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Sample records for sofc micro-chp systems

  1. MICRO-CHP System for Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Gerstmann

    2009-01-31

    This is the final report of progress under Phase I of a project to develop and commercialize a micro-CHP system for residential applications that provides electrical power, heating, and cooling for the home. This is the first phase of a three-phase effort in which the residential micro-CHP system will be designed (Phase I), developed and tested in the laboratory (Phase II); and further developed and field tested (Phase III). The project team consists of Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc. (AMTI), responsible for system design and integration; Marathon Engine Systems, Inc. (MES), responsible for design of the engine-generator subsystem; AO Smith, responsible for design of the thermal storage and water heating subsystems; Trane, a business of American Standard Companies, responsible for design of the HVAC subsystem; and AirXchange, Inc., responsible for design of the mechanical ventilation and dehumidification subsystem.

  2. Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy DeValve; Benoit Olsommer

    2007-09-30

    Integrated micro-CHP (Cooling, Heating and Power) system solutions represent an opportunity to address all of the following requirements at once: conservation of scarce energy resources, moderation of pollutant release into our environment, and assured comfort for home-owners. The objective of this effort was to establish strategies for development, demonstration, and sustainable commercialization of cost-effective integrated CHP systems for residential applications. A unified approach to market and opportunity identification, technology assessment, specific system designs, adaptation to modular product platform component conceptual designs was employed. UTRC's recommendation to U.S. Department of Energy is to go ahead with the execution of the proposed product development and commercialization strategy plan under Phase II of this effort. Recent indicators show the emergence of micro-CHP. More than 12,000 micro-CHP systems have been sold worldwide so far, around 7,500 in 2004. Market projections predict a world-wide market growth over 35% per year. In 2004 the installations were mainly in Europe (73.5%) and in Japan (26.4%). The market in North-America is almost non-existent (0.1%). High energy consumption, high energy expenditure, large spark-spread (i.e., difference between electricity and fuel costs), big square footage, and high income are the key conditions for market acceptance. Today, these conditions are best found in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, New England states. A multiple stage development plan is proposed to address risk mitigation. These stages include concept development and supplier engagement, component development, system integration, system demonstration, and field trials. A two stage commercialization strategy is suggested based on two product versions. The first version--a heat and power system named Micro-Cogen, provides the heat and essential electrical power to the homeowner

  3. Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Thermoelectric Generator for Maximum Power Output in Micro-CHP Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, L. A.; Mortensen, Paw V.; Enkeshafi, Ali A.

    2011-05-01

    One of the most obvious early market applications for thermoelectric generators (TEG) is decentralized micro combined heat and power (CHP) installations of 0.5 kWe to 5 kWe based on fuel cell technology. Through the use of TEG technology for waste heat recovery it is possible to increase the electricity production in micro-CHP systems by more than 15%, corresponding to system electrical efficiency increases of some 4 to 5 percentage points. This will make fuel cell-based micro-CHP systems very competitive and profitable and will also open opportunities in a number of other potential business and market segments which are not yet quantified. This paper quantifies a micro-CHP system based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a high-performance TE generator. Based on a 3 kW fuel input, the hybrid SOFC implementation boosts electrical output from 945 W to 1085 W, with 1794 W available for heating purposes.

  4. Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP System for Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Karl Mayer

    2010-03-31

    ECR International and its joint venture company, Climate Energy, are at the forefront of the effort to deliver residential-scale combined heat and power (Micro-CHP) products to the USA market. Part of this substantial program is focused on the development of a new class of steam expanders that offers the potential for significantly lower costs for small-scale power generation technology. The heart of this technology is the scroll expander, a machine that has revolutionized the HVAC refrigerant compressor industry in the last 15 years. The liquid injected cogeneration (LIC) technology is at the core of the efforts described in this report, and remains an excellent option for low cost Micro-CHP systems. ECR has demonstrated in several prototype appliances that the concept for LIC can be made into a practical product. The continuing challenge is to identify economical scroll machine designs that will meet the performance and endurance requirements needed for a long life appliance application. This report describes the numerous advances made in this endeavor by ECR International. Several important advances are described in this report. Section 4 describes a marketing and economics study that integrates the technical performance of the LIC system with real-world climatic data and economic analysis to assess the practical impact that different factors have on the economic application of Micro-CHP in residential applications. Advances in the development of a working scroll steam expander are discussed in Section 5. A rigorous analytical assessment of the performance of scroll expanders, including the difficult to characterize impact of pocket to pocket flank leakage, is presented in Section 5.1. This is followed with an FEA study of the thermal and pressure induced deflections that would result from the normal operation of an advanced scroll expander. Section 6 describes the different scroll expanders and test fixtures developed during this effort. Another key technical

  5. A Study of a Diesel Engine Based Micro-CHP System

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, C.R.; Andrews, J.; Tutu, N.; Butcher, T.

    2010-08-31

    This project, funded by New York State Energy Research and Development Agency (NYSERDA), investigated the potential for an oil-fired combined heat and power system (micro-CHP system) for potential use in residences that use oil to heat their homes. Obviously, this requires the power source to be one that uses heating oil (diesel). The work consisted of an experimental study using a diesel engine and an analytical study that examined potential energy savings and benefits of micro-CHP systems for 'typical' locations in New York State. A search for a small diesel engine disclosed that no such engines were manufactured in the U.S. A single cylinder engine manufactured in Germany driving an electric generator was purchased for the experimental work. The engine was tested using on-road diesel fuel (15 ppm sulfur), and biodiesel blends. One of the main objectives was to demonstrate the possibility of operation in the so-called HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) mode. The HCCI mode of operation of engines is being explored as a way to reduce the emission of smoke, and NOx significantly without exhaust treatment. This is being done primarily in the context of engines used in transportation applications. However, it is felt that in a micro-CHP application using a single cylinder engine, such an approach would confer those emission benefits and would be much easier to implement. This was demonstrated successfully by injecting the fuel into the engine air intake using a heated atomizer made by Econox Technologies LLC to promote significant vaporization before entering the cylinder. Efficiency and emission measurements were made under different electrical loads provided by two space heaters connected to the generator in normal and HCCI modes of operation. The goals of the analytical work were to characterize, from the published literature, the prime-movers for micro-CHP applications, quantify parametrically the expected energy savings of using micro-CHP systems

  6. Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications - Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Robert A. Zogg

    2011-03-14

    The objective of the Micro-CHP Phase I effort was to develop a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system including: Defining market potential; Assessing proposed technology; Developing a proof-of-principle design; and Developing a commercialization strategy. TIAX LLC assembled a team to develop a Micro-CHP system that will provide electricity and heating. TIAX, the contractor and major cost-share provider, provided proven expertise in project management, prime-mover design and development, appliance development and commercialization, analysis of residential energy loads, technology assessment, and market analysis. Kohler Company, the manufacturing partner, is a highly regarded manufacturer of standby power systems and other residential products. Kohler provides a compellingly strong brand, along with the capabilities in product development, design, manufacture, distribution, sales, support, service, and marketing that only a manufacturer of Kohler's status can provide. GAMA, an association of appliance and equipment manufacturers, provided a critical understanding of appliance commercialization issues, including regulatory requirements, large-scale market acceptance issues, and commercialization strategies. The Propane Education & Research Council, a cost-share partner, provided cost share and aided in ensuring the fuel flexibility of the conceptual design. Micro-CHP systems being commercialized in Europe and Japan are generally designed to follow the household thermal load, and generate electricity opportunistically. In many cases, any excess electricity can be sold back to the grid (net metering). These products, however, are unlikely to meet the demands of the U.S. market. First, these products generally cannot provide emergency power when grid power is lost--a critical feature to market success in the U.S. Even those that can may have insufficient electric generation capacities to meet emergency needs for many U.S. homes. Second, the extent to which net metering

  7. The financial viability of an SOFC cogeneration system in single-family dwellings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanne, Kari; Saari, Arto; Ugursal, V. Ismet; Good, Joel

    In the near future, fuel cell-based residential micro-CHP systems will compete with traditional methods of energy supply. A micro-CHP system may be considered viable if its incremental capital cost compared to its competitors equals to cumulated savings during a given period of time. A simplified model is developed in this study to estimate the operation of a residential solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. A comparative assessment of the SOFC system vis-à-vis heating systems based on gas, oil and electricity is conducted using the simplified model for a single-family house located in Ottawa and Vancouver. The energy consumption of the house is estimated using the HOT2000 building simulation program. A financial analysis is carried out to evaluate the sensitivity of the maximum allowable capital cost with respect to system sizing, acceptable payback period, energy price and the electricity buyback strategy of an energy utility. Based on the financial analysis, small (1-2 kW e) SOFC systems seem to be feasible in the considered case. The present study shows also that an SOFC system is especially an alternative to heating systems based on oil and electrical furnaces.

  8. Design and analysis of permanent magnet moving coil type generator used in a micro-CHP generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oros Pop, Susana Teodora; Berinde, Ioan; Vadan, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the design and analysis of a permanent magnet moving coil type generator driven by a free piston Stirling engine. This assemble free piston Stirling engine - permanent magnet moving coil type generator will be used in a combined heat and power (CHP) system for producing heat and power in residential area. The design procedure for moving coil type linear generator starts from the rated power imposed and finally uses the Faraday law of induction. The magneto-static magnetic field generated by permanent magnets is analyzed by means of Reluctance method and Finite Element Method in order to evaluate the magnetic flux density in the air gap, which is a design data imposed in the design stage, and the results are compared.

  9. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  10. Changes of the thermodynamic parameters in failure conditions of the micro-CHP cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matysko, Robert; Mikielewicz, Jarosław; Ihnatowicz, Eugeniusz

    2014-03-01

    The paper presents the calculations for the failure conditions of the ORC (organic Rankine cycle) cycle in the electrical power system. It analyses the possible reasons of breakdown, such as the electrical power loss or the automatic safety valve failure. The micro-CHP (combined heat and power) system should have maintenance-free configuration, which means that the user does not have to be acquainted with all the details of the ORC system operation. However, the system should always be equipped with the safety control systems allowing for the immediate turn off of the ORC cycle in case of any failure. In case of emergency, the control system should take over the safety tasks and protect the micro-CHP system from damaging. Although, the control systems are able to respond quickly to the CHP system equipped with the inertial systems, the negative effects of failure are unavoidable and always remain for some time. Moreover, the paper presents the results of calculations determining the inertia for the micro-CHP system of the circulating ORC pump, heat removal pump (cooling condenser) and the heat supply pump in failure conditions.

  11. Mississippi State University Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center

    SciTech Connect

    Mago, Pedro; Newell, LeLe

    2014-01-31

    Between 2008 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy funded the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center located at Mississippi State University. The overall objective of this project was to enable micro-CHP (micro-combined heat and power) utilization, to facilitate and promote the use of CHP systems and to educate architects, engineers, and agricultural producers and scientists on the benefits of CHP systems. Therefore, the work of the Center focused on the three areas: CHP system modeling and optimization, outreach, and research. In general, the results obtained from this project demonstrated that CHP systems are attractive because they can provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits. Some of these benefits include the potential to reduce operational cost, carbon dioxide emissions, primary energy consumption, and power reliability during electric grid disruptions. The knowledge disseminated in numerous journal and conference papers from the outcomes of this project is beneficial to engineers, architects, agricultural producers, scientists and the public in general who are interested in CHP technology and applications. In addition, more than 48 graduate students and 23 undergraduate students, benefited from the training and research performed in the MSU Micro-CHP and Bio-Fuel Center.

  12. Development of Residential SOFC Cogeneration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takashi; Miyachi, Itaru; Suzuki, Minoru; Higaki, Katsuki

    2011-06-01

    Since 2001 Kyocera has been developing 1kW class Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for power generation system. We have developed a cell, stack, module and system. Since 2004, Kyocera and Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. have been developed SOFC residential co-generation system. From 2007, we took part in the "Demonstrative Research on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells" Project conducted by New Energy Foundation (NEF). Total 57 units of 0.7kW class SOFC cogeneration systems had been installed at residential houses. In spite of residential small power demand, the actual electric efficiency was about 40%(netAC,LHV), and high CO2 reduction performance was achieved by these systems. Hereafter, new joint development, Osaka Gas, Toyota Motors, Kyocera and Aisin Seiki, aims early commercialization of residential SOFC CHP system.

  13. Micro Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center, Mississippi State University

    SciTech Connect

    Louay Chamra

    2008-09-26

    Initially, most micro-CHP systems will likely be designed as constant-power output or base-load systems. This implies that at some point the power requirement will not be met, or that the requirement will be exceeded. Realistically, both cases will occur within a 24-hour period. For example, in the United States, the base electrical load for the average home is approximately 2 kW while the peak electrical demand is slightly over 4 kW. If a 3 kWe micro- CHP system were installed in this situation, part of the time more energy will be provided than could be used and for a portion of the time more energy will be required than could be provided. Jalalzadeh-Azar [6] investigated this situation and presented a comparison of electrical- and thermal-load-following CHP systems. In his investigation he included in a parametric analysis addressing the influence of the subsystem efficiencies on the total primary energy consumption as well as an economic analysis of these systems. He found that an increase in the efficiencies of the on-site power generation and electrical equipment reduced the total monthly import of electricity. A methodology for calculating performance characteristics of different micro-CHP system components will be introduced in this article. Thermodynamic cycles are used to model each individual prime mover. The prime movers modeled in this article are a spark-ignition internal combustion engine (Otto cycle) and a diesel engine (Diesel cycle). Calculations for heat exchanger, absorption chiller, and boiler modeling are also presented. The individual component models are then linked together to calculate total system performance values. Performance characteristics that will be observed for each system include maximum fuel flow rate, total monthly fuel consumption, and system energy (electrical, thermal, and total) efficiencies. Also, whether or not both the required electrical and thermal loads can sufficiently be accounted for within the system

  14. Status of the TMI SOFC system

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhl, R.C.; Petrik, M.A.; Cable, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    TMI has completed preliminary engineering designs for complete 20kW SOFC systems modules for stationary distributed generation applications using pipeline natural gas [sponsored by Rochester Gas and Electric (Rochester, New York) and EPRI (Palo Alto, California)]. Subsystem concepts are currently being tested.

  15. SOFC system with integrated catalytic fuel processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, Caine; Tompsett, Geoff. A.; Kendall, Kevin; Ormerod, R. Mark

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the development of solid oxide fuel cell technology operating directly on hydrocarbon fuels. The development of a catalytic fuel processing system, which is integrated with the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power source is outlined here. The catalytic device utilises a novel three-way catalytic system consisting of an in situ pre-reformer catalyst, the fuel cell anode catalyst and a platinum-based combustion catalyst. The three individual catalytic stages have been tested in a model catalytic microreactor. Both temperature-programmed and isothermal reaction techniques have been applied. Results from these experiments were used to design the demonstration SOFC unit. The apparatus used for catalytic characterisation can also perform in situ electrochemical measurements as described in previous papers [C.M. Finnerty, R.H. Cunningham, K. Kendall, R.M. Ormerod, Chem. Commun. (1998) 915-916; C.M. Finnerty, N.J. Coe, R.H. Cunningham, R.M. Ormerod, Catal. Today 46 (1998) 137-145]. This enabled the performance of the SOFC to be determined at a range of temperatures and reaction conditions, with current output of 290 mA cm -2 at 0.5 V, being recorded. Methane and butane have been evaluated as fuels. Thus, optimisation of the in situ partial oxidation pre-reforming catalyst was essential, with catalysts producing high H 2/CO ratios at reaction temperatures between 873 K and 1173 K being chosen. These included Ru and Ni/Mo-based catalysts. Hydrocarbon fuels were directly injected into the catalytic SOFC system. Microreactor measurements revealed the reaction mechanisms as the fuel was transported through the three-catalyst device. The demonstration system showed that the fuel processing could be successfully integrated with the SOFC stack.

  16. A price mechanism for supply demand matching in local grid of households with micro-CHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, G. K. H.; van Foreest, N. D.; Scherpen, J. M. A.

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes a dynamic price mechanism to coordinate eletric power generation from micro Combined Heat and Power (micro-CHP) systems in a network of households. It is assumed that the households are prosumers, i.e. both producers and consumers of electricity. The control is done on household level in a completely distributed manner. Avoiding a centralized controller both eases computation complexity and preserves communication structure in the network. Local information is used to decide to turn on or off the micro-CHP, but through price signals between the prosumers the network as a whole operates in a cooperative way.

  17. Micro-CHP Technologies Roadmap: Meeting 21st Century Residential Energy Needs

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2003-12-01

    On June 11-12, 2003, at Greenbelt, Maryland, key stakeholders from industry, government agencies, universities, and others involved in combined heat and power and the residential buildings industry explores solutions to technical, institutional, and market barriers facing micro-combined heat and power systems (mCHP). Participants outlined a desired future for mCHP systems, identified specific interim technology cost and performance targets, and developed actions to achieve the interim targets and vision. This document, The Micro-CHP Technologies Roadmap, is a result of their deliberations. It outlines a set of actions that can be pursued by both the government and industry to develop mCHP appliances for creating a new approach for households to meet their energy needs.

  18. The ways of SOFC systems efficiency increasing

    SciTech Connect

    Demin, A.K.; Timofeyeva, N.

    1996-04-01

    The efficiency of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is described. This paper considers methods to lift the fuel utilization and/or the average cell voltage with the goal of increasing the cell efficiency by improved cell designs.

  19. Performance comparison of two combined SOFC-gas turbine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.

    A necessary step in the use of natural gas (methane) in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is its preliminary conversion to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. To perform methane conversion within fuel cells and avoid catalyst carbonization the molar ratio between methane and steam (or steam with carbon dioxide) should be 1:2 or higher at the SOFC inlet. In this article two possible technological approaches to provide this desirable ratio in a combined SOFC-gas turbine system are compared. The first approach involves generation of the required steam in the coupled gas turbine cycle. The second (which is more traditional) involves recycling some part of the exhaust gases around the anodes of the SOFC stack. Exergy and energy analyses for the two SOFC-gas turbine systems are conducted to determine their efficiencies and capabilities to generate power at different rates of oxygen conductivity through the SOFC electrolyte (ion conductive membrane), as well as various efficiencies for natural gas conversion to electricity in the SOFC stack. It is determined that with a fixed SOFC stack the scheme with recycling has higher exergy and energy efficiencies (requiring less natural gas for a fixed electricity output) and the scheme with steam generation is associated with a higher capability for power generation. The question of which scheme permits a higher reduction in natural gas consumption (per unit of time), in the case of its implementation instead of a contemporary combined gas turbine-steam power cycle is considered. The greater capability of power generation while retaining high efficiency of fuel consumption in the scheme with steam generation makes its implementation more favorable. This scheme provides a better relative reduction in natural gas consumption (relative to the scheme with exhaust gas recycling) calculated per unit of time which reaches values of about 20%. At higher values of oxygen conductivity and efficiency of natural gas conversion to electricity in the

  20. SOFC combined cycle systems for distributed generation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    The final phase of the tubular SOFC development program will focus on the development and demonstration of pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC)/gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power systems for distributed power applications. The commercial PSOFC/GT product line will cover the power range 200 kWe to 50 MWe, and the electrical efficiency for these systems will range from 60 to 75% (net AC/LHV CH4), the highest of any known fossil fueled power generation technology. The first demonstration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine combined cycle will be a proof-of-concept 250 kWe PSOFC/MTG power system consisting of a single 200 kWe PSOFC module and a 50 kWe microturbine generator (MTG). The second demonstration of this combined cycle will be 1.3 MWe fully packaged, commercial prototype PSOFC/GT power system consisting of two 500 kWe PSOFC modules and a 300 kWe gas turbine.

  1. The effect of fuel feeding method on performance of SOFC-PEFC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoo, M.; Watanabe, K.; Arakawa, M.; Yamazaki, Y.

    We evaluate two kinds of solid-oxide-fuel-cell (SOFC)-polymer-electrolyte-fuel-cell (PEFC) combined systems by numerical simulation to investigate the effect of the fuel feeding method. In one, fuel for the system is reformed by using exhaust heat from the SOFC and is separately supplied to the SOFC and PEFC (parallel SOFC-PEFC system). In the other, fuel is fed to the SOFC first and then SOFC exhaust fuel is fed to the PEFC (series SOFC-PEFC system). The quality of the fuel gas in the SOFC is better in the latter system, whereas the quality of the fuel gas in the PEFC is better in the former. We demonstrate that larger PEFC output can be obtained in the parallel SOFC-PEFC system, since more steam, which is included in the SOFC anode exhaust gas, can be used for the reforming of the fuel for the PEFC. We show that the series SOFC-PEFC system provides higher electrical efficiency because the fuel gas quality has a stronger influence on the electromotive force in the SOFC than in the PEFC.

  2. Experiences from operation of different expansion devices for application in domestic micro CHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicsz, Dariusz; Mikielewicz, Jarosław; Wajs, Jan

    2010-10-01

    In the paper presented are experiences from operation of three different expansion devices for possible implementation in the domestic micro CHP. These were the modified scroll expander and two designs based on the variable working chamber volume pneumatic devices. Experiments showed the superiority of both "pneumatic devices" over the scroll expander, indicating the possible internal efficiencies in the range of 61 82Such efficiencies are very attractive, especially at the higher end of that range. The volume of these devices is much smaller than the scroll expander which makes it again more suitable for a domestic micro CHP. Small rotational velocities enable to conclude that connection to electricity grid will also be simpler in the case of "pneumatic devices". The "pneumatic devices" under scrutiny here could be an alternative to the typical vapour turbine in the ORC cycle, which is in the process of development at the IFFM.

  3. Performance evaluation of an integrated small-scale SOFC-biomass gasification power generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongchanapai, Suranat; Iwai, Hiroshi; Saito, Motohiro; Yoshida, Hideo

    2012-10-01

    The combination of biomass gasification and high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offers great potential as a future sustainable power generation system. In order to provide insights into an integrated small-scale SOFC-biomass gasification power generation system, system simulation was performed under diverse operating conditions. A detailed anode-supported planar SOFC model under co-flow operation and a thermodynamic equilibrium for biomass gasification model were developed and verified by reliable experimental and simulation data. The other peripheral components include three gas-to-gas heat exchangers (HXs), heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), burner, fuel and air compressors. To determine safe operating conditions with high system efficiency, energy and exergy analysis was performed to investigate the influence through detailed sensitivity analysis of four key parameters, e.g. steam-to-biomass ratio (STBR), SOFC inlet stream temperatures, fuel utilization factor (Uf) and anode off-gas recycle ratio (AGR) on system performance. Due to the fact that SOFC stack is accounted for the most expensive part of the initial investment cost, the number of cells required for SOFC stack is economically optimized as well. Through the detailed sensitivity analysis, it shows that the increase of STBR positively affects SOFC while gasifier performance drops. The most preferable operating STBR is 1.5 when the highest system efficiencies and the smallest number of cells. The increase in SOFC inlet temperature shows negative impact on system and gasifier performances while SOFC efficiencies are slightly increased. The number of cells required for SOFC is reduced with the increase of SOFC inlet temperature. The system performance is optimized for Uf of 0.75 while SOFC and system efficiencies are the highest with the smallest number of cells. The result also shows the optimal anode off-gas recycle ratio of 0.6. Regarding with the increase of anode off-gas recycle ratio

  4. Realisation of an anode supported planar SOFC system

    SciTech Connect

    Buchkremer, H.P.; Stoever, D.; Diekmann, U.

    1996-12-31

    Lowering the operating temperature of S0FCs to below 800{degrees}C potentially lowers production costs of a SOFC system because of a less expensive periphery and is able to guarantee sufficient life time of the stack. One way of achieving lower operating temperatures is the development of new high conductive electrolyte materials. The other way, still based on state-of-the-art material, i.e. yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, is the development of a thin film electrolyte concept. In the Forschungszentrum Julich a program was started to produce a supported planar SOFC with an YSZ electrolyte thickness between 10 to 20 put. One of the electrodes, i.e. the anode, was used as support, in order not to increase the number of components in the SOFC. The high electronic conductivity of the anode-cermet allows the use of relatively thick layers without increasing the cell resistance. An additional advantage of the supported planar concept is the possibility to produce single cells larger than 10 x 10 cm x cm, that is with an effective electrode cross area of several hundred cm{sup 2}.

  5. 10 kW SOFC Power System Commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Norrick; Brad Palmer; Charles Vesely; Eric Barringer; John Budge; Cris DeBellis; Rich Goettler; Milind Kantak; Steve Kung; Zhien Liu; Tom Morris; Keith Rackers; Gary Roman; Greg Rush; Liang Xue

    2006-02-01

    Cummins Power Generation (CPG) as the prime contractor and SOFCo-EFS Holdings LLC (SOFCo), as their subcontractor, teamed under the Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program to develop 3-10kW solid oxide fuel cell systems for use in recreational vehicles, commercial work trucks and stand-by telecommunications applications. The program goal is demonstration of power systems that meet commercial performance requirements and can be produced in volume at a cost of $400/kW. This report summarizes the team's activities during the seventh six-month period (July-December 2005) of the four-year Phase I effort. While there has been significant progress in the development of the SOFC subsystems that can support meeting the program Phase 1 goals, the SOFCo ceramic stack technology has progressed significantly slower than plan and CPG consider it unlikely that the systemic problems encountered will be overcome in the near term. SOFCo has struggled with a series of problems associated with inconsistent manufacturing, inadequate cell performance, and the achievement of consistent, durable, low resistance inter-cell connections with reduced or no precious materials. A myriad of factors have contributed to these problems, but the fact remains that progress has not kept pace with the SECA program. A contributing factor in SOFCo's technical difficulties is attributed to their significantly below plan industry cost share spending over the last four years. This has resulted in a much smaller SOFC stack development program, has contributed to SOFCo not being able to aggressively resolve core issues, and clouds their ability to continue into a commercialization phase. In view of this situation, CPG has conducted an independent assessment of the state-of-the-art in planar SOFC's stacks and have concluded that alternative technology exists offering the specific performance, durability, and low cost needed to meet the SECA objectives. We have further concluded that there is

  6. Physically based dynamic modeling of planar anode-supported sofc cogeneration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Kevin J.

    Abstract Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) have been a key area of academic research interest over the past decade due to their high electrical efficiency, fuel flexibility, and high quality waste heat. These benefits suggest that SOFCs could play a significant role as a future distributed generation, combined heat and power source if life cycle cost can be reduced or significant incentives such as a carbon tax are implemented. At the current point in SOFC development, degradation effects limit the operational lifetime of SOFCs. Other research efforts have suggested that the dynamic operation of SOFCs could improve the economics in addition to reducing degradation. Thus the development of high fidelity modeling tools for the assessment of dynamic SOFC system operation is important to determine the potential load-following ability of SOFC systems. One of the goals of this research is to identify the required level of fidelity necessary for a dynamic SOFC system-level simulation tool. The channel-level steady-state simulation and dynamic response to step changes in current density are presented for a one-dimensional and `quasi' two-dimensional model. The results indicate the predicted temperature gradient is less severe when implementing a higher fidelity `quasi' two-dimensional model. Additionally, the modeling and sizing of the balance of plant components to simulate off-design and system dynamics are presented. The effects of dynamic balance of plant components are compared to the typically accepted steady-state models. The incorporation of the dynamic balance of plant components are shown to have a significant effect on the dynamics of the waste heat recovery, where the power dynamics are only minimally affected. Finally, the steady-state performance at off-design conditions and dynamic response to step changes in the net system power are presented to assess the potential load-following ability of a combined heat and power SOFC system.

  7. 10kW SOFC POWER SYSTEM COMMERCIALIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Norrick; Charles Vesely; Todd Romine; Brad Palmer; Greg Rush; Eric Barringer; Milind Kantak; Cris DeBellis

    2003-02-01

    Participants in the SECA 10 kW SOFC Power System Commercialization project include Cummins Power Generation (CPG), the power generation arm of Cummins, Inc., SOFCo-EFS Holdings, LLC (formerly McDermott Technology, Inc.), the fuel cell and fuel processing research and development arm of McDermott International Inc., M/A-COM, the Multi-Layer Ceramics (MLC) processing and manufacturing arm of Tyco Electronics, and Ceramatec, a materials technology development company. CPG functions in the role of prime contractor and system integrator. SOFCo-EFS is responsible for the design and development of the hot box assembly, including the SOFC stack(s), heat exchanger(s), manifolding, and fuel reformer. M/A-COM and SOFCo-EFS are jointly responsible for development of the MLC manufacturing processes, and Ceramatec provides technical support in materials development. In October 2002, McDermott announced its intention to cease operations at McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) as of December 31, 2002. This decision was precipitated by several factors, including the announced tentative settlement of the B&W Bankruptcy which would result in all of the equity of B&W being conveyed to a trust, thereby eliminating McDermott's interest in the company, and the desire to create a separate fuel cell entity to facilitate its commercial development. The new fuel cell entity is named SOFCo-EFS Holdings, LLC. All of McDermott's solid oxide fuel cell and fuel processing work will be conducted by SOFCo-EFS, using personnel previously engaged in that work. SOFCo-EFS will continue to be located in the Alliance, OH facility and use the existing infrastructure and test facilities for its activities. While the effort needed to accomplish this reorganization has detracted somewhat from SOFCo's efficiency during the fourth quarter, we believe the improved focus on the core fuel cell and fuel reformation resulting from the reorganization will have a positive impact on the SECA project in the long run. The

  8. Fuel flexibility study of an integrated 25 kW SOFC reformer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaofan; Rao, Ashok D.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    The operation of solid oxide fuel cells on various fuels, such as natural gas, biogas and gases derived from biomass or coal gasification and distillate fuel reforming has been an active area of SOFC research in recent years. In this study, we develop a theoretical understanding and thermodynamic simulation capability for investigation of an integrated SOFC reformer system operating on various fuels. The theoretical understanding and simulation results suggest that significant thermal management challenges may result from the use of different types of fuels in the same integrated fuel cell reformer system. Syngas derived from coal is simulated according to specifications from high-temperature entrained bed coal gasifiers. Diesel syngas is approximated from data obtained in a previous NFCRC study of JP-8 and diesel operation of the integrated 25 kW SOFC reformer system. The syngas streams consist of mixtures of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrogen. Although the SOFC can tolerate a wide variety in fuel composition, the current analyses suggest that performance of integrated SOFC reformer systems may require significant operating condition changes and/or system design changes in order to operate well on this variety of fuels.

  9. SOFC-Gas Turbine Hybrid System for Aircraft Applications: Modeling and Performance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Nischal

    2005-11-01

    There is a growing interest in fuel cells for aircraft applications. Fuel cells when combined with conventional turbine power plants offer high fuel efficiencies. The feature of fuel cells (SOFC, MCFC) used in aircraft applications, which makes them suitable for hybrid systems, is their high operating temperature. Their dynamic nature, both electrical and thermodynamic, demands a dynamic study of the complete hybrid cycle. In this paper we present a model for a SOFC/Gas Turbine hybrid system and its implementation in Matlab-Simulink. The main focus of the paper is on the dynamic analysis of the combined SOFC/GT cycle. Various configurations of the hybrid system are proposed and simulated. A comparative study of the simulated configurations, based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics, is presented. An exergy analysis for the chosen configuration is used to perform a parametric study of the overall hybrid system performance.

  10. Feasibility study for SOFC-GT hybrid locomotive power part II. System packaging and operating route simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Andrew S.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    2012-09-01

    This work assesses the feasibility of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) hybrid power systems for use as the prime mover in freight locomotives. The available space in a diesel engine-powered locomotive is compared to that required for an SOFC-GT system, inclusive of fuel processing systems necessary for the SOFC-GT. The SOFC-GT space requirement is found to be similar to current diesel engines, without consideration of the electrical balance of plant. Preliminary design of the system layout within the locomotive is carried out for illustration. Recent advances in SOFC technology and implications of future improvements are discussed as well. A previously-developed FORTRAN model of an SOFC-GT system is then augmented to simulate the kinematics and power notching of a train and its locomotives. The operation of the SOFC-GT-powered train is investigated along a representative route in Southern California, with simulations presented for diesel reformate as well as natural gas reformate and hydrogen as fuels. Operational parameters and difficulties are explored as are comparisons of expected system performance to modern diesel engines. It is found that even in the diesel case, the SOFC-GT system provides significant savings in fuel and CO2 emissions, making it an attractive option for the rail industry.

  11. Progress in the planar CPn SOFC system design verification

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, S.; Hartvigsen, J.; Khandkar, A.

    1996-04-01

    SOFCo is developing a high efficiency, modular and scaleable planar SOFC module termed the CPn design. This design has been verified in a 1.4 kW module test operated directly on pipeline natural gas. The design features multistage oxidation of fuel wherein the fuel is consumed incrementally over several stages. High efficiency is achieved by uniform current density distribution per stage, which lowers the stack resistance. Additional benefits include thermal regulation and compactness. Test results from stack modules operating in pipeline natural gas are presented.

  12. Techno-Economic Feasibility of Highly Efficient Cost-Effective Thermoelectric-SOFC Hybrid Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jifeng Zhang; Jean Yamanis

    2007-09-30

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems have the potential to generate exhaust gas streams of high temperature, ranging from 400 to 800 C. These high temperature gas streams can be used for additional power generation with bottoming cycle technologies to achieve higher system power efficiency. One of the potential candidate bottoming cycles is power generation by means of thermoelectric (TE) devices, which have the inherent advantages of low noise, low maintenance and long life. This study was to analyze the feasibility of combining coal gas based SOFC and TE through system performance and cost techno-economic modeling in the context of multi-MW power plants, with 200 kW SOFC-TE module as building blocks. System and component concepts were generated for combining SOFC and TE covering electro-thermo-chemical system integration, power conditioning system (PCS) and component designs. SOFC cost and performance models previously developed at United Technologies Research Center were modified and used in overall system analysis. The TE model was validated and provided by BSST. The optimum system in terms of energy conversion efficiency was found to be a pressurized SOFC-TE, with system efficiency of 65.3% and cost of $390/kW of manufacturing cost. The pressurization ratio was approximately 4 and the assumed ZT of the TE was 2.5. System and component specifications were generated based on the modeling study. The major technology and cost barriers for maturing the system include pressurized SOFC stack using coal gas, the high temperature recycle blowers, and system control design. Finally, a 4-step development roadmap is proposed for future technology development, the first step being a 1 kW proof-of-concept demonstration unit.

  13. A global thermo-electrochemical model for SOFC systems design and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruzzi, L.; Cocchi, S.; Fineschi, F.

    At BMW AG in Munich high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being developed as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for high-class car conveniences. Their design requires simulation of their thermo-electrochemical behaviour in all the conditions that may occur during operation (i.e. heat-up to about 600 °C, start-up to operating temperature, energy-delivering and cool-down). A global thermo-electrochemical model was developed for the whole system and a three-dimensional geometry code was performed using MATLAB programming language. The problems in developing SOFCs are now so many and so different that a very flexible code is necessary. Thus, the code was not only designed in order to simulate each of the operating conditions, but also to test different stack configurations, materials, etc. In every event, the code produces a time-dependent profile of temperatures, currents, electrical and thermal power density, gases concentrations for the whole system. The heat-up and start-up simulations allow: (1) to evaluate the time the cell stack needs to reach operating temperature from an initial temperature distribution, (2) to check the steepest temperature gradients occurring in the ceramic layers (which result in material stresses) and (3) to obtain important information about the pre-operating strategy. Simulation of energy-delivering gives a detailed profile of the temperatures, currents, power density, and allows to define the guidelines in system-controlling. Simulation of cooling-down gives important advises about insulation designing. The aim of this work is to build up a tool to clearly individuate the best designing criteria and operating strategy during the development and the engineering of a SOFC system.

  14. Control Valve Trajectories for SOFC Hybrid System Startup

    SciTech Connect

    Gorrell, Megan; Banta, Larry; Rosen, William; Restrepo, Bernardo; Tucker, David

    2012-07-01

    Control and management of cathode airflow in a solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine hybrid power system was analyzed using the Hybrid Performance (HyPer) hardware simulation at the National Energy Technology (NETL), U.S. Department of Energy. This work delves into previously unexplored operating practices for HyPer, via simultaneous manipulation of bypass valves and the electric load on the generator. The work is preparatory to the development of a Multi-Input, Multi-Output (MIMO) controller for HyPer. A factorial design of experiments was conducted to acquire data for 81 different combinations of the manipulated variables, which consisted of three air flow control valves and the electric load on the turbine generator. From this data the response surface for the cathode airflow with respect to bypass valve positions was analyzed. Of particular interest is the control of airflow through the cathode during system startup and during large load swings. This paper presents an algorithm for controlling air mass flow through the cathode based on a modification of the steepest ascent method.

  15. 10 kW SOFC POWER SYSTEM COMMERCIALIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Norrick; Brad Palmer; Charles Vesely; Eric Barringer; Cris DeBellis; Rich Goettler; Kurt Kneidel; Milind Kantak; Steve Kung; Tom Morris; Greg Rush

    2004-02-01

    The program is organized into three developmental periods. In Phase 1 the team will develop and demonstrate a proof-of-concept prototype design and develop a manufacturing plan to substantiate potential producibility at a target cost level of $800/kW factory manufacturing cost. Phase 2 will further develop the design and reduce the manufacturing cost to a level of $600 kW. Depending on an assessment of the maturity of the technology at the end of Phase 1, Phase 2 may be structured and supplemented to provide a limited production capability. Finally, in Phase 3, a full Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program will be integrated into the SECA program to develop a mass-producible design at a factory cost of $400/kW with full cross-functional support for unrestricted commercial sales. The path to market for new technology products in the Cummins system involves two processes. The first is called Product Preceding Technology, or PPT. The PPT process provides a methodology for exploring potentially attractive technologies and developing them to the point that they can be reliably scheduled into a new product development program with a manageable risk to the product introduction schedule or product quality. Once a technology has passed the PPT gate, it is available to be incorporated into a Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program. VPI is the process that coordinates the cross-functional development of a fully supported product. The VPI Program is designed to synchronize efforts in engineering, supply, manufacturing, marketing, finance, and product support areas in such a way that the product, when introduced to the market, represents the maximum value to the customer.

  16. 10 kW SOFC POWER SYSTEM COMMERCIALIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Norrick; Brad Palmer; Todd Romine; Charles Vesely; Eric Barringer; Cris DeBellis; Rich Goettler; Kurt Kneidel; Milind Kantak; Steve Kung; Greg Rush

    2003-08-01

    The program is organized into three developmental periods. In Phase 1 the team will develop and demonstrate a proof-of-concept prototype design and develop a manufacturing plan to substantiate potential producibility at a target cost level of $800/kW factory manufacturing cost. Phase 2 will further develop the design and reduce the manufacturing cost to a level of $600 kW. Depending on an assessment of the maturity of the technology at the end of Phase 1, Phase 2 may be structured and supplemented to provide a limited production capability. Finally, in Phase 3, a full Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program will be integrated into the SECA program to develop a mass-producible design at a factory cost of $400/kW with full cross-functional support for unrestricted commercial sales. The path to market for new technology products in the Cummins system involves two processes. The first is called Product Preceding Technology, or PPT. The PPT process provides a methodology for exploring potentially attractive technologies and developing them to the point that they can be reliably scheduled into a new product development program with a manageable risk to the product introduction schedule or product quality. Once a technology has passed the PPT gate, it is available to be incorporated into a Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program. VPI is the process that coordinates the cross-functional development of a fully supported product. The VPI Program is designed to synchronize efforts in engineering, supply, manufacturing, marketing, finance, and product support areas in such a way that the product, when introduced to the market, represents the maximum value to the customer.

  17. Development of Parametric Mass and Volume Models for an Aerospace SOFC/Gas Turbine Hybrid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornabene, Robert; Wang, Xiao-yen; Steffen, Christopher J., Jr.; Freeh, Joshua E.

    2005-01-01

    In aerospace power systems, mass and volume are key considerations to produce a viable design. The utilization of fuel cells is being studied for a commercial aircraft electrical power unit. Based on preliminary analyses, a SOFC/gas turbine system may be a potential solution. This paper describes the parametric mass and volume models that are used to assess an aerospace hybrid system design. The design tool utilizes input from the thermodynamic system model and produces component sizing, performance, and mass estimates. The software is designed such that the thermodynamic model is linked to the mass and volume model to provide immediate feedback during the design process. It allows for automating an optimization process that accounts for mass and volume in its figure of merit. Each component in the system is modeled with a combination of theoretical and empirical approaches. A description of the assumptions and design analyses is presented.

  18. Fuel Cell Power Plant Initiative. Volume 2; Preliminary Design of a Fixed-Base LFP/SOFC Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veyo, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the preliminary design for a military fixed-base power system of 3 MWe nominal capacity using Westinghouse's tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell [SOFC] and Haldor Topsoe's logistic fuels processor [LFP]. The LFP provides to the fuel cell a methane rich sulfur free fuel stream derived from either DF-2 diesel fuel, or JP-8 turbine fuel. Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that directly convert the chemical energy contained in fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, or coal gas into electricity at high efficiency with no intermediate heat engine or dynamo. The SOFC is distinguished from other fuel cell types by its solid state ceramic structure and its high operating temperature, nominally 1000'C. The SOFC pioneered by Westinghouse has a tubular geometry closed at one end. A power generation stack is formed by aggregating many cells in an ordered array. The Westinghouse stack design is distinguished from other fuel cell stacks by the complete absence of high integrity seals between cell elements, cells, and between stack and manifolds. Further, the reformer for natural gas [predominantly methane] and the stack are thermally and hydraulically integrated with no requirement for process water. The technical viability of combining the tubular SOFC and a logistic fuels processor was demonstrated at 27 kWe scale in a test program sponsored by the Advanced Research Projects Agency [ARPA) and carried out at the Southern California Edison's [SCE] Highgrove generating station near San Bernardino, California in 1994/95. The LFP was a breadboard design supplied by Haldor Topsoe, Inc. under subcontract to Westinghouse. The test program was completely successful. The LFP fueled the SOFC for 766 hours on JP-8 and 1555 hours of DF-2. In addition, the fuel cell operated for 3261 hours on pipeline natural gas. Over the 5582 hours of operation, the SOFC generated 118 MVVH of electricity with no perceptible degradation in performance. The LFP processed military

  19. Solid oxide fuel cell systems for residential micro-combined heat and power in the UK: Key economic drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Adam; Leach, Matthew

    The ability of combined heat and power (CHP) to meet residential heat and power demands efficiently offers potentially significant financial and environmental advantages over centralised power generation and heat-provision through natural-gas fired boilers. A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) can operate at high overall efficiencies (heat and power) of 80-90%, offering an improvement over centralised generation, which is often unable to utilise waste heat. This paper applies an equivalent annual cost (EAC) minimisation model to a residential solid oxide fuel cell CHP system to determine what the driving factors are behind investment in this technology. We explore the performance of a hypothetical SOFC system—representing expectations of near to medium term technology development—under present UK market conditions. We find that households with small to average energy demands do not benefit from installation of a SOFC micro-CHP system, but larger energy demands do benefit under these conditions. However, this result is sensitive to a number of factors including stack capital cost, energy import and export prices, and plant lifetime. The results for small and average dwellings are shown to reverse under an observed change in energy import prices, an increase in electricity export price, a decrease in stack capital costs, or an improvement in stack lifetime.

  20. JV Task 46 - Development and Testing of a Thermally Integrated SOFC-Gasification System for Biomass Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Phillip Hutton; Nikhil Patel; Kyle Martin; Devinder Singh

    2008-02-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center has designed a biomass power system using a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) thermally integrated with a downdraft gasifier. In this system, the high-temperature effluent from the SOFC enables the operation of a substoichiometric air downdraft gasifier at an elevated temperature (1000 C). At this temperature, moisture in the biomass acts as an essential carbon-gasifying medium, reducing the equivalence ratio at which the gasifier can operate with complete carbon conversion. Calculations show gross conversion efficiencies up to 45% (higher heating value) for biomass moisture levels up to 40% (wt basis). Experimental work on a bench-scale gasifier demonstrated increased tar cracking within the gasifier and increased energy density of the resultant syngas. A series of experiments on wood chips demonstrated tar output in the range of 9.9 and 234 mg/m{sup 3}. Both button cells and a 100-watt stack was tested on syngas from the gasifier. Both achieved steady-state operation with a 22% and 15% drop in performance, respectively, relative to pure hydrogen. In addition, tar tolerance testing on button cells demonstrated an upper limit of tar tolerance of approximately 1%, well above the tar output of the gasifier. The predicted system efficiency was revised down to 33% gross and 27% net system efficiency because of the results of the gasifier and fuel cell experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of thermally integrating a gasifier and a high-temperature fuel cell in small distributed power systems.

  1. Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power

    SciTech Connect

    Vesely, Charles John-Paul; Fuchs, Benjamin S.; Booten, Chuck W.

    2010-03-31

    The following report documents the progress of the Cummins Power Generation (CPG) Diesel Fueled SOFC for Class 7/Class 8 On-Highway Truck Auxiliary Power (SOFC APU) development and final testing under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) contract DE-FC36-04GO14318. This report overviews and summarizes CPG and partner development leading to successful demonstration of the SOFC APU objectives and significant progress towards SOFC commercialization. Significant SOFC APU Milestones: Demonstrated: Operation meeting SOFC APU requirements on commercial Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) fuel. SOFC systems operating on dry CPOX reformate. Successful start-up and shut-down of SOFC APU system without inert gas purge. Developed: Low cost balance of plant concepts and compatible systems designs. Identified low cost, high volume components for balance of plant systems. Demonstrated efficient SOFC output power conditioning. Demonstrated SOFC control strategies and tuning methods.

  2. FEEDSTOCK-FLEXIBLE REFORMER SYSTEM (FFRS) FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL (SOFC)- QUALITY SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect

    Jezierski, Kelly; Tadd, Andrew; Schwank, Johannes; Kibler, Roland; McLean, David; Samineni, Mahesh; Smith, Ryan; Parvathikar, Sameer; Mayne, Joe; Westrich, Tom; Mader, Jerry; Faubert, F. Michael

    2010-07-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory funded this research collaboration effort between NextEnergy and the University of Michigan, who successfully designed, built, and tested a reformer system, which produced highquality syngas for use in SOFC and other applications, and a novel reactor system, which allowed for facile illumination of photocatalysts. Carbon and raw biomass gasification, sulfur tolerance of non-Platinum Group Metals (PGM) based (Ni/CeZrO2) reforming catalysts, photocatalysis reactions based on TiO2, and mild pyrolysis of biomass in ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated at low and medium temperatures (primarily 450 to 850 C) in an attempt to retain some structural value of the starting biomass. Despite a wide range of processes and feedstock composition, a literature survey showed that, gasifier products had narrow variation in composition, a restriction used to develop operating schemes for syngas cleanup. Three distinct reaction conditions were investigated: equilibrium, autothermal reforming of hydrocarbons, and the addition of O2 and steam to match the final (C/H/O) composition. Initial results showed rapid and significant deactivation of Ni/CeZrO2 catalysts upon introduction of thiophene, but both stable and unstable performance in the presence of sulfur were obtained. The key linkage appeared to be the hydrodesulfurization activity of the Ni reforming catalysts. For feed stoichiometries where high H2 production was thermodynamically favored, stable, albeit lower, H2 and CO production were obtained; but lower thermodynamic H2 concentrations resulted in continued catalyst deactivation and eventual poisoning. High H2 levels resulted in thiophene converting to H2S and S surface desorption, leading to stable performance; low H2 levels resulted in unconverted S and loss in H2 and CO production, as well as loss in thiophene conversion. Bimetallic catalysts did not outperform Ni-only catalysts, and small Ni particles were

  3. Westinghouse tubular SOFC technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.

    1992-12-01

    A summary of significant developments and accomplishments which have recently occurred throughout the tubular Solidi Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) program include: Demonstration that thousands of tubular solid oxide fuel cells can be fabricated with consistent and reproducible performance. Continuous operation of a 3 kWe tubular SOFC system for over six months at a customer`s test site. Demonstration of stable performance and lifetime in excess of 5,300 hours for a 3 kWe generator module, operating on desulfurized natural gas without external humidification. Demonstration of stable performance and life times in excess of 30,000 hours in multiple single cell tests. Design, construction and operation of a dedicated cell, module and generator Pre-Pilot Manufacturing Facility (PPMF). Successful 6,840 hour bundle tests of 50 cm. cells produced at the PPMF. Significant improvements in cell performance and life and marked reduction in cell degradation. Design, construction and successful operation of a 20 kWe tubular solid oxide fuel cell generator module. Design, construction, shipment and installation of 25 kWe (40 kWe peak power) field units.

  4. Westinghouse tubular SOFC technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of significant developments and accomplishments which have recently occurred throughout the tubular Solidi Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) program include: Demonstration that thousands of tubular solid oxide fuel cells can be fabricated with consistent and reproducible performance. Continuous operation of a 3 kWe tubular SOFC system for over six months at a customer's test site. Demonstration of stable performance and lifetime in excess of 5,300 hours for a 3 kWe generator module, operating on desulfurized natural gas without external humidification. Demonstration of stable performance and life times in excess of 30,000 hours in multiple single cell tests. Design, construction and operation of a dedicated cell, module and generator Pre-Pilot Manufacturing Facility (PPMF). Successful 6,840 hour bundle tests of 50 cm. cells produced at the PPMF. Significant improvements in cell performance and life and marked reduction in cell degradation. Design, construction and successful operation of a 20 kWe tubular solid oxide fuel cell generator module. Design, construction, shipment and installation of 25 kWe (40 kWe peak power) field units.

  5. Hydrogen Fueled Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) System for Long-Haul Rail Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Justin Jeff

    Freight movement of goods is the artery for America's economic health. Long-haul rail is the premier mode of transport on a ton-mile basis. Concerns regarding greenhouse gas and criteria pollutant emissions, however, have motivated the creation of annually increasing locomotive emissions standards. Health issues from diesel particulate matter, especially near rail yards, have also been on the rise. These factors and the potential to raise conventional diesel-electric locomotive performance warrants the investigation of using future fuels in a more efficient system for locomotive application. This research evaluates the dynamic performance of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) Hybrid system operating on hydrogen fuel to power a locomotive over a rail path starting from the Port of Los Angeles and ending in the City of Barstow. Physical constraints, representative locomotive operation logic, and basic design are used from a previous feasibility study and simulations are performed in the MATLAB Simulink environment. In-house controls are adapted to and expanded upon. Results indicate high fuel-to-electricity efficiencies of at least 54% compared to a conventional diesel-electric locomotive efficiency of 35%. Incorporation of properly calibrated feedback and feed-forward controls enables substantial load following of difficult transients that result from train kinematics while maintaining turbomachinery operating requirements and suppressing thermal stresses in the fuel cell stack. The power split between the SOFC and gas turbine is deduced to be a deterministic factor in the balance between capital and operational costs. Using hydrogen results in no emissions if renewable and offers a potential of 24.2% fuel energy savings for the rail industry.

  6. SOFC technology development at Rolls-Royce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, F. J.; Day, M. J.; Brandon, N. P.; Pashley, M. N.; Cassidy, M.

    Fuel cells have the prospect for exploiting fossil fuels more benignly and more efficiently than alternatives. The various types represent quite different technologies, with no clear winner, yet. Nevertheless, the high temperature MCFC and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) types seem better suited to power generation in a hydrocarbon fuel economy. Presently, the costs of MCFCs and SOFCs are too high to compete directly with contemporary power generation plant. Seeking to overcome the drawbacks of first generation fuel cells, over the past 7 years an innovative second generation SOFC concept has been evolved in the Rolls-Royce Strategic Research Centre, with encouraging results. It is distinguished from other types by the name: Integrated Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (IP-SOFC). It is a family of integrated system concepts supporting product flexibility with evolutionary stretch potential from a common SOFC module. Fabrication of the key component of the IP-SOFC, the "multi-cell membrane electrode assembly (multi-cell MEA) module" carrying many series connected cells with supported electrolyte membranes only 10 to 20 μm thick, has been proved. Development of the internal reforming subsystem, the next big hurdle, is now in hand. Following an outline of its salient features and test results, the methodology and results of recent IP-SOFC stack costing studies are presented, and the continuing research and development programme indicated.

  7. Development of a Low Cost 10kW Tubular SOFC Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Bessette, Norman; Litka, Anthony; Rawson, Jolyon; Schmidt, Douglas

    2013-06-06

    The DOE program funded from 2003 through early 2013 has brought the Acumentrics SOFC program from an early stage R&D program to an entry level commercial product offering. The development work started as one of the main core teams under the DOE Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the DOE. During the first phase of the program, lasting approximately 3-4 years, a 5kW machine was designed, manufactured and tested against the specification developed by NETL. This unit was also shipped to NETL for independent verification testing which validated all of the results achieved while in the laboratory at Acumentrics. The Acumentrics unit passed all criteria established from operational stability, efficiency, and cost projections. Passing of the SECA Phase I test allowed the program to move into Phase II of the program. During this phase, the overall objective was to further refine the unit meeting a higher level of performance stability as well as further cost reductions. During the first year of this new phase, the NETL SECA program was refocused towards larger size units and operation on coal gasification due to the severe rise in natural gas prices and refocus on the US supply of indigenous coal. At this point, the program was shifted to the U.S. DOE’s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) division located in Golden, Colorado. With this shift, the focus remained on smaller power units operational on gaseous fuels for a variety of applications including micro combined heat and power (mCHP). To achieve this goal, further enhancements in power, life expectancy and reductions in cost were necessary. The past 5 years have achieved these goals with machines that can now achieve over 40% electrical efficiency and field units that have now operated for close to a year and a half with minimal maintenance. The following report details not only the first phase while under the SECA program

  8. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance Delphi SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Shaffer; Gary Blake; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; Karl Haltiner; Larry Chick; David Schumann; Jeff Weissman; Gail Geiger; Ralphi Dellarocco

    2006-12-31

    The following report details the results under the DOE SECA program for the period July 2006 through December 2006. Developments pertain to the development of a 3 to 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. This report details technical results of the work performed under the following tasks for the SOFC Power System: Task 1 SOFC System Development; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant Components; Task 5 Project Management; and Task 6 System Modeling & Cell Evaluation for High Efficiency Coal-Based Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Hybrid System.

  9. SOFC INTERCONNECT DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Diane M. England

    2004-03-16

    An interconnect for an SOFC stack is used to connect fuel cells into a stack. SOFC stacks are expected to run for 40,000 hours and 10 thermal cycles for the stationary application and 10,000 hours and 7000 thermal cycles for the transportation application. The interconnect of a stack must be economical and robust enough to survive the SOFC stack operation temperature of 750 C and must maintain the electrical connection to the fuel cells throughout the lifetime and under thermal cycling conditions. Ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, and nickel-based superalloys were investigated as possible interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The alloys were thermally cycled in air and in a wet nitrogen-argon-hydrogen (N2-Ar-H2-H2O) atmosphere. Thermogravimetry was used to determine the parabolic oxidation rate constants of the alloys in both atmospheres. The area-specific resistance of the oxide scale and metal substrates were measured using a two-probe technique with platinum contacts. The study identifies two new interconnect designs which can be used with both bonded and compressive stack sealing mechanisms. The new interconnect designs offer a solution to chromium vaporization, which can lead to degradation of some (chromium-sensitive) SOFC cathodes.

  10. Modelling and control synthesis of a micro-combined heat and power interface for a concentrating solar power system in off-grid rural power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinsloo, Gerro; Dobson, Robert; Brent, Alan; Mammoli, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating solar power co-generation systems have been identified as potential stand-alone solar energy supply solutions in remote rural energy applications. This study describes the modelling and synthesis of a combined heat and power Stirling CSP system in order to evaluate its potential performance in small off-grid rural village applications in Africa. This Stirling micro-Combined Heat and Power (micro-CHP) system has a 1 kW electric capacity, with 3 kW of thermal generation capacity which is produced as waste heat recovered from the solar power generation process. As part of the development of an intelligent microgrid control and distribution solution, the Trinum micro-CHP system and other co-generation systems are systematically being modelled on the TRNSYS simulation platform. This paper describes the modelling and simulation of the Trinum micro-CHP configuration on TRNSYS as part of the process to develop the control automation solution for the smart rural microgrid in which the Trinum will serve as a solar powerpack. The results present simulated performance outputs for the Trinum micro-CHP system for a number of remote rural locations in Africa computed from real-time TRNSYS solar irradiation and weather data (yearly, monthly, daily) for the relevant locations. The focus of this paper is on the parametric modelling of the Trinum Stirling micro-CHP system, with specific reference to this system as a TRNSYS functional block in the microgrid simulation. The model is used to forecast the solar energy harvesting potential of the Trinum micro-CHP unit at a number of remote rural sites in Africa.

  11. Final Report, Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Dr Scott L.; Thrun, Dr Lora B.; Arkenberg, Mr Gene B.; Chenault, Ms Kellie M.

    2012-01-03

    This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm2. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year).

  12. Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Gene Arkenberg; Kellie Chenault

    2011-09-30

    This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm{sup 2}. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year). DISCLAIMER

  13. On the systematic optimization of ethanol fed SOFC-based electricity generating systems in terms of energy and exergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douvartzides, S. L.; Coutelieris, F. A.; Tsiakaras, P. E.

    An energy-exergy analysis was undertaken in order to optimize the operational conditions of a SOFC-based power plant fueled by ethanol. A certain plant configuration was contemplated, equipped with an external steam reformer, an afterburner, a mixer and two heat exchangers (preheaters). The most significant operational parameters are enunciated and their influence on the energy and exergy balances of the plant is discussed and optimized. An optimization strategy is presented and optimally controlled unit operations are specified through minimization and allocation of exergy costs.

  14. Thermal start-up behaviour and thermal management of SOFC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apfel, H.; Rzepka, M.; Tu, H.; Stimming, U.

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have many attractive features for widespread applications. The high operating temperature provides a valuable heat source and in contrast to low temperature fuel cells they not only tolerate substances such as CO but can even use them as fuel. Thus, reforming of hydrocarbon fuels for SOFCs can be done without additional gas purification. As both stack and hydrocarbon reformer unit have to be operated at high temperatures (700-1000 °C), thermal management plays an important role in the successful operation of SOFC systems. As the SOFC system contains ceramic components, both large thermal gradients in the system and thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) mismatch must be avoided. Matching TECs is done by selecting the suitable materials. Avoiding high temperature gradients is done by selecting the right system design and control strategies. In order to achieve both, we have built a finite element simulation for a complete SOFC systems which allows to study system parameters both during steady operation and during transients. Examples of the thermal start-up behaviour for several system configurations are given for selected components as well as internal temperatures of the SOFC-stack during start-up. The simulation model includes also the option to simulate the effects of internal methane reformation in the SOFC stack. As the minimum operation temperature is high, cooling down of the system has to be avoided if instant operation is desired. This can be achieved either passively by selecting suitable thermal insulation materials and/or actively by adopting a strategy for maintaining the temperature.

  15. Status of SOFCo SOFC technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Privette, R.; Perna, M.A.; Kneidel, K.

    1996-12-31

    SOFCo, a Babcock & Wilcox/Ceramatec Research & Development Limited Partnership, is a collaborative research and development venture to develop technologies related to planar, solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). SOFCo has successfully demonstrated a kW-class, solid-oxide fuel cell module operating on pipeline natural gas. The SOFC system design integrates the air preheater and the fuel processor with the fuel cell stacks into a compact test unit; this is the platform for multi-kW modules. The cells, made of tape-cast zirconia electrolyte and conventional electrode materials, exhibit excel lent stability in single-cell tests approaching 40,000 hours of operation. Stack tests using 10-cm and 15-cm cells with ceramic interconnects also show good performance and stability in tests for many thousands of hours.

  16. SOFC cells and stacks for complex fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Edward M. Sabolsky; Matthew Seabaugh; Katarzyna Sabolsky; Sergio A. Ibanez; Zhimin Zhong

    2007-07-01

    Reformed hydrocarbon and coal (syngas) fuels present an opportunity to integrate solid oxide fuel cells into the existing fuel infrastructure. However, these fuels often contain impurities or additives that may lead to cell degradation through sulfur poisoning or coking. Achieving high performance and sulfur tolerance in SOFCs operating on these fuels would simplify system balance of plant and sequestration of anode tail gas. NexTech Materials, Ltd., has developed a suite of materials and components (cells, seals, interconnects) designed for operation in sulfur-containing syngas fuels. These materials and component technologies have been integrated into an SOFC stack for testing on simulated propane, logistic fuel reformates and coal syngas. Details of the technical approach, cell and stack performance is reported.

  17. Business Case for a Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel Cell System in Commercial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Anderson, David M.; Amaya, Jodi P.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Srivastava, Viraj; Upton, Jaki F.

    2013-10-30

    Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a business case for CHP-FCSs in the range of 5 to 50 kWe. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. For this particular business case, commercial applications rather than residential or industrial are targeted. To understand the benefits of implementing a micro-CHP-FCS, the characteristics that determine their competitive advantage must first be identified. Locations with high electricity prices and low natural gas prices are ideal locations for micro-CHP-FCSs. Fortunately, these high spark spread locations are generally in the northeastern area of the United States and California where government incentives are already in place to offset the current high cost of the micro-CHP-FCSs. As a result of the inherently high efficiency of a fuel cell and their ability to use the waste heat that is generated as a CHP, they have higher efficiency. This results in lower fuel costs than comparable alternative small-scale power systems (e.g., microturbines and reciprocating engines). A variety of markets should consider micro-CHP-FCSs including those that require both heat and baseload electricity throughout the year. In addition, the reliable power of micro-CHP-FCSs could be beneficial to markets where electrical outages are especially frequent or costly. Greenhouse gas emission levels from micro-CHP-FCSs are 69 percent lower, and the human health costs are 99.9 percent lower, than those attributed to conventional coal-fired power plants. As a result, FCSs can allow a company to advertise as environmentally conscious and provide a bottom-line sales advantage. As a new technology in the early stages of adoption, micro-CHP-FCSs are currently more expensive than alternative

  18. Formulating liquid hydrocarbon fuels for SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, G. J.; Preece, J.; Kendall, K.

    The injection of liquid hydrocarbons directly into an SOFC system is considered for application to hybrid vehicles. The main problem is carbon deposition on the nickel anode when molecules such as ethanol or iso-octane are injected directly. Such carbon deposition has been studied using a microtubular SOFC with a mass spectrometer analysing the product gases to investigate the reaction sequence and also to investigate the deposited carbon by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO). The results show that only two liquids could be injected directly onto nickel cermet anodes without serious carbon blockage, methanol and methanoic acid. Even then, TPO experiments revealed deposition of small amounts of carbon which could be prevented by small additions of air or water to the fuel. Gasoline type molecules like iso-octane killed the SOFC in about 30 min operation, with about 90% of the molecular carbon being deposited on the nickel cermet anode. However, certain mixtures of iso-octane, water, alcohol and surfactant were found to produce beneficial results with remarkably low carbon deposition, less than 1% of the molecular carbon appearing on the anode. Such formulations had octane numbers appropriate to internal combustion engine operation.

  19. Tubular SOFC and SOFC/gas turbine combined cycle status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.E.; Lundberg, W.L.

    1996-12-31

    Presently under fabrication at Westinghouse for a consortium of Dutch and Danish utilities is the world`s first 100 kWe Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power generation system. This natural gas fueled experimental field unit will be installed near Arnhem, Netherlands, at an auxiliary district heating plant. Electrical generation efficiency of this simple cycle atmospheric pressure system will approach 50% [net ac/LHV]. For larger capacity systems, the horizon for the efficiency (atmospheric pressure) is about 55%. Pressurization would increase the efficiency. Objectives of the analyses reported were: (1) to document the improved performance potential of the two shaft turbine cycle given access to a better recuperator and lower lead losses, (2) to assess the performance of PSOFC/GT combined cycles in the 3 MW plant application that are based on use of a simple single shaft gas turbine having a design-point turbine inlet temperature that closely matches the temperature of the SOFC exhaust gas (about 850 C), (3) to estimate the performance potential of smaller combined cycle power plants employing a single SOFC submodule, and (4) to evaluate the cogeneration potential of such systems.

  20. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance Delphi SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Larry Chick; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann

    2003-05-20

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW SOFC power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: 1. Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with piped-in water (Demonstration System A). 2. Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This topical report covers work performed by Delphi Automotive Systems from January through June 2002 under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246 for the 5 kW mass-market automotive (gasoline) auxiliary power unit. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks for the automotive 5 kW system: 1. System Design and Integration 2. SOFC Stack Development 3. Reformer Development The next anticipated Technical Progress Report will be submitted January 30, 2003 and will include tasks contained within the cooperative agreement including development work on the Demonstration System A, if available.

  1. Refractory Glass Seals for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-07-01

    One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals must exhibit long-term stability and mechanical integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operation. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Among glass seals, rigid glass-ceramics, self-healing glass, and composite glass approaches have been investigated under the SECA Core Technology Program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed the refractory glass approach in light of the fact that higher sealing temperatures (e.g., 930-1000 degrees C) may enhance the ultimate in-service bulk strength and electrical conductivity of contact materials, as well as the bonding strength between contact materials and adjacent SOFC components, such as interconnect coatings and electrodes. This report summarizes the thermal, chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties of the refractory sealing glass.

  2. Design studies of mobile applications with SOFC-heat engine modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Wolfgang; Lorenz, Hagen

    The recent development of thin tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), microturbines and Stirling engines has inspired design studies of the integration of a SOFC-heat engine (HE) system within a car. The total power system consists of a SOFC-HE power generation unit, a power storage (battery) system, a power management system and electric motors at the wheels. The sizes of the HE and the SOFC stack are to be matched by the start-up requirements. The use of micro tubes allows a very high power density of the stack. The thermodynamic calculation of the cycle gives the actual design values for the study and indicates further steps for system optimisation. The first SOFC-GT layout lead to an electric efficiency of 45% for the cycle used as a base for a design study [The Design of Stationary and Mobile SOFC-GT Systems, UECT, 2001]. The design study shows that the space available in a mid-class car allows the integration of such a system including space reserves. A further improvement of the system might allow an electric efficiency of more than 55%. The integration of a Stirling engine instead of the microturbine is a second possibility and the object of an ongoing study. This was motivated by interesting results from the development of solar powered Stirling engines. Generally, the analyses show that the optimal match of the SOFC and the HE will be a key issue for any engineering solution.

  3. Demonstration and System Analysis of High Temperature Steam Electrolysis for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production Using SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; Carl M. Stoots; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01

    At the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, an integrated laboratory scale (ILS), 15 kW high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) facility has been developed under the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Initial operation of this facility resulted in over 400 hours of operation with an average hydrogen production rate of approximately 0.9 Nm3/hr. The integrated laboratory scale facility is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high-temperature gas handling), multiple-stack hot-zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, and other “integral” issues. Additionally, a reference process model of a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The reference plant design is driven by a 600 megawatt thermal high-temperature helium-cooled reactor coupled to a direct Brayton power cycle. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen consists of 4.01×106 cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. A nominal cell area-specific resistance, ASR, value of 0.4 Ohm•cm2 with a current density of 0.25 A/cm2 was used, and isothermal boundary conditions were assumed. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the low heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 47.1% at a hydrogen production rate of 2.36 kg/s with the high-temperature helium-cooled reactor concept. This paper documents the initial operation of the ILS, with experimental details about heat-up, initial stack performance, as well as long-term operation and stack degradation. The paper will also present the optimized design for the reference nuclear-driven HTE hydrogen production plant which may be compared with other hydrogen production methods and power cycles to evaluate relative performance characteristics and plant economics.

  4. Fundamental researches of SOFC in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    Demin, A.K.; Neuimin, A.D.; Perfiliev, M.V.

    1996-04-01

    The main results of research on ZrO{sub 2}-based solid electrolytes, electrodes and interconnects are reviewed. The mathematical models of the processes in SOFC are considered. Two types of SOFC stacks composed of tubular and block cells, as well the results of their tests are described.

  5. Progress in High Power Density SOFC Material Development for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Thomas L.; Sofie, Stephen W.; Setlock, John A.; Misra, Ajay K.

    2004-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems for aircraft applications require order of magnitude increase in specific power density and long life under aircraft operating conditions. Advanced SOFC materials and fabrication processes are being developed at NASA GRC to increase specific power density and durability of SOFC cell and stack. Initial research efforts for increasing specific power density are directed toward increasing the operating temperature for the SOFC system and reducing the weight of the stack. While significant research is underway to develop anode supported SOFC system operating at temperatures in the range of 650 - 850 C for ground power generation applications, such temperatures may not yield the power densities required for aircraft applications. For electrode-supported cells, SOFC stacks with power densities greater than 1.0 W/sq cm are favorable at temperatures in excess of 900 C. The performance of various commercial and developmental anode supported cells is currently being evaluated in the temperature range of 900 to 1000 C to assess the performance gains and materials reliability. The results from these studies will be presented. Since metal interconnects developed for lower temperature operation are not practical at these high temperatures, advanced perovskite based ceramic interconnects with high electronic conductivity and lower sintering temperatures are being developed. Another option for increasing specific power density of SOFC stacks is to decrease the stack weight. Since the interconnect contributes to a significant portion of the stack weight, considerable weight benefits can be derived by decreasing its thickness. Eliminating the gas channels in the interconnect by engineering the pore structure in both anode and cathode can offer significant reduction in thickness of the ceramic interconnect material. New solid oxide fuel cells are being developed with porous engineered electrode supported structures with a 10 - 20 micron thin

  6. Tubular SOFC and SOFC/Gas Turbine combined cycles-status and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.E.; Lundberg, W.L.

    1996-12-31

    Presently under fabrication at Westinghouse for EDB/ELSAM, a consortium of Dutch and Danish utilities, is the world`s first 100 kWe Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power generation system. This natural gas fueled experimental field unit will be installed near Arnhem, The Netherlands, at an auxiliary district heating plant (Hulp Warmte Centrale) at the Rivierweg in Westervoort, a site provided by NUON, one of the Dutch participants, and will supply ac power to the utility grid and hot water to the district heating system serving the Duiven/Westervoort area. The electrical generation efficiency of this simple cycle atmospheric pressure system will approach 50%. The analysis of conceptual designs for larger capacity systems indicates that the horizon for the efficiency of simple cycle atmospheric pressure units is about 55%.

  7. LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Haberman, Ben; Martinez-Baca, Carlos; Rush, Greg

    2013-05-31

    This report presents a summary of the work performed by LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. during the project LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development (DOE Award Number: DE-FE0000773) which commenced on October 1, 2009 and was completed on March 31, 2013. The aim of this project is for LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) to develop a multi-physics solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) computer code (MPC) for performance calculations of the LGFCS fuel cell structure to support fuel cell product design and development. A summary of the initial stages of the project is provided which describes the MPC requirements that were developed and the selection of a candidate code, STAR-CCM+ (CD-adapco). This is followed by a detailed description of the subsequent work program including code enhancement and model verification and validation activities. Details of the code enhancements that were implemented to facilitate MPC SOFC simulations are provided along with a description of the models that were built using the MPC and validated against experimental data. The modeling work described in this report represents a level of calculation detail that has not been previously available within LGFCS.

  8. Formulating liquid ethers for microtubular SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Kevin; Slinn, Matthew; Preece, John

    One of the key problems of applying solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in transportation is that conventional fuels like kerosene and diesel do not operate directly in SOFCs without prereforming to hydrogen and carbon monoxide which can be handled by the nickel cermet anode. SOFCs can internally reform certain hydrocarbon molecules such as methanol and methane. However, other liquid fuels usable in petrol or diesel internal combustion engines (ICEs) have not easily been reformable directly on the anode. This paper describes a search for liquid fuels which can be mixed with petrol or diesel and also injected directly into an SOFC without destroying the nickel anode. When fuel molecules such as octane are injected onto the conventional nickel/yttria stabilised zirconia (Ni/YSZ) SOFC fuel electrode, the anode rapidly becomes blocked by carbon deposition and the cell power drops to near zero in minutes. This degeneration of the anode can be inhibited by injection of air or water into the anode or by some upstream reforming just before entry to the SOFC. Some smaller molecules such as methane, methanol and methanoic acid produce a slight tendency to carbon deposition but not sufficient to prevent long term operation. In this project we have investigated a large number of molecules and now found that some liquid ethers do not significantly damage the anode when directly injected. These molecules and formulations with other components have been evaluated in this study. The theory put forward in this paper is that carbon-carbon bonds in the fuel are the main reason for anode damage. By testing a number of fuels without such bonds, particularly liquid ethers such as methyl formate and dimethoxy methane, it has been shown that SOFCs can run without substantial carbon formation. The proposal is that conventional fuels can be doped with these molecules to allow hybrid operation of an ICE/SOFC device.

  9. Manufacture of SOFC electrodes by wet powder spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkenhoener, R.; Mallener, W.; Buchkremer, H.P.

    1996-12-31

    The reproducible and commercial manufacturing of electrodes with enhanced electrochemical performance is of central importance for a successful technical realization of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) systems. The route of electrode fabrication for the SOFC by Wet Powder Spraying (WPS) is presented. Stabilized suspensions of the powder materials for the electrodes were sprayed onto a substrate by employing a spray gun. After drying of the layers, binder removal and sintering are performed in one step. The major advantage of this process is its applicability for a large variety of materials and its flexibility with regard to layer shape and thickness. Above all, flat or curved substrates of any size can be coated, thus opening up the possibility of {open_quotes}up-scaling{close_quotes} SOFC technology. Electrodes with an enhanced electrochemical performance were developed by gradually optimizing the different process steps. For example an optimized SOFC cathode of the composition La{sub 0.65}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} with 40% 8YSZ showed a mean overpotential of about -50 mV at a current density of -0.8 A/cm{sup 2}, with a standard deviation amounting to 16 mV (950{degrees}C, air). Such optimized electrodes can be manufactured with a high degree of reproducibility, as a result of employing a computer-controlled X-Y system for moving the spray gun. Several hundred sintered composites, comprising the substrate anode and the electrolyte, of 100x 100 mm{sup 2} were coated with the cathode by WPS and used for stack integration. The largest manufactured electrodes were 240x240 mm{sup 2}, and data concerning their thickness homogeneity and electrochemical performance are given.

  10. Fault Diagnosis Strategies for SOFC-Based Power Generation Plants.

    PubMed

    Costamagna, Paola; De Giorgi, Andrea; Gotelli, Alberto; Magistri, Loredana; Moser, Gabriele; Sciaccaluga, Emanuele; Trucco, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The success of distributed power generation by plants based on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is hindered by reliability problems that can be mitigated through an effective fault detection and isolation (FDI) system. However, the numerous operating conditions under which such plants can operate and the random size of the possible faults make identifying damaged plant components starting from the physical variables measured in the plant very difficult. In this context, we assess two classical FDI strategies (model-based with fault signature matrix and data-driven with statistical classification) and the combination of them. For this assessment, a quantitative model of the SOFC-based plant, which is able to simulate regular and faulty conditions, is used. Moreover, a hybrid approach based on the random forest (RF) classification method is introduced to address the discrimination of regular and faulty situations due to its practical advantages. Working with a common dataset, the FDI performances obtained using the aforementioned strategies, with different sets of monitored variables, are observed and compared. We conclude that the hybrid FDI strategy, realized by combining a model-based scheme with a statistical classifier, outperforms the other strategies. In addition, the inclusion of two physical variables that should be measured inside the SOFCs can significantly improve the FDI performance, despite the actual difficulty in performing such measurements. PMID:27556472

  11. Cold start dynamics and temperature sliding observer design of an automotive SOFC APU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Po-Hsu; Hong, Che-Wun

    This paper presents a dynamic model for studying the cold start dynamics and observer design of an auxiliary power unit (APU) for automotive applications. The APU is embedded with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack which is a quiet and pollutant-free electric generator; however, it suffers from slow start problem from ambient conditions. The SOFC APU system equips with an after-burner to accelerate the start-up transient in this research. The combustion chamber burns the residual fuel (and air) left from the SOFC to raise the exhaust temperature to preheat the SOFC stack through an energy recovery unit. Since thermal effect is the dominant factor that influences the SOFC transient and steady performance, a nonlinear real-time sliding observer for stack temperature was implemented into the system dynamics to monitor the temperature variation for future controller design. The simulation results show that a 100 W APU system in this research takes about 2 min (in theory) for start-up without considering the thermal limitation of the cell fracture.

  12. Recent Development of SOFC Metallic Interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Wu JW, Liu XB

    2010-04-01

    Interest in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) stems from their higher e±ciencies and lower levels of emitted pollu- tants, compared to traditional power production methods. Interconnects are a critical part in SOFC stacks, which connect cells in series electrically, and also separate air or oxygen at the cathode side from fuel at the anode side. Therefore, the requirements of interconnects are the most demanding, i:e:, to maintain high elec- trical conductivity, good stability in both reducing and oxidizing atmospheres, and close coe±cient of thermal expansion (CTE) match and good compatibility with other SOFC ceramic components. The paper reviewed the interconnect materials, and coatings for metallic interconnect materials.

  13. Development of Osaka gas type planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Iha, M.; Shiratori, A.; Chikagawa, O.

    1996-12-31

    Osaka Gas Co. has been developing a planar type SOFC (OG type SOFC) which has a suitable structure for stacking. Murata Mfg. Co. has begun to develop the OG type SOFC stack through joint program since 1993. Figure 1 shows OG type cell structure. Because each cell is sustained by cell holders acting air manifold, the load of upper cell is not put on the lower cells. Single cell is composed of 3-layered membrane and LaCrO{sub 3} separator. 5 single cells are mounted on the cell holder, connected with Ni felt electrically, and bonded by glassy material sealant. We call the 5-cell stack a unit. Stacking 13 units, we succeeded 870 W generation in 1993. But the power density was low, 0.11 Wcm{sup -2} because of crack in the electrolyte and gas leakage at some cells.

  14. Characterization of ceria-based SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Doshi, R.; Roubort, J.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-12-31

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) operating at low temperatures (500-700 C) offer many advantages over conventional zirconia-based fuel cells operating at higher temperatures. Cathode performance is being improved by using better materials and/or microstructures. Fabrication of thin dense electrolytes is also necessary to achieve high cell performances.

  15. FRACTURE FAILURE CRITERIA OF SOFC PEN STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Qu, Jianmin

    2007-04-30

    Thermal stresses and warpage of the PEN are unavoidable due to the temperature changes from the stress-free sintering temperature to room temperature and mismatch of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of various layers in the PEN structures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) during the PEN manufacturing process. In the meantime, additional mechanical stresses will also be created by mechanical flattening during the stack assembly process. The porous nature of anode and cathode in the PEN structures determines presence of the initial flaws and crack on the interfaces of anode/electrolyte/cathode and in the interior of the materials. The sintering/assembling induced stresses may cause the fracture failure of PEN structure. Therefore, fracture failure criteria for SOFC PEN structures is developed in order to ensure the structural integrity of the cell and stack of SOFC. In this paper, the fracture criteria based on the relationship between the critical energy release rate and critical curvature and maximum displacement of the warped cells caused by the temperature changes as well as mechanical flattening process is established so that possible failure of SOFC PEN structures may be predicted deterministically by the measurement of the curvature and displacement of the warped cells.

  16. Status of SOFC development at Siemens

    SciTech Connect

    Drenckhahn, W.; Blum, L.; Greiner, H.

    1996-12-31

    The Siemens SOFC development programme reached an important milestone in June 1995. A stack operating with hydrogen and oxygen produced a peak power of 10.7 kW at a current density of 0.7 A/cm{sup 2} and was running for more than 1400 hours. The SOFC configuration is based on a flat metal separator plate using the multiple cell array design. Improved PENs, functional layer and joining technique were implemented. Based on this concept, a 100 kW plant was designed The SOFC development at Siemens has been started in 1990 after a two years preparation phase. The first period with the goal of the demonstration of a 1 kW SOFC stack operation ended in 1993. This important milestone was finally reached in the begin of 1994. The second project phase with the final milestone of a 20 kW module operation will terminate at the end of 1996. This result will form a basis for the next phase in which a 50 to 100 kW pilot plant will be built and tested.

  17. Energy balance model of a SOFC cogenerator operated with biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van herle, Jan; Maréchal, F.; Leuenberger, S.; Favrat, D.

    A small cogeneration system based on a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) fed on the renewable energy source biogas is presented. An existing farm biogas production site (35 m 3 per day), currently equipped with a SOFC demonstration stack, is taken for reference. A process flow diagram was defined in a software package allowing to vary system operating parameters like the fuel inlet composition, reforming technology, stack temperature and stack current (or fuel conversion). For system reforming simplicity, a base case parameter set was defined as the fuel inlet of 60% CH 4:40% CO 2 mixed with air in a 1:1 ratio, together with 800 °C operating temperature and 80% fuel conversion. A model stack, consisting of 100 series elements of anode supported electrolyte cells of 100 cm 2 each, was calculated to deliver 3.1 kW el and 5.16 kW th from an input of 1.5 N m 3/h of biogas (8.95 kW LHV), corresponding to 33.8 and 57.6% electrical and thermal efficiencies (Lower Heating Values (LHVs)), respectively. The incidence on the efficiencies of the model system was examined by the variation of a number of parameters such as the CO 2 content in the biogas, the amount of air addition to the biogas stream, the addition of steam to the fuel inlet, the air excess ratio λ and the stack operating temperature, and the results discussed.

  18. Extended Durability Testing of an External Fuel Processor for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Perna; Anant Upadhyayula; Mark Scotto

    2012-11-05

    Durability testing was performed on an external fuel processor (EFP) for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power plant. The EFP enables the SOFC to reach high system efficiency (electrical efficiency up to 60%) using pipeline natural gas and eliminates the need for large quantities of bottled gases. LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) is developing natural gas-fired SOFC power plants for stationary power applications. These power plants will greatly benefit the public by reducing the cost of electricity while reducing the amount of gaseous emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides compared to conventional power plants. The EFP uses pipeline natural gas and air to provide all the gas streams required by the SOFC power plant; specifically those needed for start-up, normal operation, and shutdown. It includes a natural gas desulfurizer, a synthesis-gas generator and a start-gas generator. The research in this project demonstrated that the EFP could meet its performance and durability targets. The data generated helped assess the impact of long-term operation on system performance and system hardware. The research also showed the negative impact of ambient weather (both hot and cold conditions) on system operation and performance.

  19. Liquid-fueled SOFC power sources for transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, K. M.; Doshi, R.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    Traditionally, fuel cells have been developed for space or stationary terrestrial applications. As the first commercial 200-kW systems were being introduced by ONSI and Fuji Electric, the potentially much larger, but also more challenging, application in transportation was beginning to be addressed. As a result, fuel cell-powered buses have been designed and built, and R&D programs for fuel cell-powered passenger cars have been initiated. The engineering challenge of eventually replacing the internal combustion engine in buses, trucks, and passenger cars with fuel cell systems is to achieve much higher power densities and much lower costs than obtainable in systems designed for stationary applications. At present, the leading fuel cell candidate for transportation applications is, without question, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC). Offering ambient temperature start-up and the potential for a relatively high power density, the polymer technology has attracted the interest of automotive manufacturers worldwide. But the difficulties of fuel handling for the PEFC have led to a growing interest in exploring the prospects for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating on liquid fuels for transportation applications. Solid oxide fuel cells are much more compatible with liquid fuels (methanol or other hydrocarbons) and are potentially capable of power densities high enough for vehicular use. Two SOFC options for such use are discussed in this report.

  20. Reducing the Manufacturing Cost of Tubular SOFC Technology

    SciTech Connect

    George, R.A.; Bessette, N.F.

    1997-12-31

    In recent years, Westinghouse Electric Corporation has made great strides in advancing tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology towards commercialization by the year 2001. In 1993, Westinghouse initiated a program to develop a `MWe Class` (1-3 MWe) pressurized SOFC (PSOFC) gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power system for distributed power applications because of its: (1) ultra high efficiency (approx. 63% net AC/LHV CH{sub 4}), (2) its compatibility with a factory packaged, minimum site work philosophy, and (3) its cost effectiveness. Since then two cost studies on this market entry product performed by consultants to the U.S. Department of Energy have confirmed Westinghouse cost studies that fully installed costs of under $1300/kWe can be achieved in the early commercialization years for such small PSOFC/GT power systems. The paper will present the results of these cost studies in the areas of cell manufacturing cost, PSOFC generator manufacturing cost, balance-of-plant (BOP) cost, and system installation cost. In addition, cost of electricity calculations will be presented.

  1. Digital Manufacturing of Gradient Meshed SOFC Sealing Composites with Self-Healing Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kathy Lu; Christopher Story; W.T. Reynolds

    2007-12-21

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) hold great promise for clean power generation. However, high temperature stability and long term durability of the SOFC components have presented serious problems in SOFC technological advancement and commercialization. The seals of the fuel cells are the most challenging area to address. A high temperature gas seal is highly needed which is durable against cracking and gas leakage during thermal cycling and extended operation. This project investigates a novel composite seal by integrating 3D printed shape memory alloy (SMA) wires into a glass matrix. The SMA we use is TiNiHf and the glass matrix we use is SrO-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} (SLABS). Dilatometry shows to be an extremely useful tool in providing the CTEs. It pinpoints regions of different CTEs under simulated SOFC thermal cycles for the same glass. For the studied SLABS glass system, the region with the greatest CTE mismatch between the glass seal and the adjacent components is 40-500 C, the typical heating and cooling regions for SOFCs. Even for low temperature SOFC development, this region is still present and needs to be addressed. We have demonstrated that the proposed SLABS glass has great potential in mitigating the thermal expansion mismatch issues that are limiting the operation life of SOFCs. TiNiHf alloy has been successfully synthesized with the desired particle size for the 3DP process. The TiNiHf SMA shape memory effect very desirably overlaps with the problematic low CTE region of the glass. This supports the design intent that the gradient structure transition, phase transformation toughening, and self-healing of the SMA can be utilized to mitigate/eliminate the seal problem. For the 3DP process, a new binder has been identified to match with the specific chemistry of the SMA particles. This enables us to directly print SMA particles. Neutron diffraction shows to be an extremely useful tool in providing information

  2. Radiation heat transfer in SOFC materials and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, David L.; Fedorov, Andrei G.

    Radiative transport within the electrode and electrolyte layers, as well as surface-to-surface radiation within the fuel and oxygen flow channels, has the potential to dramatically influence temperature fields and overall operating conditions of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). On a larger scale, radiation from the stack to the environment, including heat losses through insulation, must be accounted for in the plant design, and is of critical importance for effective thermal management of the high temperature stack. In this report, we discuss the current state-of-the-art and the challenges that remain in understanding, predicting, and quantifying the effects of radiation in SOFC materials and systems. These phenomena are of great interest and importance not only from a fundamental perspective but also from a systems design point of view. Last, but not the least in importance, the determination of radiative properties of the materials involved - either through experimental methods or predictive models - must be an ongoing effort as new materials are continuously being developed.

  3. Fabrication and characteristics of unit cell for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Gwi-Yeol; Eom, Seung-Wook; Moon, Seong-In

    1996-12-31

    Research and development on solid oxide fuel cells in Korea have been mainly focused on unit cell and small stack. Fuel cell system is called clean generation system which not cause NOx or SOx. It is generation efficiency come to 50-60% in contrast to 40% of combustion generation system. Among the fuel cell system, solid oxide fuel cell is constructed of ceramics, so stack construction is simple, power density is very high, and there are no corrosion problems. The object of this study is to develop various composing material for SOFC generation system, and to test unit cell performance manufactured. So we try to present a guidance for developing mass power generation system. We concentrated on development of manufacturing process for cathode, anode and electrolyte.

  4. Sonochemistry in the service of SOFC research.

    PubMed

    Sakkas, Petros M; Schneider, Oliver; Sourkouni, Georgia; Argirusis, Christos

    2014-11-01

    Decoration of SOFC anode cermets with metal nanoparticles (NPs) enchance their ability and stability in natural gas to hydrogen reform. A novel sonoelectrochemical approach of Au-NPs synthesis (mean 12.31±2.69nm) is suggested, according to which the sonication is held constant while the electrochemical activity is either pulsed or continuous. The gold colloidal solution is cosonicated with state of the art cermet powder to yield particles decorated with Au-NPs. Nevertheless sonochemical routes of mixed molybdenum, rhenium or tungsten mixed oxides synthesis are utilized in order to decorate SOFC anode cermets. The decoration loading achieved spanned from 0.1 to 10.0wt.%. PMID:24561110

  5. Siemens SOFC Test Article and Module Design

    SciTech Connect

    2011-03-31

    Preliminary design studies of the 95 kWe-class SOFC test article continue resulting in a stack architecture of that is 1/3 of 250 kWe-class SOFC advanced module. The 95 kWeclass test article is envisioned to house 20 bundles (eight cells per bundle) of Delta8 cells with an active length of 100 cm. Significant progress was made in the conceptual design of the internal recirculation loop. Flow analyses were initiated in order to optimize the bundle row length for the 250 kWeclass advanced module. A preferred stack configuration based on acceptable flow and thermal distributions was identified. Potential module design and analysis issues associated with pressurized operation were identified.

  6. Considerations of Glass Sealing SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Weil, K. Scott; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Paxton, Dean M.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-08-31

    Due to their TEC matching to PEN components, excellent oxidation resistance, low cost and good fabricability, stainless steels have been used as the interconnect materials in planar SOFC. For being hermetical, the stainless steel interconnect ought to be sealed to YSZ electrolyte and/or another piece of metallic interconnect, usually using a sealing glass. The seal performance, which is critical factor to determine the reliability and durability of SOFC stack, largely depends on the chemical compatibility between the sealing glass and stainless steel. In this work, the ferritic stainless steel 446 and a barium-aluminosilicate base glass have been taken as an example for metallic interconnects and sealing glass, respectively, and the corrosion at the interface of metal and sealing glass has been investigated and understood. The methodology and results of the microscopic analysis and thermodynamic modeling will be presented, and the mechanism of corrosion at the interface will be discussed as well.

  7. Compressive Mica Seals for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2001-08-01

    Muscovite and phlogopite micas have been assessed as SOFC seals at 800C. Paper gaskets, composed of pressed mica platelets in an organic binder, proved ineffective seal materials predominantly because of their uneven surface. However, cleaved natural mica sheets (with no binder) indicated far superior sealing characteristics with leak rates lower than 0.1 sccm. cm-1 at 800C, and approximately 0.7 MPa (100 psi) compressive stress.

  8. Compressive Mica Seals for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2001-09-30

    Muscovite and phlogopite micas have been assessed as SOFC seals at 800 C. Paper gaskets, composed of pressed mica platelets in an organic binder, proved ineffective seal materials predominantly because of their uneven surface. However, cleaved natural mica sheets (with no binder) indicated far superior sealing characteristics with leak rates lower than 0.1 sccm.cm-1 at 800 C, and approximately 0.7 MPa (100 psi) compressive stress.

  9. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsman, Eric

    2015-08-31

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  10. Development of 5kW class MOLB type SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, M.; Esaki, Y.; Sakaki, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell development has been accelerated in recent years primarily due to its high efficiency and minimum environmental effect. Especially SOFC is receiving greater attention due to its excellent characteristics. Among several types of SOFC, MOLB (MOno block Layer Built) type SOFC provides following advantages for a large scale power plant; (1) Suitable for mass production, and (2) able to obtain high power density. Chubu Electric Power Company, Inc. (CEPCO) and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD. (MHI) have jointly developed and evaluated the MOLB type SOFC on since 1990. This paper presents recent progress on it.

  11. Effect of Samarium Oxide on the Electrical Conductivity of Plasma-Sprayed SOFC Anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, S. N.; Samadi, H.; Nemati, A.

    2016-05-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are rapidly becoming recognized as a new alternative to traditional energy conversion systems because of their high energy efficiency. From an ecological perspective, this environmentally friendly technology, which produces clean energy, is likely to be implemented more frequently in the future. However, the current SOFC technology still cannot meet the demands of commercial applications due to temperature constraints and high cost. To develop a marketable SOFC, suppliers have tended to reduce the operating temperatures by a few hundred degrees. The overall trend for SOFC materials is to reduce their service temperature of electrolyte. Meanwhile, it is important that the other components perform at the same temperature. Currently, the anodes of SOFCs are being studied in depth. Research has indicated that anodes based on a perovskite structure are a more promising candidate in SOFCs than the traditional system because they possess more favorable electrical properties. Among the perovskite-type oxides, SrTiO3 is one of the most promising compositions, with studies demonstrating that SrTiO3 exhibits particularly favorable electrical properties in contrast with other perovskite-type oxides. The main purpose of this article is to describe our study of the effect of rare-earth dopants with a perovskite structure on the electrical behavior of anodes in SOFCs. Sm2O3-doped SrTiO3 synthesized by a solid-state reaction was coated on substrate by atmospheric plasma spray. To compare the effect of the dopant on the electrical conductivity of strontium titanate, different concentrations of Sm2O3 were used. The samples were then investigated by x-ray diffraction, four-point probe at various temperatures (to determine the electrical conductivity), and a scanning electron microscope. The study showed that at room temperature, nondoped samples have a higher electrical resistance than doped samples. As the temperature was increased, the electrical

  12. Feasibility study for SOFC-GT hybrid locomotive power: Part I. Development of a dynamic 3.5 MW SOFC-GT FORTRAN model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Andrew S.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    2012-09-01

    This work presents the development of a dynamic SOFC-GT hybrid system model applied to a long-haul freight locomotive in operation. Given the expectations of the rail industry, the model is used to develop a preliminary analysis of the proposed system's operational capability on conventional diesel fuel as well as natural gas and hydrogen as potential fuels in the future. It is found that operation of the system on all three of these fuels is feasible with favorable efficiencies and reasonable dynamic response. The use of diesel fuel reformate in the SOFC presents a challenge to the electrochemistry, especially as it relates to control and optimization of the fuel utilization in the anode compartment. This is found to arise from the large amount of carbon monoxide in diesel reformate that is fed to the fuel cell, limiting the maximum fuel utilization possible. This presents an opportunity for further investigations into carbon monoxide electrochemical oxidation and/or system integration studies where the efficiency of the fuel reformer can be balanced against the needs of the SOFC.

  13. Mica-based Composite Compressive Seals for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y S.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2004-07-07

    One of the critical challenges facing planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is the need for reliable sealing technology. Seals are required for long-term stability and integrity in the high temperature SOFC environment during normal and transient operations. Several different approaches for sealing SOFC stacks are under development, including glass or glass-ceramic seals, metallic brazes, and compressive seals. Compressive seals potentially offer a significant and unique advantage over the other approaches by providing a means of mechanically ''de-coupling'' adjacent stack components, thereby minimizing the need for closely matching the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of the various SOFC stack components. In an attempt to help the SOFC industry overcome sealing challenges, PNNL is developing mica-based hybrid compressive seals which exhibit leak rates 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than obtained with simple mica gasket seals.

  14. Development of Ceramic Interconnect Materials for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Kyung J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Marina, Olga A.

    2010-08-05

    Currently, acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite is the state-of-the-art ceramic interconnect material for high temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) due to its fairly good electronic conductivity and chemical stability in both oxidizing and reducing atmospheres, and thermal compatibility with other cell components. The major challenge for acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite for SOFC interconnect applications is its inferior sintering behavior in air, which has been attributed to the development of a thin layer of Cr2O3 at the interparticle necks during the initial stages of sintering. In addition, lanthanum chromite is reactive with YSZ electrolyte at high temperatures, forming a highly resistive lanthanum zirconate phase (La2Zr2O7), which further complicates co-firing processes. Acceptor-doped yttrium chromite is considered to be one of the promising alternatives to acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite because it is more stable with respect to the formation of hydroxides in SOFC operating conditions, and the formation of impurity phases can be effectively avoided at co-firing temperatures. In addition, calcium-doped yttrium chromite exhibits higher mechanical strength than lanthanum chromite-based materials. The major drawback of yttrium chromite is considered to be its lower electrical conductivity than lanthanum chromite. The properties of yttrium chromites could possibly be improved and optimized by partial substitution of chromium with various transition metals. During FY10, PNNL investigated the effect of various transition metal doping on chemical stability, sintering and thermal expansion behavior, microstructure, electronic and ionic conductivity, and chemical compatibility with other cell components to develop the optimized ceramic interconnect material.

  15. Development of Lanthanum Ferrite SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Shelton, Jayne P.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted concerning compositional/microstructural modifications of a Sr-doped lanthanum ferrite (LSF) cathode and protective Sm-doped ceria (SDC) layer in an anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Emphasis was placed on achieving enhanced low temperature (700-800 degrees C) performance, and long-term cell stability. Investigations involved manipulation of the lanthanum ferrite chemistry, addition of noble metal oxygen reduction catalysts, incorporation of active cathode layer compositions containing Co, Fe and higher Sr contents, and attempts to optimize the ceria barrier layer between the LSF cathode and YSZ electrolyte.

  16. Reactions of hydrocarbons in small tubular SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, G. J.; Kendall, K.

    The benefits of SOFCs are likely to be optimally realised using fuels other than pure hydrogen, which is best employed in PEMFCs. This paper examines a number of plausible fuels including pure alkanes such as methane and iso-octane. Other compounds such as ammonia, methanol and methanoic acid have been shown to react very cleanly when injected directly into the SOFC. More complex fuels, e.g. ethanol and ethanoic acid tend to produce carbon deposits unless the inlet stream is much diluted, e.g. with argon or carbon dioxide. More complex real fuels such as natural gas, landfill gas and gasoline are also mentioned. The experiments involved mixing the fuel with a carrier gas and passing the composition down a zirconia fuel cell tube to examine electrochemical output, while analysing the reaction products using mass spectroscopy. Any carbon deposited was measured by temperature programmed oxidation at the end of the experiment. Windows of operation were found for many of the fuels examined.

  17. Analysis of SOFCs Using Reference Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Finklea, H.; Chen, X.; Gerdes, K.; Pakalapati, S.; Celik, I.

    2013-01-01

    Reference electrodes are frequently applied to isolate the performance of one electrode in a solid oxide fuel cell. However, reference electrode simulations raise doubt to veracity of data collected using reference electrodes. The simulations predict that the reported performance for the one electrode will frequently contain performance of both electrodes. Nonetheless, recent reports persistently treat data so collected as ideally isolated. This work confirms the predictions of the reference electrode simulations on two SOFC designs, and to provides a method of validating the data measured in the 3-electrode configuration. Validation is based on the assumption that a change in gas composition to one electrode does not affect the impedance of the other electrode at open circuit voltage. This assumption is supported by a full physics simulation of the SOFC. Three configurations of reference electrode and cell design are experimentally examined using various gas flows and two temperatures. Impedance data are subjected to deconvolution analysis and equivalent circuit fitting and approximate polarization resistances of the cathode and anode are determined. The results demonstrate that the utility of reference electrodes is limited and often wholly inappropriate. Reported impedances and single electrode polarization values must be scrutinized on this basis.

  18. Optimal integration strategies for a syngas fuelled SOFC and gas turbine hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yingru; Sadhukhan, Jhuma; Lanzini, Andrea; Brandon, Nigel; Shah, Nilay

    This article aims to develop a thermodynamic modelling and optimization framework for a thorough understanding of the optimal integration of fuel cell, gas turbine and other components in an ambient pressure SOFC-GT hybrid power plant. This method is based on the coupling of a syngas-fed SOFC model and an associated irreversible GT model, with an optimization algorithm developed using MATLAB to efficiently explore the range of possible operating conditions. Energy and entropy balance analysis has been carried out for the entire system to observe the irreversibility distribution within the plant and the contribution of different components. Based on the methodology developed, a comprehensive parametric analysis has been performed to explore the optimum system behavior, and predict the sensitivity of system performance to the variations in major design and operating parameters. The current density, operating temperature, fuel utilization and temperature gradient of the fuel cell, as well as the isentropic efficiencies and temperature ratio of the gas turbine cycle, together with three parameters related to the heat transfer between subsystems are all set to be controllable variables. Other factors affecting the hybrid efficiency have been further simulated and analysed. The model developed is able to predict the performance characteristics of a wide range of hybrid systems potentially sizing from 2000 to 2500 W m -2 with efficiencies varying between 50% and 60%. The analysis enables us to identify the system design tradeoffs, and therefore to determine better integration strategies for advanced SOFC-GT systems.

  19. Studies on Effective Utilization of SOFC Exhaust Heat Using Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terayama, Takeshi; Nagata, Susumu; Tanaka, Yohei; Momma, Akihiko; Kato, Tohru; Kunii, Masaru; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2013-07-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being researched around the world. In Japan, a compact SOFC system with rated alternative current (AC) power of 700 W has become available on the market, since the base load electricity demand for a standard home is said to be less than 700 W AC. To improve the generating efficiency of SOFC systems in the 700-W class, we focused on thermoelectric generation (TEG) technology, since there are a lot of temperature gradients in the system. Analysis based on simulations indicated the possibility of introducing thermoelectric generation at the air preheater, steam generator, and exhaust outlet. Among these options, incorporating a TEG heat exchanger comprising multiple CoSb3/SiGe-based TEG modules into the air preheater had potential to produce additional output of 37.5 W and an improvement in generating efficiency from 46% to 48.5%. Furthermore, by introducing thermoelectric generation at the other two locations, an increase in maximum output of more than 50 W and generating efficiency of 50% can be anticipated.

  20. An Integrated Approach to Modeling and Mitigating SOFC Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, A.; Haynes, C.; Qu, J.

    2005-01-27

    The objective of this project is to develop first-order failure criteria to be used for the initial design, material selection and optimization against thermomechanical failure of the PEN structure in high temperature SOFCs.

  1. Thermal management of power sources for mobile electronic devices based on micro-SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, S.; Iguchi, F.; Shimizu, M.; Yugami, H.

    2014-11-01

    Small power sources based on micro-SOFC for mobile electronic devices required two conditions, i,e, thermally compatibility and thermally self-sustain, because of high operating temperature over 300 oC. Moreover, high energy efficiency was also required. It meant that this system should be designed considering thermal management. In this study, we developed micro-SOFC packages which have three functions, thermal insulation, thermal recovery, and self-heating. Heat conduction analysis based on finite element method, and thermochemical calculation revealed that vacuum thermal insulation was effective for size reduction and gas-liquid heat exchanger could reduce the temperature of outer surface. We fabricated the package with three functions for proof of concept and evaluated. As a result, it was suggested that developed package could satisfy both two requirements with high efficiency.

  2. An operando surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) study of carbon deposition on SOFC anodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Lee, Jung-pil; Ding, Dong; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Park, Soojin; Liu, Meilin

    2015-09-01

    Thermally robust and chemically inert Ag@SiO2 nanoprobes are employed to provide the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect for an in situ/operando study of the early stage of carbon deposition on nickel-based solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes. The enhanced sensitivity to carbon enables the detection of different stages of coking, offering insights into intrinsic coking tolerance of material surfaces. Application of a thin coating of gadolinium doped ceria (GDC) enhances the resistance to coking of nickel surfaces. The electrochemically active Ni-YSZ interface appears to be more active for hydrocarbon reforming, resulting in the accumulation of different hydrocarbon molecules, which can be readily removed upon the application of an anodic current. Operando SERS is a powerful tool for the mechanistic study of coking in SOFC systems. It is also applicable to the study of other catalytic and electrochemical processes in a wide range of conditions. PMID:25599129

  3. Determination of interfacial adhesion strength between oxide scale and substrate for metallic SOFC interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Liu, W. N.; Stephens, E.; Khaleel, M. A.

    The interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the substrate is crucial to the reliability and durability of metallic interconnects in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operating environments. It is necessary, therefore, to establish a methodology to quantify the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and the metallic interconnect substrate, and furthermore to design and optimize the interconnect material as well as the coating materials to meet the design life of an SOFC system. In this paper, we present an integrated experimental/analytical methodology for quantifying the interfacial adhesion strength between the oxide scale and a ferritic stainless steel interconnect. Stair-stepping indentation tests are used in conjunction with subsequent finite element analyses to predict the interfacial strength between the oxide scale and Crofer 22 APU substrate.

  4. Cassette less SOFC stack and method of assembly

    DOEpatents

    Meinhardt, Kerry D

    2014-11-18

    A cassette less SOFC assembly and a method for creating such an assembly. The SOFC stack is characterized by an electrically isolated stack current path which allows welded interconnection between frame portions of the stack. In one embodiment electrically isolating a current path comprises the step of sealing a interconnect plate to a interconnect plate frame with an insulating seal. This enables the current path portion to be isolated from the structural frame an enables the cell frame to be welded together.

  5. Cycle Analysis using Exhaust Heat of SOFC and Turbine Combined Cycle by Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezawa, Shinya; Wakahara, Kenji; Araki, Takuto; Onda, Kazuo; Nagata, Susumu

    A power generating efficiency of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and gas turbine combined cycle is fairly high. However, the exhaust gas temperature of the combined cycle is still high, about 300°C. So it should be recovered for energy saving, for example, by absorption chiller. The energy demand for refrigeration cooling is recently increasing year by year in Japan. Then, we propose here a cogeneration system by series connection of SOFC, gas turbine and LiBr absorption chiller to convert the exhaust heat to the cooling heat. As a result of cycle analysis of the combined system with 500kW class SOFC, the bottoming single-effect absorption chiller can produce the refrigerating capacity of about 120kW, and the double-effect absorption chiller can produce a little higher refrigerating capacity of about 130kW without any additional fuel. But the double-effect absorption chiller became more expensive and complex than the single-effect chiller.

  6. Nondestructive cell evaluation techniques in SOFC stack manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderlich, C.

    2016-04-01

    Independent from the specifics of the application, a cost efficient manufacturing of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), its electrolyte membranes and other stack components, leading to reliable long-life stacks is the key for the commercial viability of this fuel cell technology. Tensile and shear stresses are most critical for ceramic components and especially for thin electrolyte membranes as used in SOFC cells. Although stack developers try to reduce tensile stresses acting on the electrolyte by either matching CTE of interconnects and electrolytes or by putting SOFC cells under some pressure - at least during transient operation of SOFC stacks ceramic cells will experience some tensile stresses. Electrolytes are required to have a high Weibull characteristic fracture strength. Practical experiences in stack manufacturing have shown that statistical fracture strength data generated by tests of electrolyte samples give limited information on electrolyte or cell quality. In addition, the cutting process of SOFC electrolytes has a major influence on crack initiation. Typically, any single crack in one the 30 to 80 cells in series connection will lead to a premature stack failure drastically reducing stack service life. Thus, for statistical reasons only 100% defect free SOFC cells must be assembled in stacks. This underlines the need for an automated inspection. So far, only manual processes of visual or mechanical electrolyte inspection are established. Fraunhofer IKTS has qualified the method of optical coherence tomography for an automated high throughput inspection. Alternatives like laser speckle photometry and acoustical methods are still under investigation.

  7. Clean combined-cycle SOFC power plant — cell modelling and process analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riensche, E.; Achenbach, E.; Froning, D.; Haines, M. R.; Heidug, W. K.; Lokurlu, A.; von Andrian, S.

    The design principle of a specially adapted solid-oxide fuel cell power plant for the production of electricity from hydrocarbons without the emission of greenhouse gases is described. To achieve CO 2 separation in the exhaust stream, it is necessary to burn the unused fuel without directly mixing it with air, which would introduce nitrogen. Therefore, the spent fuel is passed over a bank of oxygen ion conducting tubes very similar in configuration to the electrochemical tubes in the main stack of the fuel cell. In such an SOFC system, pure CO 2 is produced without the need for a special CO 2 separation process. After liquefaction, CO 2 can be re-injected into an underground reservoir. A plant simulation model consists of four main parts, that is, turbo-expansion of natural gas, fuel cell stack, periphery of the stack, and CO 2 recompression. A tubular SOFC concept is preferred. The spent fuel leaving the cell tube bundle is burned with pure oxygen instead of air. The oxygen is separated from the air in an additional small tube bundle of oxygen separation tubes. In this process, mixing of CO 2 and N 2 is avoided, so that liquefaction of CO 2 becomes feasible. As a design tool, a computer model for tubular cells with an air feed tube has been developed based on an existing planar model. Plant simulation indicates the main contributors to power production (tubular SOFC, exhaust air expander) and power consumption (air compressor, oxygen separation).

  8. Characterization of ceria-based SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Doshi, R.; Routbort, J.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-12-31

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) operating at low temperatures (500-700{degrees}C) offer many advantages over the conventional zirconia-based fuel cells operating at higher temperatures. Reduced operating temperatures result in: (1) Application of metallic interconnects with reduced oxidation problems (2) Reduced time for start-up and lower energy consumption to reach operating temperatures (3) Increased thermal cycle ability for the cell structure due to lower thermal stresses of expansion mismatches. While this type of fuel cell may be applied to stationary applications, mobile applications require the ability for rapid start-up and frequent thermal cycling. Ceria-based fuel cells are currently being developed in the U.K. at Imperial College, Netherlands at ECN, and U.S.A. at Ceramatec. The cells in each case are made from a doped ceria electrolyte and a La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub 1-y}Fe{sub y}O{sub 3} cathode.

  9. Development status of planar SOFCs at Sanyo

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, Yasuo; Akiyama, Yukinori; Yasuo, Takashi

    1996-12-31

    A 2 kW class combined cell stacked module (182 cm{sup 2} X 4X 17) was examined. An output power of 2.47 kW and output power density of 0.20 W/cm{sup 2} were obtained at the current density of 0.3 A/cm{sup 2}. The temperature uniformity is an important factor to develop large scale SOFC modules. Therefore, in this 2 kW class module, one cell was divided into four smaller unit cells to decrease temperature difference across these cells. Moreover, an internal heat-exchanging duct was arranged to spend the surplus heat effectively in the middle of the module. As for the basic research, the followings were investigated to improve thermal cycle characteristics. One was to adopt a silica/alumina-based sealing, material in order to absorb the thermal expansion difference between the electrolyte and the separator. Deterioration was quite small after 12 thermal cycles with a 150 by 150 mm single cell. The other was to use a heat-resisting ferritic alloy as a separator in a 50 by 50 mm single cell in order to decrease the thermal expansion coefficient of the separator. High performance was obtained for 2000 hours at 900{degrees}C in an endurance test and deterioration was quite small after a thermal cycle.

  10. Development of cofired type planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Hiroaki; Sakamoto, Sadaaki; Zhou, Hua-Bing

    1996-12-31

    We have developed fabrication process for planar SOFC fabricated with cofired anode/electrolyte/cathode multilayers and interconnects. By cofiring technique for the multilayers, we expect to reduce the thickness of the electrolyte layers, resulting in decrease of innerimpedance, and achieve low production cost. On the other hand, the cofiring technique requires that the sintering temperature, the shrinkage profiles and the thermal expansion characteristics of all component materials should be compatible with the other. It is, therefore, difficult to cofire the multilayers with large area. Using the multilayers with surface area of 150cm{sup 2}, we fabricated the multiple cell stacks. The maximum power of 5x4 multiple cell stack (5 planes of cells in series, 4 cells in parallel in each planes 484cm{sup 2} effective electrode area of each cell planes) was 601W (0.25Wcm{sup -2}, Uf=40%). However, the terminal voltage of the multiple cell stack decreased by the cause of cell cracking, gas leakage and degradation of cofired multilayers. This paper presents the improvements of cofired multilayers, and the performance of multiple cell stacks with the improved multilayers.

  11. Oxide diffusion in innovative SOFC cathode materials.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Thoréton, V; Pirovano, C; Capoen, E; Bogicevic, C; Nuns, N; Mamede, A-S; Dezanneau, G; Vannier, R N

    2014-01-01

    Oxide diffusion was studied in two innovative SOFC cathode materials, Ba(2)Co(9)O(14) and Ca(3)Co(4)O(9)+δ derivatives. Although oxygen diffusion was confirmed in the promising material Ba(2)Co(9)O(14), it was not possible to derive accurate transport parameters because of an oxidation process at the sample surface which has still to be clarified. In contrast, oxygen diffusion in the well-known Ca(3)Co(4)O(9)+δ thermoelectric material was improved when calcium was partly substituted with strontium, likely due to an increase of the volume of the rock salt layers in which the conduction process takes place. Although the diffusion coefficient remains low, interestingly, fast kinetics towards the oxygen molecule dissociation reaction were shown with surface exchange coefficients higher than those reported for the best cathode materials in the field. They increased with the strontium content; the Sr atoms potentially play a key role in the mechanism of oxygen molecule dissociation at the solid surface. PMID:25407246

  12. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture - Part B: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-09-01

    An important advantage of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as future systems for large scale power generation is the possibility of being efficiently integrated with processes for CO2 capture. Focusing on natural gas power generation, Part A of this work assessed the performances of advanced pressurised and atmospheric plant configurations (SOFC + GT and SOFC + ST, with fuel cell integration within a gas turbine or a steam turbine cycle) without CO2 separation. This Part B paper investigates such kind of power cycles when applied to CO2 capture, proposing two ultra-high efficiency plant configurations based on advanced intermediate-temperature SOFCs with internal reforming and low temperature CO2 separation process. The power plants are simulated at the 100 MW scale with a set of realistic assumptions about FC performances, main components and auxiliaries, and show the capability of exceeding 70% LHV efficiency with high CO2 capture (above 80%) and a low specific primary energy consumption for the CO2 avoided (1.1-2.4 MJ kg-1). Detailed results are presented in terms of energy and material balances, and a sensitivity analysis of plant performance is developed vs. FC voltage and fuel utilisation to investigate possible long-term improvements. Options for further improvement of the CO2 capture efficiency are also addressed.

  13. Synthesis, processing and properties of materials for SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Armstrong, T.A.; Kingsley, J.J.; Pederson, L.R.

    1994-03-01

    The synthesis and processing methods of complex oxide materials can significantly influence use in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). This paper discusses (1) effects of powder synthesis and conditioning on fabrication, i.e., sintering, where close, reproducible control of composition and structure are required, and (2) influences on electrical, mechanical, structural and electrochemical properties that can influence SOFC performance. Examples are given for chromites, manganites and related oxides used as interconnections and electrodes in SOFCs. Materials, from source to incorporation into the fuel cell and generator, is a major issue in the development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). An integral part of this is the synthesis from chemicals and other virgin materials, generally as an oxide or metal powder, which can become a SOFC component. In some instances, such as with electrochemical vapor deposition, the component is formed directly from the chemicals. The synthesized materials are then conditioned and processes prior to fabrication into the fuel cell component, either separately or in conjunction with other material components.

  14. Approaches to mitigate metal catalyst deactivation in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) fuel electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adijanto, Lawrence

    While Ni/YSZ cermets have been used successfully in SOFCs, they also have several limitations, thus motivating the use of highly conductive ceramics to replace the Ni components in SOFC anodes. Ceramic electrodes are promising for use in SOFC anodes because they are expected to be less susceptible to sintering and coking, be redox stable, and be more tolerant of impurities like sulfur. In this thesis, for catalytic studies, the infiltration procedure has been used to form composites which have greatly simplified the search for the best ceramics for anode applications. In the development of ceramic fuel electrodes for SOFC, high performance can only be achieved when a transition metal catalyst is added. Because of the high operating temperatures, deactivation of the metal catalyst by sintering and/or coking is a severe problem. In this thesis, two approaches aimed at mitigating metal catalyst deactivation which was achieved by: 1) designing a catalyst that is resistant to coking and sintering and 2) developing a new method for catalyst deposition, will be presented. The first approach involved synthesizing a self-regenerating, "smart" catalyst, in which Co, Cu, or Ni were inserted into the B-site of a perovskite oxide under oxidizing conditions and then brought back to the surface under reducing conditions. This restores lost surface area of sintered metal particles through an oxidation/reduction cycle. Results will be shown for each of the metals, as well as for Cu-Co mixed metal systems, which are found to exhibit good tolerance to carbon deposition and interesting catalytic properties. The second strategy involves depositing novel Pd CeO2 core-shell nanostructure catalysts onto a substrate surface which had been chemically modified to anchor the nanoparticles. The catalyst deposited onto the chemically modified, hydrophobic surface is shown to be uniform and well dispersed, and exhibit excellent thermal stability to temperatures as high as 1373 K. Similar metal

  15. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  16. Thermal stress analysis of a planar SOFC stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Kuang; Chen, Tsung-Ting; Chyou, Yau-Pin; Chiang, Lieh-Kwang

    The aim of this study is, by using finite element analysis (FEA), to characterize the thermal stress distribution in a planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack during various stages. The temperature profiles generated by an integrated thermo-electrochemical model were applied to calculate the thermal stress distributions in a multiple-cell SOFC stack by using a three-dimensional (3D) FEA model. The constructed 3D FEA model consists of the complete components used in a practical SOFC stack, including positive electrode-electrolyte-negative electrode (PEN) assembly, interconnect, nickel mesh, and gas-tight glass-ceramic seals. Incorporation of the glass-ceramic sealant, which was never considered in previous studies, into the 3D FEA model would produce more realistic results in thermal stress analysis and enhance the reliability of predicting potential failure locations in an SOFC stack. The effects of stack support condition, viscous behavior of the glass-ceramic sealant, temperature gradient, and thermal expansion mismatch between components were characterized. Modeling results indicated that a change in the support condition at the bottom frame of the SOFC stack would not cause significant changes in thermal stress distribution. Thermal stress distribution did not differ significantly in each unit cell of the multiple-cell stack due to a comparable in-plane temperature profile. By considering the viscous characteristics of the glass-ceramic sealant at temperatures above the glass-transition temperature, relaxation of thermal stresses in the PEN was predicted. The thermal expansion behavior of the metallic interconnect/frame had a greater influence on the thermal stress distribution in the PEN than did that of the glass-ceramic sealant due to the domination of interconnect/frame in the volume of a planar SOFC assembly.

  17. Advanced materials and design for low temperature SOFCs

    DOEpatents

    Wachsman, Eric D.; Yoon, Heesung; Lee, Kang Taek; Camaratta, Matthew; Ahn, Jin Soo

    2016-05-17

    Embodiments of the invention are directed to SOFC with a multilayer structure comprising a porous ceramic cathode, optionally a cathodic triple phase boundary layer, a bilayer electrolyte comprising a cerium oxide comprising layer and a bismuth oxide comprising layer, an anion functional layer, and a porous ceramic anode with electrical interconnects, wherein the SOFC displays a very high power density at temperatures below 700.degree. C. with hydrogen or hydrocarbon fuels. The low temperature conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy allows the fabrication of the fuel cells using stainless steel or other metal alloys rather than ceramic conductive oxides as the interconnects.

  18. Effects of composition on sintering of current interconnects in SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, L.A.; Bates, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    The sintering behavior of alkaline-earth-substituted lanthanum and yttrium chromites, which are candidates for the current interconnect in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was investigated. Extensive commercialization of SOFC technology may involve co-sintering as a method to reduce production costs. Co-sintering will require that the interconnect material reaches high density (closed porosity) under conditions in which the air-electrode material, a manganite, maintains substantial porosity and remains stable. Therefore, ideal chromite compositions are those that attain greater than 94% of theoretical density in high PO{sub 2} atmosphere at temperatures near or below 1400{degree}C.

  19. Effects of composition on sintering of current interconnects in SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Chick, L.A.; Bates, J.L.

    1992-11-01

    The sintering behavior of alkaline-earth-substituted lanthanum and yttrium chromites, which are candidates for the current interconnect in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was investigated. Extensive commercialization of SOFC technology may involve co-sintering as a method to reduce production costs. Co-sintering will require that the interconnect material reaches high density (closed porosity) under conditions in which the air-electrode material, a manganite, maintains substantial porosity and remains stable. Therefore, ideal chromite compositions are those that attain greater than 94% of theoretical density in high PO[sub 2] atmosphere at temperatures near or below 1400[degree]C.

  20. Corrosion Performance of Ferritic Steel for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-11-01

    Ferritic stainless steels have been identified as potential candidates for interconnects in planar-type solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) operating below 800ºC. Crofer 22 APU was selected for this study. It was studied under simulated SOFC-interconnect dual environment conditions with humidified air on one side of the sample and humidified hydrogen on the other side at 750ºC. The surfaces of the oxidized samples were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with microanalytical capabilities. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was also used in this study.

  1. Balance of plant for SOFC experiences with the planning, engineering, construction and testing of a 10 kW planar SOFC pilot plant

    SciTech Connect

    Klov, K.; Sundal, P.; Monsen, T.; Vik, A.

    1996-12-31

    The Statoil Solide Oxide Fuel Cell Research Program was started in January 1991. Some results from this Program were presented to the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar in San Diego. The final technical milestone for the program was to design, engineer, construct and test a 10 kW pilot plant. From the very beginning, the importance of coordination and integration in the development of components, subsystems and systems, combined with basic research on cell and stack performance, were established as the guidelines for the program. In this way the progress towards the final goal was not a matter of making the best individual cell, the best stack or a superior balance of plant, but to build an efficient, reliable and operative pilot plant system, and thus make a further step towards a verification of commercial SOFC system technology.

  2. Development of SOFC anodes resistant to sulfur poisoning and carbon deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Song Ho

    The advantages of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) over other types of fuel cells include high energy efficiency and excellent fuel flexibility. In particular, the possibility of direct utilization of fossil fuels and renewable fuels (e.g., bio-fuels) may significantly reduce the cost of SOFC technologies. However, it is known that these types of fuels contain many contaminants that may be detrimental to SOFC performance. Among the contaminants commonly encountered in readily available fuels, sulfur-containing compounds could dramatically reduce the catalytic activity of Ni-based anodes under SOFC operating conditions. While various desulphurization processes have been developed for the removal of sulfur species to different levels, the process becomes another source of high cost and system complexity in order to achieve low concentration of sulfur species. Thus, the design of sulfur tolerant anode materials is essential to durability and commercialization of SOFCs. Another technical challenge to overcome for direct utilization of hydrocarbon fuels is carbon deposition. Carbon formation on Ni significantly degrades fuel cell performance by covering the electrochemically active sites at the anode. Therefore, the prevention of the carbon deposition is a key technical issue for the direct use of hydrocarbon fuels in a SOFC. In this research, the surface of a dense Ni-YSZ anode was modified with a thin-film coating of niobium oxide (Nb2O5) in order to understand the mechanism of sulfur tolerance and the behavior of carbon deposition. Results suggest that the niobium oxide was reduced to NbO 2 under operating conditions, which has high electrical conductivity. The NbOx coated dense Ni-YSZ showed sulfur tolerance when exposed to 50 ppm H2S at 700°C over 12 h. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis suggest that different phases of NbSx formed on the surface. Further, the DOS (density of state) analysis of NbO2, NbS, and NbS2 indicates that niobium sulfides can be considered

  3. Clad metals, roll bonding and their applications for SOFC interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lichun; Yang, Zhenguo; Jha, Bijendra; Xia, Guanguang; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    Metallic interconnects have been becoming an increasingly interesting topic in the development in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). High temperature oxidation resistant alloys are currently considered as candidate materials. Among these alloys however, different groups of alloys demonstrate different advantages and disadvantages, and few if any can completely satisfy the stringent requirements for the application. To integrate the advantages and avoid the disadvantages of different groups of alloys, clad metal has been proposed for SOFC interconnect applications and interconnect structures. This paper gives a brief overview of the cladding approach and its applications, and discuss the viability of this technology to fabricate the metallic layered-structure interconnects. To examine the feasibility of this approach, the austenitic Ni-base alloy Haynes 230 and the ferritic stainless steel AL 453 were selected as examples and manufactured into a clad metal. Its suitability as an interconnect construction material was investigated.

  4. Clad metals by roll bonding for SOFC interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Jha, B; Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2006-08-01

    Metallic interconnects have been becoming an increasingly interesting topic in the development in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). High temperature oxidation resistant alloys are currently considered as candidate materials. Among these alloys however, different groups of alloys demonstrate different advantages and disadvantages, and few if any can completely satisfy the stringent requirements for the application. To integrate the advantages and avoid the disadvantages of different groups of alloys, clad metal has been proposed for SOFC interconnect applications and interconnect structures. This paper gives a brief overview of the cladding approach and its applications, and discuss the viability of this technology to fabricate the metallic layered-structure interconnects. To examine the feasibility of this approach, the austenitic Ni-base alloy Haynes 230 and the ferritic stainless steel AL 453 were selected as examples and manufactured into a clad metal. Its suitability as an interconnect construction material was investigated.

  5. Study on durability for thermal cycle of planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Motoo; Nakata, Kei-ichi; Wakayama, Sin-ichi

    1996-12-31

    TONEN CORPORATION has developed planar type SOFC since 1986. We demonstrated the output of 1.3 kW in 1991 and 5.1 kW in 1995. Simultaneously we have studied how to raise electric efficiency and reliability utilizing hydrogen and propane as fuel. Durability for thermal cycle is one of the most important problems of planar SOFC to make it more practical. The planar type SOFC is made up of separator, zirconia electrolyte and glass sealant. The thermal expansion of these components are expected to be the same value, however, they still possess small differences. In this situation, a thermal cycle causes a thermal stress due to the difference of the cell components and is often followed by a rupture in cell components, therefore, the analysis of the thermal stress should give us much useful information. The thermal cycle process consists of a heating up and cooling down procedure. Zirconia electrolyte is not bonded to the separator under the condition of the initial heating up procedure, and glass sealant becomes soft or melts and glass seals spaces between the zirconia and separator. The glass sealant becomes harder with the cooling down procedure. Moreover, zirconia is tightly bonded with separator below a temperature which is defined as a constraint temperature and thermal stress also occurs. This indicates that the heating up process relaxes the thermal stress and the cooling down increases it. In this paper, we simulated dependence of the stress on the sealing configuration, thermal expansion of sealant and constraint temperature of sealant glass. Furthermore, we presented SOFC electrical properties after a thermal cycle.

  6. All-Ceramic SOFC Tolerant to Oxygen, Carbon and Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Greg W. ); Hardy, John S. ); Meinhardt, Kerry D. ); Marina, Olga A. ); Simner, Steve P. )

    2002-11-21

    Novel strontium titanate-ceria composite solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode materials[1] were tested in single electrolyte-supported cells in the temperature range 600-900 degrees centigrade. Power densities of 420 to 350 mW/cm2 were generated in wet hydrogen at 0.7 Volt at 850 and 800 degrees centigrade, respectively. Moreover, ceramic anodes offered higher tolerance to oxidizing environments, sulfur-containing environments and hydrocarbons.

  7. Investigation of Performance of SCN-1 Pure Glass as Sealant Used in SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-03-01

    As its name implies, self-healing glass seal has the potential of restoring its mechanical properties upon being reheated to stack operating temperature, even when it has experienced some cooling induced damage/crack at room temperature. Such a self-healing feature is desirable for achieving high seal reliability during thermal cycling. On the other hand, self-healing glass is also characterized by its low mechanical stiffness and high creep rate at the typical operating temperature of SOFCs. Therefore, from a design’s perspective, it is important to know the long term geometric stability and thermal mechanical behaviors of the self-healing glass under the stack operating conditions. These predictive capabilities will guide the design and optimization of a reliable sealing system that potentially utilizes self-healing glass as well as other ceramic seal components in achieving the ultimate goal of SOFC. In this report, we focused on predicting the effects of various generic seal design parameters on the stresses in the seal. For this purpose, we take the test cell used in the leakage test for compliant glass seals conducted in PNNL as our initial modeling geometry. The effect of the ceramic stopper on the geometry stability of the self-healing glass sealants is studied first. Then we explored the effect of various interfaces such as stopper and glass, stopper and PEN, as well stopper and IC plate, on the geometry stability and reliability of glass during the operating and cooling processes.

  8. A Symmetrical, Planar SOFC Design for NASA's High Specific Power Density Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Thomas L.; Sofie, Stephen W.

    2007-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems for aircraft applications require an order of magnitude increase in specific power density (1.0 kW/kg) and long life. While significant research is underway to develop anode supported cells which operate at temperatures in the range of 650-800 C, concerns about Cr-contamination from the metal interconnect may drive the operating temperature down further, to 750 C and lower. Higher temperatures, 900-1000 C, are more favorable for SOFC stacks to achieve specific power densities of 1.0 kW/kg. Since metal interconnects are not practical at these high temperatures and can account for up to 75% of the weight of the stack, NASA is pursuing a design that uses a thin, LaCrO3-based ceramic interconnect that incorporates gas channels into the electrodes. The bi-electrode supported cell (BSC) uses porous YSZ scaffolds, on either side of a 10-20 microns electrolyte. The porous support regions are fabricated with graded porosity using the freeze-tape casting process which can be tailored for fuel and air flow. Removing gas channels from the interconnect simplifies the stack design and allows the ceramic interconnect to be kept thin, on the order of 50 -100 microns. The YSZ electrode scaffolds are infiltrated with active electrode materials following the high temperature sintering step. The NASA-BSC is symmetrical and CTE matched, providing balanced stresses and favorable mechanical properties for vibration and thermal cycling.

  9. Development and Application of HVOF Sprayed Spinel Protective Coating for SOFC Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, O.; Pihlatie, M.; Rautanen, M.; Himanen, O.; Lagerbom, J.; Mäkinen, M.; Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Kiviaho, J.

    2013-06-01

    Protective coatings are needed for metallic interconnects used in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks to prevent excessive high-temperature oxidation and evaporation of chromium species. These phenomena affect the lifetime of the stacks by increasing the area-specific resistance (ASR) and poisoning of the cathode. Protective MnCo2O4 and MnCo1.8Fe0.2O4 coatings were applied on ferritic steel interconnect material (Crofer 22 APU) by high velocity oxy fuel spraying. The substrate-coating systems were tested in long-term exposure tests to investigate their high-temperature oxidation behavior. Additionally, the ASRs were measured at 700 °C for 1000 h. Finally, a real coated interconnect was used in a SOFC single-cell stack for 6000 h. Post-mortem analysis was carried out with scanning electron microscopy. The deposited coatings reduced significantly the oxidation of the metal, exhibited low and stable ASR and reduced effectively the migration of chromium.

  10. Development of 10kW SOFC module

    SciTech Connect

    Hisatome, N.; Nagata, K.; Kakigami, S.

    1996-12-31

    Mitsubishi Heavy industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been developing tubular type Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) since 1984. A 1 kW module of SOFC has been continuously operated for 3,000 hours with 2 scheduled thermal cycles at Electric Power Development Co., Inc. (EPDC) Wakamatsu Power Station in 1993. We have obtained of 34% (HHV as H{sub 2}) module efficiency and deterioration rate of 2% Per 1,000 hours in this field test. As for next step, we have developed 10 kW module in 1995. The 10 kW module has been operated for 5,000 hours continuously. This module does not need heating support to maintain the operation temperature, and the module efficiency was 34% (HHV as H{sub 2}). On the other hand, we have started developing the technology of pressurized SOFC. In 1996, pressurized MW module has been tested at MHI Nagasaki Shipyard & Machinery, Works. We are now planning the development of pressurized 10 kW module.

  11. Innovative Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Raj

    2008-06-30

    A functioning SOFC requires different type of seals such as metal-metal, metal-ceramic, and ceramic-ceramic. These seals must function at high temperatures between 600--900{sup o}C and in oxidizing and reducing environments of the fuels and air. Among the different type of seals, the metal-metal seals can be readily fabricated using metal joining, soldering, and brazing techniques. However, the metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic seals require significant research and development because the brittle nature of ceramics/glasses can lead to fracture and loss of seal integrity and functionality. Consequently, any seals involving ceramics/glasses require a significant attention and technology development for reliable SOFC operation. This final report is prepared to describe the progress made in the program on the needs, approaches, and performance of high temperature seals for SOFC. In particular, a new concept of self-healing glass seals is pursued for making seals between metal-ceramic material combinations, including some with a significant expansion mismatch.

  12. High-temperature seals for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raj N.

    2006-08-01

    A functioning solid oxide fuel-cell (SOFC) may require all types of seals, such as metal-metal, metal-ceramic, and ceramic-ceramic. These seals must function at high temperatures between 600 and 900 °C and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuels and air. Among the different types of seals, the metal-metal seals can be readily fabricated using metal joining, soldering, and brazing techniques. However, metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic seals require significant research and development because the brittle nature of ceramics/glasses can lead to fracture and loss of seal integrity and functionality. Consequently, any seals involving ceramics/glasses also require significant attention and technology development for reliable SOFC operation. This paper is prepared to primarily address the needs and possible approaches for high-temperature seals for SOFC and seals fabricated using some of these approaches. A new concept of self-healing glass seals is proposed for making seals among material combinations with a significant expansion mismatches.

  13. Biogas as a fuel source for SOFC co-generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van herle, Jan; Membrez, Yves; Bucheli, Olivier

    This study reports on the combination of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generators fueled with biogas as renewable energy source, recoverable from wastes but at present underexploited. From a mobilisable near-future potential in the European Union (EU-15) of 17 million tonnes oil equivalent (Mtoe), under 15% appears to be converted today into useful heat and power (2 Mtoe). SOFCs could improve and promote the exploitation of biogas on manifold generation sites as small combined heat and power (5-50 kW el), especially for farm and sewage installations, raising the electrical conversion efficiency on such reduced and variable power level. Larger module packs of the high temperature ceramic converter would also be capable of operating on contaminated fuel of low heating value (less than 40% that of natural gas) which can emanate from landfill sites (MW-size). Landfill gas delivers 80% of current world biogas production. This document compiles and estimates biogas data on actual production and future potential and presents the thermodynamics of the biogas reforming and electrochemical conversion processes. A case study is reported of the energy balance of a small SOFC co-generator operated with agricultural biogas, the largest potential source.

  14. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; H. Skip Mieney

    2003-06-09

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with piped-in water (Demonstration System A); and Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from July through December 2002 under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246 for the 5 kW mass-market automotive (gasoline) auxiliary power unit. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks for the automotive 5 kW system: Task 1--System Design and Integration; Task 2--Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3--Reformer Developments; Task 4--Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5--Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6--System Fabrication; and Task 7--System Testing.

  15. Global Failure Criteria for SOFC Positive/Electrolyte/Negative (PEN) Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Qu, Jianmin

    2007-04-01

    Due to the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients (TEC) of the various layer materials in SOFC, the internal stresses are unavoidable under temperature differential. In order to create the reliable cell and stack of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), it is necessary to develop a failure criterion for SOFC PEN structures for the initial failures occurred during cell/stack assembly. In this paper, a global failure criterion is developed for the initial design against mechanical failure of the PEN structure in high temperature SOFCs. The relationship of the critical energy release rate and critical curvature and maximum displacement of the warpage of the cells caused by the temperature differential is established so that the failure reliability of SOFC PEN structures may be determined by the measurement of the curvature and displacement of the warpaged cells.

  16. SOFC chromite sintering and electrolyte/air-electrode interface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Chick, L.A.; Youngblood, G.E.

    1992-04-01

    Air sintering of chromites was investigated in La(Sr)CrO{sub 3}, La(Ca)CrO{sub 3}, and Y(Ca)CrO{sub 3}. Effects of alkaline earth dopant level and chromium enrichment/depletion on chromite sintered densities and microstructures are discussed. Ac impedance spectroscopy and dc polarization coupled with an unbonded interface cell were used to examine SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells) electrochemical reactions at solid-solid-gas interfaces, particularly for La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}. 5 refs.

  17. SOFC chromite sintering and electrolyte/air-electrode interface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.L.; Chick, L.A.; Youngblood, G.E.

    1992-04-01

    Air sintering of chromites was investigated in La(Sr)CrO[sub 3], La(Ca)CrO[sub 3], and Y(Ca)CrO[sub 3]. Effects of alkaline earth dopant level and chromium enrichment/depletion on chromite sintered densities and microstructures are discussed. Ac impedance spectroscopy and dc polarization coupled with an unbonded interface cell were used to examine SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells) electrochemical reactions at solid-solid-gas interfaces, particularly for La[sub 1-x]Sr[sub x]MnO[sub 3]. 5 refs.

  18. Improvement of SOFC electrodes using mixed ionic-electronic conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Y.; Hishinuma, M.

    1996-12-31

    Since the electrode reaction of SOFC is limited to the proximity of a triple phase boundary (TPB), the local current density at the electrode and electrolyte interface is larger than mean current density, which causes large ohmic and electrode polarization. This paper describes an application of mixed ionic-electronic conductors to reduce such polarization by means of (1) enhancing ionic conductivity of the electrolyte surface layer by coating a high ionic conductors, and (2) reducing the local current density by increasing the electrochemically active sites.

  19. Overview of SOFC Anode Interactions with Coal Gas Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    O. A. Marina; L. R. Pederson; R. Gemmen; K. Gerdes; H. Finklea; I. B. Celik

    2010-03-01

    An overview of the results of SOFC anode interactions with phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, antimony, and hydrogen chloride as single contaminants or in combinations is discussed. Tests were performed using both anode- and electrolyte-supported cells in synthetic and actual coal gas for periods greater than 1000 hours. Post-test analyses were performed to identify reaction products formed and their distribution, and compared to phases expected from thermochemical modeling. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish maximum permissible concentrations for impurities in coal gas, to aid in the selection of appropriate coal gas clean-up technologies.

  20. SURFACE SEGREGATION STUDIES OF SOFC CATHODES: COMBINING SOFT X-RAYS AND ELECTROCHEMICAL IMPEDENCE SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Miara, Lincoln J.; Piper, L.F.J.; Davis, Jacob N.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Basu, Soumendra; Smith, K. E.; Pal, Uday B.; Gopalan, Srikanth

    2010-12-01

    A system to grow heteroepitaxial thin-films of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes on single crystal substrates was developed. The cathode composition investigated was 20% strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on single crystal (111) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. By combining electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy XAS measurements, we conclude that electrically driven cation migration away from the two-phase gas-cathode interface results in improved electrochemical performance. Our results provide support to the premise that the removal of surface passivating phases containing Sr2+ and Mn2+, which readily form at elevated temperatures even in O2 atmospheric pressures, is responsible for the improved cathodic performance upon application of a bias.

  1. Corrosion of Metallic SOFC Interconnects in Coal Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Dastane, R.R.; Liu, X.; Johnson, C., Mao, Scott

    2007-09-01

    With recent reductions in the operating temperature of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC), the potential of using metallic interconnect has gone up. There is also an interest in using Coal syngas as the fuel gas and thus there is a need to analyze the behavior and performance of metallic interconnects when exposed to Coal syngas. Three high temperature material alloys, Crofer 22 APU, Ebrite and Haynes 230, having the potential to be used as SOFC interconnects were studied in simulated wet coal syngas. These alloys were exposed to syngas at 800 degrees C and for 100 hours. The exposure to coal syngas led to the formation of oxides and spinels, which evidently led to an increase in electrical resistance. Oxidation in a reducing and carburizing environment leads to unique phase and morphology formations. A comparative analysis was carried out for all the three alloys, wherein the samples were characterized by using SEM, EDS, Raman and X-Ray diffraction to obtain the morphology, thickness, composition and crystal structure of the oxides and spinels

  2. Tracking Oxygen Vacancies in Thin Film SOFC Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Donovan; Kumar, Amit; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei; Shao-Horn, Yang; Crumlin, Ethan; Mutoro, Eva; Biegalski, Michael; Christen, Hans; Pennycook, Stephen; Borisevich, Albina

    2011-03-01

    Oxygen vacancies have been proposed to control the rate of the oxygen reduction reaction and ionic transport in complex oxides used as solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes [1,2]. In this study oxygen vacancies were tracked, both dynamically and statically, with the combined use of scanned probe microscopy (SPM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Epitaxial films of La 0.8 Sr 0.2 Co O3 (L SC113) and L SC113 / LaSrCo O4 (L SC214) on a GDC/YSZ substrate were studied, where the latter showed increased electrocatalytic activity at moderate temperature. At atomic resolution, high angle annular dark field STEM micrographs revealed vacancy ordering in L SC113 as evidenced by lattice parameter modulation and EELS studies. The evolution of oxygen vacancy concentration and ordering with applied bias and the effects of bias cycling on the SOFC cathode performance will be discussed. Research is sponsored by the of Materials Sciences and Engineering Division, U.S. DOE.

  3. Anode protection system for shutdown of solid oxide fuel cell system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bob X; Grieves, Malcolm J; Kelly, Sean M

    2014-12-30

    An Anode Protection Systems for a SOFC system, having a Reductant Supply and safety subsystem, a SOFC anode protection subsystem, and a Post Combustion and slip stream control subsystem. The Reductant Supply and safety subsystem includes means for generating a reducing gas or vapor to prevent re-oxidation of the Ni in the anode layer during the course of shut down of the SOFC stack. The underlying ammonia or hydrogen based material used to generate a reducing gas or vapor to prevent the re-oxidation of the Ni can be in either a solid or liquid stored inside a portable container. The SOFC anode protection subsystem provides an internal pressure of 0.2 to 10 kPa to prevent air from entering into the SOFC system. The Post Combustion and slip stream control subsystem provides a catalyst converter configured to treat any residual reducing gas in the slip stream gas exiting from SOFC stack.

  4. Application of impedance spectroscopy to SOFC research

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, G.; Mason, T.O.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    With the resurgence of interest in solid oxide fuel cells and other solid state electrochemical devices, techniques originally developed for characterizing aqueous systems are being adapted and applied to solid state systems. One of these techniques, three-electrode impedance spectroscopy, is particularly powerful as it allows characterization of subcomponent and interfacial properties. Obtaining accurate impedance spectra, however, is difficult as reference electrode impedance is usually non-negligible and solid electrolytes typically have much lower conductance than aqueous solutions. Faidi et al and Chechirlian et al have both identified problems associated with low conductivity media. Other sources of error are still being uncovered. Ford et al identified resistive contacts with large time constants as a possibility, while Me et al showed that the small contact capacitance of the reference electrode was at fault. Still others show that instrument limitations play a role. Using the voltage divider concept, a simplified model that demonstrates the interplay of these various factors, predicts the form of possible distortions, and offers means to minimize errors is presented.

  5. Dense Membranes for Anode Supported all Perovskite IT-SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Rambabu Bobba

    2006-09-14

    During this first year of the project, a post doctoral fellow (Dr. Hrudananda Jena), and two graduate students (Mr. Vinay B. V. Sivareddy, Aswin Somuru), were supported through this project funds. Also, partial support was provided to three undergraduate students (Jonthan Dooley, India Snowden, Jeremy Gilmore) majoring in Chemistry, Physics, and Engineering disciplines. Various wet chemical methods of synthesis have been attempted to prepare perovskite oxide powders with a hope to improve and engineer its properties to meet the requirements of Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (IT-SOFCs) components. Various compounds were synthesized, characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, XPS, electron microprobe and their electrical transport properties were measured by EIS at elevated temperatures and compared. Sonochemical technique (power of ultra sonic probe 750 watt) combined with hydrothermal treatment of precursors for the preparation of calcium hydroxy apatites (Ca-HAp) was used for the first time. Ca-HAp was substituted with Sr and Mg (50% replacement of Ca in Ca-HAp) to study the effect of substitution on Ca-HAp. Calcium hydroxy apatite is a bioceramic and has potential applications as artificial bone, enamel materials. In this study we tried to investigate its use as proton conductors in PC-SOFC. The properties like electrical conductivity, crystal structure, compositions of CaHAp were studied and compared with the natural bone material. The comparison found to be excellent indicating the efficiency of the preparation techniques. The typical value of conductivity measured is 0.091 x 10{sup -6} Scm{sup -1} at 25 C and 19.26 x 10{sup -6} Scm{sup -1} at 850 C with an applied frequency of 100 kHz. The conductivity increases on increasing frequency and temperature and reaches 0.05mS/cm at 500 C. The crystal structure and phase stability of perovskites as well as apatites were investigated with respect to substitution of various iso-valent and alivalent ions to

  6. High-Temperature Desulfurization of Heavy Fuel-Derived Reformate Gas Streams for SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Surgenor, Angela D.

    2007-01-01

    Desulfurization of the hot reformate gas produced by catalytic partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of heavy fuels, such as JP-8 and jet fuels, is required prior to using the gas in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Development of suitable sorbent materials involves the identification of sorbents with favorable sulfidation equilibria, good kinetics, and high structural stability and regenerability at the SOFC operating temperatures (650 to 800 C). Over the last two decades, a major barrier to the development of regenerable desulfurization sorbents has been the gradual loss of sorbent performance in cyclic sulfidation and regeneration at such high temperatures. Mixed oxide compositions based on ceria were examined in this work as regenerable sorbents in simulated reformate gas mixtures and temperatures greater than 650 C. Regeneration was carried out with dilute oxygen streams. We have shown that under oxidative regeneration conditions, high regeneration space velocities (greater than 80,000 h(sup -1)) can be used to suppress sulfate formation and shorten the total time required for sorbent regeneration. A major finding of this work is that the surface of ceria and lanthanan sorbents can be sulfided and regenerated completely, independent of the underlying bulk sorbent. This is due to reversible adsorption of H2S on the surface of these sorbents even at temperatures as high as 800 C. La-rich cerium oxide formulations are excellent for application to regenerative H2S removal from reformate gas streams at 650 to 800 C. These results create new opportunities for compact sorber/regenerator reactor designs to meet the requirements of solid oxide fuel cell systems at any scale.

  7. Thermoeconomic modeling and parametric study of hybrid SOFC-gas turbine-steam turbine power plants ranging from 1.5 to 10 MWe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsalis, Alexandros

    Detailed thermodynamic, kinetic, geometric, and cost models are developed, implemented, and validated for the synthesis/design and operational analysis of hybrid SOFC-gas turbine-steam turbine systems ranging in size from 1.5 to 10 MWe. The fuel cell model used in this research work is based on a tubular Siemens-Westinghouse-type SOFC, which is integrated with a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) integrated in turn with a steam turbine cycle. The current work considers the possible benefits of using the exhaust gases in a HRSG in order to produce steam which drives a steam turbine for additional power output. Four different steam turbine cycles are considered in this research work: a single-pressure, a dual-pressure, a triple pressure, and a triple pressure with reheat. The models have been developed to function both at design (full load) and off-design (partial load) conditions. In addition, different solid oxide fuel cell sizes are examined to assure a proper selection of SOFC size based on efficiency or cost. The thermoeconomic analysis includes cost functions developed specifically for the different system and component sizes (capacities) analyzed. A parametric study is used to determine the most viable system/component syntheses/designs based on maximizing total system efficiency or minimizing total system life cycle cost.

  8. Novel Composite Materials for SOFC Cathode-Interconnect Contact

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Zhu

    2009-07-31

    This report summarized the research efforts and major conclusions of our University Coal Research Project, which focused on developing a new class of electrically-conductive, Cr-blocking, damage-tolerant Ag-perovksite composite materials for the cathode-interconnect contact of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The Ag evaporation rate increased linearly with air flow rate initially and became constant for the air flow rate {ge} {approx} 1.0 cm {center_dot} s{sup -1}. An activation energy of 280 KJ.mol{sup -1} was obtained for Ag evaporation in both air and Ar+5%H{sub 2}+3%H{sub 2}O. The exposure environment had no measurable influence on the Ag evaporation rate as well as its dependence on the gas flow rate, while different surface morphological features were developed after thermal exposure in the oxidizing and reducing environments. Pure Ag is too volatile at the SOFC operating temperature and its evaporation rate needs to be reduced to facilitate its application as the cathode-interconnect contact. Based on extensive evaporation testing, it was found that none of the alloying additions reduced the evaporation rate of Ag over the long-term exposure, except the noble metals Au, Pt, and Pd; however, these noble elements are too expensive to justify their practical use in contact materials. Furthermore, the addition of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM) into Ag to form a composite material also did not significantly modify the Ag evaporation rate. The Ag-perovskite composites with the perovskite being either (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2})O{sub 3} (LSCF) or LSM were systematically evaluated as the contact material between the ferritic interconnect alloy Crofer 22 APU and the LSM cathode. The area specific resistances (ASRs) of the test specimens were shown to be highly dependent on the volume percentage and the type of the perovskite present in the composite contact material as well as the amount of thermal cycling

  9. Clad Metals, Roll Bonding and their Applications for SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Yang, Zhenguo; Jha, B.; Xia, Guanguang; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-12-01

    High temperature oxidation resistant alloys are currently considered as candidate materials for construction of interconnects in intermediate temperature SOFCs. Among these alloys however, different groups of alloys demonstrate different advantages and disadvantages for the interconnect applications, and few if any can completely satisfied the stringent requirements for the applications. To integrate the advantages and avoid the disadvantages of different groups of alloys, cladding has been proposed as the approach to fabricate metallic layered interconnect structures. To examine the feasibility of this approach, the austenitic Ni-base alloy Haynes 230 and the ferritic stainless steel AL453 were selected as examples and manufactured into a clad metal. It’s suitability as interconnect construction materials were investigated. This paper will give a brief overview of the cladding approach and discuss the viability of this technology to fabricate the metallic layered-structure interconnects.

  10. Heat resistant alloys as interconnect materials of reduced temperature SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Li; Jian, Pu; Guangyuan, Xie; Shunxu, Wang; Jianzhong, Xiao

    Heat-resistant alloys, Haynes 230 and SS310, were exposed to air and humidified H 2 at 750 °C for up to 1000 h, respectively, simulating the environments in reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The oxidized samples were characterized by using SEM, EDS and X-ray diffraction to obtain the morphology, thickness, composition and crystal structure of the oxide scales. A mechanism for the formation of metallic Ni-rich nodules on top of the oxide scale in Haynes 230 sample oxidized in humidified H 2 was established. Thermodynamic analysis confirmed that MnCr 2O 4 is the favored spinel phase, together with Cr 2O 3, in the oxide scales.

  11. FEASIBILITY OF A STACK INTEGRATED SOFC OPTICAL CHEMICAL SENSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Carpenter

    2004-03-30

    The work performed during the UCR Innovative Concepts phase I program was designed to demonstrate the chemical sensing capabilities of nano-cermet SPR bands at solid oxide fuel cell operating conditions. Key to this proposal is that the materials choice used a YSZ ceramic matrix which upon successful demonstration of this concept, will allow integration directly onto the SOFC stack. Under the Innovative Concepts Program the University at Albany Institute for Materials (UAIM)/UAlbany School of NanoSciences and NanoEngineering synthesized, analyzed and tested Pa, and Au doped YSZ nano-cermets as a function of operating temperature and target gas exposure (hydrogen, carbon monoxide and 1-dodecanethiol). During the aforementioned testing procedure the optical characteristics of the nano-cermets were monitored to determine the sensor selectivity and sensitivity.

  12. Power generation characteristics of tubular type SOFC by wet process

    SciTech Connect

    Tajiri, H.; Nakayama, T.; Kuroishi, M.

    1996-12-31

    The development of a practical solid oxide fuel cell requires improvement of a cell performance and a cell manufacturing technology suitable for the mass production. In particular tubular type SOFC is thought to be superior in its reliability because its configuration can avoid the high temperature sealing and reduce the thermal stress resulting from the contact between cells. The authors have fabricated a tubular cell with an air electrode support by a wet processing technique, which is suitable for mass production in improving a power density. To enhance the power output of the module, the Integrated Tubular-Type (ITT) cell has been developed. This paper reports the performance of the single cells with various active anode areas and the bundle with series-connected 9-ITT cells with an active anode area of 840 cm{sup 2}.

  13. A Design of Experiments (DOE) approach to optimise temperature measurement accuracy in Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barari, F.; Morgan, R.; Barnard, P.

    2014-11-01

    In SOFC, accurately measuring the hot-gas temperature is challenging due to low gas velocity, high wall temperature, complex flow geometries and relatively small pipe diameter. Improper use of low cost thermometry system such as standard Type K thermocouples (TC) may introduce large measurement error. The error could have a negative effect on the thermal management of the SOFC systems and consequential reduction in efficiency. In order to study the factors affecting the accuracy of the temperature measurement system, a mathematical model of a TC inside a pipe was defined and numerically solved. The model calculated the difference between the actual and the measured gas temperature inside the pipe. A statistical Design of Experiment (DOE) approach was applied to the modelling data to compute the interaction effect between variables and investigate the significance of each variable on the measurement errors. In this study a full factorial DOE design with six variables (wall temperature, gas temperature, TC length, TC diameter and TC emissivity) at two levels was carried out. Four different scenarios, two sets of TC length (6 - 10.5 mm and 17 - 22 mm) and two different sets of temperature range (550 - 650 °C and 750 - 850 °C), were proposed. DOE analysis was done for each scenario and results were compared to identify key parameters affecting the accuracy of a particular temperature reading.

  14. On the State of the Art of Metal Interconnects for SOFC Application

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski@netl.doe.gov

    2011-02-27

    One of the recent developments for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) is oxide component materials capable of operating at lower temperatures such as 700-800C. This lower temperature range has provided for the consideration of metallic interconnects which have several advantages over ceramic interconnects: low cost, ease in manufacturing, and high conductivity. Most metals and alloys will oxidize under both the anode and cathode conditions within an SOFC, thus a chief requirement is that the base metal oxide scale must be electrically conductive since this constitutes the majority of the electrical resistance in a metallic interconnect. Common high temperature alloys form scales that contain chrome, silicon and aluminum oxides among others. Under SOFC operating conditions chrome oxide is a semi-conductor while silicon and aluminum oxides are insulators. In this talk we will review the evolution in candidate alloys and surface modifications which constitute an engineered solution for SOFC interconnect applications.

  15. A dual-structured anode/Ni-mesh current collector hollow fibre for micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Wu, Zhentao; Li, K.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a unique dual-structured hollow fibre design has been developed for micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs), using a single-step phase-inversion assisted co-extrusion technique. The dual-structured design consists of an outer anode layer and an inner anodic current collecting layer that are formed simultaneously during fabrication. Meanwhile, a plurality of micro-channels initiating from the exterior surface of the anode layer penetrate through the two layers, forming a highly asymmetric anode and a mesh current collecting layer, which significantly facilitates the gas transport. With the increasing thickness of the current collecting layer (approximately 15-60 μm), electrical conductivity increases from 1.9 × 104 S cm-1 to 4.0 × 104 S cm-1, while the mechanical strength drops slightly from approximately 168-113 MPa due to its 'dragging effect' during co-sintering. The benefits of improved current collection may potentially overweigh the reduced mechanical property, especially when dual-structured hollow fibres of this type are bundled together to form a stack. Moreover, benefiting from this innovative design, sustainable development of a larger scale of MT-SOFC stack or system becomes less challenging, since technical issues, such as concentration polarization and efficient current collection, hampering the MT-SOFC system design, can be completely overcome.

  16. Chemically Stable Proton Conducting Doped BaCeO3 -No More Fear to SOFC Wastes

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Ramaiyan; Singh, Kalpana; Gill, Sukhdeep; Fürstenhaupt, Tobias; Thangadurai, Venkataraman

    2013-01-01

    Development of chemically stable proton conductors for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) will solve several issues, including cost associated with expensive inter-connectors, and long-term durability. Best known Y-doped BaCeO3 (YBC) proton conductors-based SOFCs suffer from chemical stability under SOFC by-products including CO2 and H2O. Here, for the first time, we report novel perovskite-type Ba0.5Sr0.5Ce0.6Zr0.2Gd0.1Y0.1O3−δ by substituting Sr for Ba and co-substituting Gd + Zr for Ce in YBC that showed excellent chemical stability under SOFC by-products (e.g., CO2 and H2O) and retained a high proton conductivity, key properties which were lacking since the discovery of YBCs. In situ and ex- situ powder X-ray diffraction and thermo-gravimetric analysis demonstrate superior structural stability of investigated perovskite under SOFC by-products. The electrical measurements reveal pure proton conductivity, as confirmed by an open circuit potential of 1.15 V for H2-air cell at 700°C, and merits as electrolyte for H-SOFCs. PMID:23823931

  17. Chemically Stable Proton Conducting Doped BaCeO3 -No More Fear to SOFC Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Ramaiyan; Singh, Kalpana; Gill, Sukhdeep; Fürstenhaupt, Tobias; Thangadurai, Venkataraman

    2013-07-01

    Development of chemically stable proton conductors for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) will solve several issues, including cost associated with expensive inter-connectors, and long-term durability. Best known Y-doped BaCeO3 (YBC) proton conductors-based SOFCs suffer from chemical stability under SOFC by-products including CO2 and H2O. Here, for the first time, we report novel perovskite-type Ba0.5Sr0.5Ce0.6Zr0.2Gd0.1Y0.1O3-δ by substituting Sr for Ba and co-substituting Gd + Zr for Ce in YBC that showed excellent chemical stability under SOFC by-products (e.g., CO2 and H2O) and retained a high proton conductivity, key properties which were lacking since the discovery of YBCs. In situ and ex- situ powder X-ray diffraction and thermo-gravimetric analysis demonstrate superior structural stability of investigated perovskite under SOFC by-products. The electrical measurements reveal pure proton conductivity, as confirmed by an open circuit potential of 1.15 V for H2-air cell at 700°C, and merits as electrolyte for H-SOFCs.

  18. Evaluation of a Functional Interconnect System for SOFC's

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Bender; James Rakowski

    2010-12-31

    The overall objective of this project was to validate the concept and application of a functional interconnect, based on a ferritic stainless steel, for a solid oxide fuel cell through manufacturing trials, laboratory testing, and field experience. The materials of construction and their surfaces were to be optimized for the particular service conditions and include low-cost ferritic stainless steels, novel postprocess treatments, and third-party coatings. This work aimed to optimize specific aspects of substrate alloy chemistry and to study the effects of long-term exposures on resistive oxide film structure and chemistry, interaction with applied surface coatings, and effectiveness of novel surface treatments.

  19. Surface Exchange and Bulk Diffusivity of LSCF as SOFC Cathode: Electrical Conductivity Relaxation and Isotope Exchange Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yihong; Gerdes, Kirk; Horita, Teruhisa; Liu, Xingbo

    2013-05-05

    The oxygen diffusion coefficient (D) and surface exchange coefficient (k) of a typical SOFC cathode material, La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) were characterized by both electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) and oxygen isotope exchange (IE) methods. Conductivity relaxation experiments were conducted at 800°C for small step changes in partial pressure of oxygen (P{sub O{sub 2}} ), both decreasing and increasing, from 0.02 atm to 0.20 atm. The results revealed P{sub O{sub 2}} dependent hysteresis with the reduction process requiring more equilibration time than oxidation. Analysis of the experimental data indicated that the surface exchange coefficient is a function of the final oxygen partial pressure in an isothermal system. In addition, both forward and backward oxygen reduction reaction constants, which are vital for the fundamental understanding of SOFC cathode reaction mechanisms, are investigated based on the relationship between surface exchange coefficient and P{sub O{sub 2}} . The direct comparisons between the results from both ECR and IE were presented and the possible experimental errors in both methods were discussed.

  20. Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Petrik, Michael; Ruhl, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) of Cleveland, Ohio, has completed the project entitled Small Scale SOFC Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels. Under this program, two 1-kW systems were engineered as technology demonstrators of an advanced technology that can operate on either traditional hydrocarbon fuels or renewable biofuels. The systems were demonstrated at Patterson's Fruit Farm of Chesterland, OH and were open to the public during the first quarter of 2012. As a result of the demonstration, TMI received quantitative feedback on operation of the systems as well as qualitative assessments from customers. Based on the test results, TMI believes that > 30% net electrical efficiency at 1 kW on both traditional and renewable fuels with a reasonable entry price is obtainable. The demonstration and analysis provide the confidence that a 1 kW entry-level system offers a viable value proposition, but additional modifications are warranted to reduce sound and increase reliability before full commercial acceptance.

  1. Anode gas recirculation for improving the performance and cost of a 5-kW solid oxide fuel cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Ryohei; Tachikawa, Yuya; Sasaki, Kazunari; Ito, Kohei

    2016-09-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have the potential to efficiently convert chemical energy into electricity and heat and are expected to be implemented in stationary combined heat and power (CHP) systems. This paper presents the heat balance analysis for a 5-kW medium-sized integrated SOFC system and the evaluation of the effect of anode gas recirculation on the system performance. The risk of carbon deposition on an SOFC anode due to anode gas recirculation is also assessed using the C-H-O diagram obtained from thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. These results suggest that a higher recirculation ratio increases net fuel utilization and improves the electrical efficiency of the SOFC system. Furthermore, cost simulation of the SOFC system and comparison with the cost of electricity supply by a power grid indicates that the capital cost is sufficiently low to popularize the SOFC system in terms of the total cost over one decade.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Martinez; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; James Postona

    2010-03-20

    A thermodynamic analysis was conducted to characterize the effects of trace contaminants in syngas derived from coal gasification on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. The effluents from 15 different gasification facilities were considered to assess the impact of fuel composition on anode susceptibility to contamination. For each syngas case, the study considers the magnitude of contaminant exposure resulting from operation of a warm gas cleanup unit at two different temperatures and operation of a nickel-based SOFC at three different temperatures. Contaminant elements arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and antimony (Sb) are predicted to be present in warm gas cleanup effluent and will interact with the nickel (Ni) components of a SOFC anode. Phosphorous is the trace element found in the largest concentration of the three contaminants and is potentially the most detrimental. Poisoning was found to depend on the composition of the syngas as well as system operating conditions. Results for all trace elements tended to show invariance with cleanup operating temperature, but results were sensitive to syngas bulk composition. Synthesis gas with high steam content tended to resist poisoning.

  3. Long-term commitment of Japanese gas utilities to PAFCs and SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyokazu; Kasahara, Komei

    Tokyo Gas and Osaka Gas have been committed to addressing the energy- and environment-related issues of Japan through promotion of natural gas, an energy friendly to the environment. Being aware of the diversifying market needs (e.g. efficient energy utilization, rising demand for electricity, etc.), active efforts have been made in marketing gas-fired air-conditioning and co-generation systems. In this process, a high priority has also been placed on fuel cells, particularly for realizing their market introduction. Since their participation in the TARGET Program in USA in 1972, the two companies have been involved with the field testing and operation of phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs), whose total capacity has amounted to 12.4 MW. The two companies have played a vital role in promoting and accelerating fuel cell development through the following means: (1) giving incentives to manufacturers through purchase of units and testing, (2) giving feedback on required specifications and technical problems in operation, and (3) verifying and realizing long-term operation utilizing their maintenance techniques. It has been expected that the primary goal of the cumulative operation time of 40 000 h shall be achieved in the near future. Work has also been in progress to develop SOFC. In the joint R&D of a 25-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with Westinghouse, the record operation time of 13 000 h has been achieved. Though still twice as much as the average price of competing equipment, the commercialization of PAFCs is close at hand. By utilizing government spending and subsidies for field testing, work will be continued to verify reliability and durability of PAFCs installed at users' sites. These activities have been expected to contribute to realizing economically viable systems and enhance market introduction. The superlative advantages of fuel cells, particularly their environment-friendly qualities, should be best taken advantage of at an appropriate time. In

  4. Measurement of residual stresses in deposited films of SOFC component materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, T.; Momma, A.; Nagata, S.; Kasuga, Y.

    1996-12-31

    The stress induced in Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC)s has important influence on the lifetime of SOFC. But the data on stress in SOFC and mechanical properties of SOW component materials have not been accumulated enough to manufacture SOFC. Especially, the data of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} cathode and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} interconnection have been extremely limited. We have estimated numerically the dependences of residual stress in SOFC on the material properties, the cell structure and the fabrication temperatures of the components, but these unknown factors have caused obstruction to simulate the accurate behavior of residual stress. Therefore, the residual stresses in deposited La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} films are researched by the observation of the bending behavior of the substrate strips. The films of SOFC component materials were prepared by the RF sputtering method, because: (1) It can fabricate dense films of poor sinterable material such as La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} compared with sintering or plasma spray method. (2) For the complicated material such as perovskite materials, the difference between the composition of a film and that of a target material is generally small. (3) It can fabricate a thick ceramics film by improving of the deposition rate. For example, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thick films of 50{mu}m can be fabricated with the deposition rate of approximately 5{mu}m/h industrially. In this paper, the dependence of residual stress on the deposition conditions is defined and mechanical properties of these materials are estimated from the results of the experiments.

  5. Development of a high-performance composite cathode for LT-SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byung Wook

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) has drawn considerable attention for decades due to its high efficiency and low pollution, which is made possible since chemical energy is directly converted to electrical energy through the system without combustion. However, successful commercialization of SOFC has been delayed due to its high production cost mainly related with using high cost of interconnecting materials and the other structural components required for high temperature operation. This is the reason that intermediate (IT) or low temperature (LT)-SOFC operating at 600~800°C or 650°C and below, respectively, is of particular significance because it allows the wider selection of cheaper materials such as stainless steel for interconnects and the other structural components. Also, extended lifetime and system reliability are expected due to less thermal stress through the system with reduced temperature. More rapid start-up/shut-down procedure is another advantage of lowering the operating temperatures. As a result, commercialization of SOFC will be more viable. However, there exists performance drop with reduced operating temperature due to increased polarization resistances from the electrode electrochemical reactions and decreased electrolyte conductivity. Since ohmic polarization of the electrolyte can be significantly reduced with state-of-the art thin film technology and cathode polarization has more drastic effect on total SOFC electrochemical performance than anode polarization as temperature decreases, development of the cathode with high performance operating at IT or LT range is thus essential. On the other hand, chemical stability of the cathode and its chemical compatibility with the electrolyte should also be considered for cathode development since instability and incompatibility of the cathode will also cause substantial performance loss. Based on requirements of the cathode mentioned above, in this study, several chemico-physical approaches were

  6. Carbonaceous deposits in direct utilization hydrocarbon SOFC anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hongpeng; Vohs, John M.; Gorte, Raymond J.

    Carbonaceous deposits formed in Cu-based SOFC anode compartment by exposing porous YSZ anodes to n-butane at elevated temperatures were studied using a combination of V- I curves, impedance spectroscopy, SEM, and TPO measurements. While short-term exposure of a porous YSZ matrix to n-butane at 973 K resulted in the deposition of electronically conducting carbonaceous film and therefore to enhance the fuel cell performance, the power density decays quickly in n-butane at temperature 1073 K or higher for long-term operation. SEM results indicate that the carbonaceous deposits arising from gas phase reaction have different morphology, and a dense layer composed of poly-aromatic rings has been formed on the porous anode surface. The dense layer could block the penetration of fuels to the anode and ions transfer to the three-phase boundaries where electrochemical reactions occur, resulting in the drop of the power density. TPO measurements revealed that the amount of carbonaceous deposits increased and the type of deposits changed with exposure time to n-butane. The stability of deposits increased with extending the exposure time according to the increased oxidation temperature. Steam can remove the carbonaceous deposits from the porous YSZ anode, but the reaction temperature was severely elevated compared to that of oxygen. The carbonaceous deposits can also be removed at 973 K by steam but the deposition of carbon will be controlled by the speed of removal and formation from the gas phase reaction.

  7. Performance analysis of a SOFC under direct internal reforming conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janardhanan, Vinod M.; Heuveline, Vincent; Deutschmann, Olaf

    This paper presents the performance analysis of a planar solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) under direct internal reforming conditions. A detailed solid-oxide fuel cell model is used to study the influences of various operating parameters on cell performance. Significant differences in efficiency and power density are observed for isothermal and adiabatic operational regimes. The influence of air number, specific catalyst area, anode thickness, steam to carbon (s/c) ratio of the inlet fuel, and extend of pre-reforming on cell performance is analyzed. In all cases except for the case of pre-reformed fuel, adiabatic operation results in lower performance compared to isothermal operation. It is further discussed that, though direct internal reforming may lead to cost reduction and increased efficiency by effective utilization of waste heat, the efficiency of the fuel cell itself is higher for pre-reformed fuel compared to non-reformed fuel. Furthermore, criteria for the choice of optimal operating conditions for cell stacks operating under direct internal reforming conditions are discussed.

  8. Catalyst-infiltrated supporting cathode for thin-film SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Yamahara, Keiji; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe,Lutgard C.

    2004-04-12

    The fabrication and electrochemical performance of co-fired,LSM-SYSZ [i.e., La0.65Sr0.30MnO3 (LSM) - (Sc2O3)0.1(Y2O3)0.01(ZrO2)0.89] supported thin-film cells were examined using humidified hydrogen as a fuel. Co-firing of bi-layers and tri-layers was successful at 1250 C by optimizing the amount of carbon pore formers. A power density of a factor of 2.5 higher than that recently reported for the same type of cell at 800 C [3] was obtained for a cell with cobalt infiltration into the supporting cathode: the peak power densities were 455, 389, 285, 202, 141mW/cm2 at 800, 750, 700, 650, 600 C, respectively, and in most cases power densities at 0.7V exceeded more than 90 percent of the peak output. Increasing the cathode porosity from 43 to 53 percent improved peak power densities by as much as 1.3, shifting the diffusion limitation to high current densities. Cobalt infiltration into the support improved those by as much as a factor of 2 due to a significant reduction in non-ohmic resistance. These results demonstrate that cobalt catalyst-infiltrated LSM can be effective and low-cost supporting electrodes for reduced temperature, thin film SOFCs.

  9. Fundamentals of Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA-SOFC) Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Randall Gemmen; Harry Abernathy; Kirk Gerdes; Mark Koslowske; William A. McPhee; Tomas Tao

    2009-01-23

    An alternative high temperature fuel cell system, called Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA-SOFC) technology, is presently under consideration by NETL for the ability to directly convert coal. Before such a fuel cell concept can be considered in system studies, a detailed assessment for the electrochemical activity and SnO and O-atom diffusion within the liquid tin needs to be performed. In addition, the fundamental thermodynamic operation of such a concept needs to be properly analyzed. Initial research efforts to characterize the tin electrochemistry on a button cell at 900°C and with a tin thickness of 6mm showed a peak power density of 40 mW/cm2, and an activation energy for total resistivity of 185600 J/gm-mol. Higher power densities are expected with a more optimized electrolyte interface, and additional tests are being planned. A review of the liquid tin anode cell theoretical operation and performance data will be presented.

  10. Mathematical model of a plate fin heat exchanger operating under solid oxide fuel cell working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniowski, Robert; Poniewski, Mieczysław

    2013-12-01

    Heat exchangers of different types find application in power systems based on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Compact plate fin heat exchangers are typically found to perfectly fit systems with power output under 5 kWel. Micro-combined heat and power (micro-CHP) units with solid oxide fuel cells can exhibit high electrical and overall efficiencies, exceeding 85%, respectively. These values can be achieved only when high thermal integration of a system is assured. Selection and sizing of heat exchangers play a crucial role and should be done with caution. Moreover, performance of heat exchangers under variable operating conditions can strongly influence efficiency of the complete system. For that reason, it becomes important to develop high fidelity mathematical models allowing evaluation of heat exchangers under modified operating conditions, in high temperature regimes. Prediction of pressure and temperatures drops at the exit of cold and hot sides are important for system-level studies. Paper presents dedicated mathematical model used for evaluation of a plate fin heat exchanger, operating as a part of micro-CHP unit with solid oxide fuel cells.

  11. Modeling the Electrochemistry of an SOFC through the Electrodes and Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a distributed electrochemistry model of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes and electrolyte. The distributed electrochemistry (DEC) model solves the transport, reactions, and electric potential through the thickness of the SOFC electrodes. The DEC model allows the local conditions within the electrodes to be studied and allows for a better understanding of how electrochemical and microstructural parameters affect the electrodes. In this paper the governing equations and implementation of the DEC model are presented along with several case studies which are used to investigate the sensitivity of the cathode to the microstructural and electrochemical parameters of the model and to explore methods of improving the electrochemical performance of the SOFC cathode.

  12. Characterization of Atomic and Electronic Structures of Electrochemically Active SOFC Cathode Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Blinn; Yongman Choi; Meilin Liu

    2009-08-11

    The objective of this project is to gain a fundamental understanding of the oxygen-reduction mechanism on mixed conducting cathode materials by means of quantum-chemical calculations coupled with direct experimental measurements, such as vibrational spectroscopy. We have made progress in the elucidation of the mechanisms of oxygen reduction of perovkite-type cathode materials for SOFCs using these quantum chemical calculations. We established computational framework for predicting properties such as oxygen diffusivity and reaction rate constants for adsorption, incorporation, and TPB reactions, and formulated predictions for LSM- and LSC-based cathode materials. We have also further developed Raman spectroscopy as well as SERS as a characterization tool for SOFC cathode materials. Raman spectroscopy was used to detect chemical changes in the cathode from operation conditions, and SERS was used to probe for pertinent adsorbed species in oxygen reduction. However, much work on the subject of unraveling oxygen reduction for SOFC cathodes remains to be done.

  13. CO2 emission free co-generation of energy and ethylene in hydrocarbon SOFC reactors with a dehydrogenation anode.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xian-Zhu; Lin, Jie-Yuan; Xu, Shihong; Luo, Jing-Li; Chuang, Karl T; Sanger, Alan R; Krzywicki, Andrzej

    2011-11-21

    A dehydrogenation anode is reported for hydrocarbon proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A Cu-Cr(2)O(3) nanocomposite is obtained from CuCrO(2) nanoparticles as an inexpensive, efficient, carbon deposition and sintering tolerant anode catalyst. A SOFC reactor is fabricated using a Cu-Cr(2)O(3) composite as a dehydrogenation anode and a doped barium cerate as a proton conducting electrolyte. The protonic membrane SOFC reactor can selectively convert ethane to valuable ethylene, and electricity is simultaneously generated in the electrochemical oxidative dehydrogenation process. While there are no CO(2) emissions, traces of CO are present in the anode exhaust when the SOFC reactor is operated at over 700 °C. A mechanism is proposed for ethane electro-catalytic dehydrogenation over the Cu-Cr(2)O(3) catalyst. The SOFC reactor also has good stability for co-generation of electricity and ethylene at 700 °C. PMID:21984357

  14. Advanced Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Improved SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Adler; L. Dunyushkina; S. Huff; Y. Lu; J. Wilson

    2006-12-31

    The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of factors governing performance and degradation of mixed-conducting SOFC cathodes. Two new diagnostic tools were developed to help achieve this goal: (1) microelectrode half-cells for improved isolation of cathode impedance on thin electrolytes, and (2) nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS), a variant of traditional impedance that allows workers to probe nonlinear rates as a function of frequency. After reporting on the development and efficacy of these tools, this document reports on the use of these and other tools to better understand performance and degradation of cathodes based on the mixed conductor La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSC) on gadolinia or samaria-doped ceria (GDC or SDC). We describe the use of NLEIS to measure O{sub 2} exchange on thin-film LSC electrodes, and show that O{sub 2} exchange is most likely governed by dissociative adsorption. We also describe parametric studies of porous LSC electrodes using impedance and NLEIS. Our results suggest that O{sub 2} exchange and ion transport co-limit performance under most relevant conditions, but it is O{sub 2} exchange that is most sensitive to processing, and subject to the greatest degradation and sample-to-sample variation. We recommend further work that focuses on electrodes of well-defined or characterized geometry, and probes the details of surface structure, composition, and impurities. Parallel work on primarily electronic conductors (LSM) would also be of benefit to developers, and to improved understanding of surface vs. bulk diffusion.

  15. Innovative Self-Healing Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    SciTech Connect

    Raj Singh

    2012-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology is critical to several national initiatives. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) addresses the technology needs through its comprehensive programs on SOFC. A reliable and cost-effective seal that works at high temperatures is essential to the long-term performance of the SOFC for 40,000 hours at 800°C. Consequently, seals remain an area of highest priority for the SECA program and its industry teams. An innovative concept based on self-healing glasses was advanced and successfully demonstrated through seal tests for 3000 hours and 300 thermal cycles to minimize internal stresses under both steady state and thermal transients for making reliable seals for the SECA program. The self-healing concept requires glasses with low viscosity at the SOFC operating temperature of 800°C but this requirement may lead to excessive flow of the glass in areas forming the seal. To address this challenge, a modification to glass properties by addition of particulate fillers is pursued in the project. The underlying idea is that a non-reactive ceramic particulate filler is expected to form glass-ceramic composite and increase the seal viscosity thereby increasing the creep resistance of the glass-composite seals under load. The objectives of the program are to select appropriate filler materials for making glass-composite, fabricate glass-composites, measure thermal expansion behaviors, and determine stability of the glass-composites in air and fuel environments of a SOFC. Self-healing glass-YSZ composites are further developed and tested over a longer time periods under conditions typical of the SOFCs to validate the long-term stability up to 2000 hours. The new concepts of glass-composite seals, developed and nurtured in this program, are expected to be cost-effective as these are based on conventional processing approaches and use of the inexpensive materials.

  16. Improvement of capabilities of the Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for investigating SOFC long term performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Galdamez, Rinaldo A.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.

    2012-04-30

    This report provides an overview of the work performed for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) modeling during the 2012 Winter/Spring Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). A brief introduction on the concept, operation basics and applications of fuel cells is given for the general audience. Further details are given regarding the modifications and improvements of the Distributed Electrochemistry (DEC) Modeling tool developed by PNNL engineers to model SOFC long term performance. Within this analysis, a literature review on anode degradation mechanisms is explained and future plans of implementing these into the DEC modeling tool are also proposed.

  17. Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Gorokhovsky

    2008-03-31

    This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

  18. Development of a New Class of Low Cost, High Frequency Link Direct DC to AC Converters for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad Enjeti; J.W. Howze

    2003-12-01

    This project proposes to design and develop a new class of power converters (direct DC to AC) to drastically improve performance and optimize the cost, size, weight and volume of the DC to AC converter in SOFC systems. The proposed topologies employ a high frequency link; direct DC to AC conversion approach. The direct DC to AC conversion approach is more efficient and operates without an intermediate dc-link stage. The absence of the dc-link, results in the elimination of bulky, aluminum electrolytic capacitors, which in turn leads to a reduction in the cost, volume, size and weight of the power electronic converter. The feasibility of two direct DC to AC converter topologies and their suitability to meet SECA objectives will be investigated. Laboratory proto-type converters (3-5kW) will be designed and tested in Phase-1. A detailed design trade-off study along with the test results will be available in the form of a report for the evaluation of SECA Industrial partners. This project proposes to develop a new and innovative power converter technology suitable for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power systems in accordance with SECA objectives. The proposed fuel cell inverter (FCI) employs state of the art power electronic devices configured in two unique topologies to achieve direct conversion of DC power (24-48V) available from a SOFC to AC power (120/240V, 60Hz) suitable for utility interface and powering stand alone loads. The primary objective is to realize cost effective fuel cell converter, which operates under a wide input voltage range, and output load swings with high efficiency and improved reliability.

  19. Preparation and properties of ceramic interconnecting materials, La 0.7Ca 0.3CrO 3- δ doped with GDC for IT-SOFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoliang; Ma, Jianjun; Deng, Feijun; Meng, Guangyao; Liu, Xingqin

    One of the challenges for improving the performance and cost-effectiveness of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is the development of effective interconnect materials. A widely used interconnect ceramic for SOFCs is doped lanthanum chromite. In this paper, we report a doped lanthanum chromite, La 0.7Ca 0.3CrO 3- δ (LCC) + x wt.% Gd 0.2Ce 0.8O 1.9 (GDC) (x = 0-10), with improved electrical conductivity and sintering capability. In this composite material system, LCC + GDC were prepared by an auto-ignition process and the electrical conductivity was characterized in air and in H 2. The LCC powders exhibited a better sintering ability and could reach a 94.7% relative density at 1400 °C for 4 h in air and with the increase of GDC content the relative density increased, reached 98.5% when the GDC content was up to 10 wt.%. The electrical conductivity of the samples dramatically increased with GDC addition until a maximum of 134.48 S cm -1 in air at 900 °C when the materials contained 3 wt.% GDC. This is 5.5 times higher than pure LCC (24.63 S cm -1). For the sample with a 1 wt.% GDC content, the conductivity in pure H 2 at 900 °C was a maximum 5.45 S cm -1, which is also higher than that of pure LCC ceramics (4.72 S cm -1). The average thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) increased with the increase of GDC content, ranging from 11.12 to 14.32 × 10 -6 K -1, the majority of which unfortunately did not match that of 8YSZ. The oxygen permeation measurement presented a negligible oxygen ionic conduction, indicating that it is still an electronically conducting ceramic. Therefore, it is a very promising interconnect material for higher performance and cost-effectiveness for SOFCs.

  20. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ioni Beam-scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    G Nelson; W Harris; J Lombardo; J Izzo Jr.; W Chiu; P Tanasini; M Cantoni; J Van herle; C Comninellis; et al.

    2011-12-31

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB-SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB-SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  1. Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ion Beam - Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, George J.; Harris, William H.; Lombardo, Jeffrey J.; Izzo, Jr., John R.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Tanasini, Pietro; Cantoni, Marco; Van herle, Jan; Comninellis, Christos; Andrews, Joy C.; Liu, Yijin; Pianetta, Piero; Chu, Yong

    2011-03-24

    X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB–SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB–SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

  2. New concept for soot removal from a syngas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, A.; Fino, D.; Saracco, G.

    A new concept for soot removal from inside a syngas environment has been studied. Particulate emissions are retained in a soot trap downstream from a thermal partial oxidation (TPOX) reformer, while the syngas atmosphere itself is utilized as a gasification agent to achieve continuous and passive trap regeneration. This work analyses the performances of the loading and the regenerating phases of a wall flow soot trap in a syngas environment in an ad hoc developed test rig. A balance point between filtered and removed soot was actually reached at trap temperatures in the 800-1000 °C range with soot abatement efficiencies above 95 wt%. The particulate is obtained from a TPOX reactor operating in very rich fuel conditions, using methane as fuel. The final application of the reactor and trap assembly is a micro CHP system, based on an SOFC fed by a TPOX reformer. However, application to larger contexts (e.g. biomass gasification plants) can be envisaged.

  3. Preparation of thin layer materials with macroporous microstructure for SOFC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Marrero-Lopez, D.; Ruiz-Morales, J.C.; Pena-Martinez, J.; Canales-Vazquez, J.; Nunez, P.

    2008-04-15

    A facile and versatile method using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres as pore formers has been developed to prepare thin layer oxide materials with controlled macroporous microstructure. Several mixed oxides with fluorite and perovskite-type structures, i.e. doped zirconia, ceria, ferrites, manganites, and NiO-YSZ composites have been prepared and characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry. The synthesised materials are nanocrystalline and present a homogeneous pore distribution and relatively high specific surface area, which makes them interesting for SOFC and catalysis applications in the intermediate temperature range. - Graphical abstract: Thin films materials of mixed oxides with potential application in SOFC devices have been prepared with macroporous microstructure using PMMA microspheres as pore formers. Display Omitted.

  4. Development of MnCoO Coating with New Aluminizing Process for Planar SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Weil, K. Scott; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-03-22

    Low-cost, chromia-forming steels find widespread use in SOFCs at operating temperatures below 800°C, because of their low thermal expansion mismatch and low cost. However, volatile Cr-containing species originating from this scale poison the cathode material in the cells and subsequently cause power degradation in the devices. To prevent this, a conductive manganese cobaltite coating has been developed. However, this coating is not compatible with forming hermetic seals between the interconnect or window frame component and ceramic cell. This coating reacts with sealing materials. Thus, a new aluminizing process has been developed for the sealing regions in these parts, as well as for other metallic stack and balance-of-plant components. From this development, the sealing performance and SOFC stack performance became very stable.

  5. A Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for Simulating SOFC Performance and Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Ryan, Emily M.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-10-13

    This report presents a distributed electrochemistry (DEC) model capable of investigating the electrochemistry and local conditions with the SOFC MEA based on the local microstructure and multi-physics. The DEC model can calculate the global current-voltage (I-V) performance of the cell as determined by the spatially varying local conditions through the thickness of the electrodes and electrolyte. The simulation tool is able to investigate the electrochemical performance based on characteristics of the electrode microstructure, such as particle size, pore size, electrolyte and electrode phase volume fractions, and triple-phase-boundary length. It can also investigate performance as affected by fuel and oxidant gas flow distributions and other environmental/experimental conditions such as temperature and fuel gas composition. The long-term objective for the DEC modeling tool is to investigate factors that cause electrode degradation and the decay of SOFC performance which decrease longevity.

  6. Surface modification of alloys for improved oxidation resistance in SOFC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Kung, S.C.

    2006-11-01

    This research is aimed at improving the oxidation behavior of metallic alloys for SOFC application, by the incorporation of rare earths through surface treatments. This paper details the effect of such surface modification on the behavior of Crofer 22 APU, a ferritic steel designed specifically for SOFC application, and Type 430 stainless steel. Two pack cementation like treatments were used to incorporate Ce into the surface of the alloys. After 4000 hours of exposure at 800oC to air+3%H2O, the weight gain of Crofer 22APU samples that were Ce surface modified were less than half that of an unmodified sample, revealing the effectiveness of the treatments on enhancing oxidation resistance. For Type-430, the treatment prevented scale spalling that occurred during oxidation of the unmodified alloy.

  7. An Investigation to Resolve the Interaction Between Fuel Cell, Power Conditioning System and Application Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Sudip K. Mazumder

    2005-12-31

    Development of high-performance and durable solidoxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and a SOFC power-generating system requires knowledge of the feedback effects from the power-conditioning electronics and from application-electrical-power circuits that may pass through or excite the power-electronics subsystem (PES). Therefore, it is important to develop analytical models and methodologies, which can be used to investigate and mitigate the effects of the electrical feedbacks from the PES and the application loads (ALs) on the reliability and performance of SOFC systems for stationary and non-stationary applications. However, any such attempt to resolve the electrical impacts of the PES on the SOFC would be incomplete unless one utilizes a comprehensive analysis, which takes into account the interactions of SOFC, PES, balance-of-plant system (BOPS), and ALs as a whole. SOFCs respond quickly to changes in load and exhibit high part- and full-load efficiencies due to its rapid electrochemistry, which is not true for the thermal and mechanical time constants of the BOPS, where load-following time constants are, typically, several orders of magnitude higher. This dichotomy can affect the lifetime and durability of the SOFCSs and limit the applicability of SOFC systems for load-varying stationary and transportation applications. Furthermore, without validated analytical models and investigative design and optimization methodologies, realizations of cost-effective, reliable, and optimal PESs (and power-management controls), in particular, and SOFC systems, in general, are difficult. On the whole, the research effort can lead to (a) cost-constrained optimal PES design for high-performance SOFCS and high energy efficiency and power density, (b) effective SOFC power-system design, analyses, and optimization, and (c) controllers and modulation schemes for mitigation of electrical impacts and wider-stability margin and enhanced system efficiency.

  8. DETERMINATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL PERFORMANCE, AND THERMO-MECHANICALCHEMICAL STABILITY OF SOFCS FROM DEFECT MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Wachsman, E.D.; Duncan, K.L.; Ebrahimi, F.

    2005-01-27

    The objectives of this project were to: provide fundamental relationships between SOFC performance and operating conditions and transient (time dependent) transport properties; extend models to thermo-mechanical stability, thermo-chemical stability, and multilayer structures; incorporate microstructural effects such as grain boundaries and grain-size distribution; experimentally verify models and devise strategies to obtain relevant material constants; and assemble software package for integration into SECA failure analysis models.

  9. LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr for metallic interconnect of planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Rak-Hyun; Shin, Dong Ryul; Dokiya, Masayuki

    1996-12-31

    In the planar SOFC, the interconnect materials plays two roles as an electrical connection and as a gas separation plate in a cell stack. The interconnect materials must be chemically stable in reducing and oxidizing environments, and have high electronic conductivity, high thermal conductivity, matching thermal expansion with an electrolyte, high mechanical strength, good fabricability, and gas tightness. Lanthanum chromite so far has been mainly used as interconnect materials in planar SOFC. However, the ceramic materials are very weak in mechanical strength and have poor machining property as compared with metal. Also the metallic materials have high electronic conductivity and high thermal conductivity. Recently some researchers have studied metallic interconnects such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Inconel 600 cermet, Ni-20Cr coated with (LaSr)CoO{sub 3}, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3-} or La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-dispersed Cr alloy. These alloys have still some problems because Ni-based alloys have high thermal expansion, the added Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} to metals have no electronic conductivity, and the oxide formed on the surface of Cr alloy has high volatility. To solve these problems, in this study, LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr for metallic interconnect of planar SOFC was investigated. The LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr can be one candidate of metallic interconnect because LaCrO{sub 3} possesses electronic conductivity and Cr metal has relatively low thermal expansion. The content of 25 vol.% LaCrO{sub 3} Was selected on the basis of a theoretically calculated thermal expansion. The thermal expansion, electrical and oxidation properties were examined and the results were discussed as related to SOFC requirements.

  10. Investigation of Modified Ni-Cr-Mn Base Alloys for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Singh, Prabhakar; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Xia, Gordon

    2006-09-01

    Two Ni-Cr-W-Mn base alloys based on Haynes 230 were developed and evaluated against criteria relevant to SOFC interconnect applications, which included oxidation behavior under SOFC operating conditions, scale electrical conductivity, and thermal expansion. It was found that, similar to the ferritic stainless steel Crofer22 APU, additions of Mn led to the formation of a unique scale that was comprised of a M3O4 (M=Mn, Cr, Ni, …) spinel-rich top layer and Cr2O3-rich sub-layer. The modified alloys demonstrated reasonable oxidation resistance under SOFC operating conditions, though the Mn additions increased the scale growth rate and thus sacrificed to some extent the oxidation resistance of the base alloy (Haynes 230). The formation of a spinel-rich top layer improved the scale conductivity, especially during the early stages of oxidation, but the higher scale growth rate resulted in a higher rate of increase in the area-specific electrical resistance. Due to their FCC crystal structure, the Ni-Cr-W-Mn base alloys demonstrated a CTE that was higher than that of anode-supported cells and candidate ferritic stainless steels such as Crofer22 APU.

  11. Mitigation of Sulfur Poisoning of Ni/Zirconia SOFC Anodes by Antimony and Tin

    SciTech Connect

    Marina, Olga A.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Pederson, Larry R.

    2011-02-28

    Surface Ni/Sb and Ni/Sb alloys were found to efficiently minimize the negative effects of sulfur on the performance of Ni/zirconia anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Prior to operating on fuel gas containing low concentrations of H2S, the nickel/zirconia anodes were briefly exposed to antimony or tin vapor, which only slightly affected the SOFC performance. During the subsequent exposures to 1 and 5 ppm H2S, increases in anodic polarization losses were minimal compared to those observed for the standard nickel/zirconia anodes. Post-test XPS analyses showed that Sb and Sn tended to segregate to the surface of Ni particles, and further confirmed a significant reduction of adsorbed sulfur on the Ni surface in Ni/Sn and Ni/Sb samples compared to the Ni. The effect may be the result of weaker sulfur adsorption on bimetallic surfaces, adsorption site competition between sulfur and Sb or Sn on Ni, or other factors. The use of dilute binary alloys of Ni-Sb or Ni-Sn in the place of Ni, or brief exposure to Sb or Sn vapor, may be effective means to counteract the effects of sulfur poisoning in SOFC anodes and Ni catalysts. Other advantages, including suppression of coking or tailoring the anode composition for the internal reforming, are also expected.

  12. Oxidation resistance of novel ferritic stainless steels alloyed with titanium for SOFC interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2008-05-15

    Chromia (Cr2O3) forming ferritic stainless steels are being developed for interconnect application in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). A problem with these alloys is that in the SOFC environment chrome in the surface oxide can evaporate and deposit on the electrochemically active sites within the fuel cell. This poisons and degrades the performance of the fuel cell. The development of steels that can form conductive outer protective oxide layers other than Cr2O3 or (CrMn)3O4 such as TiO2 may be attractive for SOFC application. This study was undertaken to assess the oxidation behavior of ferritic stainless steel containing 1 weight percent (wt.%) Ti, in an effort to develop alloys that form protective outer TiO2 scales. The effect of Cr content (6–22 wt.%) and the application of a Ce-based surface treatment on the oxidation behavior (at 800° C in air+3% H2O) of the alloys was investigated. The alloys themselves failed to form an outer TiO2 scale even though the large negative {delta}G of this compound favors its formation over other species. It was found that in conjunction with the Ce-surface treatment, a continuous outer TiO2 oxide layer could be formed on the alloys, and in fact the alloy with 12 wt.% Cr behaved in an identical manner as the alloy with 22 wt.% Cr.

  13. Effect of interlayer on structure and performance of anode-supported SOFC single cells.

    PubMed

    Eom, Tae Wook; Yang, Hae Kwang; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Yoon, Hyon Hee; Kim, Jong Sung; Park, Sang Joon

    2008-09-01

    To lower the operating temperatures in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operations, anode-supported SOFC single cells with a single dip-coated interlayer were fabricated and the effect of the interlayer on the electrolyte structure and the electrical performance was investigated. For the preparation of SOFC single cells, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, NiO-YSZ anode, and 50% YSZ-50% strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) cathode were used. In order to characterize the cells, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were utilized and the gas (air) permeability measurements were conducted for gas tightness estimation. When the interlayer was inserted onto NiO-YSZ anode, the surface roughness of anode was diminished by about 40% and dense crack-free electrolytes were obtained. The electrical performance was enhanced remarkably and the maximum power density was 0.57 W/cm(2) at 800 degrees C and 0.44 W/cm(2) at 700 degrees C. On the other hand, the effect of interlayer on the gas tightness was negligible. The characterization study revealed that the enhancement in the electrical performance was mainly attributed to the increase of ion transmission area of anode/electrolyte interface and the increase of ionic conductivity of dense crack-free electrolyte layer. PMID:18571861

  14. Performance Impact Associated with Ni-Based SOFCs Fueled with Higher Hydrocarbon-Doped Coal Syngas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk; Chen, Yun; Song, Xueyan; Zondlo, John

    2015-03-01

    Energy generation strategies demonstrating high efficiency and fuel flexibility are desirable in the contemporary energy market. When integrated with a gasification process, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) can produce electricity at efficiencies exceeding 50 pct by consuming fuels such as coal, biomass, municipal solid waste, or other opportunity wastes. The synthesis gas derived from such fuel may contain trace species (including arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, phosphorus, sulfur, and tars) and low concentration organic species that adversely affect the SOFC performance. This work demonstrates the impact of exposure of the hydrocarbons ethylene, benzene, and naphthalene at various concentrations. The cell performance degradation rate is determined for tests exceeding 500 hours at 1073 K (800 °C). Cell performance is evaluated during operation with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and exposed samples are post-operationally analyzed by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The short-term performance is modeled to predict performances to the desired 40,000-hours operational lifetime for SOFCs. Possible hydrocarbon interactions with the nickel anode are postulated, and acceptable hydrocarbon exposure limits are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of a Surface Treatment on the Performance of Stainless Steels for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Holcomb, Adler, T.A.; G.R.; Wilson, R.D.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-04-01

    Pack cementation-like Cerium based surface treatments have been found to be effective in enhancing the oxidation resistance of ferritic steels (Crofer 22APU) for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The application of either a CeN- or CeO2 based surface treatment results in a decrease in weight gain by a factor of three after 4000 hours exposure to air+3%H2O at 800oC. Similar oxide scales formed on treated and untreated surfaces, with a continuous Cr-Mn outer oxide layer and a continuous inner Cr2O3 layer formed on the surface. However, the thickness of the scales, and the amount of internal oxidation were significantly reduced with the treatment, leading to the decrease in oxidation rate. This presentation will detail the influence of the treatment on the electrical properties of the interconnect. Half-cell experiments (LSM cathode sandwiched between two steel interconnects) and full SOFC button cell experiments were run with treated and untreated interconnects. Preliminary results indicate the Ce treatment can improve SOFC performance.

  16. Refined computational modeling of SOFCs degradation due to trace impurities in coal syngas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, Hayri

    The Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is a good alternative for clean and efficient power generation. These cells can be operated directly on a wide variety of fuels including biogas, hydrocarbon fuels and synthesized coal gas (syngas), which is a promising avenue for utilization of coal with much less environmental impact. One of the challenges in this technology is poisoning of SOFC anodes by trace impurities contained in coal syngas. One such impurity, phosphine is known to cause catastrophic failure of SOFC anode even at <10ppm concentrations. Fuel impurity degradation patterns can vary by different operating conditions such as humidity, applied current, temperature and anode thickness. In the present study, more detailed models are developed to predict the typical degradation behaviors observed in SOFC anode due to phosphine by extension of an in-house one-dimensional computational code. This model is first used to predict the effect of steam concentration on phosphine induced degradation in anode supported SOFCs. The model is refined based on the experimental observation, which indicate that the phosphine degradation is less severe in the absence of steam. Simulations results showed good agreement with experimental data. Then, a sensitivity analysis, using dual numbers automatic differentiation (DNAD) is performed to investigate the influence of empirical model parameters on model outputs, electrical potential, ohmic and polarization losses. Further, the refined one-dimensional model is extended to a three-dimensional model to study the phosphine induced performance degradation in relatively large planar cells operating on hydrogen fuel. The empirical model parameters are calibrated using button cell experiments and sensitivity analysis as a guide. These parameters are then used in planar cell simulations. The results from the three dimensional model show that the contaminant coverage of nickel and fuel distribution inside the anode is highly non-uniform. These

  17. Development and analysis of micro-polygeneration systems and adsorption chillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluesenkamp, Kyle

    About a fifth of all primary energy in the US is consumed by residential buildings, mostly for cooling, heating and to provide electricity. Furthermore, retrofits are essential to reducing this consumption, since the buildings that exist today will comprise over half of those in use in 2050. Residential combined heat and power (or micro CHP, defined by <5 kW electrical generation capacity) has been identified as a retrofit technology which can reduce energy consumption in existing homes during the heating season by 5-30%. This thesis investigates the addition of a thermally-driven chiller/heat pump to a CHP system (to form a trigeneration system) to additionally provide savings during the cooling season, and enhance heating season savings. Scenarios are identified in which adding thermally-driven equipment to a micro CHP system reduces primary energy consumption, through analytical and experimental investigations. The experimental focus is on adsorption heat pump systems, which are capable of being used with the CHP engines (prime movers) that are already widely deployed. The analytical analysis identifies energy saving potential off-grid for today's prime movers, with potential on-grid for various fuel cell technologies. A novel dynamic test facility was developed to measure real-world residential trigeneration system performance using a prototype adsorption chiller. The chiller was designed and constructed for this thesis and was driven by waste heat from a commercially available natural gas-fueled 4 kW (electric) CHP engine. A control strategy for the chiller was developed, enabling a 5-day experiment to be run using a thermal load profile based on moderate Maryland summer air conditioning loads and typical single-family domestic hot water demand, with experimental results in agreement with models. In this summer mode, depending on electrical loads, the trigeneration system used up to 36% less fuel than off-grid separate generation and up to 29% less fuel than

  18. Intermediate-temperature operation of solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) with thin film proton conductive electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, T.; Uchiyama, K.; Tanaka, H.; Hirono, T.; Kuse, T.; Yanagimoto, K.; Henmi, M.; Hirose, M.; Kimura, I.; Suu, K.; Funakubo, H.

    2015-12-01

    A novel solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) structure, which is fabricated on a Pd-plated porous stainless steel substrate, was proposed for low-temperature SOFC operation. The surface of the substrate was covered with Pd layer without any pores, which reduces the difficulty of depositing thin film electrolyte on the porous substrate. A 1.2-μm thick proton conductive Sr(Zr0.8Y0.2)O3-δ (SZYO) layer and the cathode of a 100-nm thick (La0.6Sr0.4)(Co0.2Fe0.8)O3-δ (LSCF) layer were deposited on the Pd-plated substrates by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The low temperature operations at 400 and 450 °C were demonstrated with proposed SOFC cells.

  19. Stability of Materials in High Temperature Water Vapor: SOFC Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, E. J.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell material systems require long term stability in environments containing high-temperature water vapor. Many materials in fuel cell systems react with high-temperature water vapor to form volatile hydroxides which can degrade cell performance. In this paper, experimental methods to characterize these volatility reactions including the transpiration technique, thermogravimetric analysis, and high pressure mass spectrometry are reviewed. Experimentally determined data for chromia, silica, and alumina volatility are presented. In addition, data from the literature for the stability of other materials important in fuel cell systems are reviewed. Finally, methods for predicting material recession due to volatilization reactions are described.

  20. Effect of ionic conductivity of zirconia electrolytes on polarization properties of various electrodes in SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Manabu

    1996-12-31

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been intensively investigated because, in principle, their energy conversion efficiency is fairly high. Lowering the operating temperature of SOFCs from 1000{degrees}C to around 800{degrees}C is desirable for reducing serious problems such as physical and chemical degradation of the constructing materials. The object of a series of the studies is to find a clue for achieving higher electrode performances at a low operating temperature than those of the present level. Although the polarization loss at electrodes can be reduced by using mixed-conducting ceria electrolytes, or introducing the mixed-conducting (reduced zirconia or ceria) laver on the conventional zirconia electrolyte surface, no reports are available on the effect of such an ionic conductivity of electrolytes on electrode polarizations. High ionic conductivity of the electrolyte, of course, reduces the ohmic loss. However, we have found that the IR-free polarization of a platinum anode attached to zirconia electrolytes is greatly influenced by the ionic conductivity, {sigma}{sub ion}, of the electrolytes used. The higher the {sigma}{sub ion}, the higher the exchange current density, j{sub 0}, for the Pt anode in H{sub 2} at 800 {approximately} 1000{degrees}C. It was indicated that the H{sub 2} oxidation reaction rate was controlled by the supply rate of oxide ions through the Pt/zirconia interface which is proportional to the {sigma}{sub ion}. Recently, we have proposed a new concept of the catalyzed-reaction layers which realizes both high-performances of anodes and cathodes for medium-temperature operating SOFCs. We present the interesting dependence of the polarization properties of various electrodes (the SDC anodes with and without Ru microcatalysts, Pt cathode, La(Sr)MnO{sub 3} cathodes with and without Pt microcatalysts) on the {sigma}{sub ion} of various zirconia electrolytes at 800 {approximately} 1000{degrees}C.

  1. Fabrication of Sr- and Co-doped lanthanum chromite interconnectors for SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Setz, L.F.G.; Colomer, M.T.; Mello-Castanho, S.R.H.

    2011-07-15

    Graphical abstract: FESEM micrographs of the fresh fracture surfaces for the La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}Cr{sub 0.92}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 3} sintered specimens cast from optimised suspensions with 13.5, 15 and 17.5 vol.% solids loading. Aqueous suspensions were prepared using ammonium polyacrylate (PAA) as dispersant and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to assure a basic pH and providing stabilization. Sintering of the green discs was performed in air at 1600 {sup o}C for 4 h. Highlights: {yields} Optimum casting slips were achieved with 3 wt.% of ammonium polyacrylate and 1 wt.% of tetramethylammonium hydroxide. -- Abstract: Many studies have been performed dealing with the processing conditions of electrodes and electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). However, the processing of the interconnector material has received less attention. Lanthanum chromite (LaCrO{sub 3}) is probably the most studied material as SOFCs interconnector. This paper deals with the rheology and casting behaviour of lanthanum chromite based materials to produce interconnectors for SOFCs. A powder with the composition La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}Cr{sub 0.92}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 3} was obtained by combustion synthesis. Aqueous suspensions were prepared to solids loading ranging from 8 to 17.5 vol.%, using ammonium polyacrylate (PAA) as dispersant and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to assure a basic pH and providing stabilization. The influence of the additives concentrations and suspension ball milling time were studied. Suspensions prepared with 24 h ball milling, with 3 wt.% and 1 wt.% of PAA and TMAH, respectively, yielded the best conditions for successful slip casting. Sintering of the green discs was performed in air at 1600 {sup o}C for 4 h leading to relatively dense materials.

  2. Investigation of AISI 441 Ferritic Stainless Steel and Development of Spinel Coatings for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Chong M.; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua D.; Singh, Prabhakar; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2008-05-30

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, both bare and spinel coated AISI 441 were studied in terms of metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. The conventional melt metallurgy used for the bulk alloy fabrication leads to significant processing cost reduction and the alloy chemistry with the presence of minor alloying additions of Nb and Ti facilitate the strengthening by precipitation and formation of Laves phase both inside grains and along grain boundaries during exposure in the intermediate SOFC operating temperature range. The Laves phase formed along the grain boundaries also ties up Si and prevents the formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface during prolonged exposure. The substantial increase in ASR during long term oxidation due to oxide scale growth suggested the need for a conductive protection layer, which could also minimize Cr evaporation. In particular, Mn1.5Co1.5O4 based surface coatings on planar coupons drastically improved the electrical performance of the 441, yielding stable ASR values at 800ºC for over 5,000 hours. Ce-modified spinel coatings retained the advantages of the unmodified spinel coatings, and also appeared to alter the scale growth behavior beneath the coating, leading to a more adherent scale. The spinel protection layers appeared also to improve the surface stability of 441 against the anomalous oxidation that has been observed for ferritic stainless steels exposed to dual atmosphere conditions similar to SOFC interconnect environments. Hence, it is anticipated that, compared to unmodified spinel coatings, the Ce-modified coatings may lead to superior structural stability and electrical performance.

  3. Preparation of thin layer materials with macroporous microstructure for SOFC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero-López, D.; Ruiz-Morales, J. C.; Peña-Martínez, J.; Canales-Vázquez, J.; Núñez, P.

    2008-04-01

    A facile and versatile method using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microspheres as pore formers has been developed to prepare thin layer oxide materials with controlled macroporous microstructure. Several mixed oxides with fluorite and perovskite-type structures, i.e. doped zirconia, ceria, ferrites, manganites, and NiO-YSZ composites have been prepared and characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry. The synthesised materials are nanocrystalline and present a homogeneous pore distribution and relatively high specific surface area, which makes them interesting for SOFC and catalysis applications in the intermediate temperature range.

  4. Long-Term SOFC Stability with Coated Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Anderson, Michael D.; Xia, Gordon; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2005-01-25

    This study details long-term performance data for anode-supported thin-film YSZ-based SOFCs utilizing a ferritic stainless steel cathode current collector (Crofer22 APU) coated with a protective (Mn,Co)3O4 spinel to prevent Cr volatilization. Two standard cathode compositions, La(Sr)FeO3 and La(Sr)MnO3, were considered. The coating proved effective in blocking Cr migration, which resulted in long-term stability of the manganite cathode. In contrast the ferrite cathode indicated degradation that could not be attributed to Cr poisoning.

  5. Modeling of On-Cell Reforming Reaction for Planar SOFC Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Choongmo; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Hwang, Soon Cheol; Kim, Dohyung; Lai, Canhai; Koeppel, Brian J.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-05-30

    Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stack is known to suffer thermal problem from high stack temperature during operation to generate high current. On-Cell Reforming (OCR) phenomenon is often used to reduce stack temperature by an endothermic reaction of steam-methane reforming process. RIST conducted single-cell experiment to validate modeling tool to simulate OCR performance including temperature measurement. 2D modeling is used to check reforming rate during OCR using temperature measurement data, and 3D modeling is used to check overall thermal performance including furnace boundary conditions.

  6. Exergy & economic analysis of biogas fueled solid oxide fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Litster, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    We present an exergy and an economic analysis of a power plant that uses biogas produced from a thermophilic anaerobic digester (AD) to fuel a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). We performed a 4-variable parametric analysis of the AD-SOFC system in order to determine the optimal design operation conditions, depending on the objective function of interest. We present results on the exergy efficiency (%), power normalized capital cost ( kW-1), and the internal rate of return on investment, IRR, (% yr-1) as a function of the current density, the stack pressure, the fuel utilization, and the total air stoichiometric ratio. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first AD-SOFC paper to include the cost of the AD when conducting economic optimization of the AD-SOFC plant. Our calculations show that adding a new AD-SOFC system to an existing waste water treatment (WWT) plant could yield positives values of IRR at today's average electricity prices and could significantly out-compete other options for using biogas to generate electricity. AD-SOFC systems could likely convert WWT plants into net generators of electricity rather than net consumers of electricity while generating economically viable rates of return on investment if the costs of SOFC systems are within a factor of two of the DOE/SECA cost targets.

  7. Exergy & economic analysis of biogas fueled solid oxide fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Litster, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    We present an exergy and an economic analysis of a power plant that uses biogas produced from a thermophilic anaerobic digester (AD) to fuel a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). We performed a 4-variable parametric analysis of the AD-SOFC system in order to determine the optimal design operation conditions, depending on the objective function of interest. We present results on the exergy efficiency (%), power normalized capital cost ($ kW-1), and the internal rate of return on investment, IRR, (% yr-1) as a function of the current density, the stack pressure, the fuel utilization, and the total air stoichiometric ratio. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first AD-SOFC paper to include the cost of the AD when conducting economic optimization of the AD-SOFC plant. Our calculations show that adding a new AD-SOFC system to an existing waste water treatment (WWT) plant could yield positives values of IRR at today's average electricity prices and could significantly out-compete other options for using biogas to generate electricity. AD-SOFC systems could likely convert WWT plants into net generators of electricity rather than net consumers of electricity while generating economically viable rates of return on investment if the costs of SOFC systems are within a factor of two of the DOE/SECA cost targets.

  8. An Integrated Approach to Modeling and Mitigating SOFC Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Jianmin Qu; Andrei Fedorov; Comas Haynes

    2006-05-15

    The specific objectives of this project were: (1) To develop and demonstrate the feasibility of an integrated predictive computer-based tool for fuel cell design and reliability/durability analysis, (2) To generate new scientific and engineering knowledge to better enable SECA Industry Teams to develop reliable, low-cost solid-oxide fuel cell power generation systems, (3) To create technology breakthroughs to address technical risks and barriers that currently limit achievement of the SECA performance and cost goals for solidoxide fuel cell systems, and (4) To transfer new science and technology developed in the project to the SECA Industry Teams. Through this three-year project, the Georgia Tech's team has demonstrated the feasibility of the solution proposed and the merits of the scientific path of inquiry, and has developed the technology to a sufficient level such that it can be utilized by the SECA Industry Teams. This report summarizes the project's results and achievements.

  9. Co-flow planar SOFC fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-11-30

    A co-flow planar solid oxide fuel cell stack with an integral, internal manifold and a casing/holder to separately seal the cell. This construction improves sealing and gas flow, and provides for easy manifolding of cell stacks. In addition, the stack construction has the potential for an improved durability and operation with an additional increase in cell efficiency. The co-flow arrangement can be effectively utilized in other electrochemical systems requiring gas-proof separation of gases.

  10. Chemistry of SOFC Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Yildiz, Bilge; Heski, Clemens

    2013-08-31

    1) Electron tunneling characteristics on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin-film surfaces were studied up to 580oC in 10-3mbar oxygen pressure, using scanning tunneling microscopy/ spectroscopy (STM/STS). A threshold-like drop in the tunneling current was observed at positive bias in STS, which is interpreted as a unique indicator for the activation polarization in cation oxygen bonding on LSM cathodes. Sr-enrichment was found on the surface at high temperature using Auger electron spectroscopy, and was accompanied by a decrease in tunneling conductance in STS. This suggests that Sr-terminated surfaces are less active for electron transfer in oxygen reduction compared to Mn-terminated surfaces on LSM. 2) Effects of strain on the surface cation chemistry and the electronic structure are important to understand and control for attaining fast oxygen reduction kinetics on transition metal oxides. Here, we demonstrate and mechanistically interpret the strain coupling to Sr segregation, oxygen vacancy formation, and electronic structure on the surface of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin films as a model system. Our experimental results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy are discussed in light of our first principles-based calculations. A stronger Sr enrichment tendency and a more facile oxygen vacancy formation prevail for the tensile strained LSM surface. The electronic structure of the tensile strained LSM surface exhibits a larger band gap at room temperature, however, a higher tunneling conductance near the Fermi level than the compressively strained LSM at elevated temperatures in oxygen. Our findings suggest lattice strain as a key parameter to tune the reactivity of perovskite transition metal oxides with oxygen in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. 3) Cation segregation on perovskite oxide surfaces affects vastly the oxygen reduction activity and stability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes. A unified theory that explains the physical

  11. Selection and Evaluation of Heat-Resistant Alloys for Planar SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Weil, K. Scott; Paxton, Dean M.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2002-11-21

    Over the past several years, the steady reduction in SOFC operating temperatures to the intermediate range of 700~850oC [1] has made it feasible for lanthanum chromite to be supplanted by metals or alloys as the interconnect materials. Compared to doped lanthanum chromite, metals or alloys offer significantly lower raw material and fabrication costs. However, to be a durable and reliable, a metal or alloy has to satisfy several functional requirements specific to the interconnect under SOFC operating conditions. Specifically, the interconnect metal or alloy should possess the following properties: (i) Good surface stability (resistance to oxidation, hot corrosion, and carburization) in both cathodic (air) and anodic (fuel) atmospheres; (ii) Thermal expansion matching to the ceramic PEN (positive cathode-electrolyte-negative anode) and seal materials (as least for a rigid seal design); (iii) High electrical conductivity through both the bulk material and in-situ formed oxide scales; (iv) Bulk and interfacial thermal mechanical reliability and durability at the operating temperature; (v) Compatibility with other materials in contact with interconnects such as seals and electrical contact materials.

  12. Superstructure formation and variation in Ni-GDC cermet anodes in SOFC.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Peng; Mori, Toshiyuki; Auchterlonie, Graeme John; Zou, Jin; Drennan, John

    2011-05-28

    The microstructures and spatial distributions of constituent elements at the anode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been characterized by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM). High resolution TEM observations demonstrate two different types of superstructure formation in grain interiors and at grain boundaries. Energy-filtered TEM elemental imaging qualitatively reveals that mixture zones exist at metal-ceramic grain boundaries, which is also quantitatively verified by STEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was apparent that both metallic Ni and the rare-earth elements Ce/Gd in gadolinium-doped ceria can diffuse into each other with equal diffusion lengths (about 100 nm). This will lead to the existence of mutual diffusion zones at grain boundaries, accompanied by a change in the valence state of the diffusing ions, as identified by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Such mutual diffusion is believed to be the dominant factor that gives rise to superstructure formation at grain boundaries, while a different superstructure is formed at grain interiors, as a consequence solely of the reduction of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+) during H(2) treatment. This work will enhance the fundamental understanding of microstructural evolution at the anode, correlating with advancements in sample preparation in order to improve the performance of SOFC anodes. PMID:21494741

  13. EFFECTS OF GEOMETRICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF VARIOUS COMPONENTS ON STRESSES OF THE SEALS IN SOFCS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, numerical modeling was used to understand of the effect of the geometry and mechanical properties of various components in SOFCs on the level and distribution of stresses in the stack during operating and cooling. The results of these modeling analyses will help stack designers reduce high stresses in the seals of the stack so that structural failures are prevented and high stack mechanical reliability is achieved to meet technical targets. In general, it was found that the load carrying capacity of the cathode contact layer was advantageous for reducing the transmitted loads on the cell perimeter seal under operating environments of SOFCs, but the amount of reduction depends upon the relative stiffness values of the cell, interconnect, porous media, and support structures. Comparison of a fully bonded interface to a frictionless sliding interface resulted in 30-50% less transmitted load through the perimeter seal, with the greater reductions due to stiffer contact/media/interconnect structures. These results demonstrate that the mechanical contribution of the contact layer can be substantial and warrant design consideration

  14. A study of carbon formation and prevention in hydrocarbon-fueled SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Liu, G.; Boaro, M.; Lee, S.-I.; Vohs, J. M.; Gorte, R. J.; Al-Madhi, O. H.; Dabbousi, B. O.

    The formation and removal of the carbonaceous deposits formed by n-butane and liquid hydrocarbons, such as n-decane and proprietary light and heavy naphthas, between 973 and 1073 K on YSZ and ceria-YSZ, has been studied to determine conditions for stable operation of direct-utilization SOFC. First, it is shown that deactivation of SOFC with Cu-ceria-YSZ anodes operating on undiluted n-decane, a mixture of 80% n-decane and 20% toluene, or light naphtha at temperatures above 973 K is due to filling of the pores with polyaromatic compounds formed by gas-phase, free-radical reactions. Formation of these compounds occurs at a negligible rate below 973 K but increases rapidly above this temperature. The rate of formation also depends on the residence time of the fuel in the anode compartment. Because steam does not participate in the gas-phase reactions, carbonaceous deposits could form even at a H 2O:C ratio of 1.5, a value greater than the stability threshold predicted by thermodynamic calculations. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) measurements with 20% H 2O in He demonstrated that carbon deposits formed in pure YSZ were unreactive below 1073 K, while deposits formed on ceria-YSZ could be removed at temperatures as low as 923 K. Based on these results, we discuss strategies for avoiding carbon formation during the operation of direct-utilization anodes on oil-based liquid fuels.

  15. Deposition and Evaluation of Protective PVD Coatings on Ferritic Stainless Steel SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Gannon, Paul; Deibert, Max; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; Kopczyk, M.; Van Vorous, D.; Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Visco, s.; jacobson, c.; Kurokawa, H.; Sofie, Stephen W.

    2006-09-21

    Reduced operating temperatures (600-800°C) of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) may enable the use of inexpensive ferritic steels as interconnects. Due to the demanding SOFC interconnect operating environment, protective coatings are gaining attention to increase longterm stability. In this study, large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) and hybrid filtered arc assisted electron beam physical vapor deposition (FA-EBPVD) technologies were used for deposition of two-segment coatings with Cr-Co-Al-O-N based sublayer and Mn-Co-O top layer. Coatings were deposited on ferritic steel and subsequently annealed in air for various time intervals. Surface oxidation was investigated using RBS, SEM and EDS analyses. Cr volatilization was evaluated using a transpiration apparatus and ICP-MS analysis of the resultant condensate. Electrical conductivity (Area Specific Resistance) was studied as a function of time using the four-point technique with Ag electrodes. The oxidation behavior, Cr volatilization rate, and electrical conductivity of the coated and uncoated samples are reported. Transport mechanisms for various oxidizing species and coating diffusion barrier properties are discussed.

  16. Novel alkaline earth silicate sealing glass for SOFC, Part II: sealing and interfacial microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Gow, Robert N.

    2007-07-10

    This is the second part of a study of a novel Sr-Ca-Ni-Y-B silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Part I of the study addresses the effect of NiO on glass forming, thermal, and mechanical properties, and is presented in the preceding paper. In this paper (Part II), candidate composite glass with 10v percent NiO was tested for sealing standard coupons of Ni/YSZ anode-supported YSZ electrolyte bilayer and metallic interconnect Crofer22APU at various temperatures. Samples sealed at the highest temperature (1050 degrees C) showed hermetic seal after fully reduction and 10 thermal cycles. The interfacial microstructure characterization showed no distinct reactions at the interfaces of glass/YSZ or glass/metal, though some segregation of Ni was found along the glass/metal interface. Possible reactions were discussed. Overall the composite glass with 10v percent NiO appeared to be a good candidate for SOFC sealing.

  17. Novel alkaline earth silicate sealing glass for SOFC. Part II. Sealing and interfacial microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Gow, Robert N.

    This is the second part of a study of a novel Sr-Ca-Ni-Y-B silicate sealing glass for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). Part I of the study addresses the effect of NiO on glass forming, thermal, and mechanical properties, and is presented in the preceding paper. In this paper (part II), candidate composite glass with 10 vol.% NiO was tested for sealing standard coupons of Ni/YSZ anode-supported YSZ electrolyte bilayer and metallic interconnect Crofer22APU at various temperatures. Samples sealed at the highest temperature (1050 °C) showed hermetic seal after fully reduction and 10 thermal cycles. The interfacial microstructure characterization showed no distinct reactions at the interfaces of glass/YSZ or glass/metal, though some segregation of Ni was found along the glass/metal interface. Possible reactions were discussed. Overall the composite glass with 10 vol.% NiO appeared to be a good candidate for SOFC sealing.

  18. Evaluation of Ni-Cr-base alloys for SOFC interconnect applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guan-Guang; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    To further understand the suitability of Ni-Cr-base alloys for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect applications, three commercial Ni-Cr-base alloys, Haynes 230, Hastelloy S and Haynes 242 were selected and evaluated for oxidation behavior under different exposure conditions, scale conductivity and thermal expansion. Haynes 230 and Hastelloy S, which have a relatively high Cr content, formed a thin scale mainly comprised of Cr 2O 3 and (Mn,Cr,Ni) 3O 4 spinels under SOFC operating conditions, demonstrating excellent oxidation resistance and a high scale electrical conductivity. In contrast, a thick double-layer scale with a NiO outer layer above a chromia-rich substrate was grown on Haynes 242 in moist air or at the air side of dual exposure samples, indicating limited oxidation resistance for the interconnect application. With a face-centered-cubic (FCC) substrate, all three alloys possess a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) that is higher than that of candidate ferritic stainless steels, e.g. Crofer22 APU. Among the three alloys, Haynes 242, which is heavily alloyed with W and Mo and contains a low Cr content, demonstrated the lowest average CTE at 13.1 × 10 -6 K -1 from room temperature to 800 °C, but it was also observed that the CTE behavior of Haynes 242 was very non-linear.

  19. Evaluation of Ni-Cr-Base Alloys for SOFC Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Xia, Gordon; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2006-10-06

    To further understand the suitability of Ni-Cr-base alloys for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect applications, three commercial Ni-Cr-base alloys, Haynes 230, Hastelloy S and Haynes 242 were selected and evaluated for oxidation behavior under different exposure conditions, scale conductivity and thermal expansion. Haynes 230 and Hastelloy S, which have a relatively high Cr content, formed a thin scale mainly comprised of Cr2O3 and (Mn,Cr,Ni)3O4 spinels under SOFC operating conditions, demonstrating excellent oxidation resistance and a high scale electrical conductivity. In contrast, a thick double-layer scale with a NiO outer layer above a chromia-rich substrate was grown on Haynes 242 in moist air or at the air side of dual exposure samples, indicating limited oxidation resistance for the interconnect application. With a face-centered-cubic (FCC) substrate, all three alloys possess a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) that is higher than that of candidate ferritic stainless steels, e.g. Crofer22 APU. Among the three alloys, Haynes 242, which is heavily alloyed with W and Mo and contains a low Cr content, demonstrated the lowest average CTE at 13.1x10-6 K-1 from room temperature to 800oC, but it was also observed that the CTE behavior of Haynes 242 was very nonlinear.

  20. The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with CombinedHeat and Power

    SciTech Connect

    Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Lai, Judy; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2009-08-15

    The addition of solar thermal and heat storage systems can improve the economic, as well as environmental attraction of micro-generation systems, e.g. fuel cells with or without combined heat and power (CHP) and contribute to enhanced CO2 reduction. However, the interactions between solar thermal collection and storage systems and CHP systems can be complex, depending on the tariff structure, load profile, etc. In order to examine the impact of solar thermal and heat storage on CO2 emissions and annual energy costs, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program. The objective is minimization of annual energy costs. This paper focuses on analysis of the optimal interaction of solar thermal systems, which can be used for domestic hot water, space heating and/or cooling, and micro-CHP systems in the California service territory of San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). Contrary to typical expectations, our results indicate that despite the high solar radiation in southern California, fossil based CHP units are dominant, even with forecast 2020 technology and costs. A CO2 pricing scheme would be needed to incent installation of combined solar thermal absorption chiller systems, and no heat storage systems are adopted. This research also shows that photovoltaic (PV) arrays are favored by CO2 pricing more than solar thermal adoption.

  1. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CATHODE-INTERCONNECT INTERFACES IN PLANAR SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Armstrong, Beth L; Trejo, Rosa M; Bai, Jianming; Watkins, Thomas R; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2010-01-01

    The residual stresses in manganese cobaltite, i.e., Mn1.5Co1.5O4, coatings applied onto alloys 441 and Crofer 22 APU were determined by X-Ray Diffraction. The residual stresses were found to be tensile at 800 C for both systems. The residual stress for spinel-coated AL441 relaxed with time and reached a value of 0.16 0.02 GPa after 300 minutes. The stress relaxation process was slower for spinel-coated Crofer and reached a value of 0.23 0.01 GPa after 500 minutes. Four-point bend SENB testing technique was used to evaluate the toughness of the interfaces between LSM10, i.e., (La0.9Sr0.1)0.98MnO3+δ, and spinel-coated AL441 and Crofer. Sandwich test specimens were prepared by sintering the LSM10 layer at 900 C for four hours in air or under PO2 cyclic conditions. The strain energy release rate was found to be 1.52 0.11 J/m2 for regular sintering and 1.47 0.15 J/m2 for sintering with cyclic PO2 treatment. This difference was found to be statistically insignificant.

  2. The design of stationary and mobile solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Wolfgang; Lorenz, Hagen

    A general thermodynamic model has shown that combined fuel cell cycles may reach an electric-efficiency of more than 80%. This value is one of the targets of the Department of Energy (DOE) solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine (SOFC-GT) program. The combination of a SOFC and GT connects the air flow of the heat engine and the cell cooling. The principle strategy in order to reach high electrical-efficiencies is to avoid a high excess air for the cell cooling and heat losses. Simple combined SOFC-GT cycles show an efficiency between 60 and 72%. The combination of the SOFC and the GT can be done by using an external cooling or by dividing the stack into multiple sub-stacks with a GT behind each sub-stack as the necessary heat sink. The heat exchangers (HEXs) of a system with an external cooling have the benefit of a pressurization on both sides and therefore, have a high heat exchange coefficient. The pressurization on both sides delivers a low stress to the HEX material. The combination of both principles leads to a reheat (RH)-SOFC-GT cycle that can be improved by a steam turbine (ST) cycle. The first results of a study of such a RH-SOFC-GT-ST cycle indicate that a cycle design with an efficiency of more than 80% is possible and confirm the predictions by the theoretical thermodynamic model mentioned above. The extremely short heat-up time of a thin tubular SOFC and the market entrance of the micro-turbines give the option of using these SOFC-GT designs for mobile applications. The possible use of hydrocarbons such as diesel oil is an important benefit of the SOFC. The micro-turbine and the SOFC stack will be matched depending on the start-up requirements of the mobile system. The minimization of the volume needed is a key issue. The efficiency of small GTs is lower than the efficiency of large GTs due to the influence of the leakage within the stages of GTs increasing with a decreasing size of the GT. Thus, the SOFC module pressure must be lower than in larger

  3. High-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator development project: Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The proposed project involves research, development, fabrication, and testing of solid oxide fuel cells/generators. All of the work, with the exception of various SOFC generator tests, would be conducted at two existing permitted Westinghouse facilities in the greater metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. The DOE has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA). This site-specific analysis addresses the two existing permitted Westinghouse facilities. The sources of information for this EA include the following: the technical proposal submitted as part of the assistance application by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation; discussions with the Westinghouse staff and information provided on the sites to be utilized; and site visits during work conducted under the prior Westinghouse effort with DOE.

  4. Optimized Lanthanum Ferrite-Based Cathods for Anode-Supported SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2002-07-15

    Three cathode compositions (La0.8Sr0.2FeO3-d, La0.7Sr0.3Fe0.8Ni0.2O3-d and LaNi0.6Fe0.4O3-d) have been tested as SOFC cathodes at operating temperatures from 650 degrees C to 750 degrees C. Sintering temperatures were established for each cathode composition to provide optimized cell performance. La0.8Sr0.2FeO3-d exhibited the highest power density (> 900 mW/cm2 at 750 degrees C and 0.7 V), and indicated excellent performance stability over a 300 hour period.

  5. The Development of Low-Cost Integrated Composite Seal for SOFC: Materials and Design Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Xinyu Huang; Kristoffer Ridgeway; Srivatsan Narasimhan; Serg Timin; Wei Huang; Didem Ozevin; Ken Reifsnider

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted by UConn SOFC seal development team during the Phase I program and no cost extension. The work included composite seal sample fabrication, materials characterizations, leak testing, mechanical strength testing, chemical stability study and acoustic-based diagnostic methods. Materials characterization work revealed a set of attractive material properties including low bulk permeability, high electrical resistivity, good mechanical robustness. Composite seal samples made of a number of glasses and metallic fillers were tested for sealing performance under steady state and thermal cycling conditions. Mechanical testing included static strength (pull out) and interfacial fracture toughness measurements. Chemically stability study evaluated composite seal material stability after aging at 800 C for 168 hrs. Acoustic based diagnostic test was conducted to help detect and understand the micro-cracking processes during thermal cycling test. The composite seal concept was successfully demonstrated and a set of material (coating composition & fillers) were identified to have excellent thermal cycling performance.

  6. Preparation and characterisation of SOFC anodic materials based on Ce-Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerte, A.; Valenzuela, R. X.; Daza, L.

    Ce-Cu mixed oxide precursors with varing Ce:Cu atomic ratio have been prepared by freeze-drying and microemulsion coprecipitation methods. Nanostructured particles having different properties have been obtained. Physicochemical properties have been studied with X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry, ICP-AES, conductivity measurement and thermal expansion coefficient. All samples show fluorite structure with slight copper surface enrichment for samples having high copper content. Microemulsion method allows the introduction of a large quantity of copper into the cerium oxide structure, obtaining a nanostructured mixed oxide of high surface area. On the other hand, freeze-drying samples does not show evidence of copper incorporation to the lattice of cerium oxide. All materials have a thermal expansion coefficient similar to other components of SOFC.

  7. Model-based prediction of suitable operating range of a SOFC for an Auxiliary Power Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfafferodt, Matthias; Heidebrecht, Peter; Stelter, Michael; Sundmacher, Kai

    This paper presents a one-dimensional steady state model of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to be used in an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU). The fuel cell is fed a prereformed gas from an external autothermic reformer. In addition to the three electrochemical reactions (reduction of oxygen at the cathode, oxidation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide at the anode) the water-gas shift reaction and the methane steam reforming reaction are taken into account in the anode channel. The model predicts concentrations and temperatures and uses an equivalent circuit approach to describe the current-voltage characteristics of the cell. The model equations are presented and their implementation into the commercial mathematical software FEMLAB is discussed. An application of this model is used to determine suitable operating parameters with respect to optimum performance and allowable temperature.

  8. Surface modification of ferritic and Ni based alloys for improved oxidation resistance of SOFC interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.; Kung, Steven C.

    2005-08-01

    This research is aimed at evaluating a surface modification of ferritic stainless steels (Type-430 and Crofer 22APU) and nickel-base alloys (Haynes 230) for use in the SOFC temperature range of 700 to 800°C. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the stability of the base metal oxide that forms and to reduce the oxidation rate of the materials at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted at 800°C to evaulate the corrosion resistance of the alloys. It was found that the surface treatment improved the oxidation resistance of all the alloys tested. However, the treatment improved the performance of 430SS more than that of the other alloys.

  9. Cost projections for planar solid oxide fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Krist, K.; Wright, J.D.; Romero, C.; Chen, Tan Ping

    1996-12-31

    The Gas Research Institute (GRI) is funding fundamental research on solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that operate at reduced temperature. As part of this effort, we have carried out engineering analysis to determine what areas of research can have the greatest effect on the commercialization of SOFCs. Previous papers have evaluated the markets for SOFCs and the amount which a customer will be willing to pay for fuel cell systems or stacks in these markets, the contribution of materials costs to the total stack cost, and the benefits and design requirements associated with reduced temperature operation. In this paper, we describe the cost of fabricating SOFC stacks by different methods. The complete analysis is available in report form.

  10. Lattice Expansion of LSCF-6428 Cathodes Measured by In-situ XRD during SOFC Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Edwards, Danny J.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-01-03

    A new capability has been developed for analyzing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). This paper describes the initial results of in-situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) of the cathode on an operating anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell. It has been demonstrated that XRD measurements of the cathode can be performed simultaneously with electrochemical measurements of cell performance or electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). While improvements to the technique are still to be made, the XRD pattern of a lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode with the composition La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF-6428) was found to continually but gradually change over the course of more than 60 hours of operation in air under typical SOFC operating conditions. It was determined that the most significant change was a gradual increase in the cubic lattice parameters of the LSCF from 3.92502 Å (as determined from the integration of the first 20 hours of XRD patterns) to 3.92650 Å (from the integration of the last 20 hours). This analysis also revealed that there were several peaks from unidentified minor phases that increased in intensity over this timeframe. After a temporary loss of airflow early in the test, the cell generated between 225 and 250 mW/cm2 for the remainder of the test. A large low frequency arc in the impedance spectra suggests the cell performance was gas diffusion limited and that there is room for improvement in air delivery to the cell.

  11. Lanthanum oxide-coated stainless steel for bipolar plates in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jong Seol; Lee, Jun; Hwang, Hae Jin; Whang, Chin Myung; Moon, Ji-Woong; Kim, Do-Hyeong

    Solid oxide fuel cells typically operate at temperatures of about 1000 °C. At these temperatures only ceramic interconnects such as LaCrO 3 can be employed. The development of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) can potentially bring about reduced manufacturing costs as it makes possible the use of an inexpensive ferritic stainless steel (STS) interconnector. However, the STS suffers from Cr 2O 3 scale formation and a peeling-off phenomenon at the IT-SOFC operating temperature in an oxidizing atmosphere. Application of an oxidation protective coating is an effective means of providing oxidation resistance. In this study, we coated an oxidation protective layer on ferritic stainless steel using a precursor solution prepared from lanthanum nitrate, ethylene glycol, and nitric acid. Heating the precursor solution at 80 °C yielded a spinable solution for coating. A gel film was coated on a STS substrate by a dip coating technique. At the early stage of the heat-treatment, lanthanum-containing oxides such as La 2O 3 and La 2CrO 6 formed, and as the heat-treatment temperature was increased, an oxidation protective perovskite-type LaCrO 3 layer was produced by the reaction between the lanthanum-containing oxide and the Cr 2O 3 scale on the SUS substrate. As the concentration of La-containing precursor solution was increased, the amount of La 2O 3 and La 2CrO 6 phases was gradually increased. The coating layer, which was prepared from a precursor solution of 0.8 M, was composed of LaCrO 3 and small amounts of (Mn,Cr)O 4 spinel. A relatively dense coating layer without pin-holes was obtained by heating the gel coating layer at 1073 K for 2 h. Microstructures and oxidation behavior of the La 2O 3-coated STS444 were investigated.

  12. Elementary Electrochemical reactions of H2-CO mixtures over an SOFC anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle Marchante, Nicolas

    SOFC is a mature technology suitable for producing potentially clean energy. Understanding the reaction mechanism of a complex H2 - CO fuel is presented in this work. By using existent fundamental reaction mechanisms and kinetic parameters, elementary reactions involved in an SOFC anode have been detailed, modeled and analyzed. This involves both homogeneous and heterogeneous chemistry, electrochemistry and surface diffusion. Modeling has been implemented in a patterned anode geometry with a C++ code using the open-source code CANTERA for chemical kinetics. The use of the patterned anode approach removes the mass transport complications and allows comparison with pre-existent experimental data. The model provides both the polarization curves and the surface coverage distribution and allows a high level of detail on the physical phenomena involved. In particular, understanding of how the competitive reactions behave is achieved. Results show a good agreement with the experimental conclusions provided previously by Sukesini et al., where concentrations on the fuel stream up to 75% CO behave similarly to those with pure H2 . Further analysis has been performed as well to understand both temperature and composition effects on the cell performance. CO has shown to stabilize the OCV response to temperature, improving the H2 response to such effect. At the same time, high temperatures have proven to improve the CO tolerance in the stream, providing good performance. Surface analysis shows that CO occupies most of the active sites present in the electrode, although it does not penalize the cell performance as far as there is some H2 in the stream. On the other hand, the presence of oxidized species (i.e., H2 O and CO2 ) in the anode compartment when the corresponding reductant species (i.e., H2 and CO) provokes a reversible reaction at the TPB vicinity, penalizing the performance of the cell.

  13. Materials Properties Database for Selection of High-Temperature Alloys and Concepts of Alloy Design for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Paxton, Dean M.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2002-11-24

    To serve as an interconnect / gas separator in an SOFC stack, an alloy should demonstrate the ability to provide (i) bulk and surface stability against oxidation and corrosion during prolonged exposure to the fuel cell environment, (ii) thermal expansion compatibility with the other stack components, (iii) chemical compatibility with adjacent stack components, (iv) high electrical conductivity of the surface reaction products, (v) mechanical reliability and durability at cell exposure conditions, (vii) good manufacturability, processability and fabricability, and (viii) cost effectiveness. As the first step of this approach, a composition and property database was compiled for high temperature alloys in order to assist in determining which alloys offer the most promise for SOFC interconnect applications in terms of oxidation and corrosion resistance. The high temperature alloys of interest included Ni-, Fe-, Co-base superal

  14. Development of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nickel alloys for potential use as interconnects in SOFC

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, David E.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2004-11-01

    This paper deals with the development of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nickel-base superalloys for potential use as interconnects for SOFC. Ni-Mo-Cr alloys were formulated with CTE on the order of 12.5 to 13.5 x10-6/°C. The alloys were vacuum induction melted and reduced to sheet via a combination of hot and cold working. Dilatometry was used to measure CTE of the alloys. Oxidation behavior of the alloys at 800°C in dry and moist air is reported. The results are compared to results for Haynes 230 (a commercial Ni-base superalloy) and for Crofer 22APU (a commercial ferritic stainless steel designed specifically for use as an SOFC interconnect).

  15. Thermodynamic assessment of solid oxide fuel cell system integrated with bioethanol purification unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamsak, W.; Assabumrungrat, S.; Douglas, P. L.; Croiset, E.; Laosiripojana, N.; Suwanwarangkul, R.; Charojrochkul, S.

    A solid oxide fuel cell system integrated with a distillation column (SOFC-DIS) has been proposed in this article. The integrated SOFC system consists of a distillation column, an EtOH/H 2O heater, an air heater, an anode preheater, a reformer, an SOFC stack and an afterburner. Bioethanol with 5 mol% ethanol was purified in a distillation column to obtain a desired concentration necessary for SOFC operation. The SOFC stack was operated under isothermal conditions. The heat generated from the stack and the afterburner was supplied to the reformer and three heaters. The net remaining heat from the SOFC system (Q SOFC,Net) was then provided to the reboiler of the distillation column. The effects of fuel utilization and operating voltage on the net energy (Q Net), which equals Q SOFC,Net minus the distillation energy (Q D), were examined. It was found that the system could become more energy sufficient when operating at lower fuel utilization or lower voltage but at the expense of less electricity produced. Moreover, it was found that there were some operating conditions, which yielded Q Net of zero. At this point, the integrated system provides the maximum electrical power without requiring an additional heat source. The effects of ethanol concentration and ethanol recovery on the electrical performance at zero Q Net for different fuel utilizations were investigated. With the appropriate operating conditions (e.g. C EtOH = 41%, U f = 80% and EtOH recovery = 80%), the overall electrical efficiency and power density are 33.3% (LHV) and 0.32 W cm -2, respectively.

  16. High temperature phase transition in SOFC anodes based on Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6-{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Marrero-Lopez, D.; Pena-Martinez, J.; Ruiz-Morales, J.C.; Martin-Sedeno, M.C.; Nunez, P.

    2009-05-15

    The double perovskite Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6-{delta}} has been recently reported as an efficient anode material for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). In the present work, this material have been investigated by high temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and impedance spectroscopy to further characterise its properties as SOFC anode. DSC and XRD measurements indicate that Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6-{delta}} exhibits a reversible phase transition around 275 deg. C from triclinic (I1-bar) with an octahedral tilting distortion to cubic (Fm3-barm) without octahedral distortion. This phase transition is continuous with increasing temperature without any sudden cell volume change during the phase transformation. The main effect of the phase transformation is observed in the electrical conductivity with a change in the activation energy at low temperature. La{sup 3+} and Fe-substituted Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6-{delta}} phases were also investigated, however these materials are unstable under oxidising conditions due to phase segregations above 600 deg. C. - Graphical abstract: The double perovskite Sr{sub 2}MgMoO{sub 6}, recently proposed as an efficient SOFC anode for direct hydrocarbon oxidation, exhibits a reversible structural phase transition from triclinic to cubic at 275 deg. C.

  17. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture - Part A: Methodology and reference cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-08-01

    Driven by the search for the highest theoretical efficiency, in the latest years several studies investigated the integration of high temperature fuel cells in natural gas fired power plants, where fuel cells are integrated with simple or modified Brayton cycles and/or with additional bottoming cycles, and CO2 can be separated via chemical or physical separation, oxy-combustion and cryogenic methods. Focusing on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) and following a comprehensive review and analysis of possible plant configurations, this work investigates their theoretical potential efficiency and proposes two ultra-high efficiency plant configurations based on advanced intermediate-temperature SOFCs integrated with a steam turbine or gas turbine cycle. The SOFC works at atmospheric or pressurized conditions and the resulting power plant exceeds 78% LHV efficiency without CO2 capture (as discussed in part A of the work) and 70% LHV efficiency with substantial CO2 capture (part B). The power plants are simulated at the 100 MW scale with a complete set of realistic assumptions about fuel cell (FC) performance, plant components and auxiliaries, presenting detailed energy and material balances together with a second law analysis.

  18. Predicting the ultimate potential of natural gas SOFC power cycles with CO2 capture - Part A: Methodology and reference cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanari, Stefano; Mastropasqua, Luca; Gazzani, Matteo; Chiesa, Paolo; Romano, Matteo C.

    2016-08-01

    Driven by the search for the highest theoretical efficiency, in the latest years several studies investigated the integration of high temperature fuel cells in natural gas fired power plants, where fuel cells are integrated with simple or modified Brayton cycles and/or with additional bottoming cycles, and CO2 can be separated via chemical or physical separation, oxy-combustion and cryogenic methods. Focusing on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) and following a comprehensive review and analysis of possible plant configurations, this work investigates their theoretical potential efficiency and proposes two ultra-high efficiency plant configurations based on advanced intermediate-temperature SOFCs integrated with a steam turbine or gas turbine cycle. The SOFC works at atmospheric or pressurized conditions and the resulting power plant exceeds 78% LHV efficiency without CO2 capture (as discussed in part A of the work) and 70% LHV efficiency with substantial CO2 capture (part B). The power plants are simulated at the 100 MW scale with a complete set of realistic assumptions about fuel cell (FC) performance, plant components and auxiliaries, presenting detailed energy and material balances together with a second law analysis.

  19. Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey W. Fergus

    2012-09-05

    The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution

  20. PRESSURIZED SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL/GAS TURBINE POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    W.L. Lundberg; G.A. Israelson; R.R. Moritz; S.E. Veyo; R.A. Holmes; P.R. Zafred; J.E. King; R.E. Kothmann

    2000-02-01

    Power systems based on the simplest direct integration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator and a gas turbine (GT) are capable of converting natural gas fuel energy to electric power with efficiencies of approximately 60% (net AC/LHV), and more complex SOFC and gas turbine arrangements can be devised for achieving even higher efficiencies. The results of a project are discussed that focused on the development of a conceptual design for a pressurized SOFC/GT power system that was intended to generate 20 MWe with at least 70% efficiency. The power system operates baseloaded in a distributed-generation application. To achieve high efficiency, the system integrates an intercooled, recuperated, reheated gas turbine with two SOFC generator stages--one operating at high pressure, and generating power, as well as providing all heat needed by the high-pressure turbine, while the second SOFC generator operates at a lower pressure, generates power, and provides all heat for the low-pressure reheat turbine. The system cycle is described, major system components are sized, the system installed-cost is estimated, and the physical arrangement of system components is discussed. Estimates of system power output, efficiency, and emissions at the design point are also presented, and the system cost of electricity estimate is developed.

  1. A solid oxide fuel cell system fed with hydrogen sulfide and natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yixin; Schaefer, Laura

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) occurs naturally in crude petroleum, natural gas, volcanic gases, hot springs, and some lakes. Hydrogen sulfide can also result as a by-product from industrial activities, such as food processing, coke ovens, paper mills, tanneries, and petroleum refineries. Sometimes, it is considered to be an industrial pollutant. However, hydrogen can be decomposed from H 2S and then used as fuel for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This paper presents an examination of a simple hydrogen sulfide and natural gas-fed solid oxide fuel cell system. The possibility of utilization of hydrogen sulfide as a feedstock in a solid oxide fuel cell is discussed. A system configuration of an SOFC combined with an external H 2S decomposition device is proposed, where a certain amount of natural gas is supplied to the SOFC. The exhaust fuel gas of the SOFC is after-burned with exhaust air from the SOFC, and the heat of the combustion gas is utilized in the decomposition of H 2S in a decomposition reactor (DR) to produce hydrogen to feed the SOFC. The products are electricity and industry-usable sulfur. Through a mass and energy balance, a preliminary thermodynamic analysis of this system is performed, and the system efficiency is calculated. Also in this paper, the challenges in creating the proposed configuration are discussed, and the direction of future work is presented.

  2. PROGRESS IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING PLANAR SOFC TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, J. E.; Herring, J. S.; Stoots, C. M.; Hawkes, G. L.; Hartvigsen, J., J.; Mehrdad Shahnam

    2005-04-01

    A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. The research program includes both experimental and modeling activities. Selected results from both activities are presented in this paper. Experimental results were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, fabricated by Ceramatec , Inc. The electrolysis cells are electrolyte-supported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Hydrogen production rates up to 90 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was also created to model high-temperature steam electrolysis in a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model represents a single cell as it would exist in the experimental electrolysis stack. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT1. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean model results are shown to compare favorably with

  3. Tailoring Fe-Base Alloys for Intermediate Temperature SOFC Interconnect Application

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Zhu; M.P. Brady; H.U. Anderson

    2007-12-31

    This report summarized the research efforts and major conclusions for our SECA Phase I and II project focused on Cr-free or low Cr Fe-Ni based alloy development for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect application. Electrical conductivity measurement on bulk (Fe,Ni){sub 3}O{sub 4} coupons indicated that this spinel phase possessed a higher electrical conductivity than Cr{sub 1.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} spinel and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which was consistent with the low area specific resistance (ASR) of the oxide scale formed on these Fe-Ni based alloys. For Cr-free Fe-Ni binary alloys, although the increase in Ni content in the alloys improved the oxidation resistance, and the Fe-Ni binary alloys exhibited adequate CTE and oxide scale ASR, their oxidation resistance needs to be further improved. Systematic alloy design efforts have led to the identification of one low-Cr (6wt.%) Fe-Ni-Co based alloy which formed a protective, electrically-conductive Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} inner layer underneath a Cr-free, highly conductive spinel outer layer. This low-Cr, Fe-Ni-Co alloy has demonstrated a good CTE match with other cell components; high oxidation resistance comparable to that of Crofer; low oxide scale ASR with the formation of electrically-insulating phases in the oxide scale; no scale spallation during thermal cycling; adequate compatibility with cathode materials; and comparable mechanical properties with Crofer. The existence of the Cr-free (Fe,Co,Ni){sub 3}O{sub 4} outer layer effectively reduced the Cr evaporation and in transpiration testing resulted in a 6-fold decrease in Cr evaporation as compared to a state-of-the-art ferritic interconnect alloy. In-cell testing using an anode supported cell with a configuration of Alloy/Pt/LSM/YSZ/Ni+YSZ indicates that the formation of the Cr-free spinel layer via thermal oxidation was effective in blocking the Cr migration and thus improving the cell performance stability. Electroplating of the Fe

  4. Electro-catalytically Active, High Surface Area Cathodes for Low Temperature SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2006-09-30

    This research focused on developing low polarization (area specific resistance, ASR) cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). In order to accomplish this we focused on two aspects of cathode development: (1) development of novel materials; and (2) developing the relationships between microstructure and electrochemical performance. The materials investigated ranged from Ag-bismuth oxide composites (which had the lowest reported ASR at the beginning of this contract) to a series of pyrochlore structured ruthenates (Bi{sub 2-x}M{sub x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, where M = Sr, Ca, Ag; Pb{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 6.5}; and Y{sub 2-2x}Pr{sub 2x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}), to composites of the pyrochlore ruthenates with bismuth oxide. To understand the role of microstructure on electrochemical performance, we optimized the Ag-bismuth oxide and the ruthenate-bismuth oxide composites in terms of both two-phase composition and particle size/microstructure. We further investigated the role of thickness and current collector on ASR. Finally, we investigated issues of stability and found the materials investigated did not form deleterious phases at the cathode/electrolyte interface. Further, we established the ability through particle size modification to limit microstructural decay, thus, enhancing stability. The resulting Ag-Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} and Bi{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7{sup -}}Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} composite cathodes had ASRs of 1.0 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and 0.73 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 500 C and 0.048 {Omega}cm{sup 2} and 0.053 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 650 C, respectively. These ASRs are truly impressive and makes them among the lowest IT-SOFC ASRs reported to date.

  5. Développement de matériaux pour les piles à combustibles SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubourdieu, G.; Gauthier, G.; Henry, J. Y.; Sanchette, F.; Delépine, J.; Lefebvre-Joud, F.

    2002-04-01

    Dans le cadre des nouveaux programmes du CEA dédiés aux Nouvelles Technologies pour l'Energie, l'un des axes concerne les piles à combustible haute température et tout solide (SOFC). Deux voies de recherche sont présentées ici ; l'une traite de l'élaboration d'électrolytes connus - de type zircone yttriée - en couche mince, par des techniques de dépôt PVD ou CVD à injection, ceci dans le but d'un fonctionnement à plus basse température. L'autre a trait au développement de matériaux d'anode compatibles avec l'utilisation directe du méthane à la place de l'hydrogène. Les chromates de lanthane substitué par le strontium, dont une méthode de synthèse sous forme de poudres très divisées est présentée ici, semblent être des matériaux prometteurs pour cette application, à condition qu'ils ne subissent pas de dégradation en fonctionnement.

  6. Evaluation of porous 430L stainless steel for SOFC operation at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molin, Sebastian; Kusz, Boguslaw; Gazda, Maria; Jasinski, Piotr

    In this paper a 430L porous stainless steel is evaluated for possible SOFC applications. Recently, there are extensive studies related to dense stainless steels for fuel cell purposes, but only very few publications deal with porous stainless steel. In this report porous substrates, which are prepared by die-pressing and sintering in hydrogen of commercially available 430L stainless steel powders, are investigated. Prepared samples are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and cyclic thermogravimetry in air and humidified hydrogen at 400 °C and 800 °C. The electrical properties of steel and oxide scale measured in air are investigated as well. The results show that at high temperatures porous steel in comparison to dense steel behaves differently. It was found that porous 430L has reduced oxidation resistance both in air and in humidified hydrogen. This is connected to its high surface area and grain boundaries, which after sintering are prone to oxidation. Formed oxide scale is mainly composed of iron oxide after the oxidation in air and chromium oxide after the oxidation in humidified hydrogen. In case of dense substrates only chromium oxide scale usually occurs. Iron oxide is also a cause of relatively high area-specific resistance, which reaches the literature limit of 100 mΩ cm 2 when oxidizing in air only after about 70 h at 800 °C.

  7. Electrodeposition of Mn-Co Alloys on Stainless Steels for SOFC Interconnect Application

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Jiang, Y.; Johnson, C.; Gong, M.; Liu, X.

    2007-09-01

    Chromium-containing ferritic stainless steels are the most popular materials for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect applications because of its oxidation resistance and easy fabrication process. However, excessive scale growth and chromium evaporation will degrade the cell performance. Highly conductive coatings that resist oxide scale growth and chromium evaporation may prevent both of these problems. Mn1.5Co1.5O4 spinel is one of the most promising coatings for interconnect application because of its high conducitivy, good chromium retention capability, as well as good CTE match. Electroplating of alloys or thin film multilayers followed by controlled oxidation to the desired spinel phase offers an additional deposition option. In the present study binary Mn/Co alloys was fabricated by electrodeposition, and polarization curves were used to characterize the cathodic reactions on substrate surface. By controlling the current density precisely, coatings with Mn/Co around 1:1 has been successfully deposited in Mn/Co =10 solutions, SEM and EDX was used to characterize the surface morphology and composition.

  8. Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Electrochemical Performance Using Multi-Phase Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane

    2015-09-30

    This work explored the use of oxide heterostructures for enhancing the catalytic and degradation properties of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode electrodes. We focused on heterostructures of Ruddlesden-Popper and perovskite phases. Building on previous work showing enhancement of the Ruddlesden-Popper (La,Sr)2CoO4 / perovskite (La,Sr)CoO3 heterostructure compared to pure (La,Sr)CoO3 we explored the application of related heterostructures of Ruddlesden-Popper phases on perovskite (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3. Our approaches included thin-film electrodes, physical and electrochemical characterization, elementary reaction kinetics modeling, and ab initio simulations. We demonstrated that Sr segregation to surfaces is likely playing a critical role in the performance of (La,Sr)CoO3 and (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 and that modification of this Sr segregation may be the mechanism by which Ruddlesden-Popper coatings enhance performances. We determined that (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 could be enhanced in thin films by about 10× by forming a heterostructure simultaneously with (La,Sr)2CoO4 and (La,Sr)CoO3. We hope that future work will develop this heterostructure for use as a bulk porous electrode.

  9. Coal-fuelled systems for peaking power with 100% CO2 capture through integration of solid oxide fuel cells with compressed air energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nease, Jake; Adams, Thomas A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a coal-fuelled integrated solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and compressed air energy storage (CAES) system in a load-following power production scenario is discussed. Sixteen SOFC-based plants with optional carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and syngas shifting steps are simulated and compared to a state-of-the-art supercritical pulverised coal (SCPC) plant. Simulations are performed using a combination of MATLAB and Aspen Plus v7.3. It was found that adding CAES to a SOFC-based plant can provide load-following capabilities with relatively small effects on efficiencies (1-2% HHV depending on the system configuration) and levelized costs of electricity (∼0.35 ¢ kW-1 h-1). The load-following capabilities, as measured by least-squares metrics, show that this system may utilize coal and achieve excellent load-tracking that is not adversely affected by the inclusion of CCS. Adding CCS to the SOFC/CAES system reduces measurable direct CO2 emission to zero. A seasonal partial plant shutdown schedule is found to reduce fuel consumption by 9.5% while allowing for cleaning and maintenance windows for the SOFC stacks without significantly affecting the performance of the system (∼1% HHV reduction in efficiency). The SOFC-based systems with CCS are found to become economically attractive relative to SCPC above carbon taxes of 22 ton-1.

  10. Citrate-complexation synthesized Ce0.85Gd0.15O2-δ (GDC15) as solid electrolyte for intermediate temperature SOFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjaneya, K. C.; Manjanna, J.; Nayaka, G. P.; Ashwin Kumar, V. M.; Govindaraj, G.; Ganesha, K. N.

    2014-08-01

    A typical Ce0.85Gd0.15O2-δ (GDC15) composition of CeO2-Gd2O3 system is synthesized by modified sol-gel technique known as citrate-complexation. TG-DTA, XRD, FT-IR, Raman, FE-SEM/EDX and ac-impedance analysis are carried out for structural and electrical characterization. XRD pattern confirmed the well crystalline cubic fluorite structure of GDC15 after calcining at 873 K. Raman spectral bands at 463, 550 and 600 cm-1 are also in agreement with these structural features. FE-SEM image shows well-defined grains separated from grain boundary and good densification. Ac-impedance studies reveal that GDC15 has oxide ionic conductivity similar to that reported for Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ (GDC10) and Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ (GDC20). Ionic and electronic transference numbers at 673 K are found to be 0.95 and 0.05, respectively. This indicates the possible application of GDC15 as a potential electrolyte for IT-SOFCs.