Science.gov

Sample records for soil compaction

  1. Compost improves compacted urban soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urban construction sites usually result in compacted soils that limit infiltration and root growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if compost, aeration, and/or prairie grasses can remediate a site setup as a simulated post-construction site (compacted). Five years after establishing the ...

  2. Combined method of compaction of collapsible soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdasarov, Yu.A.

    1994-07-01

    The writer proposes a combined method of compaction of collapsible soils. He presents results of investigations carried out to study compacted zones of pads punched (tamped-out) by rammers 10 and 20 tons in mass, as well as a comparative analysis of the pads over against compacted zones obtained by means of plane rammers. The analysis results are illustrated by the {open_quotes}arch effect{close_quotes} on the stress conditions of the soaked soil mass.

  3. Diagnostics of soil compaction in steppe zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Alexey; Kust, German

    2014-05-01

    Land degradation and desertification are among the major challenges in steppe zone, and leads the risks of food security in affected areas. Soil compaction is one of the basic reasons of degradation of arable land. The processes of soil compaction have different genesis. Knowledge of soil compaction mechanisms and their early diagnostics permit to accurately forecast velocity and degree of degradation processes as well as to undertake effective preventive measures and land reclamation activities. Manifestations of soil compaction and degradation of soil structure due to vertic, alkaline and and mechanical (agro-) compaction, as well as caused by combination of these processes in irrigated and rainfed conditions were studied in four model plots in Krasnodar and Saratov regions of Russia. Typic chernozems, solonetz and kashtanozem solonetz, south chernozem and dark-kashtanozem soils were under investigation. Morphological (mesomorphological, micromorphological and microtomographic) features, as well as number of physical (particle size analyses, water-peptizable clays content (WPC), swelling and shrinking, bulk density and moisture), chemical (humus, pH, CAC, EC), and mineralogical (clay fraction) properties were investigated. Method for grouping soil compaction types by morphological features was proposed. It was shown that: - overcompacted chernozems with vertic features has porosity close to natural chernozems (about 40%), but they had the least pore diameter (7-12 micron) among studied soils. Solonetzic soils had the least amount of "pore-opening" (9%). - irrigation did not lead to the degradation of soil structure on micro-level. - "mechanically" (agro-) compacted soils retained an intra-aggregate porosity. - studied soils are characterized by medium and heavy particle size content (silt [<0.1mm] of 30-60%). Subsoil horizons of chernozems with vertic and alkaline features were the heaviest by particle size content. - the share of WPC to clay ratio was 40% in

  4. Deep Compaction Control of Sandy Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bałachowski, Lech; Kurek, Norbert

    2015-02-01

    Vibroflotation, vibratory compaction, micro-blasting or heavy tamping are typical improvement methods for the cohesionless deposits of high thickness. The complex mechanism of deep soil compaction is related to void ratio decrease with grain rearrangements, lateral stress increase, prestressing effect of certain number of load cycles, water pressure dissipation, aging and other effects. Calibration chamber based interpretation of CPTU/DMT can be used to take into account vertical and horizontal stress and void ratio effects. Some examples of interpretation of soundings in pre-treated and compacted sands are given. Some acceptance criteria for compaction control are discussed. The improvement factors are analysed including the normalised approach based on the soil behaviour type index.

  5. Soil compaction across the old rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluating soil compaction levels across the Old Rotation, the world’s oldest continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) experiment, has not been conducted since the experiment transitioned to conservation tillage and high residue cover crops with and without irrigation. Our objective was to charact...

  6. Soil microbial activity as influenced by compaction and straw mulching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siczek, A.; Frąc, M.

    2012-02-01

    Field study was performed on Haplic Luvisol soil to determine the effects of soil compaction and straw mulching on microbial parameters of soil under soybean. Treatments with different compaction were established on unmulched and mulched with straw soil. The effect of soil compaction and straw mulching on the total bacteria number and activities of dehydrogenases, protease, alkaline and acid phosphatases was studied. The results of study indicated the decrease of enzymes activities in strongly compacted soil and their increase in medium compacted soil as compared to no-compacted treatment. Mulch application caused stimulation of the bacteria total number and enzymatic activity in the soil under all compaction levels. Compaction and mulch effects were significant for all analyzed microbial parameters (P<0.001).

  7. Soil compaction: Evaluation of stress transmission and resulting soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Schjønning, Per; Keller, Thomas; Lamande, Mathieu

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimation of stress transmission and resultant deformation in soil profiles is a prerequisite for the development of predictive models and decision support tools for preventing soil compaction. Numerous studies have been carried out on the effects of soil compaction, whilst relatively few studies have focused on the cause (mode of stress transmission in the soil). We have coupled both cause and effects together in the present study by carrying out partially confined compression tests on (1) wet aggregates, (2) air dry aggregates, and (3) intact soils to quantify stress transmission and compaction-resulted soil structure at the same time. Stress transmission was quantified using both X-ray CT and Tactilus sensor mat, and soil-pore structure was quantified using X-ray CT. Our results imply that stress transmission through soil highly depends on the magnitude of applied load and aggregate strength. As soon as the applied load is lower than the aggregate strength, the mode of stress transmission is discrete as stresses were mainly transmitted through chain of aggregates. With increasing applied load soil aggregates start deforming that transformed heterogeneous soil into homogenous, as a result stress transmission mode was shifted from discrete towards more like a continuum. Continuum-like stress transmission mode was better simulated with Boussinesq (1885) model based on theory of elasticity compared to discrete. The soil-pore structure was greatly affected by increasing applied stresses. Total porosity was reduced 5-16% and macroporosity 50-85% at 620 kPa applied stress for the intact soils. Similarly, significant changes in the morphological indices of the macropore space were also observed with increasing applied stresses.

  8. Three single wheel machines for traction and soil compaction research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three single wheel machines for traction and soil compaction research have been developed in recent years at the USDA-ARS National Soil Dynamics Laboratory. The Traction Research Vehicle has been used extensively for soil bin traction and soil compaction experiments. The vehicle uses feedback comp...

  9. Soil compaction vulnerability at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, Robert H.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Carmichael, Shinji; Esque, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Compaction vulnerability of different types of soils by hikers and vehicles is poorly known, particularly for soils of arid and semiarid regions. Engineering analyses have long shown that poorly sorted soils (for example, sandy loams) compact to high densities, whereas well-sorted soils (for example, eolian sand) do not compact, and high gravel content may reduce compaction. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (ORPI) in southwestern Arizona, is affected greatly by illicit activities associated with the United States–Mexico border, and has many soils that resource managers consider to be highly vulnerable to compaction. Using geospatial soils data for ORPI, compaction vulnerability was estimated qualitatively based on the amount of gravel and the degree of sorting of sand and finer particles. To test this qualitative assessment, soil samples were collected from 48 sites across all soil map units, and undisturbed bulk densities were measured. A scoring system was used to create a vulnerability index for soils on the basis of particle-size sorting, soil properties derived from Proctor compaction analyses, and the field undisturbed bulk densities. The results of the laboratory analyses indicated that the qualitative assessments of soil compaction vulnerability underestimated the area of high vulnerability soils by 73 percent. The results showed that compaction vulnerability of desert soils, such as those at ORPI, can be quantified using laboratory tests and evaluated using geographic information system analyses, providing a management tool that managers potentially could use to inform decisions about activities that reduce this type of soil disruption in protected areas.

  10. Site-Specific Compaction, Soil Physical Property, and Crop Yield Relationships for Claypan Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil compaction is a concern in crop production and environmental protection. Compaction is most often quantified in the field, albeit indirectly, using cone penetrometer measurements of soil strength. The objective of this research was to relate soil compaction to soil physical properties and crop ...

  11. RELATING SPATIAL VARIATIONS IN SOIL COMPACTION TO SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND CROP YIELDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil compaction is a concern in crop production and environmental protection. Compaction is most often quantified in the field, albeit indirectly, using cone penetrometer measurements of soil strength, reported as cone index (CI). The objective of this research was to relate soil compaction, measure...

  12. Responses of methane effluxes and soil methane concentrations to compaction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plain, C.; Delogu, E.; Longdoz, B.; Epron, D.; Ranger, J.

    2015-12-01

    Forest soils host methanotrophic bacterial communities that make them a major methane sink worldwide. Soil compaction resulting from mechanization of forest operations is first affecting soil macroporosity, and thus gas and water transfer within the soil, leading to a reduced oxygenation of the soil. This reduction of soil aeration is expected to reduce the methanotrophic activity leading thus to less CH4 oxidation and more CH4 production, affecting the overall soil CH4budget. Compaction was applied in 2007 and had created linear ruts. We measured continuously since September 2014, in three different situations (compacted-mound, compacted hollow and control), soil CO2 and CH4 effluxes using closed chamber coupled to a cavity ring down spectrometer in an young oak plantation. Since December 2015, in addition to these measurements, we have implanted hydrophobic tubes to measure vertical soil profiles of CH4, O2 and CO2 concentrations in the 3 situations. The soil acts as CH4 sink, with no significant difference in net CH4uptake between control and both hollow and mound in the compacted treatment. However, the uptake of CH4 was significantly lower for the hollows than for the mounds resulting from both a lower diffusion of CH4 within soil and a higher production of CH4 in deeper layer when the soil is water saturated.

  13. Soil compaction and structural morphology under tractor wheelings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanahan, Peter; Quinton, John; Binley, Andrew; Silgram, Martyn

    2010-05-01

    Compaction of cultivated soils is a major problem for agriculture in terms of yield decline and sustainable soil resource management. Tramline wheelings exacerbate runoff and increase erosion from arable land. The UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) LINK Project - a joint venture between agri-business, land managers and research groups - is currently evaluating a number of methods for alleviating compaction in tractor wheelings across a range of soil types in England. Using innovative applications of agri-geophysics (e.g. ground penetrating radar, electrical resistivity, acoustics and x-ray tomography), this current project aims to determine relationships between properties derived from geophysical methods (e.g. soil moisture, porosity), soil compaction and structural morphology. Such relationships are important for a clearer understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in compacted soils, to address land management practices and develop cost-effective mitigation measures. Our poster will present some early results of this study.

  14. SOIL COMPACTION AND POULTRY LITTER EFFECTS ON FACTORS AFFECTING NITROGEN AVAILABILITY IN A CLAYPAN SOIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil compaction may affect N mineralization and the subsequent fate of N in agroecosystems. Laboratory incubation and field experiments were conducted to determine the effects of surface soil compaction on soil N mineralization in a claypan soil amended with poultry litter (i.e., turkey excrement mi...

  15. Quantifying the heterogeneity of soil compaction, physical soil properties and soil moisture across multiple spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian; Sander, Graham

    2016-04-01

    England's rural landscape is dominated by pastoral agriculture, with 40% of land cover classified as either improved or semi-natural grassland according to the Land Cover Map 2007. Since the Second World War the intensification of agriculture has resulted in greater levels of soil compaction, associated with higher stocking densities in fields. Locally compaction has led to loss of soil storage and an increased in levels of ponding in fields. At the catchment scale soil compaction has been hypothesised to contribute to increased flood risk. Previous research (Pattison, 2011) on a 40km2 catchment (Dacre Beck, Lake District, UK) has shown that when soil characteristics are homogeneously parameterised in a hydrological model, downstream peak discharges can be 65% higher for a heavy compacted soil than for a lightly compacted soil. However, at the catchment scale there is likely to be a significant amount of variability in compaction levels within and between fields, due to multiple controlling factors. This research focusses in on one specific type of land use (permanent pasture with cattle grazing) and areas of activity within the field (feeding area, field gate, tree shelter, open field area). The aim was to determine if the soil characteristics and soil compaction levels are homogeneous in the four areas of the field. Also, to determine if these levels stayed the same over the course of the year, or if there were differences at the end of the dry (October) and wet (April) periods. Field experiments were conducted in the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK, which has an area of 120km2. The dynamic cone penetrometer was used to determine the structural properties of the soil, soil samples were collected to assess the bulk density, organic matter content and permeability in the laboratory and the Hydrosense II was used to determine the soil moisture content in the topsoil. Penetration results show that the tree shelter is the most compacted and the open field area

  16. The impact of soil compaction on runoff - a meta analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogger, Magdalena; Blöschl, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Soil compaction caused by intensive agricultural practices is known to influence runoff processes at the local scale and is often speculated to have an impact on flood events at much larger scales. Due to the complex and diverse mechanisms related to soil compaction, the key processes influencing runoff at different scales are still poorly understood. The impacts of soil compaction are, however, not only investigated by hydrologists, but also by agricultural scientists since changes in the soil structure and water availability have a direct impact on agricultural yield. Results from these studies are also of interest to hydrologists. This study presents a meta analysis of such agricultural studies with the aim to analyse and bring together the results related to runoff processes. The study identifies the most important parameters used to describe soil compaction effects and compares the observed impacts under different climatic and soil conditions. The specific type of agricultural practice causing the soil compaction is also taken into account. In a further step the results of this study shall be used to derive a toy model for scenario analysis in order to identify the potential impacts of soil compaction on runoff processes at larger scales then the plot scale.

  17. Recovery of compacted soils in Mojave Desert ghost towns.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webb, R.H.; Steiger, J.W.; Wilshire, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Residual compaction of soils was measured at seven sites in five Mojave Desert ghost towns. Soils in these Death Valley National Monument townsites were compacted by vehicles, animals, and human trampling, and the townsites had been completely abandoned and the buildings removed for 64 to 75 yr. Recovery times extrapolated using a linear recovery model ranged from 80 to 140 yr and averaged 100 yr. The recovery times were related to elevation, suggesting freeze-thaw loosening as an important factor in ameliorating soil compaction in the Mojave Desert. -from Authors

  18. Sensing and 3D Mapping of Soil Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Yücel; Kul, Basri; Okursoy, Rasim

    2008-01-01

    Soil compaction is an important physical limiting factor for the root growth and plant emergence and is one of the major causes for reduced crop yield worldwide. The objective of this study was to generate 2D/3D soil compaction maps for different depth layers of the soil. To do so, a soil penetrometer was designed, which was mounted on the three-point hitch of an agricultural tractor, consisting of a mechanical system, data acquisition system (DAS), and 2D/3D imaging and analysis software. The system was successfully tested in field conditions, measuring soil penetration resistances as a function of depth from 0 to 40 cm at 1 cm intervals. The software allows user to either tabulate the measured quantities or generate maps as soon as data collection has been terminated. The system may also incorporate GPS data to create geo-referenced soil maps. The software enables the user to graph penetration resistances at a specified coordinate. Alternately, soil compaction maps could be generated using data collected from multiple coordinates. The data could be automatically stratified to determine soil compaction distribution at different layers of 5, 10,.…, 40 cm depths. It was concluded that the system tested in this study could be used to assess the soil compaction at topsoil and the randomly distributed hardpan formations just below the common tillage depths, enabling visualization of spatial variability through the imaging software.

  19. Experimental study of soil compaction effects on GPR signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Hu, Zhenqi; Zhao, Yanling; Li, Xinju

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical operations may lead to soil compaction hazard in land consolidation projects. Aiming to quantitatively guarantee soil compaction status with ground penetrating radar (GPR), we should clearly understand the relationship between bulk density/penetration resistance (PR) and GPR signals. This research adopted GPR with a central frequency of 500 MHz and the experimental design with laboratory test and outdoor test. Because soil dielectric constant receives combination influence of soil properties, statistical methods were used to analyze the influence of soil bulk density on electromagnetic wave velocity. Significant correlation exists between electromagnetic wave velocity and bulk density, with a partial correlation coefficient of 0.882 and two-tailed significance of 0.020. While soil dielectric constant strongly depends on soil water content, the growing of soil bulk density usually reduces free water content, increases bound water content and finally influences GPR signals. The results also showed that high soil PR value accompanied with low amplitude values of electromagnetic wave and fast decay rate of the amplitude back to noise level. More experimental data would be acquired for accurate quantification between soil compaction and GPR signals with statistic methods in the future research.

  20. Development of a Hydraulic-driven Soil Penetrometer for Measuring Soil Compaction in Field Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekin, Yucel; Okursoy, Rasim

    Soil compaction is an important physical limiting factor for root emergence and the growth of plants. Therefore it is essential to control soil compaction, which is normally caused by heavy traffic in fields during the growing season. Soil compaction in fields is usually measured by using standard soil cone penetrometers, which can be of several different types according to their design. Most of the time, especially in heavy soil conditions, measuring soil compaction with a standard hand penetrometer produces measurement errors if the cone of the penetrometer cannot be pushed into the soil at a standard rate. Obtaining data with hand penetrometers is also difficult and takes a long time and effort. For this reason, a three-point hitch-mounted and hydraulic-driven soil cone penetrometer has been designed in order to reduce time and effort and to reduce possible measurement errors in the sampling of soil compaction data for research purposes. The hydraulic penetrometer is mounted on the three-point hitch and a hydraulic piston pushes the standard penetrometer cone into the soil at a constant speed. Forces acting on the cone base are recorded with a computer-based 16-bit data acquisition system composed of a load cell, a portable computer, signal amplification and necessary control software for the sampling. As a conclusion, the designed and constructed three-point hitch-mounted hydraulic-driven standard soil cone penetrometer provides with quick and very accurate measurements about soil compaction in clay soil in heavy conditions.

  1. Risk assessment of soil compaction in Walloon Region (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlotte, Rosiere; Marie-France, Destain; Jean-Claude, Verbrugge

    2010-05-01

    The proposed Soil Framework Directive COM(2006)232 requires Member States to identify areas at risk of erosion, decline in organic matter, salinisation, compaction, sealing and landslides, as well as to set up an inventory of contaminated sites. The present project aims to identify the susceptibility to compaction of soils of the Walloon Region (Belgium) and to recommend good farming practices avoiding soil compaction as far as possible. Within this scope, the concept of precompression stress (Pc) (Horn and Fleige, 2003) was used. Pc is defined as the maximum major principal stress that a soil horizon can withstand against any applied external vertical stress. If applied stress is higher than Pc, the soil enters in a plastic state, not easily reversible. For a given soil, the intensity of soil compaction is mainly due to the applied load which depends on vehicle characteristics (axle load, tyre dimensions, tyre inflation pressure, and vehicle velocity). To determine soil precompression stress, pedotransfert functions of Lebert and Horn (1991) defined at two water suctions (pF 1.8 and 2.5) were used. Parameters required by these functions were found within several databases (Aardewerk and Digital Map of Walloon Soils) and literature. The validation of Pc was performed by measuring stress-strain relationships using automatic oedometers. Stresses of 15.6, 31, 3, 62.5, 125, 250, 500 and 1000 kPa were applied for 10 min each. In this study, the compaction due to beet harvesters was considered because the axle load can exceed 10 tons and these machines are often used during wet conditions. The compaction at two depth levels was considered: 30 and 50 cm. Compaction of topsoil was not taken into account because, under conventional tillage, the plough depth is lower than 25 cm. Before and after the passage of the machines, following measurements were performed: granulometry, density, soil moisture, pF curve, Atterberg limits, ... The software Soilflex (Keller et al., 2007

  2. Soil Compaction Varies by Crop Management System over a Claypan Soil Landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the effects of landscape position and management practices on soil compaction have been documented as individual factors, limited understanding exists of their interactions. Such understanding is needed to prevent site-specific compaction and to better optimize soil management practices using ...

  3. Subsoil compaction in Flanders: from soil map to susceptibility map and risk map for subsoil compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vreken, Philippe; van Holm, Lieven; Diels, Jan; van Orshoven, Jos

    2010-05-01

    In contrast to topsoil compaction, which can be remediated by normal soil tillage and natural loosening processes, subsoil compaction must be considered as a long term threat to soil productivity as this form of compaction is much more persistent and not easy to alleviate. Therefore we focused on subsoil compaction with a view to demarcate areas prone to soil compaction in Flanders, Belgium. The susceptibility of soil material to compaction is inversely related to its structural strength which can be expressed in terms of precompression stress (PCS). In order to construct maps of subsoil susceptibility we upgraded the soil map of Flanders, originally printed at a scale of 1:20.000, by attributing a ‘typical' PCS-value to the legend units. These PCS-values were estimated by means of pedotransfer functions (PTFs), valid either at pF 1.8 or pF 2.5, elaborated from PCS-measurements on soils in Germany by Lebert and Horn (1991). Predictor values for the PTFs were supplied by or derived by means of other PTFs from a historical database of georeferenced soil profiles, which were analysed between 1947 and 1971. After regional stratification, soil profiles with associated horizons were linked to soil map units based on corresponding classification units. Next, for each map unit the horizon at 40 cm of depth was selected and its characteristics retrieved for use in the PTFs. The two resulting PCS-maps (pF 1.8 or 2.5) show the susceptibility to compaction of almost uncompacted or little compacted arable soils as they were present in the period 1950-1970, when the wheel loads of the agricultural equipment of that time were much lower compared to the wheel loads that are common today. Both maps of inherent susceptibility at fixed pF were combined into a ‘hybrid map' of the inherent susceptibility to subsoil compaction in spring, when the groundwater table is at its highest level and correspondingly also the susceptibility to compaction is highest. Each soil map unit was

  4. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Cover Soils: Effects of Soil Compaction and Water Blockages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Hamamoto, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Nawagamuwa, U.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric CH4. landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest source of anthropogenic CH4 emission , the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the biogas migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil , there are few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils. Therefore, the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size and water blockage effects on the gas exchange in t highly compacted final cover soil are largely unknown. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport . In this study, the effects of compaction level and water blockage effects on ka and Dp for two landfill final cover soils were investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final covers in Japan and Sri Lanka. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm) at two different compaction levels (2700 kN/m2 and 600 kN/m2). After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential (pF; pF equals to log(-ɛ) where ɛ is soil-water matric potential in cm H2O) of 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.1, and with air-dried (pF 6.0) and oven-dried (pF 6.9) conditions. Results showed that measured Dp values

  5. Freeze-Thaw Cycles Effects on Soil Compaction in a Clay Loam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabro, J.; Evans, R.; Iversen, W.

    2012-04-01

    Inappropriate soil management practices and heavier farm machinery and equipment have led to an increase in soil compaction in the last two decades prompting increased global concern regarding the impact of soil compaction on crop production and soil quality in modern mechanized agriculture. A 3-yr comprehensive study was established to evaluate the dynamic of freeze-thaw cycles on soil compaction in a clay loam soil. Plots of frozen soils were compared with plots where soils were prevented from freezing with electrically heated blankets commonly used on concrete. Results showed that frequent freeze-thaw cycles over the winter alleviated a majority of soil compaction at the 0 - 20 cm depth. Soil penetration resistance in compacted soils was reduced by 73 and 68% over the winter at the 0 - 10 and 10 - 20 cm depths, respectively, due to dynamic effects of freeze-thaw cycles on soil structure and particles configuration. In unfrozen compacted soils, the penetration resistance was also reduced by 50 and 60% over winter at the 0 - 10 and 10 - 20 cm depths, respectively, due to the biology of soil, microbial activity, and disruptive effects of shrink-swell cycles. These results have demonstrated of how repeated freeze-thaw cycles can alleviate soil compaction, alter soil physical quality and create optimal soil conditions required for profitable growth of agricultural crops. The results from this study will save growers considerable time, money and energy currently required to alleviate soil compaction using other methods such as sub-soiling and deep tillage. We believe that Mother Nature provides ways to reverse soil compaction and improve soil structure and aggregation through the dynamic of freeze-thaw cycles that soils in Montana and other parts of the country go through each year. We concluded that the Mother Nature is the most effective and cheapest way to alleviate soil compaction.

  6. Freeze-thaw cycles effects on soil compaction in a clay loam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inappropriate soil management practices and heavier farm machinery and equipment have led to an increase in soil compaction in the last two decades prompting increased global concern regarding the impact of soil compaction on crop production and soil quality in modern mechanized agriculture. A 3-yr ...

  7. Statistical and Multifractal Evaluation of Soil Compaction in a Vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, M.; Raposo, J. R.; Mirás Avalos, J. M.; Paz González, A.

    2012-04-01

    One of the detrimental effects caused by agricultural machines is soil compaction, which can be defined by an increase in soil bulk density. Soil compaction often has a negative impact on plant growth, since it reduces the macroporosity and soil permeability and increases resistance to penetration. Our research explored the effect of the agricultural machinery on soil when trafficking through a vineyard at a small spatial scale, based on the evaluation of the soil compaction status. The objectives of this study were: i) to quantify soil bulk density along transects following wine row, wheel track and outside track, and, ii) to characterize the variability of the bulk density along these transects using multifractal analysis. The field work was conducted at the experimental farm of EVEGA (Viticulture and Enology Centre of Galicia) located in Ponte San Clodio, Leiro, Orense, Spain. Three parallel transects were marked on positions with contrasting machine traffic effects, i.e. vine row, wheel-track and outside-track. Undisturbed samples were collected in 16 points of each transect, spaced 0.50 m apart, for bulk density determination using the cylinder method. Samples were taken in autumn 2011, after grape harvest. Since soil between vine rows was tilled and homogenized beginning spring 2011, cumulative effects of traffic during the vine growth period could be evaluated. The distribution patterns of soil bulk density were characterized by multifractal analysis carried out by the method of moments. Multifractality was assessed by several indexes derived from the mass exponent, τq, the generalized dimension, Dq, and the singularity spectrum, f(α), curves. Mean soil bulk density values determined for vine row, outside-track and wheel-track transects were 1.212 kg dm-3, 1.259 kg dm-3and 1.582 kg dm-3, respectively. The respective coefficients of variation (CV) for these three transects were 7.76%, 4.82% and 2.03%. Therefore mean bulk density under wheel-track was 30

  8. Compact Subsurface Soil Investigation System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The compact subsurface soil investigation system is a mobile soil sampler used to obtain soil samples, including from below concrete floors, such as under fuel soil basins. If soils under buildings can be sampled and analyzed to document that the soil is not contaminated and thus can remain in place, the concrete structure over it may also be left in place or only partially removed. Taking soil samples through a concrete floor, often in inaccessible or congested locations, required rugged, portable equipment, such as the improved technology tested, the Geoprobe Model 540M soil sampler that is mounted on a hand cart. The traditional (baseline) technology used a comparable probe mounted on a full-size, 1-ton capacity, diesel-powered truck. The truck was not easily able to access all areas, because of its greater size and weight. In two sample holes from below the fuel storage basin at C-Reactor, the Geoprobe Model 540M was able to penetrate to the full sampling target depth of 3.3 m (10 ft). In the other three locations the sampler was stopped at lesser depths because of large stones. The Geoprobe 540M reduced schedule time and reduced costs by approximately 50% versus the baseline technology. For sampling at a congested fuel storage basin at five locations, the improved technology cost $7,300, whereas the baseline technology would have cost $13,000. As an extension of this demonstration, cost savings and schedule acceleration can be expected to increase commensurate with structure complexity/congestion and the number of samples required.

  9. RESOUNDING SOIL: AAES AND ARS RESEARCHERS EXPLORING ACOUSTIC COMPACTION LAYER DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring the depth of soil compaction has traditionally been done with a soil cone penetrometer, a labor-intensive and slow stop-and-go method of inserting a probe into the ground. Faster methods are needed for site-specific use of this information. A new sonic method of sensing soil compaction h...

  10. Continuous Cropping Systems Reduce Near-Surface Maximum Compaction in No-Till Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of increased concerns over compaction in NT soils, it is important to assess how continuous cropping systems influence risks of soil compaction across a range of soils and NT management systems. We quantified differences in maximum bulk density (BDmax) and critical water content (CWC) by the...

  11. The impact of soil compaction and freezing-thawing cycles on soil structure and yield in Mollisol region of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Enheng; Zhao, Yusen; Chen, Xiangwei

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural machinery tillage and alternating freezing and thawing are two critical factors associated with soil structure change and accelerates soil erosion in the black soil region of Northeast China. Combining practical machinery operation and natural freeze-thaw cycles with artificial machinery compaction in the field and artificial freeze-thaw cycles in the lab, the plus and minus benefits of machinery tillage, characterization of seasonal freeze-thaw cycles, and their effects on soil structure and yield were studied. Firstly,the effects of machinery type and antecedent water content on soil structure and soil available nutrient were investigated by measuring soil bulk density, soil strength, soil porosity, soil aggregate distribution and stability, and three soil phases. The results showed that: Machinery tillage had positive and negative influence on soil structure, soil in top cultivated layer can be loosened and ameliorated however the subsoil accumulation of compaction was resulted. For heavy and medium machinery, subsoil compaction formed in the soil depth of 41~60cm and 31~40cm, respectively; however during the soil depth of 17.5~30cm under medium machinery operation there was a new plow pan produced because of the depth difference between harvesting and subsoiling. Antecedent water content had a significant effect on soil structure under machinery operations. Higher water antecedent resulted in deeper subsoil compaction at 40cm,which was deeper by 10cm than lower water content and soil compaction accumulation occurred at the first pass under higher water content condition. Besides water content and bulk density, soil organic matter is another key factor for affecting compressive-resilient performance of tillage soil. Secondly, based on the soils sampled from fields of the black soil region, the effects of freeze-thaw cycles on soil structure at different soil depths (0 -- 40 cm, 40 -- 80 cm, 120 -- 160 cm) and size scales (field core sampling

  12. Resistance and resilience of the forest soil microbiome to logging-associated compaction

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Martin; Niklaus, Pascal A; Zimmermann, Stephan; Schmutz, Stefan; Kremer, Johann; Abarenkov, Kessy; Lüscher, Peter; Widmer, Franco; Frey, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Soil compaction is a major disturbance associated with logging, but we lack a fundamental understanding of how this affects the soil microbiome. We assessed the structural resistance and resilience of the microbiome using a high-throughput pyrosequencing approach in differently compacted soils at two forest sites and correlated these findings with changes in soil physical properties and functions. Alterations in soil porosity after compaction strongly limited the air and water conductivity. Compaction significantly reduced abundance, increased diversity, and persistently altered the structure of the microbiota. Fungi were less resistant and resilient than bacteria; clayey soils were less resistant and resilient than sandy soils. The strongest effects were observed in soils with unfavorable moisture conditions, where air and water conductivities dropped well below 10% of their initial value. Maximum impact was observed around 6–12 months after compaction, and microbial communities showed resilience in lightly but not in severely compacted soils 4 years post disturbance. Bacteria capable of anaerobic respiration, including sulfate, sulfur, and metal reducers of the Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, were significantly associated with compacted soils. Compaction detrimentally affected ectomycorrhizal species, whereas saprobic and parasitic fungi proportionally increased in compacted soils. Structural shifts in the microbiota were accompanied by significant changes in soil processes, resulting in reduced carbon dioxide, and increased methane and nitrous oxide emissions from compacted soils. This study demonstrates that physical soil disturbance during logging induces profound and long-lasting changes in the soil microbiome and associated soil functions, raising awareness regarding sustainable management of economically driven logging operations. PMID:24030594

  13. Resistance and resilience of the forest soil microbiome to logging-associated compaction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Martin; Niklaus, Pascal A; Zimmermann, Stephan; Schmutz, Stefan; Kremer, Johann; Abarenkov, Kessy; Lüscher, Peter; Widmer, Franco; Frey, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Soil compaction is a major disturbance associated with logging, but we lack a fundamental understanding of how this affects the soil microbiome. We assessed the structural resistance and resilience of the microbiome using a high-throughput pyrosequencing approach in differently compacted soils at two forest sites and correlated these findings with changes in soil physical properties and functions. Alterations in soil porosity after compaction strongly limited the air and water conductivity. Compaction significantly reduced abundance, increased diversity, and persistently altered the structure of the microbiota. Fungi were less resistant and resilient than bacteria; clayey soils were less resistant and resilient than sandy soils. The strongest effects were observed in soils with unfavorable moisture conditions, where air and water conductivities dropped well below 10% of their initial value. Maximum impact was observed around 6-12 months after compaction, and microbial communities showed resilience in lightly but not in severely compacted soils 4 years post disturbance. Bacteria capable of anaerobic respiration, including sulfate, sulfur, and metal reducers of the Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, were significantly associated with compacted soils. Compaction detrimentally affected ectomycorrhizal species, whereas saprobic and parasitic fungi proportionally increased in compacted soils. Structural shifts in the microbiota were accompanied by significant changes in soil processes, resulting in reduced carbon dioxide, and increased methane and nitrous oxide emissions from compacted soils. This study demonstrates that physical soil disturbance during logging induces profound and long-lasting changes in the soil microbiome and associated soil functions, raising awareness regarding sustainable management of economically driven logging operations. PMID:24030594

  14. Influence of suction cycles on the soil fabric of compacted swelling soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowamooz, Hossein; Masrouri, Farimah

    2010-12-01

    The soil fabric plays an important role in complex hydromechanical behaviour of the expansive soils. This article addresses the influence of the wetting and drying paths on the soil fabric of compacted bentonite and silt mixtures at two different initial dry densities corresponding to loose and dense states. To obtain the hydric response of the soil, two suction imposition techniques were used: osmotic technique for the suction range less than 8.5 MPa and the vapour equilibrium or the salt solution technique for the suction range between 8.5 and 287.9 MPa. Additionally, the soil fabric analysis was performed using mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and nitrogen gas adsorption (BET) techniques. The dense samples produced cumulative swelling strains during the suction cycles, while shrinkage was observed for the loose samples. The suction cycles induced an equilibrium state indicative of the elastic behaviour of the samples. The soil fabric analysis showed that regardless of the soil's initial state (loose or dense), the samples obtained the same soil fabric at the equilibrium state. The experimental results illustrated also the existence of an elastic void ratio ( e0el) where the compacted soils at this state present an elastic hydric behaviour during the successive suction cycles.

  15. Reducing compaction effort and incorporating air permeability in Proctor testing for design of urban green spaces on cohesive soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well established that compaction negatively affects agronomic productivity, that air permeability is a sensitive measure of the degree of soil compaction and therefore a good indicator of soil productivity impairment from compaction. Cohesive soils in urban settings are often heavily compacted...

  16. Soil microbial activity and functional diversity changed by compaction, poultry litter and cropping in a claypan soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in soil physical characteristics induced by soil compaction may alter soil microhabitats and, therefore, play a significant role in governing soil microorganisms and their activities. Laboratory incubation and field experiments were conducted in 2001 and 2002 to investigate the effects of so...

  17. A long-term soil structure observatory for post-compaction soil structure evolution: design and initial soil structure recovery observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Thomas; Colombi, Tino; Ruiz, Siul; Grahm, Lina; Reiser, René; Rek, Jan; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Schymanski, Stanislaus; Walter, Achim; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Soil compaction due to agricultural vehicular traffic alters the geometrical arrangement of soil constituents, thereby modifying mechanical properties and pore spaces that affect a range of soil hydro-ecological functions. The ecological and economic costs of soil compaction are dependent on the immediate impact on soil functions during the compaction event, and a function of the recovery time. In contrast to a wealth of soil compaction information, mechanisms and rates of soil structure recovery remain largely unknown. A long-term (>10-yr) soil structure observatory (SSO) was established in 2014 on a loamy soil in Zurich, Switzerland, to quantify rates and mechanisms of structure recovery of compacted arable soil under different post-compaction management treatments. We implemented three initial compaction treatments (using a two-axle agricultural vehicle with 8 Mg wheel load): compaction of the entire plot area (i.e. track-by-track), compaction in wheel tracks, and no compaction. After compaction, we implemented four post-compaction soil management systems: bare soil (BS), permanent grass (PG), crop rotation without mechanical loosening (NT), and crop rotation under conventional tillage (CT). BS and PG provide insights into uninterrupted natural processes of soil structure regeneration under reduced (BS) and normal biological activity (PG). The two cropping systems (NT and CT) enable insights into soil structure recovery under common agricultural practices with minimal (NT) and conventional mechanical soil disturbance (CT). Observations include periodic sampling and measurements of soil physical properties, earthworm abundance, crop measures, electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar imaging, and continuous monitoring of state variables - soil moisture, temperature, CO2 and O2 concentrations, redox potential and oxygen diffusion rates - for which a network of sensors was installed at various depths (0-1 m). Initial compaction increased soil bulk density

  18. Effect of soil compaction on the degradation and ecotoxicological impact of isoproturon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamy, L.; Vrignaud, P.; Cheviron, N.; Perreau, F.; Belkacem, M.; Brault, A.; Breuil, S.; Delarue, G.; Touton, I.; Chaplain, V.

    2009-04-01

    Soil is essentially a non-renewable resource which performs many functions and delivers services vital to human activities and ecosystems survival. However the capacity of soil to keep on fully performing its broad variety of crucial functions is damaged by several threats and, among them, chemical contamination by pesticides and compaction due to intensive agriculture practices. How these two threats could interact is largely unknown: compaction may modify the fate of pesticides in soil therefore their effects on the biological functioning of soil. The aim of this work was to study the effect of soil compaction on (1) the degradation of one herbicide, isoproturon (2) the ecotoxicological impact of this herbicide measured through two enzyme activities involved in C (beta-glucosidase) and N (urease) cycles in soil. Undisturbed soil cylinders were sampled in the 2-4 cm layer of La Cage experimental site (INRA, Versailles, France), under intensive agriculture practices. Several soil samples were prepared with different bulk density then treated with isoproturon (IPU). The samples were incubated at 18 ± 1°C in darkness for 63 days. At 0, 2, 7, 14, 28 and 63 days, the concentrations of isoproturon and of two of its main metabolites in soil (monodesmethyl-isoproturon, IPPMU; didesmethyl-isoproturon, IPPU), and the enzyme activities were measured. The results showed that there was no significant difference in IPU degradation under no and moderate soil compaction. IPU was less persistent in the highly compacted soil, but this soil had also higher humidity which is known to increase the degradation. Only one metabolite, IPPMU, was detected independently of the conditions of compaction. The compaction did not modify the effect of IPU on beta-glucosidase and urease activities in the long term, but microbial communities were probably the same in all the soil samples that were initially not compacted. The communities developed in durably compacted zones in the field are

  19. Reduction of Soil compaction in a cotton and peanut rotation using conservation systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Southern Coastal Plain soils benefit from the adoption of conservation tillage systems as water retention and organic matter increase which improves soil structure. However, some Coastal Plain soils are prone to compaction and tend to form hardpans which restrict root growth and reduce yields. The a...

  20. Long-term effects of deep soil loosening on root distribution and soil physical parameters in compacted lignite mine soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badorreck, Annika; Krümmelbein, Julia; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is a major problem of soils on dumped mining substrates in Lusatia, Germany. Deep ripping and cultivation of deep rooting plant species are considered to be effective ways of agricultural recultivation. Six years after experiment start, we studied the effect of initial deep soil loosening (i.e. down to 65 cm) on root systems of rye (Secale cereale) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and on soil physical parameters. We conducted a soil monolith sampling for each treatment (deep loosened and unloosened) and for each plant species (in three replicates, respectively) to determine root diameter, length density and dry mass as well as soil bulk density. Further soil physical analysis comprised water retention, hydraulic conductivity and texture in three depths. The results showed different reactions of the root systems of rye and alfalfa six years after deep ripping. In the loosened soil the root biomass of the rye was lower in depths of 20-40 cm and the root biomass of alfalfa was also decreased in depths of 20-50 cm together with a lower root diameter for both plant species. Moreover, total and fine root length density was higher for alfalfa and vice versa for rye. The soil physical parameters such as bulk density showed fewer differences, despite a higher bulk density in 30-40cm for the deep loosened rye plot which indicates a more pronounced plough pan.

  1. Soybean nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation in response to soil compaction and mulching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siczek, A.; Lipiec, J.

    2009-04-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legume crops such as soybean plays a key role in supplying nitrogen for agricultural systems. In symbiotic associations with Bradyrhizobium japonicum soybean can fix up to 200 kg N ha-1 yr-1. This reduces the need for expensive and often environmentally harmful because of leaching nitrogen fertilization. However both soybean nodulation and nitrogen fixation are sensitive to soil conditions. One of the critical soil constraints is soil compaction. Increasing use of heavy equipment and intensive cropping in modern agriculture leads to excessive soil compaction. Compaction often is found as a result of field operations that have to be performed in a very short period of time and when soils are wet and more susceptible to compaction. This results in unfavourable water content, temperature, aeration, pore size distribution, strength for plant growth and microbial activity. The surface mulching can alleviate the adverse effect of the environmental factors on soil by decreasing fluctuation of soil temperature, increasing moisture by controlling evaporation from the soil surface, decreasing bulk density, preventing soil crusting. The effect of mulch on soil conditions largely depends on soil compaction and weather conditions during growing season. The positive effect of the straw mulch on soil moisture has been seen under seasons with insufficient rainfalls. However thicker layers of mulch can act as diffusion barrier, especially when the mulch is wet. Additionally, low soil temperature prevalent during early spring under mulch can impede development of nodule, nodule size and delay onset of nodulation. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the straw mulch on nodulation and nitrogen fixation of soybean in variously compacted soil. The experimental field was 192 m2and was divided into three parts composed of 6 micro-plots with area 7 m2. Three degrees of soil compaction obtained in each field part through tractor passes were

  2. Soil microbial biomass nitrogen and Beta-Glucosaminidase activity response to compaction, poultry litter application and cropping in a claypan soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compaction-induced changes in soil physical properties may significantly affect soil microbial activity, especially nitrogen-cycling processes, in many agroecosystems. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of soil compaction on soil microbiological properties related to N in a clay...

  3. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-01

    Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 × 10(-10), 2.08 × 10(-9) and 6.8 × 10(-10)m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH=2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m(3)) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity. PMID:22980909

  4. Natural physical and biological processes compromise the long-term performance of compacted soil caps

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.D.

    1995-12-01

    Compacted soil barriers are components of essentially all caps placed on closed waste disposal sites. The intended functions of soil barriers in waste facility caps include restricting infiltration of water and release of gases and vapors, either independently or in combination with synthetic membrane barriers, and protecting other manmade or natural barrier components. Review of the performance of installed soil barriers and of natural processes affecting their performance indicates that compacted soil caps may function effectively for relatively short periods (years to decades), but natural physical and biological processes can be expected to cause them to fail in the long term (decades to centuries). This paper addresses natural physical and biological processes that compromise the performance of compacted soil caps and suggests measures that may reduce the adverse consequences of these natural failure mechanisms.

  5. LLWR techniques for quantifying potential soil compaction consequences of crop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvesting crop residues for bioenergy or bio-product production may decrease soil organic matter (SOM), resulting in the degradation of soil physical properties and ultimately soil productivity. Using the Least Limiting Water Range (LLWR) to evaluate improvement or degradation of soil physical pro...

  6. Environmental impacts of different crop rotations in terms of soil compaction.

    PubMed

    Götze, Philipp; Rücknagel, Jan; Jacobs, Anna; Märländer, Bernward; Koch, Heinz-Josef; Christen, Olaf

    2016-10-01

    Avoiding soil compaction caused by agricultural management is a key aim of sustainable land management, and the soil compaction risk should be considered when assessing the environmental impacts of land use systems. Therefore this project compares different crop rotations in terms of soil structure and the soil compaction risk. It is based on a field trial in Germany, in which the crop rotations (i) silage maize (SM) monoculture, (ii) catch crop mustard (Mu)_sugar beet (SB)-winter wheat (WW)-WW, (iii) Mu_SM-WW-WW and (iv) SB-WW-Mu_SM are established since 2010. Based on the cultivation dates, the operation specific soil compaction risks and the soil compaction risk of the entire crop rotations are modelled at two soil depths (20 and 35 cm). To this end, based on assumptions of the equipment currently used in practice by a model farm, two scenarios are modelled (100 and 50% hopper load for SB and WW harvest). In addition, after one complete rotation, in 2013 and in 2014, the physical soil parameters saturated hydraulic conductivity (kS) and air capacity (AC) were determined at soil depths 2-8, 12-18, 22-28 and 32-38 cm in order to quantify the soil structure. At both soil depths, the modelled soil compaction risks for the crop rotations including SB (Mu_SB-WW-WW, SB-WW-Mu_SM) are higher (20 cm: medium to very high risks; 35 cm: no to medium risks) than for those without SB (SM monoculture, Mu_SM-WW-WW; 20 cm: medium risks; 35 cm: no to low risks). This increased soil compaction risk is largely influenced by the SB harvest in years where soil water content is high. Halving the hopper load and adjusting the tyre inflation pressure reduces the soil compaction risk for the crop rotation as a whole. Under these conditions, there are no to low soil compaction risks for all variants in the subsoil (soil depth 35 cm). Soil structure is mainly influenced in the topsoil (2-8 cm) related to the cultivation of Mu as a catch crop and WW as a preceding crop. Concerning k

  7. Experimental study of nonlinear ultrasonic behavior of soil materials during the compaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Hao; Yao, Yangping

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear ultrasonic behavior of unconsolidated granular medium - soil during the compaction is experimentally studied. The second harmonic generation technique is adopted to investigate the change of microstructural void in materials during the compaction process of loose soils. The nonlinear parameter is measured with the change of two important environmental factors i.e. moisture content and impact energy of compaction. It is found the nonlinear parameter of soil material presents a similar variation pattern with the void ratio of soil samples, corresponding to the increased moisture content and impact energy. A same optimum moisture content is found by observing the variation of nonlinear parameter and void ratio with respect to moisture content. The results indicate that the unconsolidated soil is manipulated by a strong material nonlinearity during the compaction procedure. The developed experimental technique based on the second harmonic generation could be a fast and convenient testing method for the determination of optimum moisture content of soil materials, which is very useful for the better compaction effect of filled embankment for civil infrastructures in-situ. PMID:27010698

  8. Mathematical simulation and calculation of the soil compaction under dynamic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotarevskaya, D. I.

    2011-04-01

    The deformation and compaction of loamy sandy soddy-podzolic soils under linear dynamic changes in the compressive stresses and in the course of the soil creeping were studied in field experiments. The rheological properties of these soils occurring in the viscoelastic state were described by a first-order differential equation relating the compressive stresses, the rates of their changes, and the velocities of the relative vertical compressive deformation. Regression equations were derived for the viscoelastic properties of the studied soil as functions of its density, moisture, and linear compaction velocity. Methods were proposed for the calculation of indices of the stress-strain state and the compaction of soils under specified conditions of changes in their compressive stresses with time and in the course of the soil creeping after the initial linear increase in load. Corresponding computer programs were developed. The effect of the main factors due to the linear increase in the compressive loads and in the course of the soil creeping on the rheological properties, the stress-strain state, and the density of soils was quantitatively estimated. The calculation showed that the values of the soil deformation and the density under compressive stresses lower than the ultimate strength were stabilized with time, and the properties of the viscoelastic soil approached elastic ones.

  9. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-05-29

    Application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed to peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR waveguides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this paper, we introduce a method that estimates this error by combining two models: one that describes soil compaction around cylindrical objects and another that translates change in bulk density to evolution of soil water retention characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention properties of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature indicate that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR waveguide could be up to 10%. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the interradius spacing.

  10. Errors in determination of soil water content using time domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2008-08-01

    Application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed to peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR waveguides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this paper, we introduce a method that estimates this error by combining two models: one that describes soil compaction around cylindrical objects and another that translates change in bulk density to evolution of soil water retention characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention properties of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature indicate that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR waveguide could be up to 10%. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the interradius spacing.

  11. Characterization of field compaction using shrinkage analysis and visual soil examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Alice; Keller, Thomas; Weisskopf, Peter; Schulin, Rainer; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Visual field examination of soil structure can be very useful in extension work, because it is easy to perform, does not require equipment or lab analyses and the result is immediately available. The main limitations of visual methods are subjectivity and variation with field conditions. To provide reliable reference information, methods for objective and quantitative assessment of soil structure quality are still necessary. Soil shrinkage analysis (ShA) (Braudeau et al., 2004) provides relevant parameters for soil functions that allow precise and accurate assessment of soil compaction. To test it, we applied ShA to samples taken from a soil structure observatory (SSO) set up in 2014 on a loamy soil in Zurich, Switzerland to quantify the structural recovery of compacted agricultural soil. The objective in this presentation is to compare the ability of a visual examination method and ShA to assess soil compaction and structural recovery on the SSO field plots. Eighteen undisturbed soil samples were taken in the topsoil (5-10 cm) and 9 samples in the subsoil (30-35 cm) of compacted plots and control. Each sample went through ShA, followed by a visual examination of the sample and analysis of soil organic carbon and texture. ShA combines simultaneous shrinkage with water retention measurements and, in addition to soil properties such as bulk density, coarse and fine porosity, also provides information on hydrostructural stability and plasma and structural porosity. For visual examination the VESS method of Ball et al. (2007) was adapted to core samples previously equilibrated at -100 hPa matric potential. The samples were randomly and anonymously scored to avoid subjectivity and were equilibrated to insure comparable conditions. Compaction decreased the total specific volume, as well as air and water content at all matric potentials. Structural porosity was reduced, while plasma porosity remained unchanged. Compaction also changed the shape of the shrinkage curve: (i

  12. MEASUREMENTS OF INFILTRATION RATES IN COMPACTED URBAN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous research hs identified significant reductions in infiltration rates in disturbed urban soils, More than 150 prior tests were conducted in predominately sandy and clayey urban soils in the Birmingham and Mobile, AL areas. Infiltration in Clayey soils ws found to be affect...

  13. Changes in hydraulic soil conductivity in the walls of zoogenic macropores due to the soil compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelíšek, Igor

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on assessement of the hydric functions and effectiveness of the preferential zoogenic routes (preferentially lumbricid burrows), with primary focus on the hydric functions and parameters of individual vertical tubular macropores and on the analysis of selected possible detailed effects on these functions. The effect of earthworms (Lumbricidae) on the physical soil properties is notable. During burrowing, earthworms press the material in the vicinity of the hollowed burrows. Several variants of the relationship between the macropores and the soil compaction, permeability and erodibility were verified. Both measurements in the field and laboratory tests of intact collected samples and engineered samples were performed. With regard to preferential focus on the hydraulic processes in gravity macropores, to the limits of the instrumentation and the size of individual earthworms in agricultural soils in the Czech Republic, we assessed the processes in the macropores with diameter of ca 5 mm or larger. In some cases, saturated hydraulic conductivity of zoogenic macropore walls was reduced in order of tens of percent compared with hydraulic conductivity of soil matrix, and the increase of bulk density of soil in the macropore vicinity achieved 25%. The effect of repeated rise and water level stagnation (repeated macropore washing during multiple wetting cycles) was tested. Investigation of water erosion of macropores was limited by adjustable flow, vessel capacity and pump capacity of the accurate continuous infiltrometer. Investigation of the water inlet from above gave more data on the washed-off material in the selected time intervals. Analysis of water rise from below and macropore sealing provided one cumulative data for each testing period.

  14. Inter- and Intra- Field variations in soil compaction levels and subsequent impacts on hydrological extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattison, Ian; Coates, Victoria

    2015-04-01

    The rural landscape in the UK is dominated by pastoral agriculture, with about 40% of land cover classified as either improved or semi-natural grassland according to the Land Cover Map 2007. Intensification has resulted in greater levels of compaction associated with higher stocking densities. However, there is likely to be a great amount of variability in compaction levels within and between fields due to multiple controlling factors. This research focusses in on two of these factors; firstly animal species, namely sheep, cattle and horses; and secondly field zonation e.g. feeding areas, field gates, open field. Field experiments have been conducted in multiple fields in the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK, which has an area of 140km2. The effect on physical and hydrologic soil characteristics such as bulk density and moisture contents have been quantified using a wide range of field and laboratory based experiments. Results have highlighted statistically different properties between heavily compacted areas where animals congregate and less-trampled open areas. Furthermore, soil compaction has been hypothesised to contribute to increased flood risk at larger spatial scales. Previous research (Pattison, 2011) on a ~40km2 catchment (Dacre Beck, Lake District, UK) has shown that when soil characteristics are homogeneously parameterised in a hydrological model, downstream peak discharges can be 65% higher for a heavy compacted soil than for a lightly compacted soil. Here we report results from spatially distributed hydrological modelling using soil parameters gained from the field experimentation. Results highlight the importance of both the percentage of the catchment which is heavily compacted and also the spatial distribution of these fields.

  15. An approach for modeling the influence of wheel tractor loads and vibration frequencies on soil compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verotti, M.; Servadio, P.; Belfiore, N. P.; Bergonzoli, S.

    2012-04-01

    Both soil compaction and ground vibration are forms of environmental degradation that may be understood in the context of the vehicle-soil interaction process considered (Hildebrand et al., 2008). The transit of tractors on agricultural soil is often the main cause of soil compaction increasing. As known, this can be a serious problems for tillage and sowing and therefore the influence of all the affecting factors have been extensively studied in the last decades in order to understand their impact on the biosystem. There are factors related to the climate, namely to the rainfalls and temperature, and many others. Hence, it is not simple to figure out a complete model for predicting an index of compaction, for a given situation. Soil compaction models are important tools for controlling soil compaction due to agricultural field traffic and they are potentially useful technique to provide information concerning correct soil management. By means of such models, strategies and recommendations for prevention of soil compaction may be developed and specific advice may be given to farmers and advisers. In order to predict field wheeled and tracked vehicle performance, some empirical methods, used for off-road vehicle, were applied by Servadio (2010) on agricultural soil. The empirical indexes included, besides the soil strength, the load carried by the tire or track, some technical characteristics of the tire or track of the vehicle (tire or track width, tire or track wheel diameter, unloaded tire section height, number of wheel station in one track, tire deflection, total length of the belt track, the track pitch) as well as the vehicle passes. They have been validated with the tests results of agricultural vehicles over a range of soil in central Italy. Among the parameters which affect soil compaction, the water content of the soil, the axle load and number of vehicle passes proved to be the most important ones. The present paper concerns mainly vehicle-soil

  16. Multiple pass effects of skidder tires on soil compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Koger, J.L.; Burt, E.C.; Trouse, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of tyre, size, dynamic load, inflation pressure, and multiple passes on bulk density varied significantly with soil type. The biggest changes in bulk density occurred between the pre-test soil conditions and the first pass. The results of this study also indicated that bulk density values are reduced by lowering inflation pressure and increasing tyre size. 20 references.

  17. Effect of Aggregates Compaction in Soil Hydraulic Properties, due to Root Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, J. E.; Tyler, S. W.; Berli, M.

    2009-12-01

    The rhizosphere is critical for soil-root interactions, however, physical processes within the soil around roots and implications of these processes, such as plant water and nutrient uptake, continue to raise questions. Soil compaction, due to root growth, results in favorable physical conditions in the rhizosphere to foster plant growth by providing aeration under wet conditions and improving water storage and flow toward the roots under dry conditions. In unsaturated conditions, the air transfer occurs through the macropores, while the water transfer occurs through the aggregates; providing the plant with these two vital elements, continuously. At the aggregate-scale, compaction gives connectivity within the aggregates. As the contact area between the aggregates increases, more water may be transfer to the plant. As result, the hydraulic conductivity of the rhizosphere may be higher than that at initial conditions (i.e., before compaction). This idea is important, as usually compaction is associated with decreasing water conductivity. This study focuses on understanding the role of roots to modify the soil, and in particular, their impact on rhizosphere hydraulic properties at the aggregate-scale. Using HYDRUS 3D, an aggregate system was modeled. It was found that the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the system increased following an S-shape as contact area increased due to compaction. This result differs from previous studies that assumed a quadratic relation. In addition, it was found that the compaction of big pores within the aggregates will be more beneficial for water extraction purposes, than the change in pore-size distribution within the aggregates due to compaction.

  18. Hydraulic conductivity study of compacted clay soils used as landfill liners for an acidic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Noureddine; Srasra, Ezzeddine

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examined the hydraulic conductivity evolution as function of dry density of Tunisian clay soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Follow the hydraulic conductivity evolution at long-term of three clay materials using the waste solution (pH=2.7). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determined how compaction affects the hydraulic conductivity of clay soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analyzed the concentration of F and P and examined the retention of each soil. - Abstract: Three natural clayey soils from Tunisia were studied to assess their suitability for use as a liner for an acid waste disposal site. An investigation of the effect of the mineral composition and mechanical compaction on the hydraulic conductivity and fluoride and phosphate removal of three different soils is presented. The hydraulic conductivity of these three natural soils are 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}, 2.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 6.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} m/s for soil-1, soil-2 and soil-3, respectively. Soil specimens were compacted under various compaction strains in order to obtain three wet densities (1850, 1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}). In this condition, the hydraulic conductivity (k) was reduced with increasing density of sample for all soils. The test results of hydraulic conductivity at long-term (>200 days) using acidic waste solution (pH = 2.7, charged with fluoride and phosphate ions) shows a decrease in k with time only for natural soil-1 and soil-2. However, the specimens of soil-2 compressed to the two highest densities (1950 and 2050 kg/m{sup 3}) are cracked after 60 and 20 days, respectively, of hydraulic conductivity testing. This damage is the result of a continued increase in the internal stress due to the swelling and to the effect of aggressive wastewater. The analysis of anions shows that the retention of fluoride is higher compared to phosphate and soil-1 has the highest sorption capacity.

  19. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2007-12-01

    Application of time-domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed with peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR wave guides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this presentation, we introduce a combined mechanical-hydrological method that estimates the measurement error. Our analysis indicates that soil compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention characteristics of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature show that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR wave guide could be up to 10 percent. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the inter- radius spacing.

  20. Soil compaction and fertilization effects on nitrous oxide and methane fluxes in potato fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ruser, R.; Schilling, R.; Steindl, H.; Flessa, H.; Beese, F.

    1998-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of soil compaction and N fertilization on the fluxes of N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} in a soil planted with potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Fluxes of N{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} were measured weekly for 1 yr on two differently fertilized fields. For the potato cropping period (May-September) these fluxes were quantified separately for the ridges covering two-thirds of the total field area, and for the uncompacted and the tractor-traffic-compacted interrow soils, each of which made up one-sixth of the field area. The annual N{sub 2}O-N emissions for the low and the high rates of N fertilization were 8 and 16 kg ha{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The major part (68%) of the total N{sub 2}O release from the fields during the cropping period was emitted from the compacted tractor tramlines; emissions from the ridges made up only 23%. The annual CH{sub 4}-C uptake was 140 and 118 g ha{sup {minus}1} for the low and high levels of fertilization, respectively. The ridge soil and the uncompacted interrow had mean CH{sub 4}-C oxidation rates of 3.8 and 0.8 {micro}g m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1}, respectively; however, the tractor-compacted soil released CH{sub 4} at 2.1 {micro}g CH{sub 4}-C m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1}. The results indicate that soil compaction was probably the main reason for increased N{sub 2}O emission and reduced CH{sub 4} uptake of potato-cropped fields.

  1. COMPACTED SOIL BARRIERS OF ABANDONED LANDFILL SITES ARE LIKELY TO FAIL IN THE LONG-TERM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Buried wastes are isolated from the environment by barriers constructed entirely or in part of compacted soil. he chief concern in barrier design has been to isolate the waste in the short term by preventing movement of water into and through the waste. owever, in the long term a...

  2. METHOD OF ESTIMATING THE TRAVEL TIME OF NONINTERACTING SOLUTES THROUGH COMPACTED SOIL MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pollutant travel time through compacted soil material (i.e., when a pollutant introduced at the top first appears at the bottom) cannot be accurately predicted from the permeability (saturated hydraulic conductivity) alone. The travel time is also dependent on the effective p...

  3. Upscaling spatially heterogeneous parameterisations of soil compaction to investigate catchment scale flood risk.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Upscaling land management signals observed at the point scale to the regional scale is challenging for three reasons. Individual catchments are unique and at the point scale land management signals are spatially and temporally variable, depending on topography, soil characteristics and on the individual characteristics of a rainfall event. However at larger scales land management effects diffuse and climatic or human induced signals have a larger impact. This does not mean that there is no influence on river flows, just that the effect is not discernible. Land management practices in different areas of the catchment vary spatially and temporally and their influence on the flood hydrograph will be different at different points within the catchment. Once the water enters the river, the land management effects are disturbed further by hydrodynamic and geomorphological dispersion. Pastoral agriculture is the dominant rural land cover in the UK (40% is classified as improved/ semi-natural grassland - Land Cover Map 2007). The intensification of agriculture has resulted in greater levels of soil compaction associated with higher stocking densities in fields. Natural flood management is the alteration, restoration or use of landscape features to reduce flood risk. Soil compaction has been shown to change the partitioning of rainfall into runoff. However the link between locally observed hydrological changes and catchment scale flood risk has not yet been proven. This paper presents the results of a hydrological modelling study on the impact of soil compaction on downstream flood risk. Field experiments have been conducted in multiple fields in the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK (area of 120km2) to determine soil characteristics and compaction levels under different types of land-use. We use this data to parameterise and validate the Distributed Physically-based Connectivity of Runoff model. A number of compaction scenarios have been tested that represent

  4. Three dimensional, non-linear, finite element analysis of compactable soil interaction with a hyperelastic wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiroux, Robert Charles

    The objective of this research was to produce a three dimensional, non-linear, dynamic simulation of the interaction between a hyperelastic wheel rolling over compactable soil. The finite element models developed to produce the simulation utilized the ABAQUS/Explicit computer code. Within the simulation two separate bodies were modeled, the hyperelastic wheel and a compactable soil-bed. Interaction between the bodies was achieved by allowing them to come in contact but not to penetrate the contact surface. The simulation included dynamic loading of a hyperelastic, rubber tire in contact with compactable soil with an applied constant angular velocity or torque, including a tow load, applied to the wheel hub. The constraints on the wheel model produced a straight and curved path. In addition the simulation included a shear limit between the tire and soil allowing for the introduction of slip. Soil properties were simulated using the Drucker-Prager, Cap Plasticity model available within the ABAQUS/Explicit program. Numerical results obtained from the three dimensional model were compared with related experimental data and showed good correlation for similar conditions. Numerical and experimental data compared well for both stress and wheel rut formation depth under a weight of 5.8 kN and a constant angular velocity applied to the wheel hub. The simulation results provided a demonstration of the benefit of three-dimensional simulation in comparison to previous two-dimensional, plane strain simulations.

  5. Evaluation of Soil Moisture Estimation in Vegetated Areas Using Compact Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jian; Chen, Lin; Yin, Qiang; Li, Yang; Hong, Wen

    2010-12-01

    Within the framework of the DRAGON project, in this paper, we preliminarily analyze the soil moisture estimation performance in vegetated areas based on Water-Cloud model and Dubois model using compact polarimetry. We compare the inversion results of the compact polarimetry (CP) data to those of the dual polarimetric data (DP, HH and VV) and to the in-situ data. The comparison indicates that the retrieved parameters from original DP data are mainly in consistence with ground measured values, but the estimated parameters from the reconstructed data of CP are not quite consistent with the in-situ values, especially for the moisture.

  6. Development of Soil Compaction Analysis Software (SCAN) Integrating a Low Cost GPS Receiver and Compactometer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jinsang; Yun, Hongsik; Kim, Juhyong; Suh, Yongcheol; Hong, Sungnam; Lee, Dongha

    2012-01-01

    A software for soil compaction analysis (SCAN) has been developed for evaluating the compaction states using the data from the GPS as well as a compactometer attached on the roller. The SCAN is distinguished from other previous software for intelligent compaction (IC) in that it can use the results from various types of GPS positioning methods, and it also has an optimal structure for remotely managing the large amounts of data gathered from numerous rollers. For this, several methods were developed: (1) improving the accuracy of low cost GPS receiver’s positioning results; (2) modeling the trajectory of a moving roller using a GPS receiver’s results and linking it with the data from the compactometer; and (3) extracting the information regarding the compaction states of the ground from the modeled trajectory, using spatial analysis methods. The SCAN was verified throughout various field compaction tests, and it has been confirmed that it can be a very effective tool in evaluating field compaction states. PMID:22736955

  7. Synchrotron Microtomographic Quantification of Geometrical Soil Pore Characteristics Affected by Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udawatta, Ranjith; Gantzer, Clark; Anderson, Stephen; Assouline, Shmuel

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction degrades soil structure and affects water, heat, and gas exchange as well as root penetration and crop production. The objective of this study was to use X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) techniques to compare differences in geometrical soil pore parameters as influenced by compaction of two different aggregate size classes. Sieved (diam. < 2mm and < 0.5mm) and repacked (1.51 and 1.72 Mg m-3) Hamra soil cores of 5- by 5-mm (average porosities were 0.44 and 0.35) were imaged at 9.6-micrometer resolution at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source (synchrotron facility) using X-ray computed microtomography. Images of 58.9 mm3 volume were analyzed using 3-Dimensional Medial Axis (3DMA) software. Geometrical characteristics of the spatial distributions of pore structures (pore radii, volume, connectivity, path length, and tortuosity) were numerically investigated. Results show that the coordination number (CN) distribution and path length (PL) measured from the medial axis were reasonably fit by exponential relationships P(CN)=10-CN/Co and P(PL)=10-PL/PLo, respectively, where Co and PLo are the corresponding characteristic constants. Compaction reduced porosity, average pore size, number of pores, and characteristic constants. The average pore radii (64 and 61 μm; p<0.04), largest pore volume (1.6 and 0.6 mm3; p=0.06), number of pores (55 and 50; p=0.09), characteristic coordination number (6.3 and 6.0; p=0.09), and characteristic path length number (116 and 105; p=0.001) were significantly greater in the low density than the high density treatment. Aggregate size also influenced measured geometrical pore parameters. This analytical technique provides a tool for assessing changes in soil pores that affect hydraulic properties and thereby provides information to assist in assessment of soil management systems.

  8. Synchrotron microtomographic quantification of geometrical soil pore characteristics affected by compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udawatta, R. P.; Gantzer, C. J.; Anderson, S. H.; Assouline, S.

    2015-07-01

    Soil compaction degrades soil structure and affects water, heat, and gas exchange as well as root penetration and crop production. The objective of this study was to use X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) techniques to compare differences in geometrical soil pore parameters as influenced by compaction of two different aggregate size classes. Sieved (diam. < 2 mm and < 0.5 mm) and repacked (1.51 and 1.72 Mg m-3) Hamra soil cores of 5- by 5 mm (average porosities were 0.44 and 0.35) were imaged at 9.6-micrometer resolution at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source (synchrotron facility) using X-ray computed microtomography. Images of 58.9 mm3 volume were analyzed using 3-Dimensional Medial Axis (3DMA) software. Geometrical characteristics of the spatial distributions of pore structures (pore radii, volume, connectivity, path length, and tortuosity) were numerically investigated. Results show that the coordination number (CN) distribution and path length (PL) measured from the medial axis were reasonably fit by exponential relationships P(CN) = 10-CN/Co and P(PL) = 10-PL/PLo, respectively, where Co and PLo are the corresponding characteristic constants. Compaction reduced porosity, average pore size, number of pores, and characteristic constants. The average pore radii (63.7 and 61 μm; p < 0.04), largest pore volume (1.58 and 0.58 mm3; p = 0.06), number of pores (55 and 50; p = 0.09), characteristic coordination number (6.32 and 5.94; p = 0.09), and characteristic path length number (116 and 105; p = 0.001) were significantly greater in the low density than the high density treatment. Aggregate size also influenced measured geometrical pore parameters. This analytical technique provides a tool for assessing changes in soil pores that affect hydraulic properties and thereby provides information to assist in assessment of soil management systems.

  9. Synchrotron microtomographic quantification of geometrical soil pore characteristics affected by compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udawatta, Ranjith P.; Gantzer, Clark J.; Anderson, Stephen H.; Assouline, Shmuel

    2016-05-01

    Soil compaction degrades soil structure and affects water, heat, and gas exchange as well as root penetration and crop production. The objective of this study was to use X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) techniques to compare differences in geometrical soil pore parameters as influenced by compaction of two different aggregate size classes. Sieved (diameter < 2 mm and < 0.5 mm) and repacked (1.51 and 1.72 Mg m-3) Hamra soil cores of 5 by 5 mm (average porosities were 0.44 and 0.35) were imaged at 9.6 μm resolution at the Argonne Advanced Photon Source (synchrotron facility) using X-ray CMT. Images of 58.9 mm3 volume were analyzed using 3-Dimensional Medial Axis (3-DMA) software. Geometrical characteristics of the spatial distributions of pore structures (pore radii, volume, connectivity, path length, and tortuosity) were numerically investigated. Results show that the coordination number (CN) distribution and path length (PL) measured from the medial axis were reasonably fit by exponential relationships P(CN) = 10-CN/Co and P(PL) = 10-PL/PLo, respectively, where Co and PLo are the corresponding characteristic constants. Compaction reduced porosity, average pore size, number of pores, and characteristic constants. The average pore radii (63.7 and 61 µm; p < 0.04), largest pore volume (1.58 and 0.58 mm3; p = 0.06), number of pores (55 and 50; p = 0.09), and characteristic coordination number (3.74 and 3.94; p = 0.02) were significantly different between the low-density than the high-density treatment. Aggregate size also influenced measured geometrical pore parameters. This analytical technique provides a tool for assessing changes in soil pores that affect hydraulic properties and thereby provides information to assist in assessment of soil management systems.

  10. Susceptibility of volcanic ash-influenced soil in Northern Idaho to mechanical compaction. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Page-Dumroese, D.S.

    1993-02-01

    Timber harvesting and mechanical site preparation can reduce site productivity if they excessively disturb or compact the soil. Volcanic ash-influenced soils with low undisturbed bulk densities and rock content are particularly susceptible. The study evaluates the effects of harvesting and site preparation on changes in the bulk density of ash-influenced forest soils in northern Idaho. Three different levels of surface organic matter were studied. Soil samples were taken before and after harvesting to determine the extent and depth of compaction. Soil bulk densities increased significantly after extensive compaction from site preparation, especially when little logging slash and surface organic matter were left on the soil surface. As site preparation intensity increased, bulk density increased significantly at greater depths in the soil profile. Although ash-influenced soils have naturally low bulk densities, they can easily be compacted to levels that limit growth. The experimental site has been designated as part of the Forest Service's national long-term site productivity study into the impacts of organic matter depletion and soil compaction on stand development.

  11. The impact of dense willow stands (Salix purpurea L.) on the hydrology and soil stability of heavily compacted soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammeranner, Walter; Obriejetan, Michael; Florineth, Florin

    2010-05-01

    Willows are often used in soil bioengineering techniques for stabilizing heavily compacted soils (e.g. embankments, landfills, levees etc.). Beyond reinforcing and anchoring effects by their root matrix, plants enhance soil stability by decreasing pore-water pressure due to evapotranspiration. In the common praxis of soil bioengineering, it is taken for granted that willow stands have higher evapotranspiration rates than grass-herb (turf) vegetation. But the positive effect of dense willow stands on pore water pressure from the soil bioengineering point of view is insufficiently studied and therefore difficult to quantify. Hence, the study investigates the effect of willow stands on evapotranspiration and seepage compared to grass-herb vegetation using a lysimeter-like setup. The weighable lysimeters are composed of two planted barrels (one with a dense willow stand grown from brush mattresses; one with turf vegetation) and one unplanted barrel. The fill material used is a mineral silt-sand-gravel classified as silty sand compacted to 97% Proctor [DPr], meaning a dry density [ρD] of 1.97 g/cm³. Each barrel is equipped with two soil moisture sensors, four tensiometers and seepage measurement devices. Furthermore the relevant meteorological parameters as precipitation, air temperature, air moisture wind speed and radiation are measured. Plant parameters such as biomass, leaf area index and root growth are observed in 17 additional barrels. The talk is going to deal with methodology and setup of the lysimeter investigations, showing the results of the first growing season of these two vegetation types compared to bare soil. As result of the first growing season, evapotranspiration rates of the willow stands were significantly higher than those found with grass-herb vegetation, whereas seepage was significantly lower.

  12. Operational methods for minimising soil compaction and diffuse pollution risk from wheelings in winter cereals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Bob; Silgram, Martyn; Quinton, John

    2010-05-01

    Recent UK government-funded research has shown that compacted, unvegetated tramlines wheelings can represent an important source and transport pathway, which can account for 80% of surface runoff, sediment and phosphorus losses to edge-of-field from cereals on moderate slopes. For example, recent research found 5.5-15.8% of rainfall lost as runoff, and losses of 0.8-2.9 kg TP/ha and 0.3-4.8 T/ha sediment from tramline wheelings. When compaction was released by shallow cultivation, runoff was reduced to 0.2-1.7% of rainfall with losses of 0.0-0.2 kg TP/ha and 0.003-0.3 T/ha sediment respectively i.e. close to reference losses from control areas without tramlines. Recent independent assessments using novel tracer techniques have also shown that tramline wheelings can represent important sediment sources at river catchment scale. In response to these latest findings, a new project is now underway investigating the most cost-effective and practical ways of operationalising methods for managing tramline wheelings in autumn-sown cereal systems to reduce the risk of soil compaction from the autumn spray operation and the associated risk of surface runoff and diffuse pollution loss of sediment, phosphorus and nitrogen to edge of field. Research is focusing on the over-winter period when soils are close to field capacity and the physical protection of the soil surface granted by growing crop is limited. This paper outlines this new multi-disciplinary project and associated methodologies, which include hillslope-scale event-based evaluations of the effectiveness of novel mitigation methods on surface runoff and diffuse pollution losses to edge of field, assessments of the economic and practical viability of mitigation methods, and modelling the impact on water quality of implementation of the most promising techniques at both farm and catchment scale. The study involves a large consortium with 20 partners, including many industrial organisations representing tractor, crop

  13. Composition and structure of aggregates from compacted soil horizons in the southern steppe zone of European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. S.; Abrosimov, K. N.; Lebedeva, M. P.; Kust, G. S.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and structure of aggregates from different agrogenic soils in the southern steppe zone of European Russia have been studied. It is shown that the multi-level study (from the macro- to microlevel) of these horizons makes it possible to identify soil compaction caused by different elementary soil processes: solonetz-forming, vertisol-forming, and mechanical (wheel) compaction in the rainfed and irrigated soils. The understanding of the genesis of the compaction of soil horizons (natural or anthropogenic) is important for the economic evaluation of soil degradation. It should enable us to make more exact predictions of the rates of degradation processes and undertake adequate mitigation measures. The combined tomographic and micromorphological studies of aggregates of 1-2 and 3-5 mm in diameter from compacted horizons of different soils have been performed for the first time. Additional diagnostic features of negative solonetz- forming processes (low open porosity of aggregates seen on tomograms and filling of a considerable part of the intraped pores with mobile substance) and the vertisol-forming processes (large amount of fine intraaggregate pores seen on tomograms and a virtual absence of humus-clay plasma in the intraped zone)—have been identified. It is shown that the combination of microtomographic and micromorphological methods is helpful for studying the pore space of compacted horizons in cultivated soils.

  14. Modeling of permeability and compaction characteristics of soils using evolutionary polynomial regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahangar-Asr, A.; Faramarzi, A.; Mottaghifard, N.; Javadi, A. A.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a new approach, based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR), for prediction of permeability ( K), maximum dry density (MDD), and optimum moisture content (OMC) as functions of some physical properties of soil. EPR is a data-driven method based on evolutionary computing aimed to search for polynomial structures representing a system. In this technique, a combination of the genetic algorithm (GA) and the least-squares method is used to find feasible structures and the appropriate parameters of those structures. EPR models are developed based on results from a series of classification, compaction, and permeability tests from the literature. The tests included standard Proctor tests, constant head permeability tests, and falling head permeability tests conducted on soils made of four components, bentonite, limestone dust, sand, and gravel, mixed in different proportions. The results of the EPR model predictions are compared with those of a neural network model, a correlation equation from the literature, and the experimental data. Comparison of the results shows that the proposed models are highly accurate and robust in predicting permeability and compaction characteristics of soils. Results from sensitivity analysis indicate that the models trained from experimental data have been able to capture many physical relationships between soil parameters. The proposed models are also able to represent the degree to which individual contributing parameters affect the maximum dry density, optimum moisture content, and permeability.

  15. Soil Penetration by Earthworms and Plant Roots—Mechanical Energetics of Bioturbation of Compacted Soils

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We quantify mechanical processes common to soil penetration by earthworms and growing plant roots, including the energetic requirements for soil plastic displacement. The basic mechanical model considers cavity expansion into a plastic wet soil involving wedging by root tips or earthworms via cone-like penetration followed by cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydroskeleton or root radial growth. The mechanical stresses and resulting soil strains determine the mechanical energy required for bioturbation under different soil hydro-mechanical conditions for a realistic range of root/earthworm geometries. Modeling results suggest that higher soil water content and reduced clay content reduce the strain energy required for soil penetration. The critical earthworm or root pressure increases with increased diameter of root or earthworm, however, results are insensitive to the cone apex (shape of the tip). The invested mechanical energy per unit length increase with increasing earthworm and plant root diameters, whereas mechanical energy per unit of displaced soil volume decreases with larger diameters. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy requirements for soil penetration work done by earthworms and plant roots, and delineates intrinsic and external mechanical limits for bioturbation processes. Estimated energy requirements for earthworm biopore networks are linked to consumption of soil organic matter and suggest that earthworm populations are likely to consume a significant fraction of ecosystem net primary production to sustain their subterranean activities. PMID:26087130

  16. Soil Penetration by Earthworms and Plant Roots--Mechanical Energetics of Bioturbation of Compacted Soils.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Siul; Or, Dani; Schymanski, Stanislaus J

    2015-01-01

    We quantify mechanical processes common to soil penetration by earthworms and growing plant roots, including the energetic requirements for soil plastic displacement. The basic mechanical model considers cavity expansion into a plastic wet soil involving wedging by root tips or earthworms via cone-like penetration followed by cavity expansion due to pressurized earthworm hydroskeleton or root radial growth. The mechanical stresses and resulting soil strains determine the mechanical energy required for bioturbation under different soil hydro-mechanical conditions for a realistic range of root/earthworm geometries. Modeling results suggest that higher soil water content and reduced clay content reduce the strain energy required for soil penetration. The critical earthworm or root pressure increases with increased diameter of root or earthworm, however, results are insensitive to the cone apex (shape of the tip). The invested mechanical energy per unit length increase with increasing earthworm and plant root diameters, whereas mechanical energy per unit of displaced soil volume decreases with larger diameters. The study provides a quantitative framework for estimating energy requirements for soil penetration work done by earthworms and plant roots, and delineates intrinsic and external mechanical limits for bioturbation processes. Estimated energy requirements for earthworm biopore networks are linked to consumption of soil organic matter and suggest that earthworm populations are likely to consume a significant fraction of ecosystem net primary production to sustain their subterranean activities. PMID:26087130

  17. Mapping the spatial patterns of field traffic and traffic intensity to predict soil compaction risks at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duttmann, Rainer; Kuhwald, Michael; Nolde, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is one of the main threats to cropland soils in present days. In contrast to easily visible phenomena of soil degradation, soil compaction, however, is obscured by other signals such as reduced crop yield, delayed crop growth, and the ponding of water, which makes it difficult to recognize and locate areas impacted by soil compaction directly. Although it is known that trafficking intensity is a key factor for soil compaction, until today only modest work has been concerned with the mapping of the spatially distributed patterns of field traffic and with the visual representation of the loads and pressures applied by farm traffic within single fields. A promising method for for spatial detection and mapping of soil compaction risks of individual fields is to process dGPS data, collected from vehicle-mounted GPS receivers and to compare the soil stress induced by farm machinery to the load bearing capacity derived from given soil map data. The application of position-based machinery data enables the mapping of vehicle movements over time as well as the assessment of trafficking intensity. It also facilitates the calculation of the trafficked area and the modeling of the loads and pressures applied to soil by individual vehicles. This paper focuses on the modeling and mapping of the spatial patterns of traffic intensity in silage maize fields during harvest, considering the spatio-temporal changes in wheel load and ground contact pressure along the loading sections. In addition to scenarios calculated for varying mechanical soil strengths, an example for visualizing the three-dimensional stress propagation inside the soil will be given, using the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) to construct 2D or 3D maps supporting to decision making due to sustainable field traffic management.

  18. An in-situ soil structure characterization methodology for measuring soil compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobos, Endre; Kriston, András; Juhász, András; Sulyok, Dénes

    2016-04-01

    The agricultural cultivation has several direct and indirect effects on the soil properties, among which the soil structure degradation is the best known and most detectable one. Soil structure degradation leads to several water and nutrient management problems, which reduce the efficiency of agricultural production. There are several innovative technological approaches aiming to reduce these negative impacts on the soil structure. The tests, validation and optimization of these methods require an adequate technology to measure the impacts on the complex soil system. This study aims to develop an in-situ soil structure and root development testing methodology, which can be used in field experiments and which allows one to follow the real time changes in the soil structure - evolution / degradation and its quantitative characterization. The method is adapted from remote sensing image processing technology. A specifically transformed A/4 size scanner is placed into the soil into a safe depth that cannot be reached by the agrotechnical treatments. Only the scanner USB cable comes to the surface to allow the image acquisition without any soil disturbance. Several images from the same place can be taken throughout the vegetation season to follow the soil consolidation and structure development after the last tillage treatment for the seedbed preparation. The scanned image of the soil profile is classified using supervised image classification, namely the maximum likelihood classification algorithm. The resulting image has two principal classes, soil matrix and pore space and other complementary classes to cover the occurring thematic classes, like roots, stones. The calculated data is calibrated with filed sampled porosity data. As the scanner is buried under the soil with no changes in light conditions, the image processing can be automated for better temporal comparison. Besides the total porosity each pore size fractions and their distributions can be calculated for

  19. The effect of mulching and soil compaction on fungi composition and microbial communities in the rhizosphere of soybean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frac, M.; Siczek, A.; Lipiec, J.

    2009-04-01

    The soil environment is the habitat of pathogenic and saprotrophic microorganisms. The composition of the microbial community are related to biotic and abiotic factors, such as root exudates, crop residues, climate factors, mulching, mineral fertilization, pesticides introduction and soil compaction. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of the mulching and soil compaction on the microorganism communities in the rhizosphere soil of soybean. The studies were carried out on silty loam soil (Orthic Luvisol) developed from loess (Lublin, Poland). The experiment area was 192m2 divided into 3 sections consisted of 6 micro-plots (7m2). Three levels of soil compaction low, medium and heavy obtained through tractor passes were compared. The soil was compacted and loosened within seedbed layer 2 weeks before sowing. Soybean "Aldana" seeds were inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum and were sown with interrow spacing of 0.3m. Wheat straw (as mulch) was uniformly spread on the half of each micro-plot at an amount of 0.5kg m-1 after sowing. Rhizosphere was collected three times during growing season of soybean. Microbiological analyses were conducted in 3 replications and included the determination of: the total number of bacteria and fungi, the number of bacteria Pseudomonas sp. and Bacillus sp., the genus identification of fungi isolated from rhizosphere of soybean. Results indicated a positive effect of mulching on the increase number of all groups of examined rhizosphere microorganisms (fungi, bacteria, Pseudomonas sp., Bacillus sp.). The highest number of the microorganisms was found in the low and medium compacted soil and markedly decreased in the most compacted soil. Relatively high number of antagonistic fungi (Penicillium sp., Trichoderma sp.) was recorded in the rhizosphere of low and medium compacted soil, particularly in mulched plots. The presence of these fungi can testify to considerable biological activity, which contributes to the improvement of

  20. Impact of cattle congregation sites on soil nutrients and soil compaction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study determined the impact of grazing cattle on the changes in soil quality around and beneath cattle congregation sites (mineral feeders, water troughs, and shades). Baseline soil samples around and beneath three congregations sites in established (>10 yr) grazed beef cattle pastures at the U...

  1. Impact of Cattle Congregation Sites on Soil Nutrients and Soil Compaction.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study determined the impact of grazing cattle on the changes in soil quality around and beneath cattle congregation sites (mineral feeders, water troughs, and shades). Baseline soil samples around and beneath three congregations sites in established (>10 yr) grazed beef cattle pastures at the ...

  2. Field-scale investigation of infiltration into a compacted soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panno, Samuel V.; Herzog, Beverly L.; Cartwright, Keros; Rehfeldt, Kenneth R.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Hensel, Bruce R.

    1991-01-01

    The Illinois State Geological Survey constructed and instrumented an experimental compacted soil liner. Infiltration of water into the liner has been monitored for two years. The objectives of this investigation were to determine whether a soil liner could be constructed to meet the U.S. EPA's requirement for a saturated hydraulic conductivity of less than or equal to 1.0 ?? 10-7 cm/s, to quantify the areal variability of the hydraulic properties of the liner, and to determine the transit time for water and tracers through the liner. The liner measures 8m ?? 15m ?? 0.9m and was designed and constructed to simulate compacted soil liners built at waste disposal facilities. The surface of the liner was flooded to form a pond on April 12, 1988. Since flooding, infiltration has been monitored with four large-ring (LR) and 32 small-ring (SR) infiltrometers, and a water-balance (WB) method that accounted for total infiltration and evaporation. Ring-infiltrometer and WB data were analyzed using cumulative-infiltration curves to determine infiltration fluxes. The SR data are lognormally distributed, and the SR and LR data form two statistically distinct populations. Small-ring data are nearly identical with WB data; because there is evidence of leakage in the LRs, the SR and WB data are considered more reliable.

  3. Intrinsic degradation of volatile fatty acids in laboratory-compacted clayey soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrapovic, L.; Rowe, R. K.

    2002-10-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) represent the major organic constituent of landfill leachate and provide the greatest potential for leachate induced organic contamination of groundwater (e.g. as represented by an increase in the concentration of dissolved organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand). Long-term diffusion tests were performed for laboratory-compacted clayey soil plugs exposed to continuous supply of synthetic leachate containing VFAs. Significant microbial activity developed upon exposure of the soil's indigenous microorganisms to these degradable contaminants. The growth of heterotrophic aerobic bacteria (HAB, which include facultative anaerobes), sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria carrying out fermentation and mineralization of the VFAs became evident after 30-50 days of testing. The maximum microbial counts of (2-8)×10 8 and (0.1-1)×10 8 cfu/g for HAB and SRB were localized in the soil layer at the interface with the source of organic and inorganic nutrients. Regardless of this rapid growth in microbial population, the VFA consumption was small and measurable only after a lag of 140-180 days. It is considered that this lag of otherwise readily degradable organic compounds (such as VFAs) persisted due to a combination of the effects of a high initial concentration of these acids (2.4 g/l as dissolved organic carbon, DOC) applied to carbon starved soil microorganisms and the small pore size of the compacted clay. Once the significant amounts of gas were generated from fermentation, conditions developed for improved mass transport and exchange of the nutrients and bacteria and the outcome of the intrinsic degradation was more apparent. The breakdown of VFAs that followed after the lag was localized near the top of the soil and was characterized by a short half-life of 0.75-5 days for DOC (total VFAs as dissolved organic carbon).

  4. Solute Diffusivity of Repacked Volcanic Ash Soil: Effect of Changes in Pore Size Distribution due to Soil Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, M. S.; Resurreccion, A. C.; Kawamoto, K.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2007-12-01

    Diffusion is the dominant spreading mechanism of contaminants dissolved in soil-water in the absence of soil- water flow. Solute diffusion coefficient, Ds, is a key parameter in investigating the fate and transport of contaminants from a polluted soil site. However, only a few studies on quantifying Ds as a function of soil- water content were done, especially for aggregated soils with a dual pore system such as volcanic ash soils (Andisols). In this study, we investigated the effect of bulk density on pore size distribution, and, consequently, on solute diffusivity (Ds/Do, where Do is the solute diffusion coefficient in pure water) in repacked volcanic ash soil taken at 5-10 cm depth at a pasture site in Nishi-Tokyo, Japan. Measurements of Ds were done on sieved and repacked soil at three bulk densities (0.62 g cm-3 , 0.7 g cm-3, and 0.8 g cm-3 ) and at three soil moisture conditions at pF (= log (-ψ; soil-water matric potential in cm H2O)) 1.8, 2, and 3 for each bulk density. Half-cell method was used to measure Ds where the source and sink half cells (each cell of 10-cm length and 4.9 cm in diameter) were joined together and the concentration profile was analyzed after a substantial time to determine Ds. Results showed that at a particular bulk density, Ds decreased with decreasing degree of saturation. This is expected since as the soil becomes drier, water films become disconnected resulting in a decrease in Ds. On the other hand, at a particular degree of saturation, the magnitude of Ds considerably decreases with increasing dry bulk density. As soil is compacted (and thus the increase in bulk density), the observed pore size distribution obtained from soil-water retention curve changes where the mainly inter-aggregate large pores become smaller and soil particles become closer to each other. This reduction in inter-aggregate pore size likely increases the liquid-phase tortuosity resulting in the decrease in Ds/Do at soil-water content at pF < 3. The soil

  5. Compact, Lightweight Dual- Frequency Microstrip Antenna Feed for Future Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Wilson, William J.; Njoku, Eni; Hunter, Don; Dinardo, Steve; Kona, Keerti S.; Manteghi, Majid; Gies, Dennis; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2004-01-01

    The development of a compact, lightweight, dual frequency antenna feed for future soil moisture and sea surface salinity (SSS) missions is described. The design is based on the microstrip stacked-patch array (MSPA) to be used to feed a large lightweight deployable rotating mesh antenna for spaceborne L-band (approx. 1 GHz) passive and active sensing systems. The design features will also enable applications to airborne sensors operating on small aircrafts. This paper describes the design of stacked patch elements, 16-element array configuration and power-divider beam forming network The test results from the fabrication of stacked patches and power divider were also described.

  6. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials.

    PubMed

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Gröngröft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-01

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm(-3), reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1), covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH(4)m(-2)d(-1) and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity and diffusive ingress of

  7. Assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of compacted soils intended for use as landfill cover materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rachor, Ingke; Gebert, Julia; Groengroeft, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2011-05-15

    The microbial oxidation of methane in engineered cover soils is considered a potent option for the mitigation of emissions from old landfills or sites containing wastes of low methane generation rates. A laboratory column study was conducted in order to derive design criteria that enable construction of an effective methane oxidising cover from the range of soils that are available to the landfill operator. Therefore, the methane oxidation capacity of different soils was assessed under simulated landfill conditions. Five sandy potential landfill top cover materials with varying contents of silt and clay were investigated with respect to methane oxidation and corresponding soil gas composition over a period of four months. The soils were compacted to 95% of their specific proctor density, resulting in bulk densities of 1.4-1.7 g cm{sup -3}, reflecting considerably unfavourable conditions for methane oxidation due to reduced air-filled porosity. The soil water content was adjusted to field capacity, resulting in water contents ranging from 16.2 to 48.5 vol.%. The investigated inlet fluxes ranged from 25 to about 100 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, covering the methane load proposed to allow for complete oxidation in landfill covers under Western European climate conditions and hence being suggested as a criterion for release from aftercare. The vertical distribution of gas concentrations, methane flux balances as well as stable carbon isotope studies allowed for clear process identifications. Higher inlet fluxes led to a reduction of the aerated zone, an increase in the absolute methane oxidation rate and a decline of the relative proportion of oxidized methane. For each material, a specific maximum oxidation rate was determined, which varied between 20 and 95 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} and which was positively correlated to the air-filled porosity of the soil. Methane oxidation efficiencies and gas profile data imply a strong link between oxidation capacity

  8. Effects of compaction and wetting of laterite cover soil on development and survival of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) immatures.

    PubMed

    Abu Tahir, Nurita; Ahmad, Abu Hassan

    2013-09-01

    Effects of laterite cover soil with different characteristics on survival of buried eggs, third instar larvae, and pupae of Musca domestica (L.) were studied experimentally. Soil treatments were loose dry soil, loose wet soil, compacted dry soil, and compacted wet soil (CWS). Eggs, third instar larvae, and pupae were buried under 30 cm of the different soil treatments and placed under field conditions until adults emerged. Rearing medium was provided for eggs and larvae, and control treatments of all stages were unburied immatures placed on soil surface. Egg and pupal survival to adult were significantly affected by the cover soil treatments, but third instars were more resilient. Wet soil treatments (loose wet soil and CWS) resulted in significantly reduced pupal survival, but increased survival of eggs. However, CWS significantly reduced adult emergence from buried eggs. Though emergence of house flies buried as eggs was significantly reduced, some were able to hatch and emerging first instar larvae developed to pupation. Although cover soil does not completely prevent fly emergence, it did limit development and emergence of buried house flies. PMID:24180104

  9. Yield Loss Caused by Soil Compaction on a Loam Soil in Eastern Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of no-till cropping systems in the central Great Plains has led to water savings that allow increased cropping intensity and more diversity of crop species. However, because no tillage is done to loosen the soil, concerns arise that the long-term effects of no tillage could result in increas...

  10. Non-invasive Observation of the Compacted Plough Pan Layer and Its Effect on Soil Water Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeřábek, J.; Zumr, D.

    2015-12-01

    A compaction of soils at agricultural areas is a known phenomenon influencing the water retention and runoff regimes. Nevertheless, an investigation of compacted soil layer position and (dis)continuity is complicated. Using of direct measurement methods is almost infeasible at larger areas due to excessive labour and cost demands of such an approach. Other disadvantage of direct methods is usually lack of continuous information, which may be desirable in some cases. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is useful method for its relatively simple and non-invasive data acquisition and continuity of the measured data. However, reliability of the ERT measurement for exact plough pan delineation is still questionable. In this work we assessed the feasibility of the ERT to delineate the compacted soil layer. To do so, we compared soil electrical resistivity with soil penetration resistance. The field experiments took place at the experimental catchment in central part of the Czech Republic. Soil profile samples were taken to gain more complex information of soil physical characteristics possibly influencing the soil resistivity. All measurements were performed recurrently under different topsoil structure and soil saturation conditions. Classical methods of statistic and geo-statistis was used to evaluate the data. The effect of the compacted subsoil layer on soil water regime during heavy rainfall events was evaluated with the use of dual porosity numerical code S1D. Due to comparatively lower ratio of preferential pathways and macropores in the subsoil the percolating water accumulate on the plough pan causing local flooding of the fields or lateral shallow subsurface runoff. The research was performed within the framework of a postdoctoral project granted by Czech Science Foundation No. 13-20388P.

  11. Laboratory soil piping and internal erosion experiments: evaluation of a soil piping model for low-compacted soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil piping has been attributed as a potential mechanism of instability for embankments, hillslopes, dams, and streambanks. In fact, deterministic models have been proposed to predict soil piping and internal erosion. However, limited research has been conducted under controlled conditions to evalua...

  12. Root Development of Salix purpurea L. on Heavily Compacted Levee Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammeranner, W.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of woody vegetation on levee stability is discussed controversially. On the one hand woody plants improve slope stability, prevent erosion failures and may aid in levee stability. On the other hand it is believed that woody vegetation has negative impacts which are largely related to the rooting system. Hence, root penetration can facilitate water movement - seepage or piping - as well as living and decaying roots can lead to voids and threaten the structural integrity of levees. In general root architecture is known for many plant species, but specific root characteristics and their interaction with soils are influenced by many factors, and therefore poorly understood. Consequently the current research investigates the rooting performance of woody vegetation by singling out a special type of vegetation which is often used within soil bioengineering techniques at river embankments. This vegetation type is a dense stand of shrubby willows (Salix purpurea L.), implemented with brush mattresses. The data is collected from a test site constructed in 2007, 5 km northeast of Vienna, Austria. Part of the test site is a research levee built true to natural scale. The fill material of the levee is a mineral silt-sand-gravel compound classified as silty sand, which was compacted to a dry density of 1.86 g/cm3. The planting of vegetation was applied directly to the compacted levee body using only a thin layer (2-4 cm) of humus topsoil. In 2009 the studies were supplemented with a lysimeter-like setup consisting of a total of 20 containers. The lysimeters were filled homogenously with the same soil as the levees and were consolidated to the same degree of compaction. They were planted similar to the research levees. Within the investigations a comprehensive annual vegetation monitoring program was carried out. Measured aboveground parameters were shoot diameter, shoot length, biomass and leaf area index (LAI). Monitored rooting parameters - examined by excavation

  13. Evaluation of multidimensional transport through a field-scale compacted soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willingham, T.W.; Werth, C.J.; Valocchi, A.J.; Krapac, I.G.; Toupiol, C.; Stark, T.D.; Daniel, D.E.

    2004-01-01

    A field-scale compacted soil liner was constructed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Illinois State Geological Survey in 1988 to investigate chemical transport rates through low permeability compacted clay liners (CCLs). Four tracers (bromide and three benzoic acid tracers) were each added to one of four large ring infiltrometers (LRIs) while tritium was added to the pond water (excluding the infiltrometers). Results from the long-term transport of Br- from the localized source zone of LRI are presented in this paper. Core samples were taken radially outward from the center of the Br- LRI and concentration depth profiles were obtained. Transport properties were evaluated using an axially symmetric transport model. Results indicate that (1) transport was diffusion controlled; (2) transport due to advection was negligible and well within the regulatory limits of ksat???1 ?? 10-7 cm/s; (3) diffusion rates in the horizontal and vertical directions were the same; and (4) small positioning errors due to compression during soil sampling did not affect the best fit advection and diffusion values. The best-fit diffusion coefficient for bromide was equal to the molecular diffusion coefficient multiplied by a tortuosity factor of 0.27, which is within 8% of the tortuosity factor (0.25) found in a related study where tritium transport through the same liner was evaluated. This suggests that the governing mechanisms for the transport of tritium and bromide through the CCL were similar. These results are significant because they address transport through a composite liner from a localized source zone which occurs when defects or punctures in the geomembrane of a composite system are present. ?? ASCE.

  14. Remote Sensing-based Models of Soil Vulnerability to Compaction and Erosion from Off-highway Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, M. L.; Webb, R. H.; Norman, L.; Psillas, J.; Rosenberg, A.; Carmichael, S.; Petrakis, R.; Sparks, P.

    2014-12-01

    Intensive off-road vehicle use for immigration, smuggling, and security of the United States-Mexico border has prompted concerns about long-term human impacts on sensitive desert ecosystems. To help managers identify areas susceptible to soil erosion from vehicle disturbances, we developed a series of erosion potential models based on factors from the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE), with particular focus on the management factor (P-factor) and vegetation cover (C-factor). To better express the vulnerability of soils to human disturbances, a soil compaction index (applied as the P-factor) was calculated as the difference in saturated hydrologic conductivity (Ks) between disturbed and undisturbed soils, which was then scaled up to remote sensing-based maps of vehicle tracks and digital soils maps. The C-factor was improved using a satellite-based vegetation index, which was better correlated with estimated ground cover (r2 = 0.77) than data derived from regional land cover maps (r2 = 0.06). RUSLE factors were normalized to give equal weight to all contributing factors, which provided more management-specific information on vulnerable areas where vehicle compaction of sensitive soils intersects with steep slopes and low vegetation cover. Resulting spatial data on vulnerability and erosion potential provide land managers with information to identify critically disturbed areas and potential restoration sites where off-road driving should be restricted to reduce further degradation.

  15. Compact, Low-power Nitrous Oxide Monitor for Eddy Flux Soil Emission Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorter, Joanne; Nelson, David; McManus, Barry; Zahniser, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous oxide, N2O, is one of the most important greenhouse and ozone-depleting gases. The concentration of N2O in the atmosphere has been increasing at a rate of 0.3% per year, with this rise believed to be largely due to soil emissions and agricultural practices (Park et al. 2011; Park et al. 2012). The eddy covariance technique, which requires fast (~10 Hz) measurement of mixing ratios and wind data, is perhaps the most effective technique available to quantify the exchange of gases between the atmosphere and the biosphere. It is very useful for addressing the high spatial and temporal variability of nitrous oxide emissions from soils. Nitrous oxide monitors appropriate for eddy covariance measurements generally require large flow rates (~10 - 15 slpm) and high speed, high power vacuum pumps (500 lpm, 600 W). These requirements complicate and in some environments prevent successful field deployment. We have addressed this by developing a compact, low-power nitrous oxide monitor for eddy flux or soil chamber measurements with a dramatically reduced sample cell volume. The sample volume is reduced nearly 5 fold (from 500 to 108 cm3) with only a two-fold reduction in optical path length (from 76 m to 36 m). The new multi-pass cell has an aluminum tube insert with a tapered internal volume that follows the mode envelope of the multi-pass spot pattern. This permits the use of a much smaller, lower power pump while still achieving high precision and fast response. Precision of 26 parts per trillion (ppt) in 1 sec was achieved with a 1/e response time of 0.14 s using a relatively low speed vacuum pump (100 lpm, 350 W). Further reductions in cell volume are planned which should permit sensitive eddy covariance measurements of nitrous oxide using an even smaller, lower power pump (60 lpm, 160 W) and modest sample flow rates (~2 slpm). We have also recently studied the application of a standard ARI nitrous oxide monitor to measurement of N2O isotopologues emitted into

  16. Influence of Organic Amendment and Compaction on Nutrient Dynamics in a Saturated Saline-Sodic Soil from the Riparian Zone.

    PubMed

    Miller, J J; Bremer, E; Curtis, T

    2016-07-01

    Cattle grazing in wet riparian pastures may influence nutrient dynamics due to nutrient deposition in feces and urine, soil compaction, and vegetation loss. We conducted a lab incubation study with a saline-sodic riparian soil to study nutrient (N, P, S, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn) dynamics in soil pore water using Plant Root Simulator (PRS) probes and release of nutrients into the overlying ponded water during flooding. The treatment factors were organic amendment (manure, roots, and unamended control), compaction (compacted, uncompacted), and burial time (3, 7, and 14 d). Amendment treatment had the greatest impact on nutrient dynamics, followed by burial time, whereas compaction had little impact. The findings generally supported our hypothesis that organic amendments should first increase nitrate loss, then increase Mn mobility, then Fe mobility and associated release of P, and finally increase sulfate loss. Declines in nitrate due to amendment addition were small because nitrate was at low levels in all treatments due to high denitrification potential instead of being released to soil pore water or overlying water. Addition of organic amendment strongly increased Mn and Fe concentrations in overlying water and of adsorbed Fe on PRS probes but only increased Mn on PRS probes on Day 3 due to subsequent displacement from ion exchange membranes. Transport of P to overlying water was increased by organic amendment addition but less so for manure than roots despite higher P on PRS probes. The findings showed that saline-sodic soils in riparian zones are generally a nutrient source for P and are a nutrient sink for N as measured using PRS probes after 3 to 7 d of flooding. PMID:27380095

  17. Long-term tritium transport through field-scale compacted soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toupiol, C.; Willingham, T.W.; Valocchi, A.J.; Werth, C.J.; Krapac, I.G.; Stark, T.D.; Daniel, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    A 13-year study of tritium transport through a field-scale earthen liner was conducted by the Illinois State Geological Survey to determine the long-term performance of compacted soil liners in limiting chemical transport. Two field-sampling procedures (pressure-vacuum lysimeter and core sampling) were used to determine the vertical tritium concentration profiles at different times and locations within the liner. Profiles determined by the two methods were similar and consistent. Analyses of the concentration profiles showed that the tritium concentration was relatively uniformly distributed horizontally at each sampling depth within the liner and thus there was no apparent preferential transport. A simple one-dimensional analytical solution to the advective-dispersive solute transport equation was used to model tritium transport through the liner. Modeling results showed that diffusion was the dominant contaminant transport mechanism. The measured tritium concentration profiles were accurately modeled with an effective diffusion coefficient of 6 ?? 10-4 mm2/s, which is in the middle of the range of values reported in the literature.

  18. Compact, Lightweight Dual-Frequency Microstrip Antenna Feed for Future Soil Moisture and Sea Surface Salinity Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon; Wilson, William J.; Njoku, Eni; Dinardo, Steve; Hunter, Don; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Kona, Keerti S.; Manteghi, Majid

    2006-01-01

    The development of a compact, lightweight, dual-frequency antenna feed for future soil moisture and sea surface salinity (SSS) missions is described. The design is based on the microstrip stacked-patch array (MSPA) to be used to feed a large lightweight deployable rotating mesh antenna for spaceborne L-band (approx.1 GHz) passive and active sensing systems. The design features will also enable applications to airborne soil moisture and salinity remote sensing sensors operating on small aircrafts. This paper describes the design of stacked patch elements and 16-element array configuration. The results from the return loss, antenna pattern measurements and sky tests are also described.

  19. Desiccation-Induced Volumetric Shrinkage of Compacted Metakaolin-Treated Black Cotton Soil for a Hydraulic Barriers System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, George; Peter, Oriola F. O.; Osinubi, Kolawole J.

    2016-03-01

    Black cotton soil treated with up to 24% metakaolin (MCL) content was prepared by molding water contents of -2, 0, 2, 4 and 6% of optimum moisture content (OMC) and compacted with British Standard Light (BSL) and West African Standard (WAS) or `Intermediate' energies. The specimens were extruded from the compaction molds and allowed to air dry in a laboratory in order to assess the effect of desiccation-induced shrinkage on the compacted mix for use as a hydraulic barrier in a waste containment application. The results recorded show that the volumetric shrinkage strain (VSS) values were large within the first 10 days of drying; the VSS values increased with a higher molding of the water content, relative to the OMC. The VSS generally increased with a higher initial degree of saturation for the two compactive efforts, irrespective of the level of MCL treatment. Generally, the VSS decreased with an increasing MCL content. Only specimens treated with a minimum 20% MCL content and compacted with the WAS energy satisfied the regulatory maximum VSS of 4% for use as a hydraulic barrier.

  20. STUDIES ON CONTAMINANT BIODEGRADATION IN SLURRY, WAFER, AND COMPACTED SOIL TUBE REACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic experimental approach is presented to quantitatively evaluate biodegradation rates in intact soil systems. Knowledge of bioremediation rates in intact soil systems is important for evaluating the efficacy of in-situ biodegradation and approaches for enhancing degrad...

  1. Soil compaction related to grazing and its effects on herbaceous roots frequency and soil organic matter content in rangelands of SW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido, Manuel; Schnabel, Susanne; Francisco Lavado Contador, Joaquín; Miralles Mellado, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Rangelands in SW Spain occupy a total surface area of approximately 6 million ha and constitute the most representative extensive ranching system of the Iberian Peninsula gathering more than 13 million livestock heads. They are characterised by an herbaceous layer, mostly composed of therophytic species, with a disperse tree cover, mainly holm oak and cork oak (Quercus ilex rotundifolia and Q. suber), interspersed with shrubs in many places. This type of land system is of ancient origin and experienced frequent changes in land use in the past, since agricultural, livestock and forestry activities have coexisted within the same farms. In recent decades, livestock farming has become dominant due, in part, to the subsidies of the Common Agriculture Policy. Since Spain joined the European Union in 1986 until the year 2000, the number of domestic animals doubled, particularly cattle, and consequently animal stocking rates have increased on average from 0.40 AU ha-1 up to 0.70 AU ha-1. This increase in animal stocking rates, along with a progressive substitution of cattle instead of sheep in many farms, has led to the occurrence of land degradation processes such as the reduction of grass cover or soil compaction in heavily grazed areas. Previous research has evidenced higher values of soil bulk density and resistance to penetration as well as larger bare surface areas in spring in fenced areas with animal stocking rates above 1 AU ha-1. However, a better understanding of how increasing bulk density or resistance to penetration influence the frequency of herbaceous roots and how a reduction in the frequency of roots affects soil organic matter content in rangelands is still unknown. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to determine possible relationships between the frequencies of herbaceous roots and soil organic matter content in order to understand the effect of excessive animal numbers on the depletion of soil fertility by reducing progressively the quantity of

  2. A comparison of two models to evaluate soil compaction effects on corn root growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several complex interactions among soil physical properties influence root growth of common crops. Models are used to combine limitations of temperature, aeration, water availability and soil strength to determine the zonal suitability for root growth. Two models are compared in this study, the Jone...

  3. Mineralogical investigation of soils formed on compacted carbonate rocks in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Eszter; Sajó, István; Bidló, András

    2014-05-01

    The primary aim of our mineralogical investigation was to study the mineral composition and the soil-forming materials of the soils in the Bükk Hills' native forest. The investigated soils can be found at the top of the Bükk Hills, on the so-called Bükk-Highlands. This limestone plateau is composed primarily of limestones but also contains dolomites and shales. In the course of our investigations we have analysed four soil profiles. The formation of the acidic and humus rich upper layer of the soil profiles is influenced by the mineral composition and the weathering of the rocks. In order to study the composition of soil minerals thermoanalytical and X-ray diffraction measurements have been carried out. Different soil particle fractions have been analysed by polarizing microscopy. According to the thermal analyses the most abundant mineral in the soil samples was quartz, accompanied by clay minerals and oxides-hidroxides. The presence of calcite could only be evidenced in a few samples. The X-ray diffraction measurements have also confirmed these findings, because according to this we can say that quartz represents the most significant proportion in all of the soil profiles, and besides quartz clay minerals, feldspars, oxides-hidroxides also occur; respecting calcite we have got interesting results, as this mineral appears only in four layers and in very little concentrations in all of the soil profiles. X-ray analyses have also revealed the presence of alumogoethit in each of the profiles, a mineral, indicating a previously warmer and humider subtropical climate. This warmer cilmate of the area has been periodically changing for over 65 million years with a colder and dryer climate, and these changes also affect the development of the soils. The investigated soils of the Bükk-Highland contain significant amounts of silicates, so apparently they cannot be the product of the weathering of limestone solely. The major part of soil-forming material originates

  4. Long term chemo-hydro-mechanical behavior of compacted soil bentonite polymer complex submitted to synthetic leachate.

    PubMed

    Razakamanantsoa, Andry Rico; Djeran-Maigre, Irini

    2016-07-01

    An experimental program is carried out to investigate the long term hydro-mechanical behavior correlated with chemical one of compacted soils with low concentration of Ca-bentonite and Ca-bentonite polymer mixture. The effect of prehydration on the hydraulic performance is compared to the polymer adding effect. All specimens are submitted to synthetic leachate (LS) under different permeation conditions. Several issues are studied: mechanical stability, hydraulic performance, chemical exchange of cations validated with microstructure observations. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observations demonstrate two distinct behaviors: dispersive for Bentonite (B) and B with Polymer P1 (BP1) and flocculated for B with Polymer P2 (BP2). Direct shear tests show that bentonite adding increases the Soil (S) cohesion and decreases the friction angle. Polymer adding behaves similarly by maintaining the soil cohesion and increasing the friction angle. Hydraulic conductivity of prehydrated soil bentonite (SB) and direct permeation of polymer added soil bentonite are studied (SBP1 and SBP2). Hydraulic test duration are in range of 45days to 556days long. Prehydration allows to delay the aggressive effect of the LS in short term but seems to increase its negative effect on the hydraulic conductivity value in long term exposure. SB and SBP1 behave similarly and seem to act in the long term as a granular filler effect. SBP2 presents positive results comparing to the other mixtures: it maintains the hydraulic conductivity and the chemical resistance. Chemical analysis confirms that all specimens are subjected to Na(+) dissolution and Ca(2+) retention which are more pronounced for prehydrated specimen. The short term effect of prehydration and the positive effect of SBP2 are also confirmed. PMID:27156365

  5. Evaluating energy sorghum harvest thresholds and tillage cropping systems to offset negative environmental impacts and harvesting equipment-induced soil compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meki, M. N.; Snider, J. L.; Kiniry, J. R.; Raper, R. L.; Rocateli, A. C.

    2011-12-01

    Energy sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) could be the ideal feedstock for the cellulosic ethanol industry because of its robust establishment, broader adaptability and drought tolerance, water and nutrient use efficiency, and the relatively high annual biomass yields. Of concern, however, is the limited research data on harvest thresholds, subsequent environmental impacts and the potential cumulative effects of harvesting equipment-induced soil compaction. Indiscriminate harvests of the high volume wet energy sorghum biomass, coupled with repeated field passes, could cause irreparable damage to the soil due to compaction. Furthermore, biomass harvests result in lower soil organic matter returns to the soil, making the soil even more susceptible to soil compaction. Compacted soils result in poor root zone aeration and drainage, more losses of nitrogen from denitrification, and restricted root growth, which reduces yields. Given the many positive attributes of conservation tillage and crop residue retention, our research and extension expectations are that sustainable energy sorghum cropping systems ought to include some form of conservation tillage. The challenge is to select cropping and harvesting systems that optimize feedstock production while ensuring adequate residue biomass to sustainably maintain soil structure and productivity. Producers may have to periodically subsoil-till or plow-back their lands to alleviate problems of soil compaction and drainage, weeds, insects and disease infestations. Little, however, is known about the potential impact of these tillage changes on soil productivity, environmental integrity, and sustainability of bioenergy agro-ecosystems. Furthermore, 'safe' energy sorghum feedstock removal thresholds have yet to be established. We will apply the ALMANAC biophysical model to evaluate permissible energy sorghum feedstock harvest thresholds and the effects of subsoil tillage and periodically plowing no-tilled (NT) energy sorghum

  6. Evaluating Soil Compaction for an Annual Winter Grazing/Vegetable Production Rotation in North-Central

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degraded soils of Alabama have demonstrated the ability to respond well to conservation tillage in a large variety of crops. Winter annual grazing/sod-based rotations with summer vegetable production can offer reduced economic risks for producers but may change tillage requirements for vegetable pro...

  7. Using Soil Apparent Electrical Conductivity to Optimize Sampling of Soil Penetration Resistance and to Improve the Estimations of Spatial Patterns of Soil Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Glécio Machado; Dafonte, Jorge Dafonte; Bueno Lema, Javier; Valcárcel Armesto, Montserrat; Silva, Ênio Farias França e

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a combined application of an EM38DD for assessing soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and a dual-sensor vertical penetrometer Veris-3000 for measuring soil electrical conductivity (ECveris) and soil resistance to penetration (PR). The measurements were made at a 6 ha field cropped with forage maize under no-tillage after sowing and located in Northwestern Spain. The objective was to use data from ECa for improving the estimation of soil PR. First, data of ECa were used to determine the optimized sampling scheme of the soil PR in 40 points. Then, correlation analysis showed a significant negative relationship between soil PR and ECa, ranging from −0.36 to −0.70 for the studied soil layers. The spatial dependence of soil PR was best described by spherical models in most soil layers. However, below 0.50 m the spatial pattern of soil PR showed pure nugget effect, which could be due to the limited number of PR data used in these layers as the values of this parameter often were above the range measured by our equipment (5.5 MPa). The use of ECa as secondary variable slightly improved the estimation of PR by universal cokriging, when compared with kriging. PMID:25610899

  8. In-situ studies on the performance of landfill caps (compacted soil liners, geomembranes, geosynthetic clay liners, capillary barriers)

    SciTech Connect

    Melchior, S.

    1997-12-31

    Since 1986 different types of landfill covers have been studied in-situ on the Georgswerder landfill in Hamburg, Germany. Water balance data are available for eight years. The performance of different carriers has been measured by collecting the leakage on areas ranging from 100 m{sup 2} to 500 m{sup 2}. Composite liners with geomembranes performed best, showing no leakage. An extended capillary barrier also performed well. The performance of compacted soil liners, however, decreased severely within five years due to desiccation, shrinkage and plant root penetration (liner leakage now ranging from 150 mm/a to 200 mm/a). About 50 % of the water that reaches the surface of the liner is leaking through it. The maximum leakage rates have increased from 2 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} to 4 x 10{sup -8} m{sup 3} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Two types of geosynthetic clay liners (GCL) have been tested for two years now with disappointing results. The GCL desiccated during the first dry summer of the study. High percolation rates through the GCL were measured during the following winter (45 mm resp. 63 mm in four months). Wetting of the GCL did not significantly reduce the percolation rates.

  9. ACOUSTIC COMPACTION LAYER DETECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The depth and strength of compacted layers in fields have been determined traditionally using the ASAE standardized cone penetrometer method. However, an on-the-go method would be much faster and much less labor intensive. The soil measurement system described here attempts to locate the compacted...

  10. Microbiological assessment of the application of quicklime and limestone as a measure to stabilize the structure of compaction-prone soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltedesco, Evi; Bauer, Lisa-Maria; Unterfrauner, Hans; Peticzka, Robert; Zehetner, Franz; Keiblinger, Katharina Maria

    2014-05-01

    Compaction of soils is caused by increasing mechanization of agriculture and forestry, construction of pipelines, surface mining and land recultivation. This results in degradation of aggregate stability and a decrease of pore space, esp. of macropores. It further impairs the water- and air permeability, and restricts the habitat of soil organisms. A promising approach to stabilize the structure and improve the permeability of soils is the addition of polyvalent ions like Ca2+ which can be added in form of quicklime (CaO) and limestone (CaCO3). In this study, we conducted a greenhouse pot experiment using these two different sources of calcium ions in order to evaluate their effect over time on physical properties and soil microbiology. We sampled silty and clayey soils from three different locations in Austria and incubated them with and without the liming materials (application 12.5 g) for 3 months in four replicates. In order to assess short-term and medium-term effects, soil samples were taken 2 days, 1 month and 3 months after application of quicklime and limestone, respectively. For these samples, we determined pH, bulk density, aggregate stability and water retention characteristics. Further, we measured microbiological parameters, such as potential enzyme activities (cellulase, phosphatase, chitinase, protease, phenoloxidase and peroxidase activity), PLFAs, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen and ammonium nitrogen. In contrast to limestone, quicklime significantly improved soil aggregate stability in all tested soils only 2 days after application. Initially, soil pH was strongly increased by quicklime; however, after the second sampling (one month) the pH values of all tested soils returned to levels comparable to the soils treated with limestone. Our preliminary microbiological results show an immediate inhibition effect of quicklime on most potential hydrolytic enzyme activities and an increase in

  11. The Snow Must Go On: Ground Ice Encasement, Snow Compaction and Absence of Snow Differently Cause Soil Hypoxia, CO2 Accumulation and Tree Seedling Damage in Boreal Forest.

    PubMed

    Martz, Françoise; Vuosku, Jaana; Ovaskainen, Anu; Stark, Sari; Rautio, Pasi

    2016-01-01

    At high latitudes, the climate has warmed at twice the rate of the global average with most changes observed in autumn, winter and spring. Increasing winter temperatures and wide temperature fluctuations are leading to more frequent rain-on-snow events and freeze-thaw cycles causing snow compaction and formation of ice layers in the snowpack, thus creating ice encasement (IE). By decreasing the snowpack insulation capacity and restricting soil-atmosphere gas exchange, modification of the snow properties may lead to colder soil but also to hypoxia and accumulation of trace gases in the subnivean environment. To test the effects of these overwintering conditions changes on plant winter survival and growth, we established a snow manipulation experiment in a coniferous forest in Northern Finland with Norway spruce and Scots pine seedlings. In addition to ambient conditions and prevention of IE, we applied three snow manipulation levels: IE created by artificial rain-on-snow events, snow compaction and complete snow removal. Snow removal led to deeper soil frost during winter, but no clear effect of IE or snow compaction done in early winter was observed on soil temperature. Hypoxia and accumulation of CO2 were highest in the IE plots but, more importantly, the duration of CO2 concentration above 5% was 17 days in IE plots compared to 0 days in ambient plots. IE was the most damaging winter condition for both species, decreasing the proportion of healthy seedlings by 47% for spruce and 76% for pine compared to ambient conditions. Seedlings in all three treatments tended to grow less than seedlings in ambient conditions but only IE had a significant effect on spruce growth. Our results demonstrate a negative impact of winter climate change on boreal forest regeneration and productivity. Changing snow conditions may thus partially mitigate the positive effect of increasing growing season temperatures on boreal forest productivity. PMID:27254100

  12. The Snow Must Go On: Ground Ice Encasement, Snow Compaction and Absence of Snow Differently Cause Soil Hypoxia, CO2 Accumulation and Tree Seedling Damage in Boreal Forest

    PubMed Central

    Vuosku, Jaana; Ovaskainen, Anu; Stark, Sari; Rautio, Pasi

    2016-01-01

    At high latitudes, the climate has warmed at twice the rate of the global average with most changes observed in autumn, winter and spring. Increasing winter temperatures and wide temperature fluctuations are leading to more frequent rain-on-snow events and freeze-thaw cycles causing snow compaction and formation of ice layers in the snowpack, thus creating ice encasement (IE). By decreasing the snowpack insulation capacity and restricting soil-atmosphere gas exchange, modification of the snow properties may lead to colder soil but also to hypoxia and accumulation of trace gases in the subnivean environment. To test the effects of these overwintering conditions changes on plant winter survival and growth, we established a snow manipulation experiment in a coniferous forest in Northern Finland with Norway spruce and Scots pine seedlings. In addition to ambient conditions and prevention of IE, we applied three snow manipulation levels: IE created by artificial rain-on-snow events, snow compaction and complete snow removal. Snow removal led to deeper soil frost during winter, but no clear effect of IE or snow compaction done in early winter was observed on soil temperature. Hypoxia and accumulation of CO2 were highest in the IE plots but, more importantly, the duration of CO2 concentration above 5% was 17 days in IE plots compared to 0 days in ambient plots. IE was the most damaging winter condition for both species, decreasing the proportion of healthy seedlings by 47% for spruce and 76% for pine compared to ambient conditions. Seedlings in all three treatments tended to grow less than seedlings in ambient conditions but only IE had a significant effect on spruce growth. Our results demonstrate a negative impact of winter climate change on boreal forest regeneration and productivity. Changing snow conditions may thus partially mitigate the positive effect of increasing growing season temperatures on boreal forest productivity. PMID:27254100

  13. Adult Compacts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin focuses on adult compacts, three-way agreements among employers, potential employees, and trainers to provide the right kind of quality training to meet the employers' requirements. Part 1 is an executive summary of a report of the Adult Compacts Project, which studied three adult compacts in Birmingham and Loughborough, England, and…

  14. Predicting Winter Wheat Yield Loss from Soil Compaction in the Central Great Plains of the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extent to which no-till management improves water and wind erodibility parameters is not well understood. This study assessed changes in aggregate resistance to raindrops, dry aggregate wettability, and dry aggregate stability as well as their relationships with changes in soil organic carbon co...

  15. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  16. A Compact L-band Radiometer for High Resolution sUAS-based Imaging of Soil Moisture and Surface Salinity Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Stachura, M.; Dai, E.; Elston, J.; McIntyre, E.; Leuski, V.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the long electrical wavelengths required along with practical aperture size limitations the scaling of passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture and salinity from spaceborne low-resolution (~10-100 km) applications to high resolution (~10-1000 m) applications requires use of low flying aerial vehicles. This presentation summarizes the status of a project to develop a commercial small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) hosting a microwave radiometer for mapping of soil moisture in precision agriculture and sea surface salinity studies. The project is based on the Tempest electric-powered UAS and a compact L-band (1400-1427 MHz) radiometer developed specifically for extremely small and lightweight aerial platforms or man-portable, tractor, or tower-based applications. Notable in this combination are a highly integrated sUAS/radiometer antenna design and use of both the upwelling emitted signal from the surface and downwelling cold space signal for precise calibration using a unique lobe-differencing correlating radiometer architecture. The system achieves a spatial resolution comparable to the altitude of the UAS above the surface while referencing upwelling measurements to the constant and well-known background temperature of cold space. The radiometer has been tested using analog correlation detection, although future builds will include infrared, near-infrared, and visible (red) sensors for surface temperature and vegetation biomass correction and digital sampling for radio frequency interference mitigation. This NASA-sponsored project is being developed for commercial application in cropland water management (for example, high-value shallow root-zone crops), landslide risk assessment, NASA SMAP satellite validation, and NASA Aquarius salinity stratification studies. The system will ultimately be capable of observing salinity events caused by coastal glacier and estuary fresh water outflow plumes and open ocean rainfall events.

  17. A human health risk assessment of mercury species in soil and food around compact fluorescent lamp factories in Zhejiang Province, PR China.

    PubMed

    Shao, D D; Wu, S C; Liang, P; Kang, Y; Fu, W J; Zhao, K L; Cao, Z H; Wong, M H

    2012-06-30

    This study investigated total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in a major production center of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) located in Gaohong, Zhejiang Province, China. This was a result of the growing concern associated with the release of mercury into the environment from such components. The results of the study included the following mean concentrations for THg and MeHg of 157±11 (61-518)ng/gdw and 0.28±0.07 (0.07-0.67)ng/gdw in agricultural soil, respectively, and 18.6±6.5 (3.2-47.8)ng/gww and 0.11±0.03 (0.02-0.37)ng/gww in vegetable samples, respectively. A significant correlation was observed between THg in vegetables and corresponding soil samples (r=0.64, p<0.01). THg and MeHg in sediment samples had respective concentrations ranging from 28 to 1019ng/gdw and 0.11 to 3.15ng/gdw. Mud skipper bought from the local market contained the highest Hg (THg: 170±45ng/gww, MeHg: 143±37ng/gww) amongst all fish species (THg: 14-170; MeHg: 11-143ng/gww) of the study. The risk assessment indicated that fish consumption should not result in a MeHg EDI exceeding the RfD (0.1μg/kgbw/d) for both adults and children, when MeHg bioaccessibility is taken into account. PMID:22575176

  18. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  19. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  20. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  1. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  2. Compaction behavior of roller compacted ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2008-06-01

    The effect of roller compaction pressure on the bulk compaction of roller compacted ibuprofen was investigated using instrumented rotary tablet press. Three different roller pressures were utilized to prepare granules and Heckel analysis, Walker analysis, compressibility, and tabletability were performed to derive densification, deformation, course of volume reduction and bonding phenomenon of different pressure roller compacted granules. Nominal single granule fracture strength was obtained by micro tensile testing. Heckel analysis indicated that granules prepared using lower pressure during roller compaction showed lower yield strength. The reduction in tabletability was observed for higher pressure roller compacted granules. The reduction in tabletability supports the results of granule size enlargement theory. Apart from the granule size enlargement theory, the available fines and relative fragmentation during compaction is responsible for higher bonding strength and provide larger areas for true particle contact at constant porosity for lower pressure roller compacted granules. Overall bulk compaction parameters indicated that granules prepared by lower roller compaction pressure were advantageous in terms of tabletability and densification. Overall results suggested that densification during roller compaction affects the particle level properties of specific surface area, nominal fracture strength, and compaction behavior. PMID:18280716

  3. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  4. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  5. PROTOCOL FOR DETERMINING BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOKINETICS OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN DISPERSED, COMPACTED AND INTACT SOIL SYSTEMS TO ENHANCE IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of effective in situ and on-site bioremediation technologies can facilitate the cleanup of chemically-contaminated soil sites. Knowledge of biodegradation kinetics and bioavailability of organic pollutants can facilitate decisions on the efficacy of in situ and o...

  6. Compaction and Wear Concerns on Sports Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan, John

    1999-01-01

    Describes relatively simple measures athletic-facility managers can use to alleviate the turf destruction and compaction of athletic fields including seed and soil amendments and modifications on team practice. Ways of enhancing surface traction and lessen surface hardness are explored. (GR)

  7. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  8. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  9. Electrical properties of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozdnyakova, Larisa A.

    genesis, precision agriculture, and environmental engineering. The applications of the methods included studying soil water retention, compaction, and soil morphology; mapping soil spatial variability within fields, catenas, or landscapes; locating genetic horizons, compacted or disturbed layers, hydrocarbon pollutants, stones, and groundwater tables in soil profiles; and monitoring soil drying or freezing.

  10. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. PMID:24300366

  11. Compaction behavior of isomalt after roll compaction.

    PubMed

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist. PMID:24300366

  12. Biochar impact on water infiltration and water quality through a compacted subsoil layer

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soils in the SE USA Coastal Plain region frequently have a compacted subsoil layer (E horizon), which is a barrier for water infiltration. Four different biochars were evaluated to increase water infiltration through a compacted horizon from a Norfolk soil (fine-loamy, kaolinitic...

  13. Biochars impact on water infiltration and water quality through a compacted subsoil layer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soils in the Southeastern United States Coastal Plain region frequently have a compacted subsoil layer, which is a barrier for water movement. Four different biochars were evaluated to increase water movement through a compacted horizon from a Norfolk soil (fine-loamy, kaolinitic, thermic, Typic Ka...

  14. Dynamical compactness and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Khilko, Danylo; Kolyada, Sergiĭ; Zhang, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    To link the Auslander point dynamics property with topological transitivity, in this paper we introduce dynamically compact systems as a new concept of a chaotic dynamical system (X , T) given by a compact metric space X and a continuous surjective self-map T : X → X. Observe that each weakly mixing system is transitive compact, and we show that any transitive compact M-system is weakly mixing. Then we discuss the relationships between it and other several stronger forms of sensitivity. We prove that any transitive compact system is Li-Yorke sensitive and furthermore multi-sensitive if it is not proximal, and that any multi-sensitive system has positive topological sequence entropy. Moreover, we show that multi-sensitivity is equivalent to both thick sensitivity and thickly syndetic sensitivity for M-systems. We also give a quantitative analysis for multi-sensitivity of a dynamical system.

  15. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  17. Compact Microscope Imaging System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. The CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, can scan, find areas of interest, focus, and acquire images automatically. Large numbers of multiple cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is only feasible with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities. The software also has a user-friendly interface that can be used independently of the hardware for post-experiment analysis. CMIS has potential commercial uses in the automated online inspection of precision parts, medical imaging, security industry (examination of currency in automated teller machines and fingerprint identification in secure entry locks), environmental industry (automated examination of soil/water samples), biomedical field (automated blood/cell analysis), and microscopy community. CMIS will improve research in several ways: It will expand the capabilities of MSD experiments utilizing microscope technology. It may be used in lunar and Martian experiments (Rover Robot). Because of its reduced size, it will enable experiments that were not feasible previously. It may be incorporated into existing shuttle orbiter and space station experiments, including glove-box-sized experiments as well as ground-based experiments.

  18. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  19. Dark compact planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Schaffner-Bielich, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We investigate compact objects formed by dark matter admixed with ordinary matter made of neutron-star matter and white-dwarf material. We consider non-self annihilating dark matter with an equation of state given by an interacting Fermi gas. We find new stable solutions, dark compact planets, with Earth-like masses and radii from a few Km to few hundred Km for weakly interacting dark matter which are stabilized by the mutual presence of dark matter and compact star matter. For the strongly interacting dark matter case, we obtain dark compact planets with Jupiter-like masses and radii of few hundred Km. These objects could be detected by observing exoplanets with unusually small radii. Moreover, we find that the recently observed 2 M⊙ pulsars set limits on the amount of dark matter inside neutron stars which is, at most, 1 0-6 M⊙ .

  20. Compact baby Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect

    Adam, C.; Klimas, P.; Sanchez-Guillen, J.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2009-11-15

    For the baby Skyrme model with a specific potential, compacton solutions, i.e., configurations with a compact support and parabolic approach to the vacuum, are derived. Specifically, in the nontopological sector, we find spinning Q-balls and Q-shells, as well as peakons. Moreover, we obtain compact baby skyrmions with nontrivial topological charge. All these solutions may form stable multisoliton configurations provided they are sufficiently separated.

  1. Building healthy soils using conservation tillage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil organic matter affects nearly every aspect of crop production. Soils with higher amounts of organic matter resist compaction, and have increased water holding capacity, infiltration, fertility, and disease resistance. All these factors ultimately affect productivity. Conservation tillage syste...

  2. Effects of compaction and simulated root channels in the subsoil on root development, water uptake and growth of radiata pine.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, E K; Sands, R

    1992-04-01

    Effects of subsoil compaction and simulated root channels (perforations) through the compacted layer on root growth, water uptake, foliar nutrient concentration and growth of radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) were studied in a field experiment where a range of treatments were applied in reconstituted soil profiles. Subsoil compaction adversely affected root penetration in deeper parts of the soil and consequently caused greater water stress in trees. However, the effect of compaction was largely overcome when the subsoil was perforated to render 0.2% of the soil volume into vertical channels. Roots showed a remarkable ability to reach the points of low penetration strength and to travel through them to deeper parts of the profile. Perforations through compacted soil layers at a relatively low frequency may be a practical solution to allow root development into deeper parts of the soil and allow greater soil water exploration by roots. PMID:14969986

  3. DETERMINATION OF EFFECTIVE POROSITY OF SOIL MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of a compacted soil liner is partly a function of the porosity, where the transport of materials through the liner occurs via the pore space. The project studies the pore spaces of compacted soil materials to estimate the effective porosity, which is the portion o...

  4. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  5. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  6. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  7. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  8. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  9. Compact waveguide splitter networks.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yusheng; Song, Jiguo; Kim, Seunghyun; Hu, Weisheng; Nordin, Gregory P

    2008-03-31

    We demonstrate compact waveguide splitter networks in siliconon- insulator (SOI) rib waveguides using trench-based splitters (TBSs) and bends (TBBs). Rather than a 90 degrees geometry, we use 105 degrees TBSs to facilitate reliable fabrication of high aspect ratio trenches suitable for 50/50 splitting when filled with SU8. Three dimensional (3D) finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation is used for splitter and bend design. Measured TBB and TBS optical efficiencies are 84% and 68%, respectively. Compact 105 degrees 1 x 4, 1 x 8, and 1 x 32 trench-based splitter networks (TBSNs) are demonstrated. The measured total optical loss of the 1 x 32 TBSN is 9.15 dB. Its size is only 700 microm x 1600 microm for an output waveguide spacing of 50 microm. PMID:18542598

  10. Compact infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Hong, S.; Moacanin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Broadband IR detector integrated into compact package for pollution monitoring and weather prediction is small, highly responsive, and immune to high noise. Sensing material is transparent sheet metalized with reflecting coating and overcoated with black material on same side. Pulse produced by chopping of infrared source beam creates transient "thermal lens" that temporarily defocuses laser beam probe. Detector monitoring beam measures defocusing which parallels infrared intensity.

  11. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  12. Compact heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kays, W.M.; London, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    This third edition is an update of the second edition published in 1964. New data and more modern theoretical solutions for flow in the simple geometries are included, although this edition does not differ radically from the second edition. It contains basic test data for eleven new surface configurations, including some of the very compact ceramic matrices. Al dimensions are given in both the English and the Systeme International (SI) system of units.

  13. Granule consolidation during compaction.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M H

    1976-03-01

    The deformation of small cylindrical aggregates of dibasic calcium phosphate was measured during compaction. An analogy between these aggregates and cylindrical granules was proposed. No change in the original shape of the aggregates occurred; the cylindrical shape was maintained even at high compaction pressures. Relaxation of the aggregates occurred at pressures higher than 420 MNm-2 (60.9 x 10(3) lb in.-2) when removed from the compacts, but no relaxation took place at pressures below this value. In addition, the aggregates relaxed by an increase in thickness only; there was no corresponding change in diameter. Up to a pressure of 200 MNm-2 (29.0 x 10(3) lb in.-2), an increase in aggregate diameter occurred, which was accompanied by a reduction in thickness. This change produced only a small reduction in volume, which was attributable to interparticulate slippage resulting in a closer packed arrangement. At a pressure of 200 MNm-2, the aggregate diameter no longer increased because solid bridges were formed between the particles and the die wall, preventing further spreading. From 200 to 420 MNm-2, failure of the material occurred by plastic deformation, which produced only a decrease in aggregate thickness. From 420 to 800 MNm-2 (116.0 x 10(3) lb in.-2), a structure was formed that could support the applied load without further reduction of thickness, and this structure was shown to behave elastically. PMID:1263085

  14. Effect of soil structure on the growth of bacteria in soil quantified using CARD-FISH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juyal, Archana; Eickhorst, Thilo; Falconer, Ruth; Otten, Wilfred

    2014-05-01

    It has been reported that compaction of soil due to use of heavy machinery has resulted in the reduction of crop yield. Compaction affects the physical properties of soil such as bulk density, soil strength and porosity. This causes an alteration in the soil structure which limits the mobility of nutrients, water and air infiltration and root penetration in soil. Several studies have been conducted to explore the effect of soil compaction on plant growth and development. However, there is scant information on the effect of soil compaction on the microbial community and its activities in soil. Understanding the effect of soil compaction on microbial community is essential as microbial activities are very sensitive to abrupt environmental changes in soil. Therefore, the aim of this work was to investigate the effect of soil structure on growth of bacteria in soil. The bulk density of soil was used as a soil physical parameter to quantify the effect of soil compaction. To detect and quantify bacteria in soil the method of catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) was used. This technique results in high intensity fluorescent signals which make it easy to quantify bacteria against high levels of autofluorescence emitted by soil particles and organic matter. In this study, bacterial strains Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and Bacillus subtilis DSM10 were used. Soils of aggregate size 2-1mm were packed at five different bulk densities in polyethylene rings (4.25 cm3).The soil rings were sampled at four different days. Results showed that the total number of bacteria counts was reduced significantly (P

  15. Relationship between the erosion properties of soils and other parameters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil parameters are essential for erosion process prediction and ultimately improved model development, especially as they relate to dam and levee failure. Soil parameters including soil texture and structure, soil classification, soil compaction, moisture content, and degree of saturation can play...

  16. Rhizosphere Compaction: Modeling a Bed of Multiple Aggregates Using X-Ray Micro-Tomography Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aravena, J. E.; Berli, M.; Tyler, S. W.

    2010-12-01

    The rhizosphere is the thin layer of soil that surrounds the roots. Its properties are different from the bulk, thus it is a critical environmental interface that controls water, nutrient and solute transport from the soil to the biosphere. At the aggregate scale, natural root-induced compaction may be surprisingly beneficial for the plants, as it increases contact areas between the aggregates and, contrary to traditional thinking, increases the hydraulic conductivity. We study the combined effect of compaction in a bed of multiple soil aggregates, before and after compaction for (a) a micro-balloon-induced compacted sample and (b) a natural root-induced compacted sample. Numerical models were constructed using X-ray micro-tomography (XMT) images to build the finite element meshes; the soil hydraulic properties (porosity and air-entry pressure), used to populate the models of the beds of aggregates, were estimated using XMT information, as the consolidation of the aggregates, due to the compaction results in a variable distribution of inter- and intra-aggregate porosity. The results show that root-induced compaction can be very beneficial for the plant, as it increases the hydraulic conductivity of the system. Thus, roots are able to extract more water than prior to compaction. The numerical modeling results were compared with a new theoretical hydraulic conductivity model.

  17. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  18. Photometry of compact galaxies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, B. S. P.; Usher, P. D.; Barrett, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Photometric histories of the N galaxies 3C 390.3 and PKS 0521-36. Four other compact galaxies, Markarian 9, I Zw 92, 2 Zw 136, and III Zw 77 showed no evidence of variability. The photometric histories were obtained from an exhaustive study of those plates of the Harvard collection taken with large aperture cameras. The images of all galaxies reported were indistinguishable from stars due to the camera f-ratios and low surface brightness of the outlying nebulosities of the galaxies. Standard techniques for the study of variable stars are therefore applicable.

  19. Compact Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; da Rocha, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  20. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S S; O' Hara, J F; Rybarcyk, L J

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  1. Compact multiframe blind deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Hope, Douglas A; Jefferies, Stuart M

    2011-03-15

    We describe a multiframe blind deconvolution (MFBD) algorithm that uses spectral ratios (the ratio of the Fourier spectra of two data frames) to model the inherent temporal signatures encoded by the observed images. In addition, by focusing on the separation of the object spectrum and system transfer functions only at spatial frequencies where the measured signal is above the noise level, we significantly reduce the number of unknowns to be determined. This "compact" MFBD yields high-quality restorations in a much shorter time than is achieved with MFBD algorithms that do not model the temporal signatures; it may also provide higher-fidelity solutions. PMID:21403711

  2. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  3. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  4. Impact of disturbance on soil microbial activity in the Northern Chihuahuan Desert

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptobiotic soil crusts in arid regions contribute to ecosystem stability through increased water infiltration, soil aggregate stability, and nutrient cycling between the soil community and vascular plants. These crusts are particularly sensitive to compaction/fracturing disturbances such as livest...

  5. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  6. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  7. Hard-pan soils - Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hard pans, hard layers, or compacted horizons, either surface or subsurface, are universal problems that limit crop production. Hard layers can be caused by traffic or soil genetic properties that result in horizons with high density or cemented soil particles; these horizons have elevated penetrati...

  8. Compaction of chernozems on the right bank of the Kuban River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, A. S.; Kust, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    Overcompacted chernozems with vertic features are described for the first time on the right bank of the Kuban River in the Korenovsk and Ust-Labinsk districts of the Krasnodar region. These soils are mainly localized in depressions. The differences between the properties and genesis of these soils and the classical Vertisols or dark vertic soils are discussed. A grouping of the morphological characteristics of soil compaction (including bulk density, penetration resistance, structure characteristics, distribution of roots, porosity, and fissuring of the humus horizon) is suggested. It is shown that the morphological manifestation of soil compaction is weaker on the elevated elements of the topography in comparison with that of the local depressions. The morphological features of soil compaction are not directly correlated with physical properties of the soil. It can be concluded that the physicomechanical characteristics of the studied soils (light clayey texture with physical clay (<0.01 mm) content exceeding 50%, clay (<0.001 mm) content exceeding 30%, and a high portion of water-peptizable clay) attest to potential soil susceptibility to high compaction and appearance of vertic features.

  9. METHOD OF FORMING ELONGATED COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Larson, H.F.

    1959-05-01

    A powder compacting procedure and apparatus which produces elongated compacts of Be is described. The powdered metal is placed in a thin metal tube which is chemically compatible to lubricant, powder, atmosphere, and die material and will undergo a high degree of plastic deformation and have intermediate hardness. The tube is capped and placed in the die, and punches are applied to the ends. During the compacting stroke the powder seizes the tube and a thickening and shortening of the tube occurs. The tube is easily removed from the die, split, and peeled from the compact. (T.R.H.)

  10. Restoring soil quality on construction sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil at construction sites gets compacted reducing root growth and infiltration, which leads to runoff, erosion, and loss of nutrients. Adding compost and prairie grasses decreased the soil density, increased soil water storage, increased root penetration, and reduced runoff and erosion....

  11. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarov, Viktor; Cermak, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Stekl, Ivan

    2009-11-09

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  12. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  13. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  14. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  15. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  16. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  17. Compact SPS - Power delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospisil, M.; Pospisilova, L.

    1982-09-01

    The power deliverable by a compact solar Space Power Station (SPS) is a function of its outer surface shape. Methods of fitting the power delivery curve of such a system to different patterns of daily power demand are considered that involve the appropriate choice of the number of satellites, their maximal power, height to width ratio and the shift of longitude with respect to the receiving station. Changes in the daily delivery curve can be made by altering the longitudes and orientations of the satellites. Certain limitations to the choice of parameters exist, such as: the height to width ratio should be near 1.2, and the sum of longitude and orientation changes will probably not be greater than 50 deg. The optimization of the peak to average power ratio is also discussed.

  18. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  19. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  20. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  1. Compact ultraviolet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Brian Walter

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation presents theoretical analysis and experimental investigation of a compact ultraviolet laser, comprising an unstable resonator semiconductor (URSL) laser-pumped potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) periodically segmented waveguide (PSW) laser. A comprehensive survey of existing short wavelength visible and near ultraviolet laser technologies suitable for the development of compact ultraviolet lasers is presented. This survey establishes the suitability of a diode-pumped KTP PSW laser as an attractive approach for developing a compact ultraviolet laser. Requirements for an efficient diode-pumped KTP PSW laser are given, leading to the selection of a frequency-stabilized URSL and hydrothermal KTP PSWs as the component technologies to be developed and integrated. Since the design requirements for the URSL and KTP PSW are critically dependent on a thorough understanding of the spatial mode properties of KTP PSWs, analyses and modeling of the spatial mode properties of these devices is presented using effective index method (EIM) and beam propagation method (BPM) models. In addition, a new expression for the normalized conversion efficiency is presented which explicitly incorporates the dependence of this important parameter on the lateral variation of the refractive index and d coefficient. To assess the theoretical performance of an URSL-pumped KTP PSW, the BPM model was extended to incorporate second harmonic generation. This represents an important contribution to the development of numerical methods for modeling nonlinear waveguides, in general, and provides important information on the cooperative effects of diffraction and spatial mode beating on the SHG output from KTP PSWs. Extensive optical characterization of NUV SHG in hydrothermal KTP PSWs using an argon-ion laser-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser as the infrared laser pump source is presented. Spectral characterization, spatial mode characterization, and the temperature dependence of the QPM

  2. Spatial and temporal variability of soil penetration resistance transecting sugarbeet rows and inter-rows in tillage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil compaction has detrimental consequences on soil quality and plant root growth. Soil compaction is a variable property due to tillage in both space and time. A field study was conducted near Sidney, MT, USA, in 2007 to evaluate spatial and temporal variations of soil penetration resistance (PR...

  3. The Meaning of a Compact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasescha, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To mark the 30th anniversary of "Campus Compact," leaders from across the network came together in the summer of 2015 to reaffirm a shared commitment to the public purposes of higher education. Campus Compact's 30th Anniversary Action Statement of Presidents and Chancellors is the product of that collective endeavor. In signing the…

  4. A Compact Ring Design with Tunable Momentum Compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.; /SLAC

    2012-05-17

    A storage ring with tunable momentum compaction has the advantage in achieving different RMS bunch length with similar RF capacity, which is potentially useful for many applications, such as linear collider damping ring and predamping ring where injected beam has a large energy spread and a large transverse emittance. A tunable bunch length also makes the commissioning and fine tuning easier in manipulating the single bunch instabilities. In this paper, a compact ring design based on a supercell is presented, which achieves a tunable momentum compaction while maintaining a large dynamic aperture.

  5. GEODE : In situ planetary compact geochemistry facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angrilli, F.; Guizzo, G. P.; Bibring, J. P.; Fulchignoni, M.; Marinangeli, L.

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this compact and miniaturised facility is to analyse the composition and physical properties of soils and rocks of the planetary surfaces. This type of assemblage would be suitable for the Mercury and Mars Scout missions (though under different environmental conditions) which require a very lightweight scientific package. In fact, ought to the very small dimensions of this facility, it can be easily allocated either inside a microrover or on a robotic arm of a lander. The scientific experiments we propose to be onboard the facility are: XMAP (x-ray diffractometer and fluorescence), MPE (magnetic properties experiment), VIRCUI (visible and infrared close-up imager). XMAP will perform mineralogical and chemical analysis directly on the sample surface. It will allow to define the textural and petro-mineralogical characteristics of the rocks and thus information of the past environment conditions. MPE will provide answers on the magnetic phase of particles and minerals which are responsible for the magnetisation of the soil. It can perform repeated measurements in different sites or generate variable field intensity and collect particles with different sizes. VIRCUI is a multifunction microscope that can perform visible and infrared analysis of the soil and at the same time it is a support for the MPE experiment; moreover VIRCUI can also be useful for the navigation of a microrover.

  6. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  7. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  8. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  9. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  10. Compact Doppler magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Moynihan, Philip I.; Vaughan, Arthur H.; Cacciani, Alessandro

    1998-11-01

    We designed a low-cost flight instrument that images the full solar disk through two narrow band filters at the red nd blue 'wings' of the solar potassium absorption line. The images are produced on a 1024 X 1024 charge-coupled device with a resolution of 2 arcsec per pixel. Four filtergrams taken in a very short time at both wings in the left and right states of circular polarization are used to yield a Dopplergram and a magnetogram simultaneously. The noise-equivalent velocity associated with each pixel is less than 3 m/s. The measured signal is linearly proportional to the velocity in the range +/- 4000 m/s. The range of magnetic fields is from 3 to 3000 Gauss. The optical system of the instrument is simple and easily aligned. With a pixel size of 12 micrometers , the effective focal length is 126 cm. A Raleigh resolution limit of 4 arcsec is achieved with a 5-cm entrance apertures, providing an f/25 focal ratio. The foreoptic is a two-component telephoto lens serving to limit the overall optical length to 89 cm or less. The mass of the instrument is 14 kg. the power required is less than 30 Watts. The Compact Doppler Magnetograph can be used in space mission with severe mass and power requirements. It can also be effectively used for ground-based observations: large telescope, dome or other observatory facilities are not required.

  11. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  12. Diffusion of inorganic chemical wastes in compacted clay

    SciTech Connect

    Shackelford, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    The factors that were investigated included the water content/dry unit weight, the method of compaction, the mineralogy of the soil, and the concentration of the ions. The effective diffusion coefficients (D{asterisk}) of three anions (Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, and I{sup {minus}}) and three cations (K{sup +}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+}) in a simulated waste leachate were measured. Two clay soils (kaolinite and Lufkin clay) and a sand were used in the study. The clay samples were compacted and pre-soaked to minimize hydraulic gradients due to negative pore pressures. Mass balance calculations were performed to indicate possible sinks/sources in the diffusion system. The results of the diffusion tests were analyzed using two analytical solutions to Fick's second law and a commercially available semi-analytical solution. The D{asterisk} values for tests using high-concentration (0.04 N) leachate generally fell in the narrow range of about 4.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s, and were relatively insensitive to compaction water content/dry unit weight and to compaction method. The variability in the results from the tests with low-concentration (0.013 N) leachate precluded any definite conclusions from these tests. The values of D{asterisk} measured in this study were compared to values from previous studies, and the D{asterisk} values from this study were found to be slightly conservative (i.e., high). However, the results of the tests may be affected by several chemical and physical factors, and care should be taken to ensure that the soils used in the tests are representative of those used in the application of the test results. Recommendations are made for estimating D{asterisk} values for use in the design of compacted clay barriers for the containment of inorganic chemical wastes.

  13. Spatial and Temporal Variations of Soil Penetration Resistance across Rows of Sugarbeet under Two Tillage Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil compaction has detrimental effects on soil quality and root growth. Soil compaction due to cultural operations is an acknowledged problem by growers in the northern Great Plains, USA. A field study was conducted near Sidney, MT, USA in 2007 to evaluate spatial and temporal variations of penetr...

  14. SOIL PROPERTY ESTIMATION AND VARIABLE TILLAGE RECOMMENDATION USING GEO-REFERENCED CONE INDEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil compaction is a concern in crop production and environmental protection. Compaction is most often quantified in the field, albeit indirectly, using cone penetrometer measurements of soil strength, reported as cone index (CI). In this research, CI data collected under different soil conditions (...

  15. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  16. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  17. Plant Species Recovery on a Compacted Skid Road

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Murat; Makineci, Ender; Gungor, Beyza Sat

    2008-01-01

    This study was executed to determine the plant species of herbaceous cover in a skid road subjected to soil compaction due to timber skidding in a beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky.) stand. Our previous studies have shown that ground based timber skidding destroys the soils extremely, and degradations on ecosystem because of the timber skidding limit recovery and growth of plant cover on skid roads. However, some plant species show healthy habitat, recovery and they can survive after the extreme degradation in study area. We evaluated composition of these plant species and their cover-abundance scales in 100 m x 3 m transect. 15 plant species were determined belongs to 12 plant families and Liliaceae was the highest representative plant family. Smilax aspera L., Epimedium pubigerum (DC.) Moren et Decaisne, Carex distachya Desf. var. distachya Desf., Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn., Trachystemon orientalis (L.) G. Don, Hedera helix L. have the highest cover-abundance scale overall of determined species on compacted skid road.

  18. Compact, Reliable EEPROM Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A compact, reliable controller for an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) has been developed specifically for a space-flight application. The design may be adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for reliability in general and, in particular, for prevention of inadvertent writing of data in EEPROM cells. Inadvertent writes pose risks of loss of reliability in the original space-flight application and could pose such risks in other applications. Prior EEPROM controllers are large and complex and do not provide all reasonable protections (in many cases, few or no protections) against inadvertent writes. In contrast, the present controller provides several layers of protection against inadvertent writes. The controller also incorporates a write-time monitor, enabling determination of trends in the performance of an EEPROM through all phases of testing. The controller has been designed as an integral subsystem of a system that includes not only the controller and the controlled EEPROM aboard a spacecraft but also computers in a ground control station, relatively simple onboard support circuitry, and an onboard communication subsystem that utilizes the MIL-STD-1553B protocol. (MIL-STD-1553B is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical-interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. MIL-STD- 1553B is commonly used in defense and space applications.) The intent was to both maximize reliability while minimizing the size and complexity of onboard circuitry. In operation, control of the EEPROM is effected via the ground computers, the MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem, and the onboard support circuitry, all of which, in combination, provide the multiple layers of protection against inadvertent writes. There is no controller software, unlike in many prior EEPROM controllers; software can be a major contributor to unreliability, particularly in fault

  19. Compact dc link

    SciTech Connect

    Flairty, C. )

    1991-10-01

    The EPRI Compact Substation Project (a HVDC Converter Station) was developed, designed, and constructed per EPRI Agreement RP213. In December 1983, the converter station operated at its rating (100 MW power transmission and 300 kV dc bias plus 100 kV operating voltage). From January to May 1984, the converter station operated at various power transmission levels. Operation was intermittent due to a randomly occurring voltage breakdown. The voltage breakdown was isolated to the steel tanks containing the thyristor valves in an SF{sub 6} environment. The type of insulators stressed within the valve tanks were: (1) the epoxy cone shape insulators providing an interface to the bus entering the valve tank; (2) epoxy fiberglass hydraulic columns for the flow of the R113 refrigerant to and from the thyristor valves; and (3) the epoxy fiberglass support columns supporting the thyristor valves from the floor of the valve tank. The cause of the randomly occurring breakdown was investigated and determined to be the epoxy fiberglass support columns. The random dielectric breakdowns were due to excessive voltage gradients existing at the epoxy fiberglass support columns. This probably was caused by the misplacement of an internal insert within the column with respect to an external shield on the column. The cost and time to retrofit the support columns outweighed the benefits expected from resuming the project. Consequently, work was terminated and the equipment disassembled. Examination of the epoxy fiberglass support columns revealed several arcing tracks along the inside surface confirming the earlier hypothesis. 53 figs., 32 tabs.

  20. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  1. Compact Holographic Data Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, T. H.; Reyes, G. F.; Zhou, H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's future missions would require massive high-speed onboard data storage capability to Space Science missions. For Space Science, such as the Europa Lander mission, the onboard data storage requirements would be focused on maximizing the spacecraft's ability to survive fault conditions (i.e., no loss in stored science data when spacecraft enters the 'safe mode') and autonomously recover from them during NASA's long-life and deep space missions. This would require the development of non-volatile memory. In order to survive in the stringent environment during space exploration missions, onboard memory requirements would also include: (1) survive a high radiation environment (1 Mrad), (2) operate effectively and efficiently for a very long time (10 years), and (3) sustain at least a billion write cycles. Therefore, memory technologies requirements of NASA's Earth Science and Space Science missions are large capacity, non-volatility, high-transfer rate, high radiation resistance, high storage density, and high power efficiency. JPL, under current sponsorship from NASA Space Science and Earth Science Programs, is developing a high-density, nonvolatile and rad-hard Compact Holographic Data Storage (CHDS) system to enable large-capacity, high-speed, low power consumption, and read/write of data in a space environment. The entire read/write operation will be controlled with electrooptic mechanism without any moving parts. This CHDS will consist of laser diodes, photorefractive crystal, spatial light modulator, photodetector array, and I/O electronic interface. In operation, pages of information would be recorded and retrieved with random access and high-speed. The nonvolatile, rad-hard characteristics of the holographic memory will provide a revolutionary memory technology meeting the high radiation challenge facing the Europa Lander mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Compact Robotic Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.; Ohm, Timothy R.

    1993-01-01

    Radio-controlled microrover features light weight and agility. Miniature robotic vehicle, called Go-For, implements new fork-wheeled mobility concept to traverse extremely rough terrain. Weighs 4 kg and is 0.4 m long, climbs over obstacles as large as 60 percent of its length. Mobility concept applied to much larger vehicles. Demonstrates such applications as exploration of planetary surfaces, military surveillance, and assessing hazardous situations. Video camera on vehicle sends images to control station, where human supervisor chooses sequence of paths to traverse to reach locations of interest. For planetary exploration, spectrometer and seisometer on vehicle sends scientific data to control station, and onboard tools collect soil and rock samples. Terrestrial version equipped similarly to take samples in chemically and/or biologically contaminated areas.

  3. Compaction/Liquefaction Properties of Some Model Sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Andrzej; Mierczyński, Jacek; Sławińska, Justyna

    2015-12-01

    The compaction/liquefaction characteristics of two model sands are determined experimentally. One sand (Istanbul) is used in shaking table investigations, and the other (Dundee) in geotechnical centrifuge experiments. Both types of these highly sophisticated experiments are planned to be applied to test theories of seabed liquefaction. The first step of these experiments is to determine the parameters of model soils, which is the main goal of this paper.

  4. Physics of compaction of fine cohesive particles.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, A; Valverde, J M; Quintanilla, M A S

    2005-02-25

    Fluidized fractal clusters of fine particles display critical-like dynamics at the jamming transition, characterized by a power law relating consolidation stress with volume fraction increment [sigma--(c) proportional, variant(Deltaphi)(beta)]. At a critical stress clusters are disrupted and there is a crossover to a logarithmic law (Deltaphi = nu logsigma--(c)) resembling the phenomenology of soils. We measure lambda identical with- partial differentialDelta(1/phi)/ partial log(sigma--(c) proportional, variant Bo(0.2)(g), where Bo(g) is the ratio of interparticle attractive force (in the fluidlike regime) to particle weight. This law suggests that compaction is ruled by the internal packing structure of the jammed clusters at nearly zero consolidation. PMID:15783824

  5. Effects of nonlinear reservoir compaction on casing behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chia, Y.P.; Bradley, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    Depletion of overpressured, undercompacted reservoirs can cause large reservoir pressure drops and sediment compaction, which may result in casing deformation and well failure. To predict soil and casing deformation during depletion, a finite-element model was developed. Nonlinear elastic and plastic behavior of the soils and slippage along the wellbore boundary are major advancements in this study. This axisymmetric model is composed of casing wall, cement column, slippage interface, and sediments from 11,400 to 13,200 ft (3475 to 4025 m) in depth with a radius of 3,400 ft (1035 m). This study features a process of concurrent fluid flow, nonlinear elastic and plastic soil deformation, slippage from the wellbore boundary, and casing deformation. The modeling results show that the decline in near-wellbore reservoir pressure during depletion causes vertical compaction in both the sand reservoirs and the confining shale formations. Slippage next to the wellbore decreases the axial shear load placed on the casing by the sediments. Nonlinear elastic and plastic soils show a greater tendency for casing deformation with depletion than do linear elastic soils. Axial strains in the casing above the yield strain eventually developed as near-wellbore reservoir pressure was allowed to decline to a minimum. Because this effect is quantified, the production rate may be held to a safe maximum so that the operating limits of the casing are not exceeded. Criteria are given to improve both completion design and production rate specification.

  6. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  7. A Compact Beam Measurement Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Urs U.

    2016-03-01

    We present the design of a compact measurement device to determine the position of a beam in a radio optical setup. The unit is used to align the Terahertz optics of the GREAT instrument on the airborne astronomical observatory SOFIA.

  8. An isolated compact galaxy triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuai; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I.; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Fang-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of an isolated compact galaxy triplet SDSS J084843.45+164417.3, which is first detected by the LAMOST spectral survey and then confirmed by a spectroscopic observation of the BFOSC mounted on the 2.16 meter telescope located at Xinglong Station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is found that this triplet is an isolated and extremely compact system, which has an aligned configuration and very small radial velocity dispersion. The member galaxies have similar colors and show marginal star formation activities. These results support the opinion that the compact triplets are well-evolved systems rather than hierarchically forming structures. This serendipitous discovery reveals the limitations of fiber spectral redshift surveys in studying such a compact system, and demonstrates the necessity of additional observations to complete the current redshift sample.

  9. A compact rotary vane attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, D. L.; Otosh, T. Y.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1969-01-01

    Rotary vane attenuator, when used as a front end attenuator, introduces an insertion loss that is proportional to the angle of rotation. New technique allows the construction of a shortened compact unit suitable for most installations.

  10. A Compact Beam Measurement Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Urs U.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of a compact measurement device to determine the position of a beam in a radio optical setup. The unit is used to align the Terahertz optics of the GREAT instrument on the airborne astronomical observatory SOFIA.

  11. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-28

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  12. Mesoscale Simulations of Powder Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya.; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  13. The Non-finished, Non-well Compacted Soil of the Crest of Zayzoun Dam, the Technical and Administrative Errors, and the Correct Ways of its Reinforcement and Renovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamze, Youssef; Stanivska, Anna

    Zayzoun dam is one of the irrigation elements of the valley of (Alkhab) in northern Syria; its exploitation started in 1996 and breached on June 4th, 2002. There were many experts searching for the causes of its failure and the correct ways of its renovation. There were many reports written about the failure with different opinions, and we have been one of these experts with an objective opinion. The principal aim was to study all the technical and administrative components of the dam, and to analyze the existing and the new laboratory testing. The soil of the unfinished summit of the dam, in the end, was found to be the real cause that led to its failure. These causes will be analyzed in order to avoid them in the future and to find the suitable ways of its renovation and reinforcement.

  14. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  15. Soil weight (lbf/ft{sup 3}) at Hanford waste storage locations (2 volumes)

    SciTech Connect

    Pianka, E.W.

    1994-12-01

    Hanford Reservation waste storage tanks are fabricated in accordance with approved construction specifications. After an underground tank has been constructed in the excavation prepared for it, soil is place around the tank and compacted by an approved compaction procedure. To ensure compliance with the construction specifications, measurements of the soil compaction are taken by QA inspectors using test methods based on American Society for the Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. Soil compaction tests data taken for the 241AP, 241AN, and 241AW tank farms constructed between 1978 and 1986 are included. The individual data values have been numerically processed to obtain average soil density values for each of these tank farms.

  16. Compact boson stars in K field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Grandi, N.; Klimas, P.; Sánchez-Guillén, J.; Wereszczyński, A.

    2010-11-01

    We study a scalar field theory with a non-standard kinetic term minimally coupled to gravity. We establish the existence of compact boson stars, that is, static solutions with compact support of the full system with self-gravitation taken into account. Concretely, there exist two types of solutions, namely compact balls on the one hand, and compact shells on the other hand. The compact balls have a naked singularity at the center. The inner boundary of the compact shells is singular, as well, but it is, at the same time, a Killing horizon. These singular, compact shells therefore resemble black holes.

  17. Modelling of compaction in planetesimals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Wladimir; Breuer, Doris; Spohn, Tilman

    2014-07-01

    Aims: Compaction of initially porous material prior to melting is an important process that has influenced the interior structure and the thermal evolution of planetesimals in their early history. On the one hand, compaction decreases the porosity resulting in a reduction of the radius and on the other hand, the loss of porosity results in an increase of the thermal conductivity of the material and thus in a more efficient cooling. Porosity loss by hot pressing is the most efficient process of compaction in planetesimals and can be described by creep flow, which depends on temperature and stress. Hot pressing has been repeatedly modelled using a simplified approach, for which the porosity is gradually reduced in some fixed temperature interval between ≈650 K and 700 K. This approach neglects the dependence of compaction on stress and other factors such as matrix grain size and creep activation energy. In the present study, we compare this parametrised method with a self-consistent calculation of porosity loss via a creep related approach. Methods: We use our thermal evolution model from previous studies to model compaction of an initially porous body and consider four basic packings of spherical dust grains (simple cubic, orthorhombic, rhombohedral, and body-centred cubic). Depending on the grain packing, we calculate the effective stress and the associated porosity change via the thermally activated creep flow. For comparison, compaction is also modelled by simply reducing the initial porosity linearly to zero between 650 K and 700 K. As we are interested in thermal metamorphism and not melting, we only consider bodies that experience a maximum temperature below the solidus temperature of the metal phase. Results: For the creep related approach, the temperature interval in which compaction takes place depends strongly on the size of the planetesimal and is not fixed as assumed in the parametrised approach. Depending on the radius, the initial grain size, the

  18. Blue ellipticals in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    1990-01-01

    By studying galaxies in compact groups, the authors examine the hypothesis that mergers of spiral galaxies make elliptical galaxies. The authors combine dynamical models of the merger-rich compact group environment with stellar evolution models and predict that roughly 15 percent of compact group ellipticals should be 0.15 mag bluer in B - R color than normal ellipticals. The published colors of these galaxies suggest the existence of this predicted blue population, but a normal distribution with large random errors can not be ruled out based on these data alone. However, the authors have new ultraviolet blue visual data which confirm the blue color of the two ellipticals with blue B - R colors for which they have their own colors. This confirmation of a population of blue ellipticals indicates that interactions are occurring in compact groups, but a blue color in one index alone does not require that these ellipticals are recent products of the merger of two spirals. The authors demonstrate how optical spectroscopy in the blue may distinguish between a true spiral + spiral merger and the swallowing of a gas-rich system by an already formed elliptical. The authors also show that the sum of the luminosity of the galaxies in each group is consistent with the hypothesis that the final stage in the evolution of compact group is an elliptical galaxy.

  19. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  20. Improving root-zone soil properties for Trembling Aspen in a reconstructed mine-site soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, M. F.; Sabbagh, P.; Bockstette, S.; Landhäusser, S.; Pinno, B.

    2014-12-01

    Surface mining activities have significantly depleted natural tree cover, especially trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides), in the Boreal Forest and Aspen Parkland Natural Regions of Alberta. The natural soil profile is usually destroyed during these mining activities and soil and landscape reconstruction is typically the first step in the reclamation process. However, the mine tailings and overburden materials used for these new soils often become compacted during the reconstruction process because they are subjected to high amounts of traffic with heavy equipment. Compacted soils generally have low porosity and low penetrability through increased soil strength, making it difficult for roots to elongate and explore the soil. Compaction also reduces infiltration capacity and drainage, which can cause excessive runoff and soil erosion. To improve the pore size distribution and water transmission, subsoil ripping was carried out in a test plot at Genesee Prairie Mine, Alberta. Within the site, six replicates with two treatments each, unripped (compacted) and ripped (decompacted), were established with 20-m buffers between them. The main objective of this research was to characterize the effects of subsoil ripping on soil physical properties and the longevity of those effects.as well as soil water dynamics during spring snowmelt. Results showed improved bulk density, pore size distribution and water infiltration in the soil as a result of the deep ripping, but these improvements appear to be temporary.

  1. Compaction Behavior of Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endicott, Mark R.; Kenkre, V. M.; Glass, S. Jill; Hurd, Alan J.

    1996-03-01

    We report the results of our recent study of compaction of granular materials. A theoretical model is developed for the description of the compaction of granular materials exemplified by granulated ceramic powders. Its predictions are compared to observations of uniaxial compaction tests of ceramic granules of PMN-PT, spray dried alumina and rutile. The theoretical model employs a volume-based statistical mechanics treatment and an activation analogy. Results of a computer simulation of random packing of discs in two dimensions are also reported. The effect of type of particle size distribution and other parameters of that distribution on the calculated quantities are discussed. We examine the implications of the results of the simulation for the theoretical model.

  2. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF BIOAVAILABILITY AND BIOKINETICS DETERMINATION METHODS FOR ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN SOIL TO ENHANCE IN-SITU AND ON-SITE BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of biodegradation rates of organics in soil slurry and compacted soil systems is essential for evaluating the efficacy of bioremediation for treatment of contaminated soils. In this paper, a systematic protocol has been developed for evaluating bioknetic and transp...

  4. VARIABLE MOMENTUM COMPACTION LATTICE STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    KRAMER,S.; MURPHY,J.B.

    1999-03-29

    The VUV storage ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source was used to study the impact of changes in the momentum compaction factors over a large range from positive to negative values. Changes in bunch length and synchrotron tune were measured versus current and RF parameters for these different lattices. By controlling both the first and second-order momentum compaction factors, a lattice was developed in which a pair of alpha buckets was created within the energy aperture of the vacuum chamber and beam was stored simultaneously in both buckets.

  5. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Vernon, George E.; Hoke, Darren A.; De Marquis, Virginia K.; Harris, Steven M.

    2007-06-26

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  6. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  7. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  8. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  9. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.

    1987-09-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas, the model treats sub-tuned RDL antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mock-ups of RDL antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT).

  10. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  11. Burial trench dynamic compaction demonstration at a humid site

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, B.P.

    1985-01-01

    This task has the objective of determining the degree of consolidation which can be achieved by dynamic compaction of a closed burial trench within a cohesive soil formation. A seven-year-old burial trench in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was selected for this demonstration. This 251 m/sup 3/ trench contained about 80 Ci of mixed radionuclides, mostly /sup 90/Sr, in 25 m/sup 3/ of waste consisting of contaminated equipment, dry solids, and demolition debris. Prior to compaction, a total trench void space of 79 m/sup 3/ was measured by pumping the trench full of water with corrections for seepage. Additional pre-compaction characterization included trench cap bulk density (1.68 kg/L), trench cap permeability (3 x 10/sup -7/ m/s), and subsurface waste/backfill hydraulic conductivity (>0.01 m/s). Compaction was achieved by repeatedly dropping a 4-ton steel-reinforced concrete cylinder from heights of 4 to 8 m using the whipline of a 70-ton crane. The average trench ground surface was depressed 0.79 m, with some sections over 2 m, yielding a surveyed volumetric depression which totaled to 64% of the measured trench void space. Trench cap (0 to 60 cm) bulk density and permeability were not affected by compaction indicating that the consolidation was largely subsurface. Neither surface nor airborne radioactive contamination were observed during repeated monitoring during the demonstration. Dynamic compaction was shown to be an excellent and inexpensive (i.e., about $20/m/sup 2/) method to collapse trench void space, thereby hastening subsidence and stabilizing the land surface. 15 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Tolerance of Soybean Crops to Soil Waterlogging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monoculture of irrigated paddy rice, common in the Mississippi delta of the United States and in Asia, diminishes soil nutrients, compacts soils, contaminates water supplies, and increases pest and diseases. While the addition of soybean crops to this cropping ecosystem can attenuate many of these p...

  13. FACTORS CONTROLLING MINIMUM SOIL LINER THICKNESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a three-part study to gather information on liquid flow through soil liners in hazardous waste disposal facilities. n the first part of the study a model was developed to simulate flow occurring through discreet channels in lifts (a layer of compacted soil) ...

  14. 75 FR 62568 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... of the Council should notify the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Compact Officer, Mr. Gary S..., FBI Compact Officer, Compact Council Office, Module D3, 1000 Custer Hollow Road, Clarksburg,...

  15. Compact Circuit Preprocesses Accelerometer Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Compact electronic circuit transfers dc power to, and preprocesses ac output of, accelerometer and associated preamplifier. Incorporated into accelerometer case during initial fabrication or retrofit onto commercial accelerometer. Made of commercial integrated circuits and other conventional components; made smaller by use of micrologic and surface-mount technology.

  16. Generalized high order compact methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Spotz, William F.; Kominiarczuk, Jakub

    2010-09-01

    The fundamental ideas of the high order compact method are combined with the generalized finite difference method. The result is a finite difference method that works on unstructured, nonuniform grids, and is more accurate than one would classically expect from the number of grid points employed.

  17. The Compact Project: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The National Alliance of Business (NAB) surveyed the 12 sites that participated in the Compact Project to develop and implement programs of business-education collaboration. NAB studied start-up activities, key players, conditions for collaboration, accomplishments, challenges, and future plans. Program outcomes indicated that building successful…

  18. Mesoscale Simulations of Power Compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Fujino, D; Antoun, T; Liu, B

    2009-08-06

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line also observed in experiments. They found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations.

  19. Mesoscale simulations of powder compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-06-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to experimental match compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show evidence of hard-to-explain reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line, which have also been observed in the experiments. We found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations, since 2D results tend to underpredict stress levels for high-porosity powders regardless of material properties. We developed a process to extract macroscale information for the simulation which can be directly used in calibration of continuum model for heterogeneous media.

  20. Compact color schlieren optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, Donald R.; Griffin, Devon W.

    1993-01-01

    A compact optical system for use with rainbow schlieren deflectometry is described. Both halves of the optical system consist of well-corrected telescopes whose refractive elements are all from manufacturer's stock catalogs, with the reflective primary being a spherical surface. As a result, the system is relatively easy to construct and meets the requirement of long focal length for quantitative rainbow schlieren measurements.

  1. Compact CFB: The next generation CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Utt, J.

    1996-12-31

    The next generation of compact circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers is described in outline form. The following topics are discussed: compact CFB = pyroflow + compact separator; compact CFB; compact separator is a breakthrough design; advantages of CFB; new design with substantial development history; KUHMO: successful demo unit; KUHMO: good performance over load range with low emissions; KOKKOLA: first commercial unit and emissions; KOKKOLA: first commercial unit and emissions; compact CFB installations; next generation CFB boiler; grid nozzle upgrades; cast segmented vortex finders; vortex finder installation; ceramic anchors; pre-cast vertical bullnose; refractory upgrades; and wet gunning.

  2. Compaction in the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boorman, S.; Boudreau, A.

    2003-12-01

    Compaction in the mush zone of a crystallizing chamber is a model for fractionation, whereby evolved interstitial liquid expelled from the compacting crystal pile is returned to the magma chamber. If compaction was important during crystallization of the Lower and Critical Zones of the Bushveld Complex, certain textural features are expected; and, these features should correlate to position in the section, as well as to the number of mineral phases present. We report on a spectrum of textural data for 30 samples form the Lower and Critical Zones of the Bushveld Complex. Crystal Size Distributions (CSDs) are a semi-log plot of population density against crystal size, and provide information about magmatic processes such as crystal accumulation, removal and aging. Changes to the magmatic system are reflected in the shape of the CSD plot. CSDs of Bushveld rocks show a log-linear trend overturned at smaller grain sizes, a result consistent with both crystal aging, wherein larger grains grow at the expense of small ones in the crystallizing pile, and melt migration, where nucleation is suppressed by the loss of late melt fractions. CSD slope and intercept data vary with stratigraphy. Slopes in the Critical Zone are steeper, indicating less recrystallization and less of a compaction effect. In contrast, slopes in the Lower Zone are shallower, a result consistent with slower cooling and a greater compaction/recrystallization effect. Likewise, lower CSD intercepts are associated with the shallower slopes of the lower zone and vice versa. The extent of foliation is measured as alignment factor (AF), determined by orientation statistics of the major axes of the grains of interest. AF decreases with stratigraphic height and foliation is best developed in the nearly monomineralic harzburgite of the Lower Zone (AF avg=64). At the Lower Zone-Critical Zone transition, plagioclase content increases, decreasing bulk density and thus, the systems ability to accommodate compaction

  3. CONSTRUCTION, MONITORING, AND PERFORMANCE OF TWO SOIL LINERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype soil liner and a field-scale soil liner were constructed to test whether compacted soil barrier systems could be built to meet the standard set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for saturated hydraulic conductivity (< 1 x 10'7 cm/s). In situ ponded inf...

  4. Permanent soil monitoring system as a basic tool for protection of soils and sustainable land use in Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobza, J.

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of soil monitoring system in Slovakia is to better protect the soils with regard to sustainable land use. The main object is the observation of soil parameters indicative of change to the equilibrium of soil system as far as to the irreversible change with possible development of degradation processes in soil. The soil monitoring system in Slovakia has been running since 1993. Its importance consists of providing the information on changing spatial and temporal variations of soil parameters as well as the evolution of soil quality in topsoil and subsoil. The soil monitoring network in Slovakia is constructed using ecological principles, taking into account all main soil types and subtypes, soil organic matter, climatic regions, emission regions, polluted and non-polluted regions as well as various other land uses. The results of soil monitoring of 318 sites on agricultural land in Slovakia have been presented. Soil properties are evaluated according to the main threats to soil relating to European Commission recommendation for European soil monitoring performance as follows: soil erosion, soil compaction, decline in soil organic matter, soil salinization and sodification and soil contamination. The most significant change has been determined in physical properties of soils. The physical degradation was especially manifested in compacted and the eroded soils. On the basis of our results about 40%of agricultural land is potentially affected by soil erosion in Slovakia. In addition, decline in soil organic matter and available nutrients indicate seriousness of soil degradation processes observed during the last monitoring period in Slovakia. Measured data and required outputs are reported to Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra(Italy) and European Environmental Agency (EEA) in Copenhagen (Denmark). Finally, the soil monitoring system thus becomes a basic tool for protection of soils and sustainable land use as well as for the creation of legislation not

  5. Invariant distributions on compact homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatsevich, V V

    2013-12-31

    In this paper, we study distributions on compact homogeneous spaces, including invariant distributions and also distributions admitting a sub-Riemannian structure. We first consider distributions of dimension 1 and 2 on compact homogeneous spaces. After this, we study the cases of compact homogeneous spaces of dimension 2, 3, and 4 in detail. Invariant distributions on simply connected compact homogeneous spaces are also treated. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  6. Powder compaction in systems of bimodal distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, A. K.; Whittemore, O. J., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The compaction of mixtures involving different particle sizes is discussed. The various stages of the compaction process include the rearrangement of particles, the filling of the interstices of the large particles by the smaller ones, and the change in particle size and shape upon further densification through the application of pressure. Experimental approaches and equipment used for compacting material are discussed together with the theoretical relations of the compacting process.

  7. Animal waste containment in anaerobic lagoons lined with compacted clays

    SciTech Connect

    Reddi, L.N.; Davalos, H.

    2000-03-01

    The practice of animal waste containment has recently drawn much interest from public and regulatory agencies in agriculture-oriented states such as Kansas and North Carolina. In this paper, the debate surrounding the practice is outlined, and results from a research investigation pertinent to the state of Kansas are presented. The research investigation involved two phases. In the first phase, compacted specimens of Kansas soils were tested with animal waste as the influent. The key objective of this phase of research was to assess the range of seepage quantities and the transport characteristics of nitrogen in the ammonium form (NH{sub 4}-N) through the compacted soils. Results from this phase indicated a steady increase of microbial counts in the liquid effluent. However, biological clogging did not appear to be prominent during the NH{sub 4}-N breakthrough time period. The results indicate significant differences in microbial uptake of NH{sub 4}-N among samples of the same soil type. In the second phase, analytical and numerical solutions were used to simulate ammonium transport in the field-scale liners and to estimated upper-bound travel times and final concentrations of NH{sub 4}-N in the underlying soils. Results form this phase showed drastic differences in travel times and end concentrations of NH{sub 4}-N among liners prepared from the same soil type. The potential for significant retardation, decay, and saturation levels of NH{sub 4}-N in clay liners suggests that liner thickness is an important parameter. It is concluded that mass transfer characteristics of liner material, cation exchange capacity and microbial uptake in particular, should be important considerations in the design of animal waste lagoon liners.

  8. Rapid compaction during RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rick; Millett, Ian S.; Tate, Mark W.; Kwok, Lisa W.; Nakatani, Bradley; Gruner, Sol M.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Pande, Vijay; Doniach, Sebastian; Herschlag, Daniel; Pollack, Lois

    2002-04-01

    We have used small angle x-ray scattering and computer simulations with a coarse-grained model to provide a time-resolved picture of the global folding process of the Tetrahymena group I RNA over a time window of more than five orders of magnitude. A substantial phase of compaction is observed on the low millisecond timescale, and the overall compaction and global shape changes are largely complete within one second, earlier than any known tertiary contacts are formed. This finding indicates that the RNA forms a nonspecifically collapsed intermediate and then searches for its tertiary contacts within a highly restricted subset of conformational space. The collapsed intermediate early in folding of this RNA is grossly akin to molten globule intermediates in protein folding.

  9. Nuclear Physics for Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Baldo, M.

    2009-05-04

    A brief overview is given of the different lines of research developed under the INFN project 'Compact Stellar Objects and Dense Hadronic Matter' (acronym CT51). The emphasis of the project is on the structure of Neutron Stars (NS) and related objects. Starting from crust, the different Nuclear Physics problems are described which are encountered going inside a NS down to its inner core. The theoretical challenges and the observational inputs are discussed in some detail.

  10. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.