Science.gov

Sample records for soft x-ray inelastic

  1. Highly efficient beamline and spectrometer for inelastic soft X-ray scattering at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Lai, C H; Fung, H S; Wu, W B; Huang, H Y; Fu, H W; Lin, S W; Huang, S W; Chiu, C C; Wang, D J; Huang, L J; Tseng, T C; Chung, S C; Chen, C T; Huang, D J

    2014-03-01

    The design, construction and commissioning of a beamline and spectrometer for inelastic soft X-ray scattering at high resolution in a highly efficient system are presented. Based on the energy-compensation principle of grating dispersion, the design of the monochromator-spectrometer system greatly enhances the efficiency of measurement of inelastic soft X-rays scattering. Comprising two bendable gratings, the set-up effectively diminishes the defocus and coma aberrations. At commissioning, this system showed results of spin-flip, d-d and charge-transfer excitations of NiO. These results are consistent with published results but exhibit improved spectral resolution and increased efficiency of measurement. The best energy resolution of the set-up in terms of full width at half-maximum is 108 meV at an incident photon energy tuned about the Ni L3-edge. PMID:24562553

  2. Resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering of CdS: a two-dimensional electronic structure map approach

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Fleszar, A.; Bar, M.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Yang, W.; Hanke, W.; Umbach, E.; Heske, C.

    2008-09-24

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) with soft x-rays is uniquely suited to study the elec-tronic structure of a variety of materials, but is currently limited by low (fluorescence yield) count rates. This limitation is overcome with a new high-transmission spectrometer that allows to measure soft x-ray RIXS"maps." The S L2,3 RIXS map of CdS is discussed and compared with density functional calculations. The map allows the extraction of decay channel-specific"absorp-tion spectra," giving detailed insight into the wave functions of occupied and unoccupied elec-tronic states.

  3. The SEXTANTS beamline at SOLEIL: a new facility for elastic, inelastic and coherent scattering of soft X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchi, M.; Jaouen, N.; Popescu, H.; Gaudemer, R.; Tonnerre, J. M.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Hague, C. F.; Delmotte, A.; Dubuisson, J. M.; Cauchon, G.; Lagarde, B.; Polack, F.

    2013-03-01

    SEXTANTS is a new SOLEIL beamline dedicated to soft X-ray scattering techniques. The beamline, covering the 50-1700 eV energy range, features two Apple-II undulators for polarization control and a fixed-deviation monochromator. Two branch-lines host three end-stations for elastic, inelastic and coherent scattering experiments.

  4. Electronic Structure in Thin Film Organic Semiconductors Studied using Soft X-ray Emission and Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Y.; Downes, J.; Wang, S.; Learmonth, T.; Plucinski, L.; Matsuura, A.; McGuinness, C.; Glans, P.; Bernardis, S.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structure of thin films of the organic semiconductors copper and vanadyl (VO) phthalocyanine (Pc) has been measured using resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. For Cu-Pc we report the observation of two discrete states near E{sub F}. This differs from published photoemission results, but is in excellent agreement with density functional calculations. For VO-Pc, the vanadyl species is shown to be highly localized. Both dipole forbidden V 3d to V 3d*, and O 2p to V 3d* charge transfer transitions are observed, and explained in a local molecular orbital model.

  5. A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander; Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe; Kalus, Christian; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; and others

    2012-12-15

    We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

  6. Nuclear dynamics in the core-excited state of aqueous ammonia probed by resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, L.; Weigand, M.; Fuchs, O.; Baer, M.; Blum, M.; Denlinger, J. D.; Yang, W.; Umbach, E.; Heske, C.

    2011-09-01

    The electronic structure of aqueous NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} has been investigated using resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering. Spectral features of different processes involving nuclear dynamics in the core-excited state can be identified. When exciting into the lowest core-excited state, we find a strong isotope effect and clear evidence for ultrafast proton dynamics. Furthermore, a strong vibronic coupling is observed and, in the case of aqueous NH{sub 3}, a vibrational fine structure can be resolved.

  7. Isotope Effects in the Resonant Inelastic Soft X-ray Scattering Maps of Gas-Phase Methanol.

    PubMed

    Benkert, A; Meyer, F; Hauschild, D; Blum, M; Yang, W; Wilks, R G; Bär, M; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L

    2016-04-14

    The electronic structure of gas-phase methanol molecules (H3COH, H3COD, and D3COD) at atmospheric pressure was investigated using resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the O K and C K edges. We observe strong changes of the relative emission intensities of all valence orbitals as a function of excitation energy, which can be related to the symmetries of the involved orbitals causing an angularly anisotropic RIXS intensity. Furthermore, all observed emission lines are subject to strong spectator shifts of up to -0.9 eV at the O K edge and up to -0.3 eV at the C K edge. At the lowest O K resonance, we find clear evidence for dissociation of the methanol molecule on the time scale of the RIXS process, which is illustrated by comparing X-ray emission spectra of regular and deuterated methanol. PMID:27003748

  8. Ultra-high Resolution Optics for EUV and Soft X-ray Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Voronov, Dmitry L.; Cambie, Rossana; Ahn, Minseung; Anderson, Erik H.; Chang, Chih-Hao; Gullikson, Eric M.; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Salmassi, Farhad; Schattenburg, Mark L.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2009-09-16

    We describe a revolutionary new approach to high spectral resolution soft x-ray optics. Conventionally in the soft x-ray energy range, high spectral resolution is obtained by use of a relatively low line density grating operated in 1st order with small slits. This severely limits throughput. This limitation can be removed by use of a grating either in very high order, or with very high line density, if one can maintain high diffraction efficiency. We have developed a new technology for achieving both of these goals which should allow high throughput spectroscopy, at resolving powers of up to 106 at 1 keV. Such optics should provide a revolutionary advance for high resolution lifetime free spectroscopy, such as RIXS, and for pulse compression of chirped beams. We report recent developmental fabrication and characterization of a prototype grating optimized for 14.2 nm EUV light. The prototype grating with a 200 nm period of the blazed grating substrate coated with 20 Mo/Si bilayers with a period of 7.1 nm demonstrates good dispersion in the third order (effective groove density of 15,000 lines per mm) with a diffraction efficiency of more than 33percent.

  9. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Braicovich, L. Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Le Tacon, M.; Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B.; Supruangnet, R.

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  10. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Braicovich, L; Minola, M; Dellea, G; Le Tacon, M; Moretti Sala, M; Morawe, C; Peffen, J-Ch; Supruangnet, R; Yakhou, F; Ghiringhelli, G; Brookes, N B

    2014-11-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B4C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L3 edge on a high-Tc superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%. PMID:25430146

  11. Nuclear dynamics and spectator effects in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering of gas-phase water molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, Lothar; Benkert, Andreas; Meyer, Frank; Blum, Monika; Wilks, Regan G.; Yang, Wanli; Baer, Marcus; Reinert, Friedrich; and others

    2012-04-14

    The electronic structure of gas-phase H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O molecules has been investigated using resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS). We observe spectator shifts for all valence orbitals when exciting into the lowest three absorption resonances. Strong changes of the relative valence orbital emission intensities are found when exciting into the different absorption resonances, which can be related to the angular anisotropy of the RIXS process. Furthermore, excitation into the 4a{sub 1} resonance leads to nuclear dynamics on the time scale of the RIXS process; we find evidence for vibrational coupling and molecular dissociation in both, the spectator and the participant emission.

  12. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Strocov, V N; Schmitt, T; Flechsig, U; Schmidt, T; Imhof, A; Chen, Q; Raabe, J; Betemps, R; Zimoch, D; Krempasky, J; Wang, X; Grioni, M; Piazzalunga, A; Patthey, L

    2010-09-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0-180 degrees rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/DeltaE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 x 10(13) photons s(-1) (0.01% BW)(-1) at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 microm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/DeltaE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785

  13. High-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS at the Swiss Light Source for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    Strocov, V. N.; Schmitt, T.; Flechsig, U.; Schmidt, T.; Imhof, A.; Chen, Q.; Raabe, J.; Betemps, R.; Zimoch, D.; Krempasky, J.; Wang, X.; Grioni, M.; Piazzalunga, A.; Patthey, L.

    2010-01-01

    The concepts and technical realisation of the high-resolution soft X-ray beamline ADRESS operating in the energy range from 300 to 1600 eV and intended for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) are described. The photon source is an undulator of novel fixed-gap design where longitudinal movement of permanent magnetic arrays controls not only the light polarization (including circular and 0–180° rotatable linear polarizations) but also the energy without changing the gap. The beamline optics is based on the well established scheme of plane-grating monochromator operating in collimated light. The ultimate resolving power E/ΔE is above 33000 at 1 keV photon energy. The choice of blazed versus lamellar gratings and optimization of their profile parameters is described. Owing to glancing angles on the mirrors as well as optimized groove densities and profiles of the gratings, the beamline is capable of delivering high photon flux up to 1 × 1013 photons s−1 (0.01% BW)−1 at 1 keV. Ellipsoidal refocusing optics used for the RIXS endstation demagnifies the vertical spot size down to 4 µm, which allows slitless operation and thus maximal transmission of the high-resolution RIXS spectrometer delivering E/ΔE > 11000 at 1 keV photon energy. Apart from the beamline optics, an overview of the control system is given, the diagnostics and software tools are described, and strategies used for the optical alignment are discussed. An introduction to the concepts and instrumental realisation of the ARPES and RIXS endstations is given. PMID:20724785

  14. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  15. Inelastic magnetic X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzman, P. M.; Tzoar, N.

    1985-04-01

    The theory of magnetic X-ray scattering is used to discuss the possibilities for employing inelastic scattering to probe the magnetic properties of condensed matter systems. In particular, it is shown how the interference between the nonmagnetic (Compton) and magnetic scattering arising from the use of circularly polarized X-rays is absolutely essential in such experiments. The very beautiful preliminary experiments by Sakai and Ono (1976) on Fe which use circularly polarized Moessbauer gamma-rays will be discussed. They already show the sensitivity of the technique to the 'magnetic form factor'. In addition, the physics of a unique quarter wave plate employed in obtaining circularly polarized X-rays is considered, and the implications of this advance for doing such experiments on existing synchrotron X-ray sources are discussed.

  16. Soft x-ray interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the soft x-ray interferometry workshop held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory was to discuss with the scientific community the proposed technical design of the soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer being developed at the ALS. Different design strategies for the instrument`s components were discussed, as well as detection methods, signal processing issues, and how to meet the manufacturing tolerances that are necessary for the instrument to achieve the desired levels of performance. Workshop participants were encouraged to report on their experiences in the field of Fourier transform spectroscopy. The ALS is developing a Fourier transform spectrometer that is intended to operate up to 100 eV. The motivation is solely improved resolution and not the throughput (Jaquinot) or multiplex (Fellgett) advantage, neither of which apply for the sources and detectors used in this spectral range. The proposed implementation of this is via a Mach-Zehnder geometry that has been (1) distorted from a square to a rhombus to get grazing incidence of a suitable angle for 100 eV and (2) provided with a mirror-motion system to make the path difference between the interfering beams tunable. The experiment consists of measuring the emergent light intensity (I(x)) as a function of the path difference (x). The resolving power of the system is limited by the amount of path difference obtainable that is 1 cm (one million half-waves at 200{angstrom} wavelength) in the design thus allowing a resolving power of one million. The free spectral range of the system is limited by the closeness with which the function I(x) is sampled. It is proposed to illuminate a helium absorption cell with roughly 1%-band-width light from a monochromator thus allowing one hundred aliases without spectral overlap even for sampling of I(x) at one hundredth of the Nyquist frequency.

  17. Electronic Structure of the ID Conductor K0.3MoO3 studied using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Learmonth, T.; Glans, P.-A.; McGuinness, C.; Plucinski, L.; Zhang, Y.; Guo, J.-H.; Greenblatt, M.; Smith, K.E.

    2008-09-24

    The electronic structure of the quasi-one dimensional conductor K{sub 0.3}MoO{sub 3} has been measured using high resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data is compared to that from the related two dimensional insulator {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. Scattering features are observed from both oxides that are explained in terms of the band momentum selectivity of the scattering process, allowing a comparison of the scattering data to recent band structure calculations.

  18. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  19. Applications of soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1993-08-01

    The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

  20. High energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, J.B.; Moncton, D.E.; Fujii

    1984-01-01

    A brief review is presented of various aspects of high energy-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering based on synchrotron sources. We show what kinematical advantages are provided by the photon probe and propose mirror and monochromator designs to achieve an optically efficient beam line for inelastic x-ray scattering.

  1. Soft x-ray polarimeter laboratory tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Kendrah D.; Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Jenks, Kevin; Sommer, Sophie J. B.; Marshall, Eric A.

    2010-07-01

    Multilayer-coated optics can strongly polarize X-rays and are central to a new design of a broad-band, soft X-ray polarimeter. We have begun laboratory work to verify the performance of components that could be used in future soft X-ray polarimetric instrumentation. We have reconfigured a 17 meter beamline facility, originally developed for testing transmission gratings for Chandra, to include a polarized X-ray source, an X-ray-dispersing transmission grating, and a multilayer-coated optic that illuminates a CCD detector. The X-rays produced from a Manson Model 5, multi-anode source are polarized by a multilayer-coated flat mirror. The current configuration allows for a 180 degree rotation of the source in order to rotate the direction of polarization. We will present progress in source characterization and system modulation measurements as well as null and robustness tests.

  2. Polars - soft X-ray emitters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwope, Axel

    2010-10-01

    The defining criterion of polars (AM Herculis stars) was their prominent soft X-ray emission, which led to numerous discoveries with the EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, ROSAT and EUVE satellites. XMM-Newton observations of those X-ray selected polars and genuine discoveries of new polar systems reveal growing evidence that the prevailence or even the existence of a soft X-ray component may be rather the exception than the rule. In the last decade polars were discovered in optical surveys like the SDSS and the CSS. Here we propose XMM-Newton observations of 5 optically selected polars to search for soft X-ray spectral components, answer the question why they escaped detection in past X-ray surveys and shed new light on the intrinsic energy distribution of polars.

  3. Reaction cell for in situ soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of heterogeneous catalysis up to 1 atm and 250 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Kristiansen, P. T.; Rocha, T. C. R.; Knop-Gericke, A.; Guo, J. H.; Duda, L. C.

    2013-11-15

    We present a novel in situ reaction cell for heterogeneous catalysis monitored in situ by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The reaction can be carried out at a total pressure up to 1 atm, a regime that has not been accessible to comparable in situ techniques and thus closes the pressure gap to many industrial standard conditions. Two alternate catalyst geometries were tested: (A) a thin film evaporated directly onto an x-ray transparent membrane with a flowing reaction gas mixture behind it or (B) a powder placed behind both the membrane and a gap of flowing reaction gas mixture. To illustrate the working principle and feasibility of our reaction cell setup we have chosen ethylene epoxidation over a silver catalyst as a test case. The evolution of incorporated oxygen species was monitored by total electron/fluorescence yield O K-XAS as well as O K-RIXS, which is a powerful method to separate contributions from inequivalent sites. We find that our method can reliably detect transient species that exist during catalytic reaction conditions that are hardly accessible using other spectroscopic methods.

  4. Polars - soft X-ray emitters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwope, Axel

    2011-10-01

    The defining criterion of polars (AM Herculis stars) was their prominent soft X-ray emission, which led to numerous discoveries with the EINSTEIN, EXOSAT, ROSAT and EUVE satellites. XMM-Newton discovered polars however and new polar systems from optical surveys (SDSS, CSS) reveal growing evidence that the prevalence or even the existence of a soft X-ray component may be rather the exception than the rule. Here we propose XMM-Newton observations of 5 optically identified polars to search for soft X-ray spectral components, answer the question why they escaped detection in past X-ray surveys and shed new light on the intrinsic energy distribution and accretion energy release of polars.

  5. Soft x-ray tomoholography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guehrs, Erik; Stadler, Andreas M.; Flewett, Sam; Frömmel, Stefanie; Geilhufe, Jan; Pfau, Bastian; Rander, Torbjörn; Schaffert, Stefan; Büldt, Georg; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an x-ray imaging method that combines Fourier transform holography with tomography (‘tomoholography’) for three-dimensional (3D) microscopic imaging. A 3D image of a diatom shell with a spatial resolution of 140 nm is presented. The experiment is realized by using a small gold sphere as the reference wave source for holographic imaging. This setup allows us to rotate the sample and to collect a number of 2D projections for tomography.

  6. Soft x-ray tomography on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo-Petravic, G.

    1988-12-01

    The tomographic method used for deriving soft x-ray local emissivities on TFTR, using one horizontal array of 60 soft x-ray detectors, is described. This method, which is based on inversion of Fourier components and subsequent reconstruction, has been applied to the study of a sawtooth crash. A flattening in the soft x-ray profile, which we interpret as an m = 1 island, is clearly visible during the precursor phase and its location and width correlate well with those from electron temperature profiles reconstructed from electron cyclotron emission measurement. The limitations of the Fourier method, due notably to the aperiodic nature of the signals in the fast crash phase and the difficulty of obtaining accurately the higher Fourier harmonics, are discussed. 9 refs., 13 figs.

  7. Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering for Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Young, Athony; Hexemer, Alexander; Padmore, Howard

    2015-03-01

    Over the past a few years, we have developed Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering (RSoXS) and constructed the first dedicated resonant soft x-ray scattering beamline at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL. RSoXS combines soft x-ray spectroscopy with x-ray scattering thus offers statistical information for 3D chemical morphology over a large length scale range from nanometers to micrometers. Its unique chemical sensitivity, large accessible size scale, molecular bond orientation sensitivity with polarized x-rays and high coherence have shown great potential for chemical/morphological structure characterization for many classes of materials. Some recent development of in-situ soft x-ray scattering with in-vacuum sample environment will be discussed. In order to study sciences in naturally occurring conditions, we need to overcome the sample limitations set by the low penetration depth of soft x-rays and requirement of high vacuum. Adapting to the evolving environmental cell designs utilized increasingly in the Electron Microscopy community, customized designed liquid/gas environmental cells will enable soft x-ray scattering experiments on biological, electro-chemical, self-assembly, and hierarchical functional systems in both static and dynamic fashion. Recent RSoXS results on organic electronics, block copolymer thin films, and membrane structure will be presented.

  8. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Studies of Electronic Excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Kenji; Tohyama, Takami; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro

    2013-02-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) has developed into one of the most powerful momentum-resolved spectroscopies. Especially in the last decade, it has achieved significant progress utilizing brilliant x-rays from third-generation synchrotron radiation facilities. Simultaneously, theoretical efforts have been made to predict or interpret the experimental spectra. One of the scientific fields studied intensively by IXS is strongly correlated electron systems, where the interplay of charge, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom determines their physical properties. IXS can provide a new insight into the electron dynamics of the systems through the observation of charge, spin, and orbital excitations. Focusing on the momentum-resolved electronic excitations in strongly correlated electron systems, we review IXS studies and the present capabilities of IXS for the study of the dynamics of materials. With nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NIXS), one can directly obtain dynamical charge correlation and we discuss its complementary aspects with inelastic neutron scattering. NIXS also has a unique capability of measuring higher multipole transitions, which are usually forbidden in conventional optical absorption. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) is now established as a valuable tool for measuring charge, spin, and orbital excitations in a momentum-resolved manner. We describe RIXS works on cuprates in detail and show what kind of electronic excitations have been observed. We also discuss RIXS studies on other transition-metal compounds. Finally, we conclude with an outlook on IXS using next-generation x-ray sources.

  9. European XFEL: Soft X-Ray instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Molodtsov, S. L.

    2011-12-15

    The currently constructed European X-Ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) will generate new knowledge in almost all the technical and scientific disciplines that are shaping our daily life-including nanotechnology, medicine, pharmaceutics, chemistry, materials science, power engineering and electronics. On 8 January 2009, civil engineering work (tunnels, shafts, halls) has been started at all three construction sites. In this presentation status and parameters of the European XFEL facility and instrumentation as well as planned research applications particularly in the range of soft X-rays are reviewed.

  10. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; Skinner, Charles H.; Rosser, Roy

    1993-01-01

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  11. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Rosser, R.

    1993-01-05

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  12. Soft x-ray laser microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL's 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  13. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering from molecules and atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, U.; Deslattes, R.D.; Miyano, K.E.; Southworth, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy is one of the most powerful methods for the understanding of the electronic structure of matter. We report here on fluorescence experiments in the 2 to 6 keV photon energy range using tunable synchrotron radiation and the resulting experimental programs on resonant inelastic scattering in atoms and on polarization measurements in resonant molecular excitations.

  14. Soft x-ray laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D.; Meixler, L.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.; Hirschberg, J.; Kohen, E.

    1987-12-31

    Microscopes based on soft X-ray lasers possess unique advantages in bridging the gap between high resolution electron microscopy of dehydrated, stained cells and light microscopy at comparatively low resolution of unaltered live cells. The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft X-ray lasers make them ideal for flash imaging of live specimens. The Princeton soft X-ray laser is based on a magnetically confined laser produced carbon plasma. Radiation cooling after the laser pulse produces rapid recombination which produces a population inversion and high gain. A full account is given in a companion paper in this volume. The important characteristics of the laser beam produced by this device are 1 to 3 mJ of 18.2 nm radiation in a 10 to 30 nsec pulse with a divergence of 5 mrad. The 18.2 nm wavelength, while outside the water window, does provide a factor of 3 difference in absorption coefficients between oxygen and carbon.

  15. Soft x-ray laser microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D. ); Meixler, L.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Hirschberg, J.; Kohen, E. . Dept. of Physics)

    1987-01-01

    Microscopes based on soft X-ray lasers possess unique advantages in bridging the gap between high resolution electron microscopy of dehydrated, stained cells and light microscopy at comparatively low resolution of unaltered live cells. The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft X-ray lasers make them ideal for flash imaging of live specimens. The Princeton soft X-ray laser is based on a magnetically confined laser produced carbon plasma. Radiation cooling after the laser pulse produces rapid recombination which produces a population inversion and high gain. A full account is given in a companion paper in this volume. The important characteristics of the laser beam produced by this device are 1 to 3 mJ of 18.2 nm radiation in a 10 to 30 nsec pulse with a divergence of 5 mrad. The 18.2 nm wavelength, while outside the water window, does provide a factor of 3 difference in absorption coefficients between oxygen and carbon.

  16. 4 f excitations in Ce Kondo lattices studied by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorese, A.; Dellea, G.; Fanciulli, M.; Seiro, S.; Geibel, C.; Krellner, C.; Makarova, I. P.; Braicovich, L.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Brookes, N. B.; Kummer, K.

    2016-04-01

    The potential of resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering to measure 4 f crystal electric-field excitation spectra in Ce Kondo lattices has been examined. Spectra have been obtained for several Ce systems and show a well-defined structure determined by crystal-field, spin-orbit, and charge-transfer excitations only. The spectral shapes of the excitation spectra can be well understood in the framework of atomic multiplet calculations. For CeCu2Si2 we found notable disagreement between the inelastic x-ray-scattering spectra and theoretical calculations when using the crystal-field scheme proposed from inelastic neutron scattering. Modified sets of crystal-field parameters yield better agreement. Our results also show that, with the very recent improvements of soft x-ray spectrometers in resolution to below 30 meV at the Ce M4 ,5 edges, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering could be an ideal tool to determine the crystal-field scheme in Ce Kondo lattices and other rare-earth compounds.

  17. Soft X-Ray Spectra of AGN Discovered Via Their Hard X-Ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    This final report is a study of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Investigation of the soft x-ray spectra of AGN were performed by using their hard x-ray emission. ROSAT observations of AGN was also performed, which allowed for the study of these x-ray spectra and the structures of 7 clusters of galaxies.

  18. Inelastic x-ray scattering from phonons under multibeam conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosak, Alexey; Krisch, Michael

    2007-03-01

    We report on an experimental observation of a previously neglected multibeam contribution to the inelastic x-ray scattering cross section. Its manifestation is a substantial modification of the apparent phonon selection rules when two (or more) reciprocal lattice points are simultaneously intercepted by the Ewald sphere. The observed multibeam contributions can be treated semi-quantitatively in the frame of Renninger’s “simplest approach.” A few corollaries, relevant for experimental work on inelastic scattering from phonons, are presented.

  19. Soft x-ray transmission gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, E. T.; Caldwell, P. J.; Williams, M. W.

    1980-01-01

    A technique was developed for producing transmission diffraction gratings suitable for use in the soft x-ray region. Thin self-supporting films of a transparent material are overlaid with several thousand opaque metallic strips per mm. Gratings with 2100, 2400, and 5600 1/mm have been produced and tested. Representative spectra over the wavelength range from 17.2 to 40.0 nm are given for a grating consisting of a 120-nm-thick Al support layer overlaid with 2400, 34-nm-thick, Ag strips/mm. The absolute transmittance is approx. 13% at 30 nm, and the efficiency in the first order is approx. 16%. The observed resolution of approx. 2A is acceptable for many of the potential applications. These gratings have several advantages over the two presently available alternatives in the soft x-ray region (i.e., reflection gratings used at grazing incidence and free-standing metallic wire transmission gratings). Fabrication is relatively quick, simple, and cheap. The support layer can also serve as a filter and help conduct excessive heat away. Higher line densities and hence higher resolutions are possible, and when used at normal incidence the spectra are aberration free. Suitable materials, component thicknesses, and line densities can be chosen to produce a grating of optimum characteristics for a particular application.

  20. The PERCIVAL soft X-ray imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Marras, A.; Bayer, M.; Correa, J.; Göttlicher, P.; Lange, S.; Shevyakov, I.; Smoljanin, S.; Tennert, M.; Viti, M.; Xia, Q.; Zimmer, M.; Das, D.; Guerrini, N.; Marsh, B.; Sedgwick, I.; Turchetta, R.; Cautero, G.; Gianoncelli, A.; Giuressi, D.; Menk, R.; Stebel, L.; Yousef, H.; Marchal, J.; Rees, N.; Tartoni, N.; Graafsma, H.

    2015-02-01

    With the increased brilliance of state-of-the-art Synchrotron radiation sources and the advent of Free Electron Lasers enabling revolutionary science on atomic length and time scales with EUV to X-ray photons comes an urgent need for suitable photon imaging detectors. Requirements include high frame rates, very large dynamic range, single-photon counting capability with low probability of false positives, and (multi)-megapixels. PERCIVAL (``Pixelated Energy Resolving CMOS Imager, Versatile And Large'') is currently being developed by a collaboration of DESY, RAL, Elettra, DLS and Pohang to address this need for the soft X-ray regime. PERCIVAL is a monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS), i.e. based on CMOS technology. It will be back-thinned to access its primary energy range of 250 eV to 1 keV with target efficiencies above 90%. According to its preliminary specifications, the roughly 10 × 10 cm2, 3.5k × 3.7k monolithic ``PERCIVAL13M'' sensor will operate at frame rates up to 120 Hz (commensurate with most FELs) and use multiple gains within its 27 μm pixels to measure 1 to ~ 105 (500 eV) simultaneously-arriving photons. A smaller ``PERCIVAL2M'' with ~ 1.4k × 1.5k pixels is also planned. Currently, small-scale back-illuminated prototype systems (160 × 210 pixels of 25 μm pitch) are undergoing detailed testing with X-rays and optical photons. In March 2014, a prototype sensor was tested at 350 eV-2 keV at Elettra's TwinMic beamline. The data recorded include diffraction patterns at 350 eV and 400 eV, knife edge and sub-pixel pinhole illuminations, and comparisons of different pixel types. Another prototype chip will be submitted in fall 2014, first larger sensors could be in hand in late 2015.

  1. Technology development for soft X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törmä, P. T.; Sipilä, H. J.; Koskinen, T.; Mattila, M.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray spectroscopy instruments lose part of their performance due to the lack of suitable components for soft X-ray region below 1 keV. Therefore, in the analysis of low atomic number elements including lithium, beryllium, boron and carbon instrument sensitivity is often limited. In this work we describe how the performance of the spectroscopy of soft X-rays is significantly improved when all devices integrated in the spectroscopic instrument are suitable for both soft and hard X-rays. This concept is based on utilizing ultra-thin SiN X-ray windows with proven performance not only as a detector window but also as an X-ray source window. By including a soft-X-ray-sensitive silicon drift detector with efficient surface charge collection in this concept the sensitivity and performance of the instrument is significantly increased.

  2. Soft X-Ray Tomography in HSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, V.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K.

    2003-10-01

    Under certain discharge conditions, HSX plasmas exhibit a sudden loss of stored energy followed by fluctuations of the order of few kHz in both the stored energy and the soft x-ray (SXR) signals. These are measured by a diamagnetic loop and a set of PIPS detectors respectively. To help understand the origin of these crashes and the nature of the oscillations, as well as to measure basic plasma properties such as position and shape, a SXR tomography system is under development in HSX. A single array of 20 silicon p-n junction photodiodes is installed on the device and, in the near future, the diagnostic system will be expanded to several arrays in order to obtain tomographic reconstructions of the SXR emission. Initial SXR and stored energy measurements during these crashing discharges as well as the results of the one-array reconstruction will be presented. Implementation details of the complete tomographic system will be shown as well.

  3. Tunable Soft X-Ray Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan; Gandhi, Punut; Gu, X-W; Fawley, William M; Reinsch, Matthia; Penn, Gregory; Kim, K-J; Lindberg, Ryan; Zholents, Alexander

    2010-09-17

    A concept for a tunable soft x-ray free electron laser (FEL) photon source is presented and studied numerically. The concept is based on echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG), wherein two modulator-chicane sections impose high harmonic structure with much greater efficacy as compared to conventional high harmonic FELs that use only one modulator-chicane section. The idea proposed here is to replace the external laser power sources in the EEHG modulators with FEL oscillators, and to combine the bunching of the beam with the production of radiation. Tunability is accomplished by adjusting the magnetic chicanes while the two oscillators remain at a fixed frequency. This scheme eliminates the need to develop coherent sources with the requisite power, pulse length, and stability requirements by exploiting the MHz bunch repetition rates of FEL continuous wave (CW) sources driven by superconducting (SC) linacs. We present time-dependent GINGER simulation results for an EEHG scheme with an oscillator modulator at 43 nm employing 50percent reflective dielectric mirrors and a second modulator employing an external, 215-nm drive laser. Peak output of order 300 MW is obtained at 2.7 nm, corresponding to the 80th harmonic of 215 nm. An alternative single-cavity echo-oscillator scheme based on a 13.4 nm oscillator is investigated with time-independent simulations that a 180-MW peak power at final wavelength of 1.12 nm. Three alternate configurations that use separate bunches to produce the radiation for EEHG microbunching are also presented. Our results show that oscillator-based soft x-ray FELs driven by CWSC linacs are extremely attractive because of their potential to produce tunable radiation at high average power together with excellent longitudinal coherence and narrow spectral bandwidth.

  4. Inelastic X-ray Scattering from Shocked Liquid Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S. P.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Boehly, T. R.; Crowley, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O.; Gericke, D. O.; Doeppner, T.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Murphy, C. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Vorberger, J.

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation—driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Lyα line emission at 2.96 keV. Thus, these first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5 eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×1023 cm-3, and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results.

  5. Inelastic x-ray scattering from shocked liquid deuterium.

    PubMed

    Regan, S P; Falk, K; Gregori, G; Radha, P B; Hu, S X; Boehly, T R; Crowley, B J B; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Gericke, D O; Döppner, T; Meyerhofer, D D; Murphy, C D; Sangster, T C; Vorberger, J

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation-driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Ly(α) line emission at 2.96 keV. These first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5  eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×10(23)  cm(-3), and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results. PMID:23368573

  6. Inelastic X-ray Scattering from Shocked Liquid Deuterium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Regan, S. P.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Boehly, T. R.; Crowley, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O.; Gericke, D. O.; et al

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation—driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Lyα line emission at 2.96 keV. Thus, these first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5 eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×1023 cm-3, and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results.

  7. INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING AT ULTRAHIGH PRESSURES.

    SciTech Connect

    MAO, H.K.; HEMLEY, J.; KAO, C.C.

    2000-08-28

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) provides high-pressure research with an arsenal of analytical capabilities for key measurements that were previously unattainable, and high pressure research provides IXS with numerous applications where the technique has unique advantages over other methods. High-pressure investigations can now be conducted using non-resonant IXS, resonant IXS, nuclear resonant IXS, and x-ray emission spectroscopy with energy resolutions of 100 meV to 1 eV for electronic transitions and 1 to 10 meV for phonon studies. By pressure-tuning materials over a wide range, we are able to investigate fundamental physics of electron gases, strongly correlated electron systems, high-energy electronic excitations, and phonons in energy and momentum space. The results will have a profound influence on materials applications as well as providing basic information for understanding the deep interior of the Earth and other planets.

  8. Effects of Galactic absorption on soft X-ray surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamorani, G.; Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Wolter, A.

    1988-01-01

    A bias in the spectral distribution of X-ray sources detected in X-ray surveys is discussed which is due to the combination of the intrinsic characteristics of X-ray telescopes and the effects of low-energy photoelectric absorption within the Galaxy. A statistical method for obtaining information on the average spectrum of X-ray sources detected in well-defined surveys is presented. This method can be applied to surveys performed with X-ray telescopes working at relatively soft X-ray energies, such as Einstein, Exosat, and Rosat.

  9. A soft X-ray image of the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Aschenbach, B.; Hasinger, G.; Pfeffermann, E.; Snowden, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    A soft X-ray image of the moon obtained by the Roentgen Observatory Satellite ROSAT clearly shows a sunlit crescent, demonstrating that the moon's X-ray luminosity arises from backscattering of solar X-rays. The moon's optically dark side is also X-ray dark, and casts a distinct shadow on the diffuse cosmic X-ray background. Unexpectedly, the dark side seems to emit X-rays at a level about one percent of that of the bright side; this emission very probably results from energetic solar-wind electrons striking the moon's surface.

  10. Dante Soft X-ray Power Diagnostic for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Campbell, K; Turner, R; Holder, J; Landen, O; Glenzer, S; Kauffman, R; Suter, L; Landon, M; Rhodes, M; Lee, D

    2004-04-15

    Soft x-ray power diagnostics are essential for measuring spectrally resolved the total x-ray flux, radiation temperature, conversion efficiency and albedo that are important quantities for the energetics of indirect drive hohlraums. At the Nova or Omega Laser Facilities, these measurements are performed mainly with Dante, but also with DMX and photo-conductive detectors (PCD's). The Dante broadband spectrometer is a collection of absolute calibrated vacuum x-ray diodes, thin filters and x-ray mirrors used to measure the soft x-ray emission for photon energies above 50 eV.

  11. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These

  12. The Origin of Soft X-rays in DQ Herculis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor); Mukai, K.; Still, M.; Ringwald, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    DQ Herculis (Nova Herculis 1934) is a deeply eclipsing cataclysmic variable containing a magnetic white dwarf primary. The accretion disk is thought to block our line of sight to the white dwarf at all orbital phases due to its extreme inclination angle. Nevertheless, soft X-rays were detected from DQ Her with ROSAT PSPC. To probe the origin of these soft X-rays, we have performed Chandra ACIS observations. We confirm that DQ Her is an X-ray source. The bulk of the X-rays are from a point-like source and exhibit a shallow partial eclipse. We interpret this as due to scattering of the unseen central X-ray source, probably in an accretion disk wind. At the same time, we detect weak extended X-ray features around DQ Her, which we interpret as an X-ray emitting knot in the nova shell.

  13. Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-03-03

    We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

  14. CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    HAYASHI,H.; UDAGAWA,Y.; GILLET,J.M.; CALIEBE,W.A.; KAO,C.C.

    2001-08-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), complementary to other more established inelastic scattering probes, such as light scattering, electron scattering, and neutron scattering, is becoming an important experimental technique in the study of elementary excitations in condensed matters. Over the past decade, IXS with total energy resolution of few meV has been achieved, and is being used routinely in the study of phonon dispersions in solids and liquids as well as dynamics in disordered and biological systems. In the study of electronic excitations, IXS with total energy resolution on the order of 100 meV to 1 eV is gaining wider applications also. For example, IXS has been used to study collective excitations of valence electrons, single electron excitations of valence electrons, as well as core electron excitations. In comparison with the alternative scattering techniques mentioned above, IXS has several advantages. First, IXS probes the full momentum transfer range of the dielectric response of the sample, whereas light scattering is limited to very small momentum transfers, and electron scattering suffers the effects of multiple scattering at large momentum transfers. Second, since IXS measures the bulk properties of the sample it is not surface sensitive, therefore it does not require special preparation of the sample. The greater flexibility in sample conditions and environments makes IXS an ideal probe in the study of liquids and samples under extreme temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Third, the tunability of synchrotron radiation sources enables IXS to exploit element specificity and resonant enhancement of scattering cross sections. Fourth, IXS is unique in the study of dynamics of liquids and amorphous solids because it can probe the particular region of energy-momentum transfer phase space, which is inaccessible to inelastic neutron scattering. On the other hand, the main disadvantages of IXS are the small cross sections and the strong absorption of

  15. The hard X-ray perspective on the soft X-ray excess

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Ranjan V.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Lohfink, Anne M.; Zoghbi, Abderahmen; Fabian, Andrew C.; Gallo, Luigi C.; Walton, Dominic

    2014-04-10

    The X-ray spectra of many active galactic nuclei exhibit a 'soft excess' below 1 keV, whose physical origin remains unclear. Diverse models have been suggested to account for it, including ionized reflection of X-rays from the inner part of the accretion disk, ionized winds/absorbers, and Comptonization. The ionized reflection model suggests a natural link between the prominence of the soft excess and the Compton reflection hump strength above 10 keV, but it has not been clear what hard X-ray signatures, if any, are expected from the other soft X-ray candidate models. Additionally, it has not been possible up until recently to obtain high-quality simultaneous measurements of both soft and hard X-ray emission necessary to distinguish these models but upcoming joint XMM-NuSTAR programs provide precisely this opportunity. In this paper, we present an extensive analysis of simulations of XMM-NuSTAR observations, using two candidate soft excess models as inputs, to determine whether such campaigns can disambiguate between them by using hard and soft X-ray observations in tandem. The simulated spectra are fit with the simplest 'observer's model' of a blackbody and neutral reflection to characterize the strength of the soft and hard excesses. A plot of the strength of the hard excess against the soft excess strength provides a diagnostic plot which allows the soft excess production mechanism to be determined in individual sources and samples using current state-of-the-art and next generation hard X-ray enabled observatories. This approach can be straightforwardly extended to other candidate models for the soft excess.

  16. Moon: lunar albedo for soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2016-07-01

    Albedo of the Moon for soft X-rays (0.1-2 keV photons) is determined on the basis of the X-ray luminosity of the Moon detected and measured for the first time by orbital space telescope ROSAT in 1990. It is found that the lunar albedo for the solar soft X-rays is less than the lunar visual region albedo almost thousand times. The data allow to estimate more correctly X-ray luminosity of dusty comets like Hyakutake C/1996 B2 and Hale-Bopp C/1995 O1 due to scattering of solar soft X-rays and to reveal thus the dominant mechanism for production of X-rays in dusty comets.

  17. Stellar contribution to the galactic soft x-ray background

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, R.; Avni, Y.; Bookbinder, J. R.,Giacconi; Golub, L.; Harnden, F.R. Jr.; Maxson, C.W.; Topka, K.; Vaiana, G.S.

    1981-10-01

    We construct log N-log S relations for stars based on medium x-ray luminosities for dF, dG, and dK stars previously reported for the Einstein Observatory/Center for Astrophysics stellar survey and on a detailed x-ray luminosity function derived here for dM stars, and investigate the stellar contribution to the diffuse soft x-ray background. The principal results are that stars provide approx.20% of the soft x-ray background in the 0.28--1.0 keV passband and therefore contribute significantly to the soft x-ray background in this energy range (with dM stars constituting the dominant contributing class), and that the stellar contribution to the diffuse x-ray background in the 0.15--0.28 keV passband is < or approx. =3%.

  18. Phase Resolved X-ray Spectral Analysis of Soft IPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekon, Yakup

    2016-07-01

    As a subclass of Cataclysmic Variables, Intermediate Polars (IPs) are magnetic systems which mainly show hard X-ray emission. However, there have been an increasing number of systems that also show a soft emission component arising from reprocessed X-rays from the white dwarf limbs. Due to their relatively short periods, they pose as good canditates to perform phase resolved analysis. In this work, X-ray phase resolved spectral analysis of selected IPs with soft X-ray emission components (such as PQ Gem, V2069 Cyg etc.) over the orbital and/or spin periods will be presented. The analyses will help a better understanding of the complex absorption mechanisms and the nature of the soft X-ray emissions in soft IPs.

  19. Multilayers for EUV, soft x-ray and x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhanshan; Huang, Qiushi; Zhang, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    Driven by the requirements in synchrotron radiation applications, astronomical observation, and dense plasma diagnostics, the EUV, soft X-rays and X-rays multilayer optics have been tremendously developed. Based on the LAMP project for soft X-ray polarimetry, Co/C and Cr/C multilayers have been fabricated and characterized. Both Co/C and Cr/C multilayers reveal good optical performance working at 250 eV. Pd/Y multilayers have been successfully fabricated using reactive sputtering with nitrogen working at around 9.4 nm. EUV normal incidence Schwarzschild and soft X-ray grazing incidence KB microscopes were developed for ICF plasma diagnostics. This paper covers the outline of the multilayer optics and the current status in our lab.

  20. Modeled soft X-ray solar irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    1994-01-01

    Solar soft X-rays have historically been inaccurately modeled in both relative variations and absolute magnitudes by empirical solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance models. This is a result of the use of a limited number of rocket data sets which were primarily associated with the calibration of the AE-E satellite EUV data set. In this work, the EUV91 solar EUV irradiance model has been upgraded to improve the accuracy of the 3.0 to 5.0 nm relative irradiance variations. The absolute magnitude estimate of the flux in this wavelength range has also been revised upwards. The upgrade was accomplished by first digitizing the SOLRAD 11 satellite 4.4 to 6.0 nm measured energy flux data set, then extracting and extrapolating a derived 3.0 to 5.0 nm photon flux from these data, and finally by performing a correlation between these derived data and the daily and 81-day mean 10.7 cm radio flux emission using a multiple linear regression technique. A correlation coefficient of greater than 0.9 was obtained between the dependent and independent data sets. The derived and modeled 3.0 to 5.0 nm flux varies by more than an order of magnitude over a solar cycle, ranging from a flux below 1 x 10(exp 8) to a flux greater than 1 x 10(exp 9) photons per sq cm per sec. Solar rotational (27-day) variations in the flux magnitude are a factor of 2. The derived and modeled irradiance absolute values are an order of magnitude greater than previous values from rocket data sets related to the calibration of the AE-E satellite.

  1. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Studies of Zeolite Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Kargl, Florian; Ward, David; Holliman, Peter; Meneau, Florian

    2009-01-29

    In situ inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) experiments have been used to probe heterogeneity and deformability in zeolte Y as this thermally collapses to a high density amorphous (HDA) aluminosilicate phase. The Landau-Placzek ratio R{sub LP} falls slowly as amorphisation advances, increasing in the later stages of collapse clearly showing how homogeneity improves non-linearly--behaviour linked closely with the decline in molar volume V{sub Molar}. The Brillouin frequency {omega}{sub Q} also decreases with amorphisation in a similar fashion, signifying a non-uniform decrease in the speed of sound v{sub l}. All of these changes with zeolite amorphisation infer formation of an intermediate low density amorphous (LDA) phase. This low entropy or 'perfect glass' has mechanical properties which are closer to the zeolite rather to the HDA glass--notably a very small value of Poisson's Ratio signifying unusually low resistance to deformation.

  2. Development of small scale soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Suckewer, S. . Plasma Physics Lab. Princeton Univ., NJ . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering); Skinner, C.H.; Voorhees, D. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1991-05-01

    At present rapid progress is being made in the application of soft x-ray lasers to fields such as microscopy and microlithography. A critical factor in the range of suitable applications is the scale and hence cost of the soft x-ray lasers. At Princeton, gain at 183{angstrom} has been obtained with relatively low pump laser energies (as low as 6J) in a portable'' small-scale soft x-ray laser system. We will also discuss aspects of data interpretation and pitfalls to be avoided in measurements of gain in such systems. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Hard X-Ray, Soft X-Ray, and EUV Studies of Solar Eruptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Document study the hard X-ray (HXR), soft X-ray (SXR) ,EUV, and magnetic nature of solar eruptions, with the objective of elucidating the physics of the eruption process. In particular, it was examine the viability of two specific eruption mechanisms, detailed in our proposal. These mechanisms are the "breakout model", and the "tether cutting model". During the second year, it was a significant progress in the goals to Data Sets Utilized. In the publications during this second year of the grant period, the data was used from the E W Imaging Telescope (EIT) and the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) instruments on SOHO, and from the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT), Hard X-ray Telescope (HXT), and the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) on Yooh.

  4. Soft-X-Ray Prefilter for Hot, Bright Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Ortendahl, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Prefilters consisting of beryllium foil supported on conductive silver mesh transmit soft x-rays but are nearly opaque to visible and infrared light. New Be/AG filters protect imaging X-ray detectors from damage by visible and longer wavelength radiation when viewing such hot, bright emitters as Sun or possibly certain industrial processes.

  5. First Terrestrial Soft X-ray Auroral Observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Ostegaard, Nikolai; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Chang, Shen-Wu; Majeed, Tariq; Metzger, Albert E.

    2004-01-01

    Northern auroral regions of Earth were imaged using the High-Resolution Camera (HRC-1) aboard the Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) at 10 epochs (each approx.20 min duration) between mid-December 2003 and mid-April 2004. These observations aimed at searching for Earth s soft (<2 keV) x-ray aurora in a comparative study with Jupiter s x-ray aurora, where a pulsating x-ray "hot-spot" has been previously observed by Chandra. The first Chandra soft x-ray observations of Earth s aurora show that it is highly variable (intense arcs, multiple arcs, diffuse patches, at times absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed near the expected cusp location. A fortuitous overflight of DMSP satellite F13 provided SSJ/4 energetic particle measurements above a bright arc seen by Chandra on 24 January 2004, 20:01-20:22 UT. A model of the emissions expected strongly suggests that the observed soft x-ray signal is produced by electron bremsstrahlung.

  6. First Terrestrial Soft X-Ray Auroral Observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Gladstone, G. Randall; Elsner, Ronald F.; Oestgaard, Nikolai; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Chang, Shen-Wu; Majeed, Tariq; Metzger, Albert E.

    2007-01-01

    Northern auroral regions of Earth were imaged with energetic photons in the 0.1-10keV range using the High-Resolution Camera (HRC-I) aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory at 10 epochs (each approx.20 min duration) between mid- December 2003 and mid-April 2004. These observations aimed at searching for Earth's soft (< 2 keV) X-ray aurora in a comparative study with Jupiter's X-ray aurora, where a pulsating X-ray "hot-spot" has been previously observed by Chandra. The first Chandra soft X-ray observations of Earth's aurora show that it is highly variable 0ntense arcs, multiple arcs, diffuse patches, at times absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed near the expected cusp location. A fortuitous overflight of DMSP satellite F13 provided SSJ/4 energetic particle measurements above a bright arc seen by Chandra on 24 January 2004, 20:01-20:22 UT. A model of the emissions expected strongly suggests that the observed soft X-ray signal is bremsstrahlung and characteristic K-shell line emissions of nitrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere produced by electrons.

  7. HERMES: a soft X-ray beamline dedicated to X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Belkhou, Rachid; Stanescu, Stefan; Swaraj, Sufal; Besson, Adrien; Ledoux, Milena; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Dalle, Didier

    2015-07-01

    The HERMES beamline (High Efficiency and Resolution beamline dedicated to X-ray Microscopy and Electron Spectroscopy), built at Synchrotron SOLEIL (Saint-Auban, France), is dedicated to soft X-ray microscopy. The beamline combines two complementary microscopy methods: XPEEM (X-ray Photo Emitted Electron Microscopy) and STXM (Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy) with an aim to reach spatial resolution below 20 nm and to fully exploit the local spectroscopic capabilities of the two microscopes. The availability of the two methods within the same beamline enables the users to select the appropriate approach to study their specific case in terms of sample environment, spectroscopy methods, probing depth etc. In this paper a general description of the beamline and its design are presented. The performance and specifications of the beamline will be reviewed in detail. Moreover, the article is aiming to demonstrate how the beamline performances have been specifically optimized to fulfill the specific requirements of a soft X-ray microscopy beamline in terms of flux, resolution, beam size etc. Special attention has been dedicated to overcome some limiting and hindering problems that are usually encountered on soft X-ray beamlines such as carbon contamination, thermal stability and spectral purity. PMID:26134801

  8. Soft x-ray holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickler, Daniel; Frömter, Robert; Stillrich, Holger; Menk, Christian; Tieg, Carsten; Streit-Nierobisch, Simone; Sprung, Michael; Gutt, Christian; Stadler, Lorenz-M.; Leupold, Olaf; Grübel, Gerhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a new x-ray microscopy technique based on Fourier transform holography (FTH), where the sample is separate from the optics part of the setup. The sample can be shifted with respect to the holography optics, thus large-scale or randomly distributed objects become accessible. As this extends FTH into a true microscopy technique, we call it x-ray holographic microscopy (XHM). FTH allows nanoscale imaging without the need for nanometer-size beams. Simple Fourier transform yields an unambiguous image reconstruction. We demonstrate XHM by studying the magnetic domain evolution of a Co/Pt multilayer film as function of locally varied iron overlayer thickness.

  9. Filters for soft X-ray solar telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiller, Eberhard; Grebe, Kurt; Golub, Leon

    1990-01-01

    Soft X-ray telescopes require filters that block visible and infrared light and have good soft X-ray transmission. The optical properties of possible materials are discussed, and the fabrication and testing methods for the filters used in a 10-inch normal incidence telescope for 63 A are described. The best performances in the 44-114-A wavelength range are obtained with foils of carbon and rhodium.

  10. Soft x-ray imaging using Polaroid Land films

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.S.; Choi, P.; Deeney, C.

    1988-02-01

    It is demonstrated in this note that optical Polaroid Land films can be used as a convenient detector in the soft x-ray region. The performance of Polaroid 667 film has been found to be comparable to that of the Kodak direct exposure film (DEF) for soft x-ray pinhole imaging. By a suitable choice of multiple filters, qualitative information about a dense plasma has been obtained.

  11. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Seppala, L.G.

    1991-03-26

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm[sup 2]. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics. 9 figures.

  12. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOEpatents

    Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1991-01-01

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

  13. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Cravens, T. E.; Howell, R. R.; Metzger, A. E.; Ostgaard, N.; Maurellis, A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A wide variety of solar system planetary bodies are now known to radiate in the soft x-ray energy (<5 keV) regime. These include planets (Earth, Jupiter, Venus, Saturn): bodies having thick atmosphere and with/without intrinsic magnetic field; planetary satellites (Moon, Io, Europa, Ganymede): bodies with no/thin atmosphere; and comets and Io plasma torus: bodies having extended tenuous atmosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the generation of soft x-rays from these objects. whereas in the hard x-ray energy range (>10 keV) x-rays mainly result from electron bremsstrahlung process. In this paper we present a brief review of the x-ray observations on each of the planetary bodies and discuss their characteristics and proposed source mechanisms.

  14. Resonant soft X-ray scattering on protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Dan; Le, Thinh; Wang, Cheng; Zwart, Peter; Gomez, Esther; Gomez, Enrique

    Protein structure is crucial for biological function, such that characterizing protein folding and packing is important for the design of therapeutics and enzymes. We propose resonant soft X-ray scattering (RSOXS) as an approach to study proteins and other biological assemblies in solution. Calculations of the scattering contrast suggest that soft X-ray scattering is more sensitive than hard X-ray scattering, because of contrast generated at the absorption edges of constituent elements such as carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. We have examined the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in solution by RSOXS. We find that by varying incident X-ray energies, we are able to achieve higher scattering contrast near the absorption edge. From our RSOXS scattering result we are able to reconstruct the structure of BSA in 3D. These RSOXS results also agree with hard X-ray experiments, including crystallographic data. Our study demonstrates the potential of RSOXS for studying protein structure in solution.

  15. Effects of soft x-ray irradiation on cell ultrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Thomas W.; Page, Anton M.; Foster, Guy F.; Stead, Anthony D.

    1993-01-01

    The future of x-ray microscopy lies mainly in its potential for imaging fresh, hydrated biological material at a resolution superior to that of light microscopy. For the image to be accepted as representing the cellular organization of the living cell, it is essential that artefacts are not introduced as a result of the image collection system. One possible source of artefacts is cellular damage resulting form the irradiation of the material with soft x rays. Cells of the unicellular alga Chlorella have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following exposure to different doses of monochromatic (380 eV) soft x rays. Extreme ultrastructural damage has been detected following doses of 103 - 104 Gy, in particular loss of cellular membranes such as the internal thylakoid membranes of the chloroplast. This is discussed in relation to dosage commonly used for imaging by soft x-ray microscopy.

  16. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  17. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  18. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  19. Soft X-ray Polarimetry Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Herman; Schulz, Norbert S.; Heine, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    We present continued development of a telescope for measuring linear X-ray polarization over the 0.2-0.8 keV band. We employ multilayer-coated mirrors as Bragg reflectors at the Brewster angle. By matching to the dispersion of a spectrometer, one may take advantage of high multilayer reflectivities and achieve polarization modulation factors over 95%. We have constructed a source of polarized X-rays that operates at a wide range of energies with a selectable polarization angle. We will present results from measurements of new laterally graded multilayer mirrors and new gratings essential to the design. Finally, we will present a design for a small telescope for suborbital or orbital missions. A suborbital mission could measure the polarization of a blazar such as Mk 421 to 5-10 percent while an orbital version could measure the polarizations of neutron stars, active galactic nuclei, and blazars.

  20. The soft X-ray diffuse background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Burrows, D. N.; Sanders, W. T.; Kraushaar, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Maps of the diffuse X-ray background intensity covering essentially the entire sky with approx. 7 deg spatial resolution are presented for seven energy bands. The data were obtained on a series of ten sounding rocket flights conducted over a seven-year period. The different nature of the spatial distributions in different bands implies at least three distinct origins for the diffuse X-rays, none of which is well-understood. At energies or approx. 2000 eV, an isotropic and presumably extraglalactic 500 and 1000 eV, an origin which is at least partially galactic seems called for. At energies 284 eV, the observed intensity is anticorrelated with neutral hydrogen column density, but we find it unlikely that this anticorrelation is simply due to absorption of an extragalactic or halo source.

  1. X-Ray Emission from the Soft X-Ray Transient Aquila X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Aquila X-1 is the most prolific of soft X-ray transients. It is believed to contain a rapidly spinning neutron star sporadically accreting near the Eddington limit from a low-mass companion star. The interest in studying the repeated X-ray outbursts from Aquila X-1 is twofold: (1) studying the relation between optical, soft and hard X-ray emission during the outburst onset, development and decay; (2) relating the spectral component to thermal and non-thermal processes occurring near the magnetosphere and in the boundary layer of a time-variable accretion disk. Our investigation is based on the BATSE monitoring of Aquila X-1 performed by our group. We observed Aquila X-1 in 1997 and re-analyzed archival information obtained in April 1994 during a period of extraordinary outbursting activity of the source in the hard X-ray range. Our results allow, for the first time for this important source, to obtain simultaneous spectral information from 2 keV to 200 keV. A black body (T = 0.8 keV) plus a broken power-law spectrum describe accurately the 1994 spectrum. Substantial hard X-ray emission is evident in the data, confirming that the accretion phase during sub-Eddington limit episodes is capable of producing energetic hard emission near 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs(exp -1). A preliminary paper summarizes our results, and a more comprehensive account is being written. We performed a theoretical analysis of possible emission mechanisms, and confirmed that a non-thermal emission mechanism triggered in a highly sheared magnetosphere at the accretion disk inner boundary can explain the hard X-ray emission. An anticorrelation between soft and hard X-ray emission is indeed prominently observed as predicted by this model.

  2. Laboratory cryo soft X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hertz, H M; von Hofsten, O; Bertilson, M; Vogt, U; Holmberg, A; Reinspach, J; Martz, D; Selin, M; Christakou, A E; Jerlström-Hultqvist, J; Svärd, S

    2012-02-01

    Lens-based water-window X-ray microscopy allows two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) imaging of intact unstained cells in their near-native state with unprecedented contrast and resolution. Cryofixation is essential to avoid radiation damage to the sample. Present cryo X-ray microscopes rely on synchrotron radiation sources, thereby limiting the accessibility for a wider community of biologists. In the present paper we demonstrate water-window cryo X-ray microscopy with a laboratory-source-based arrangement. The microscope relies on a λ=2.48-nm liquid-jet high-brightness laser-plasma source, normal-incidence multilayer condenser optics, 30-nm zone-plate optics, and a cryo sample chamber. We demonstrate 2D imaging of test patterns, and intact unstained yeast, protozoan parasites and mammalian cells. Overview 3D information is obtained by stereo imaging while complete 3D microscopy is provided by full tomographic reconstruction. The laboratory microscope image quality approaches that of the synchrotron microscopes, but with longer exposure times. The experimental image quality is analyzed from a numerical wave-propagation model of the imaging system and a path to reach synchrotron-like exposure times in laboratory microscopy is outlined. PMID:22119891

  3. Review of soft x-ray lasers and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1991-03-01

    The emerging technology of soft x-ray lasers is in a transition phase between the first laboratory demonstrations of gain and the acceptance of soft x-ray lasers as practical tools for novel applications. Current research is focused on several fronts. The operational wavelength range has been extended to the water window'', important for applications in the life sciences. Gain has also been generated with substantially simpler technology (such as a 6J laser) and this augurs well for the commercially availability in the near future of soft x-ray lasers for a variety of applications. Advanced soft x-ray laser concepts are being developed from investigations into ultra-high intensity laser/matter interactions. The first paper a brief historical perspective of x-ray microscopy and holography have begun. In this paper a brief historical perspective of x-ray laser development will be followed by a review of recent advances in recombination, collisional and photo-pumped systems and applications. A summary of current gain-length performance achieved in laboratories worldwide is presented. Near term prospects for applications to novel fields are discussed. 81 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Nanoimaging cells using soft X-ray tomography.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Dilworth Y; Epperly, Lindsay R; McDermott, Gerry; Le Gros, Mark A; Boudreau, Rosanne M; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2013-01-01

    Soft X-ray microscopy is ideally suited to visualizing and quantifying biological cells. Specimens, including eukaryotic cells, are imaged intact, unstained and fully hydrated, and therefore visualized in a near-native state. The contrast in soft X-ray microscopy is generated by the differential attenuation of X-rays by the molecules in the specimen-water is relatively transmissive to this type of illumination compared to carbon and nitrogen. The attenuation of X-rays by the specimen follows the Beer-Lambert law, and therefore both linear and a quantitative measure of thickness and chemical species present at each point in the cell. In this chapter, we will describe the procedures and computational methods that lead to 50 nm (or better) tomographic reconstructions of cells using soft X-ray microscope data, and the subsequent segmentation and analysis of these volumetric reconstructions. In addition to being a high-fidelity imaging modality, soft X-ray tomography is relatively high-throughput; a complete tomographic data set can be collected in a matter of minutes. This new modality is being applied to imaging cells that range from small prokaryotes to stem cells obtained from mammalian tissues. PMID:23086890

  5. First Terrestrial Soft X-ray Aurora Observations by Chandra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Chang, Shen-Wu; Metzger, Albert E.; Majeed, Tariq

    2004-01-01

    Northern polar "auroral" regions of Earth was observed by High-Resolution Camera in imaging mode (T32C-I) aboard Chandra X-Ray Observatory (CXO) during mid December 2003 - mid April 2004. Ten CXO observations, each approximately 20 min duration, were made in a non-conventional method (due to CXO technical issues), such that Chandra was aimed at a fixed point in sky and the Earth's polar cusp was allowed to drift through the HRC-I field-of-view. The observations were performed when CXO was near apogee and timed during northern winter mostly near midnight (6 hr), except two observations which occurred around 1200 UT, so that northern polar region is entirely in dark and solar fluoresced x-ray contamination can be avoided. These observations were aimed at searching the Earth's soft x-ray aurora and to do a comparative study with Jupiter's x-ray aurora, where a pulsating x-ray hot-spot near the northern magnetic pole has been observed by Chandra that implies a particle source region near Jupiter's magnetopause, and entry of heavy solar wind ions due to high-latitude reconnection as a viable explanation for the soft x-ray emissions. The first Chandra soft (0.1-2 keV) x-ray observations of Earth's aurora show that it is highly variable (intense arc, multiple arcs, diffuse, at times almost absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed where we expect cusp to be: giving indication of solar wind charge-exchange signature in x-rays. We are comparing the Chandra x-ray observations with observations at other wavelengths and particle data from Earth-orbiting satellites and solar wind measurements from near-Earth ACE and SOH0 spacecraft. Preliminary results from these unique CXO-Earth observations will be presented and discussed.

  6. Soft x-ray imager onboard ASTRO-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi Go; Tanaka, Takaaki; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ozaki, Masayuki; Natsukari, Chikara; Tomida, Hiroshi; Hiraga, Junko S.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mori, Koji; Yamauchi, Makoto; Hatsukade, Isamu; Bamba, Aya

    2013-09-01

    The Soft X-ray Imager, SXI, is an X-ray CCD camera onboard the ASTRO-H satellite to be launched in 2015. ASTRO-H will carry two types of soft X-ray detector. The X-ray calorimeter, SXS, has an excellent energy resolution with a narrow field of view while the SXI has a medium energy resolution with a large field of view, 38' square. We employ 4 CCDs of P-channel type with a depletion layer of 200 μm. Having passed the CDR, we assemble the FM so that we can join the final assembly. We present here the SXI status and its expected performance in orbit.

  7. The interstellar medium and the soft X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    The soft X-ray background (SXRB) surface brightness provides data to study the approximately 10(exp 6) K plasma of the local interstellar medium of our Galaxy. Various studies were carried out in order to search for negative correlation, or shadowing, of the SXRB, and were coupled with interstellar medium absorption line studies. The purpose was to determine whether the distances to the shadowing material will lead to a three dimensional mapping of the X-ray emitting, and X-ray absorbing components.

  8. Fabrication of a focusing soft X-ray collector payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Decaprio, A. R.; Manko, H.; Ting, J. W. S.

    1976-01-01

    A large area X-ray focusing collector with arc minute resolution and a position sensitive detector capable of operating in the soft X-ray region was developed for use on sounding rockets in studying stellar X-ray sources. The focusing payload consists of the following components, which are described: (1) a crossed paraboloid mirror assembly; (2) an aspect camera and star tracker; (3) a focal plane assembly containing an imaging proportional counter and its preamplifiers, high voltage power supplies and gas system; (4) a fiducial system; and (5) housekeeping, data handling, instrumentation and telemetry electronics. The design, tests, and operation are described.

  9. Soft x-ray amplification in a plasma waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Kodama, R.; Daido, H.; Murai, K.; Yuan, G.; Ninomiya, S.; Neely, D.; MacPhee, A.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Choi, I. W.; Nam, C. H.; Kawachi, T.

    1995-05-01

    Narrow divergence soft x-ray laser has been generated by double-pass amplification in a curved slab target with a neon-like germanium laser. Considering the electron density profile with the curved slab target, the plasma acts as a one-dimensional waveguide to the x-ray laser beam. Beam parameters such as radius and wavefront curvature of the Gaussian beam are derived from the analysis on beam propagation in the waveguide. Possibility for generating a single-mode x-ray laser beam by multiple-pulse pumping of the curved target is discussed.

  10. Contact microscopy with a soft x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    DiCicco, D.S.; Kim, D.; Rosser, R.J.; Skinner, C.H.; Suckewer, S.; Gupta, A.P.; Hirschberg, J.G.

    1989-03-01

    A soft x-ray laser of output energy 1-3 mJ at 19.2 nm has been used to record high resolution images of biological specimens. The contact images were recorded on photoresist which was later viewed in a scanning electron microscope. We also present a Composite Optical X- ray Laser Microscope ''COXRALM'' of novel design. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The very soft X-ray emission of X-ray-faint early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellegrini, S.; Fabbiano, G.

    1994-01-01

    A recent reanaylsis of Einstein data, and new ROSAT observations, have revealed the presence of at least two components in the X-ray spectra of X-ray faint early-type galaxies: a relatively hard component (kT greater than 1.5 keV), and a very soft component (kT approximately 0.2-0.3 keV). In this paper we address the problem of the nature of the very soft component and whether it can be due to a hot interstellar medium (ISM), or is most likely originated by the collective emission of very soft stellar sources. To this purpose, hydrodynamical evolutionary sequences for the secular behavior of gas flows in ellipticals have been performed, varying the Type Ia supernovae rate of explosion, and the dark matter amount and distribution. The results are compared with the observational X-ray data: the average Einstein spectrum for six X-ray faint early-type galaxies (among which are NGC 4365 and NGC 4697), and the spectrum obtained by the ROSAT pointed observation of NGC 4365. The very soft component could be entirely explained with a hot ISM only in galaxies such as NGC 4697, i.e., when the depth of the potential well-on which the average ISM temperature strongly depends-is quite shallow; in NGC 4365 a diffuse hot ISM would have a temperature larger than that of the very soft component, because of the deeper potential well. So, in NGC 4365 the softest contribution to the X-ray emission comes certainly from stellar sources. As stellar soft X-ray emitters, we consider late-type stellar coronae, supersoft sources such as those discovered by ROSAT in the Magellanic Clouds and M31, and RS CVn systems. All these candidates can be substantial contributors to the very soft emission, though none of them, taken separately, plausibly accounts entirely for its properties. We finally present a model for the X-ray emission of NGC 4365, to reproduce in detail the results of the ROSAT pointed observation, including the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) spectrum and radial

  12. X-ray induced dimerization of cinnamic acid: Time-resolved inelastic X-ray scattering study

    PubMed Central

    Inkinen, Juho; Niskanen, Johannes; Talka, Tuomas; Sahle, Christoph J.; Müller, Harald; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Hashemi, Javad; Akbari, Ali; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2015-01-01

    A classic example of solid-state topochemical reactions is the ultraviolet-light induced photodimerization of α-trans-cinnamic acid (CA). Here, we report the first observation of an X-ray-induced dimerization of CA and monitor it in situ using nonresonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy (NRIXS). The time-evolution of the carbon core-electron excitation spectra shows the effects of two X-ray induced reactions: dimerization on a short time-scale and disintegration on a long time-scale. We used spectrum simulations of CA and its dimerization product, α-truxillic acid (TA), to gain insight into the dimerization effects. From the time-resolved spectra, we extracted component spectra and time-dependent weights corresponding to CA and TA. The results suggest that the X-ray induced dimerization proceeds homogeneously in contrast to the dimerization induced by ultraviolet light. We also utilized the ability of NRIXS for direct tomography with chemical-bond contrast to image the spatial progress of the reactions in the sample crystal. Our work paves the way for other time-resolved studies on chemical reactions using inelastic X-ray scattering. PMID:26568420

  13. Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ade, Harald

    1997-03-01

    The development of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) microscopy^1 and linear dichroism microscopy^2 over the last few years utilizing the X1-Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (X1-STXM) at the National Synchrotron Light Source provides excellent specificity to various functional groups and moieties in organic molecules and polymeric materials at a spatial resolution of 50 nm. This chemical specificity can be utilized to map the distribution of various compounds in a material, or to micro-chemically analyze small sample areas. Examples of applications include the study of various phase-separated polymers (polyurethanes, liquid crystalline polyesters), multicomponent polymer blends, polymer laminates, and other organic materials such as coal^3. Linear dichroism microscopy furthermore explores the polarization dependence of NEXAFS in (partially) oriented materials, and can determine the orientation of specific functional groups. Applications of linear dichroism microscopy have focused so far on determining the relative degree of radial orientation in Kevlar fibers^3. ^1 H. Ade, X. Zhang, S. Cameron, C. Costello, J. Kirz, and S. Williams, Science 258, 972 (1992). ^2 H. Ade and B. Hsiao, Science 262, 1427 (1993). ^3 Acknowledgement: My callaborators are B. Hsiao, S. Subramoney, B. Wood, I. Plotzker, E. Rightor, G. Mitchell, C. Sloop, D.-J. Liu, S.-C. Liu, J. Marti, C. Zimba, A. P. Smith, R. Spontak, R. Fornes, R. Gilbert, C. Cody, A. Hitchcock and S. Urquhart. The X1-STXM is built and maintained by J. Kirz and C. Jacobsen and their groups. Work supported by: NSF Young Investigator Award (DMR-9458060), DuPont Young Professor Grant, and Dow Chemical.

  14. Electronic Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials with Photon-in/Photon-out Soft-X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jinghua

    2008-09-22

    The applications of resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy on a variety of carbon systems have yielded characteristic fingerprints. With high-resolution monochromatized synchrotron radiation excitation, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has emerged as a new source of information about electronic structure and excitation dynamics. Photon-in/photon-out soft-X-ray spectroscopy is used to study the electronic properties of fundamental materials, nanostructure, and complex hydrides and will offer potential in-depth understanding of chemisorption and/or physisorption mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption/desorption capacity and kinetics.

  15. Isolated attosecond soft X-rays and water window XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegert, Jens

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate generation of isolated attosecond soft X-ray pulses with duration less than 350 as at the carbon K-edge at 284 eV. This reproducible and CEP stable attosecond soft X-ray continuum covers the entire water window from 200 eV to 550 eV with a flux of 7.3x 107 photons/s and corresponds to a pulse energy of 2.9 pJ. We demonstrate the utility of our table-top source through soft X-ray near-edge fine-structure spectroscopy at K-shell absorption edges in condensed matter and retrieve the specific absorption features corresponding to the binding orbitals. We believe that these results herald attosecond material science by bridging the gap between ultrafast temporal resolution and element specific probing at the fundamental absorption edges of matter.

  16. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in atmospheric pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, M.D.; van der Laan, G.; Flaherty, J.V.; Padmore, H.A. )

    1992-01-01

    We report on an environmental chamber, which is attached to a UHV beamline, in which soft x-ray measurements can be done at atmospheric pressure in helium. X-ray measurements in air can only be performed at energies above about 3 keV because of the strong absorption of soft x rays by oxygen and nitrogen. However, a low-{ital Z} scatterer such as helium has a long absorption length for soft x rays even at atmospheric pressure. Thus, this new chamber allows soft x-ray experiments to be performed on samples with physical properties that are incompatible with UHV conditions, e.g., liquid and frozen aqueous solutions, corrosive materials, etc. A helium-tight tank has been installed behind the vacuum experimental chamber of the double crystal beamline 3.4 at the Daresbury SRS. The tank is purged with helium at atmospheric pressure and the gas in the tank is isolated from the high vacuum of the rest of the beamline by a thin mylar window which is supported on a capillary array. The tank contains a sample stage, two ionization chambers and a parallel-plate gas proportional counter for fluorescence detection of dilute samples, which has produced good results on the {ital K} edges of Cl, S, and P.

  17. X-Ray Morphology,Kinematics and Geometry of the Eridanus Soft X-Ray Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhiyu; Burrows, David N.; Sanders, Wilton T.; Snowden, Steve L.; Penprase, Bryan E.

    1994-12-01

    We present mosaics of X-ray intensity maps and spectral fit results for selected regions of the Eridanus soft X-ray Enhancement (EXE), as well as kinematics of the X-ray absorbing clouds in the EXE region and geometrical properties of this X-ray emitting bubble. The work is based on pointed observations with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter, 21 cm observations with the NRAO 140 foot telescope at Green Bank and interstellar Na D line observations with the NOAO Coude Feed telescope at Kitt Peak. The ROSAT pointed observations examine two regions of the EXE. The first is an X-ray absorption lane produced by an IR filament which is located at galactic coordinates of about (199(deg) , -45(deg) ). The second is in the vicinity of the northern (galactic) boundary of the 1/4 keV EXE, at galactic coordinates of about (200(deg) , -25(deg) ). Both our spatial and spectral analysis suggest that variations in emission measure and NH are primarily reponsible for the observed variations of the X-ray intensity. Using 100mu intensities obtained from IRAS maps and NH column densities obtained from our X-ray spectral fits, we find 100 microns/NH ratios across the IR filament that are compatible with typical high latitude values. Maps of the X-ray absorbing clouds in the EXE region at 21 cm reveal that these clouds may belong to two different expanding systems, with one possibly associated with our Local Bubble and the other with the boundary of the EXE. Combination of 21 cm data with interstellar Na D line observations toward stars in the directions of some of the X-ray absorbing clouds along (l,b) ~ (200(deg) ,-40(deg) ) indicate that the near side of the EXE is farther than 151 pc and the distance to the center of the EXE at this latitude is about 226 pc. The density and the thermal pressure found for this X-ray emitting superbubble are 0.015 cm(-3) and 4.9 times 10(4) cm(-3) K.

  18. Soft X-ray Excesses and X-ray Line Variability in Cygnus X-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlotta, Angelo; McCollough, Michael L

    2014-06-01

    Cygnus X-3 is an X-ray binary (XRB) system containing a stellar-mass compact object, most likely a black hole, and a Wolf-Rayet companion star, which produces collimated, relativistic jets, placing it in the sub-class of XRBs known as microquasars. During a Swift/XRT monitoring program of Cygnus X-3, a soft X-ray excess (below 1 keV) was observed at certain states and phases of activity. This soft excess appears to be similar to the variable soft emission observed in Seyfert galaxies. The presence of these features in Cygnus X-3 would argue for a greater support of the black-hole nature of the compact object and serve to better highlight the similarities of microquasars and AGN. We present the results of our investigations of these soft excesses, as well as the variations of the X-ray Fe line region (6.4-7.0 keV) as a function of the state activity and orbital phase.

  19. Soft X-ray contact microscopy of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, G.; Orsini, F.; Batani, D.; Bernardinello, A.; Desai, T.; Ullschmied, J.; Skala, J.; Kralikova, B.; Krousky, E.; Juha, L.; Pfeifer, M.; Kadlec, Ch.; Mocek, T.; Präg, A.; Renner, O.; Cotelli, F.; Lora Lamia, C.; Zullini, A.

    2004-08-01

    Soft X-ray Contact Microscopy (SXCM) of Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes with typical length ~800 μ m and diameter ~30 μ m has been performed using the PALS laser source of wavelength λ = 1.314~μ m and pulse duration τ (FWHM) = 400 ps. Pulsed soft X-rays were generated using molybdenum and gold targets with laser intensities I ≥ 1014 W/cm2. Images have been recorded on PMMA photo resists and analyzed using an atomic force microscope operating in contact mode. Cuticle features and several internal organs have been identified in the SXCM images including lateral field, cuticle annuli, pharynx, and hypodermal and neuronal cell nuclei.

  20. A soft x-ray octadecyl hydrogen maleate crystal spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, P.Z.; Fill, E.E.; Tietang, G.

    1996-03-01

    A crystal spectrograph is described which can be used to investigate laser-produced plasmas in the region of soft x rays at wavelengths of up to 60 A. The spectrograph uses an octadecyl hydrogen maleate crystal with a 2{ital d} of 63.5 A, combined with a very thin carbon filter (3000 A thick). As examples of its application, soft x-ray spectra in the range of 43{endash}51 A from laser plasmas of Si and Cu are presented. A spectral resolution of {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}=1100 is deduced from the spectra. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D.; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J.; Mancuso, Christopher A.; Hogle, Craig W.; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L.; Dorney, Kevin M.; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Fullerton, Eric E.; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Milošević, Dejan B.; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A.; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  2. Bright circularly polarized soft X-ray high harmonics for X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Grychtol, Patrik; Knut, Ronny; Hernández-García, Carlos; Hickstein, Daniel D; Zusin, Dmitriy; Gentry, Christian; Dollar, Franklin J; Mancuso, Christopher A; Hogle, Craig W; Kfir, Ofer; Legut, Dominik; Carva, Karel; Ellis, Jennifer L; Dorney, Kevin M; Chen, Cong; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Oren; Oppeneer, Peter M; Milošević, Dejan B; Becker, Andreas; Jaroń-Becker, Agnieszka A; Popmintchev, Tenio; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C

    2015-11-17

    We demonstrate, to our knowledge, the first bright circularly polarized high-harmonic beams in the soft X-ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum, and use them to implement X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements in a tabletop-scale setup. Using counterrotating circularly polarized laser fields at 1.3 and 0.79 µm, we generate circularly polarized harmonics with photon energies exceeding 160 eV. The harmonic spectra emerge as a sequence of closely spaced pairs of left and right circularly polarized peaks, with energies determined by conservation of energy and spin angular momentum. We explain the single-atom and macroscopic physics by identifying the dominant electron quantum trajectories and optimal phase-matching conditions. The first advanced phase-matched propagation simulations for circularly polarized harmonics reveal the influence of the finite phase-matching temporal window on the spectrum, as well as the unique polarization-shaped attosecond pulse train. Finally, we use, to our knowledge, the first tabletop X-ray magnetic circular dichroism measurements at the N4,5 absorption edges of Gd to validate the high degree of circularity, brightness, and stability of this light source. These results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the polarization, spectrum, and temporal shape of high harmonics in the soft X-ray region by manipulating the driving laser waveform. PMID:26534992

  3. Resource Letter on Stimulated Inelastic X-ray Scattering at an XFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Bruce D.; /SLAC

    2010-09-02

    At sufficient X-ray intensity, stimulated effects in inelastic scattering will become important. These coherent, non-linear optical phenomena may be used to impulsively produce a high degree of collective excitation in, for example, correlated electron materials, suitable for performing ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. This Resource Letter collects information on fundamental aspects of stimulated X-ray scattering and evaluates the prospect for successful experiments at a present or future X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility.

  4. Soft X-ray Absorption Edges in LMXBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The XMM observation of LMC X-2 is part of our program to study X-ray absorption in the interstellar medium (ISM). This program includes a variety of bright X-ray binaries in the Galaxy as well as the Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC). LMC X-2 is located near the heart of the LMC. Its very soft X-ray spectrum is used to determine abundance and ionization fractions of neutral and lowly ionized oxygen of the ISM in the LMC. The RGS spectrum so far allowed us to determine the O-edge value to be for atomic O, the EW of O-I in the ls-2p resonance absorption line, and the same for O-II. The current study is still ongoing in conjunction with other low absorption sources like Sco X-1 and the recently observed X-ray binary 4U 1957+11.

  5. Soft x-ray streak camera for laser fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stradling, G.L.

    1981-04-01

    This thesis reviews the development and significance of the soft x-ray streak camera (SXRSC) in the context of inertial confinement fusion energy development. A brief introduction of laser fusion and laser fusion diagnostics is presented. The need for a soft x-ray streak camera as a laser fusion diagnostic is shown. Basic x-ray streak camera characteristics, design, and operation are reviewed. The SXRSC design criteria, the requirement for a subkilovolt x-ray transmitting window, and the resulting camera design are explained. Theory and design of reflector-filter pair combinations for three subkilovolt channels centered at 220 eV, 460 eV, and 620 eV are also presented. Calibration experiments are explained and data showing a dynamic range of 1000 and a sweep speed of 134 psec/mm are presented. Sensitivity modifications to the soft x-ray streak camera for a high-power target shot are described. A preliminary investigation, using a stepped cathode, of the thickness dependence of the gold photocathode response is discussed. Data from a typical Argus laser gold-disk target experiment are shown.

  6. Microspectroscopic soft X-ray analysis of keratin based biofibers.

    PubMed

    Späth, Andreas; Meyer, Markus; Semmler, Sonja; Fink, Rainer H

    2015-03-01

    Scanning soft X-ray transmission microspectroscopy (STXM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been employed for a high-resolution morphological and chemical analysis of hair fibers from human, sheep and alpaca. STXM allows optimum contrast imaging of the main hair building blocks due to tuneable photon energy. Chemical similarities and deviations for the human hair building blocks as well as for the three investigated species are discussed on the basis of the local near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The spectra of melanosomes corroborate the state-of-the-art model for the chemical structure of eumelanin. Complementary TEM micrographs reveal the occurrence of cortex sectioning in alpaca hair to some extent. A spectroscopic analysis for human hair cortex indicates low mass loss upon soft X-ray irradiation, but transformation of chemical species with decreasing amount of peptide bonds and increasing NEXAFS signal for unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds. PMID:25553413

  7. Soft x-ray virtual diagnostics for tokamak simulations.

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Zhao, L; Bogatu, I N; In, Y; Turnbull, A; Osborne, T; Maraschek, M; Comer, K

    2009-11-01

    The numerical toolset, FAR-TECH Virtual Diagnostic Utility, for generating virtual experimental data based on theoretical models and comparing it with experimental data, has been developed for soft x-ray diagnostics on DIII-D. The virtual (or synthetic) soft x-ray signals for a sample DIII-D discharge are compared with the experimental data. The plasma density and temperature radial profiles needed in the soft x-ray signal modeling are obtained from experimental data, i.e., from Thomson scattering and electron cyclotron emission. The virtual soft x-ray diagnostics for the equilibriums have a good agreement with the experimental data. The virtual diagnostics based on an ideal linear instability also agree reasonably well with the experimental data. The agreements are good enough to justify the methodology presented here for utilizing virtual diagnostics for routine comparison of experimental data. The agreements also motivate further detailed simulations with improved physical models such as the nonideal magnetohydrodynamics contributions (resistivity, viscosity, nonaxisymmetric error fields, etc.) and other nonlinear effects, which can be tested by virtual diagnostics with various stability modeling. PMID:19947727

  8. Soft x-ray virtual diagnostics for tokamak simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. S.; Zhao, L.; Bogatu, I. N.; In, Y.; Turnbull, A.; Osborne, T.; Maraschek, M.; Comer, K.

    2009-11-15

    The numerical toolset, FAR-TECH Virtual Diagnostic Utility, for generating virtual experimental data based on theoretical models and comparing it with experimental data, has been developed for soft x-ray diagnostics on DIII-D. The virtual (or synthetic) soft x-ray signals for a sample DIII-D discharge are compared with the experimental data. The plasma density and temperature radial profiles needed in the soft x-ray signal modeling are obtained from experimental data, i.e., from Thomson scattering and electron cyclotron emission. The virtual soft x-ray diagnostics for the equilibriums have a good agreement with the experimental data. The virtual diagnostics based on an ideal linear instability also agree reasonably well with the experimental data. The agreements are good enough to justify the methodology presented here for utilizing virtual diagnostics for routine comparison of experimental data. The agreements also motivate further detailed simulations with improved physical models such as the nonideal magnetohydrodynamics contributions (resistivity, viscosity, nonaxisymmetric error fields, etc.) and other nonlinear effects, which can be tested by virtual diagnostics with various stability modeling.

  9. Lensless imaging of nanoporous glass with soft X-rays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Turner, Joshua J.; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Jacobsen, Chris

    2013-06-01

    Coherent soft X-ray diffraction has been used to image nanoporous glass structure in two dimensions using different methods. The merit of the reconstructions was judged using a new method of Fourier phase correlation with a final, refined image. The porous structure was found to have a much larger average size then previously believed.

  10. Lasers, extreme UV and soft X-ray

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nilsen, Joseph

    2015-09-20

    Three decades ago, large ICF lasers that occupied entire buildings were used as the energy sources to drive the first X-ray lasers. Today X-ray lasers are tabletop, spatially coherent, high-repetition rate lasers that enable many of the standard optical techniques such as interferometry to be extended to the soft X-ray regime between wavelengths of 10 and 50 nm. Over the last decade X-ray laser performance has been improved by the use of the grazing incidence geometry, diode-pumped solid-state lasers, and seeding techniques. The dominant X-ray laser schemes are the monopole collisional excitation lasers either driven by chirped pulse amplification (CPA)more » laser systems or capillary discharge. The CPA systems drive lasing in neon-like or nickel-like ions, typically in the 10 – 30 nm range, while the capillary system works best for neon-like argon at 46.9 nm. Most researchers use nickel-like ion lasers near 14 nm because they are well matched to the Mo:Si multilayer mirrors that have peak reflectivity near 13 nm and are used in many applications. As a result, the last decade has seen the birth of the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) that can reach wavelengths down to 0.15 nm and the inner-shell Ne laser at 1.46 nm.« less

  11. Lasers, extreme UV and soft X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, Joseph

    2015-09-20

    Three decades ago, large ICF lasers that occupied entire buildings were used as the energy sources to drive the first X-ray lasers. Today X-ray lasers are tabletop, spatially coherent, high-repetition rate lasers that enable many of the standard optical techniques such as interferometry to be extended to the soft X-ray regime between wavelengths of 10 and 50 nm. Over the last decade X-ray laser performance has been improved by the use of the grazing incidence geometry, diode-pumped solid-state lasers, and seeding techniques. The dominant X-ray laser schemes are the monopole collisional excitation lasers either driven by chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems or capillary discharge. The CPA systems drive lasing in neon-like or nickel-like ions, typically in the 10 – 30 nm range, while the capillary system works best for neon-like argon at 46.9 nm. Most researchers use nickel-like ion lasers near 14 nm because they are well matched to the Mo:Si multilayer mirrors that have peak reflectivity near 13 nm and are used in many applications. As a result, the last decade has seen the birth of the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) that can reach wavelengths down to 0.15 nm and the inner-shell Ne laser at 1.46 nm.

  12. A soft X-ray lag detected in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Arimoto, Makoto; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Pike, Sean; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We performed time-lag analysis on the X-ray light curves of Centaurus A (Cen A) obtained by the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) aboard the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) in three energy bands (2-4 keV, 4-10 keV, and 10-20 keV). We discovered a soft X-ray lag relative to higher energies (soft lag) on a timescale of days in a flaring episode by employing the discrete correlation function (DCF) and the z-transformed discrete correlation function (ZDCF) method. In the episode, a peak and a centroid in the DCF and the ZDCF was observed at a soft lag of ˜ 5 d in 2-4 keV versus 4-10 keV and in 4-10 keV versus 10-20 keV, and ˜ 10 d in 2-4 keV versus 10-20 keV. We found it difficult to explain the observed X-ray variation by a single energy injection with the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the soft lags in these three energy bands reflect the different cooling times of the relativistic electrons, by assuming the magnetic field and minimum Lorentz factor estimated from a broad-band spectral energy distribution. Alternatively, if the phenomenon is interpreted as cooling of Comptonizing electrons in a corona covering the accretion disk, the temperature of the corona producing the variable X-rays should be ˜ 10 keV for reconciliation with the soft lag in the energy range of 2-20 keV.

  13. A soft X-ray lag detected in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Arimoto, Makoto; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Pike, Sean; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    We performed time-lag analysis on the X-ray light curves of Centaurus A (Cen A) obtained by the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) aboard the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) in three energy bands (2-4 keV, 4-10 keV, and 10-20 keV). We discovered a soft X-ray lag relative to higher energies (soft lag) on a timescale of days in a flaring episode by employing the discrete correlation function (DCF) and the z-transformed discrete correlation function (ZDCF) method. In the episode, a peak and a centroid in the DCF and the ZDCF was observed at a soft lag of ˜ 5 d in 2-4 keV versus 4-10 keV and in 4-10 keV versus 10-20 keV, and ˜ 10 d in 2-4 keV versus 10-20 keV. We found it difficult to explain the observed X-ray variation by a single energy injection with the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the soft lags in these three energy bands reflect the different cooling times of the relativistic electrons, by assuming the magnetic field and minimum Lorentz factor estimated from a broad-band spectral energy distribution. Alternatively, if the phenomenon is interpreted as cooling of Comptonizing electrons in a corona covering the accretion disk, the temperature of the corona producing the variable X-rays should be ˜ 10 keV for reconciliation with the soft lag in the energy range of 2-20 keV.

  14. Transition radiation very soft X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umiastowski, K.; Nguyen, A.

    1994-05-01

    There is a growing interest in the transition radiation (TR), as a soft X-ray source, in the last few years. Many papers have been published on calculations or experiments in the 1-10 keV X-ray energy range using 50-200 MeV electron accelerators. We investigate the possibility to generate very soft X-rays (λ = 12 nm) with low-energy electron accelerator (5-20 MeV). Very little information is available on TR in this range of photon wavelength and electron energy. A stack of 20 foils of beryllium placed in vacuum was used in our computer simulation. Calculation shows that for 1 mA electron beam current, radiation with few mW intensity can be produced. Emitted photons are quasi-monoenergetic (FWHM less than 5%), and well collimated. The aim of our study is to investigate the possibility of fabricate a soft X-ray source, much more compact than synchrotron source and producing an intense and quasi-coherent radiation, for industrial applications.

  15. Soft x-ray diagnostics for pulsed power machines

    SciTech Connect

    Idzorek, G.C.; Coulter, W.L.; Walsh, P.J.; Montoya, R.R.

    1995-08-01

    A variety of soft x-ray diagnostics are being fielded on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus and Procyon pulsed power systems and also being fielded on joint US/Russian magnetized target fusion experiments known as MAGO (Magnitoye Obzhatiye). The authors have designed a low-cost modular photoemissive detector designated the XRD-96 that uses commercial 1100 series aluminum for the photocathode. In addition to photocathode detectors a number of designs using solid state silicon photodiodes have been designed and fielded. They also present a soft x-ray time-integrated pinhole camera system that uses standard type TMAX-400 photographic film that obviates the need for expensive and no longer produced zero-overcoat soft x-ray emulsion film. In a typical experiment the desired spectral energy cuts, signal intensity levels, and desired field of view will determine diagnostic geometry and x-ray filters selected. The authors have developed several computer codes to assist in the diagnostic design process and data deconvolution. Examples of the diagnostic design process and data analysis for a typical pulsed power experiment are presented.

  16. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T.

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  17. Exploring nanomagnetism with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.; Kim, D.-H.; Mesler, B.L.; Chao, W.; Sakdinawat,A.E.; Anderson, E.H.

    2006-10-30

    Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy images magnetism in nanoscale systems with a spatial resolution down to 15nm provided by state-of-the-art Fresnel zone plate optics. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) is used as element-specific magnetic contrast mechanism similar to photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), however, with volume sensitivity and the ability to record the images in varying applied magnetic fields which allows to study magnetization reversal processes at fundamental length scales. Utilizing a stroboscopic pump-probe scheme one can investigate fast spin dynamics with a time resolution down to 70 ps which gives access to precessional and relaxation phenomena as well as spin torque driven domain wall dynamics in nanoscale systems. Current developments in zone plate optics aim for a spatial resolution towards 10nm and at next generation X-ray sources a time resolution in the fsec regime can be envisioned.

  18. Soft X-Ray Polarimetry with a CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaaret, Philip

    2016-07-01

    We describe an instrument capable of measuring the polarization of astrophysical sources in soft X-rays that can be accomplished at modest cost by exploiting CubeSats as novel vehicles for high energy astrophysics. The instrument would re-use technologies that will be demonstrated on the HaloSat cubesat that is currently under construction. Potential target include thermally-emitting isolated neutron stars and blazars. Measurement of the polarization of X-rays emitted from the surface of a highly magnetized neutron star provides a means to test a unique signature of strong-field quantum electrodynamics and probe the neutron star magnetic field and X-ray emission geometry. Polarization measurements of blazars should strongly constrain jet emission models.

  19. Soft x-ray holographic tomography for biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongyi; Chen, Jianwen; Xie, Honglan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Jiang, Shiping; Zhang, Yuxuan

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we present some experimental results on X -ray holography, holographic tomography, and a new holographic tomography method called pre-amplified holographic tomography is proposed. Due to the shorter wavelength and the larger penetration depths, X-rays provide the potential of higher resolution in imaging techniques, and have the ability to image intact, living, hydrated cells w ithout slicing, dehydration, chemical fixation or stain. Recently, using X-ray source in National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory in Hefei, we have successfully performed some soft X-ray holography experiments on biological specimen. The specimens used in the experiments was the garlic clove epidermis, we got their X-ray hologram, and then reconstructed them by computer programs, the feature of the cell walls, the nuclei and some cytoplasm were clearly resolved. However, there still exist some problems in realization of practical 3D microscopic imaging due to the near-unity refractive index of the matter. There is no X-ray optics having a sufficient high numerical aperture to achieve a depth resolution that is comparable to the transverse resolution. On the other hand, computer tomography needs a record of hundreds of views of the test object at different angles for high resolution. This is because the number of views required for a densely packed object is equal to the object radius divided by the desired depth resolution. Clearly, it is impractical for a radiation-sensitive biological specimen. Moreover, the X-ray diffraction effect makes projection data blur, this badly degrades the resolution of the reconstructed image. In order to observe 3D structure of the biological specimens, McNulty proposed a new method for 3D imaging called "holographic tomography (HT)" in which several holograms of the specimen are recorded from various illumination directions and combined in the reconstruction step. This permits the specimens to be sampled over a wide range of spatial

  20. The Interrelation of Soft and Hard X-Ray Emission During Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the characteristics of flare energy transport processes through the study of soft X-rays, hard X-rays, and their interrelationships through analysis of Yohkoh SXT (Soft X-ray Telescope), HXT (Hard X- Ray Telescope) , and BCS (Bragg Crystal Spectrometer) data, and comparison with theoretical models.

  1. ASTRO-H Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos Peter J.; Okajima, Takashi; Hahne, Devin

    2011-01-01

    ASTRO-H is an astrophysics satellite dedicated for X-ray spectroscopic study non-dispersively and to carry out survey complementally, which will be borne out of US-Japanese collaborative effort. Among the onboard instruments there are four conically approximated Wolter-I X-ray mirrors, among which two of them are soft X-ray mirrors\\ of which the energy range is from a few hundred eV to 15 keY, currently being fabricated in the X-ray Optics Lab at Goddard Space Flight Center. The focal point instruments will be a calorimeter (SXS) and a CCD camera (SXI), respectively. The reflectors of the mirror are made of heat-formed aluminum substrate of the thickness gauged of 152 micron, 229 micron, and 305 micron of the alloy 5052 H-19, followed by epoxy replication on gold-sputtered smooth Pyrex cylindrical mandrels to acquire the X-ray reflective surface. The epoxy layer is 10 micron nominal and surface gold layer of 0.2 micron. Improvements on angular response over the Astro-El/Suzaku mirrors come from error reduction on the figure, the roundness, and the grazing angle/radius mismatching of the reflecting surface, and tighter specs and mechanical strength on supporting structure to reduce the reflector positioning and the assembly errors. In this paper, we report the results of calibration of the engineering model of SXT (EM), and project the quality of the flight mirrors.

  2. Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and dipolar energy terms. As a result the energetically favored ground state of a ferromagnetic system is a rather complex spin configuration, the magnetic domain structure. Magnetism is one of the eldest scientific phenomena, yet it is one of the most powerful and versatile utilized physical effects in modern technologies, such as in magnetic storage and sensor devices. To achieve highest storage density, the relevant length scales, such as the bit size in disk drives is now approaching the nanoscale and as such further developments have to deal with nanoscience phenomena. Advanced characterization tools are required to fully understand the underlying physical principles. Magnetic microscopes using polarized soft X-rays offer a close-up view into magnetism with unique features, these include elemental sensitivity due to X-ray magnetic dichroism effects as contrast mechanism, high spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the inherent time structure of current X-ray sources, which will be overcome with the introduction of ultrafast and high brilliant X-ray sources.

  3. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of the Cygnus Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntaffer, Randall L.

    My thesis work consisted of the design, fabrication and launch of a sounding rocket payload to observe the spectrum of the soft X-ray emission from the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. This payload was designated the Cygnus X-ray Emission Spectroscopic Survey (CyXESS) and launched from White Sands Missile Range on November 20th, 2006. The novel X-ray spectrograph incorporated a wire- grid collimator feeding an array of gratings in the extreme off-plane mount which ultimately dispersed the spectrum onto never before flown Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. This instrument recorded 65 seconds of usable data between 43-49.5 Å in two prominent features. The first feature near 45 Å is dominated by the He-like triplet of O VII in second order with contributions from Mg X and Si IX-Si XII in first order, while the second feature near 47.5 Å is first order S IX and S X. Fits to the spectra give an equilibrium plasma at log( T )=6.2 ( kT e =0.14 keV) and near cosmic abundances. This is consistent with previous observations, which demonstrated that the soft x-ray emission from the Cygnus Loop is dominated by interactions between the initial blast wave with the walls of a precursor formed cavity surrounding the Cygnus Loop.

  4. Soft X-ray polarimeter-spectrometer SOLPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steslicki, Marek; Sylwester, Janusz; Plocieniak, Stefan; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Szaforz, Zaneta Anna; Scislowski, Daniel; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Hernandez, Jose; Vadimovich Kuzin, Sergey; Shestov, Sergey

    2015-08-01

    We present an innovative soft X-ray polarimeter and spectrometer SOLPEX. The instrument will be mounted aboard the ISS within the Russian science complex KORTES. The measurements to be made by SOLPEX are expected to be of unprecedented quality in terms of sensitivity to detect the soft-X- ray polarization of solar emission emanating from active regions and flares in particular. Simultaneous measurements of the polarization degree and the other characteristics (eg. evolution of the spectra) constitute the last, rather unexplored area of solar X-ray spectroscopy providing substantial diagnostic potential. Second important science task to be addressed are the measurements of Doppler shifts in selected X-ray spectral emission lines formed in hot flaring sources. The novel-type Dopplerometer (flat Bragg crystal drum unit) is planned to be a part of SOLPEX and will allow to measure line Doppler shifts in absolute terms with unprecedented time resolution (fraction of a second) during the impulsive flare phases. We shall present some details of the SolpeX instrument and discuss observing sequences in a view of science objectives to be reached.

  5. Soft x-ray laser microscope. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL`s 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  6. PSPC soft x-ray observations of Seyfert 2 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Urry, C. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from ROSAT PSPC soft x-ray (0.1-2.0 keV) observations of six Seyfert 2 galaxies, chosen from the brightest Seyfert 2s detected with the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter. All of the targets were detected with the ROSAT PSPC. Spatial analysis shows that the source density within a few arcmin of each Seyfert 2 galaxy is a factor of approximately eight higher than in the rest of the inner field of view of the PSPC images. In NGC1365 it appears that the serendipitous sources may be x-ray binary systems in the host galaxy. The proximity of the serendipitous sources, typically within a few arcmin of the target Seyfert 2, means that previous x-ray observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxies have been significantly contaminated, and that source confusion is important on a spatial scale of approximately 1 arcmin. Some spectra, most notably Mrk3 and NGC1365, indicate the presence of a high equivalent width soft x-ray line blend consistent with unresolved iron L and oxygen K emission.

  7. The soft x ray telescope for Solar-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Acton, L. W.; Bruner, M. E.; Lemen, J. R.; Strong, K. T.

    1989-01-01

    The Solar-A satellite being prepared by the Institute for Sapce and Astronautical Sciences (ISAS) in Japan is dedicated to high energy observations of solar flares. The Soft X Ray Telescope (SXT) is being prepared to provide filtered images in the 2 to 60 A interval. The flight model is now undergoing tests in the 1000 foot tunnel at MSFC. Launch will be in September 1991. Earlier resolution and efficiency tests on the grazing incidence mirror have established its performance in soft x rays. The one-piece, two mirror grazing incidence telescope is supported in a strain free mount separated from the focal plane assembly by a carbon-epoxy metering tube whose windings and filler are chosen to minimize thermal and hygroscopic effects. The CCD detector images both the x ray and the concentric visible light aspect telescope. Optical filters provide images at 4308 and 4700 A. The SXT will be capable of producing over 8000 of the smallest partial frame images per day, or fewer but larger images, up to 1024 x 1024 pixel images. Image sequence with two or more of the five x ray analysis filters, with automatic exposure compensation to optimize the charge collection by the CCD detector, will be used to provide plasma diagnostics. Calculations using a differential emission measure code were used to optimize filter selection over the range of emission measure variations and to avoid redundancy, but the filters were chosen primarily to give ratios that are monotonic in plasma temperature.

  8. Quantifying the Exospheric Component of Soft X-ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Robertson, Ina; Hansen, Kenneth; Cravens, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    High charge state heavy ions in the solar wind exchange charge with ambient neutral gas. This process creates a product ion in an excited state. During the radiative cascade process, EUV and X-ray photons are emitted with energies in the range of about 100 eV to 1 keV. Because the terrestrial exospheric density at the nominal magnetopause location is relatively high, approx. 10 cu cm, solar wind charge exchange, or SWCX, can be observed by Earth-orbiting soft X-ray instruments such as the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counters (PSPC). In this presentation, we will compare simulated and observed soft Xray emission during an event on August 18-19, 1991 and discuss the role of exospheric SWCX emission for this and other events.

  9. The soft X ray excess in Einstein quasar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Masnou, Jean-Louis; Elvis, Martin; Mcdowell, Jonathan; Arnaud, Keith

    1989-01-01

    The soft X-ray excess component is studied for a signal to noise limited subsample of 14 quasars from the WE87 sample observed with the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC). Detailed analysis of the IPC data, combined with Einstein Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) data where possible, and use of accurate galactic N sub H values allows estimation of the strength of any excess and improvement of constraints on the spectral slope at higher X-ray energies. A significant excess in 9 of the 14 objects is found. It is confined in all but one case to below 0.6 keV and variable in the two cases where there are multiple observations. The relation of the soft excess to other continuum properties of the quasars is investigated.

  10. Phase dispersion X-ray imaging of murine soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingal, V. N.; Ingal, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of phase-contrast (PC) images in the phase-dispersion introscopy (PDI) technique is the subject of this paper. Conditions for extreme sensitivity to murine soft-tissue anatomy are discussed. The unique information content and good contrast of the minutest details of anatomy, together with the high brilliance of X-ray optics, give the authors confidence that the PDI method can be successfully applied for medical diagnostics.

  11. ASTRO-H Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, Yang; Okajima, Takashi; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Odell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Ishida, Manabu; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Iizuka, Ryo; Hayashi, Takayuki; Tawara, Yuzuru; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Mori, Hideyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Kunieda, Hideyo; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Sugita, Satoshi; Tamura, Keisuke; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Izumiya, Takanori; Minami, Sari; Sato, Toshiki; Tomikawa, Kazuki; Kikuchi, Naomichi; Iwase, Toshihiro

    2014-07-01

    ASTRO-H is an astrophysics satellite dedicated for non-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic study on selective celestial X-ray sources. Among the onboard instruments there are four Wolter-I X-ray mirrors of their reflectors' figure in conical approximation. Two of the four are soft X-ray mirrors1, of which the energy range is from a few hundred eV to 15 keV within the effective aperture being defined by the nested reflectors' radius ranging between 5.8 cm to 22.5 cm. The focal point instruments will be a calorimeter (SXS) and a CCD camera (SXI), respectively. The mirrors were in quadrant configuration with photons being reflected consecutively in the primary and secondary stage before converging on the focal plane of 5.6 m away from the interface between the two stages. The reflectors of the mirror are made of heat-formed aluminum substrate of the thickness gauged of 152 μm, 229 μm, and 305 μm of the alloy 5052 H-19, followed by epoxy replication on gold-sputtered smooth Pyrex cylindrical mandrels to acquire the X-ray reflective surface. The epoxy layer is 10 m nominal and surface gold layer of 0.2 μm. Improvements on angular response over its predecessors, e.g. Astro-E1/Suzaku mirrors, come from error reduction on the figure, the roundness, and the grazing angle/radius mismatching of the reflecting surface, and tighter specs and mechanical strength on supporting structure to reduce the reflector positioning and the assembly errors. Each soft x-ray telescope (SXT), SXT-1 or SXT-2, were integrated from four independent quadrants of mirrors. The stray-light baffles, in quadrant configuration, were mounted onto the integrated mirror. Thermal control units were attached to the perimeter of the integrated mirror to keep the mirror within operating temperature in space. The completed instrument went through a series of optical alignment, thus made the quadrant images confocal and their optical axes in parallel to achieve highest throughput possible. Environmental tests

  12. Soft X-ray measurements in magnetic fusion plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botrugno, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Mazon, D.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.

    2010-11-01

    Soft X-ray diagnostic systems and their successful application in the field of magnetic fusion plasma physics are discussed. Radiation with wavelength in the region of Soft X-Ray (1-30 keV) is largely produced by high temperature plasmas, carrying important information on many processes during a plasma discharge. Soft X-ray diagnostics are largely used in various fusion devices all over the world. These diagnostic systems are able to obtain information on electron temperature, electron density, impurity transport, Magneto Hydro Dynamic instabilities. We will discuss the SXR diagnostic installed on FTU in Frascati (Italy) and on Tore Supra in Cadarache (France), with special emphasis on diagnostic performances. Moreover, we will discuss the two different inversion methods for tomographic reconstruction used in Frascati and in Cadarache, the first one is relied on a guessed topology of iso-emissivity surfaces, the second one on regularization techniques, like minimum Fisher or maximum entropy. Finally, a new and very fast 2D imaging system with energy discrimination and high time resolution will be summarized as an alternative approach of SXR detection system.

  13. Tokamak T-10 soft x-ray imaging diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovskij, G. A.; Kislov, D. A.; Lyadina, E. S.; Savrukhin, P. V.

    1991-04-01

    Three arrays of silicon surface-barrier diodes were recently installed on T-10 (R=1.5 m, a=0.3 m). The detectors view the plasma cross section along 58 chords spaced in the poloidal direction at one toroidal location. The tomographic reconstruction technique allows one to obtain the time evolution of the two-dimensional soft x-ray intensity profiles in the energy range of 2.5-15 keV. The field of view covered the main part of the plasma (r/a<0.7) with a spatial resolution as small as 2 cm, which is consistent with the scale of the processes under study. The signals are digitized at rates up to 100 kHz and stored in 464K (total) memory (8K per channel). The measured soft x-ray emission was applicable for investigation of the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, heat and particle transport, and plasma position control. Studies of the evolution of soft x-ray perturbations were made in ohmically and ECRH heated plasmas. It was shown that the effect of ECRH on the plasma parameters (transport coefficients, sawtooth activity, modification of the electron temperature profiles) depends on the position of the EC resonance zone within the plasma cross section. The tomographic reconstruction revealed the different mechanisms of sawtooth crashes in the T-10 plasma.

  14. Soft x ray properties of the Geminga pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Ruderman, M.

    1993-01-01

    The ROSAT soft x ray spectrum and pulse profile of the Geminga pulsar are analyzed and interpreted in terms of thermal emission from the surface of the neutron star. The x ray spectrum appears to consist of two blackbody components with T(sub 1) = (5.2 +/- 1.0) x 10 (exp 5) K and T(sub 2) approximately 3 x 10(exp 6) K, respectively. The inferred ratio of surface areas, A(sub 2)/A(sub 1), is approximately 3 x 10(exp -5). Both components are highly modulated at the pulsar rotation period, but the harder x ray pulse is narrower, and leads the main (soft) x ray pulse by about 105 deg of phase. The soft x ray component is interpreted as photospheric cooling of much of the neutron star's surface area, while the small, hot region could be part of the much smaller polar cap heated by energetic particles flowing inward from the magnetospheric accelerator which is responsible for the production of Geminga's gamma rays. Geminga's gamma ray emission is consistent with outer-magnetosphere accelerator models for highly inclined dipoles. These predict the beaming of energetic gamma rays close enough to the star to give copious e(+/-) production in the stellar magnetic field and a large circumstellar pair density from pair inflow toward the surface. These pairs may quench radio emission, and also reflect most of the hard polar cap x rays back to the stellar surface by cyclotron resonance scattering. They are then reemitted from that much larger area at the lower temperature T(sub 1). The single-peaked nature of the x ray pulse and its energy-dependent phase suggest an off-center dipole geometry for the surface magnetic field. Under the assumption that the soft x ray emission comes from the full surface of a neutron star of radius R = 10 km, a distance estimate of (150-400) pc is derived. This range is consistent with the fit interstellar column density of (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 20) cm(exp -2). Distances less than 150 pc are probably ruled out both by the lower limit on the column

  15. X-ray microscopy of soft and hard human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bert; Schulz, Georg; Deyhle, Hans; Stalder, Anja K.; Ilgenstein, Bernd; Holme, Margaret N.; Weitkamp, Timm; Beckmann, Felix; Hieber, Simone E.

    2016-01-01

    The simultaneous post mortem visualization of soft and hard tissues using absorption-based CT remains a challenge. If the photon energy is optimized for the visualization of hard tissue, the surrounding soft tissue components are almost X-ray transparent. Therefore, the combination with other modalities such as phase-contrast CT, magnetic resonance microscopy, and histology is essential to detect the anatomical features. The combination of the 2D and 3D data sets using sophisticated segmentation and registration tools allows for conclusions about otherwise inaccessible anatomical features essential for improved patient treatments.

  16. Anomalous X-ray diffraction with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, P; Berthet-Colominas, C; Capitan, M; Chesne, M L; Fanchon, E; Lequien, S; Stuhrmann, H; Thiaudière, D; Vicat, J; Zielinski, P; Kahn, R

    2000-07-01

    Anomalous diffraction with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation opens new possibilities in protein crystallography and materials science. Low-Z elements like silicon, phosphorus, sulfur and chlorine become accessible as new labels in structural studies. Some of the heavy elements like uranium exhibit an unusually strong dispersion at their M(V) absorption edge (lambdaMV = 3.497 A, E(MV) = 3545 eV) and so does thorium. Two different test experiments are reported here showing the feasibility of anomalous X-ray diffraction at long wavelengths with a protein containing uranium and with a salt containing chlorine atoms. With 110 electrons the anomalous scattering amplitude of uranium exceeds by a factor of 4 the resonance scattering of other strong anomalous scatterers like that of the lanthanides at their L(III) edge. The resulting exceptional phasing power of uranium is most attractive in protein crystallography using the multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method. The anomalous dispersion of an uranium derivative of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (hexagonal unit cell; a = 123.4 A, c = 124.4 A) has been measured for the first time at 4 wavelengths near the M(V) edge using the beamline ID1 of ESRF (Grenoble, France). The present set up allowed to measure only 30% of the possible reflections at a resolution of 4 A, mainly because of the low sensitivity of the CCD detector. In the second experiment, the dispersion of the intensity of 5 X-ray diffraction peaks from pentakismethylammonium undecachlorodibismuthate (PMACB, orthorhombic unit cell; a = 13.003 A, b = 14.038 A, c = 15.450 A) has been measured at 30 wavelengths near the K absorption edge of chlorine (lambdaK = 4.397 A, EK= 2819.6 eV). All reflections within the resolution range from 6.4 A to 3.4 A expected in the 20 degree scan were observed. The chemical state varies between different chlorine atoms of PMACB, and so does the dispersion of different Bragg peaks near the K-edge of chlorine. The results reflect

  17. Soft x-ray holography and microscopy of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwen; Gao, Hongyi; Xie, Honglan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2003-10-01

    Some experimental results on soft X-ray microscopy and holography imaging of biological specimens are presented in the paper. As we know, due to diffraction effects, there exists a resolution limit determined by wavelength λ and numerical aperture NA in conventional optical microscopy. In order to improve resolution, the num erical aperture should be made as large as possible and the wavelength as short as possible. Owing to the shorter wavelength, X-rays provide the potential of higher resolution in X-ray microscopy, holography image and allow for exam ination the interior structures of thicker specimens. In the experiments, we used synchrotron radiation source in Hefei as light source. Soft X-rays come from a bending magnet in 800 M eV electron storage ring with characteristic wavelength of 2.4 nm. The continuous X-ray spectrums are monochromatized by a zone-plate and a pinhole with 300 m diameter. The experimental set-up is typical contact microscopic system, its main advantage is simplicity and no special optical element is needed. The specimens used in the experiments of microscopic imaging are the colibacillus, the gingko vascular hundle and the fritillaries ovary karyon. The specimen for holographic imaging is the spider filam ents. The basic structures of plant cells such as the cell walls, the cytoplasm and the karyon especially the joint structures between the cells are observed clearly. An experimental study on a thick biological specimen that is a whole sporule w ith the thickness of about 30 μm is performed. In the holographic experiments, the experimental setup is typical Gabor in-line holography. The specimen is placed in line with X-ray source, which provides both the reference w aves and specimen illum ination. The specimen is some spider filament, which adhere to a Si3N4 film. The recording medium is PM M A, which is placed at recording distance of about 400 μm from the specimen. The hologram s were reconstructed by digital method with 300 nm

  18. High energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering at the SRI-CAT

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.T.

    1996-08-01

    This report is a combination of vugraphs and two papers. The vugraphs give information on the beamline at the APS for IXS and the science addressable by IXS. They also cover the 10 milli-eV resolution spectrometer and the 200 milli-eV resolution spectrometer. The first paper covers the performance of the focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for the inelastic x-ray scattering. The second paper discusses inelastic x-ray scattering from TiC and Ti single crystals.

  19. The soft X-ray turnoff of Nova Muscae 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanley, L.; Ogelman, H.; Gallagher, J. S.; Orio, M.; Krautter, J.

    1995-01-01

    Nova GQ Muscae 1983 was detected by ROSAT as a luminous 'supersoft' X-ray source in 1992, nearly a decade after outburst. Further, this is the only classical postnova known to have maintained constant luminosity on a timescale predicted by theoretical models. Follow-up observations were made with the ROSAT position-sensitive proportional counter in 1993 January and September, and complemented with B-band photometry taken in 1993 January. By 1993 January, the X-ray count rate had declined by a factor of 17, while there was neither an appreciable decrease in the optical magnitude nor a change in the amplitude of modulation. In 1993 September the soft X-ray flux was below the ROSAT threshold limit, implying a decrease of a factor greater than or equal to 30 in the count rate. This decline can be interpreted by the turnoff of nuclear processes due to the complete consumption of the residual hydrogen-rich envelope. However, the optical luminosity of the system is not simply coupled to the X-ray luminosity (e.g., through reprocessing).

  20. Coherent X-ray diffraction from collagenous soft tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Wenger, Marco P.E.; Bean, Richard J.; Bozec, Laurent; Horton, Michael A.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2009-09-11

    Coherent X-ray diffraction has been applied in the imaging of inorganic materials with great success. However, its application to biological specimens has been limited to some notable exceptions, due to the induced radiation damage and the extended nature of biological samples, the last limiting the application of most part of the phasing algorithms. X-ray ptychography, still under development, is a good candidate to overcome such difficulties and become a powerful imaging method for biology. We describe herein the feasibility of applying ptychography to the imaging of biological specimens, in particular collagen rich samples. We report here speckles in diffraction patterns from soft animal tissue, obtained with an optimized small angle X-ray setup that exploits the natural coherence of the beam. By phasing these patterns, dark field images of collagen within tendon, skin, bone, or cornea will eventually be obtained with a resolution of 60-70 nm. We present simulations of the contrast mechanism in collagen based on atomic force microscope images of the samples. Simulations confirmed the 'speckled' nature of the obtained diffraction patterns. Once inverted, the patterns will show the disposition and orientation of the fibers within the tissue, by enhancing the phase contrast between protein and no protein regions of the sample. Our work affords the application of the most innovative coherent X-ray diffraction tools to the study of biological specimens, and this approach will have a significant impact in biology and medicine because it overcomes many of the limits of current microscopy techniques.

  1. The superconducting high-resolution soft X-ray spectrometer at the advanced biological and environmental X-ray facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, S.; Drury, O. B.; George, S. J.; Cramer, S. P.

    2007-11-01

    We have built a 36-pixel superconducting tunnel junction X-ray spectrometer for chemical analysis of dilute samples in the soft X-ray band. It offers an energy resolution of ˜10-20 eV FWHM below 1 keV, a solid angle coverage of ˜10 -3, and can be operated at total rates of up to ˜10 6 counts/s. Here, we describe the spectrometer performance in speciation measurements by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Advanced Biological and Environmental X-ray facility at the ALS synchrotron.

  2. Focusing polycapillary to reduce parasitic scattering for inelastic x-ray measurements at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, P. Xiao, Y. M.; Rod, E.; Bai, L. G.; Shen, G. Y.; Sinogeikin, S.; Gao, N.; Ding, Y.; Mao, H.-K.

    2015-07-15

    The double-differential scattering cross-section for the inelastic scattering of x-ray photons from electrons is typically orders of magnitude smaller than that of elastic scattering. With samples 10-100 μm size in a diamond anvil cell at high pressure, the inelastic x-ray scattering signals from samples are obscured by scattering from the cell gasket and diamonds. One major experimental challenge is to measure a clean inelastic signal from the sample in a diamond anvil cell. Among the many strategies for doing this, we have used a focusing polycapillary as a post-sample optic, which allows essentially only scattered photons within its input field of view to be refocused and transmitted to the backscattering energy analyzer of the spectrometer. We describe the modified inelastic x-ray spectrometer and its alignment. With a focused incident beam which matches the sample size and the field of view of polycapillary, at relatively large scattering angles, the polycapillary effectively reduces parasitic scattering from the diamond anvil cell gasket and diamonds. Raw data collected from the helium exciton measured by x-ray inelastic scattering at high pressure using the polycapillary method are compared with those using conventional post-sample slit collimation.

  3. Discovery of hard X-ray outbursts from the soft X-ray transient Aquila X-1.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, B. A.; Wilson, C. A.; Tavani, M.; Zhang, S. N.; Rubin, B. C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Ford, E. C.; Kaaret, P.

    1996-11-01

    We report the BATSE discovery of hard X-ray outbursts from the soft X-ray transient Aquila X-1 (Aql X-1). Aql X-1 is the most prolific of the soft X-ray transient sources and it has been known to produce large outbursts near the Eddington limit in the 1-10keV energy band. The typical recurrence time of outbursts is about 1-year. Aql X-1 shows type I X-ray bursts during the decay phase of the X-ray outbursts and is believed to contain a neutron star. These characteristics of Aql X-1 make it an ideal system to study time variable hard X-ray emission from accreting neutron stars. BATSE has monitored Aql X-1 continuously since the Compton Observatory mission began in April 1991. Several episodes of hard X-ray emission with durations of weeks to months have been detected in 1991-1994. These episodes are coincident with substantial brightening of the optical counterpart and to a lesser degree with observations of soft X-ray emission by ROSAT, EURECA/WATCH and ASCA. We find fluxes in the 20-100mCrab range with hard spectra extending to above 100keV and power law spectral fits yielding photon indices between -2 and -3.

  4. Soft x-ray coherent diffraction imaging on magnetic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaowen; Lee, James; Mishra, Shrawan; Parks, Daniel; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Shapiro, David; Roy, Sujoy; Kevan, Steve; Stxm Team At Als Collaboration; Soft X-Ray Microscopy Group At Als Collaboration; Soft X-ray scattering at ALS, LBL Team

    2014-03-01

    Coherent soft X-rays diffraction imaging enable coherent magnetic resonance scattering at transition metal L-edge to be probed so that magnetic domains could be imaged with very high spatial resolution with phase contrast, reaching sub-10nm. One of the overwhelming advantages of using coherent X-rays is the ability to resolve phase contrast images with linearly polarized light with both phase and absorption contrast comparing to real-space imaging, which can only be studied with circularly polarized light with absorption contrast only. Here we report our first results on high-resolution of magnetic domains imaging of CoPd multilayer thin film with coherent soft X-ray ptychography method. We are aiming to resolve and understand magnetic domain wall structures with the highest obtainable resolution here at Advanced Light Source. In principle types of magnetic domain walls could be studied so that Neel or Bloch walls can be distinguished by imaging. This work at LBNL was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy (contract no. DE-AC02- 05CH11231).

  5. Soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) of actinide particles.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Hans J; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Wilson, Richard E; Werme, Lars; Shuh, David K

    2005-09-01

    A descriptive account is given of our most recent research on the actinide dioxides with the Advanced Light Source Molecular Environmental Science (ALS-MES) Beamline 11.0.2 soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The ALS-MES STXM permits near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and imaging with 30-nm spatial resolution. The first STXM spectromicroscopy NEXAFS spectra at the actinide 4d5/2 edges of the imaged transuranic particles, NpO2 and PuO2, have been obtained. Radiation damage induced by the STXM was observed in the investigation of a mixed oxidation state particle (Np(V,VI)) and was minimized during collection of the actual spectra at the 4d5/2 edge of the Np(V,VI) solid. A plutonium elemental map was obtained from an irregular PuO2 particle with the dimensions of 650 x 650 nm. The Pu 4d5/2 NEXAFS spectra were collected at several different locations from the PuO2 particle and were identical. A representative oxygen K-edge spectrum from UO2 was collected and resembles the oxygen K-edge from the bulk material. The unique and current performance of the ALS-MES STXM at extremely low energies (ca. 100 eV) that may permit the successful measurement of the actinide 5d edge is documented. Finally, the potential of STXM as a tool for actinide investigations is briefly discussed. PMID:16021423

  6. ASTRO-H Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos, Peter J.; Okajima, Takashi; Hahne, Devin

    2011-09-01

    ASTRO-H is an astrophysics satellite dedicated for X-ray spectroscopic study non-dispersively and to carry out survey complementally, which will be borne out of US-Japanese collaborative effort. Among the onboard instruments there are four conically approximated Wolter-I X-ray mirrors, among which two of them are soft X-ray mirrors1, of which the energy range is from a few hundred eV to 15 keV, currently being fabricated in the X-ray Optics Lab at Goddard Space Flight Center. The focal point instruments will be a calorimeter (SXS) and a CCD camera (SXI), respectively. The reflectors of the mirror are made of heat-formed aluminum substrate of the thickness gauged of 152 μm, 229 μm, and 305 μm of the alloy 5052 H-19, followed by epoxy replication on gold-sputtered smooth Pyrex cylindrical mandrels to acquire the X-ray reflective surface. The epoxy layer is 10 μm nominal and surface gold layer of 0.2 μm. Improvements on angular response over the Astro-E1/Suzaku mirrors come from error reduction on the figure, the roundness, and the grazing angle/radius mismatching of the reflecting surface, and tighter specs and mechanical strength on supporting structure to reduce the reflector positioning and the assembly errors. In this paper, we report the results of calibration of the engineering model of SXT (EM), and project the quality of the flight mirrors.

  7. A Soft X-ray Spectrometer using a Highly Dispersive Multilayer Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard; Voronov, Dmitriy; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2010-01-31

    There is a need for higher resolution spectrometers as a tool for inelastic x-ray scattering. Currently, resolving power around R = 10,000 is advertised. Measured RIXS spectra are often limited by this instrumental resolution and higher resolution spectrometers using conventional gratings would be prohibitively large. We are engaged in a development program to build blazed multilayer grating structures for diffracting soft x-rays in high order. This leads to spectrometers with dispersion much higher than is possible using metal coated-gratings. The higher dispersion then provides higher resolution and the multilayer gratings are capable of operating away from grazing incidence as required. A spectrometer design is presented with a total length 3.8m and capable of 10{sup 5} resolving power.

  8. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of solar flares - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the current status of high spectral resolution soft X-ray observations of solar flares is given. The review concentrates primarily on recent results and interpretations of results obtained from orbiting Bragg crystal spectrometers flow during the last solar maximum on the US DoD P78-1 spacecraft, the NASA SMM, and the ISAS Hinotori spacecraft. Results and several key issues regarding interpretation of the spectra are presented. Specifically, the dynamics of coronal flare plasmas as revealed by X-ray line profiles and wavelength shifts are discussed. Recent results concerning the theory of chromospheric evaporation are given. The temperature of coronal flare plasma is discussed within the context of a differential mission measure. Results concerning electron density measurements, nonequilibrium processes, and relative element abundances are also reviewed.

  9. Demonstration of ultra high resolution soft x-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, W. S.; McNulty, I.; Trebes, J. E.; Anderson, E. H.; Yang, L.; Brase, J. M.

    1995-05-01

    Ultra high resolution three dimensional images of a microscopic test object were made with soft x-rays using a scanning transmission x-ray microscope. The test object consisted of two different patterns of gold bars on silicon nitride windows which were separated by ˜ 5μm. Depth resolution comparable to the transverse resolution was achieved by recording nine 2-D images of the object at angles between -50 to +55 degrees with respect to the beam axis. The projections were then combined tomographically to form a 3-D image using an algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) algorithm. We observed a transverse resolution of ˜1000 Å. Artifacts in the reconstruction limited the overall depth resolution to ˜6000 Å, however some features were clearly reconstructed with a depth resolution of ˜1000 Å.

  10. Soft X-ray FEL simulation in PAL-XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Chi Hyun; Ko, In Soo; Parc, Yong Woon; Han, Jang Hui

    2015-10-01

    The soft X-ray beamline in the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL) will provide a photon beam with a wavelength from 1 nm to 3 nm in the self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mode by using an electron beam with a 3.15-GeV beam energy. Linearly polarized radiation will be supplied by using six planar undulators (PUs). The linearly-polarized radiation powers at 1 (3) nm can reach 10.2 (30) GW. Polarization of the radiation will be controlled by applying the reverse undulator tapering scheme to the PUs and adding two helical undulators (HUs). The circularly-polarized radiation powers at 1 (3) nm will be 3.11 (11.73) GW. The degrees of circular polarization will be larger than 0.99 for both wavelengths. Three options for the future upgrade of the beamline to increase the radiation power are proposed.

  11. Goldhelox: a soft x-ray solar telescope.

    PubMed

    Durfee, D S; Moody, J W; Brady, K D; Brown, C; Campbell, B; Durfee, M K; Early, D; Hansen, E; Madsen, D W; Morey, D B; Roming, P W; Savage, M B; Eastman, P F; Jensen, V

    1995-01-01

    The Goldhelox Project is the construction and use of a near-normal incidence soft x-ray robotic solar telescope by undergraduate students at Brigham Young University. Once it is completed and tested, it will be deployed from a Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister in the bay of a space shuttle. It will image the sun at a wavelength of 171-181Å with a time resolution of 1 sec and a spatial resolution of 2.5 arcsec. The observational bandpass was chosen to image x-rays from highly ionized coronal Fe lines. The data will be an aid in better understanding the beginning phases of solar flares and how flaring relates to the physics of the corona-chromosphere transition region. Goldhelox is tentatively scheduled to fly on a space shuttle sometime in 1995 or 1996. This paper outlines the project goals, basic instrument design, and the unique aspects of making this an undergraduate endeavor. PMID:21307474

  12. Disentangling AGN and Star Formation in Soft X-Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-01-01

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF)) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF))from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L(sub x,AGN) and L(sub x,SF) derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3sigma confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne ii]12.8 micron and [O iv]26 micron lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L(sub x,SF) and L(sub x,AGN) at the 3 sigma level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  13. DISENTANGLING AGN AND STAR FORMATION IN SOFT X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2012-10-20

    We have explored the interplay of star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in soft X-rays (0.5-2 keV) in two samples of Seyfert 2 galaxies (Sy2s). Using a combination of low-resolution CCD spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton, we modeled the soft emission of 34 Sy2s using power-law and thermal models. For the 11 sources with high signal-to-noise Chandra imaging of the diffuse host galaxy emission, we estimate the luminosity due to star formation by removing the AGN, fitting the residual emission. The AGN and star formation contributions to the soft X-ray luminosity (i.e., L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF}) for the remaining 24 Sy2s were estimated from the power-law and thermal luminosities derived from spectral fitting. These luminosities were scaled based on a template derived from XSINGS analysis of normal star-forming galaxies. To account for errors in the luminosities derived from spectral fitting and the spread in the scaling factor, we estimated L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} from Monte Carlo simulations. These simulated luminosities agree with L{sub x,AGN} and L{sub x,SF} derived from Chandra imaging analysis within a 3{sigma} confidence level. Using the infrared [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m and [O IV]26 {mu}m lines as a proxy of star formation and AGN activity, respectively, we independently disentangle the contributions of these two processes to the total soft X-ray emission. This decomposition generally agrees with L{sub x,SF} and L{sub x,AGN} at the 3{sigma} level. In the absence of resolvable nuclear emission, our decomposition method provides a reasonable estimate of emission due to star formation in galaxies hosting type 2 AGNs.

  14. Soft x-ray resist characterization: Studies with a laser plasma x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, G.D.; Outka, D.A. ); Zeigler, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Little work has been performed to characterize the exposure sensitivity, contrast, and tone of candidate resists for photon energies between 100--300 eV, the range in which projection soft x-ray lithography will be developed. We report here the characterization of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, exposure sensitivity, contrast, and post-exposure processing of selected polysilane resists at photon energies close to the Si L{sub 2,3} absorption edge (100 eV). We find absorption resonance features in the NEXAFS spectra which we assign to excitation into Si--Si and Si--C {sigma}* orbitals. Using monochromatized XUV exposures on the Si--Si {sigma}* resonance at 105 eV, followed by solvent dissolution development, we have measured the exposure sensitivity curves of these resists. We find sensitivities in the range of 600--3000 mJ/cm{sup 2} and contrasts in the range from 0.5--1.4, depending on the polysilane side chain. We have also performed exposure sensitivity measurements at 92 eV, below the edge. Sensitivity decreases slightly compared to 105 eV exposures and the saturation depth and contrast both increase, as expected. We find also that exposing resist films to oxygen after XUV exposure, but before development increases the sensitivity markedly. 7 figs.

  15. Characterizing automotive fuel cell materials by soft x-ray scanning transmission x-ray microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitchcock, A. P.; Lee, V.; Wu, J.; West, M. M.; Cooper, G.; Berejnov, V.; Soboleva, T.; Susac, D.; Stumper, J.

    2016-01-01

    Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEM-FC) based engines are being developed rapidly for near-term implementation in hydrogen fueled, mass production, personal automobiles. Research is focused on understanding and controlling various degradation processes (carbon corrosion, Pt migration, cold start), and reducing cost by reducing or eliminating Pt catalyst. We are using soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the S 2p, C 1s, O 1s and F 1s edges to study a variety of issues related to optimization of PEM-FC materials for automotive applications. A method to efficiently and accurately measure perfluorosulfonic acid distributions was developed and is being used to better understand how different loadings and preparation methods affect the ionomer distribution in the cathode. Progress towards an environmental cell capable of controlling the temperature and humidity of a PEM-FC sample in the STXM is described. Methods for studying the 3D chemical structure of PEM-FC are outlined.

  16. Heliospheric X-Rays and the 1/4 keV Soft X-Ray Background Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, I. P.; Cravens, T. E.; Snowden, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    X-rays are generated throughout the heliosphere as a consequence of charge transfer collisions between heavy solar wind ions and interstellar neutrals. The high charge state solar wind ions resulting from these collisions are left in highly excited states and emit extreme ultraviolet or soft x-ray photons. X-rays are also generated because of charge transfer collisions with neutral hydrogen in the Earth's geocorona. Our model simulates this charge transfer mechanism. It uses the Fahr hot model to determine spatial variations of interstellar helium and hydrogen densities. It also uses published terrestrial exospheric hydrogen distributions and solar wind speed, density and temperature distributions to determine x-ray intensities due to charge transfer with geocoronal hydrogen. We used the same viewing conditions as Snowden [1995] for the 1/4 keV channel soft x-ray background map in galactic coordinates, and produce an analogous heliospheric/geocoronal x-ray intensity map. Our preliminary conclusion is that roughly 50% of the total background soft x-ray intensity in the galactic plane and 25% at high galactic latitudes can be attributed to the charge transfer process operating within the solar system, with the remaining emission coming from outside our heliosphere.

  17. Soft X-ray Microscopy of Green Cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, P. J. M.; Mancio, M.; Kirchheim, A. P.; Chae, R.; Ha, J.; Fischer, P.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2011-09-01

    The present status of the cement and concrete industry is not sustainable. The production of Portland cement is responsible for 7% of the CO2 emissions in the world and existing reinforced concrete infrastructure is deteriorating at a fast pace. The change in the existing technology requires new developments in our understanding of the nanostructure of hydration products and the complex deterioration reactions. We have been developing an elaborate research program to advance the existing cement and concrete science by characterizing its nanostructure by synchrotron radiation. A new generation of green cements is being studied using high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy at the nano-level.

  18. Soft X-ray Microscopy of Green Cements

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, P. J. M.; Mancio, M.; Chae, R.; Ha, J.; Kirchheim, A. P.; Fischer, P.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2011-09-09

    The present status of the cement and concrete industry is not sustainable. The production of Portland cement is responsible for 7% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the world and existing reinforced concrete infrastructure is deteriorating at a fast pace. The change in the existing technology requires new developments in our understanding of the nanostructure of hydration products and the complex deterioration reactions. We have been developing an elaborate research program to advance the existing cement and concrete science by characterizing its nanostructure by synchrotron radiation. A new generation of green cements is being studied using high-resolution soft x-ray microscopy at the nano-level.

  19. A wide-field soft X-ray camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, R.

    1981-01-01

    A wide-field soft X-ray camera (WFSXC) sensitive in the 50 to 250 eV band is described. The camera features Wolter-Schwarzschild optics with an 8 degree field of view and 300 cu cu collecting area. The focal plane instrument is a microchannel plate detector. Broad-band energy discrimination is provided by thin-film filters mounted immediately in front of the focal plane. The WFSXC is capable of detecting sources with intensities greater than 5 percent of HZ 43 during typical sounding rocket exposures, and it would approach the same sensitivity range as EUVE during a typical exposure from the Shuttle.

  20. Advanced laser driver for soft x-ray projection lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Beach, R.J.; Dane, C.B.; Reichert, P.; Honig, J.N.; Hackel, L.A.

    1994-03-01

    A diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser for use as a driver for a soft x-ray projection lithography system is described. The laser will output 0.5 to 1 J per pulse with about 5 ns pulse width at up to 1.5 kHz repetition frequency. The design employs microchannel-cooled diode laser arrays for optical pumping, zigzag slab energy storage, and a single frequency oscillator injected regenerative amplifier cavity using phase conjugator beam correction for near diffraction limited beam quality. The design and initial results of this laser`s activation experiments will be presented.

  1. Soft X-ray microscopy to characterize polyelectrolyte assemblies.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Karen; Déjugnat, Christophe; Dubois, Monique; Zemb, Thomas; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Guttmann, Peter; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2007-07-26

    Transmission microscopy with soft X-rays (TXM) is applied to image in-situ polyelectrolyte assemblies in aqueous environment. The method is element specific and at this stage exhibits a lateral resolution of 20 nm. With the specific examples of hollow capsules and full spheres made of PAH/PSS polyelectrolyte multilayers, it is shown quantitatively that heat treatment irreversibly reduces the water content in the membrane. These experiments complement those reported recently on the polyion system PDADMAC/PSS, which shows a different glass-transition behavior. Finally, the potential and present limitations of TXM are discussed. PMID:17428089

  2. Imaging the Magnetosphere in Soft X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibeck, David; Connor, Hyunju K.; Collier, MIchael; Kuntz, Kip

    2015-04-01

    The charge exchange that occurs when high charge state solar wind ions encounter exospheric neutrals in the Earth's magnetosheath and cusps results in the emission of soft (0.1 to 1 keV) x-rays that have been observed by a number of astrophysics telescopes with narrow fields of view. A global imager would be able to visualize and diagnose the state of the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction, including the characteristics of reconnection on the dayside magnetopause. This talk presents our current efforts to develop such an imager, including both hardware and simulations of the expected signatures.

  3. Synoptic IPS and Yohkoh soft X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.; Rappoport, S.; Woan, G.; Slater, G.; Strong, K.; Uchida, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation measurements of the disturbance factor, g, from October 1991 to October 1992 are used to construct synoptic Carrington maps. These maps, which show the structure of the quiet solar wind, are compared with X-ray Carrington maps from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) instrument. For the period studied the global structure outlined by (weakly) enhanced g-values apparent in the interplanetary scintillation (IPS) maps tend to match the active regions (as shown in the X-ray maps) significantly better than the heliospheric current sheet. Contrary to traditional opinion, which views active regions as magnetically closed structures that do not have any significant impact on the solar wind flow, our results suggest that density fluctuations in the solar wind are significantly enhanced over active regions. These results support the suggestion by Uchida et al. (1992), based on Yohkoh observations of expanding active regions, that active regions play a role in feeding mass into the quiet solar wind.

  4. The Astro-H Soft X-Ray Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David; Okajima, Takashi; Serlemitsos, Peter; Soong, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The Astro-H is led by the Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) in collaboration with many other institutions including the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Goddard's contributions include two soft X-ray telescopes (SXTs). The telescopes have an effective area of 562 square cm at 1 keV and 425 square cm at 6 keV with an image quality requirement of 1.7 arc-minutes half power diameter (HPD). The engineering model has demonstrated 1.1 arc-minutes HPD error. The design of the SXT is based on the successful Suzaku mission mirrors with some enhancements to improve the image quality. Two major enhancements are bonding the X-ray mirror foils to alignment bars instead of allowing the mirrors to float, and fabricating alignment bars with grooves within 5 microns of accuracy. An engineering model SXT was recently built and subjected to several tests including vibration, thermal, and X-ray performance in a beamline. Several lessons were learned during this testing that will be incorporated in the flight design. Test results and optical performance are discussed, along with a description of the design of the SXT.

  5. OSO-8 soft X-ray wheel experiment: Data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraushaar, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The soft X-ray experiment hardware and its operation are described. The device included six X-ray proportional counters, two of which, numbers 1 and 4, were pressurized with on-board methane gas supplies. Number 4 developed an excessive leak rate early in the mission and was turned off on 1975 day number 282 except for brief (typically 2-hour) periods up to day 585 after which it as left off. Counter 1 worked satisfactorily until 1975 day number 1095 (January 1, 1978) at which time the on-board methane supply was depleted. The other four counters were sealed and all except number 3 worked satisfactorily throughout the mission which terminated with permanent satellie shut-down on day 1369. This was the first large area thin-window, gas-flow X-ray detector to be flown in orbit. The background problems were severe and consumed a very large portion of the data analysis effort. These background problems were associated with the Earth's trapped electron belts.

  6. OSO-8 soft X-ray wheel experiment: Data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraushaar, W. L.

    The soft X-ray experiment hardware and its operation are described. The device included six X-ray proportional counters, two of which, numbers 1 and 4, were pressurized with on-board methane gas supplies. Number 4 developed an excessive leak rate early in the mission and was turned off on 1975 day number 282 except for brief (typically 2-hour) periods up to day 585 after which it as left off. Counter 1 worked satisfactorily until 1975 day number 1095 (January 1, 1978) at which time the on-board methane supply was depleted. The other four counters were sealed and all except number 3 worked satisfactorily throughout the mission which terminated with permanent satellie shut-down on day 1369. This was the first large area thin-window, gas-flow X-ray detector to be flown in orbit. The background problems were severe and consumed a very large portion of the data analysis effort. These background problems were associated with the Earth's trapped electron belts.

  7. The Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. Scott; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Mitsuda, Kazuhiasa; Ohashi, Takaya; Astro-H/SXS Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    The Soft-X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is a high spectral resolution, cryogenic x-ray spectrometer that will fly on the Japan/U.S. Astro-H observatory in 2014. The SXS is composed of a 36 pixel, imaging, x-ray calorimeter array that will operate at 0.05 K utilizing a 2-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator and a redundant pre-cooler design using both a 40 liter liquid helium tank and a 1.7 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Additional redundant Stirling cycle coolers provide pre-cooling for the (JT) and cool the outer thermal shields for the JT and the helium tank. The detector system, while similar to that flown on Suzaku, is composed of larger 0.81×0.81mm pixels, but has significantly better performance, currently predicted to be better than 4 eV FWHM at 6 keV with 95% quantum efficiency. This instrument is the result of a close collaboration between many institutions in the U.S. and Japan over the last 25 years. Here we will present an overview of the SXS instrument, the SXS cooling system, and recent laboratory improvements to the detector system.

  8. The Astro-H Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS)

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, F. Scott; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Mitsuda, Kazuhiasa; Ohashi, Takaya

    2009-12-16

    The Soft-X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is a high spectral resolution, cryogenic x-ray spectrometer that will fly on the Japan/U.S. Astro-H observatory in 2014. The SXS is composed of a 36 pixel, imaging, x-ray calorimeter array that will operate at 0.05 K utilizing a 2-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator and a redundant pre-cooler design using both a 40 liter liquid helium tank and a 1.7 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Additional redundant Stirling cycle coolers provide pre-cooling for the (JT) and cool the outer thermal shields for the JT and the helium tank. The detector system, while similar to that flown on Suzaku, is composed of larger 0.81x0.81mm pixels, but has significantly better performance, currently predicted to be better than 4 eV FWHM at 6 keV with 95% quantum efficiency. This instrument is the result of a close collaboration between many institutions in the U.S. and Japan over the last 25 years. Here we will present an overview of the SXS instrument, the SXS cooling system, and recent laboratory improvements to the detector system.0.

  9. Comparison of hard and soft x-ray photoelectron spectra of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offi, F.; Werner, W. S. M.; Sacchi, M.; Torelli, P.; Cautero, M.; Cautero, G.; Fondacaro, A.; Huotari, S.; Monaco, G.; Paolicelli, G.; Smekal, W.; Stefani, G.; Panaccione, G.

    2007-08-01

    A detailed comparison of the surface sensitivity of x-ray photoemission spectroscopy for hard and soft x rays is presented and discussed. Electron scattering parameters and their energy dependence are given for Si and two Si spectra are analyzed: a MgKα (hν=1253.6eV) excited spectrum of the Si2p and 2s lines and a hard x-ray excited spectrum (hν=5925eV) of the Si1s line. The differential inelastic scattering characteristics for Si are extracted from reflection electron energy loss spectra taken at energies of 1500 and 4000eV . Using these scattering characteristics and electron mean free paths from the literature, simulated spectra are compared with experiment. The experimental spectra are deconvoluted to give the true intrinsic line shape corresponding to the theoretical collision statistics when interference effects between intrinsic and extrinsic scattering are neglected. The magnitude of interference effects cannot be assessed by our analysis. Within the (unknown) uncertainty introduced by neglecting interference effects, it is possible to determine the relative intensity of intrinsic and extrinsic excitations. In this way, it is found that in the case of the soft x-ray excited photoelectron spectrum of the shallower electronic shells ( 2p and 2s ), intrinsic plasmon creation is rather weak, and the apparent asymmetric line shape of the spectrum might be interpreted as the fact that electron-hole pair creation dominates the intrinsic loss spectrum, while an alternative explanation in terms of surface core level shifted components is also proposed. For the deeper core electronic shell, probed with hard x rays, the opposite situation is observed: while intrinsic electron-hole pair creation was not observed, a strong contribution of intrinsic plasmon losses of about 30% was seen.

  10. Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J G

    2011-03-17

    The subjects of discussion included: VUV photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy, Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy, Inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, Low energy IPES, Resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy.

  11. Inelastic x-ray scattering at modest energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K. D.; Tischler, J. Z.; Larson, B. C.

    1997-07-01

    We report results from the development of an inelastic scattering spectrometer designed to take advantage of high energy synchrotron radiation available at CHESS. The device allows a large increase of the effective scattering volume in the sample by permitting measurements to be made in an energy range up to 25 KeV. The highest useable energy appears limited by the efficiency of the analyzers under consideration. At 20 KeV a novel 4-bounce, sagittal focusing monochromator passes 10e11 photons/second with Darwin width limited energy resolution. In the scattering plane, the monochromator images the electron beam producing a small scattering source for the analyzing optics. Analyzer systems under study include a cooled mosaic crystal in para-focusing geometry, and an adjustable spherically bent silicon crystal respectively for parallel and point-by-point collection of the energy loss spectrum. This paper discusses the optical configurations presents results from our early measurements and suggests directions for improvements.

  12. Molecular orientation in soft matter thin films studied by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Mezger, Markus; Jerome, Blandine; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Valvidares, Manuel; Gullikson, Eric; Giglia, Angelo; Mahne, Nicola; Nannarone, Stefano

    2011-01-12

    We present a technique to study depth profiles of molecular orientation in soft matter thin films with nanometer resolution. The method is based on dichroism in resonant soft X-ray reflectivity using linear s- and p-polarization. It combines the chemical sensitivity of Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to specific molecular bonds and their orientation relative to the polarization of the incident beam with the precise depth profiling capability of X-ray reflectivity. We demonstrate these capabilities on side chain liquid crystalline polymer thin films with soft X-ray reflectivity data at the carbon K edge. Optical constants of the anisotropic refractive index ellipsoid were obtained from a quantitative analysis using the Berreman formalism. For films up to 50 nm thickness we find that the degree of orientation of the long axis exhibits no depth variation and isindependent of the film thickness.

  13. Soft x-ray spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure of organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng

    Organic semiconductors have several unique properties, different from traditional inorganic semiconductors, such as flexibility and low cost production on a large scale. Potentially, they can be used in several new optoelectronic devices, such as organic solar cells, and organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) Phthalocyanines (Pc's) are one important type of molecular organic semiconductor. The ease with which a diverse set of cations can bond to the phthalocyanine ligand leads to Pc-based thin films that display a wide variety of optical and electrical properties. In these materials, the ligand has a complex electronic structure in itself, and the introduction of metal cations adds further complexity to the states near the Fermi level (EF) due to the overlap of metal d states with carbon and nitrogen 2p states. In this thesis, the electronic structure of several Pc's has been studied by soft x-ray spectroscopies, such as x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). To avoid potential contamination and beam damage, the large area thin film samples have been prepared in situ by using organic molecular beam deposition (OMBD). The structure of samples were characterized ex situ by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The soft x-ray spectra recorded from stationary samples are found to represent the electronic structure from damaged molecules, which is caused by intense x-ray beams. Continuously translating samples during measurement overcomes this problem. Element, chemical, and symmetry specific occupied and unoccupied partial density of states (PDOS) from Pc's were observed. They show good agreement with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Studies of potassium doping non-transition metal Pc, fluorinated metal Pc, and metal oxide Pc's show several interesting phenomena, such as variation of molecular symmetry, and charge transfer and d-d* resonant inelastic x-ray

  14. Gain dynamics in a soft X-ray laser ampli er perturbed by a strong injected X-ray eld

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Wang, Shoujun; Oliva, E; Lu, L; Berrill, Mark A; Yin, Liang; Nejdl, J; Luther, Brad; Proux, C; Le, T. T.; Dunn, James; Ros, D; Zeitoun, Philippe; Rocca, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Seeding soft X-ray plasma ampli ers with high harmonics has been demonstrated to generate high-brightness soft X-ray laser pulses with full spatial and temporal coherence. The interaction between the injected coherent eld and the swept-gain medium has been modelled. However, no exper- iment has been conducted to probe the gain dynamics when perturbed by a strong external seed eld. Here, we report the rst X-ray pump X-ray probe measurement of the nonlinear response of a plasma ampli er perturbed by a strong soft X-ray ultra-short pulse. We injected a sequence of two time-delayed high-harmonic pulses (l518.9 nm) into a collisionally excited nickel-like molybdenum plasma to measure with femto-second resolution the gain depletion induced by the saturated ampli cation of the high-harmonic pump and its subsequent recovery. The measured fast gain recovery in 1.5 1.75 ps con rms the possibility to generate ultra-intense, fully phase-coherent soft X-ray lasers by chirped pulse ampli cation in plasma ampli ers.

  15. Opening the Field of Soft X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Herman L.; Schulz, Norbert; Windt, David; Gullikson, Eric

    2015-08-01

    We present development of a telescope for measuring linear X-ray polarization over the 0.2-0.8 keV band. We employ multilayer-coated mirrors as Bragg reflectors at the Brewster angle. By matching to the dispersion of a spectrometer, one may take advantage of high multilayer reflectivities and achieve polarization modulation factors over 90%. We have constructed a source of polarized X-rays that operates at a wide range of energies with a selectable polarization angle. Previously, we demonstrated that the polarimetry beam-line provides 100% polarized X-rays at 0.525 keV (Marshall et al. 2013). Recently, we upgraded the source by installing a mirror with a laterally graded multilayer (LGML) coating, providing a wide energy range. Here, we will present results from continued development that includes LGMls of new material combinations (C/CrCo and La/B4C) with high efficiencies in different soft X-ray bands. We have also sponsored the development of new gratings and anticipate showing results from testing these new gratings. Finally, we will present a design for a small telescope for suborbital or orbital missions. A suborbital mission would be limited to measuring the polarization of a blazar such as Mk 421 to a few percent while an orbital version could measure the polarizations of neutron stars, active galactic nuclei, and blazars.Support for this work was provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through grant NNX12AH12G and by Research Investment Grants from the MIT Kavli Institute.

  16. Coherent X-ray diffraction from collagenous soft tissues

    PubMed Central

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Wenger, Marco P. E.; Bean, Richard J.; Bozec, Laurent; Horton, Michael A.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2009-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction has been applied in the imaging of inorganic materials with great success. However, its application to biological specimens has been limited to some notable exceptions, due to the induced radiation damage and the extended nature of biological samples, the last limiting the application of most part of the phasing algorithms. X-ray ptychography, still under development, is a good candidate to overcome such difficulties and become a powerful imaging method for biology. We describe herein the feasibility of applying ptychography to the imaging of biological specimens, in particular collagen rich samples. We report here speckles in diffraction patterns from soft animal tissue, obtained with an optimized small angle X-ray setup that exploits the natural coherence of the beam. By phasing these patterns, dark field images of collagen within tendon, skin, bone, or cornea will eventually be obtained with a resolution of 60–70 nm. We present simulations of the contrast mechanism in collagen based on atomic force microscope images of the samples. Simulations confirmed the ‘speckled’ nature of the obtained diffraction patterns. Once inverted, the patterns will show the disposition and orientation of the fibers within the tissue, by enhancing the phase contrast between protein and no protein regions of the sample. Our work affords the application of the most innovative coherent X-ray diffraction tools to the study of biological specimens, and this approach will have a significant impact in biology and medicine because it overcomes many of the limits of current microscopy techniques. PMID:19706395

  17. UV and Soft X-ray Polar Coronal Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Raymond, J. C.; Cranmer, S. R.; Li, J.

    2002-01-01

    Coronal jets are spectacular dynamic events originating from different structures in the solar corona. Jetlike phenomena were observed by various instruments aboard SOHO, and the X--ray jets were discovered by Yohkoh's soft X--ray telescope (SXT). The relation among the different types of jets is still not yet clear. We present ultraviolet spectroscopy of polar coronal jets obtained by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS/SOHO) at heights in the corona ranging from 1.5 Rodot to 2.5 Rodot. The jets appear to originate near flaring ultraviolet bright points within polar coronal holes and were recorded by UVCS as a significant enhancement in the integrated intensities of the strongest coronal emission lines: mainly H I Ly alpha and O VI lambda lambda 1032,1037. A number of the detected jets are correlated with EIT Fe XII 195Å and LASCO C2 white-light events. Our modeling of the jet's observable properties provided estimates of the jet plasma conditions, as well as the initial electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed O VI ionization state. We discuss possible relationship between the polar ultraviolet and X--ray jets based on the results of coordinated SXT and UVCS observations in December 1996. We compare their properties and consider the magnetic reconnection models, developed for X--ray jets, as a model for UV jet formation. This work is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under grant NAG5--10093 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, and by the ESA PRODEX program (Swiss contribution).

  18. Applications of soft x-ray magnetic dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, G.

    2013-04-01

    Applications of x-ray magnetic circular and linear dichroism (XMCD and XMLD) are reviewed in the soft x-ray region, covering the photon energy range 0.4-2 keV, which includes important absorption edges such as the 3d transition metal L2,3 and rare earth M4,5. These techniques enable a broad range of novel and exciting studies such as on the electronic properties and magnetic ordering of novel nanostructured systems. XMCD has a sensitivity better than 0.01 monolayer (at the surface) and due to simple detection methods, such as electron yield and fluorescence yield, it has become a workhorse technique in physics and materials science. It is the only element-specific technique able to distinguish between the spin and orbital parts of the magnetic moments. The applications are vast, e.g., in x-ray holographic imaging, XMCD gives a spatial resolution of tens of nm. While many studies in the past were centered on physics, more recently new applications have emerged in areas such as chemistry, biology and earth and environmental sciences. For instance, XMCD allows the determination of the cation occupations in spinels and other ternary oxides. In scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM), XMCD enables us to map biogenic magnetite redox changes resulting in a surprising degree of variation on the nanoscale. Another recent development is ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) detected by time-resolved XMCD which opens the door to element-, site- and layer-specific dynamical measurements. By exploiting the time structure of the pulsed synchrotron radiation from the storage ring the relative phase of precession in the individual magnetic layers of a multilayer stack can be determined.

  19. Resonant magnetic scattering of polarized soft x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, M.; Hague, C.F.; Gullikson, E.M.; Underwood, J.

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic effects on X-ray scattering (Bragg diffraction, specular reflectivity or diffuse scattering) are a well known phenomenon, and they also represent a powerful tool for investigating magnetic materials since it was shown that they are strongly enhanced when the photon energy is tuned across an absorption edge (resonant process). The resonant enhancement of the magnetic scattering has mainly been investigated at high photon energies, in order to match the Bragg law for the typical lattice spacings of crystals. In the soft X-ray range, even larger effects are expected, working for instance at the 2p edges of transition metals of the first row or at the 3d edges of rare earths (300-1500 eV), but the corresponding long wavelengths prevent the use of single crystals. Two approaches have been recently adopted in this energy range: (i) the study of the Bragg diffraction from artificial structures of appropriate 2d spacing; (ii) the analysis of the specular reflectivity, which contains analogous information but has no constraints related to the lattice spacing. Both approaches have their own specific advantages: for instance, working under Bragg conditions provides information about the (magnetic) periodicity in ordered structures, while resonant reflectivity can easily be related to electronic properties and absorption spectra. An important aspect common to all the resonant X-ray scattering techniques is the element selectivity inherent to the fact of working at a specific absorption edge: under these conditions, X-ray scattering becomes in fact a spectroscopy. Results are presented for films of iron and cobalt.

  20. Soft x-ray spectroscopy studies of novel electronic materials using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newby, David, Jr.

    surface evolution of these films is discussed, and the effects of different gas environments on oxygen vacancy concentration are elucidated. LSMO is commonly used in commercial fuel cell devices. Here the resonant soft x-ray emission (RIXS) spectrum of LSMO is examined, and it is shown that the inelastic x-ray emission structure of LSMO arises from local atomic multiplet effects.

  1. Imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X rays using a laboratory X-ray charge-coupled-device system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luppino, Gerard A.; Doty, John P.; Ricker, George R.; Vallerga, John V.; Ceglio, Natale M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the design and performance of a laboratory instrument for imaging and nondispersive spectroscopy of soft X-rays (300 eV to 10 keV) utilizing a virtual-phase CCD. This instrument has achieved a spatial resolution of 22 microns (limited by pixel size) with an overall array area of 584 x 390 pixels. It has achieved an energy resolution of about 140 eV FWHM for single-pixel Fe-55 X-ray events (5.9 keV) with the CCD operated at -30 C. The CCD has been operated in photon-counting mode at room temperature, and X-ray spectra with an energy resolution of about 450 eV at 5.9 keV have been obtained. The low energy X-ray sensitivity of the CCD also has been demonstrated by detecting carbon K-alpha X-rays (277eV).

  2. Observing soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium with X-ray calorimeter on a sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J.; Edwards, B.; Juda, M.; Mccammon, D.; Skinner, M.; Kelley, R.; Moseley, H.; Schoelkopf, R.; Szymkowiak, A.

    1990-01-01

    For an X-ray calorimeter working at 0.1 K, the energy resolution ideally can be as good as one eV for a practical detector. A detector with a resolution of 17 eV FWHM at 6 keV has been constructed. It is expected that this can be improved by a factor of two or more. With X-ray calorimeters flown on a sounding rocket, it should be possible to observe soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium over the energy range 0.07 to 1 keV. Here, a preliminary design for an X-ray calorimeter rocket experiment and the spectrum which might be observed from an equilibrium plasma are presented. For later X-ray calorimeter sounding rocket experiments, it is planned to add an aluminum foil mirror with collecting area of about 400 sq cm to observe line features from bright supernova remnants.

  3. Investigation of the Ionic Hydration in Aqueous Salt Solutions by Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jeyachandran, Y L; Meyer, F; Benkert, A; Bär, M; Blum, M; Yang, W; Reinert, F; Heske, C; Weinhardt, L; Zharnikov, M

    2016-08-11

    Understanding the molecular structure of the hydration shells and their impact on the hydrogen bond (HB) network of water in aqueous salt solutions is a fundamentally important and technically relevant question. In the present work, such hydration effects were studied for a series of representative salt solutions (NaCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2, and KBr) by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering (RIXS). The oxygen K-edge XES spectra could be described with three components, attributed to initial state HB configurations in pure water, water molecules that have undergone an ultrafast dissociation initiated by the X-ray excitation, and water molecules in contact with salt ions. The behavior of the individual components, as well as the spectral shape of the latter component, has been analyzed in detail. In view of the role of ions in such effects as protein denaturation (i.e., the Hofmeister series), we discuss the ion-specific nature of the hydration shells and find that the results point to a predominant role of anions as compared to cations. Furthermore, we observe a concentration-dependent suppression of ultrafast dissociation in all salt solutions, associated with a significant distortion of intact HB configurations of water molecules facilitating such a dissociation. PMID:27442708

  4. Large area soft x-ray collimator to facilitate x-ray optics testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, Samuel L.

    1994-01-01

    The first objective of this program is to design a nested conical foil x-ray optic which will collimate x-rays diverging from a point source. The collimator could then be employed in a small, inexpensive x-ray test stand which would be used to test various x-ray optics and detector systems. The second objective is to demonstrate the fabrication of the x-ray reflectors for this optic using lacquer-smoothing and zero-stress electroforming techniques.

  5. Imaging bacterial spores by soft-x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Judge, J.

    1997-04-01

    Bacterial spores are able to survive dehydration, but neither the physiological nor structural basis of this have been fully elucidated. Furthermore, once hydrated, spores often require activation before they will germinate. Several treatments can be used to activate spores, but in the case of Bacillus subtlis the most effective is heat treatment. The physiological mechanism associated with activation is also not understood, but some workers suggest that the loss of calcium from the spores may be critical. However, just prior to germination, the spores change from being phase bright to phase dark when viewed by light microscopy. Imaging spores by soft x-ray microscopy is possible without fixation. Thus, in contrast to electron microscopy, it is possible to compare the structure of dehydrated and hydrated spores in a manner not possible previously. A further advantage is that it is possible to monitor individual spores by phase contrast light microscopy immediately prior to imaging with soft x-rays; whereas, with both electron microscopy and biochemical studies, it is a population of spores being studied without knowledge of the phase characteristics of individual spores. This study has therefore tried to compare dehydrated and hydrated spores and to determine if there is a mass loss from individual spores as they pass the transition from being phase bright to phase dark.

  6. Soft x-ray yield from NX2 plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Rawat, R. S.; Lee, P.; Saw, S. H.

    2009-07-15

    The Lee model code is used to compute neon soft x-ray yield Y{sub sxr} for the NX2 plasma focus as a function of pressure. Comparison with measured Y{sub sxr} shows reasonable agreement in the Y{sub sxr} versus pressure curve, the absolute maximum yield as well as the optimum pressure. This gives confidence that the code gives a good representation of the neon plasma focus in terms of gross properties including speeds and trajectories and soft x-ray yields, despite its lack of modeling localized regions of higher densities and temperatures. Computed current curves versus pressure are presented and discussed particularly in terms of the dynamic resistance of the axial phase. Computed gross properties of the plasma focus including peak discharge current I{sub peak}, pinch current I{sub pinch}, minimum pinch radius r{sub min}, plasma density at the middle duration of pinch n{sub pinch}, and plasma temperature at middle duration of pinch T{sub pinch} are presented and the trends in variation of these are discussed to explain the peaking of Y{sub sxr} at optimum pressure.

  7. Inelastic x-ray scattering at modest energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, K.D.; Larson, B.C.

    1997-07-01

    We report results from the development of an inelastic scattering spectrometer designed to take advantage of high energy synchrotron radiation available at CHESS. The device allows a large increase of the effective scattering volume in the sample by permitting measurements to be made in an energy range up to 25 KeV. The highest useable energy appears limited by the efficiency of the analyzers under consideration. At 20 KeV a novel 4-bounce, sagittal focusing monochromator passes 10e11 photons/second with Darwin width limited energy resolution. In the scattering plane, the monochromator images the electron beam producing a small scattering source for the analyzing optics. Analyzer systems under study include a cooled mosaic crystal in para-focusing geometry, and an adjustable spherically bent silicon crystal respectively for parallel and point-by-point collection of the energy loss spectrum. This paper discusses the optical configurations presents results from our early measurements and suggests directions for improvements. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Time-resolved measurement of x-ray heating in plastic foils irradiated by intense soft-x-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.; Dunne, M.; Riley, D.; Taylor, R.; Willi, O. ); Rose, S.J. )

    1991-12-30

    Intense, soft-x-ray pulses, generated from separate laser-irradiated converters, were used to irradiate plane plastic foils. The x-ray heating was investigated by measuring the temperature histories of chlorinated tracer layers buried at different depths in the targets. The temperature diagonistic was a time-resolved extreme-UV absorption spectroscopy technique using chlorine {ital L}-shell transitions. The temporal temperature profiles were reasonably well reproduced by radiation-hydrocode simulations.

  9. Soft X-ray observation of the Rho Ophiuchus dark cloud region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apparao, K. M. V.; Hayakawa, S.; Hearn, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Soft X-rays (0.1-0.8 keV) from the region including the Rho Oph dark cloud were observed with the SAS-3 low-energy X-ray telescope. No X-ray absorption by the cloud was observed. This indicates that the diffuse component of soft X-rays in this region is mostly from the foreground of the Rho Oph cloud which is located at a distance of 160-200 pc.

  10. Phonon dispersion in uranium measured using inelastic x-ray scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, M. E.; Lander, G. H.; Sinn, H.; Alatas, A.; Hults, W. L.; McQueeney, R. J.; Smith, J. L.; Wilt, J.; XFD

    2003-02-01

    Phonon-dispersion curves were obtained from inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on high-purity uranium single crystals at room temperature. Modes displacing atoms along [00{zeta}] and propagating in all three high-symmetry directions were measured. Whereas the acoustic modes agree with the neutron measurements, the longitudinal-optic branch is about 10% higher in energy, but consistent with higher cutoff energies observed in phonon density-of-states measurements on polycrystals. The application of this x-ray technique, which requires only very small samples, opens possibilities in actinide science.

  11. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%. PMID:19044359

  12. Energy calibration of a high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeni, Roberto; D'Astuto, Matteo; Krisch, Michael; Lorenzen, Maren; Mermet, Alain; Monaco, Giulio; Requardt, Herwig; Sette, Francesco

    2008-08-15

    The energy scale of a triple-axis x-ray spectrometer with meV energy resolution based on perfect silicon crystal optics is calibrated, utilizing the most recent determination of the silicon lattice parameter and its thermal expansion coefficient and recording the dispersion of longitudinal acoustic and optical phonons in a diamond single crystal and the molecular vibration mode in liquid nitrogen. Comparison of the x-ray results with previous inelastic neutron and Raman scattering results as well as with ab initio phonon dispersion calculations yields an overall agreement better than 2%.

  13. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the limit of subfemtosecond natural lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, T.; Journel, L.; Marin, T.; Guillemin, R.; Carniato, S.; Simon, M.; Zitnik, M.; Kavcic, M.; Bucar, K.; Mihelic, A.; Hoszowska, J.; Cao, W.

    2011-04-14

    We present measurements of the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra of the CH{sub 3}I molecule in the hard-x-ray region near the iodine L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} absorption edges. We show that dispersive RIXS spectral features that were recognized as a fingerprint of dissociative molecular states can be interpreted in terms of ultrashort natural lifetime of {approx}200 attoseconds in the case of the iodine L-shell core-hole. Our results demonstrate the capacity of the RIXS technique to reveal subtle dynamical effects in molecules with sensitivity to nuclear rearrangement on a subfemtosecond time scale.

  14. Momentum-resolved resonant and nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Gog, T.; Seidler, G. T.; Casa, D. M.; Upton, M. H.; Kim, J.; Shvydko, Y.; Stoupin, S.; Nagle, K. P.; Balasubramanian, M.; Gordon, R. A.; Fister, T. T.; Heald, S. M.; Toellner, T.; Hill, J. P.; Coburn, D. S.; Kim, Y. J.; Said, A. H.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Yavas, H.; Burns, C. A.; Sinn, H.

    2009-11-01

    The study of electronic excitations by inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) has a rich history. Very early IXS work, for example, provided seminal demonstrations of the validity of relativistic kinematics and the quantum hypothesis and of Fermi-Dirac statistics. While there have been many important results in the interim, it has been the development of the third generation light sources together with continuing innovations in the manufacture and implementation of dispersive X-ray optics that has led to the rapid growth of IXS studies of electronic excitations.

  15. Toroidal silicon polarization analyzer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuan; Casa, Diego; Kim, Jungho; Gog, Thomas; Li, Chengyang; Burns, Clement

    2016-08-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a powerful probe for studying electronic excitations in materials. Standard high energy RIXS measurements do not measure the polarization of the scattered x-rays, which is unfortunate since it carries information about the nature and symmetry of the excitations involved in the scattering process. Here we report the fabrication of thin Si-based polarization analyzers with a double-concave toroidal surface, useful for L-edge RIXS studies in heavier atoms such as the 5-d transition metals. PMID:27587100

  16. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main

    We study a detailed broad-band X-ray/UV emission from the narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 based on two XMM-Newton and single Swift/XRT observations. Both XMM-Newton observations show the soft X-ray excess emission below 2 keV when the best-fit 2 - 10 keV power law is extrapolated down to 0.3 keV. We find the blurred reflection from an ionized accretion disc and Comptonized disc emission both describe the observed soft excess well. We find a remarkable trend of decreasing UV flux with increasing soft X-ray excess and power law emission. We suggest that this could be due to that the external edge of corona hide a fraction of accretion disk. Co-Author: Prof. Gulab C. Dewangan (IUCAA), Prof. Ranjeev Misra (IUCAA), Pramod Kumar (Nanded university)

  17. ROSAT observations of the Eridanus soft X-ray enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Burrows, D. N.; Sanders, W. T.; Aschenbach, B.; Pfeffermann, E.

    1995-01-01

    We present maps of the Eridanus soft X-ray enhancement made from the ROSAT all-sky survey data. The maps are in two energy bands: 0.25 keV (0.12-0.284 keV at 10% response, the ROSAT R1 and R2 bands), and 0.75 keV (0.47-1.20 keV at 10% response, the ROSAT R4 and R5 bands). The entire enhancement spans a total of approximately 35 deg in Galactic latitude and approximately 20 deg in Galactic longitude, centered at l approximately 22 deg, b approximately -32 deg. While the higher spatial resolution of the ROSAT data reveals a pattern of detailed anticorrelations with 100 micrometers intensity that was not evident in the HEAO 1 or earlier data, the basic morphology found in previous maps of this enhancement is confirmed. The ROSAT data also clearly show that the X-ray enhancement continues up to the Orion region in the 0.75 keV band, confirming the structure suggested by the Wisconsin sky survey maps. The ROSAT data are consistent with the interpretation of Reynolds & Ogden and Burrows et al. that this enhancement, the higher temperature component of Burrows et al., is generated for the most part by several-million-degree gas filling a huge interstellar cavity. However, we interpret the low-temperature component discussed by Burrows et al. as part of a more distant large scale (greater than or equal to approximately 30 deg) diffuse background enhancement. The part of this softer X-ray enhancement examined here appears to be produced by million degree gas in the galactic halo, and is therfore unlikely to be an isolated bubble as suggested by Burrows et al. on the basis of lower resolution HEAO 1 data.

  18. SAS 3 survey of the soft X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Clark, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a survey of the soft X-ray sky in the C band (0.10-0.28keV) are reported. The observations were carried out using two independent flow proportional counters on board the SAS 3 X-ray satellite which had a total angular resolution of 2.9 deg FWHM, and a total exposure of 2.2 x 10 to the 4th per sq cm s sr. It is found that C band counting rates were generally inversely correlated with the column density of the neutral hydrogen on all angular scales down to the lowest angular resolution of the detectors. In the region 90-180 deg l and 0-10 deg b, the relation between C-band rates and the column densities of neutral hydrogen was fitted with a residual rms deviation of less than 13 percent by a two-component numerical model of the X-ray background. For the apparent attenuation column density a value of 2.7 x 10 to the 20th per sq cm was obtained. On the basis of a computer simulation of the SAS 3 data, it is shown that the observed clumping of interstellar matter was consistent with the magnitude of spatial fluctuations in the C-band map. When the background rates were subtracted from the survey map, the subsequent map showed foreground emission and absorption features with improved sensitivity and clarity. A series of computer-generated maps incorporating the SAS 3 data is given in an appendix.

  19. X-ray emission from cataclysmic variables with accretion disks. I - Hard X-rays. II - EUV/soft X-ray radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J.; Raymond, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Theoretical models explaining the hard-X-ray, soft-X-ray, and EUV emission of accretion-disk cataclysmic variables in terms of the disk boundary layer (DBL) are developed on the basis of a survey of the published observational data. The data are compared with model predictions in graphs for systems with high or low (greater than or less than 10-Pg/s) accretion rates. Good agreement is obtained both at low accretion rates, where an optically thin rarefied hot (Te = 10 to the 8th K) DBL radiates most of its energy as hard X-rays, and at high accretion rates, where an optically thick 100,000-K DBL radiates most of its energy in the EUV and as soft X-rays. Detailed analysis of the old nova V603 Aql suggests that previous models predicting more detections of soft-X-ray/EUV emissions from thick-DBL objects (Ferland et al., 1982) used inappropriate dwarf masses, interstellar column densities, or classical-nova space densities.

  20. Coherent backscattering in the soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Matone, G.; Luccio, A.

    1986-06-01

    It is shown that coherent polarized soft x-rays can be produced by a combination of two techniques - stimulated amplification of laser light in a magnetic undulator, and Compton scattering of laser photons on an electron beam. In the combined technique, laser radiation is Compton scattered from a relativistic electron beam, whose current or charge density is periodically modulated. An electron beam and a laser beam propagate through an undulator along the same line. Inside the undulator, the laser electromagnetic waste produces a modulation of the electron energy. After some drift space, the modulation of the electron energy transforms into a modulation of the beam longitudinal charge density. The laser photons are reflected by a concave mirror against the electrons and are backscattered. In the process, their energy is greatly increased. If the electron and laser photon energy are matched properly, the modulated electron beam may act as a moving diffraction grating, and the backscattered x-rays show a high degree of coherence. The mechanism of modulation is described. The effects of electron beam energy spread, finite electron beam emittance, and undulator imperfections are discussed. The theory of scattering of a light wave by a bunched electron beam and the properties of the scattered radiation are examined. (LEW)

  1. Refraction effects in soft x-ray multilayer blazed gratings.

    PubMed

    Voronov, D L; Salmassi, F; Meyer-Ilse, J; Gullikson, E M; Warwick, T; Padmore, H A

    2016-05-30

    A 2500 lines/mm Multilayer Blazed Grating (MBG) optimized for the soft x-ray wavelength range was fabricated and tested. The grating coated with a W/B4C multilayer demonstrated a record diffraction efficiency in the 2nd blazed diffraction order in the energy range from 500 to 1200 eV. Detailed investigation of the diffraction properties of the grating demonstrated that the diffraction efficiency of high groove density MBGs is not limited by the normal shadowing effects that limits grazing incidence x-ray grating performance. Refraction effects inherent in asymmetrical Bragg diffraction were experimentally confirmed for MBGs. The refraction affects the blazing properties of the MBGs and results in a shift of the resonance wavelength of the gratings and broadening or narrowing of the grating bandwidth depending on diffraction geometry. The true blaze angle of the MBGs is defined by both the real structure of the multilayer stack and by asymmetrical refraction effects. Refraction effects can be used as a powerful tool in providing highly efficient suppression of high order harmonics. PMID:27410064

  2. Stellar contributions to the diffuse soft X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookbinder, J.; Avni, Y.; Golub, L.; Rosner, R.; Vaiana, G.

    1981-01-01

    One of the results of the EINSTEIN/C.f.A. X-ray stellar survey was a determination of the contribution of the disk stellar population to the galactic component of the diffuse soft (0.28 - 1.0 keV) X-ray background. This analysis employed both binned and unbinned nonparametric statistical methods that have been developed by Avni, et al. (1980). These methods permitted the use of the information contained in both the 22 detections and 4 upper bounds on the luminosities of 26 dM stars in order to derive their luminosity function. Luminosity functions for earlier stellar types are not yet developed. For these earlier stellar types, the median luminosities as determined by Vaiana, et al., are used (1981), which underestimates their contribution to the background. We find that it is the M dwarfs that dominate the disk population stellar contribution to this background. To calculate the contribution of the stellar sources to the background, simple models both for the spatial distribution of the stars and for the properties of the intervening interstellar medium are used. A model is chosen in which all stellar classes have the same functional form for their spatial distribution: an exponentially decreasing distribution above the galactic equatorial plane, and a uniform distribution within the galactic plane for a region of several kiloparsecs centered on the Sun.

  3. Ultra high resolution soft x-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, W.S.; Trebes, J.E.; Goodman, D.M.

    1995-07-19

    Ultra high resolution three dimensional images of a microscopic test object were made with soft x-rays using a scanning transmission x-ray microscope. The test object consisted of two different patterns of gold bars on silicon nitride windows that were separated by {approximately}5{mu}m. A series of nine 2-D images of the object were recorded at angles between {minus}50 to +55 degrees with respect to the beam axis. The projections were then combined tomographically to form a 3-D image by means of an algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) algorithm. A transverse resolution of {approximately}1000 {Angstrom} was observed. Artifacts in the reconstruction limited the overall depth resolution to {approximately}6000 {Angstrom}, however some features were clearly reconstructed with a depth resolution of {approximately}1000 {Angstrom}. A specially modified ART algorithm and a constrained conjugate gradient (CCG) code were also developed as improvements over the standard ART algorithm. Both of these methods made significant improvements in the overall depth resolution bringing it down to {approximately}1200 {Angstrom} overall. Preliminary projection data sets were also recorded with both dry and re-hydrated human sperm cells over a similar angular range.

  4. Detection of soft X-rays from Alpha Lyrae and Eta Bootis with an imaging X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topka, K.; Fabricant, D.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Gorenstein, P.; Rosner, R.

    1979-01-01

    Results are presented for observations of Alpha Lyr (Vega) and Eta Boo with an imaging X-ray telescope during two rocket flights. It is found that Vega and Eta Boo are soft X-ray sources with respective luminosities of approximately 3 x 10 to the 28th erg/s (0.15-0.8 keV) and 1 x 10 to the 29th erg/s (0.15-1.5 keV). Surface X-ray luminosities of about 640,000 erg/sq cm per sec for Vega and 300,000 erg/sq cm per sec for Eta Boo are estimated and shown to fall within the range of solar coronal X-ray emission. It is concluded that in view of the substantially larger surface areas of these stars, the relatively large total soft X-ray luminosity (as compared with that of the sun) can in both cases be understood as resulting from a moderately active corona, although the Vega observation is in severe conflict with simple models for X-ray emission from single main-sequence stars.

  5. Observation of Organelles in Leydig Cells by Contact Soft X-Ray Microscopy with a Laser Plasma X-Ray Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kado, M.; Ishino, M.; Tamotsu, S.; Yasuda, K.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kinjo, Y.; Shinohara, K.

    2011-09-01

    We observed the same biological specimens for comparison of the images by contact soft x-ray microscopy with a laser plasma x-ray source with those by confocal laser microscopy. Images of wet Leydig cells were directly comparable for organelles and showed that actin filaments and mitochondria were clearly identified in the soft x-ray images.

  6. G-133: A soft x ray solar telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Memorie K.; Campbell, Branton; Roming, Peter W. A.; Spute, Mark K.; Moody, J. Ward

    1992-01-01

    The GOLDHELOX Project, NASA payload number G-133, is a robotic soft x ray solar telescope designed and built by an organization of undergraduate students. The telescope is designed to observe the sun at a wavelength of 171 to 181 A. Since we require observations free from atmospheric interference, the telescope will be launched in a NASA Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister with a Motorized Door Assembly (MDA). In this paper we primarily discuss the most important elements of the telescope itself. We also elaborate on some of the technical difficulties associated with doing good science in space on a small budget (about $100,000) and mention ways in which controlling the instrument environment has reduced the complexity of the system and thus saved us money.

  7. Soft X-Ray Observations of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robin; Kuntz, K. D.

    2003-01-01

    In this project, my co-I (K.D. Kuntz) and I plan to extract the soft X-ray spectrum emitted by the hot gas along a high latitude line of sight. We plan to subtract off the local component (garnered from other observations) in order to isolate the halo component. We then plan to combine this spectral information with the ultraviolet resonance line emission produced by slightly cooler gas along the line of sight and use the two observations as a constraint on models. My co-I, K.D., Kuntz has been working on the determination of the instrumental background. I have not yet drawn any of the funds for this project. I have just moved from J h s Hopkins University to the University of Georgia and anticipate finishing the project while at the University of Georgia.

  8. VUV and soft x-ray spectroscopy of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C. G.; Joyce, J. J.; Durakiewicz, T.; Guziewicz, E.

    2004-01-01

    Optical and photoelectron spectroscopies using VUV and Soft X-ray photons are powerful tools for studies of elemental and compound actinides. Large changes in the relative atomic cross sections of the 5f, 6d and sp electrons allow decomposition of the character of the valence bands using photoemission. Resonant enhancement of photoelectrons and Auger electrons at the 5d core threshold further aids the decomposition and gives a measure of elemental specificity. Angle-resolved photoemission can be used to map the momentum dependence of the electronic states. The large changes in relative cross section with photon energy yields further details when the mapping is done at equivalent points in multiple zones. Spectra for well understood rare earth materials will be presented to establish spectral characteristics for known atomic character initial states. These signatures will be applied to the case of USb to investigate f-d hybridization near the Fermi level.

  9. Imaging performance and tests of soft x-ray telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Spiller, E.; McCorkle, R.; Wilczynski, J. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center); Golub, L.; Nystrom, G. ); Takacz, P.Z. ); Welch, C. )

    1990-08-01

    Photos obtained during 5 min. of observation time from the flight of our 10 in. normal incidence soft x-ray ({lambda} = 63.5{Angstrom}) telescope on September 11, 1989 are analyzed and the data are compared to the results expected from tests of the mirror surfaces. These tests cover a range of spatial periods from 25 cm to 1{Angstrom}. The photos demonstrate a reduction in the scattering of the multilayer mirror compared to a single surface for scattering angles above 1 arcmin, corresponding to surface irregularities with spatial periods below 10 {mu}m. Our results are used to predict the possible performance of future flights. Sounding rocket observations might be able to reach a resolution around 0.1 arcsec. Higher resolutions will require flights of longer durations and improvements in mirror testing for the largest spatial periods. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Holography-guided ptychography with soft X-rays.

    PubMed

    Hessing, Piet; Pfau, Bastian; Guehrs, Erik; Schneider, Michael; Shemilt, Laura; Geilhufe, Jan; Eisebitt, Stefan

    2016-01-25

    Ptychography is a lensless imaging technique that aims to reconstruct an object from a set of coherent diffraction patterns originating from different and partially overlapping sample illumination areas. For a successful convergence of the iterative algorithms used, the sample scan positions have to be known with very high accuracy. Here, we present a method that allows to directly encode this information in the diffraction patterns without the need of accurate position encoders. Our approach relies on combining ptychography with another coherent imaging method, namely Fourier-transform holography. We have imaged two different objects using coherent soft-X-ray illumination and investigate the influence of experimental and numerical position refinement on the reconstruction result. We demonstrate that holographically encoded positions significantly reduce the experimental and numerical requirements. Our ptychographic reconstructions cover a large field of view with diffraction-limited resolution and high sensitivity in the reconstructed phase shift and absorption of the objects. PMID:26832562

  11. Soft x-ray undulator for the Siam Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rugmai, S.; Dasri, T.; Prawanta, S.; Siriwattanapaitoon, S.; Kwankasem, A.; Sooksrimuang, V.; Chachai, W.; Suradet, N.; Juthong, N.; Tancharakorn, S.

    2007-01-19

    An undulator for production of intense soft x-rays has been designed for the Siam Photon Source. The construction of the undulator has been completed. It is now being characterized and prepared for installation. The device, named U60, is a pure permanent magnet planar undulator, consisting of 41 magnetic periods, with 60 mm period length. Utilization of the undulator radiation in the photon energy range of 30 - 900 eV is expected. The design studies of the magnetic structure, including investigation of perturbations arising from the magnetic field of the device, their effects on the SPS storage ring and compensation schemes are described. A magnetic measurement system has been constructed for magnetic characterization of the device. Partial results of magnetic measurements are presented.

  12. G-133: A soft X ray solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Memorie K.; Campbell, Branton; Roming, Peter W. A.; Spute, Mark K.; Moody, J. Ward

    1992-10-01

    The GOLDHELOX Project, NASA payload number G-133, is a robotic soft x ray solar telescope designed and built by an organization of undergraduate students. The telescope is designed to observe the sun at a wavelength of 171 to 181 A. Since we require observations free from atmospheric interference, the telescope will be launched in a NASA Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister with a Motorized Door Assembly (MDA). In this paper we primarily discuss the most important elements of the telescope itself. We also elaborate on some of the technical difficulties associated with doing good science in space on a small budget (about $100,000) and mention ways in which controlling the instrument environment has reduced the complexity of the system and thus saved us money.

  13. Soft x-ray microscope with zone plates at UVSOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Shimanuki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Mieko; Kihara, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    A soft x-ray microscope with zone plates was set up at UVSOR (Okazaki, Japan). A 0.41 micrometers line and space pattern was clearly distinguished using an objective zone plate with the outermost zone width of 0.41 micrometers . Modulation transfer functions were measured at wavelengths of 3.1 nm and 5.4 nm, and compared with theoretical calculations. Considering the resolution of a microchannel plate used as a detector, the agreement is fairly good. With this microscope, some biological specimens such as diatoms, spicule of trepang, crab and rabbit muscles, human blood cells, human chromosomes, and magnetotactic bacterium were observed at 3.1 nm and 5.4 nm. With an environmental chamber (wet cell) using polypropylene foils as windows, wet specimens were observed at a wavelength of 4.6 nm. Images of spicule of trepang, human blood cell, and cultured protoplast of plant cell stained by methyl mercury were observed with good contrast.

  14. Soft X-Ray Optics by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Felix E.

    1996-01-01

    Mo/Si and C/Co multilayers for soft x-ray optics were designed for spectral regions of interest in possible applications. Fabrication was effected by Pulsed Laser Deposition using Nd:YAG (355 nm) or excimer (248 nm) lasers in order to evaluate the suitability of this technique. Results for Mo/Si structures were not considered satisfactory due mainly to problems with particulate production and target surface modification during Si ablation. These problems may be alleviated by a two-wavelength approach, using separate lasers for each target. Results for C/Co multilayers are much more encouraging, since indication of good layering was observed for extremely thin layers. We expect to continue investigating this possibility. In order to compete with traditional PVD techniques, it is necessary to achieve film coverage uniformity over large enough areas. It was shown that this is feasible, and novel means of achieving it were devised.

  15. Point diffraction interferometry at soft x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G.E.; Hostetler, R.

    1993-07-01

    To achieve the image performance necessary for soft x-ray projection lithography, interferometric testing at the design wavelength is required to accurately characterize the wavefront of the imaging system. The wavefront depends not only on the surface figure of the individual optics and on their relative alignment, but also on aperture dependent phase shifts induced by the resonant multilayer coatings on the optical surfaces. This paper describes the design and lithographic fabrication of an array of point diffraction interferometers on a silicon nitride membrane that has been over-coated with a spatially graded partially transmitting film to provide fringe contrast control. Experimental results using a visible light analogue (larger pinholes and different transmission gradient) will be shown.

  16. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; Church, Matthew; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Greg; Warwick, Tony

    2010-01-31

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situ visible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  17. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, S.; Yashchuk, V.V.; Goldberg, K.A.; Celestre, R.; Church, M.; McKinney, W.R.; Morrison, G.; Warwick, T.

    2009-09-18

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situvisible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  18. Tracing Chromospheric Evaporation in Radio and Soft X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.

    1997-01-01

    There are three publications in refereed journals and several presentations at scientific conferences resulted from this work, over a period of 6 months during 1995/1996. In the first paper, the discovery of the chromospheric evaporation process at radio wavelengths is described. In the second paper, the radio detection is used to quantify electron densities in the upflowing heated plasma in flare loops, which is then compared with independent other density measurements from soft X-rays, or the plasma frequency of electron beams originating in the acceleration region. In the third paper, the diagnostic results of the chromospheric evaporation process are embedded into a broader picture of a standard flare scenario. Abstracts of these three papers are attached.

  19. 2-D soft x-ray arrays in the EAST.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaiyun; Xu, Liqing; Hu, Liqun; Duan, Yanmin; Li, Xueqin; Yuan, Yi; Mao, Songtao; Sheng, Xiuli; Zhao, Jinlong

    2016-06-01

    A high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray (SXR) imaging diagnostic has been installed in EAST for the study of magnetohydrodynamics activities and core high-Z impurity transport. Up to 122 lines of sight view the poloidal plasma from three directions (two up-down symmetrical horizontal arrays and one vertical array), which renders the diagnostic able to provide detailed tomographic reconstructions under various conditions. Fourier-Bessel method based on flux coordinates was employed for 2-D SXR tomographic reconstruction. Examples of several events measured by SXR diagnostic in EAST are shown, namely the crash patterns of sawtooth, periodical burst of edge localized modes, and the transport of high-Z intrinsic impurities. PMID:27370451

  20. 2-D soft x-ray arrays in the EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaiyun; Xu, Liqing; Hu, Liqun; Duan, Yanmin; Li, Xueqin; Yuan, Yi; Mao, Songtao; Sheng, Xiuli; Zhao, Jinlong

    2016-06-01

    A high spatial and temporal resolution soft x-ray (SXR) imaging diagnostic has been installed in EAST for the study of magnetohydrodynamics activities and core high-Z impurity transport. Up to 122 lines of sight view the poloidal plasma from three directions (two up-down symmetrical horizontal arrays and one vertical array), which renders the diagnostic able to provide detailed tomographic reconstructions under various conditions. Fourier-Bessel method based on flux coordinates was employed for 2-D SXR tomographic reconstruction. Examples of several events measured by SXR diagnostic in EAST are shown, namely the crash patterns of sawtooth, periodical burst of edge localized modes, and the transport of high-Z intrinsic impurities.

  1. ComIXS on BACH: a compact soft x-ray spectrometer operating at Elettra

    SciTech Connect

    Cocco, Daniele; Matteucci, Maurizio; Zangrando, Marco; Bondino, Federica; Zacchigna, Michele; Plate, Mauro; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Nelles, Bruno; Prince, Kevin C.

    2004-05-12

    To accommodate increasing interest in soft x-ray inelastic scattering, a new spectrometer has been designed, constructed and commissioned at Elettra. This instrument uses as the dispersive element one of two interchangeable Variable Line Spacing (VLS) spherical gratings. The energy scan is performed by a 7 cm linear translation of a back illuminated CCD which also collects the zero order light, facilitating alignment and calibration. The two gratings have the same radius of curvature while the groove densities and the groove density variations differ by a factor four. Thus the energies focused by the gratings at a particular position differ by a factor of four. The total length of the instrument is 60 cm, the energy range covered is roughly 25-1000 eV and the expected resolving power ranges from 1000 to 5000. The spectrometer is now operating on the beamline Bach. It takes advantage of the small size of the photon spot in the experimental chamber and of the possibility to control the polarization of the incoming radiation. The small spot constitutes the virtual entrance slit, and the spectrometer collects the photons emitted in a solid angle of about 30x10 mrad2. The instrument, named ComIXS (Compact Inelastic X-ray Spectrometer), has been routinely operating since October 2002. Several experiments have already been carried out, and some results illustrating the characteristics of the instrument are described. The manufacture and testing of the blaze gratings are also discussed.

  2. ComIXS on BACH: a compact soft x-ray spectrometer operating at Elettra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, Daniele; Zangrando, Marco; Matteucci, Maurizio; Bondino, Federica; Platè, Mauro; Zacchigna, Michele; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Nelles, Bruno; Prince, Kevin C.

    2004-05-01

    To accommodate increasing interest in soft x-ray inelastic scattering, a new spectrometer has been designed, constructed and commissioned at Elettra. This instrument uses as the dispersive element one of two interchangeable Variable Line Spacing (VLS) spherical gratings. The energy scan is performed by a 7 cm linear translation of a back illuminated CCD which also collects the zero order light, facilitating alignment and calibration. The two gratings have the same radius of curvature while the groove densities and the groove density variations differ by a factor four. Thus the energies focused by the gratings at a particular position differ by a factor of four. The total length of the instrument is 60 cm, the energy range covered is roughly 25-1000 eV and the expected resolving power ranges from 1000 to 5000. The spectrometer is now operating on the beamline Bach. It takes advantage of the small size of the photon spot in the experimental chamber and of the possibility to control the polarization of the incoming radiation. The small spot constitutes the virtual entrance slit, and the spectrometer collects the photons emitted in a solid angle of about 30×10 mrad2. The instrument, named ComIXS (Compact Inelastic X-ray Spectrometer), has been routinely operating since October 2002. Several experiments have already been carried out, and some results illustrating the characteristics of the instrument are described. The manufacture and testing of the blaze gratings are also discussed.

  3. Soft X-Ray Thomson Scattering in Warm Dense Hydrogen at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Faustlin, R R; Toleikis, S; Bornath, T; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Mithen, J; Przystawik, A; Redlin, H; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-07-15

    We present collective Thomson scattering with soft x-ray free electron laser radiation as a method to track the evolution of warm dense matter plasmas with {approx}200 fs time resolution. In a pump-probe scheme an 800 nm laser heats a 20 {micro}m hydrogen droplet to the plasma state. After a variable time delay in the order of ps the plasma is probed by an x-ray ultra violet (XUV) pulse which scatters from the target and is recorded spectrally. Alternatively, in a self-Thomson scattering experiment, a single XUV pulse heats the target while a portion of its photons are being scattered probing the target. From such inelastic x-ray scattering spectra free electron temperature and density can be inferred giving insight on relaxation time scales in plasmas as well as the equation of state. We prove the feasibility of this method in the XUV range utilizing the free electron laser facility in Hamburg, FLASH. We recorded Thomson scattering spectra for hydrogen plasma, both in the self-scattering and in the pump-probe mode using optical laser heating.

  4. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, Jennifer L; Stone, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80~K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  5. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, J. L.; Stone, M. B.

    2014-09-08

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80 K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  6. Interface science in nanoparticles: An electronic structure view of photon-in/photon-out soft-X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinghua

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering nanostructured 3d metal compounds in the applications of solar photovoltaic, sunlight water splitting and photoelectrochemical cells, chemical and biosensors, etc. In the soft X-ray region, the question tends to be, what are the electrons doing as they migrated between the atoms? Soft-X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy have basic features that are important to interface science. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state that makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site and gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, particular symmetry information. The possibility to select the energy of the excitation has created an extra degree of freedom and opens a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft-X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this presentation, recent findings regarding X-ray spectroscopic studies of various nanomaterials are presented. Also, in situ characterization of nanocrystal suspensions demonstrated the way for real-time studies of nanomaterial growth and chemical reactions.

  7. Implementation of soft x-ray microscopy with several tens nanometers spatial resolution at NSRL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shiping; Chen, Liang

    2009-09-01

    A transmission soft x-ray microscope (TXM), which is similar to the full-field x-ray microscopes installed on other synchrotron radiation sources in the world, was developed at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) in Hefei. An x-ray image taken with the microscope was acquired and its spatial resolution was estimated to be better than 70nm.

  8. Discovery of Soft X-Ray Emission From Io, Europa and the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Crary, F. J.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Ford, P. G.; Metzger, A. E.; Hurley, K. C.; Feigelson, E. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of soft (0.25 - 2 keV) x-ray emission from the moons Io and Europa, probably Ganymede, and from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT). Bombardment by energetic (greater than 10 keV) H, O, and S ions from the region of the IPT seems the likely source of the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons. According to our estimates, fluorescent x-ray emission excited by solar x-rays, even during flares from the active Sun, charge-exchange processes, previously invoked to explain Jupiter's x-ray aurora and cometary x-ray emission, and ion stripping by dust grains fall to account for the observed emission. On the other hand, bremsstrahlung emission of soft X-rays from non-thermal electrons in the few hundred to few thousand eV range may account for a substantial fraction of the observed x-ray flux from the IPT.

  9. TiO2 Nanoparticles as a Soft X-ray Molecular Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Larabell, Carolyn; Ashcroft, Jared M.; Gu, Weiwei; Zhang, Tierui; Hughes, Steven M.; Hartman, Keith B.; Hofmann, Cristina; Kanaras, Antonios G.; Kilcoyne, David A.; Le Gros, Mark; Yin, Yadong; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2007-06-30

    With the emergence of soft x-ray techniques for imaging cells, there is a pressing need to develop protein localization probes that can be unambiguously identified within the region of x-ray spectrum used for imaging. TiO2 nanocrystal colloids, which have a strong absorption cross-section within the "water-window" region of x-rays, areideally suited as soft x-ray microscopy probes. To demonstrate their efficacy, TiO2-streptavidin nanoconjugates were prepared and subsequently labeled microtubules polymerized from biotinylated tubulin. The microtubules were imaged using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM), and the TiO2 nanoparticle tags were specifically identified using x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). These experiments demonstrate that TiO2 nanoparticles are potential probes for protein localization analyses using soft x-ray microscopy.

  10. ON THE X-RAY OUTBURSTS OF TRANSIENT ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    SciTech Connect

    Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Sirin; Ertan, Uenal

    2012-10-20

    We show that the X-ray outburst light curves of four transient anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), namely, XTE J1810-197, SGR 0501+4516, SGR 1627-41, and CXOU J164710.2-455216, can be produced by the fallback disk model that was also applied to the outburst light curves of persistent AXPs and SGRs in our earlier work. The model solves the diffusion equation for the relaxation of a disk that has been pushed back by a soft gamma-ray burst. The sets of main disk parameters used for these transient sources are very similar to each other and to those employed in our earlier models of persistent AXPs and SGRs. There is a characteristic difference between the X-ray outburst light curves of transient and persistent sources. This can be explained by the differences in the disk surface density profiles of the transient and persistent sources in quiescence indicated by their quiescent X-ray luminosities. Our results imply that a viscous disk instability operating at a critical temperature in the range of {approx}1300-2800 K is a common property of all fallback disks around AXPs and SGRs. The effect of the instability is more pronounced and starts earlier for the sources with lower quiescent luminosities, which leads to the observable differences in the X-ray enhancement light curves of transient and persistent sources. A single active disk model with the same basic disk parameters can account for the enhancement phases of both transient and persistent AXPs and SGRs. We also present a detailed parameter study to show the effects of disk parameters on the evolution of the X-ray luminosity of AXPs and SGRs in the X-ray enhancement phases.

  11. Chemically selective soft x-ray patterning of polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Stover, H.D.; Hitchcock, A.P.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2007-06-19

    The chemically selective modification of polymer mixtures by monochromated soft X-rays has been explored using the high-brightness fine-focused 50 nm beam of a scanning transmission X-ray microscope. Four different polymer systems were examined: a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) bilayer film; a PMMA-blend-PAN microphase-separated film; a poly(MMA-co-AN) copolymer film; and a poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate) homopolymer film. A high level of chemically selective modification was achieved for the PMMA/PAN bilayer; in particular, irradiation at 288.45 eV selectively removed the carbonyl group from PMMA while irradiation at 286.80 eV selectively reduced the nitrile group of PAN, even when these irradiations were carried out at the same (x,y) position of the sample. In the last two homogeneous polymer systems, similar amounts of damage to the nitrile and carbonyl groups occurred during irradiation at either 286.80 or 288.45 eV. This is attributed to damage transfer between the C=N and C=O groups mediated by primary electrons, secondary electrons or radical/ionic processes, aided by their close spatial proximity. Although the overall thickness of the bilayer sample at 70 nm is smaller than the lateral line spreading of 100 nm, the interface between the layers appears to effectively block the transport of energy, and hence damage, between the two layers. The origins of the line spreading in homogeneous phases and possible origins of the damage blocking effect of the interface are discussed. To demonstrate chemically selective patterning, high-resolution multi-wavelength patterns were created in the PMMA/PAN bilayer system.

  12. Analysis of the Electronic Structure of Aqueous Urea and Its Derivatives: A Systematic Soft X-Ray-TD-DFT Approach.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Marc F; Golnak, Ronny; Ehrhard, Felix; Schön, Daniela; Xiao, Jie; Atak, Kaan; Bande, Annika; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-08-16

    Soft X-ray emission (XE), absorption (XA), and resonant inelastic scattering (RIXS) experiments have been conducted at the nitrogen K-edge of urea and its derivatives in aqueous solution and were compared with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory calculations. This comprehensive study provides detailed information on the occupied and unoccupied molecular orbitals of urea, thiourea, acetamide, dimethylurea, and biuret at valence levels. By identifying the electronic transitions that contribute to the experimental spectral features, the energy gap between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of each molecule is determined. Moreover, a theoretical approach is introduced to simulate resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectra by adding an extra electron to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, thereby mimicking the real initial state of the core-electron absorption before the subsequent relaxation process. PMID:27416871

  13. Correlative Analysis of Hard and Soft X-ray Emissions in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes research performed under the Phase 3 Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) Guest Investigator Program. The objective of this work is to study different mechanisms of solar flare heating by comparing their predictions with simultaneous hard and soft X-ray observations. The datasets used in this work consist of hard X-ray observations from the CGRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) and soft X-ray observations from the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and Soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on the Japanese Yohkoh spacecraft.

  14. Real space soft x-ray imaging at 10 nm spatial resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Weilun; Fischer, Peter; Tyliszczak, T.; Rekawa, Senajith; Anderson, Erik; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-04-24

    Using Fresnel zone plates made with our robust nanofabrication processes, we have successfully achieved 10 nm spatial resolution with soft x-ray microscopy. The result, obtained with both a conventional full-field and scanning soft x-ray microscope, marks a significant step forward in extending the microscopy to truly nanoscale studies.

  15. X-ray/UV variability and the origin of soft X-ray excess emission from II Zw 177

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Main; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Misra, Ranjeev; Pawar, Pramod K.

    2016-03-01

    We study X-ray and UV emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy II Zw 177 using a 137 ks long and another 13 ks short XMM-Newton observation performed in 2012 and 2001, respectively. Both observations show soft X-ray excess emission contributing 76.9 ± 4.9 per cent in 2012 and 58.8 ± 10.2 per cent in 2001 in the 0.3-2 keV band. We find that both blurred reflection from an ionized disc and Comptonized disc emission describe the observed soft excess well. Time-resolved spectroscopy on scales of ˜20 ks reveals strong correlation between the soft excess and the power-law components. The fractional variability amplitude Fvar derived from EPIC-pn light curves at different energy bands is nearly constant (Fvar ˜ 20 per cent). This is in contrast to other active galactic nuclei where the lack of short term variation in soft X-ray excess emission has been attributed to intense light bending in the framework of the `lamppost' model. Thus, the variations in power-law emission are most likely intrinsic to corona rather than just due to the changes of height of compact corona. The variable UV emission (Fvar ˜ 1 per cent) is uncorrelated to any of the X-ray components on short time-scales suggesting that the UV emission is not dominated by the reprocessed emission. The gradual observed decline in the UV emission in 2012 may be related to the secular decline due to the changes in the accretion rate. In this case, the short term X-ray variability is not due to the changes in the seed photons but intrinsic to the hot corona.

  16. Multilayer on-chip stacked Fresnel zone plates: Hard x-ray fabrication and soft x-ray simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kenan; Wojcik, Michael J.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Jacobsen, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Fresnel zone plates are widely used as x-ray nanofocusing optics. To achieve high spatial resolution combined with good focusing efficiency, high aspect ratio nanolithography is required, and one way to achieve that is through multiple e-beam lithography writing steps to achieve on-chip stacking. A two-step writing process producing 50 nm finest zone width at a zone thickness of 1.14 µm for possible hard x-ray applications is shown here. The authors also consider in simulations the case of soft x-ray focusing where the zone thickness might exceed the depth of focus. In this case, the authors compare on-chip stacking with, and without, adjustment of zone positions and show that the offset zones lead to improved focusing efficiency. The simulations were carried out using a multislice propagation method employing Hankel transforms.

  17. Recover soft x-ray spectrum using virtual flat response channels with filtered x-ray diode array.

    PubMed

    Tianming, Song; Jiamin, Yang; Rongqing, Yi

    2012-11-01

    A method for the recovery of soft x-ray spectra in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments is presented. Virtual detection channels with bandpass responses are obtained using linear combinations of the channel response functions of a filtered x-ray diode array and a weighted correction is introduced to improve the recovery. These virtual channels can be used to calculate radiation fluxes in some specific photon energy bands and hence to recover the spectrum of the whole photon energy range from 80 eV to 4.5 keV. Examples are listed which demonstrate the capability of this method to unfold various spectra such as Planck spectra with different radiation temperatures and to obtain x-ray flux of certain narrow energy interval. PMID:23206046

  18. High-contrast sub-millivolt inelastic X-ray scattering for nano- and mesoscale science

    PubMed Central

    Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Stoupin, Stanislav; Shu, Deming; Collins, Stephen P.; Mundboth, Kiran; Sutter, John; Tolkiehn, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Photon and neutron inelastic scattering spectrometers are microscopes for imaging condensed matter dynamics on very small length and time scales. Inelastic X-ray scattering permitted the first quantitative studies of picosecond nanoscale dynamics in disordered systems almost 20 years ago. However, the nature of the liquid-glass transition still remains one of the great unsolved problems in condensed matter physics. It calls for studies at hitherto inaccessible time and length scales, and therefore for substantial improvements in the spectral and momentum resolution of the inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometers along with a major enhancement in spectral contrast. Here we report a conceptually new spectrometer featuring a spectral resolution function with steep, almost Gaussian tails, sub-meV (≃620 μeV) bandwidth and improved momentum resolution. The spectrometer opens up uncharted space on the dynamics landscape. New results are presented on the dynamics of liquid glycerol, in the regime that has become accessible with the novel spectrometer. PMID:24953338

  19. Resonant inelastic contact scattering of X-ray photons on atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopersky, A. N.; Nadolinsky, A. M.; Yavna, V. A.

    2006-10-01

    The existence of an extended resonance structure outside the X-ray emission regions is theoretically predicted in the total double differential cross section for the scattering of linearly polarized photons on free atoms (ions). This structure is almost entirely determined by inelastic photon scattering of the contact type. The amplitude of the inelastic contact scattering probability is described using an analytical expression for a non-relativistic transition operator, which was previously obtained by the author outside the dipole and momentum approximations. The resonant inelastic contact scattering of X-ray photons on a neon atom and neonlike ions of argon, titanium, and iron has been studied. Calculations were performed in a nonrelativistic approximation for the wave functions of the scattering states, with allowance for many-body effects of the radial relaxation of one-electron orbitals in the Hartree-Fock field of a deep 1 s vacancy and (for neon atom) the double excitation/ionization of the ground atomic state.

  20. Multi-energy Soft X-ray diagnostic for NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritz, Kevin; Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael; Kumar, Deepak; Clayton, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    A high resolution, ``multi-energy'' soft X-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic is being developed for the NSTX edge plasma. The system will measure with spatial resolution of <=1cm and with ˜10 kHz bandwidth the XUV and SXR emission from the outer NSTX regions, including the pedestal, and will serve for studies of edge particle and electron transport, of ELM dynamics, and other edge phenomena. The system comprises five tangential AXUV diode arrays, viewing the plasma between 0.5

  1. Toward a soft x-ray Fourier-transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.; Frank, K.; Hussain, Z.; Moler, E.J.; Reich, T. |; Moeller, D.; Shirley, D.A.

    1993-10-29

    The use of Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) in the soft x-ray region is advocated as a possible route to spectral resolution superior to that attainable with a grating system. A technical plan is described for applying FTS to the study of the absorption spectrum of helium in the region of double ionization around 60--80 eV. The proposed scheme includes a Mach-Zehnder interferometer deformed into a rhombus shape to provide grazing incidence reflections. The path difference between the interfering beams is to be tuned by translation of a table carrying four mirrors over a range {+-}1 cm which, in the absence of errors generating relative tilts of the wave fronts, would provide a resolving power equal to the number of waves of path difference: half a million at 65 eV, for example. The signal-to-noise ratio of the spectrum is analyzed and for operation on an Advanced Light Source bending magnet beam line should be about 330.

  2. Soft X Ray Telescope (SXT) focus error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Anees

    1991-01-01

    The analysis performed on the soft x-ray telescope (SXT) to determine the correct thickness of the spacer to position the CCD camera at the best focus of the telescope and to determine the maximum uncertainty in this focus position due to a number of metrology and experimental errors, and thermal, and humidity effects is presented. This type of analysis has been performed by the SXT prime contractor, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab (LPARL). The SXT project office at MSFC formed an independent team of experts to review the LPARL work, and verify the analysis performed by them. Based on the recommendation of this team, the project office will make a decision if an end to end focus test is required for the SXT prior to launch. The metrology and experimental data, and the spreadsheets provided by LPARL are used at the basis of the analysis presented. The data entries in these spreadsheets have been verified as far as feasible, and the format of the spreadsheets has been improved to make these easier to understand. The results obtained from this analysis are very close to the results obtained by LPARL. However, due to the lack of organized documentation the analysis uncovered a few areas of possibly erroneous metrology data, which may affect the results obtained by this analytical approach.

  3. Plasma Emission Profile Recreation using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, J. W.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    With sufficient views from multiple diode arrays, soft X-ray tomography is an invaluable plasma diagnostic because it is a non-perturbing method to reconstruct the emission within the interior of the plasma. In preparation for the installation of new SXR arrays in HBT-EP, we compute high-resolution tomographic reconstructions of discharges having kink-like structures that rotate nearly rigidly. By assuming a uniform angular mapping from the kink mode rotation, Δϕ ~ ωΔ t, a temporal sequence from a single 16-diode fan array represents as many as 16 x 100 independent views. We follow the procedure described by Wang and Granetz and use Bessel basis functions to take the inverse Radon transform. This transform is fit to our data using a least-squares method to estimate the internal SXR emissivity as a sum of polar functions. By varying different parameters of the transformation, we optimize the quality of our recreation of the emission profile and quantify how the reconstruction changes with the azimuthal order of the transform. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  4. White dwarfs as the maximal soft x-ray scatterers

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2013-09-15

    In this paper, we explore the effect of density on the structure formation and the electromagnetic wave (EMw) elastic scattering on quantum plasmas, using the generalized quantum hydrodynamic model valid for a wide range of the plasma density and relativistic degeneracy. It is found that the electron quantum diffraction effect caused by the Bohm potential has a fundamental effect on the ion correlations in a degenerate electron fluid and crystallization in quantum plasmas in the solid-density regime and beyond. The ion correlations and structure formation are shown to be fundamentally affected by the plasma density and the relativistic degeneracy parameters. Moreover, distinct behavior is shown to exist between the non-relativistic and relativistic matter density regimes, regarding the normalized EMw elastic scattering cross-sections. It is theoretically discovered that the maximal Thomson scattering coincides with the average density of a typical white dwarf corresponding to the soft X-ray wavelength regime. Current research can be very useful in plasma optical diagnostic methods for a wide range of electron number-density from warm dense matter and inertial confinement fusion to the astrophysical compact objects.

  5. TOPICAL REVIEW: Human soft tissue analysis using x-ray or gamma-ray techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakou, C.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    This topical review is intended to describe the x-ray techniques used for human soft tissue analysis. X-ray techniques have been applied to human soft tissue characterization and interesting results have been presented over the last few decades. The motivation behind such studies is to provide improved patient outcome by using the data obtained to better understand a disease process and improve diagnosis. An overview of theoretical background as well as a complete set of references is presented. For each study, a brief summary of the methodology and results is given. The x-ray techniques include x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, Compton scattering, Compton to coherent scattering ratio and attenuation measurements. The soft tissues that have been classified using x-rays or gamma rays include brain, breast, colon, fat, kidney, liver, lung, muscle, prostate, skin, thyroid and uterus.

  6. The stellar contribution to the galactic soft X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, R.; Avni, Y.; Bookbinder, J.; Giacconi, R.; Golub, L.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.; Maxson, C. W.; Topka, K.; Vaiana, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    Log N-log S relations for stars are constructed based on median X-ray luminosities for dF, dG, and dK stars previously reported for the Einstein Observatory/Center for Astrophysics stellar survey and on a detailed X-ray luminosity function derived here for dM stars, and the stellar contribution to the diffuse soft X-ray background is investigated. The principal results are that stars provide approximately 20% of the soft X-ray background in the 0.28-1.0 keV passband and therefore contribute significantly to the soft X-ray background in this energy range (with dM stars constituting the dominant contributing class), and that the stellar contribution to the diffuse X-ray background in the 0.15-0.28 keV passband is less than approximately 3%.

  7. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering Study of the Electronic Structure of Cu2O

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.P.; Kim, Y.-J.; Yamaguchi, H.; Gog, T.; Casa, D.

    2010-05-15

    A resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study of the electronic structure of the semiconductor cuprous oxide, Cu{sub 2}O, is reported. When the incident x-ray energy is tuned to the CuK-absorption edge, large enhancements of the spectral features corresponding to the electronic transitions between the valence band and the conduction band are observed. A feature at 6.5 eV can be well described by an interband transition from occupied states of mostly Cu3d character to unoccupied states with mixed 3d, 4s, and O2p character. In addition, an insulating band gap is observed, and the momentum dependence of the lower bound is measured along the {Gamma}-R direction. This is found to be in good agreement with the valence-band dispersion measured with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

  8. Inelastic x-ray scattering studies on dynamic structure factor of polymeric liquid Se under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Masanori; Kajihara, Yukio; Kimura, Koji; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Ohara, Koji; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke

    2015-08-17

    Inelastic X-ray scattering measurements at 25 MPa using synchrotron radiation were carried out for semiconducting liquid Se at high temperatures up to 1673 K. The excitation energy of the acoustic mode disperses approximately 10-50 % faster than the ultrasonic sound velocity in the observed temperature range while the ultrasonic sound rapidly slows down with increasing temperature. We carried out X-ray scattering measurements and found that the average coordination number at 1673 K is 1.3, indicating that the high temperature liquid consists of short chain molecules. These results suggest that weakening of the interatomic interaction is correlated with breaking of polymeric chain molecules.

  9. Acoustic phonons in chrysotile asbestos probed by high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Kumzerov, Yu. A,; Alatas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic phonons in an individual, oriented fiber of chrysotile asbestos (chemical formula Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}) were observed at room temperature in the inelastic x-ray measurement with a very high (meV) resolution. The x-ray scattering vector was aligned along [1 0 0] direction of the reciprocal lattice, nearly parallel to the long axis of the fiber. The latter coincides with [1 0 0] direction of the direct lattice and the axes of the nano-channels. The data were analyzed using a damped harmonic oscillator model. Analysis of the phonon dispersion in the first Brillouin zone yielded the longitudinal sound velocity of (9200 {+-} 600) m/s.

  10. Observation of soft X-rays from extended sources. [such as Perseus star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.; Acton, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    Efforts were directed toward surveying several supernova remnants for the emission of soft X-rays. Rather than attempt to detect such faint X-ray emission, the program was redirected to observe the spectrum and angular structure of the extended X-ray source in the Perseus cluster of galaxies and the super-nova remnant Puppis A. An attempt was made to detect X-ray line emission from Puppis A with a Bragg crystal spectrometer. Observations provide evidence for the presence of X-ray line emission in the spectrum of Puppis A near .65 keV.