; (4) reporting of bone density results; and (5) nomenclature and decimal places for bone densitometry. This report describes the methodology used for the development, presentation, and finalization of PDC positions. These positions are discussed in the following papers. PMID:14742883

  9. Clinical trials update from the European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure meeting: COMET, COMPANION, Tezosentan and SHAPE.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Alison P; Clark, Andrew L; Seymour, Anne Marie L; Cleland, John G F

    2003-08-01

    This article continues a series of reports on recent research developments in the field of heart failure. Key presentations made at the European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Update meeting, held in Strasbourg, France are described. The COMET study showed a 17% relative risk reduction in all-cause mortality with carvedilol compared with metoprolol tartrate. The COMPANION study, as previously reported, showed encouraging results for the use of cardiac resynchronisation and implantable defibrillator therapy in patients with heart failure, but further evidence is awaited. The results of a study on tezosentan suggest that lower doses of this endothelin antagonist may be clinically more effective with fewer adverse effects compared with higher doses. The SHAPE survey of heart failure awareness in Europe identified a need for further heart failure education amongst the public, patients, their carers and primary care physicians. PMID:12921817

  10. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXIX. Cannabinoid Receptors and Their Ligands: Beyond CB1 and CB2

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, A. C.; Abood, M. E.; Alexander, S. P. H.; Di Marzo, V.; Elphick, M. R.; Greasley, P. J.; Hansen, H. S.; Kunos, G.; Mackie, K.; Mechoulam, R.; Ross, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). Ligands activating these G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) include the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, numerous synthetic compounds, and endogenous compounds known as endocannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists have also been developed. Some of these ligands activate or block one type of cannabinoid receptor more potently than the other type. This review summarizes current data indicating the extent to which cannabinoid receptor ligands undergo orthosteric or allosteric interactions with non-CB1, non-CB2 established GPCRs, deorphanized receptors such as GPR55, ligand-gated ion channels, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, and other ion channels or peroxisome proliferator-activated nuclear receptors. From these data, it is clear that some ligands that interact similarly with CB1 and/or CB2 receptors are likely to display significantly different pharmacological profiles. The review also lists some criteria that any novel “CB3” cannabinoid receptor or channel should fulfil and concludes that these criteria are not currently met by any non-CB1, non-CB2 pharmacological receptor or channel. However, it does identify certain pharmacological targets that should be investigated further as potential CB3 receptors or channels. These include TRP vanilloid 1, which possibly functions as an ionotropic cannabinoid receptor under physiological and/or pathological conditions, and some deorphanized GPCRs. Also discussed are 1) the ability of CB1 receptors to form heteromeric complexes with certain other GPCRs, 2) phylogenetic relationships that exist between CB1/CB2 receptors and other GPCRs, 3) evidence for the existence of several as-yet-uncharacterized non-CB1, non-CB2 cannabinoid receptors; and 4) current cannabinoid receptor nomenclature. PMID:21079038

  11. [Clinical practice guidelines of the Spanish Society of Cardiology on echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Evangelista Masip, A; María Alonso Gómez, A; Martín Durán, R; Moreno Yagüela, M; María Oliver Ruiz, J; Rodríguez Padial, L; Tobaruela, A

    2000-05-01

    Doppler echocardiography has become the technique of choice for the diagnosis and follow-up of most heart diseases its main advantages are that it is non-invasive, easy to use, readily available, rapid and has a high cost-benefict ratio. Multiple studies have demonstrated the accuracy of the technique in the diagnosis and severity quantification of the severity of different diseases. Nevertheless, its main limitation lies in the fact that results are operator dependent, and therefore correct training of the echocardiographer is mandatory. In addition, adequate infrastructure and appropriate equipment are a required guarantee quality of the study. Finally, the technique should be used for the indications, in which beneficial information can be yielded. The aim of the present article was to define and update these considerations to enhance the usefulness of echocardiography in clinical practice. PMID:10816174

  12. [Pharmacological biomodulation in cancer].

    PubMed

    Arvelo, F; Merentes, E

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of the P-glycoprotein as a mediator of multidrug resistance (MDR) represents one of the most important research accomplishments in antineoplastic pharmacology during the last decade. Demonstration of Pgp in epithelial tissues, untreated and chemotherapeutically pretreated human malignancies, and identification of various agents capable of reversing in vitro resistance has generated enthusiasm for clinical studies throughout the world. This review discusses recent developments of experimental and clinical investigations of MDR reversing agents in cancer. PMID:11510431

  13. Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Hook. f. and Thoms. (Guduchi) - validation of the Ayurvedic pharmacology through experimental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Avnish K; Kumar, Kaushal; Kumar, Arvind; Mishra, Hari S

    2010-04-01

    T. cordifolia (Guduchi) is a large, glabrous, perennial, deciduous, climbing shrub of weak and fleshy stem found throughout India. It is a widely used plant in folk and Ayurvedic systems of medicine. The chemical constituents reported from this shrub belong to different classes, such as alkaloids, diterpenoid lactones, glycosides, steroids, sesquiterpenoid, phenolics, aliphatic compounds and polysaccharides. Various properties of T. cordifolia, described in ancient texts of Ayurveda, like Rasayana, Sangrahi, Balya, Agnideepana, Tridoshshamaka, Dahnashaka, Mehnashaka, Kasa-swasahara, Pandunashaka, Kamla-Kushta-Vataraktanashaka, Jwarhara, Krimihara, Prameha, Arshnashaka, Kricch-Hridroganashak, etc., are acquiring scientific validity through modern research adopting "reverse pharmacological" approach. Potential medicinal properties reported by scientific research include anti-diabetic, antipyretic, antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory, anti-arthritic, antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-stress, anti-leprotic, antimalarial, hepato-protective, immuno-modulatory and anti-neoplastic activities. This review brings together various properties and medicinal uses of T. cordifolia described in Ayurveda, along with phytochemical and pharmacological reports. PMID:20814526

  14. Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Hook. f. and Thoms. (Guduchi) – validation of the Ayurvedic pharmacology through experimental and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Avnish K.; Kumar, Kaushal; Kumar, Arvind; Mishra, Hari S.

    2010-01-01

    T. cordifolia (Guduchi) is a large, glabrous, perennial, deciduous, climbing shrub of weak and fleshy stem found throughout India. It is a widely used plant in folk and Ayurvedic systems of medicine. The chemical constituents reported from this shrub belong to different classes, such as alkaloids, diterpenoid lactones, glycosides, steroids, sesquiterpenoid, phenolics, aliphatic compounds and polysaccharides. Various properties of T. cordifolia, described in ancient texts of Ayurveda, like Rasayana, Sangrahi, Balya, Agnideepana, Tridoshshamaka, Dahnashaka, Mehnashaka, Kasa-swasahara, Pandunashaka, Kamla-Kushta-Vataraktanashaka, Jwarhara, Krimihara, Prameha, Arshnashaka, Kricch-Hridroganashak, etc., are acquiring scientific validity through modern research adopting "reverse pharmacological" approach. Potential medicinal properties reported by scientific research include anti-diabetic, antipyretic, antispasmodic, anti-inflammatory, anti-arthritic, antioxidant, anti-allergic, anti-stress, anti-leprotic, antimalarial, hepato-protective, immuno-modulatory and anti-neoplastic activities. This review brings together various properties and medicinal uses of T. cordifolia described in Ayurveda, along with phytochemical and pharmacological reports. PMID:20814526

  15. Pharmacologic Therapies in Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana Lima; Wipf, Joyce E

    2016-07-01

    Anticoagulants are beneficial for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. The development of target-specific oral anticoagulants is changing the landscape of anticoagulation therapy and created growing interest on this subject. Understanding the pharmacology of different anticoagulants is the first step to adequately treat patients with best available therapy while avoiding serious bleeding complications. This article reviews the pharmacology of the main anticoagulant classes (vitamin K antagonists, direct oral anticoagulants, and heparins) and their clinical indications based on evidence-based data currently available in the literature. PMID:27235611

  16. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis and Treatment in Patients With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update 2014

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, Gary H.; Bohlke, Kari; Khorana, Alok A.; Kuderer, Nicole M.; Lee, Agnes Y.; Arcelus, Juan Ignacio; Balaban, Edward P.; Clarke, Jeffrey M.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Francis, Charles W.; Gates, Leigh E.; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Key, Nigel S.; Levine, Mark N.; Liebman, Howard A.; Tempero, Margaret A.; Wong, Sandra L.; Somerfield, Mark R.; Falanga, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide current recommendations about the prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer. Methods PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines from November 2012 through July 2014. An update committee reviewed the identified abstracts. Results Of the 53 publications identified and reviewed, none prompted a change in the 2013 recommendations. Recommendations Most hospitalized patients with active cancer require thromboprophylaxis throughout hospitalization. Routine thromboprophylaxis is not recommended for patients with cancer in the outpatient setting. It may be considered for selected high-risk patients. Patients with multiple myeloma receiving antiangiogenesis agents with chemotherapy and/or dexamethasone should receive prophylaxis with either low–molecular weight heparin (LMWH) or low-dose aspirin. Patients undergoing major surgery should receive prophylaxis starting before surgery and continuing for at least 7 to 10 days. Extending prophylaxis up to 4 weeks should be considered in those undergoing major abdominal or pelvic surgery with high-risk features. LMWH is recommended for the initial 5 to 10 days of treatment for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism as well as for long-term secondary prophylaxis (at least 6 months). Use of novel oral anticoagulants is not currently recommended for patients with malignancy and VTE because of limited data in patients with cancer. Anticoagulation should not be used to extend survival of patients with cancer in the absence of other indications. Patients with cancer should be periodically assessed for VTE risk. Oncology professionals should educate patients about the signs and symptoms of VTE. PMID:25605844

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update on Chemotherapy for Stage IV Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azzoli, Christopher G.; Baker, Sherman; Temin, Sarah; Pao, William; Aliff, Timothy; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H.; Laskin, Janessa L.; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pfister, David G.; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H.; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J.; Strawn, John R.; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide updated recommendations for the treatment of patients with stage IV non–small-cell lung cancer. A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. The scope of the guideline was narrowed to chemotherapy and biologic therapy. An Update Committee reviewed the literature and made updated recommendations. One hundred sixty-two publications met the inclusion criteria. Recommendations were based on treatment strategies that improve overall survival. Treatments that improve only progression-free survival prompted scrutiny of toxicity and quality of life. For first-line therapy in patients with performance status of 0 or 1, a platinum-based two-drug combination of cytotoxic drugs is recommended. Nonplatinum cytotoxic doublets are acceptable for patients with contraindications to platinum therapy. For patients with performance status of 2, a single cytotoxic drug is sufficient. Stop first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy at disease progression or after four cycles in patients who are not responding to treatment. Stop two-drug cytotoxic chemotherapy at six cycles even in patients who are responding to therapy. The first-line use of gefitinib may be recommended for patients with known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation; for negative or unknown EGFR mutation status, cytotoxic chemotherapy is preferred. Bevacizumab is recommended with carboplatin-paclitaxel, except for patients with certain clinical characteristics. Cetuximab is recommended with cisplatin-vinorelbine for patients with EGFR-positive tumors by immunohistochemistry. Docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed is recommended as second-line therapy. Erlotinib is recommended as third-line therapy for patients who have not received prior erlotinib or gefitinib. Data are insufficient to recommend the routine third-line use of cytotoxic drugs. Data are insufficient to recommend routine use of molecular markers to select chemotherapy

  18. The shifting landscape of safety pharmacology in 2015.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, Michael K; Authier, Simon; Stonerook, Michael; Curtis, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The relative importance of the discipline of safety pharmacology (which integrates physiology, pharmacologyand toxicology) has evolved since the incorporation of the Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS) as an entity on August 10, 2000. Safety pharmacology (SP), as a synthesis of these other fields of knowledge, is concerned with characterizing the safety profile (or potential undesirable pharmacodynamic effects) of new chemical entities (NCEs) and biologicals. Initially focused on the issue of drug-induced QT prolongation it has developed into an important discipline over the past 15years with expertise beyond its initial focus on torsades de pointes (TdP). It has become a repository for interrogation of models for drug safety studies and innovative non-clinical model development, validation and implementation. Thus, while safety pharmacology consists of the triumvirate obligatory cardiovascular, central nervous system (CNS) and respiratory system core battery studies it also involves assessing drug effects on numerous other physiological systems (e.g., ocular, auditory, renal, gastrointestinal, blood, immune) leveraging emerging new technologies in a wide range of non-clinical drug safety testing models. As with previous editorials that preface the themed issue on safety pharmacology methods published in the Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods (JPTM), we highlight here the content derived from the most recent (2014) SPS meeting held in Washington, DC. The dynamics of the discipline remain fervent and method development, extension and refinement are reflected in the content. This issue of the JPTM continues the tradition of providing a publication summary of articles (reviews, commentaries and methods) with impact on the discipline of safety pharmacology. PMID:26055120

  19. Pharmacological management of sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Systemic sepsis continues to be the most-difficult management problem in caring for the combat casualty. The complications of sepsis pervade all areas of injury to soldiers in the field, whether it is mechanical (missiles), thermal (burns), chemical, biological, or radiation injury. With the advent of tactical nuclear weapons, the problem of sepsis will be much higher in future wars than has previously been experienced through the world. The purpose of this chapter is a) to review the data suggesting pharmacological agents that may benefit the septic patient, and b) to emphasize the adjunctive therapies that should be explored in clinical trials. The pharmacological management of sepsis remains controversial. Most of the drugs utilized clinically treat the symptoms of the disease and are not necessarily directed at fundamental mechanisms that are known to be present in sepsis. A broad data base is emerging, indicating that NSAID should be used in human clinical trials. Prostaglandins are sensitive indicators of cellular injury and may be mediators for a number of vasoactive chemicals. Opiate antagonists and calcium channel blockers require more in-depth data; however, recent studies generate excitement for their potential use in the critically ill patient. Pharmacological effects of antibiotics, in concert with other drugs, suggest an entirely new approach to pharmacological treatment in sepsis. There is no doubt that new treatment modalities or adjunctive therapies must be utilized to alter the poor prognosis of severe sepsis that we have observed in the past 4 decades.

  20. Canadian Society of Nephrology commentary on the KDIGO clinical practice guideline for CKD evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Ayub; Clase, Catherine M; Acott, Phil; Battistella, Marisa; Bello, Aminu; Feltmate, Patrick; Grill, Allan; Karsanji, Meena; Komenda, Paul; Madore, Francois; Manns, Braden J; Mahdavi, Sara; Mustafa, Reem A; Smyth, Andrew; Welcher, E Sohani

    2015-02-01

    We congratulate the KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) work group on their comprehensive work in a broad subject area and agreed with many of the recommendations in their clinical practice guideline on the evaluation and management of chronic kidney disease. We concur with the KDIGO definitions and classification of kidney disease and welcome the addition of albuminuria categories at all levels of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), the terminology of G categories rather than stages to describe level of GFR, the division of former stage 3 into new G categories 3a and 3b, and the addition of the underlying diagnosis. We agree with the use of the heat map to illustrate the relative contributions of low GFR and albuminuria to cardiovascular and renal risk, though we thought that the highest risk category was too broad, including as it does people at disparate levels of risk. We add an albuminuria category A4 for nephrotic-range proteinuria and D and T categories for patients on dialysis or with a functioning renal transplant. We recommend target blood pressure of 140/90mm Hg regardless of diabetes or proteinuria, and against the combination of angiotensin receptor blockers with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. We recommend against routine protein restriction. We concur on individualization of hemoglobin A1c targets. We do not agree with routine restriction of sodium intake to <2g/d, instead suggesting reduction of sodium intake in those with high intake (>3.3g/d). We suggest screening for anemia only when GFR is <30mL/min/1.73m(2). We recognize the absence of evidence on appropriate phosphate targets and methods of achieving them and do not agree with suggestions in this area. In drug dosing, we agree with the recommendation of using absolute clearance (ie, milliliters per minute), calculated from the patient's estimated GFR (which is normalized to 1.73m(2)) and the patient's actual anthropomorphic body surface area. We agree with referral to a

  1. Best Practices for Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry Measurement and Reporting: International Society for Clinical Densitometry Guidance.

    PubMed

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Binkley, Neil; Morgan, Sarah L; Shuhart, Christopher R; Camargos, Bruno Muzzi; Carey, John J; Gordon, Catherine M; Jankowski, Lawrence G; Lee, Joon-Kiong; Leslie, William D

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is a technology that is widely used to diagnose osteoporosis, assess fracture risk, and monitor changes in bone mineral density (BMD). The clinical utility of DXA is highly dependent on the quality of the scan acquisition, analysis, and interpretation. Clinicians are best equipped to manage patients when BMD measurements are correct and interpretation follows well-established standards. Poor-quality acquisition, analysis, or interpretation of DXA data may mislead referring clinicians, resulting in unnecessary diagnostic evaluations, failure to evaluate when needed, inappropriate treatment, or failure to provide medical treatment, with potentially ineffective, harmful, or costly consequences. Misallocation of limited healthcare resources and poor treatment decisions can be minimized, and patient care optimized, through meticulous attention to DXA instrument calibration, data acquisition and analysis, interpretation, and reporting. This document from the International Society for Clinical Densitometry describes quality standards for BMD testing at DXA facilities worldwide to provide guidance for DXA supervisors, technologists, interpreters, and clinicians. High-quality DXA testing is necessary for correct diagnostic classification and optimal fracture risk assessment, and is essential for BMD monitoring. PMID:27020004

  2. Executive Summary: 2016 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Galgiani, John N; Ampel, Neil M; Blair, Janis E; Catanzaro, Antonino; Geertsma, Francesca; Hoover, Susan E; Johnson, Royce H; Kusne, Shimon; Lisse, Jeffrey; MacDonald, Joel D; Meyerson, Shari L; Raksin, Patricia B; Siever, John; Stevens, David A; Sunenshine, Rebecca; Theodore, Nicholas

    2016-09-15

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. Infectious Diseases Society of America considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.Coccidioidomycosis, also known as San Joaquin Valley fever, is a systemic infection endemic to parts of the southwestern United States and elsewhere in the Western Hemisphere. Residence in and recent travel to these areas are critical elements for the accurate recognition of patients who develop this infection. In this practice guideline, we have organized our recommendations to address actionable questions concerning the entire spectrum of clinical syndromes. These can range from initial pulmonary infection, which eventually resolves whether or not antifungal therapy is administered, to a variety of pulmonary and extrapulmonary complications. Additional recommendations address management of coccidioidomycosis occurring for special at-risk populations. Finally, preemptive management strategies are outlined in certain at-risk populations and after unintentional laboratory exposure. PMID:27559032

  3. First Employment of British Pharmacology Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Michael; Markham, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    A survey was conducted in UK Universities to identify the employment of pharmacology graduates (BSc, MSc and PhD) 6 months after graduation in 2003. The aim was to provide data for the British Pharmacological Society (BPS) so they could offer advice to interested bodies and to University staff for careers information. 85% of 52 Universities…

  4. 2013 Pharmacology Risk SRP Status Review Comments to Chief Scientist. The Risk of Clinically Relevant Unpredicted Effects of Medication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    On December 5, 2013, the Pharmacology Risk SRP, participants from the JSC, HQ, the NSBRI, and NRESS participated in a WebEx/teleconference. The purpose of the call (as stated in the Statement of Task) was to allow the SRP members to: 1. Receive an update by the HRP Chief Scientist or Deputy Chief Scientist on the status of NASA's current and future exploration plans and the impact these will have on the HRP. 2. Receive an update on any changes within the HRP since the 2012 SRP meeting. 3. Receive an update by the Element or Project Scientist(s) on progress since the 2012 SRP meeting. 4. Participate in a discussion with the HRP Chief Scientist, Deputy Chief Scientist, and the Element regarding possible topics to be addressed at the next SRP meeting.

  5. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXVI. Current Progress in the Mammalian TRP Ion Channel Family

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Long-Jun; Sweet, Tara-Beth

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a large family of ion channel proteins, surpassed in number in mammals only by voltage-gated potassium channels. TRP channels are activated and regulated through strikingly diverse mechanisms, making them suitable candidates for cellular sensors. They respond to environmental stimuli such as temperature, pH, osmolarity, pheromones, taste, and plant compounds, and intracellular stimuli such as Ca2+ and phosphatidylinositol signal transduction pathways. However, it is still largely unknown how TRP channels are activated in vivo. Despite the uncertainties, emerging evidence using TRP channel knockout mice indicates that these channels have broad function in physiology. Here we review the recent progress on the physiology, pharmacology and pathophysiological function of mammalian TRP channels. PMID:20716668

  6. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIII. The Parathyroid Hormone Receptors—Family B G Protein–Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The type-1 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR1) is a family B G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the actions of two polypeptide ligands; parathyroid hormone (PTH), an endocrine hormone that regulates the levels of calcium and inorganic phosphate in the blood by acting on bone and kidney, and PTH-related protein (PTHrP), a paracrine-factor that regulates cell differentiation and proliferation programs in developing bone and other tissues. The type-2 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR2) binds a peptide ligand, called tuberoinfundibular peptide-39 (TIP39), and while the biologic role of the PTHR2/TIP39 system is not as defined as that of the PTHR1, it likely plays a role in the central nervous system as well as in spermatogenesis. Mechanisms of action at these receptors have been explored through a variety of pharmacological and biochemical approaches, and the data obtained support a basic “two-site” mode of ligand binding now thought to be used by each of the family B peptide hormone GPCRs. Recent crystallographic studies on the family B GPCRs are providing new insights that help to further refine the specifics of the overall receptor architecture and modes of ligand docking. One intriguing pharmacological finding for the PTHR1 is that it can form surprisingly stable complexes with certain PTH/PTHrP ligand analogs and thereby mediate markedly prolonged cell signaling responses that persist even when the bulk of the complexes are found in internalized vesicles. The PTHR1 thus appears to be able to activate the Gαs/cAMP pathway not only from the plasma membrane but also from the endosomal domain. The cumulative findings could have an impact on efforts to develop new drug therapies for the PTH receptors. PMID:25713287

  7. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCIII. The parathyroid hormone receptors--family B G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Gardella, Thomas J; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The type-1 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR1) is a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the actions of two polypeptide ligands; parathyroid hormone (PTH), an endocrine hormone that regulates the levels of calcium and inorganic phosphate in the blood by acting on bone and kidney, and PTH-related protein (PTHrP), a paracrine-factor that regulates cell differentiation and proliferation programs in developing bone and other tissues. The type-2 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR2) binds a peptide ligand, called tuberoinfundibular peptide-39 (TIP39), and while the biologic role of the PTHR2/TIP39 system is not as defined as that of the PTHR1, it likely plays a role in the central nervous system as well as in spermatogenesis. Mechanisms of action at these receptors have been explored through a variety of pharmacological and biochemical approaches, and the data obtained support a basic "two-site" mode of ligand binding now thought to be used by each of the family B peptide hormone GPCRs. Recent crystallographic studies on the family B GPCRs are providing new insights that help to further refine the specifics of the overall receptor architecture and modes of ligand docking. One intriguing pharmacological finding for the PTHR1 is that it can form surprisingly stable complexes with certain PTH/PTHrP ligand analogs and thereby mediate markedly prolonged cell signaling responses that persist even when the bulk of the complexes are found in internalized vesicles. The PTHR1 thus appears to be able to activate the Gα(s)/cAMP pathway not only from the plasma membrane but also from the endosomal domain. The cumulative findings could have an impact on efforts to develop new drug therapies for the PTH receptors. PMID:25713287

  8. Pharmacologic vitreolysis.

    PubMed

    Rhéaume, Marc-André; Vavvas, Demetrios

    2010-01-01

    It is now well recognized that vitreous plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various retinal disorders. In many instances it can be addressed with pars plana vitrectomy, although this approach, like any surgery, has its limitations. The search for alternatives or adjunct to surgery has led to the development of pharmacologic vitreolysis. The use of intravitreal agents to alter the vitreous in order to reduce or eliminate its role in disease seems promising. The purpose of this article is to summarize the present knowledge on pharmacologic vitreolysis. A review of the different agents used and of ongoing trials will be presented. Also, current understanding of vitreous structure and its interaction with the retina will be discussed. PMID:21091015

  9. Clinical cancer advances 2007: major research advances in cancer treatment, prevention, and screening--a report from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Gralow, Julie; Ozols, Robert F; Bajorin, Dean F; Cheson, Bruce D; Sandler, Howard M; Winer, Eric P; Bonner, James; Demetri, George D; Curran, Walter; Ganz, Patricia A; Kramer, Barnett S; Kris, Mark G; Markman, Maurie; Mayer, Robert J; Raghavan, Derek; Ramsey, Scott; Reaman, Gregory H; Sawaya, Raymond; Schuchter, Lynn M; Sweetenham, John W; Vahdat, Linda T; Davidson, Nancy E; Schilsky, Richard L; Lichter, Allen S

    2008-01-10

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT: For the third year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is publishing Clinical Cancer Advances: Major Research Advances in Cancer Treatment, Prevention, and Screening, an annual review of the most significant cancer research presented or published over the past year. ASCO publishes this report to demonstrate the important progress being made on the front lines of clinical cancer research today. The report is intended to give all those with an interest in cancer care-the general public, cancer patients and organizations, policymakers, oncologists, and other medical professionals-an accessible summary of the year's most important cancer research advances. These pages report on the use of magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening, the association between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer incidence, the link between human papillomavirus and head and neck cancers, and the use of radiation therapy to prevent lung cancer from spreading. They also report on effective new targeted therapies for cancers that have been historically difficult to treat, such as liver cancer and kidney cancer, among many others. A total of 24 advances are featured in this year's report. These advances and many more over the past several years show that the nation's long-term investment in cancer research is paying off. But there are disturbing signs that progress could slow. We are now in the midst of the longest sustained period of flat government funding for cancer research in history. The budgets for the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) have been unchanged for four years. When adjusted for inflation, cancer research funding has actually declined 12% since 2004. These budget constraints limit the NCI's ability to fund promising cancer research. In the past several years the number of grants that the NCI has been able to fund has significantly decreased; this year, in response to just the

  10. Targeting poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase1 in neurological diseases: A promising trove for new pharmacological interventions to enter clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Chandra Shekhar; Jangra, Ashok; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Bezbaruah, Babul Kumar

    2014-10-01

    The highly conserved abundant nuclear protein poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase1 (PARP1) functions at the center of cellular stress response and is mainly implied in DNA damage repair mechanism. Apart from its involvement in DNA damage repair, it does sway multiple vital cellular processes such as cell death pathways, cell aging, insulator function, chromatin modification, transcription and mitotic apparatus function. Since brain is the principal organ vulnerable to oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, upon stress encounters robust DNA damage can occur and intense PARP1 activation may result that will lead to various CNS diseases. In the context of soaring interest towards PARP1 as a therapeutic target for newer pharmacological interventions, here in the present review, we are attempting to give a silhouette of the role of PARP1 in the neurological diseases and the potential of its inhibitors to enter clinical translation, along with its structural and functional aspects. PMID:25049175

  11. Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis. Scientific Advisory Board, Osteoporosis Society of Canada.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To recommend clinical practice guidelines for the assessment of people at risk for osteoporosis, and for effective diagnosis and management of the condition. OPTIONS: Screening and diagnostic methods: risk-factor assessment, clinical evaluation, measurement of bone mineral density, laboratory investigations. Prophylactic and corrective therapies: calcium and vitamin D nutritional supplementation, physical activity and fall-avoidance techniques, ovarian hormone therapy, bisphosphonate drugs, other drug therapies. Pain-management medications and techniques. OUTCOMES: Prevention of loss of bone mineral density and fracture; increased bone mass; and improved quality of life. EVIDENCE: Epidemiologic and clinical studies and reports were examined, with emphasis on recent randomized controlled trials. Clinical practice in Canada and elsewhere was surveyed. Availability of treatment products and diagnostic equipment in Canada was considered. VALUES: Cost-effective methods and products that can be adopted across Canada were considered. A high value was given to accurate assessment of fracture risk and osteoporosis, and to increasing bone mineral density, reducing fractures and fracture risk and minimizing side effects of diagnosis and treatment. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Proper diagnosis and management of osteoporosis minimize injury and disability, improve quality of life for patients and reduce costs to society. Rationally targeted methods of screening and diagnosis are safe and cost effective. Harmful side effects and costs of recommended therapies are minimal compared with the harms and costs of untreated osteoporosis. Alternative therapies provide a range of choices for physicians and patients. RECOMMENDATIONS: Population sets at high risk should be identified and then the diagnosis confirmed through bone densitometry. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is the preferred measurement technique. Radiography can be adjunct when indicated. Calcium and vitamin D

  12. Effect of vitamin B/sub 6/ on the neurotoxicity and pharmacology of desmethylmisonidazole and misonidazole: clinical and laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, C.N.; Hirst, V.K.; Brown, D.M.; Halsey, J.

    1984-08-01

    The clinical usefulness of misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) is severely limited by neurotoxicity. Based on theoretical considerations and on laboratory data suggesting that pyridoxine (PN) decreased MISO toxicity in mice. The authors attempted to ameliorate the clinical neuropathy of DMM using oral PN. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggested interaction of PN and DMM but no protection against neuropathy was observed. Serial experiments with C3H and BALB/c mice were done using various forms of vitamin B/sub 6/ (PN, pyridoxal, pyridoxal phosphate) administered orally and i.p. No consistent protection was observed. Dexamethasone did not alter MISO toxicity in mice, contrary to the clinical findings. They conclude that vitamin B/sub 6/ is not useful in preventing clinical neurotoxicity of MISO or DMM.

  13. Position statement : executive summary. The Writing Group for the International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) Position Development Conference.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    The International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) held a Position Development Conference in July 2003, at which time positions developed and researched by the organization's Scientific Advisory Committee were presented to a panel of international experts in the field of bone density testing. This panel reached agreement on a series of positions that were subsequently approved by the Board of Directors of the ISCD and are now official policy of the ISCD. These positions, which are outlined in this article and discussed in greater detail in subsequent articles in this journal, include (1) affirmation of the use of the World Health Organization classification for the diagnosis of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women; (2) the diagnosis of osteoporosis in men; (3) the diagnosis of osteoporosis in premenopausal women; (4) the diagnosis of osteoporosis in children; (5) technical standards for skeletal regions of interest by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA); (6) the use of new technologies, such as vertebral fracture assessment; (7) technical standards for quality assurance, including phantom scanning and calibration; (8) technical standards for the performance of precision assessment at bone density testing centers, and for cross-calibration of DXA devices; (9) indications for bone density testing; (10) appropriate information for a bone density report; and (11) nomenclature and decimal places for bone density reporting. PMID:14742882

  14. Do Oncologists Engage in Bereavement Practices? A Survey of the Israeli Society of Clinical Oncology and Radiation Therapy (ISCORT)

    PubMed Central

    Shabtai, Esther; Merimsky, Ofer; Inbar, Moshe; Rosenbaum, Eli; Meirovitz, Amichay; Wexler, Isaiah D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. We sought to determine the level of involvement of oncologists in bereavement rituals after a patient dies. Subjects and Methods. Members of the Israeli Society for Clinical Oncology and Radiation Therapy (ISCORT) were surveyed. The survey instrument consisted of questions regarding participation in bereavement rituals for patients in general and those with whom the oncologist had a special bond. Oncologists were queried as to the reasons for nonparticipation in bereavement rituals. Results. Nearly 70% of the ISCORT membership (126 of 182) completed the survey tool. Respondents included radiation, surgical, and medical oncologists. In general, oncologists rarely participated in bereavement rituals that involved direct contact with families such as funerals and visitations. Twenty-eight percent of physicians at least occasionally participated in rituals involving direct contact whereas 45% had indirect contact (e.g., letter of condolence) with the family on an occasional basis. There was significantly greater involvement in bereavement rituals when oncologists developed a special bond with the patient. In a stepwise linear regression model, the only factor significantly associated with greater participation in bereavement rituals was self-perceived spirituality in those claiming not to be religious. The major reasons offered for nonparticipation were time constraints, need to maintain appropriate boundaries between physicians and patients, and fear of burnout. Conclusion. Although many oncologists participate at least occasionally in some sort of bereavement ritual, a significant proportion of oncologists are not involved in these practices at all. PMID:20228130

  15. First-in-class, first-in-human phase I results of targeted agents: highlights of the 2008 American society of clinical oncology meeting.

    PubMed

    Molckovsky, Andrea; Siu, Lillian L

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes phase I trial results of 11 drugs presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting held in Chicago IL from May 30 to June 3rd 2008: BMS-663513, CT-322, CVX-045, GDC-0449, GRN163L, LY2181308, PF-00562271, RAV12, RTA 402, XL765, and the survivin vaccine. PMID:18959794

  16. Systemic Therapy in Men With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K.; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C.; Frame, James N.; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W.; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L.; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R. Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B.; Virgo, Katherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. Results When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 (223Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Recommendations Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or 223Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to

  17. Similitude in modern pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, M Z

    1999-07-01

    The principle of the similitude, the basis of homeopathy, has correspondences in the clinical studies of secondary effects of many modern pharmaceutical agents through the observation of the rebound effects of these drugs. Through clinical pharmacology, I proposed a model on which to base the scientificism of the homeopathic model. We have studied the effects of the drugs in the human body using pharmacological compendia and recent scientific works, confirming the mechanism of the homeopathic medicines' action through the verification of the primary action of the drugs and the consequent secondary reaction of the organism in hundreds of pharmaceutical agents. Treatment exploiting the "rebound" effect (curative vital reaction) may also be observed. This work suggests a research methodology to scientifically base the therapeutic principle of similitude. PMID:10449051

  18. Information technology in veterinary pharmacology instruction.

    PubMed

    Kochevar, Deborah T

    2003-01-01

    Veterinary clinical pharmacology encompasses all interactions between drugs and animals and applies basic and clinical knowledge to improve rational drug use and patient outcomes. Veterinary pharmacology instructors set educational goals and objectives that, when mastered by students, lead to improved animal health. The special needs of pharmacology instruction include establishing a functional interface between basic and clinical knowledge, managing a large quantity of information, and mastering quantitative skills essential to successful drug administration and analysis of drug action. In the present study, a survey was conducted to determine the extent to which veterinary pharmacology instructors utilize information technology (IT) in their teaching. Several IT categories were investigated, including Web-based instructional aids, stand-alone pharmacology software, interactive videoconferencing, databases, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and e-book applications. Currently IT plays a largely ancillary role in pharmacology instruction. IT use is being expanded primarily through the efforts of two veterinary professional pharmacology groups, the American College of Veterinary Clinical Pharmacology (ACVCP) and the American Academy of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (AAVPT). The long-term outcome of improved IT use in pharmacology instruction should be to support the larger educational mission of active learning and problem solving. Creation of high-quality IT resources that promote this goal has the potential to improve veterinary pharmacology instruction within and across institutions. PMID:14976618

  19. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement update: tobacco control--reducing cancer incidence and saving lives. 2003.

    PubMed

    2003-07-15

    As an international medical society dedicated to cancer prevention, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) advocates a fundamental reform of United States and international policy toward addictive tobacco products. ASCO's goal is the immediate reduction of tobacco use and ultimate achievement of a tobacco-free world. The centerpiece of ASCO's policy is the recommendation for an independent commission to study the tobacco problem in all of its dimensions: social, medical, legal, and economic (both domestically and globally). The commission membership should include broad-based representation and expertise on tobacco issues. In ASCO's view, tobacco control efforts to date have been less than successful because they are too fragmented and incremental, leaving many important issues unaddressed. A more comprehensive solution could flow from this study, including input from a variety of government agencies involved with public health, agriculture, First Amendment and other legal considerations, and international trade. The study, within defined time limits, should culminate in a report that outlines a strategy for achieving immediate reduction of tobacco use and ultimate achievement of a tobacco-free world, including explicit plans and a timetable for implementation. Although this comprehensive approach to tobacco control will take many years to implement even under the best of circumstances, there are certain measures that could be undertaken immediately with meaningful impact on tobacco usage. These include: Increasing efforts to discourage tobacco use, particularly among the young Raising federal excise taxes by at least $2 per pack and encouraging states to consider tobacco taxes as a first resort in revenue enhancement Ensuring that tobacco settlement funds be devoted only to health-related projects, including medical treatment, biomedical research, and tobacco prevention efforts Requiring disclosure of all ingredients in tobacco products Comprehensively

  20. Do urologists follow the golden rule? A global urolithiasis management study by the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Gregory; Opondo, Dedan; Nott, Linda; Razvi, Hassan; de la Rosette, Jean; Beiko, Darren

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The primary objective of this study was to compare surgical management options for various urolithiasis scenarios that urologists would choose for themselves vs. the options they would recommend for their patients. The secondary objective was to identify the common recommended treatments for upper urinary tract stones of various sizes and locations. Methods: Two surveys were sent by the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) to members of the Endourological Society. Standard demographic information was collected. The first survey asked the urologists to recommend treatment for urolithiasis in 10 different scenarios assuming that they were the patient with stone disease. The second survey, sent eight months later, asked urologists to recommend treatment for the same 10 scenarios for a theoretical patient. Only urologists who responded to the first and the second survey were included. Recommended treatment options were compared between the surveys. Agreement between the two scenarios was measured with Cohen’s kappa. Surveys were conducted on the Internet using SurveyMonkey™. All statistical analyses were performed using R statistical program version 2.12.2. Results: The two surveys had response rates of 78% (160/205) and 84% (172/205), respectively with urologists from 38 countries. Median experience of respondents was seven years (range: 2–30). The majority of respondents, 117 (75%), were affiliated with academic hospitals. Recommended treatments for stone disease in different scenarios were not entirely consistent when the urologists considered themselves as the patients compared to the choice they might recommend for their patients. Cohen’s kappa ranged from 0.292–0.534 for the different scenarios. Overall, shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and ureteroscopy (URS) were the most commonly chosen treatment options, with medical expulsive therapy (MET) and laparoscopy being the least recommended by urologists for themselves

  1. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Use in a Large Iranian Hospital: Comparison with American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Sarah; Dadpoor, Mina; Ashrafi, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factors (GCSF) is high-cost agents commonly recommended for primary and secondary prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and febrile neutropenia. GCSFs have been shown to be beneficial in some patient subgroups, although they are probably overused in clinical settings. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) guidelines summarize current data on the appropriate use of CSFs. The aim of this study was to assess and audit the use of GCSF in a tertiary care center according to the recommendation of ASCO guideline. Subjects and Methods: A prospective observational study from November 2014 to June 2015 was performed on all patients prescribed with filgrastim in the large teaching hospital (Isfahan, Iran). Data was collected on demographics, indication, dosing regimen and duration of treatment, the Absolute Neutrophil Count (ANC) and patient outcome. Results: 91 patients were recorded over the period of the study. 63.7% of prescription complied with the ASCO guideline. Febrile neutropenia post chemotherapy/radiotherapy was the most common appropriate indication (29.3%) followed by primary prophylaxis (25.8%). Fourteen (32%) patients showed ANC recovery in 1-3 days and 16 (37%) within 4-7 days. Ten patients (23%) showed no recovery. The overall mortality was 8 (8.8%) patients. Conclusion: This study revealed that at least one-third of prescribed GCSF was not in accordance with ASCO guideline. Considering the high cost of GCSF in our country and limitation of our resources, we proposed cost-effectiveness studies on GCSF treatment and also the development of a national guideline for optimizing GCSF use. PMID:27252808

  2. Differential pharmacology and clinical utility of preservative-free tafluprost in the treatment of ocular hypertension and glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ermiş, Sıtkı Samet

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic disease requiring lifelong treatment. Discomfort due to medications may affect patients’ quality of life and may cause poor compliance, which leads to poor intraocular pressure control. To minimize the side effects of long-term treatment, preparations with lower benzalkonium chloride concentrations, preservative-free preparations and alternative preservatives have been developed and reported to have a lower rate of side effects. Tafluprost, launched on the ophthalmic market in 2008, is a new 16-phenoxy analogue of prostaglandin F2α, clinically used as an ocular hypotensive agent for the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. The safety and intraocular pressure-lowering efficacy of tafluprost has been demonstrated in various preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:22654492

  3. A Review of Pharmacological Interactions Between HIV or HCV Medications and Opioid Agonist Therapy: Implications and Management for Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Moody, David E.; Altice, Frederick L.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Friedland, Gerald H.

    2014-01-01

    Global access to opioid agonist therapy and HIV/HCV treatment is expanding but when used concurrently, problematic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions may occur. Review of articles from 1966 into 2012 in Medline using the following keywords: HIV, AIDS, HIV therapy, HCV, HCV therapy, antiretroviral therapy, HAART, drug interactions, methadone, and buprenorphine. Additionally, abstracts from national and international meetings and a review of conference proceedings were conducted; selected reports were reviewed as well. The metabolism of both opioid and antiretroviral therapies, description of their known interactions, and clinical implications and management of these interactions are reviewed. Important pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic drug interactions affecting either methadone or HIV medications have been demonstrated within each class of antiretroviral agents. Drug interactions between methadone, buprenorphine and HIV medications are known and may have important clinical consequences. Clinicians must be alert to these interactions and have a basic knowledge regarding their management. PMID:23656339

  4. Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials on Safety and Efficacy of Pharmacological and Nonpharmacological Treatments for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sacchetti, Marta; Mantelli, Flavio; Merlo, Daniela; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Several treatments have been proposed to slow down progression of Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a hereditary retinal degenerative condition leading to severe visual impairment. The aim of this study is to systematically review data from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating safety and efficacy of medical interventions for the treatment of RP. Methods. Randomized clinical trials on medical treatments for syndromic and nonsyndromic RP published up to December 2014 were included in the review. Visual acuity, visual field, electroretinogram, and adverse events were used as outcome measures. Results. The 19 RCTs included in this systematic review included trials on hyperbaric oxygen delivery, topical brimonidine tartrate, vitamins, docosahexaenoic acid, gangliosides, lutein, oral nilvadipine, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and valproic acid. All treatments proved safe but did not show significant benefit on visual function. Long term supplementation with vitamin A showed a significantly slower decline rate in electroretinogram amplitude. Conclusions. Although all medical treatments for RP appear safe, evidence emerging from RCTs is limited since they do not present comparable results suitable for quantitative statistical analysis. The limited number of RCTs, the poor clinical results, and the heterogeneity among studies negatively influence the strength of recommendations for the long term management of RP patients. PMID:26339504

  5. Nationwide surveillance of bacterial respiratory pathogens conducted by the surveillance committee of Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases, and the Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology in 2010: General view of the pathogens' antibacterial susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kadota, Junichi; Aoki, Nobuki; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Masaki; Yagisawa, Morimasa; Oguri, Toyoko; Sato, Junko; Ogasawara, Kazuhiko; Wakamura, Tomotaro; Sunakawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Akira; Iwata, Satoshi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Hanaki, Hideaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu; Watari, Tomohisa; Toyoshima, Eri; Takeuchi, Kenichi; Shiokoshi, Mayumi; Takeda, Hiroaki; Miki, Makoto; Kumagai, Toshio; Nakanowatari, Susumu; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Utagawa, Mutsuko; Nishiya, Hajime; Kawakami, Sayoko; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Takasaki, Jin; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Konosaki, Hisami; Aoki, Yasuko; Yamamoto, Yumiko; Shoji, Michi; Goto, Hajime; Saraya, Takeshi; Kurai, Daisuke; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Niki, Yoshihito; Yoshida, Koichiro; Kawana, Akihiko; Saionji, Katsu; Fujikura, Yuji; Miyazawa, Naoki; Kudo, Makoto; Sato, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Yoshida, Takashi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Tsukada, Hiroki; Imai, Yumiko; Tsukada, Ayami; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Honma, Yasuo; Yamamoto, Toshinobu; Ban, Nobuyoshi; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Sawamura, Haruki; Miyara, Takayuki; Toda, Hirofumi; Sato, Kaori; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Fujikawa, Yasunori; Mitsuno, Noriko; Mikasa, Keiichi; Kasahara, Kei; Sano, Reiko; Sugimoto, Keisuke; Asari, Seishi; Nishi, Isao; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Koguchi, Yutaka; Kusano, Nobuchika; Mihara, Eiichirou; Kuwabara, Masao; Watanabe, Yaeko; Kawasaki, Yuji; Takeda, Kenichi; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Masui, Kayoko; Negayama, Kiyoshi; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Aoki, Yosuke; Fukuoka, Mami; Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Nagasawa, Zenzo; Suga, Moritaka; Muranaka, Hiroyuki; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Honda, Junichi; Fujita, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    The nationwide surveillance on antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial respiratory pathogens from patients in Japan, was conducted by Japanese Society of Chemotherapy, Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases and Japanese Society for Clinical Microbiology in 2010. The isolates were collected from clinical specimens obtained from well-diagnosed adult patients with respiratory tract infections during the period from January and April 2010 by three societies. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted at the central reference laboratory according to the method recommended by Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institutes using maximum 45 antibacterial agents. Susceptibility testing was evaluable with 954 strains (206 Staphylococcus aureus, 189 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 4 Streptococcus pyogenes, 182 Haemophilus influenzae, 74 Moraxella catarrhalis, 139 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 160 Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Ratio of methicillin-resistant S. aureus was as high as 50.5%, and those of penicillin-intermediate and -resistant S. pneumoniae were 1.1% and 0.0%, respectively. Among H. influenzae, 17.6% of them were found to be β-lactamase-non-producing ampicillin (ABPC)-intermediately resistant, 33.5% to be β-lactamase-non-producing ABPC-resistant and 11.0% to be β-lactamase-producing ABPC-resistant strains. Extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae and multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa with metallo β-lactamase were 2.9% and 0.6%, respectively. Continuous national surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility of respiratory pathogens is crucial in order to monitor changing patterns of susceptibility and to be able to update treatment recommendations on a regular basis. PMID:25817352

  6. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: Diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Jonathan G; McKelvie, Robert S; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Costigan, Jeannine; Dorian, Paul; Ducharme, Anique; Estrella-Holder, Estrellita; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Giannetti, Nadia; Haddad, Haissam; Heckman, George A; Herd, Anthony M; Isaac, Debra; Jong, Philip; Kouz, Simon; Liu, Peter; Mann, Elizabeth; Moe, Gordon W; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Ross, Heather J; White, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada. PMID:19214293

  7. Management of Adults With Hospital-acquired and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia: 2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Thoracic Society.

    PubMed

    Kalil, Andre C; Metersky, Mark L; Klompas, Michael; Muscedere, John; Sweeney, Daniel A; Palmer, Lucy B; Napolitano, Lena M; O'Grady, Naomi P; Bartlett, John G; Carratalà, Jordi; El Solh, Ali A; Ewig, Santiago; Fey, Paul D; File, Thomas M; Restrepo, Marcos I; Roberts, Jason A; Waterer, Grant W; Cruse, Peggy; Knight, Shandra L; Brozek, Jan L

    2016-09-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances.These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia. The panel's recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP are based upon evidence derived from topic-specific systematic literature reviews. PMID:27418577

  8. [Review and expert opinion in age related macular degeneration. Focus on the pathophysiology, angiogenesis and pharmacological and clinical data].

    PubMed

    Weber, M; Sennlaub, F; Souied, E; Cohen, S-Y; Béhar-Cohen, F; Milano, G; Tadayoni, R

    2014-09-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a pathological aging of the macula, brought about by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. It induces geographic atrophy of the retina and/or choroidal neovascularization. In the latter, abnormal vessels develop from the choriocapillaris, with the involvement of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor). The VEGF family includes several factors, including VEGF-A, B, C, D, F and PlGF (placental growth factor). Their biological properties and their affinities to the VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 receptors found on endothelial cells differ. Exudative AMD involves mainly VEGF-A and VEGF-R2. Anti-VEGF agents used in ophthalmology (ranibizumab, bevacizumab and aflibercept) are designed to primarily target this pathway. In vitro, all have sufficient affinity to their ligands. Their therapeutic efficacy must therefore be judged based on clinical criteria. In clinical practice, the minimum number of injections required for a satisfactory result appears to be comparable with all the three. The few available studies on therapeutic substitutions of anti-VEGF compounds suggest that some patients may benefit from substituting the anti-VEGF in cases of an unsatisfactory response to an initial molecule. Although local side effects, including increased risk of geographic atrophy, and systemic effects, including vascular accidents, have been suggested, these risks remain low, specially compared to the benefits of the treatment. Differences in safety between anti-VEGF are theoretically possible but unproven. PMID:25190312

  9. Pain management in cats--past, present and future. Part 2. Treatment of pain--clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Robertson, S A; Taylor, P M

    2004-10-01

    Opioids have an unjustified reputation for causing mania in cats, but with refinements in dosing they are now used successfully in this species. The mu-opioid agonists are generally considered the best analgesics. Morphine (0.1-0.3 mg/kg) is effective in a clinical setting. Methadone (up to 0.5 mg/kg) has a similar profile to morphine. Pethidine (Demerol, meperidine; 2-5 mg/kg) is a useful analgesic with a faster onset but shorter duration of action than morphine. Oxymorphone and hydromorphone (0.05-0.1 mg/kg) are widely used in the USA. These opioids are more potent (up to 10 times), and longer acting than morphine in cats. Butorphanol (0.1-0.4 mg/kg) is a mu-opioid antagonist that produces its analgesic actions through kappa agonist activity. It rapidly reaches a ceiling effect, is short acting and is a weaker analgesic than pure mu opioids. Buprenorphine (0.01-0.02 mg/kg), a partial mu-agonist, is the most popular opioid used in small animal practice in the UK, other parts of Europe, Australia and South Africa. In clinical studies it has produced better analgesia than several other opioids and appears to be highly suitable for perioperative pain management in cats. NSAIDs are also used in cats for pain management, although cats metabolise these differently from other species. With appropriate dosing, carprofen (1-4 mg/kg) and meloxicam (0.3 mg/kg) have proved highly effective with few side effects. The use of ketoprofen (2 mg/kg), tolfenamic acid (4 mg/kg) and vedaprofen (0.5 mg/kg) has been reported in cats. Other less traditional analgesics such as ketamine, medetomidine and local anaesthetics are also used for clinical pain management. The transmucosal, transdermal and epidural routes offer novel methods for administration of analgesic drugs and have considerable potential for improving techniques in feline pain management. PMID:15363764

  10. A consensus statement on the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis-From evidence-based medicine to the real-life setting.

    PubMed

    Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Maheu, Emmanuel; Rannou, François; Branco, Jaime; Luisa Brandi, Maria; Kanis, John A; Altman, Roy D; Hochberg, Marc C; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-02-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) published a treatment algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in 2014, which provides practical guidance for the prioritization of interventions. Further analysis of real-world data for OA provides additional evidence in support of pharmacological interventions, in terms of management of OA pain and function, avoidance of adverse events, disease-modifying effects and long-term outcomes, e.g., delay of total joint replacement surgery, and pharmacoeconomic factors such as reduction in healthcare resource utilization. This article provides an updated assessment of the literature for selected interventions in OA, focusing on real-life data, with the aim of providing easy-to-follow advice on how to establish a treatment flow in patients with knee OA in primary care clinical practice, in support of the clinicians' individualized assessment of the patient. In step 1, background maintenance therapy with symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis (SYSADOAs) is recommended, for which high-quality evidence is provided only for the prescription formulations of patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. Paracetamol may be added for rescue analgesia only, due to limited efficacy and increasing safety signals. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may provide additional symptomatic treatment with the same degree of efficacy as oral NSAIDs without the systemic safety concerns. Oral NSAIDs maintain a central role in step 2 advanced management of persistent symptoms. However, oral NSAIDs are highly heterogeneous in terms of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular safety profile, and patient stratification with careful treatment selection is advocated to maximize the risk:benefit ratio. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid as a next step provides sustained clinical benefit with effects lasting up to 6 months after a short-course of

  11. Late-onset ankylosing spondylitis and spondylarthritis: an update on clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis and pharmacological therapies.

    PubMed

    Toussirot, Eric

    2010-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and spondylarthritis (SpA) are generally observed in young male patients but can be diagnosed in the elderly. These cases correspond to late-onset or late-diagnosed AS or SpA. The clinical presentation may be either typical axial disease with a more severe illness compared with young-onset disease, or peripheral oligoarthritis of the lower limbs with pitting oedema (late-onset peripheral spondylarthropathy). New criteria for axial SpA including MRI-determined modifications of the sacroiliac joints may help the clinician with diagnosis. The treatment options for late-onset/-diagnosed AS include the same drugs as those taken by patients with young-onset AS, i.e. NSAIDs, sulfasalazine and anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha agents. Anti-TNFalpha agents are very effective drugs in young-onset AS and SpA. However, the effectiveness and safety of this drug class has not been specifically evaluated in elderly AS/SpA patients, and caution is therefore required with use of these drugs in elderly patients with co-morbidities and/or polypharmacy. In particular, careful evaluation for the risk of infection and cardiovascular events is recommended before initiating anti-TNFalpha agents in this age category. However, safety data from elderly patients with rheumatoid arthritis seem reassuring. With the increasing life expectancy and the new diagnostic modalities for axial (and peripheral) SpA, it is likely that the number of patients (diagnosed) with late-onset AS/SpA will increase. Thus, the clinician must be familiar with the clinical characteristics and particularities of this group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:20583847

  12. Clinical pharmacology profile of boceprevir, a hepatitis C virus NS3 protease inhibitor: focus on drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Khalilieh, Sauzanne; Feng, Hwa-Ping; Hulskotte, Ellen G J; Wenning, Larissa A; Butterton, Joan R

    2015-06-01

    Boceprevir is a potent, orally administered ketoamide inhibitor that targets the active site of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural (NS) 3 protease. The addition of boceprevir to peginterferon plus ribavirin resulted in higher rates of sustained virologic response (SVR) than for peginterferon plus ribavirin alone in phase III studies in both previously treated and untreated patients with HCV infection. Because boceprevir is metabolized by metabolic routes common to many other drugs, and is an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4/5, there is a high potential for drug-drug interactions when boceprevir is administered with other therapies, particularly when treating patients with chronic HCV infection who are often receiving other medications concomitantly. Boceprevir is no longer widely used in the US or EU due to the introduction of second-generation treatments for HCV infection. However, in many other geographic regions, first-generation protease inhibitors such as boceprevir continue to form an important treatment option for patients with HCV infection. This review summarizes the interactions between boceprevir and other therapeutic agents commonly used in this patient population, indicating dose adjustment requirements where needed. Most drug interactions do not affect boceprevir plasma concentrations to a clinically meaningful extent, and thus efficacy is likely to be maintained when boceprevir is coadministered with the majority of other therapeutics. Overall, the drug-drug interaction profile of boceprevir suggests that this agent is suitable for use in a wide range of HCV-infected patients receiving concomitant therapies. PMID:25787025

  13. [Physicochemical and pharmacological characteristic and clinical efficacy of an anti-irritable bowel syndrome agent, polycarbophil calcium (Polyful)].

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Yuji

    2002-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and abnormal defecation. Polycarbophil calcium, a water-absorbing polymer, is expected to improve stool consistency. Polycarbophil calcium decalcified under the acidic condition and then absorbed 70 times its weight of water under the neutral condition. In in situ experiments using rat jejunum and colon, polycarbophil decreased water absorption by the intestine without affecting water secretion. Polycarbophil inhibited prostaglandin E2-, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan- and castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice or rats. Polycarbophil calcium also inhibited sennoside-induced diarrhea in dogs. Polycarbophil increased the weight of feces in naive or low-fiber diet feeding rats. In naive dogs, polycarbophil calcium increased stool frequency, stool weight and moisture. Polycarbophil was not absorbed from the gastrointestine, not metabolized and eliminated into feces in rats and dogs. Polycarbophil calcium did not affect the absorption of coadministered drugs in dogs. In the dose-finding clinical study for IBS, polycarbophil calcium was effective both in diarrhea and constipation. In the Phase III study, polycarbophil calcium was superior to trimebutine maleate in efficacy and equal in safety. Emesis/vomiting and thirst were observed, but episodes of diarrhea or constipation by excessive action were few. Polycarbophil calcium seems promising as an anti-IBS agent. PMID:11915521

  14. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy. European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

    PubMed

    Harper, Joyce C; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2013-11-01

    In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and assisted reproductive technology (ART), and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. Seven years later, in March 2012, a follow-up interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies, including experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. The main goal of this meeting was to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ARTs. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognised and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome before conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from randomised clinical trials to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole-genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (International Standards Organisation - ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving but still remains very heterogeneous and often contradictory. The lack of legal harmonisation and uneven access to infertility treatment and PGD/PGS fosters considerable cross-border reproductive care in Europe and beyond. The aim of this paper is to complement previous publications and provide

  15. Pharmacological levels of Withaferin A (Withania somnifera) trigger clinically relevant anticancer effects specific to triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Szarc vel Szic, Katarzyna; Op de Beeck, Ken; Ratman, Dariusz; Wouters, An; Beck, Ilse M; Declerck, Ken; Heyninck, Karen; Fransen, Erik; Bracke, Marc; De Bosscher, Karolien; Lardon, Filip; Van Camp, Guy; Vanden Berghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    -resistant triple negative breast cancer, WA-based therapeutic strategies targeting the uPA pathway hold promise for further (pre)clinical development to defeat aggressive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:24498382

  16. Pharmacological Levels of Withaferin A (Withania somnifera) Trigger Clinically Relevant Anticancer Effects Specific to Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Szarc vel Szic, Katarzyna; Op de Beeck, Ken; Ratman, Dariusz; Wouters, An; Beck, Ilse M.; Declerck, Ken; Heyninck, Karen; Fransen, Erik; Bracke, Marc; De Bosscher, Karolien; Lardon, Filip; Van Camp, Guy; Berghe, Wim Vanden

    2014-01-01

    -resistant triple negative breast cancer, WA-based therapeutic strategies targeting the uPA pathway hold promise for further (pre)clinical development to defeat aggressive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:24498382

  17. A Chemical Proteomics Approach for the Search of Pharmacological Targets of the Antimalarial Clinical Candidate Albitiazolium in Plasmodium falciparum Using Photocrosslinking and Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Penarete-Vargas, Diana Marcela; Boisson, Anaïs; Urbach, Serge; Chantelauze, Hervé; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Fraisse, Laurent; Vial, Henri J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for severe malaria which is one of the most prevalent and deadly infectious diseases in the world. The antimalarial therapeutic arsenal is hampered by the onset of resistance to all known pharmacological classes of compounds, so new drugs with novel mechanisms of action are critically needed. Albitiazolium is a clinical antimalarial candidate from a series of choline analogs designed to inhibit plasmodial phospholipid metabolism. Here we developed an original chemical proteomic approach to identify parasite proteins targeted by albitiazolium during their native interaction in living parasites. We designed a bifunctional albitiazolium-derived compound (photoactivable and clickable) to covalently crosslink drug–interacting parasite proteins in situ followed by their isolation via click chemistry reactions. Mass spectrometry analysis of drug–interacting proteins and subsequent clustering on gene ontology terms revealed parasite proteins involved in lipid metabolic activities and, interestingly, also in lipid binding, transport, and vesicular transport functions. In accordance with this, the albitiazolium-derivative was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and trans-Golgi network of P. falciparum. Importantly, during competitive assays with albitiazolium, the binding of choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase (the enzyme involved in the last step of phosphatidylcholine synthesis) was substantially displaced, thus confirming the efficiency of this strategy for searching albitiazolium targets. PMID:25470252

  18. A chemical proteomics approach for the search of pharmacological targets of the antimalarial clinical candidate albitiazolium in Plasmodium falciparum using photocrosslinking and click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Penarete-Vargas, Diana Marcela; Boisson, Anaïs; Urbach, Serge; Chantelauze, Hervé; Peyrottes, Suzanne; Fraisse, Laurent; Vial, Henri J

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for severe malaria which is one of the most prevalent and deadly infectious diseases in the world. The antimalarial therapeutic arsenal is hampered by the onset of resistance to all known pharmacological classes of compounds, so new drugs with novel mechanisms of action are critically needed. Albitiazolium is a clinical antimalarial candidate from a series of choline analogs designed to inhibit plasmodial phospholipid metabolism. Here we developed an original chemical proteomic approach to identify parasite proteins targeted by albitiazolium during their native interaction in living parasites. We designed a bifunctional albitiazolium-derived compound (photoactivable and clickable) to covalently crosslink drug-interacting parasite proteins in situ followed by their isolation via click chemistry reactions. Mass spectrometry analysis of drug-interacting proteins and subsequent clustering on gene ontology terms revealed parasite proteins involved in lipid metabolic activities and, interestingly, also in lipid binding, transport, and vesicular transport functions. In accordance with this, the albitiazolium-derivative was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and trans-Golgi network of P. falciparum. Importantly, during competitive assays with albitiazolium, the binding of choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase (the enzyme involved in the last step of phosphatidylcholine synthesis) was substantially displaced, thus confirming the efficiency of this strategy for searching albitiazolium targets. PMID:25470252

  19. [ANMCO/SIC/SICI-GISE/SICCH Consensus document: Clinical approach to pharmacological pretreatment for patients undergoing myocardial revascularization].

    PubMed

    Caporale, Roberto; Geraci, Giovanna; Gulizia, Michele Massimo; Borzi, Mauro; Colivicchi, Furio; Menozzi, Alberto; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Scherillo, Marino; Ledda, Antonietta; Tarantini, Giuseppe; Gerometta, Piersilvio; Casolo, Giancarlo; Formigli, Dario; Romeo, Francesco; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    effects on periprocedural damage and late clinical events, when administered early. Although randomized data are lacking, it seems reasonable their pre-procedural administration, due to potential advantages without significant adverse effects. PMID:27311089

  20. [Metamizol--a new effective analgesic with a long history. Overview of its pharmacology and clinical use].

    PubMed

    Fendrich, Z

    2000-07-19

    Metamizol is an effective, non-opioid analgesics which was originally introduced to the therapy in the year 1922. However, with the reference to the side effects of other related pyrazolone derivatives its administration, similarly as the usage of other pyrazolones, was significantly limited. Later, metamizol has been used, usually mixed, with spasmolytic agents and quite recently it has been introduced as a mono-component medicament. Metamizol proved to be a very effective analgesic. When administered in equipotent doses, it had its effects comparable to various opioid analgesics, such as tramadol, pentazocine and pethidine. Beside the strong analgesic effect, it produces also significant antipyretic and splasmolytic effects without the adverse, unpleasant anticholinergic impact. Its spasmolytic effect on the smooth muscle of the sphincter Oddi, urinary tract, and the gal bladder is comparable to the effects of buthylscopolamine. Unlike aspirin and other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs it has, however, no antiinflammatory activity when administered in clinical doses. Similarly, metamizol has no effect on the CNS, cardiovascular system, renal and metabolic functions. On the other hand, metamizol, like aspirin, has got a significant effect on the aggregation of platelets. Metamizol is basically a prodrug. The parent substance is not effective before its conversion into two active metabolites (4-methylaninoantipyrine and 4-aminoantipyrine) in the body. Metamizol is well absorbed from the small intestine but only two above mentioned active metabolites and no parent drug can be detected in the blood. The active metabolites are consequently metabolised to ineffective metabolites including the relevant acetylderivatives, in which the acetylation phenotypes can be distinguished. In the therapy, metamizol can be used, as an analgesic, at post-surgical pain, patient's controlled analgesia (PCA), at the cancer's pain and in the pains of different origin (post

  1. Highlights from the 52nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) (June 3-7, 2016 - Chicago, Illinois, USA).

    PubMed

    Kibble, A; Al-Shamahi, A; Kuennemann, K; Marqués, F; Tremosa, L; Cole, P

    2016-07-01

    The theme of the 52nd Annual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting, 'Collective Wisdom', was intended to represent the importance of consolidating clinical advances with expertise in areas such as health informatics, pathology and economics in order to improve the role of practice providers in delivering cancer patients every component of quality care. As expected, immunotherapy and precision medicine featured heavily in the 2016 program. Gathering 30,000 oncology professionals in Chicago, educational and science sessions gave the attendees the opportunity to discuss and view ground-breaking research. PMID:27540600

  2. Echinacea species (Echinacea angustifolia (DC.) Hell., Echinacea pallida (Nutt.) Nutt.,Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench): a review of their chemistry, pharmacology and clinical properties.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Joanne; Anderson, Linda A; Gibbons, Simon; Phillipson, J David

    2005-08-01

    This paper reviews the chemistry, pharmacology and clinical properties of Echinacea species used medicinally. The Echinacea species Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida and Echinacea purpurea have a long history of medicinal use for a variety of conditions, particularly infections, and today echinacea products are among the best-selling herbal preparations in several developed countries. Modern interest in echinacea is focused on its immunomodulatory effects, particularly in the prevention and treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. The chemistry of Echinacea species is well documented, and several groups of constituents, including alkamides and caffeic acid derivatives, are considered important for activity. There are, however, differences in the constituent profile of the three species. Commercial echinacea samples and marketed echinacea products may contain one or more of the three species, and analysis of samples of raw material and products has shown that some do not meet recognized standards for pharmaceutical quality. Evidence from preclinical studies supports some of the traditional and modern uses for echinacea, particularly the reputed immunostimulant (or immunomodulatory) properties. Several, but not all, clinical trials of echinacea preparations have reported effects superior to those of placebo in the prevention and treatment of upper respiratory tract infections. However, evidence of efficacy is not definitive as studies have included different patient groups and tested various different preparations and dosage regimens of echinacea. On the basis of the available limited safety data, echinacea appears to be well tolerated. However, further investigation and surveillance are required to establish the safety profiles of different echinacea preparations. Safety issues include the possibility of allergic reactions, the use of echinacea by patients with autoimmune diseases and the potential for echinacea preparations to interact with

  3. Recommendations for switching antipsychotics. A position statement of the Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Miquel; Vieta, Eduard; Saiz Ruiz, Jerónimo; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Alamo, Cecilio; Bobes, Julio

    2011-07-01

    Switching antipsychotics is common in the clinical practice setting and is associated with potential clinically relevant complications. An expert group selected by Spanish Society of Psychiatry and the Spanish Society of Biological Psychiatry has reviewed the evidence provided by randomized clinical trials and other relevant information to reach consensus recommendations for switching antipsychotics. In this article, we will review all the information that has led to those recommendations and which includes: indications and contraindications for switching antipsychotics, pharmacological issues, switching strategies, switching antipsychotics due to efficacy problems, switching antispychotics due to tolerability issues (including extrapyramidal symptoms and tardive dyskinesia, weight gain, metabolic disorders, hyperprolactinemia, sexual dysfunction, persistent sedation, and QT prolongation), switching antypsychotics due to lack of treatment compliance, and switching antipsychotics in patients with bipolar disorders. PMID:23446195

  4. American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Nuclear Cardiology Official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Clinical Guidelines Procedures, Appropriate Use Criteria, Information Statements and Joint Society Statements Member Login Enter Forgot your password? Meetings & ...

  5. North American Menopause Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advertisements NAMS in the News Press Room Assistance Society Overview Top 10 reasons why NAMS is your ... fully updated and referenced 5th edition of the Society’s leading professional resource, featuring the latest comprehensive clinical ...

  6. Removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Birk, Michael; Bauerfeind, Peter; Deprez, Pierre H; Häfner, Michael; Hartmann, Dirk; Hassan, Cesare; Hucl, Tomas; Lesur, Gilles; Aabakken, Lars; Meining, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults. Recommendations Nonendoscopic measures 1 ESGE recommends diagnostic evaluation based on the patient's history and symptoms. ESGE recommends a physical examination focused on the patient's general condition and to assess signs of any complications (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 ESGE does not recommend radiological evaluation for patients with nonbony food bolus impaction without complications. We recommend plain radiography to assess the presence, location, size, configuration, and number of ingested foreign bodies if ingestion of radiopaque objects is suspected or type of object is unknown (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 3 ESGE recommends computed tomography (CT) scan in all patients with suspected perforation or other complication that may require surgery (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 ESGE does not recommend barium swallow, because of the risk of aspiration and worsening of the endoscopic visualization (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends clinical observation without the need for endoscopic removal for management of asymptomatic patients with ingestion of blunt and small objects (except batteries and magnets). If feasible, outpatient management is appropriate (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 ESGE recommends close observation in asymptomatic individuals who have concealed packets of drugs by swallowing ("body packing"). We recommend against endoscopic retrieval. We recommend surgical referral in cases of suspected packet rupture, failure of packets to progress, or intestinal obstruction (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). Endoscopic measures 7 ESGE recommends emergent (preferably within 2 hours, but at the latest within 6 hours) therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy for

  7. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-03-10

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number-one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include electronic cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or former smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the health of the public; however, definitive data are lacking. The AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the US Food and Drug Administration and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. This policy statement was developed by a joint writing group composed of members from the Tobacco and Cancer Subcommittee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Science Policy and Government Affairs (SPGA) Committee and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Tobacco Cessation and Control

  8. Aspirin: Pharmacology and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Paez Espinosa, Enma V.; Murad, John P.; Khasawneh, Fadi T.

    2012-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy has been documented to reduce risks of cardiovascular disease after acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft, and in chronic atrial fibrillation patients, amongst other risk factors. Conventional management of thrombosis-based disorders includes the use of heparin, oral anticoagulants, and the preferred antiplatelet agent aspirin. Interestingly, aspirin was not intended to be used as an antiplatelet agent; rather, after being repurposed, it has become one of the most widely prescribed antithrombotic drugs. To this end, there have been several milestones in the development of antiplatelet agents in the last few decades, such as adenosine diphosphate receptor inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors. However, given some of the limitations of these therapies, aspirin continues to play a major role in the management of thrombotic and cardiovascular disorders and is expected to do so for years to come. PMID:22195279

  9. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXVIII. G Protein-Coupled Receptor List: Recommendations for New Pairings with Cognate Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen P. H.; Sharman, Joanna L.; Pawson, Adam J.; Benson, Helen E.; Monaghan, Amy E.; Liew, Wen Chiy; Mpamhanga, Chidochangu P.; Bonner, Tom I.; Neubig, Richard R.; Pin, Jean Philippe; Spedding, Michael; Harmar, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2005, the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology Committee on Receptor Nomenclature and Drug Classification (NC-IUPHAR) published a catalog of all of the human gene sequences known or predicted to encode G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), excluding sensory receptors. This review updates the list of orphan GPCRs and describes the criteria used by NC-IUPHAR to recommend the pairing of an orphan receptor with its cognate ligand(s). The following recommendations are made for new receptor names based on 11 pairings for class A GPCRs: hydroxycarboxylic acid receptors [HCA1 (GPR81) with lactate, HCA2 (GPR109A) with 3-hydroxybutyric acid, HCA3 (GPR109B) with 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid]; lysophosphatidic acid receptors [LPA4 (GPR23), LPA5 (GPR92), LPA6 (P2Y5)]; free fatty acid receptors [FFA4 (GPR120) with omega-3 fatty acids]; chemerin receptor (CMKLR1; ChemR23) with chemerin; CXCR7 (CMKOR1) with chemokines CXCL12 (SDF-1) and CXCL11 (ITAC); succinate receptor (SUCNR1) with succinate; and oxoglutarate receptor [OXGR1 with 2-oxoglutarate]. Pairings are highlighted for an additional 30 receptors in class A where further input is needed from the scientific community to validate these findings. Fifty-seven human class A receptors (excluding pseudogenes) are still considered orphans; information has been provided where there is a significant phenotype in genetically modified animals. In class B, six pairings have been reported by a single publication, with 28 (excluding pseudogenes) still classified as orphans. Seven orphan receptors remain in class C, with one pairing described by a single paper. The objective is to stimulate research into confirming pairings of orphan receptors where there is currently limited information and to identify cognate ligands for the remaining GPCRs. Further information can be found on the IUPHAR Database website (http://www.iuphar-db.org). PMID:23686350

  10. An Official American Thoracic Society Workshop Report. A Framework for Addressing Multimorbidity in Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Disease, Critical Illness, and Sleep Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kevin C; Gould, Michael K; Krishnan, Jerry A; Boyd, Cynthia M; Brozek, Jan L; Cooke, Colin R; Douglas, Ivor S; Goodman, Richard A; Joo, Min J; Lareau, Suzanne; Mularski, Richard A; Patel, Minal R; Rosenfeld, Richard M; Shanawani, Hasan; Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna; Sufian, Beth; Thomson, Carey C; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2016-03-01

    Coexistence of multiple chronic conditions (i.e., multimorbidity) is the most common chronic health problem in adults. However, clinical practice guidelines have primarily focused on patients with a single disease, resulting in uncertainty about the care of patients with multimorbidity. The American Thoracic Society convened a workshop with the goal of establishing a strategy to address multimorbidity within clinical practice guidelines. In this Workshop Report, we describe a framework that addresses multimorbidity in each of the key steps of guideline development: topic selection, panel composition, identifying clinical questions, searching for and synthesizing evidence, rating the quality of that evidence, summarizing benefits and harms, formulating recommendations, and rating the strength of the recommendations. For the consideration of multimorbidity in guidelines to be successful and sustainable, the process must be both feasible and pragmatic. It is likely that this will be achieved best by the step-wise addition and refinement of the various components of the framework. PMID:26963362

  11. Pharmacologic therapeutics for cardiac reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Gross, Eric R; Gross, Garrett J

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrial societies, with myocardial infarction as the primary assassin. Pharmacologic agents, including the myocardial cell membrane receptor agonists adenosine, bradykinin/angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, opioids and erythropoietin or the mixed cell membrane and intracellular agonists, glucose insulin potassium, and volatile anesthetics, either clinically or experimentally reduce the extent of myocardial injury when administered just prior to reperfusion. Agents that specifically target proteins, transcription factors or ion channels, including PKC agonists/antagonists, PPAR, Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase and the ATP-dependent potassium channel are also promising. However, no agent has been specifically approved to reduce reperfusion injury clinically. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and limitations of agents to combat reperfusion injury, their market development status and findings reported in both clinical and preclinical studies. The molecular pathways activated by these agents that preserve myocardium from reperfusion injury, which appear to commonly involve glycogen synthase kinase 3beta and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibition, are also described. PMID:17874967

  12. A report from the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (June 3-7, 2011 - Chicago, Illinois, USA).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X; Gómez-Zaera, M

    2011-09-01

    Improving survival, as well as the quality of life and functioning of survivors, is the main objective of cancer therapy, for which a very large number of drugs are currently available or under development as therapeutic candidates. Information on many of these compounds was discussed during the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago. The number of news presentations discussed during the meeting was incredibly high, with plenary, oral abstract, poster discussion and general poster sessions filling room upon room. The following report provides a quick review of major new research into drug and support therapies for cancer as presented at the meeting. PMID:21971543

  13. Pharmacological management of acute bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Melvin; Mullett, Charles J; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge base related to the pharmacological treatments for acute bronchiolitis. Bronchiolitis is a common lower respiratory illness affecting infants worldwide. The mainstays of therapy include airway support, supplemental oxygen, and support of fluids and nutrition. Frequently tried pharmacological interventions, such as ribavirin, nebulized bronchodilators, and systemic corticosteroids, have not been proven to benefit patients with bronchiolitis. Antibiotics do not improve the clinical course of patients with bronchiolitis, and should be used only in those patients with proven concurrent bacterial infection. Exogenous surfactant and heliox therapy also cannot be recommended for routine use, but surfactant replacement holds promise and should be further studied. PMID:19209271

  14. Effects of non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions on cognition and brain plasticity of aging individuals

    PubMed Central

    Pieramico, Valentina; Esposito, Roberto; Cesinaro, Stefano; Frazzini, Valerio; Sensi, Stefano L.

    2014-01-01

    Brain aging and aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are major health challenges faced by modern societies. Brain aging is associated with cognitive and functional decline and represents the favourable background for the onset and development of dementia. Brain aging is associated with early and subtle anatomo-functional physiological changes that often precede the appearance of clinical signs of cognitive decline. Neuroimaging approaches unveiled the functional correlates of these alterations and helped in the identification of therapeutic targets that can be potentially useful in counteracting age-dependent cognitive decline. A growing body of evidence supports the notion that cognitive stimulation and aerobic training can preserve and enhance operational skills in elderly individuals as well as reduce the incidence of dementia. This review aims at providing an extensive and critical overview of the most recent data that support the efficacy of non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions aimed at enhancing cognition and brain plasticity in healthy elderly individuals as well as delaying the cognitive decline associated with dementia. PMID:25228860

  15. Effects of non-pharmacological or pharmacological interventions on cognition and brain plasticity of aging individuals.

    PubMed

    Pieramico, Valentina; Esposito, Roberto; Cesinaro, Stefano; Frazzini, Valerio; Sensi, Stefano L

    2014-01-01

    Brain aging and aging-related neurodegenerative disorders are major health challenges faced by modern societies. Brain aging is associated with cognitive and functional decline and represents the favourable background for the onset and development of dementia. Brain aging is associated with early and subtle anatomo-functional physiological changes that often precede the appearance of clinical signs of cognitive decline. Neuroimaging approaches unveiled the functional correlates of these alterations and helped in the identification of therapeutic targets that can be potentially useful in counteracting age-dependent cognitive decline. A growing body of evidence supports the notion that cognitive stimulation and aerobic training can preserve and enhance operational skills in elderly individuals as well as reduce the incidence of dementia. This review aims at providing an extensive and critical overview of the most recent data that support the efficacy of non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions aimed at enhancing cognition and brain plasticity in healthy elderly individuals as well as delaying the cognitive decline associated with dementia. PMID:25228860

  16. Clinical management of primary non-acute promyelocytic leukemia acute myeloid leukemia: practice Guidelines by the Italian Society of Hematology, the Italian Society of Experimental Hematology and the Italian Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Enrica; Barosi, Giovanni; Bosi, Alberto; Ferrara, Felicetto; Locatelli, Franco; Marchetti, Monia; Martinelli, Giovanni; Mecucci, Cristina; Vignetti, Marco; Tura, Sante

    2009-01-01

    As many options are now available to treat patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia, the Italian Society of Hematology and two affiliated societies (SIES and GITMO) commissioned project to an Expert Panel aimed at developing clinical practice guidelines for acute myeloid leukemia treatment. After systematic comprehensive literature review, the Expert Panel formulated recommendations for the management of primary acute myeloid leukemia (with the exception of acute promyelocytic leukemia) and graded them according to the supporting evidence. When evidence was lacking, consensus-based statements have been added. First-line therapy for all newly diagnosed patients eligible for intensive treatment should include one cycle of induction with standard dose cytarabine and an anthracycline. After achieving complete remission, patients aged less than 60 years should receive consolidation therapy including high-dose cytarabine. Myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-compatible sibling should be performed in first complete remission: 1) in children with intermediate-high risk cytogenetics or who achieved first complete remission after the second course of therapy; 2) in adults less than 40 years with an intermediate-risk; in those aged less than 55 years with either high-risk cytogenetics or who achieved first complete remission after the second course of therapy. Stem cell transplantation from an unrelated donor is recommended to be performed in first complete remission in adults 30 years old or younger, and in children with very high-risk disease lacking a sibling donor. Alternative donor stem cell transplantation is an option in high-risk patients without a matched donor who urgently need transplantation. Patients aged less than 60 years, who either are not candidate for allogeneic stem cell transplantation or lack a donor, are candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation. We describe the results of a systematic literature review and an

  17. Microvolt T-wave alternans physiological basis, methods of measurement, and clinical utility--consensus guideline by International Society for Holter and Noninvasive Electrocardiology.

    PubMed

    Verrier, Richard L; Klingenheben, Thomas; Malik, Marek; El-Sherif, Nabil; Exner, Derek V; Hohnloser, Stefan H; Ikeda, Takanori; Martínez, Juan Pablo; Narayan, Sanjiv M; Nieminen, Tuomo; Rosenbaum, David S

    2011-09-20

    This consensus guideline was prepared on behalf of the International Society for Holter and Noninvasive Electrocardiology and is cosponsored by the Japanese Circulation Society, the Computers in Cardiology Working Group on e-Cardiology of the European Society of Cardiology, and the European Cardiac Arrhythmia Society. It discusses the electrocardiographic phenomenon of T-wave alternans (TWA) (i.e., a beat-to-beat alternation in the morphology and amplitude of the ST-segment or T-wave). This statement focuses on its physiological basis and measurement technologies and its clinical utility in stratifying risk for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Signal processing techniques including the frequency-domain Spectral Method and the time-domain Modified Moving Average method have demonstrated the utility of TWA in arrhythmia risk stratification in prospective studies in >12,000 patients. The majority of exercise-based studies using both methods have reported high relative risks for cardiovascular mortality and for sudden cardiac death in patients with preserved as well as depressed left ventricular ejection fraction. Studies with ambulatory electrocardiogram-based TWA analysis with Modified Moving Average method have yielded significant predictive capacity. However, negative studies with the Spectral Method have also appeared, including 2 interventional studies in patients with implantable defibrillators. Meta-analyses have been performed to gain insights into this issue. Frontiers of TWA research include use in arrhythmia risk stratification of individuals with preserved ejection fraction, improvements in predictivity with quantitative analysis, and utility in guiding medical as well as device-based therapy. Overall, although TWA appears to be a useful marker of risk for arrhythmic and cardiovascular death, there is as yet no definitive evidence that it can guide therapy. PMID:21920259

  18. [Consensus statement "Dementia 2010" of the Austrian Alzheimer Society].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Reinhold; Marksteiner, Michael; Dal-Bianco, Peter; Ransmayr, G; Bancher, C; Benke, T; Wancata, J; Fischer, P; Leblhuber, C F; Psota, G; Ackerl, M; Alf, C; Berek, K; Croy, A; Delazer, M; Fasching, P; Frühwald, T; Fruhwürth, G; Fuchs-Nieder, B; Gatterer, G; Grossmann, J; Hinterhuber, H; Iglseder, B; Imarhiagbe, D; Jagsch, C; Jellinger, K; Kalousek, M; Kapeller, P; Ladurner, G; Lampl, C; Lechner, A; Lingg, A; Nakajima, T; Rainer, M; Reisecker, F; Spatt, J; Walch, T; Uranüs, M; Walter, A

    2010-01-01

    The Austrian Alzheimer Society developed evidence-based guidelines based on a systematic literature search and criteria-guided assessment with subsequent transparent determination of grades of clinical recommendation. The authors evaluated currently available therapeutic approaches for the most common forms of dementia and focused on diagnosis and pharmacological intervention, taking into consideration the situation in Austria. The purpose of these guidelines is the rational and cost-effective use of diagnostic and therapeutic measures in dementing illnesses. Users are physicians and all other providers of care for patients with dementia in Austria. PMID:20605003

  19. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model: Part 2—Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; O’Brien, Sean M.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Gaynor, J. William; Mayer, John E.; Karamlou, Tara; Welke, Karl F.; Filardo, Giovanni; Han, Jane M.; Kim, Sunghee; Quintessenza, James A.; Pizarro, Christian; Tchervenkov, Christo I.; Lacour-Gayet, Francois; Mavroudis, Constantine; Backer, Carl L.; Austin, Erle H.; Fraser, Charles D.; Tweddell, James S.; Jonas, Richard A.; Edwards, Fred H.; Grover, Frederick L.; Prager, Richard L.; Shahian, David M.; Jacobs, Marshall L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The empirically derived 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model incorporates adjustment for procedure type and patient-specific factors. The purpose of this report is to describe this model and its application in the assessment of variation in outcomes across centers. Methods All index cardiac operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2013) were eligible for inclusion. Isolated patent ductus arteriosus closures in patients weighing less than or equal to 2.5 kg were excluded, as were centers with more than 10% missing data and patients with missing data for key variables. The model includes the following covariates: primary procedure, age, any prior cardiovascular operation, any noncardiac abnormality, any chromosomal abnormality or syndrome, important preoperative factors (mechanical circulatory support, shock persisting at time of operation, mechanical ventilation, renal failure requiring dialysis or renal dysfunction (or both), and neurological deficit), any other preoperative factor, prematurity (neonates and infants), and weight (neonates and infants). Variation across centers was assessed. Centers for which the 95% confidence interval for the observed-to-expected mortality ratio does not include unity are identified as lower-performing or higher-performing programs with respect to operative mortality. Results Included were 52,224 operations from 86 centers. Overall discharge mortality was 3.7% (1,931 of 52,224). Discharge mortality by age category was neonates, 10.1% (1,129 of 11,144); infants, 3.0% (564 of 18,554), children, 0.9% (167 of 18,407), and adults, 1.7% (71 of 4,119). For all patients, 12 of 86 centers (14%) were lower-performing programs, 67 (78%) were not outliers, and 7 (8%) were higher-performing programs. Conclusions The 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database Mortality Risk Model

  20. Planetary Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  1. Chronic kidney disease certification process manual by the Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN): Part I: clinical care delivery and performance measurements and improvement.

    PubMed

    Quintaliani, Giuseppe; Cappelli, Gianni; Lodetti, Laura; Manno, Corrado; Petrucci, Virgilio; Spinelli, Cosimo; Tarchini, Renzo; Virgilio, Michele; Faini, Mario; Alloatti, Sandro; Cancarini, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD) has now emerged as a public health priority, and there is an increasing demand by patients and health care organisations that the quality of care delivered by renal units to CKD patients be systematically monitored and evaluated. The Italian Society of Nephrology (SIN) has started an initiative aimed at promoting a quality certification process specifically focused on CKD. To this end, SIN started a collaboration with an independent Italian company which is a partner of Joint Commission International (JCI), a nonprofit international organisation dedicated to the promotion of quality improvement and safety of health services. As a result of this collaboration, a document describing a voluntary certification process developed based on JCI criteria was produced by SIN. This document comprises 2 parts. Herein (Part I) we deal with standards for clinical care delivery and performance measurements related to CKD care. Programme management and clinical information management will be presented in a separate manuscript (Part II). PMID:19662596

  2. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY, AND ANDROGEN EXCESS AND PCOS SOCIETY DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: GUIDE TO THE BEST PRACTICES IN THE EVALUATION AND TREATMENT OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME - PART 2.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Neil F; Cobin, Rhoda H; Futterweit, Walter; Glueck, Jennifer S; Legro, Richard S; Carmina, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is recognized as the most common endocrine disorder of reproductive-aged women around the world. This document, produced by the collaboration of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the Androgen Excess Society aims to highlight the most important clinical issues confronting physicians and their patients with PCOS. It is a summary of current best practices in 2014. Insulin resistance is believed to play an intrinsic role in the pathogenesis of PCOS. The mechanism by which insulin resistance or insulin give rise to oligomenorrhea and hyperandrogenemia, however, is unclear. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies have shown that both obese and lean women with PCOS have some degree of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is implicated in the ovulatory dysfunction of PCOS by disrupting the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Given the association with insulin resistance, all women with PCOS require evaluation for the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components, including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and the possible risk of clinical events, including acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Obese women with PCOS are at increased risk for MetS with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; 31 to 35%) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; 7.5 to 10%). Rates of progression from normal glucose tolerance to IGT, and in turn to T2DM, may be as high as 5 to 15% within 3 years. Data suggest the need for baseline oral glucose tolerance test every 1 to 2 years based on family history of T2DM as well as body mass index (BMI) and yearly in women with IGT. Compared with BMI- and age-matched controls, young, lean PCOS women have lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) size, higher very-low-density lipoprotein particle number, higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle number, and borderline lower LDL size. Statins have been shown to lower testosterone levels either alone or in combination with oral

  3. The Pharmacology of Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Justin M.; Furth, Mark E.; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary, translational research enterprise whose explicit purpose is to advance technologies for the repair and replacement of damaged cells, tissues, and organs. Scientific progress in the field has been steady and expectations for its robust clinical application continue to rise. The major thesis of this review is that the pharmacological sciences will contribute critically to the accelerated translational progress and clinical utility of regenerative medicine technologies. In 2007, we coined the phrase “regenerative pharmacology” to describe the enormous possibilities that could occur at the interface between pharmacology, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. The operational definition of regenerative pharmacology is “the application of pharmacological sciences to accelerate, optimize, and characterize (either in vitro or in vivo) the development, maturation, and function of bioengineered and regenerating tissues.” As such, regenerative pharmacology seeks to cure disease through restoration of tissue/organ function. This strategy is distinct from standard pharmacotherapy, which is often limited to the amelioration of symptoms. Our goal here is to get pharmacologists more involved in this field of research by exposing them to the tools, opportunities, challenges, and interdisciplinary expertise that will be required to ensure awareness and galvanize involvement. To this end, we illustrate ways in which the pharmacological sciences can drive future innovations in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering and thus help to revolutionize the discovery of curative therapeutics. Hopefully, the broad foundational knowledge provided herein will spark sustained conversations among experts in diverse fields of scientific research to the benefit of all. PMID:23818131

  4. Overview of complications during pharmacological spasm provocation tests.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Shozo; Kohno, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacological spasm provocation tests are invasive methods and we always have the potential to encounter complications when performing these tests. In 1980, Buxton et al. reported three deaths when they performed intravenous ergonovine testing. However, we now employ the intracoronary ergonovine test instead of the intravenous injection of ergonovine from a safety procedure point of view. Past serious major complications of intravenous ergonovine tests, intracoronary ergonovine tests, and intracoronary acetylcholine tests were 0.31% (26/8419), 0.51% (11/2173), and 0.95% (148/15,527), respectively. Selective intracoronary testing had the serious major complications in 0.89% of patients including just one death (0.006%) and two acute myocardial infarctions (0.01%). Selective spasm provocation tests had no additional risks compared with performing diagnostic coronary angiography alone. In the Western countries, the pharmacological spasm provocation tests are not familiar in the clinic except for some specialized institutions. We need international clinical studies using the same protocol of spasm provocation tests to compare the frequency, clinical features, and prognosis of acetylcholine- or ergonovine-provoked coronary spasm between Western and Asian countries. And we hope that Western guidelines give spasm provocation testing a class I indication similar to Japanese Circulation Society guidelines because coronary artery spasm may have fewer racial differences and borders. PMID:27234219

  5. Pharmacology of antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Pepper, G A

    1999-01-01

    The wide variety of first-line agents available for managing high blood pressure include diuretics, beta adrenergic receptor blockers, alpha adrenergic receptor blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and calcium channel blockers. Supplemental agents used for second-line therapy and special indications, such as pregnancy and hypertensive emergencies, include angiotensin receptor blockers, central-acting agents, direct vasodilators, and adrenergic neuron inhibitors. Selection of agents for particular patients requires consideration of research-based evidence for positive long-term outcomes and of the unique patient profile of age, race, co-morbidities, and lifestyle. A thorough understanding of the pharmacology (mechanism, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and drug interactions, clinical use) of antihypertensive agents is an essential foundation for nursing practice in women's health. PMID:10584919

  6. Success of an International Learning Health Care System in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation Clinical Case Forum.

    PubMed

    Barba, Pere; Burns, Linda J; Litzow, Mark R; Juckett, Mark B; Komanduri, Krishna V; Lee, Stephanie J; Devlin, Sean M; Costa, Luciano J; Khan, Shakila; King, Andrea; Klein, Andreas; Krishnan, Amrita; Malone, Adriana; Mir, Muhammad A; Moravec, Carina; Selby, George; Roy, Vivek; Cochran, Melissa; Stricherz, Melisa K; Westmoreland, Michael D; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Wood, William A

    2016-03-01

    The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) Clinical Case Forum (CCF) was launched in 2014 as an online secure tool to enhance interaction and communication among hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) professionals worldwide through the discussion of challenging clinical care issues. After 14 months, we reviewed clinical and demographical data of cases posted in the CCF from January 29, 2014 to March 18, 2015. A total of 137 cases were posted during the study period. Ninety-two cases (67%) were allogeneic HCT, 29 (21%) were autologous HCT, and in 16 (12%), the type of transplantation (autologous versus allogeneic) was still under consideration. The diseases most frequently discussed included non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; n = 30, 22%), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 23, 17%), and multiple myeloma (MM; n = 20, 15%). When compared with the US transplantation activity reported by the US Department of Health and Human Services, NHL and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases were over-represented in the CCF, whereas MM was under-represented (P < .001). A total of 259 topics were addressed in the CCF with a median of 2 topics/case (range, 1 to 6). Particularly common topics included whether transplantation was indicated (n = 57, 41%), conditioning regimen choice (n = 44, 32%), and post-HCT complications after day 100 (n = 43, 31%). The ASBMT CCF is a successful tool for collaborative discussion of complex cases in the HCT community worldwide and may allow identification of areas of controversy or unmet need from clinical, educational and research perspectives. PMID:26718665

  7. Conus venom peptide pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard J; Dutertre, Sébastien; Vetter, Irina; Christie, MacDonald J

    2012-04-01

    Conopeptides are a diverse group of recently evolved venom peptides used for prey capture and/or defense. Each species of cone snails produces in excess of 1000 conopeptides, with those pharmacologically characterized (≈ 0.1%) targeting a diverse range of membrane proteins typically with high potency and specificity. The majority of conopeptides inhibit voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels, providing valuable research tools for the dissection of the role played by specific ion channels in excitable cells. It is noteworthy that many of these targets are found to be expressed in pain pathways, with several conopeptides having entered the clinic as potential treatments for pain [e.g., pyroglutamate1-MrIA (Xen2174)] and one now marketed for intrathecal treatment of severe pain [ziconotide (Prialt)]. This review discusses the diversity, pharmacology, structure-activity relationships, and therapeutic potential of cone snail venom peptide families acting at voltage-gated ion channels (ω-, μ-, μO-, δ-, ι-, and κ-conotoxins), ligand-gated ion channels (α-conotoxins, σ-conotoxin, ikot-ikot, and conantokins), G-protein-coupled receptors (ρ-conopeptides, conopressins, and contulakins), and neurotransmitter transporters (χ-conopeptides), with expanded discussion on the clinical potential of sodium and calcium channel inhibitors and α-conotoxins. Expanding the discovery of new bioactives using proteomic/transcriptomic approaches combined with high-throughput platforms and better defining conopeptide structure-activity relationships using relevant membrane protein crystal structures are expected to grow the already significant impact conopeptides have had as both research probes and leads to new therapies. PMID:22407615

  8. Pharmacology of GABA.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, B

    1982-01-01

    GABA-ergic systems are involved in all the main functions of the brain. In most brain regions impairment of this system produces epileptic activity. GABA-mediated inhibitory function can be enhanced by drugs of at least seven different types. They act on the metabolism or synaptic release of GABA, or its reuptake into neurones of glia, or on various components of the GABA receptor complex (GABA recognition site, "benzodiazepine" receptor or chloride ionophore). Among such compounds, those which act most specifically and potently on GABA receptors remain primarily research tools. Among compounds in clinical use, valproate, benzodiazepines, and anticonvulsant barbiturates al enhance GABA-mediated inhibition. In the future, new inhibitors of GABA uptake, new GABA agonists and potent inhibitors of GABA-transaminase are likely to become available. Trials of drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function have been made in a wide variety of neurological disorders. In most forms of epilepsy a therapeutic effect is evident. Real benefit from GABA therapies has not been demonstrated in the principal disorders of movement (Huntington's chorea, Parkinson's disease, dystonias), except in so far as they have a myoclonic or paroxysmal component. Among psychiatric disorders the acute symptoms of schizophrenia are exacerbated by enhanced GABA-ergic function. Abstinence syndromes (alcohol, barbiturate or narcotic withdrawal) are ameliorated by drugs enhancing GABA-ergic function, and there is some evidence for a beneficial action in anxiety states and mania. Attempts to relate the molecular neurobiology of GABA with clinical pharmacology are of very recent origin. Improved understanding of the variety of GABA receptor mechanisms will provide the key to the more selective pharmacological manipulations that are required for therapeutic success. PMID:6214305

  9. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Classification, Evaluation, and Management of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Kurland, Geoffrey; Deterding, Robin R.; Hagood, James S.; Young, Lisa R.; Brody, Alan S.; Castile, Robert G.; Dell, Sharon; Fan, Leland L.; Hamvas, Aaron; Hilman, Bettina C.; Langston, Claire; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Redding, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is growing recognition and understanding of the entities that cause interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants. These entities are distinct from those that cause ILD in older children and adults. Methods: A multidisciplinary panel was convened to develop evidence-based guidelines on the classification, diagnosis, and management of ILD in children, focusing on neonates and infants under 2 years of age. Recommendations were formulated using a systematic approach. Outcomes considered important included the accuracy of the diagnostic evaluation, complications of delayed or incorrect diagnosis, psychosocial complications affecting the patient’s or family’s quality of life, and death. Results: No controlled clinical trials were identified. Therefore, observational evidence and clinical experience informed judgments. These guidelines: (1) describe the clinical characteristics of neonates and infants (<2 yr of age) with diffuse lung disease (DLD); (2) list the common causes of DLD that should be eliminated during the evaluation of neonates and infants with DLD; (3) recommend methods for further clinical investigation of the remaining infants, who are regarded as having “childhood ILD syndrome”; (4) describe a new pathologic classification scheme of DLD in infants; (5) outline supportive and continuing care; and (6) suggest areas for future research. Conclusions: After common causes of DLD are excluded, neonates and infants with childhood ILD syndrome should be evaluated by a knowledgeable subspecialist. The evaluation may include echocardiography, controlled ventilation high-resolution computed tomography, infant pulmonary function testing, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, genetic testing, and/or lung biopsy. Preventive care, family education, and support are essential. PMID:23905526

  10. Clinical features, pathogenesis, and treatment of myasthenia gravis: a supplement to the Guidelines of the German Neurological Society.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Nico; Ruck, Tobias; Fuhr, Peter; Gold, Ralf; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Marx, Alexander; Melms, Arthur; Tackenberg, Björn; Schalke, Berthold; Schneider-Gold, Christiane; Zimprich, Fritz; Meuth, Sven G; Wiendl, Heinz

    2016-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune antibody-mediated disorder of neuromuscular synaptic transmission. The clinical hallmark of MG consists of fluctuating fatigability and weakness affecting ocular, bulbar and (proximal) limb skeletal muscle groups. MG may either occur as an autoimmune disease with distinct immunogenetic characteristics or as a paraneoplastic syndrome associated with tumors of the thymus. Impairment of central thymic and peripheral self-tolerance mechanisms in both cases is thought to favor an autoimmune CD4(+) T cell-mediated B cell activation and synthesis of pathogenic high-affinity autoantibodies of either the IgG1 and 3 or IgG4 subclass. These autoantibodies bind to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR) itself, or muscle-specific tyrosine-kinase (MuSK), lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) and agrin involved in clustering of AchRs within the postsynaptic membrane and structural maintenance of the neuromuscular synapse. This results in disturbance of neuromuscular transmission and thus clinical manifestation of the disease. Emphasizing evidence from clinical trials, we provide an updated overview on immunopathogenesis, and derived current and future treatment strategies for MG divided into: (a) symptomatic treatments facilitating neuromuscular transmission, (b) antibody-depleting treatments, and PMID:26886206

  11. Prevention of venous thromboembolism, 2nd edition: Korean Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bang, Soo-Mee; Jang, Moon Ju; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Yhim, Ho-Young; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Nam, Seung-Hyun; Hwang, Hun Gyu; Bae, Sung Hwa; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Kim, Yang-Ki; Kim, Inho; Choi, Won-Il; Jung, Chul Won; Park, Nan Hee; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Park, Byung-Joo; Oh, Doyeun; Korean Society of Thrombosis and Hemostasis

    2014-02-01

    In 2010, we proposed the first Korean Guidelines for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE). It was applicable to Korean patients, by modifying the contents of the second edition of the Japanese guidelines for the prevention of VTE and the 8th edition of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. From 2007 to 2011, we conducted a nationwide study regarding the incidence of VTE after major surgery using the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) database. In addition, we have considered the 9th edition of the ACCP Evidenced-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines, published in 2012. It emphasized the importance of clinically relevant events as opposed to asymptomatic outcomes with preferences for both thrombotic and bleeding outcomes. Thus, in the development of the new Korean guidelines, three major points were addressed: 1) the new guidelines stratify patients into 4 risk groups (very low, low, moderate, and high) according to the actual incidence of symptomatic VTE from the HIRA databases; 2) the recommended optimal VTE prophylaxis for each group was modified according to condition-specific thrombotic and bleeding risks; 3) guidelines are intended for general information only, are not medical advice, and do not replace professional medical care and/or physician advice. PMID:24550640

  12. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCV. Recent advances in the understanding of the pharmacology and biological roles of relaxin family peptide receptors 1-4, the receptors for relaxin family peptides.

    PubMed

    Halls, Michelle L; Bathgate, Ross A D; Sutton, Steve W; Dschietzig, Thomas B; Summers, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin, insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), relaxin-3, and INSL5 are the cognate ligands for the relaxin family peptide (RXFP) receptors 1-4, respectively. RXFP1 activates pleiotropic signaling pathways including the signalosome protein complex that facilitates high-sensitivity signaling; coupling to Gα(s), Gα(i), and Gα(o) proteins; interaction with glucocorticoid receptors; and the formation of hetero-oligomers with distinctive pharmacological properties. In addition to relaxin-related ligands, RXFP1 is activated by Clq-tumor necrosis factor-related protein 8 and by small-molecular-weight agonists, such as ML290 [2-isopropoxy-N-(2-(3-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl)benzamide], that act allosterically. RXFP2 activates only the Gα(s)- and Gα(o)-coupled pathways. Relaxin-3 is primarily a neuropeptide, and its cognate receptor RXFP3 is a target for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and autism. A variety of peptide agonists, antagonists, biased agonists, and an allosteric modulator target RXFP3. Both RXFP3 and the related RXFP4 couple to Gα(i)/Gα(o) proteins. INSL5 has the properties of an incretin; it is secreted from the gut and is orexigenic. The expression of RXFP4 in gut, adipose tissue, and β-islets together with compromised glucose tolerance in INSL5 or RXFP4 knockout mice suggests a metabolic role. This review focuses on the many advances in our understanding of RXFP receptors in the last 5 years, their signal transduction mechanisms, the development of novel compounds that target RXFP1-4, the challenges facing the field, and current prospects for new therapeutics. PMID:25761609

  13. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCV. Recent Advances in the Understanding of the Pharmacology and Biological Roles of Relaxin Family Peptide Receptors 1–4, the Receptors for Relaxin Family Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Halls, Michelle L.; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Sutton, Steve W.; Dschietzig, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Relaxin, insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), relaxin-3, and INSL5 are the cognate ligands for the relaxin family peptide (RXFP) receptors 1–4, respectively. RXFP1 activates pleiotropic signaling pathways including the signalosome protein complex that facilitates high-sensitivity signaling; coupling to Gαs, Gαi, and Gαo proteins; interaction with glucocorticoid receptors; and the formation of hetero-oligomers with distinctive pharmacological properties. In addition to relaxin-related ligands, RXFP1 is activated by Clq-tumor necrosis factor-related protein 8 and by small-molecular-weight agonists, such as ML290 [2-isopropoxy-N-(2-(3-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)phenylcarbamoyl)phenyl)benzamide], that act allosterically. RXFP2 activates only the Gαs- and Gαo-coupled pathways. Relaxin-3 is primarily a neuropeptide, and its cognate receptor RXFP3 is a target for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and autism. A variety of peptide agonists, antagonists, biased agonists, and an allosteric modulator target RXFP3. Both RXFP3 and the related RXFP4 couple to Gαi/Gαo proteins. INSL5 has the properties of an incretin; it is secreted from the gut and is orexigenic. The expression of RXFP4 in gut, adipose tissue, and β-islets together with compromised glucose tolerance in INSL5 or RXFP4 knockout mice suggests a metabolic role. This review focuses on the many advances in our understanding of RXFP receptors in the last 5 years, their signal transduction mechanisms, the development of novel compounds that target RXFP1–4, the challenges facing the field, and current prospects for new therapeutics. PMID:25761609

  14. Management of pulmonary nodules according to the 2015 British Thoracic Society guidelines. Key messages for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David R

    2016-04-26

    The British Thoracic Society guideline on the investigation and management of pulmonary nodules is based on a comprehensive and systematic review of the literature on pulmonary nodules. Recent evidence has suggested that significant changes to existing guidelines are necessary. The use of 2 malignancy prediction calculators to better characterize the risk of malignancy was firmly supported by evidence, as were the recommendations for a higher nodule size threshold for follow‑up (≥5 mm or ≥80 mm3) and a reduction of the follow‑up period to 1 year for solid pulmonary nodules. Although caution is required where there is a history of cancer, both of these recommendations will reduce the number of follow‑up computed tomographies, thereby improving cost‑effectiveness and pressure on imaging services. Recent evidence has also confirmed the superiority of volumetry as the preferred measurement method and clarified the management of nodules with extended volume‑doubling times. Acknowledging the good prognosis of subsolid nodules, there are recommendations for less aggressive options in their management. The guidelines recommend ordinal scale reporting for positron emission tomography-computed tomography to facilitate incorporation into risk models. There are recommendations on when biopsy is most helpful, the threshold for treatment without histological confirmation, and surgical and nonsurgical treatment. The guideline also provides evidence‑based recommendations about the information that people need and that should be provided for them. The complexity of managing pulmonary nodules is made more accessible by 4 management algorithms. In the real world, it is surprising how easy these are to follow and how they seem to follow an intuitive approach. PMID:27121867

  15. [Home childbirth and clinical delivery in the 3d Reich. On a memorial to the German Society of Gynecology 1939].

    PubMed

    Zander, J; Goetz, E

    1985-12-01

    There have always been controversies on the pros and cons of home delivery and childbirth in a hospital. During the Nazi regime, the official "health command" policy monitored by the Nazi party promoted home delivery under midwife supervision, both by pertinacious propaganda and partly also by decrees and ordinances. The official line of argument against clinical obstetrics consisted of a queer and highly questionable mélange of ideology and distored facts brought forward by the so-called "Reichsgesundheitsführer" Dr. Leonardo Conti and his mother, Mrs Nanna Conti as head of the Party-sponsored Midwives Association. The "Midwives Law" was promulgated on 21 December 1938 prescribing compulsory consultation of a midwife for every delivery. By the end of 1939 gynaecologists eventually rallied in protest against legislative measures to restrict clinical obstetrics, by means of a memorandum penned by the German Association for Gynaecology. This memorandum was scheduled for circulation among all the members of the association. The pressure exercised by this memorandum resulted in tough negotiations amounting to a tug-of-war between representatives of the German Association for Gynaecology and Dr. Conti. This led eventually not only to an abandonment of the attacks against clinical obstetrics but also to an official and unreserved recognition of its achievements. In addition, the "Reichsgesundheitsführer" issued "Directives for regulating obstetrics procedures" in 1940/41 in which it was laid down that it would be left to the decision of the expectant mother to choose where she would prefer to deliver her child. PMID:3910511

  16. OPTICAL PRINCIPLES, BIOMECHANICS, AND INITIAL CLINICAL PERFORMANCE OF A DUAL-OPTIC ACCOMMODATING INTRAOCULAR LENS (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Stephen D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To design and develop an accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) for endocapsular fixation with extended accommodative range that can be adapted to current standard extracapsular phacoemulsification technique. Methods Ray tracing analysis and lens design; finite element modeling of biomechanical properties; cadaver eye implantation; initial clinical evaluation. Results Ray tracing analysis indicated that a dual-optic design with a high plus-power front optic coupled to an optically compensatory minus posterior optic produced greater change in conjugation power of the eye compared to that produced by axial movement of a single-optic IOL, and that magnification effects were unlikely to account for improved near vision. Finite element modeling indicated that the two optics can be linked by spring-loaded haptics that allow anterior and posterior axial displacement of the front optic in response to changes in ciliary body tone and capsular tension. A dual-optic single-piece foldable silicone lens was constructed based on these principles. Subsequent initial clinical evaluation in 24 human eyes after phacoemulsification for cataract indicated mean 3.22 diopters of accommodation (range, 1 to 5 D) based on defocus curve measurement. Accommodative amplitude evaluation at 1- and 6-month follow-up in all eyes indicated that the accommodative range was maintained and that the lens was well tolerated. Conclusions A dual-optic design increases the accommodative effect of axial optic displacement, with minimal magnification effect. Initial clinical trials suggest that IOLs designed on this principle might provide true pseudophakic accommodation following cataract extraction and lens implantation. PMID:17471355

  17. A standardised, generic, validated approach to stratify the magnitude of clinical benefit that can be anticipated from anti-cancer therapies: the European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS).

    PubMed

    Cherny, N I; Sullivan, R; Dafni, U; Kerst, J M; Sobrero, A; Zielinski, C; de Vries, E G E; Piccart, M J

    2015-08-01

    The value of any new therapeutic strategy or treatment is determined by the magnitude of its clinical benefit balanced against its cost. Evidence for clinical benefit from new treatment options is derived from clinical research, in particular phase III randomised trials, which generate unbiased data regarding the efficacy, benefit and safety of new therapeutic approaches. To date, there is no standard tool for grading the magnitude of clinical benefit of cancer therapies, which may range from trivial (median progression-free survival advantage of only a few weeks) to substantial (improved long-term survival). Indeed, in the absence of a standardised approach for grading the magnitude of clinical benefit, conclusions and recommendations derived from studies are often hotly disputed and very modest incremental advances have often been presented, discussed and promoted as major advances or 'breakthroughs'. Recognising the importance of presenting clear and unbiased statements regarding the magnitude of the clinical benefit from new therapeutic approaches derived from high-quality clinical trials, the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has developed a validated and reproducible tool to assess the magnitude of clinical benefit for cancer medicines, the ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS). This tool uses a rational, structured and consistent approach to derive a relative ranking of the magnitude of clinically meaningful benefit that can be expected from a new anti-cancer treatment. The ESMO-MCBS is an important first step to the critical public policy issue of value in cancer care, helping to frame the appropriate use of limited public and personal resources to deliver cost-effective and affordable cancer care. The ESMO-MCBS will be a dynamic tool and its criteria will be revised on a regular basis. PMID:26026162

  18. Nasal Hyperreactivity: Nonspecific Nasal Provocation Tests. Review by the Rhinoconjunctivitis Committee of the Spanish Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

    PubMed

    Lluch-Bernal, M; Dordal, M T; Antón, E; Campo, P; Colás, C; Dávila, I; Del Cuvillo Bernal, A; Fernández-Parra, B; González, R; González, M L; Matheu, V; Montoro, J; Panizo, C; Rondón, C; Sánchez, M C; Valero, A; Vega, F; Velázquez, E; Navarro, A

    2015-01-01

    Nasal hyperreactivity is the abnormal reaction of nasal tissue to a stimulus that is innocuous to most people. This response is caused by dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system at various levels of the nasal autonomic reflex arc. Various stimuli (methacholine, histamine, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, cold air, mannitol, rapsaicin, phentolamine, and distilled water) have been used in an attempt to find the test that most reliably differentiates between healthy individuals and patients and also between different types of rhinitis. Despite the small number of publications available, in the present review, we provide an update on current nonspecific nasal provocation techniques. The studies published to date are not comparable: the stimuli applied act through different mechanisms and are used to assess different pathways, and the methodologies differ in terms of selection of participants, concentrations used, and assessment of response (criteria for positivity). Given the limited use of nonspecific nasal provocation tests in routine clinical practice, we believe that more studies are warranted to address the research issues we present at the end of the present review, for example, the need to standardize the methodology for each test or even the clinical benefits of knowing whether or not a patient has nasal hyperreactivity. PMID:26817136

  19. CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES FOR THE PERIOPERATIVE NUTRITIONAL, METABOLIC, AND NONSURGICAL SUPPORT OF THE BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENT—2013 UPDATE: COSPONSORED BY AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS, THE OBESITY SOCIETY, AND AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METABOLIC & BARIATRIC SURGERY★

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, M. Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE- TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529351

  20. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Perioperative Nutritional, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of the Bariatric Surgery Patient—2013 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery*

    PubMed Central

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I.; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B.; Garvey, W. Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L.; McMahon, Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J.; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D.; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B.; Brethauer, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    The development of these updated guidelines was commissioned by the AACE, TOS, and ASMBS Board of Directors and adheres to the AACE 2010 protocol for standardized production of clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Each recommendation was re-evaluated and updated based on the evidence and subjective factors per protocol. Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues. There are 74 recommendations (of which 56 are revised and 2 are new) in this 2013 update, compared with 164 original recommendations in 2008. There are 403 citations, of which 33 (8.2%) are EL 1, 131 (32.5%) are EL 2, 170 (42.2%) are EL 3, and 69 (17.1%) are EL 4. There is a relatively high proportion (40.4%) of strong (EL 1 and 2) studies, compared with only 16.5% in the 2008 AACE-TOS-ASMBS CPG. These updated guidelines reflect recent additions to the evidence base. Bariatric surgery remains a safe and effective intervention for select patients with obesity. A team approach to perioperative care is mandatory with special attention to nutritional and metabolic issues. PMID:23529939

  1. Pharmacologic inhibition of ATR and ATM offers clinically important distinctions to enhancing platinum or radiation response in ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Pang-ning; Bateman, Nicholas W.; Darcy, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Chad A.; Maxwell, George Larry; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Conrads, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Significant reductions in gynecologic (GYN) cancer mortality and morbidity require treatments that prevent and reverse resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. The objective of this study was to determine if pharmacologic inhibition of key DNA damage response kinases in GYN cancers would enhance cell killing by platinum-based chemotherapy and radiation. Methods A panel of human ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer cell lines were treated with platinum drugs or ionizing radiation (IR) along with small molecule pharmacological kinase inhibitors of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad-3-related (ATR). Results Pharmacologic inhibition of ATR significantly enhanced platinum drug response in all GYN cancer cell lines tested, whereas inhibition of ATM did not enhance the response to platinum drugs. Co-inhibition of ATM and ATR did not enhance platinum kill beyond that observed by inhibition of ATR alone. By contrast, inhibiting either ATR or ATM enhanced the response to IR in all GYN cancer cells, with further enhancement achieved with co-inhibition. Conclusions These studies highlight actionable mechanisms operative in GYN cancer cells with potential to maximize response of platinum agents and radiation in newly diagnosed as well as recurrent gynecologic cancers. PMID:25560806

  2. Pharmacologic treatment of pediatric insomnia.

    PubMed

    Owens, Judith A; Moturi, Sricharan

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric insomnia is common in children and adolescents, particularly in children who have comorbid medical, psychiatric, and neurodevelopmental disorders, and may be associated with cognitive, emotional, and psychosocial impairments that often result in significant caregiver burden. Although several behavioral interventions for pediatric insomnia are effective, there is a relative paucity of empiric evidence supporting the use of pharmacologic treatment. Sedative/hypnotic drugs are frequently used in clinical practice to treat pediatric insomnia, and guidelines for the use of these medications in general as well as for specific medications have been developed. This review presents expert consensus guidelines for the use of these medications in clinical practice, with a focus on the different classes of pharmacologic agents that are most commonly prescribed. PMID:19836701

  3. Highlights from the 42nd annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Atlanta, GA, USA, 2-6 June 2006.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Fabio; Andreetta, Claudia; Fasola, Gianpiero

    2006-11-01

    The results of approximately 3700 preclinical and clinical studies were presented at the 42nd annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) held 2-6 June 2006, in Atlanta, Georgia. The annual ASCO meeting is the largest forum in which oncology professionals from around the world report the latest advances in cancer research, encompassing a wide spectrum of subjects on molecular biology, prevention, diagnosis and therapy of tumours. The present report summarises some of the more important results of the studies presented at the meeting. In particular, the authors focused on findings from randomised Phase III trials that, in their opinion, are most likely to have an immediate effect on clinical practice. The top advances were grouped into four major themes (breast cancer, colorectal cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and selected presentations from the plenary session). In addition, selected Phase I and II studies on promising novel therapeutic agents were briefly described. Finally, a 'question and answer' format was adopted to report results of interesting studies on some hot topics. PMID:17059386

  4. Review article: the design of clinical trials in hepatic encephalopathy - an International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism (ISHEN) consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, J. S.; Cordoba, J.; Mullen, K. D.; Amodio, P.; Shawcross, D. L.; Butterworth, R. F.; Morgan, M. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The clinical classification of hepatic encephalopathy is largely subjective, which has led to difficulties in designing trials in this field. Aims To review the current classification of hepatic encephalopathy and to develop consensus guidelines on the design and conduct of future clinical trials. Methods A round table was convened at the 14th International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism (ISHEN) meeting. Key discussion points were the nomenclature of hepatic encephalopathy and the selection of patients, standards of care and end-points for assessing the treatment and secondary prevention of hepatic encephalopathy. Results It was generally agreed that severity assessment of hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis, whether made clinically or more objectively, should be continuous rather than categorical, and a system for assessing the SONIC (Spectrum of Neuro-cognitive Impairment in Cirrhosis) was proposed. Within this system, patients currently classified as having minimal hepatic encephalopathy and Grade I hepatic encephalopathy would be classified as having Covert hepatic encephalopathy, whereas those with apparent clinical abnormalities would continue to be classified as overt hepatic encephalopathy. Some aspects of the terminology require further debate. Consensus was also reached on the patient populations, standards of care and endpoints to assess clinical trial outcomes. However, some compromises had to be made as there is considerable inter- and intravariability in the availability of some of the more objective surrogate performance markers. Conclusions The objectives of the round table were met. Robust, defendable guidelines for the conduct of future studies into hepatic encephalopathy have been provided. Outstanding issues are few and will continue to be discussed. PMID:21306407

  5. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement: opportunities in the patient protection and affordable care act to reduce cancer care disparities.

    PubMed

    Moy, Beverly; Polite, Blase N; Halpern, Michael T; Stranne, Steven K; Winer, Eric P; Wollins, Dana S; Newman, Lisa A

    2011-10-01

    Patients in specific vulnerable population groups suffer disproportionately from cancer. The elimination of cancer disparities is critically important for lessening the burden of cancer. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides both opportunities and challenges for addressing cancer care disparities and access to care. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) advocates for policies that ensure access to cancer care for the underserved. Such policies include insurance reform and the reduction of economic barriers to quality health care. Building on ASCO's prior statement on disparities in cancer care (2009), this article summarizes elements of the health care law that are relevant to cancer disparities and provides recommendations for addressing major provisions in the law. It outlines specific strategies to address insurance reform, access to care, quality of care, prevention and wellness, research on health care disparities, and diversity in the health care workforce. ASCO is committed to leading efforts toward the improvement of cancer care among the most vulnerable patients. PMID:21810680

  6. [Best practices for the safe use of parenteral nutrition multi-chamber bags. Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacist's Clinical Nutrition Group].

    PubMed

    Sirvent, M; Calvo, M V; Pérez-Pons, J C; Rodríguez-Penín, I; Marti-Bonmatí, E; Vázquez, A; Romero, R; Crespo, C L; Tejada, P

    2014-01-01

    Patient security is one of the key aspects of the Health-System. Parenteral Nutrition is included in the ISMP's list of high-alert medication, being its appropiate use an essential element in maximizing effectiviness while minimizing the potential risk of errors associated with its use. Multi-chamber bags offer several advantages versus pharmacy bespoke bags. However, their apparent simplicity may induce to misuse, asuming their use requires limited consideration, thus increasing the risk of potential errors. For this reason, the Spanish Society of Hospital Pharmacist's Clinical Nutrition Group considered it essential to develop a list of safety practices regarding the use of parenteral nutrition multi-chamber bags. These recommendations are based on practices globally accepted to diminish errors in PN therapy. PMID:25344132

  7. Nanobiology for the pharmacology of cellular ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kabanov, Alexander V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Khokhlov, Alexey R

    2009-03-01

    Writing this editorial is especially pleasing. First, it provides us an opportunity to introduce new directives to the field of Neuroimmune Pharmacology and to explain why the field of nanomedicine is likely an important part of its future growth and development. Second, it is an opportunity to showcase research in this area currently operative in Russia that may not be readily accessible to the readership. Third, it is a platform to better explain why the Journal Editorial leadership was enthusiastic about the science and its relationship to the Society on NeuroImmune Pharmacology strategic goals. All are brought to bear in this issue of the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology. The issue includes articles presented at a recent joint US-Russian workshop entitled, "Health in the 21st Century: Nanomedicine and Self-Organization of Biological Systems" held at M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University (MSU), Moscow, Russia, December 10-11, 2007. The conjoint meeting was organized through the Departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, MSU and by the Center for Drug Delivery and Nanomedicine and Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center (Omaha, NE). The speakers included established internationally regarded scientists from these institutions as well as graduate students and faculties at MSU. In addition to selected papers by workshop contributors, we have included several papers closely aligned to the theme of nanomedicine and nanopharmacology of the central nervous system in order to provide a biological anchor for this research. We understand that such works are new to many but hope that its organization and interdisciplinary approaches will appeal to this audience. All together, it is our hope that, by gathering basic and clinical scientists with the common interest of using nanotechnology in the delivery of therapeutic agents with a focus on nanopharmacology and complex supramolecular biological assembly, the

  8. Level of clinical evidence presented at the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy Annual Scientific Meeting over 5 years (2010-2014).

    PubMed

    Kay, Jeffrey; de Sa, Darren; Shallow, Scott; Simunovic, Nicole; Safran, Marc R; Philippon, Marc J; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2015-12-01

    The International Society for Hip Arthroscopy (ISHA) Annual Scientific Meeting is at the forefront of informing today's orthopaedic surgeons and society of the rapid advances in the exponentially growing field of hip arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and observe any trends in the level of clinical evidence in the papers and posters presented at the ISHA Annual Scientific Meeting from 2010 to 2014. The online abstracts of the paper and poster presentations presented at the ISHA Annual Scientific Meetings were independently evaluated by two reviewers (582 total resulting presentations). Two reviewers screened these results for clinical studies and graded the quality of evidence from level I (i.e. randomized trials) to IV (i.e. case series) based on the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons classification system. Four hundred and twenty-eight presentations met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Overall, 10.1% of the presentations were level I, 12.8% were level II, 30.1% were level III and 47.0% were level IV evidence. Over time, from 2010 to 2014, we observed an increase in the percentage of level II paper presentations, an increase in the proportion of level III poster presentations, and a decrease in the proportion of both level IV paper and poster presentations. Significant non-random improvement in the level of evidence presented was noted for the poster presentations (P = 0.012) but not for the paper presentations (P = 0.61) over the study period. Statistical trends demonstrate ISHA's increased awareness and commitment to presenting higher quality evidence as the availability of this evidence increases. PMID:27011857

  9. Level of clinical evidence presented at the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy Annual Scientific Meeting over 5 years (2010–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Jeffrey; de SA, Darren; Shallow, Scott; Simunovic, Nicole; Safran, Marc R.; Philippon, Marc J.; Ayeni, Olufemi R.

    2015-01-01

    The International Society for Hip Arthroscopy (ISHA) Annual Scientific Meeting is at the forefront of informing today’s orthopaedic surgeons and society of the rapid advances in the exponentially growing field of hip arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and observe any trends in the level of clinical evidence in the papers and posters presented at the ISHA Annual Scientific Meeting from 2010 to 2014. The online abstracts of the paper and poster presentations presented at the ISHA Annual Scientific Meetings were independently evaluated by two reviewers (582 total resulting presentations). Two reviewers screened these results for clinical studies and graded the quality of evidence from level I (i.e. randomized trials) to IV (i.e. case series) based on the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons classification system. Four hundred and twenty-eight presentations met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Overall, 10.1% of the presentations were level I, 12.8% were level II, 30.1% were level III and 47.0% were level IV evidence. Over time, from 2010 to 2014, we observed an increase in the percentage of level II paper presentations, an increase in the proportion of level III poster presentations, and a decrease in the proportion of both level IV paper and poster presentations. Significant non-random improvement in the level of evidence presented was noted for the poster presentations (P = 0.012) but not for the paper presentations (P = 0.61) over the study period. Statistical trends demonstrate ISHA’s increased awareness and commitment to presenting higher quality evidence as the availability of this evidence increases. PMID:27011857

  10. International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) Recommended Guidelines for Histological Endpoints for Cartilage Repair Studies in Animal Models and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hoemann, Caroline; Kandel, Rita; Roberts, Sally; Saris, Daniel B.F.; Creemers, Laura; Mainil-Varlet, Pierre; Méthot, Stephane; Hollander, Anthony P.; Buschmann, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage repair strategies aim to resurface a lesion with osteochondral tissue resembling native cartilage, but a variety of repair tissues are usually observed. Histology is an important structural outcome that could serve as an interim measure of efficacy in randomized controlled clinical studies. The purpose of this article is to propose guidelines for standardized histoprocessing and unbiased evaluation of animal tissues and human biopsies. Methods were compiled from a literature review, and illustrative data were added. In animal models, treatments are usually administered to acute defects created in healthy tissues, and the entire joint can be analyzed at multiple postoperative time points. In human clinical therapy, treatments are applied to developed lesions, and biopsies are obtained, usually from a subset of patients, at a specific time point. In striving to standardize evaluation of structural endpoints in cartilage repair studies, 5 variables should be controlled: 1) location of biopsy/sample section, 2) timing of biopsy/sample recovery, 3) histoprocessing, 4) staining, and 5) blinded evaluation with a proper control group. Histological scores, quantitative histomorphometry of repair tissue thickness, percentage of tissue staining for collagens and glycosaminoglycan, polarized light microscopy for collagen fibril organization, and subchondral bone integration/structure are all relevant outcome measures that can be collected and used to assess the efficacy of novel therapeutics. Standardized histology methods could improve statistical analyses, help interpret and validate noninvasive imaging outcomes, and permit cross-comparison between studies. Currently, there are no suitable substitutes for histology in evaluating repair tissue quality and cartilaginous character. PMID:26069577

  11. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Giralt, Sergio; Garderet, Laurent; Durie, Brian; Cook, Gordon; Gahrton, Gosta; Bruno, Benedetto; Hari, Paremesweran; Lokhorst, Henk; McCarthy, Phillip; Krishnan, Amrita; Sonneveld, Pieter; Goldschmidt, Harmut; Jagannath, Sundar; Barlogie, Bart; Mateos, Maria; Gimsing, Peter; Sezer, Orhan; Mikhael, Joseph; Lu, Jin; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Mazumder, Amitabha; Palumbo, Antonio; Abonour, Rafat; Anderson, Kenneth; Attal, Michel; Blade, Joan; Bird, Jenny; Cavo, Michele; Comenzo, Raymond; de la Rubia, Javier; Einsele, Hermann; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Hillengass, Jens; Holstein, Sarah; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Joshua, Douglas; Koehne, Guenther; Kumar, Shaji; Kyle, Robert; Leleu, Xavier; Lonial, Sagar; Ludwig, Heinz; Nahi, Hareth; Nooka, Anil; Orlowski, Robert; Rajkumar, Vincent; Reiman, Anthony; Richardson, Paul; Riva, Eloisa; Miguel, Jesus San; Turreson, Ingemar; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David; Bensinger, William; Qazilbash, Muzaffer; Efebera, Yvonne; Mohty, Mohamed; Gasparreto, Christina; Gajewski, James; LeMaistre, Charles F.; Bredeson, Chris; Moreau, Phillipe; Pasquini, Marcelo; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Stadtmauer, Edward

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the upfront setting in which the role of high-dose therapy with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as consolidation of a first remission in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is well established, the role of high-dose therapy with autologous or allogeneic HCT has not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation convened a meeting of MM experts to: (1) summarize current knowledge regarding the role of autologous or allogeneic HCT in MM patients progressing after primary therapy, (2) propose guidelines for the use of salvage HCT in MM, (3) identify knowledge gaps, (4) propose a research agenda, and (5) develop a collaborative initiative to move the research agenda forward. After reviewing the available data, the expert committee came to the following consensus statement for salvage autologous HCT: (1) In transplantation-eligible patients relapsing after primary therapy that did NOT include an autologous HCT, high-dose therapy with HCT as part of salvage therapy should be considered standard; (2) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT should be considered appropriate therapy for any patients relapsing after primary therapy that includes an autologous HCT with initial remission duration of more than 18 months; (3) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT can be used as a bridging strategy to allogeneic HCT; (4) The role of postsalvage HCT maintenance needs to be explored in the context of well-designed prospective trials that should include new agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, immune-modulating agents, and oral proteasome inhibitors; (5) Autologous HCT consolidation should be explored as a strategy to develop novel conditioning regimens or post-HCT strategies in patients with short

  12. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Giralt, Sergio; Garderet, Laurent; Durie, Brian; Cook, Gordon; Gahrton, Gosta; Bruno, Benedetto; Hari, Paremesweran; Lokhorst, Henk; McCarthy, Phillip; Krishnan, Amrita; Sonneveld, Pieter; Goldschmidt, Harmut; Jagannath, Sundar; Barlogie, Bart; Mateos, Maria; Gimsing, Peter; Sezer, Orhan; Mikhael, Joseph; Lu, Jin; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Mazumder, Amitabha; Palumbo, Antonio; Abonour, Rafat; Anderson, Kenneth; Attal, Michel; Blade, Joan; Bird, Jenny; Cavo, Michele; Comenzo, Raymond; de la Rubia, Javier; Einsele, Hermann; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Hillengass, Jens; Holstein, Sarah; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Joshua, Douglas; Koehne, Guenther; Kumar, Shaji; Kyle, Robert; Leleu, Xavier; Lonial, Sagar; Ludwig, Heinz; Nahi, Hareth; Nooka, Anil; Orlowski, Robert; Rajkumar, Vincent; Reiman, Anthony; Richardson, Paul; Riva, Eloisa; San Miguel, Jesus; Turreson, Ingemar; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David; Bensinger, William; Qazilbash, Muzaffer; Efebera, Yvonne; Mohty, Mohamed; Gasparreto, Christina; Gajewski, James; LeMaistre, Charles F; Bredeson, Chris; Moreau, Phillipe; Pasquini, Marcelo; Kroeger, Nicolaus; Stadtmauer, Edward

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to the upfront setting in which the role of high-dose therapy with autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as consolidation of a first remission in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is well established, the role of high-dose therapy with autologous or allogeneic HCT has not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation convened a meeting of MM experts to: (1) summarize current knowledge regarding the role of autologous or allogeneic HCT in MM patients progressing after primary therapy, (2) propose guidelines for the use of salvage HCT in MM, (3) identify knowledge gaps, (4) propose a research agenda, and (5) develop a collaborative initiative to move the research agenda forward. After reviewing the available data, the expert committee came to the following consensus statement for salvage autologous HCT: (1) In transplantation-eligible patients relapsing after primary therapy that did NOT include an autologous HCT, high-dose therapy with HCT as part of salvage therapy should be considered standard; (2) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT should be considered appropriate therapy for any patients relapsing after primary therapy that includes an autologous HCT with initial remission duration of more than 18 months; (3) High-dose therapy and autologous HCT can be used as a bridging strategy to allogeneic HCT; (4) The role of postsalvage HCT maintenance needs to be explored in the context of well-designed prospective trials that should include new agents, such as monoclonal antibodies, immune-modulating agents, and oral proteasome inhibitors; (5) Autologous HCT consolidation should be explored as a strategy to develop novel conditioning regimens or post-HCT strategies in patients with short

  13. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A; Welsh, Jessemae L; Sibenaller, Zita A; Allen, Bryan G; Wagner, Brett A; Kalen, Amanda L; Doskey, Claire M; Strother, Robert K; Button, Anna M; Mott, Sarah L; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C; Spitz, Douglas R; Buettner, Garry R; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-08-15

    The toxicity of pharmacologic ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Because pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate, they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacologic ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in nontumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacologic ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacologic ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  14. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A.; Welsh, Jessemae L.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Allen, Bryan G.; Wagner, Brett A.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Doskey, Claire M.; Strother, Robert K.; Button, Anna M.; Mott, Sarah L.; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Buettner, Garry R.; Cullen, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of pharmacological ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Since pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacological ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in non-tumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacological ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacological ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  15. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands.

    PubMed

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J; Alexander, Stephen P H; Buneman, O Peter; Davenport, Anthony P; McGrath, John C; Peters, John A; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A

    2016-01-01

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options. PMID:26464438

  16. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY in 2016: towards curated quantitative interactions between 1300 protein targets and 6000 ligands

    PubMed Central

    Southan, Christopher; Sharman, Joanna L.; Benson, Helen E.; Faccenda, Elena; Pawson, Adam J.; Alexander, Stephen P. H.; Buneman, O. Peter; Davenport, Anthony P.; McGrath, John C.; Peters, John A.; Spedding, Michael; Catterall, William A.; Fabbro, Doriano; Davies, Jamie A.

    2016-01-01

    The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (GtoPdb, http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) provides expert-curated molecular interactions between successful and potential drugs and their targets in the human genome. Developed by the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (IUPHAR) and the British Pharmacological Society (BPS), this resource, and its earlier incarnation as IUPHAR-DB, is described in our 2014 publication. This update incorporates changes over the intervening seven database releases. The unique model of content capture is based on established and new target class subcommittees collaborating with in-house curators. Most information comes from journal articles, but we now also index kinase cross-screening panels. Targets are specified by UniProtKB IDs. Small molecules are defined by PubChem Compound Identifiers (CIDs); ligand capture also includes peptides and clinical antibodies. We have extended the capture of ligands and targets linked via published quantitative binding data (e.g. Ki, IC50 or Kd). The resulting pharmacological relationship network now defines a data-supported druggable genome encompassing 7% of human proteins. The database also provides an expanded substrate for the biennially published compendium, the Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY. This article covers content increase, entity analysis, revised curation strategies, new website features and expanded download options. PMID:26464438

  17. Optimizing pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--practical issues: a Canadian Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    PubMed

    Marciniuk, Darcy D; Brooks, Dina; Butcher, Scott; Debigare, Richard; Dechman, Gail; Ford, Gordon; Pepin, Veronique; Reid, Darlene; Sheel, Andrew W; Stickland, Micheal K; Todd, David C; Walker, Shannon L; Aaron, Shawn D; Balter, Meyer; Bourbeau, Jean; Hernandez, Paul; Maltais, Francois; O'Donnell, Denis E; Bleakney, Donna; Carlin, Brian; Goldstein, Roger; Muthuri, Stella K

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) participation is the standard of care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who remain symptomatic despite bronchodilator therapies. However, there are questions about specific aspects of PR programming including optimal site of rehabilitation delivery, components of rehabilitation programming, duration of rehabilitation, target populations and timing of rehabilitation. The present document was compiled to specifically address these important clinical issues, using an evidence-based, systematic review process led by a representative interprofessional panel of experts. The evidence reveals there are no differences in major patient-related outcomes of PR between nonhospital- (community or home sites) or hospital-based sites. There is strong support to recommend that COPD patients initiate PR within one month following an acute exacerbation due to benefits of improved dyspnea, exercise tolerance and health-related quality of life relative to usual care. Moreover, the benefits of PR are evident in both men and women, and in patients with moderate, severe and very severe COPD. The current review also suggests that longer PR programs, beyond six to eight weeks duration, be provided for COPD patients, and that while aerobic training is the foundation of PR, endurance and functional ability may be further improved with both aerobic and resistance training. PMID:20808973

  18. Integrating Behavioral and Pharmacological Therapeutic Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Samuel F.

    1986-01-01

    Fear of dental procedures and associated anxiety are widely accepted as important deterents to optimal oral health. Such health care-related fears and anxieties are also common in many areas of medicine. For both medical and dental care a large body of psychologically derived therapeutic modalities have evolved. These methods have been shown to interact positively with pharmacological therapies also designed to help patients better tolerate medical and dental treatment. Despite these findings, behavioral interventions have not found widespread acceptance in medical and dental practice. A multidimensional model which emphasizes the simultaneous consideration of pharmacologic, psychologic, and clinical dental factors is suggested in order to arrive at therapeutic decisions. Further research could address more powerful behavioral modalities, safer pharmacologic methods, and behavioral and pharmacologic combinations which interact optimally for particular clinical conditions. PMID:3458386

  19. An Official American Thoracic Society Clinical Practice Guideline: Diagnosis, Risk Stratification, and Management of Pulmonary Hypertension of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Klings, Elizabeth S.; Machado, Roberto F.; Barst, Robyn J.; Morris, Claudia R.; Mubarak, Kamal K.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Kato, Gregory J.; Ataga, Kenneth I.; Gibbs, J. Simon; Castro, Oswaldo; Rosenzweig, Erika B.; Sood, Namita; Hsu, Lewis; Wilson, Kevin C.; Telen, Marilyn J.; DeCastro, Laura M.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Steinberg, Martin H.; Badesch, David B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In adults with sickle cell disease (SCD), an increased tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) measured by Doppler echocardiography, an increased serum N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) level, and pulmonary hypertension (PH) diagnosed by right heart catheterization (RHC) are independent risk factors for mortality. Methods: A multidisciplinary committee was formed by clinician-investigators experienced in the management of patients with PH and/or SCD. Clinically important questions were posed, related evidence was appraised, and questions were answered with evidence-based recommendations. Target audiences include all clinicians who take care of patients with SCD. Results: Mortality risk stratification guides decision making. An increased risk for mortality is defined as a TRV equal to or greater than 2.5 m/second, an NT-pro-BNP level equal to or greater than 160 pg/ml, or RHC-confirmed PH. For patients identified as having increased mortality risk, we make a strong recommendation for hydroxyurea as first-line therapy and a weak recommendation for chronic transfusions as an alternative therapy. For all patients with SCD with elevated TRV alone or elevated NT-pro-BNP alone, and for patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH with elevated pulmonary artery wedge pressure and low pulmonary vascular resistance, we make a strong recommendation against PAH-specific therapy. However, for select patients with SCD with RHC-confirmed PH who have elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, we make a weak recommendation for either prostacyclin agonist or endothelin receptor antagonist therapy and a strong recommendation against phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor therapy. Conclusions: Evidence-based recommendations for the management of patients with SCD with increased mortality risk are provided, but will require frequent reassessment and updating. PMID:24628312

  20. ENDOTHELIAL KERATOPLASTY: CLINICAL OUTCOMES IN THE TWO YEARS FOLLOWING DEEP LAMELLAR ENDOTHELIAL KERATOPLASTY (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcome of small-incision, deep lamellar endothelial keratoplasty (DLEK) for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction. Methods A prospective series of 79 eyes that underwent DLEK by a single surgeon was evaluated. Best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), refractive astigmatism, and central endothelial cell density (ECD) were measured preoperatively and at 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Data was available on 78 eyes (99%) at 6 months, 77 eyes (97%) at 1 year, and 79 eyes (100%) at 2 years. Mean BSCVA preoperatively of 20/71 improved to 20/42 by 6 months and remained stable. Eliminating eyes with known retinal disease, BSCVA of 20/40 or better was present in 60% (40 of 67) of eyes at 6 months, 74% (49 of 66) of eyes at 1 year, and 79% (53 of 68) of eyes at 2 years. Refractive astigmatism preoperatively was .91 ±.78 diopters and was unchanged by surgery over time with results at 6 months of 1.11 ±.76 (P = .052, power = .43), 1 year 1.04 ±.80 (P =.287, power = .06), and 2 years 1.10 ±.70 (P =.467, power = .22). The mean donor ECD preoperatively was 2819 ± 225 (2389 to 3385) cells/mm2, and this decreased by 26% at 6 months (2095 ± 380) (1097 to 2920) (P = .0001; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 643–809), 3% fewer at 1 year (2009 ± 393) (612 to 2723) (P = .054, power = .5), and 17% fewer at 2 years (1536 ± 547) (500 to 2546) (P < .001, 95% CI = 368–585). Complications included one primary graft failure and 4 dislocations into the anterior chamber. Conclusions DLEK provides improved vision and minimal refractive astigmatic change, but progressive ECD decrease over time is of concern. PMID:18427629

  1. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists Guideline Recommendations for Immunohistochemical Testing of Estrogen and Progesterone Receptors in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Dowsett, Mitch; Allred, D. Craig; Hagerty, Karen L.; Badve, Sunil; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L.; Francis, Glenn; Goldstein, Neil S.; Hayes, Malcolm; Hicks, David G.; Lester, Susan; Love, Richard; Mangu, Pamela B.; McShane, Lisa; Miller, Keith; Osborne, C. Kent; Paik, Soonmyung; Perlmutter, Jane; Rhodes, Anthony; Sasano, Hironobu; Schwartz, Jared N.; Sweep, Fred C. G.; Taube, Sheila; Torlakovic, Emina Emilia; Valenstein, Paul; Viale, Giuseppe; Visscher, Daniel; Wheeler, Thomas; Williams, R. Bruce; Wittliff, James L.; Wolff, Antonio C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. Methods The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists convened an international Expert Panel that conducted a systematic review and evaluation of the literature in partnership with Cancer Care Ontario and developed recommendations for optimal IHC ER/PgR testing performance. Results Up to 20% of current IHC determinations of ER and PgR testing worldwide may be inaccurate (false negative or false positive). Most of the issues with testing have occurred because of variation in preanalytic variables, thresholds for positivity, and interpretation criteria. Recommendations The Panel recommends that ER and PgR status be determined on all invasive breast cancers and breast cancer recurrences. A testing algorithm that relies on accurate, reproducible assay performance is proposed. Elements to reliably reduce assay variation are specified. It is recommended that ER and PgR assays be considered positive if there are at least 1% positive tumor nuclei in the sample on testing in the presence of expected reactivity of internal (normal epithelial elements) and external controls. The absence of benefit from endocrine therapy for women with ER-negative invasive breast cancers has been confirmed in large overviews of randomized clinical trials. PMID:20524868

  2. Diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment of invasive infections due to multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Cisneros, José Miguel; Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Fresco, Gema; Navarro-San Francisco, Carolina; Gudiol, Carlota; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; López-Cerero, Lorena; Martínez, José Antonio; Molina, José; Montero, Milagro; Paño-Pardo, José R; Pascual, Alvaro; Peña, Carmen; Pintado, Vicente; Retamar, Pilar; Tomás, María; Borges-Sa, Marcio; Garnacho-Montero, José; Bou, Germán

    2015-05-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae related to the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenemases is a serious public health problem worldwide. Microbiological diagnosis and therapy of these infections are challenging and controversial. Clinically relevant questions were selected and the literature was reviewed for each of them. The information from the selected articles was extracted and recommendations were provided and graded according to the strength of the recommendations and quality of the evidence. The document was opened to comments from the members from the Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, which were considered for inclusion in the final version. Evidence-based recommendations are provided for the use of microbiological techniques for the detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenemases in Enterobacteriaceae, and for antibiotic therapy for invasive/severe infections caused by these organisms. The absence of randomised controlled trials is noteworthy; thus, recommendations are mainly based on observational studies (that have important methodological limitations), pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics models, and data from animal studies. Additionally, areas for future research were identified. PMID:25600218

  3. Studies in neuroendocrine pharmacology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maickel, R. P.

    1976-01-01

    The expertise and facilities available within the Medical Sciences Program section on Pharmacology were used along with informational input from various NASA sources to study areas relevant to the manned space effort. Topics discussed include effects of drugs on deprivation-induced fluid consumption, brain biogenic amines, biochemical responses to stressful stimuli, biochemical and behavioral pharmacology of amphetamines, biochemical and pharmacological studies of analogues to biologically active indole compounds, chemical pharmacology: drug metabolism and disposition, toxicology, and chemical methodology. Appendices include a bibliography, and papers submitted for publication or already published.

  4. Description of an injury in a human caused by a false tocandira (Dinoponera gigantea, Perty, 1833) with a revision on folkloric, pharmacological and clinical aspects of the giant ants of the genera Paraponera and Dinoponera (sub-family Ponerinae).

    PubMed

    Haddad Junior, Vidal; Cardoso, João Luiz Costa; Moraes, Roberto Henrique Pinto

    2005-01-01

    The authors observed an injury caused by the sting of a false tocandira ant in the hand of an amateur fisherman and they describe the clinical findings and the evolution of the envenoming, which presented an acute and violent pain, cold sweating, nausea, a vomiting episode, malaise, tachycardia and left axillary's lymphadenopathy. About three hours after the accident, still feeling intense pain in the place of the sting, he presented an episode of great amount of blood in the feces with no history of digestive, hematological or vascular problems. The intense pain decreased after eight hours, but the place stayed moderately painful for about 24 hours. In that moment, he presented small grade of local edema and erythema. The authors still present the folkloric, pharmacological and clinical aspects related to the tocandiras stings, a very interesting family of ants, which presents the largest and more venomous ants of the world. PMID:16138209

  5. Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Women With Hormone Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Focused Update

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Harold J.; Temin, Sarah; Anderson, Holly; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Gelmon, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Rowden, Diana; Solky, Alexander J.; Stearns, Vered; Winer, Eric P.; Griggs, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO clinical practice guideline on adjuvant endocrine therapy on the basis of emerging data on the optimal duration of treatment, particularly adjuvant tamoxifen. Methods ASCO convened the Update Committee and conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials from January 2009 to June 2013 and analyzed three historical trials. Guideline recommendations were based on the Update Committee's review of the evidence. Outcomes of interest included survival, disease recurrence, and adverse events. Results This guideline update reflects emerging data on duration of tamoxifen treatment. There have been five studies of tamoxifen treatment beyond 5 years of therapy. The two largest studies with longest reported follow-up show a breast cancer survival advantage with 10-year durations of tamoxifen use. In addition to modest gains in survival, extended therapy with tamoxifen for 10 years compared with 5 years was associated with lower risks of breast cancer recurrence and contralateral breast cancer. Recommendations Previous ASCO guidelines recommended treatment of women who have hormone receptor–positive breast cancer and are premenopausal with 5 years of tamoxifen, and those who are postmenopausal a minimum of 5 years of adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor or tamoxifen followed by an aromatase inhibitor (in sequence). If women are pre- or perimenopausal and have received 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen, they should be offered 10 years total duration of tamoxifen. If women are postmenopausal and have received 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen, they should be offered the choice of continuing tamoxifen or switching to an aromatase inhibitor for 10 years total adjuvant endocrine therapy. PMID:24868023

  6. Screening, Assessment, and Management of Fatigue in Adult Survivors of Cancer: An American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Julienne E.; Bak, Kate; Berger, Ann; Breitbart, William; Escalante, Carmelita P.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Schnipper, Hester Hill; Lacchetti, Christina; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Lyman, Gary H.; Ogaily, Mohammed S.; Pirl, William F.; Jacobsen, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This guideline presents screening, assessment, and treatment approaches for the management of adult cancer survivors who are experiencing symptoms of fatigue after completion of primary treatment. Methods A systematic search of clinical practice guideline databases, guideline developer Web sites, and published health literature identified the pan-Canadian guideline on screening, assessment, and care of cancer-related fatigue in adults with cancer, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) Clinical Practice Guidelines In Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Cancer-Related Fatigue and the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship. These three guidelines were appraised and selected for adaptation. Results It is recommended that all patients with cancer be evaluated for the presence of fatigue after completion of primary treatment and be offered specific information and strategies for fatigue management. For those who report moderate to severe fatigue, comprehensive assessment should be conducted, and medical and treatable contributing factors should be addressed. In terms of treatment strategies, evidence indicates that physical activity interventions, psychosocial interventions, and mind-body interventions may reduce cancer-related fatigue in post-treatment patients. There is limited evidence for use of psychostimulants in the management of fatigue in patients who are disease free after active treatment. Conclusion Fatigue is prevalent in cancer survivors and often causes significant disruption in functioning and quality of life. Regular screening, assessment, and education and appropriate treatment of fatigue are important in managing this distressing symptom. Given the multiple factors contributing to post-treatment fatigue, interventions should be tailored to each patient's specific needs. In particular, a number of nonpharmacologic treatment approaches have demonstrated efficacy in cancer survivors. PMID:24733803

  7. Pharmacological Treatment Effects on Eye Movement Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, James L.; Lencer, Rebekka; Bishop, Jeffrey R.; Keedy, Sarah; Sweeney, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing use of eye movement paradigms to assess the functional integrity of brain systems involved in sensorimotor and cognitive processing in clinical disorders requires greater attention to effects of pharmacological treatments on these systems. This is needed to better differentiate disease and medication effects in clinical samples, to…

  8. The clinical practice patterns of fetal ultrasonography in the first-trimester: A questionnaire survey of members of the Korean Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kun Woo; Kwak, Dong Wook; Ko, Hyun Sun; Park, Hyun Soo; Seol, Hyun Joo; Hong, Joon Seok; Yang, Seung Woo; Oh, Soo Young; Kim, Moon Young; Kim, Sa Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to survey the current clinical practice of first-trimester ultrasonography among members of the Korean Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology (KSUOG) and to provide basic data for making practical recommendations about first-trimester ultrasonography scan in Korea. Methods This survey was conducted using a self-administered anonymous questionnaire. The first-trimester in this survey was divided into two parts: early and late first-trimester. The survey was focused on safety issue, nuchal translucency (NT) cutoff, the anatomic structures they check, and the need for practical recommendations or educational courses during the first-trimester. Results During the study period, 194 KSUOG members participated into this survey. The survey on early first-trimester scan reveal that 173 (89.2%) of respondents had used pulsed-wave Doppler or color Doppler imaging to monitor fetal heart beat. For the late first-trimester scan, 145 (74.7%) of respondents was found to check for fetal anatomical assessments during their NT screening performance; however, the clinical practice patterns were considerably varied among participants. More than half of the respondents used the criterion of NT ≥3.0 mm to define increased NT. Approximately 80% of respondents stated that the screening ultrasonography of fetal structures in the first-trimester was necessary. Furthermore, 187 (96.4%) of respondents were in favor of a recommendation for first-trimester ultrasonography in Korea. Conclusion This is the first survey of the current clinical practice of first-trimester ultrasonography in Korea. Our survey findings highlight the need for the practical recommendation or educational course for first-trimester ultrasonography. PMID:25469332

  9. International Society for Cellular Therapy perspective on immune functional assays for mesenchymal stromal cells as potency release criterion for advanced phase clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, Jacques; Krampera, Mauro; Barrett, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Deans, Robert J; DeBruijn, Joost; Dominici, Massimo; Fibbe, Willem E; Gee, Adrian P; Gimble, Jeffery M; Hematti, Peiman; Koh, Mickey B C; LeBlanc, Katarina; Martin, Ivan; McNiece, Ian K; Mendicino, Michael; Oh, Steve; Ortiz, Luis; Phinney, Donald G; Planat, Valerie; Shi, Yufang; Stroncek, David F; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Weiss, Daniel J; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as a pharmaceutical for ailments characterized by pathogenic autoimmune, alloimmune and inflammatory processes now cover the spectrum of early- to late-phase clinical trials in both industry and academic sponsored studies. There is a broad consensus that despite different tissue sourcing and varied culture expansion protocols, human MSC-like cell products likely share fundamental mechanisms of action mediating their anti-inflammatory and tissue repair functionalities. Identification of functional markers of potency and reduction to practice of standardized, easily deployable methods of measurements of such would benefit the field. This would satisfy both mechanistic research as well as development of release potency assays to meet Regulatory Authority requirements for conduct of advanced clinical studies and their eventual registration. In response to this unmet need, the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) addressed the issue at an international workshop in May 2015 as part of the 21st ISCT annual meeting in Las Vegas. The scope of the workshop was focused on discussing potency assays germane to immunomodulation by MSC-like products in clinical indications targeting immune disorders. We here provide consensus perspective arising from this forum. We propose that focused analysis of selected MSC markers robustly deployed by in vitro licensing and metricized with a matrix of assays should be responsive to requirements from Regulatory Authorities. Workshop participants identified three preferred analytic methods that could inform a matrix assay approach: quantitative RNA analysis of selected gene products; flow cytometry analysis of functionally relevant surface markers and protein-based assay of secretome. We also advocate that potency assays acceptable to the Regulatory Authorities be rendered publicly accessible in an "open-access" manner, such as through publication or database collection. PMID:26724220

  10. International Society for Cellular Therapy perspective on immune functional assays for mesenchymal stromal cells as potency release criterion for advanced phase clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Galipeau, Jacques; Krampera, Mauro; Barrett, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Deans, Robert J.; Debruijn, Joost; Dominici, Massimo; Fibbe, Willem E.; Gee, Adrian P.; Gimble, Jeffery M.; Hematti, Peiman; Koh, Mickey B.C.; Leblanc, Katarina; Martin, Ivan; Mcniece, Ian K.; Mendicino, Michael; Oh, Steve; Ortiz, Luis; Phinney, Donald G.; Planat, Valerie; Shi, Yufang; Stroncek, David F.; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Weiss, Daniel J.; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as a pharmaceutical for ailments characterized by pathogenic autoimmune, alloimmune and inflammatory processes now cover the spectrum of early- to late-phase clinical trials in both industry and academic sponsored studies. There is a broad consensus that despite different tissue sourcing and varied culture expansion protocols, human MSC-like cell products likely share fundamental mechanisms of action mediating their anti-inflammatory and tissue repair functionalities. Identification of functional markers of potency and reduction to practice of standardized, easily deployable methods of measurements of such would benefit the field. This would satisfy both mechanistic research as well as development of release potency assays to meet Regulatory Authority requirements for conduct of advanced clinical studies and their eventual registration. In response to this unmet need, the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) addressed the issue at an international workshop in May 2015 as part of the 21st ISCT annual meeting in Las Vegas. The scope of the workshop was focused on discussing potency assays germane to immunomodulation by MSC-like products in clinical indications targeting immune disorders. We here provide consensus perspective arising from this forum. We propose that focused analysis of selected MSC markers robustly deployed by in vitro licensing and metricized with a matrix of assays should be responsive to requirements from Regulatory Authorities. Workshop participants identified three preferred analytic methods that could inform a matrix assay approach: quantitative RNA analysis of selected gene products; flow cytometry analysis of functionally relevant surface markers and protein-based assay of secretome. We also advocate that potency assays acceptable to the Regulatory Authorities be rendered publicly accessible in an “open-access” manner, such as through publication or database collection. PMID:26724220

  11. Curriculum Guidelines for Pharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Pharmacology embraces the physical and chemical properties of drugs; the preparation of pharmaceutical agents; the absorption, fate, and excretion of drugs; and the effects of drugs on living systems. These guidelines represent a consensus on what would constitute a minimally acceptable pharmacology course for predoctoral dental students. (MLW)

  12. Pharmacology Information System Ready

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the development and future of Prophet,'' a specialized information handling system for pharmacology research. It is designed to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge about mechanisms of drug action, and it is hoped that it will aid in converting pharmacology research from an empirical to a predictive science. (JR)

  13. Pharmacology for the Psychotherapist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Myron Michael

    This book covers those areas of pharmacology that are of importance and interest to the psychotherapist. The 1st chapter introduces the various types of drugs. The 2nd chapter presents an overview of pharmacology and its principles. The 3rd chapter reviews aspects of the human body of importance to understanding the workings of psychotropic drugs.…

  14. Nurse Practitioner Pharmacology Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waigandt, Alex; Chang, Jane

    A study compared the pharmacology training of nurse practitioner programs with medical and dental programs. Seventy-three schools in 14 states (40 nurse practitioner programs, 19 schools of medicine, and 14 schools of dentistry) were surveyed by mailed questionnaire about the number of hours devoted to the study of pharmacology. The major findings…

  15. Pharmacology of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2004-01-01

    Dronabinol (Delta 9-tetrahydocannabinol, THC), the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the use of cannabis, is an agonist to both the CB1 and the CB2 subtype of cannabinoid receptors. It is available on prescription in several countries. The non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), some analogues of natural cannabinoids and their metabolites, antagonists at the cannabinoid receptors and modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoid receptors are distributed in the central nervous system and many peripheral tissues including spleen, leukocytes; reproductive, urinary and gastrointestinal tracts; endocrine glands, arteries and heart. Five endogenous cannabinoids have been detected so far, of whom anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol are best characterized. There is evidence that besides the two cannabinoid receptor subtypes cloned so far additional cannabinoid receptor subtypes and vanilloid receptors are involved in the complex physiological functions of the cannabinoid system that include motor coordination, memory procession, control of appetite, pain modulation and neuroprotection. Strategies to modulate their activity include inhibition of re-uptake into cells and inhibition of their degradation to increase concentration and duration of action. Properties of cannabinoids that might be of therapeutic use include analgesia, muscle relaxation, immunosuppression, anti-inflammation, anti-allergic effects, sedation, improvement of mood, stimulation of appetite, anti-emesis, lowering of intraocular pressure, bronchodilation, neuroprotection and antineoplastic effects. PMID:15159677

  16. Psychotherapy in a Pluralistic Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisson, Lee Hansen

    A new model for psychotherapy, mandated by current evolution to a pluralistic society, is proposed in this paper. After describing the Big Island of Hawaii as a microcosm of pluralistic society, the author discusses her clinical and educational practice and explores the multi-ethnic population. An individual assessment and treatment matrix is…

  17. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  18. Methodological background and strategy for the 2012-2013 updated consensus definitions and clinical practice guidelines from the abdominal compartment society.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Roberts, Derek J; Jaeschke, Roman; De Waele, Jan J; De Keulenaer, Bart L; Duchesne, Juan; Bjorck, Martin; Leppäniemi, Ari; Ejike, Janeth C; Sugrue, Michael; Cheatham, Michael L; Ivatury, Rao; Ball, Chad G; Reintam Blaser, Annika; Regli, Adrian; Balogh, Zsolt; D'Amours, Scott; De Laet, Inneke; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    The Abdominal Compartment Society (www.wsacs.org) previously created highly cited Consensus Definitions/Management Guidelines related to intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS). Implicit in this previous work, was a commitment to regularly reassess and update in relation to evolving research. Two years preceding the Fifth World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome, an International Guidelines committee began preparation. An oversight/steering committee formulated key clinical questions regarding IAH/ /ACS based on polling of the Executive to redundancy, structured according to the Patient, Intervention, Comparator, and Outcome (PICO) format. Scientific consultations were obtained from Methodological GRADE experts and a series of educational teleconferences were conducted to educate scientific review teams from among the wscacs. org membership. Each team conducted systematic or structured reviews to identify relevant studies and prepared evidence summaries and draft Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) recommendations. The evidence and draft recommendations were presented and debated in person over four days. Updated consensus definitions and management statements were derived using a modified Delphi method. A writingcommittee subsequently compiled the results utilizing frequent Internet discussion and Delphi voting methods to compile a robust online Master Report and a concise peer-reviewed summarizing publication. A dedicated Paediatric Guidelines Subcommittee reviewed all recommendations and either accepted or revised them for appropriateness in children. Of the original 12 IAH/ACS definitions proposed in 2006, three (25%) were accepted unanimously, with four (33%) accepted by > 80%, and four (33%) accepted by > 50%, but required discussion to produce revised definitions. One (8%) was rejected by > 50%. In addition to previous 2006 definitions, the panel also defined the open abdomen

  19. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-02-01

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include e-cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or formers smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the public's health; however, definitive data are lacking. AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the FDA and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. PMID:25573384

  20. Clinical trials update from European Society of Cardiology meeting 2008: TIME-CHF, BACH, BEAUTIFUL, GISSI-HF, and HOME-HF.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Alison P; Cullington, Damien; Clark, Andrew L; Cleland, John G F

    2008-12-01

    This article provides information and a commentary on trials relevant to the pathophysiology, prevention and treatment of heart failure presented at the European Society of Cardiology meeting which was held in Munich, Germany from 30th August to 3rd September 2008. Unpublished reports should be considered as preliminary, as analyses may change in the final publication. The TIME-CHF study failed to show that BNP guided therapy was superior to usual care in patients with heart failure. The BACH study suggested that a new biomarker, MR-proANP, was as good as BNP for the diagnosis of heart failure in patients presenting with breathlessness. Ivabradine failed to reduce the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular systolic dysfunction in the BEAUTIFUL study, but patients with higher heart rates might have benefited. In GISSI-HF, n-3 PUFA reduced mortality and cardiovascular hospitalisation by a small amount compared to placebo in patients with chronic heart failure, but rosuvastatin had no effect on clinical outcomes. In the HOME-HF study, telemonitoring support failed to reduce the time to first re-hospitalisation or death, or days alive and out of hospital, compared with usual care. PMID:19008149

  1. Guidelines on the use of therapeutic apheresis in clinical practice-evidence-based approach from the Writing Committee of the American Society for Apheresis: the sixth special issue.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Joseph; Winters, Jeffrey L; Padmanabhan, Anand; Balogun, Rasheed A; Delaney, Meghan; Linenberger, Michael L; Szczepiorkowski, Zbigniew M; Williams, Mark E; Wu, Yanyun; Shaz, Beth H

    2013-07-01

    The American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) JCA Special Issue Writing Committee is charged with reviewing, updating and categorizating indications for therapeutic apheresis. Beginning with the 2007 ASFA Special Issue (Fourth Edition), the committee has incorporated systematic review and evidence-based approach in the grading and categorization of indications. This Sixth Edition of the ASFA Special Issue has further improved the process of using evidence-based medicine in the recommendations by consistently applying the category and GRADE system definitions, but eliminating the "level of evidence" criteria (from the University HealthCare Consortium) utilized in prior editions given redundancy between GRADE and University HealthCare Consortium systems. The general layout and concept of a fact sheet that was utilized in the Fourth and Fifth Editions, has been largely maintained in this edition. Each fact sheet succinctly summarizes the evidence for the use of therapeutic apheresis in a specific disease entity. This article consists of 78 fact sheets (increased from 2010) for therapeutic indications in ASFA categories I through IV, with many diseases categorized having multiple clinical presentations/situations which are individually graded and categorized. PMID:23868759

  2. Validation of International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading for prostatic adenocarcinoma in thin core biopsies using TROG 03.04 'RADAR' trial clinical data.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, B; Egevad, L; Srigley, J R; Steigler, A; Murray, J D; Atkinson, C; Matthews, J; Duchesne, G; Spry, N A; Christie, D; Joseph, D; Attia, J; Denham, J W

    2015-10-01

    In 2014 a consensus conference convened by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) adopted amendments to the criteria for Gleason grading and scoring (GS) for prostatic adenocarcinoma. The meeting defined a modified grading system based on 5 grading categories (grade 1, GS 3+3; grade 2, GS 3+4; grade 3, GS 4+3; grade 4, GS 8; grade 5, GS 9-10). In this study we have evaluated the prognostic significance of ISUP grading in 496 patients enrolled in the TROG 03.04 RADAR Trial. There were 19 grade 1, 118 grade 2, 193 grade 3, 88 grade 4 and 79 grade 5 tumours in the series, with follow-up for a minimum of 6.5 years. On follow-up 76 patients experienced distant progression of disease, 171 prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression and 39 prostate cancer deaths. In contrast to the 2005 modified Gleason system (MGS), the hazards of the distant and PSA progression endpoints, relative to grade 2, were significantly greater for grades 3, 4 and 5 of the 2014 ISUP grading scheme. Comparison of predictive ability utilising Harrell's concordance index, showed 2014 ISUP grading to significantly out-perform 2005 MGS grading for each of the three clinical endpoints. PMID:26325671

  3. Quality management of clinical-practical instruction for Practical Year medical students in Germany – Proposal for a catalogue of criteria from the German Society of Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Raes, Patricia; Angstwurm, Matthias; Berberat, Pascal; Kadmon, Martina; Rotgans, Jerome; Streitlein-Böhme, Irmgard; Burckhardt, Gerhard; Fischer, Martin R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Amended in 2013, the current version of the German Medical Licensure Regulation contains structural specifications that are also required of non-university institutions involved in Practical Year clinical training. The criteria are worded in relatively general terms. Furthermore, not all of the structural specifications can be readily applied to every subject area. In order to ensure commensurability in Practical Year instruction in Germany, not least in light of recently introduced Practical Year mobility, it is necessary to define consistent quality criteria for Practical Year training. The authors therefore propose a catalogue of criteria for the quality management process in Practical Year instruction facilities. Methods: In January 2014, the board of directors of the German Society for Medical Education decided to establish a committee comprised of representatives from various German medical faculties. In a process similar to the Delphi methodology, the group developed criteria for structure, process and outcome quality in Practical Year training in Germany. Results: The criteria developed for structure, process and outcome quality apply to Practical Year training in academic teaching hospitals and university medical centres. Furthermore, modalities for review are proposed. Conclusions: The present catalogue of criteria is intended to contribute to the formation of a basis for the most consistent quality standards possible for Practical Year instruction in Germany. PMID:25489349

  4. Validation of the Andon KD595 for clinical use and self-measurement according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ning; Zhang, Xuezhong; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Hongye

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the automated oscillometric upper arm blood pressure monitor Andon KD595 for home blood pressure monitoring according to the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were sequentially measured in 33 participants using the standard mercury sphygmomanometer and the Andon KD595 device. Ninety-nine pairs of comparisons were obtained from 33 participants for analysis. The KD595 device achieved the targets in part 1 of the validation study. The number of absolute differences between the device and the observers within a range of 5, 10, and 15 mmHg was 72/99, 93/99, and 96/99, respectively, for SBP and 72/99, 96/99, and 99/99, respectively, for DBP. The device also achieved the targets in part 2 of the validation study. A total of 28 and 25 participants had at least two of the three device-observer differences within 5 mmHg (required≥24) for SBP and DBP, respectively. The number of participants without device-observer difference within 5 mmHg was two for SBP and two for DBP (required≤3). The Andon upper arm blood pressure monitor KD595 has passed the International Protocol requirements and it can be recommended for clinical use and self-measurement in adults. PMID:26544523

  5. Non-Pharmacological Treatments of Allergic Rhinitis (Neglected Treatments)

    PubMed Central

    Zohalinezhad, Mohammad Ebrahim; Zarshenas, Mohammad M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Allergic rhinitis is the most common diseases affecting people in industrialized society. However, this is not a new disease and it was clinically described and treated for the first time by Rhazes (865-925 CE). The disease was also mentioned in “The Canon of Medicine” by Avicenna (980–1037). Methods: We searched in Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed for “allergic rhinitis”, “interactions”, “non-prescription”, “prescription”, and in electronic copies of ITM sources the “canon” and “Al-Havi”. Results: Both Persian pioneers of Medicine recommended non-pharmacologic management as an important phase of the therapy. Their recommendations consisted of avoiding overeating and polydipsia, massage of the lower extremities, adjusting the duration and time of sleep, sleeping in the supine position, avoiding exposure of the head to cold air and taking a shower early in the morning. Conclusion: Although some aspects of their recommendations, such as massage of the lower extremities, avoiding of overeating and adjusting of sleep pattern were approved, but further cross-sectional and prospective studies are needed to confirm other non-pharmacological treatments.

  6. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY: an expert-driven knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Pawson, Adam J.; Sharman, Joanna L.; Benson, Helen E.; Faccenda, Elena; Alexander, Stephen P.H.; Buneman, O. Peter; Davenport, Anthony P.; McGrath, John C.; Peters, John A.; Southan, Christopher; Spedding, Michael; Yu, Wenyuan; Harmar, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology/British Pharmacological Society (IUPHAR/BPS) Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) is a new open access resource providing pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and pathophysiological data on the targets of approved and experimental drugs. Created under the auspices of the IUPHAR and the BPS, the portal provides concise, peer-reviewed overviews of the key properties of a wide range of established and potential drug targets, with in-depth information for a subset of important targets. The resource is the result of curation and integration of data from the IUPHAR Database (IUPHAR-DB) and the published BPS ‘Guide to Receptors and Channels’ (GRAC) compendium. The data are derived from a global network of expert contributors, and the information is extensively linked to relevant databases, including ChEMBL, DrugBank, Ensembl, PubChem, UniProt and PubMed. Each of the ∼6000 small molecule and peptide ligands is annotated with manually curated 2D chemical structures or amino acid sequences, nomenclature and database links. Future expansion of the resource will complete the coverage of all the targets of currently approved drugs and future candidate targets, alongside educational resources to guide scientists and students in pharmacological principles and techniques. PMID:24234439

  7. The IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY: an expert-driven knowledgebase of drug targets and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Pawson, Adam J; Sharman, Joanna L; Benson, Helen E; Faccenda, Elena; Alexander, Stephen P H; Buneman, O Peter; Davenport, Anthony P; McGrath, John C; Peters, John A; Southan, Christopher; Spedding, Michael; Yu, Wenyuan; Harmar, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    The International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology/British Pharmacological Society (IUPHAR/BPS) Guide to PHARMACOLOGY (http://www.guidetopharmacology.org) is a new open access resource providing pharmacological, chemical, genetic, functional and pathophysiological data on the targets of approved and experimental drugs. Created under the auspices of the IUPHAR and the BPS, the portal provides concise, peer-reviewed overviews of the key properties of a wide range of established and potential drug targets, with in-depth information for a subset of important targets. The resource is the result of curation and integration of data from the IUPHAR Database (IUPHAR-DB) and the published BPS 'Guide to Receptors and Channels' (GRAC) compendium. The data are derived from a global network of expert contributors, and the information is extensively linked to relevant databases, including ChEMBL, DrugBank, Ensembl, PubChem, UniProt and PubMed. Each of the ∼6000 small molecule and peptide ligands is annotated with manually curated 2D chemical structures or amino acid sequences, nomenclature and database links. Future expansion of the resource will complete the coverage of all the targets of currently approved drugs and future candidate targets, alongside educational resources to guide scientists and students in pharmacological principles and techniques. PMID:24234439

  8. Pharmacological disruption of maladaptive memory.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jane R; Torregrossa, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are characterized by intrusive, distracting, and disturbing memories that either perpetuate the illness or hinder successful treatment. For example, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves such strong reemergence of memories associated with a traumatic event that the individual feels like the event is happening again. Furthermore, drug addiction is characterized by compulsive use and repeated relapse that is often driven by internal memories of drug use and/or by exposure to external stimuli that were associated with drug use. Therefore, identifying pharmacological methods to weaken the strength of maladaptive memories is a major goal of research efforts aimed at finding new treatments for these disorders. The primary mechanism by which memories could be pharmacologically disrupted or altered is through manipulation of memory reconsolidation. Reconsolidation occurs when an established memory is remembered or reactivated, reentering a labile state before again being consolidated into long-term memory storage. Memories are subject to disruption during this labile state. In this chapter we will discuss the preclinical and clinical studies identifying potential pharmacological methods for disrupting the integrity of maladaptive memory to treat mental illness. PMID:25977090

  9. Cryptozoology Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  10. Discovery and basic pharmacology of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), including the hyperglycosylated ESA, darbepoetin alfa: an update of the rationale and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Zoltán; Elliott, Steven; Jedynasty, Kinga; Tesar, Vladimír; Szegedi, János

    2010-04-01

    Cloning of the human erythropoietin (EPO) gene and development of the first recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) drug were truly breakthroughs. This allowed a deeper understanding of the structure and pharmacology of rHuEpo, which in turn inspired the discovery and development of additional erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). In vivo specific activity and serum half-life of rHuEPO are influenced by the amount and structure of the attached carbohydrate. Increased numbers of sialic acids on carbohydrate attached to rHuEPO correlated with a relative increase in in-vivo-specific activity and increased serum half-life. The effect of increasing the number of sialic-acid-containing carbohydrates on in-vivo-specific activity was explored. Initial research focused on solving the problem of how the protein backbone could be engineered so a cell would add more carbohydrate to it. Additional work resulted in darbepoetin alfa, a longer-acting molecule with two additional carbohydrate chains. PMID:20127232