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1

Pilot Survey of Levels of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-P-Dioxins (PCDDS), Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans (PCDFS), Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) and Mercury in Rural Soils of the U.S.  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA has released a final report entitled, Pilot Survey of Levels of Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins, Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans, Polychlorinated Biphenyls and Mercury in Rural Soils of the United States . The survey measured levels of dioxins, PCBs and mercury in soil ...

2

Sorption of mercury in soils with different humus content  

SciTech Connect

The strong sorption of mercury to humic matter in soil and water has raised the question about the influence of organic matter of different soil types on the mobilization of mercury from soil. Mercury is normally bound to humic and fulvic acids, which may be released in connection with flooding, draining and ditching. High mercury contents in fish from man-made lakes have been reported mainly from temperated regions. This has been assumed to be a result of the slower metabolism of methyl mercury in cool water but the effect of temperature on the mobilization process is still poorly known. The sorption and leaching of mercury in three different soils was studied in vitro using a mercury concentrations near the natural level. Soil lysimeters were watered with distilled water or artificial acid rain at two temperatures.

Lodenius, M.; Seppaenen, A.; Autio S.

1987-10-01

3

Atmosphere-soil mercury distribution: the biotic factor  

SciTech Connect

Research report:Studies were conducted to demonstrate that Antarctic biota are mercury accumulators. Mercury levels in air and soil of volcanic regions in Hawaii, Iceland, and Antarctica were determined. A comparison of the bioaccumulation of marine organisms from these areas reveals that Antarctic biota do accumulate mercury. Organisms in Hawaii and Iceland appear to accumulate higher concentrations, indicating that mercury generated by natural sources in Antarctica undergoes almost complete dispersal into air masses. (13 references, 3 tables)

Siegel, S.M.; Siegel, B.Z.; McMurtry, G.

1980-03-01

4

OCCURRENCE OF MERCURY-RESISTANT MICROORGANISMS IN MERCURY-CONTAMINATED SOILS AND SEDIMENTS IN PAVLODAR, KAZAKHSTAN  

EPA Science Inventory

There is extensive mercury contamination of soil surrounding a chloralkali plant in Pavlodar, Kazakhstan that operated from 1970 to 1990. High-level mercury contamination exists within the confines of the plant, at nearby off-site waste storage and evaporation ponds, and in Balky...

5

OCCURRENCE OF MICROORGANISMS RESISTANT TO MERCURY IN MERCURY CONTAMINATED SOILS AND SEDIMENTS IN PAVLODAR, KAZAKHSTAN  

EPA Science Inventory

There is extensive mercury contamination of soil surrounding a chloralkali plant in Pavlodar, Kazakhstan that operated from 1970 to 1990. High-level mercury contamination exists within the confines of the plant, at nearby off-site waste storage and evaporation ponds, and in Balky...

6

Assessment of Mercury Levels in Soils, Waters, Bottom Sediments and Fishes of Acre State in Brazilian Amazon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury in the aquatic biota and geologic materials in areas without anthropogenic sources has been stimulating the discussion about the possibility of natural Hg occurrence in the Amazon region. In this study the dispersion of Hg in different geologic materials as well as its relationship with high Hg levels, detected in some species of carnivorous fish consumed in the Rio

E. S. Brabo; R. S. Angélica; A. P. Silva; K. R. F. Faial; A. F. S. Mascarenhas; E. C. O. Santos; I. M. Jesus; E. C. B. Loureiro

2003-01-01

7

MERCURY RELEASE FROM DISTURBED ANOXIC SOILS  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of experiments conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) were to provide information on the secondary release of mercury from contaminated anoxic sediments to an aqueous environment after disturbance/change of in situ physical conditions and to evaluate its migration and partitioning under controlled conditions, including implications of these processes for treatment of contaminated soils. Experimental work included (1) characterization of the mercury-contaminated sediment; (2) field bench-scale dredging simulation; (3) laboratory column study to evaluate a longer-term response to sediment disturbance; (4) mercury volatilization from sediment during controlled drying; (5) resaturation experiments to evaluate the potential for secondary release of residual mercury after disturbance, transport, drying, and resaturation, which simulate a typical scenario during soil excavation and transport to waste disposal facilities; and (6) mercury speciation and potential for methylation during column incubation experiments.

Jaroslav Solc; Bethany A. Bolles

2001-07-16

8

Modelling of mercury emissions from background soils.  

PubMed

Emissions of volatile mercury species from natural soils are believed to be a significant contributor to the atmospheric burden of mercury, but only order-of-magnitude estimates of emissions from these sources are available. The scaling-up of mercury flux measurements to regional or global scales is confounded by a limited understanding of the physical, chemical and biochemical processes that occur in the soil, a complex environmental matrix. This study is a first step toward the development of an air-surface exchange model for mercury (known as the mercury emission model (MEM)). The objective of the study is to model the partitioning and movement of inorganic Hg(II) and Hg(0) in open field soils, and to use MEM to interpret published data on mercury emissions to the atmosphere. MEM is a multi-layered, dynamic finite-element soil and atmospheric surface-layer model that simulates the exchange of heat, moisture and mercury between soils and the atmosphere. The model includes a simple formulation of the reduction of inorganic Hg(II) to Hg(0). Good agreement was found between the meteorological dependence of observed mercury emission fluxes, and hourly modelled fluxes, and it is concluded that MEM is able to simulate well the soil and atmospheric processes influencing the emission of Hg(0) to the atmosphere. The heretofore unexplained close correlation between soil temperature and mercury emission flux is fully modelled by MEM and is attributed to the temperature dependence of the Hg(0) Henry's Law coefficient and the control of the volumetric soil-air fraction on the diffusion of Hg(0) near the surface. The observed correlation between solar radiation intensity and mercury flux, appears in part to be due to the surface-energy balance between radiation, and sensible and latent heat fluxes which determines the soil temperature. The modelled results imply that empirical correlations that are based only on flux chamber data, may not extend to the open atmosphere for all weather scenarios. PMID:12663183

Scholtz, M T; Van Heyst, B J; Schroeder, W H

2003-03-20

9

ABIOLOGICAL METHYLATION OF MERCURY IN SOIL  

EPA Science Inventory

This work defines several factors influencing the methylation of mercuric ion in soil. Two of the most important findings were that it is possible to extract the mercury methylating factor from soil with a solution of 0.5N sodium hydroxide and that this factor is responsible for ...

10

Mercury Transport and Speciation during Electrokinetic Soil Remediation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 30 V direct electric field was applied to a contaminated soilfrom a chlor-alkali plant for 182 days. The principal soilcontaminats were mercury, polchlorinated dibenzofurans, andlead. When chloride was added to the soil, mercury moved towardsthe cathode, showing that anionic mercury chloride complexes didnot dominate. When iodide was added to the soil solution,mercury moved towards the anode, illustrating the predominanceof

Pascal Suèr; Bert Allard

2003-01-01

11

Mercury and plants in contaminated soils. 2: Environmental and physiological factors governing mercury flux to the atmosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of physiological and environmental factors in governing the flux of elemental mercury from plants to the atmosphere. Five species (Lepidium latifolium, Artemisia douglasiana, Caulanthus sp., Fragaria vesca, and Eucalyptus globulus) with different ecological and physiological attributes and growing in soils with high levels of mercury contamination were examined. Studies were

Todd L. Leonard; M. S. Gustin; G. C. J. Fernandez; G. E. Jr. Taylor

1998-01-01

12

Mercury and plants in contaminated soils. 2: Environmental and physiological factors governing mercury flux to the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of physiological and environmental factors in governing the flux of elemental mercury from plants to the atmosphere. Five species (Lepidium latifolium, Artemisia douglasiana, Caulanthus sp., Fragaria vesca, and Eucalyptus globulus) with different ecological and physiological attributes and growing in soils with high levels of mercury contamination were examined. Studies were conducted in a whole-plant, gas-exchange chamber providing precise control of environmental conditions, and mercury flux was estimated using the mass balance approach. Mercury flux increased linearly as a function of temperature within the range of 20 to 40 C, and the mean temperature coefficient (Q{sub 10}) was 2.04. The temperature dependence of mercury flux was attributed to changes in the contaminant`s vapor pressure in the leaf interior. Mercury flux from foliage increased linearly as a function of irradiance within the range of 500 to 1,500 {micro}mol m/s, and the light enhancement of mercury flux was within a factor of 2.0 to 2.5 for all species. Even though the leaf-to-atmosphere diffusive path for mercury vapor from foliage is similar to that of water vapor, stomatal conductance played a secondary role in governing mercury flux. In a quantitative comparison with other studies in both laboratory and field settings, a strong linear relationship is evident between mercury vapor flux and the natural logarithm of soil mercury concentration, and this relationship may have predictive value in developing regional- and continental-scale mercury budgets. The most critical factors governing mercury flux from plants are mercury concentration in the soil, leaf area index, temperature, and irradiance.

Leonard, T.L.; Gustin, M.S.; Fernandez, G.C.J. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Taylor, G.E. Jr. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). Dept. of Biology

1998-10-01

13

Some local environmental effects on mercury emission and absorption at a soil surface.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to quantify effects of some local environmental variables on the soil surface exchanges of total gaseous mercury (TGM), under controlled conditions. A dynamic flux chamber with a Tekran mercury analyzer was used to quantify TGM emissions from, and absorption by, a clean, fine sandy loam soil with very low mercury content inside of a building and in a low TGM environment, outside. Simultaneous measurements of mercury flux, air and soil temperatures, ozone concentration, humidity, soil moisture and solar radiation were made. Controlled applications of water were made to change soil H2O content and measure the response of mercury flux. Air-soil exchanges were highly dependent on soil temperature (r2 = 0.78) and the mercury concentration gradient between the TGM in the soil pores and the ambient TGM above the soil surface (r2 = 0.98 for absorption and r2 = 0.408 for emissions). Correlations with air temperature and ozone levels are explained by the relationships of these variables with soil temperature. No detectable correlation was found with solar radiation or humidity. Wet soil maintained higher rates of soil TGM emission and decreased soil absorption. Emissions increased with increasing soil H2O, peaked at approximately field capacity, and then decreased slightly until saturation. PMID:11032127

Gillis, A A; Miller, D R

2000-10-01

14

Mercury in soil gas and air--A potential tool in mineral exploration  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The mercury content in soil gas and in the atmosphere was measured in several mining districts to test the possibility that the mercury content in the atmosphere is higher over ore deposits than over barren ground. At Cortez, Nev., the distribution of anorhalous amounts of mercury in the air collected at ground level (soil gas) correlates well with the distribution of gold-bearing rocks that are covered by as much as 100 feet of gravel. The mercury content in the atmosphere collected at an altitude of 200 feet by an aircraft was 20 times background over a mercury posit and 10 times background over two porphyry copper deposits. Measurement of mercury in soil gas and air may prove to be a valuable exploration tool.

McCarthy, Joseph Howard; Vaughn, W. W.; Learned, R. E.; Meuschke, J. L.

1969-01-01

15

Accumulation and transformation of atmospheric mercury in soil.  

PubMed

Field investigation and simulating experiments were carried out for understanding the accumulation and transformation of mercury in soil in relation to the deposition of atmospheric mercury. A positive correlation between the atmospheric mercury concentration and the content of mercury in soil was observed in the field investigation, with the correlation coefficient being 0.741** (n=52). The mercury content in soil decreased with the increasing distance from the mercury emission source. Simulated experiment demonstrated that the higher the mercury content in air was, the higher was the amount of mercury accumulated in soil, which was in accordance with the results found from the field investigation. Transformation process occurred once mercury deposited into the soil. Analyses of soil samples exposed to air with mercury contents of 796.4+/-186.3 ng/m(3) for 2 months indicated that 24.58-26.86% of total mercury deposited into the soil existed in Hg(0) form, 0.10-0.12% in active form, 14.56-18.75% in HCl-dissoluble form, 0.86-5.84% in organic-bound form and 52.64-55.29% in residual form. PMID:12663184

Wang, Dingyong; Shi, Xiaojun; Wei, Shiqiang

2003-03-20

16

Serum mercury level and multiple sclerosis.  

PubMed

Exposure to heavy metals has been associated to a higher incidence of multiple sclerosis. In this work, we present a possible relationship between serum mercury levels and development of multiple sclerosis in Isfahan, the third largest city in Iran. Seventy-four patients affected by multiple sclerosis were retrieved from multiple sclerosis (MS) clinic in Isfahan, Iran. By matching sex and age, 74 healthy volunteers were chosen as control group. Blood samples were collected and serum mercury content was determined. Serum mercury level in MS patients was significantly higher than controls (9.6?±?10.17 vs. 5.7?±?8.6, P?=?0.037). Concerning all MS patients, serum mercury value was significantly higher than the mercury concentration founded in control subjects {odd ratio: 2.39 (CI, 1.96-2.94), P?=?0.00}. Serum mercury level is higher in MS patients with odd ratio equal to 2.39 compared with healthy individuals. It may reveal that high mercury levels in serum might help MS development in susceptible individuals. More studies with larger sample size are needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:22068727

Attar, Ahmad Movahedian; Kharkhaneh, Azam; Etemadifar, Masoud; Keyhanian, Kiandokht; Davoudi, Vahid; Saadatnia, Mohammad

2012-05-01

17

Mercury Pollution Characteristics in the Soil around Landfill  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In recent years, landfill and incineration of waste is considered a new mercury pollution, which is paid widespread attention\\u000a by domestic and foreign scientists. This paper studies mercury pollution Characteristics in the soil around Landfill taking\\u000a landfill in Huainan City for an example and using AMA 254 Advanced Mercury Analyzer produced by US LECO Company. The result\\u000a shows that: mercury

JinXiang Yang; MingXu Zhang; XiaoLong Li

18

Effects of mercury on microbial biomass and enzyme activities in soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury (Hg) is a persistent soil pollutant that affects soil microbial activity. We monitored the changes in soil microbial\\u000a biomass and activity of enzymes, including alkaline phosphatase, arylsulfatase, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolytic activity,\\u000a and o-diphenol oxidase (o-DPO) in three soils contaminated with different concentrations of Hg. Increasing levels of Hg, from 0.5 to 10 µmol\\/g of dried\\u000a soil, generally depressed

Cristiano Casucci; Benedict C. Okeke; William T. Frankenberger

2003-01-01

19

Bench-scale studies with mercury contaminated SRS soil  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale studies with mercury contaminated soil were performed at the SRTC to determine the optimum waste loading obtainable in the glass product without sacrificing durability, leach resistance, and processability. Vitrifying this waste stream also required offgas treatment for the capture of the vaporized mercury. Four soil glasses with slight variations in composition were produced, which were capable of passing the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The optimum glass feed composition contained 60 weight percent soil and produced a soda-lime-silica glass when melted at 1,350 C. The glass additives used to produce this glass were 24 weight percent Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and 16 weight percent CaCO{sub 3}. Volatilized mercury released during the vitrification process was released to the proposed mercury collection system. The proposed mercury collection system consisted of quartz and silica tubing with a Na{sub 2}S wash bottle followed by a NaOH wash bottle. Once in the system, the volatile mercury would pass through the wash bottle containing Na{sub 2}S, where it would be converted to Hg{sub 2}S, which is a stable form of mercury. However, attempts to capture the volatilized mercury in a Na{sub 2}S solution wash bottle were not as successful as anticipated. Maximum mercury captured was only about 3.24% of the mercury contained in the feed. Mercury capture efforts then shifted to condensing and capturing the volatilized mercury. These attempts were much more successful at capturing the volatile mercury, with a capture efficiency of 34.24% when dry ice was used to pack the condenser. This captured mercury was treated on a mercury specific resin after digestion of the volatilized mercury.

Cicero, C.A.

1995-12-31

20

Micrometeorological methods for measurements of mercury emissions over contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

As part of a larger study involving development and application of field and laboratory methods (micrometeorological, dynamic enclosure chamber, and controlled laboratory chamber methods) to measure the air/surface exchange of Hg vapor, we performed a series of preliminary measurements over contaminated soils. From March--April 1993, we used the modified Bowen ratio (MBR) method to measure emission rates of mercury over a floodplain contaminated with mercury near Oak Ridge, TN. The mercury emission rates measured from contaminated EFPC soils using the MBR method during early spring show that (1) in all cases, the contaminated soils acted as a source of mercury to the atmosphere with source strengths ranging from 17 to 160 ng m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1}; and (2) the strengths of mercury emissions can be greatly influenced by the combined effects of surface soil temperature, residence time of air masses over the source area, and turbulence conditions. The mercury fluxes measured in a controlled flow chamber indicate that contaminated soils can exhibit up to an order of magnitude higher emission rates of Hg under conditions of elevated soil temperature, soil structure disturbance, and high turbulence. Mercury emissions from contaminated soils exceeded emissions from background soils by one to two orders of magnitude.

Kim, K.H.; Lindberg, S.E.; Hanson, P.J.; Owens, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Myers, T.P. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Air Resources Lab. Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Div.

1993-12-31

21

Distribution of mercury, methyl mercury and organic sulphur species in soil, soil solution and stream of a boreal forest catchment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentrations of methyl mercury, CH3Hg (II), total mercury, Hgtot = CH3Hg (II) + Hg (II), and organic sulphur species were determined in soils, soil solutions and streams of a small (50 ha) boreal forest catchment in northern Sweden. The CH3Hg (II)\\/Hgtot ratio decreased from 1.2–17.2% in the peaty stream bank soils to 0.4–0.8% in mineral and peat soils 20 m

Ulf Skyllberg; Jin Qian; Wolfgang Frech; Kang Xia; William F. Bleam

2003-01-01

22

Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

... mainly by microscopic organisms in the water and soil. More mercury in the environment can increase the ... from manufacturing plants. It enters the water or soil from natural deposits, disposal of wastes, and volcanic ...

23

Accumulation of mercury in selected plant species grown in soils contaminated with different mercury compounds  

SciTech Connect

The objective of our research is to screen and search for suitable plant species for phyto-remediation of mercury-contaminated soil. Currently our effort is specifically focused on mercury removal from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, where mercury contamination is a major concern. In order to cost effectively implement mercury remediation efforts, it is necessary now to obtain an improved understanding of biological means of removing mercury and mercury compounds.. Phyto-remediation is a technology that uses various plants to degrade, extract, contain, or immobilize contaminants from soil and water. In particular, phyto-extraction is the uptake of contaminants by plant roots and translocation within the plants to shoots or leaves. Contaminants are generally removed by harvesting the plants. We have investigated phyto-extraction of mercury from contaminated soil by using some of the known metal-accumulating plants since no natural plant species with mercury hyper-accumulating properties has yet been identified. Different natural plant species have been studied for mercury uptake, accumulation, toxicity and overall mercury removal efficiency. Various mercury compounds, such as HgS, HgCl{sub 2}, and Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, were used as contaminant sources. Different types of soil were examined and chosen for phyto-remediation experiments. We have applied microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectrometry as well as conventional analytical chemistry to monitor the phyto-remediation processes of mercury uptake, translocation and accumulation, and the physiological impact of mercury contaminants on selected plant species. Our results indicate that certain plant species, such as beard grass (Polypogon monospeliensis), accumulated a very limited amount of mercury in the shoots (<65 mg/kg), even though root mercury accumulation is significant (maximum 2298 mg/kg). Consequently, this plant species may not be suitable for mercury phyto-remediation. Other plant species, such as Indian mustard (Brassica juncea), a well-studied metal accumulator, exhibited severe chlorosis symptoms during some experiments. Among all the plant species studied, Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata) accumulated significant amount of mercury in both roots and shoots and hence may be considered as a potential candidate for mercury phyto-extraction. During one experiment, Chinese brake ferns accumulated 540 mg/kg and 1469 mg/kg in shoots after 18 days of growing in soils treated with 500 parts-per-million (ppm) and 1000 ppm HgCl{sub 2} powder, respectively; no visual stress symptoms were observed. We also studied mercury phyto-remediation using aged soils that contained HgS, HgCl{sub 2}, or Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. We have found that up to hundreds of ppm mercury can be accumulated in the roots of Indian mustard plants grown with soil contaminated by mercury sulfide; HgS is assumed to be the most stable and also the predominant mercury form in flood plain soils. We have also started to investigate different mercury uptake mechanisms, such as root uptake of soil contaminant and foliar mercury accumulation from ambient air. We have observed mercury translocation from roots to shoot for Chinese fern and two Indian mustard varieties. (authors)

Su, Yi; Han, Fengxiang; Shiyab, Safwan; Chen, Jian; Monts, David L. [Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET), Mississippi State University, 205 Research Blvd, Starkville, MS 39759 (United States)

2007-07-01

24

Mercury mobility and bioavailability in soil from contaminated area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mobility and bioavailability of mercury in the soil from the area near a plant using elemental mercury for manufacturing thermometers, areometers, glass energy switches and other articles made of technical glass has been evaluated. Mercury has been determined by sequential extraction method and with additional thermo desorption stage to determine elemental mercury. The procedure of sequential extraction involves five subsequent stages performed with the solutions of chloroform, deionized water, 0.5 M HCl, 0.2 M NaOH and aqua regia. The mean concentration of total mercury in soil was 147 ± 107 ?g g-1 dry mass (range 62-393), and the fractionation revealed that mercury was mainly bound to sulfides 56 ± 8% (range 45-66), one of the most biounavailable and immobile species of mercury in the environment. The fractions that brought lower contribution to the total mercury content were semi-mobile humic matter 22 ± 9% (range 11-34) and elemental mercury 17 ± 5% (range 8-23). The contributions brought by the highly mobile and toxic organomercury compounds were still lower 2.3 ± 2.7% (range 0.01-6.5). The lowest contributions brought the acid-soluble mercury 1.5 ± 1.3% (range 0.1-3.5) and water-soluble mercury 1.0 ± 0.3% (range 0.6-1.7). The surface layer of soil (0-20 cm) was characterized by higher mercury concentrations than that of the subsurface soil (60-80 cm), but the fractional contributions were comparable. The comparison of mercury fractionation results obtained in this study for highly polluted soils with results of fractionation of uncontaminated or moderately contaminated samples of soil and sediments had not shown significant statistical differences; however, in the last samples elemental mercury is usually present at very low concentrations. On the basis of obtained correlation coefficients it seems that elemental mercury soils from “Areometer” plant are contaminated; the main transformation is its vaporization to atmosphere and oxidation to divalent mercury, probably mainly mediated by organic matter, and next bound to humic matter and sulfides.

Boszke, Leonard; Kowalski, Artur; Astel, Aleksander; Bara?ski, Andrzej; Gworek, Barbara; Siepak, Jerzy

2008-09-01

25

Distribution and mobility of mercury in soils of a gold mining region, Cuyuni river basin, Venezuela  

Microsoft Academic Search

An extensive and remote gold mining region located in the East of Venezuela has been studied with the aim of assessing the distribution and mobility of mercury in soil and the level of Hg pollution at artisanal gold mining sites. To do so, soils and pond sediments were sampled at sites not subject to anthropological influence, as well as in

F. Santos-Francés; A. García-Sánchez; P. Alonso-Rojo; F. Contreras; M. Adams

2011-01-01

26

[Distribution and assessment of mercury in the ambient soil of a municipal solid waste incinerator].  

PubMed

The emission of mercury (Hg) from the municipal solid waste incineration has inspired widespread attention, especially regarding to the deposition of Hg in the surrounding soil, which is issued to be the potential negative factor of ambient environment and human health. This study mainly focused on the distributions of Hg in the ambient soil of a municipal solid waste incinerator located in North China. The pollution of the mercury and its risks to the local environment and human health were assessed. Results showed that Hg levels were in the range of 0.015-0.25 mg x kg(-1), with an average (0.088 +/- 0.064) mg x kg(-1). The concentrations of Hg in the soil were obviously influenced by wind direction and they were relatively higher in the northwest (downwind) comparing with that in the southeast (upwind). The Kriging interpolation method was adopted to create a contour map, which intuitively displayed a spatial mercury distribution in the soil. The regions with a higher Hg concentration are mainly distributed in the north northwest, the north northeast and the west southwest of the municipal solid waste incinerator. According to the evaluation results of single factor pollution index and geoaccumulation Index, some ambient soil samples were polluted by the mercury emission from the municipal solid waste incinerator; however, the results of the health risk assessment showed that the mercury in the soil had not pose a health hazard to the local population. PMID:24946613

Xie, Hui-Ting; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Xu, Feng; Li, Hai-Feng; Tian, Zhen-Yu; Tang, Chen; Liu, Wen-Bin

2014-04-01

27

Total mercury in fish, sediments and soil from the River Pra Basin, southwestern Ghana.  

PubMed

Total Mercury (Hg) concentrations were determined in soil, river sediments and six (6) species of fish from the River Pra Basin in southwestern Ghana by Cold Vapour Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. Mercury concentration (microg g(-1)) ranged from 0.042 to 0.145 for soil: from 0.390 to 0.707 for sediments and from <0.001 to 0.370 for fish. All the fish samples had Hg concentration below the World Health Organisation (WHO) permissible limit of 0.5 microg g(-1) whereas all the sediment samples had levels higher than the US-EPA value of 0.2 microg g(-1). The results obtained from this study showed that fish from River Pra Basin are unlikely to constitute any significant mercury exposure to the public through consumption. No apparent trend of increasing mercury concentration along the main river as it flows downward toward the sea was observed. PMID:20585751

Oppong, S O B; Voegborlo, R B; Agorku, S E; Adimado, A A

2010-09-01

28

Speciation of mercury in soil and sediment by selective solvent and acid extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to characterize the mercury hazard in soil, a sequential extraction scheme has been developed to classify mercury species based on their environmental mobility and\\/or toxicity for either routine lab analysis or on-site screening purposes. The alkyl mercury species and soluble inorganic species that contribute to the major portion of potential mercury toxicity in the soil are extracted by

Y. Han; H. M. Kingston; H. M. Boylan; G. M. M. Rahman; S. Shah; R. C. Richter; D. D. Link; S. Bhandari

2003-01-01

29

Natural mercury isotope variation in coal deposits and organic soils  

SciTech Connect

There is a need to distinguish among sources of Hg to the atmosphere in order to more fully understand global Hg pollution. In this study we investigate whether coal deposits within the United States, China, and Russia-Kazakhstan, which are three of the five greatest coal-producing regions, have diagnostic Hg isotopic fingerprints that can be used to discriminate among Hg sources. We also investigate the Hg isotopic composition of modern organic soil horizons developed in areas distant from point sources of Hg in North America. Mercury stored in coal deposits displays a wide range of both mass dependent fractionation and mass independent fractionation. {delta}{sup 202}Hg varies in coals by 3{per_thousand} and {Delta}{sup 201}Hg varies by 0.9{per_thousand}. Combining these two Hg isotope signals results in what may be a unique isotopic 'fingerprint' for many coal deposits. Mass independent fractionation of mercury has been demonstrated to occur during photochemical reactions of mercury. This suggests that Hg found in most coal deposits was subjected to photochemical reduction near the Earth's surface prior to deposition. The similarity in MDF and MIF of modern organic soils and coals from North America suggests that Hg deposition from coal may have imprinted an isotopic signature on soils. This research offers a new tool for characterizing mercury inputs from natural and anthropogenic sources to the atmosphere and provides new insights into the geochemistry of mercury in coal and soils. 35 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Abir, Biswas; Joel D. Blum; Bridget A. Bergquist; Gerald J. Keeler; Zhouqing Xie [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Geological Sciences

2008-11-15

30

Fractionation studies of mercury in soils and sediments: A review of the chemical reagents used for mercury extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury in contaminated soils and sediments could be extracted by various chemical reagents in order to determine the different mercury species and partitions, providing useful information of toxicology, bioavailability and biogeochemical reactivity. Unfortunately, at present, neither specific extractants nor standard protocols exist for the isolation of particular mercury species. Although there has been considerable research focused on reagents for extracting

N. Issaro; C. Abi-Ghanem; A. Bermond

2009-01-01

31

Health effects of ingestion of mercury-polluted urban soil: an animal experiment.  

PubMed

Rio Grande, the southernmost Brazilian port and industrial center, is marked by mercury-polluted ground cover. This pollution varies spatially, with levels exceeding 1,000 ?g kg(-1) in 30% of the urban territory. The risk of Hg impact as a result of deliberate and involuntary geophagy is increased by restrained urban conditions in combination with the large proportion of the population living at low-income levels. Laboratory tests have demonstrated that ingestion of Hg-polluted soil by rats results in significant alterations in animal health such as stagnation in body weight increase, and significant mercury accumulation in the liver and kidney. The consumption of Hg-contaminated urban soil also provoked changes in hematological profiles of experimental animals by increasing the number of platelets. The present study indicates the potential for the local population of Rio Grande living in mercury-polluted districts, specifically young children, to experience health disturbances. PMID:21451960

Muccillo-Baisch, Ana Luiza; Mirlean, Nicolai; Carrazzoni, Daniela; Soares, Maria Cristina Flores; Goulart, Gianni Peraza; Baisch, Paulo

2012-02-01

32

Atmospheric deposition of mercury in Atlantic Forest and ecological risk to soil fauna  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increasing levels of mercury (Hg) found in the atmosphere nowadays has a great contribution from anthropogenic sources and has been a great concern in the past two decades in industrialized countries. Brazil is the seventh country with the highest rate of mercury in the atmosphere. Certainly, the petroleum refineries have significant contribution, seen that 100 million m3 of crude oil are annually processed. These refineries contribute with low generation of solid waste; however, a large fraction of Hg can be emitted to the atmosphere. There are sixteen refineries in Brazil, three of them located in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The Hg is a toxic and hazardous trace element, naturally found in the earth crust. The major input of Hg to ecosystems is through atmospheric deposition (wet and dry), being transported in the atmosphere over large distances. The forest biomes are of great importance in the atmosphere/soil cycling of elemental Hg through foliar uptake and subsequent transfer to the soil through litterfall, which play an important role as Hg sink. The Atlantic Forest of Brazil is the greater contributor of fauna and flora biodiversity in the world and, according to recent studies, this biome has the highest concentrations of mercury in litter in the world, as well as in China, at Subtropical Forest. Ecotoxicological assessments can predict the potential ecological risk of Hg toxicity in the soil can lead to impact the soil fauna and indirectly other trophic levels of the food chain within one or more ecosystems. This study aims to determine mercury levels that represent risks to diversity and functioning of soil fauna in tropical forest soils. The study is conducted in two forest areas inserted into conservation units of Rio de Janeiro state. One area is located next to an important petroleum refinery in activity since fifty-two years ago, whereas the other one is located next to other refinery under construction (beginning activities in 2015), which will be the largest refinery of Brazil and, consequently, with less anthropogenic influences for the moment. Ecological risk assessments are conducted together with ecotoxicological tests in natural and artificial tropical soils, using exotic and native species of the soil fauna, naturally present in the area of study, in order to determine the risk of mercury in soil and litter in tropical forest. Previous results confirm higher concentrations of mercury in litter and soil of the forest area closest to the operating refinery. The presence of Hg seems to select the size of the organisms as well as the abundance and diversity of the soil fauna that remain in tropical forest.

Cristhy Buch, Andressa; Cabral Teixeira, Daniel; Fernandes Correia, Maria Elizabeth; Vieira Silva-Filho, Emmanoel

2014-05-01

33

Sources of mercury in groundwater and soils of west Gijón (Asturias, NW Spain).  

PubMed

This work aimed to determine the cause of the presence of high concentrations of mercury in several springs that exhibit a low concentration of metals in the bedrocks of their recharge areas in Gijón, NW Spain and the extent of this contamination. On the basis of geological mapping, different lithological substrata were analysed at the regional scale with the objective of establishing the base level of mercury in natural soils. The mercury content was simultaneously analysed in several water samples, and the following parameters were also determined: major anions and cations, As, Pb, ?(34)S, and ?(18)OSO4. The soils of the recharge area of the springs exhibited Hg concentrations that were higher than the base level established for sandstone at the regional level, and four of the total number of springs analysed exhibited Hg concentrations higher than 1?g/l. In addition, the sulphate concentration exceeded the values that this type of aquifer shows in other parts of the region. A comparison between the regionally geochemical background of soils and mercury concentration in springs and soils of the study area did not exhibit a direct relationship, suggesting an anthropogenic and timely origin (most likely from industrial emissions) for this metal. The ?(34)S and ?(18)OSO4 values of dissolved sulphate from the springs with a higher Hg concentration also indicate an anthropogenic origin. PMID:24602906

González-Fernández, B; Menéndez-Casares, E; Meléndez-Asensio, Mónica; Fernández-Menéndez, Susana; Ramos-Muñiz, F; Cruz-Hernández, P; González-Quirós, A

2014-05-15

34

Evaluation of Mercury in Urine as an Indicator of Exposure to Low Levels of Mercury Vapor  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a pooled analysis to investigate the relationship between exposure to elemental mercury in air and resulting urinary mercury levels, specifically at lower air levels relevant for envi- ronmental exposures and public health goals (i.e., < 50 µg\\/m3 down to 1.0 µg\\/m3). Ten studies reporting paired air and urine mercury data (149 samples total) met criteria for data quality

Joyce S. Tsuji; Pamela R. D. Williams; Melanie R. Edwards; Krishna P. Allamneni; Michael A. Kelsh; Dennis J. Paustenbach; Patrick J. Sheehan

2002-01-01

35

Methyl mercury production and loss in Arctic soil.  

PubMed

Mercury has been found in polar bears and other top predators in the Arctic at concentrations that pose a risk to the indigenous population, however, the means by which this occurs is uncertain. There has been extensive research on the atmospheric cycling of mercury but little is known about mercury cycling in Arctic terrestrial ecosystems. The objective of this study was to determine whether wet sedge meadow soils within the Truelove Lowlands, Devon Island, NT, Canada (75 degrees 33'N, 84 degrees 40'N) were acting as sources or sinks for methylmercury (MeHg). Over the course of an Arctic summer, MeHg concentrations and other biophysical characteristics were measured at four wet sedge meadows over a 19 day study period that commenced approximately 1 month after snowmelt. Soil MeHg concentrations declined during the study period, indicating a net loss of MeHg over the summer. The dominant ligand in solution appeared to be dissolved organic matter, little sulfide was detected, and it would seem that most of the mercury was unavailable for methylation during the summer sampling period. In soil microcosms, spiked with 5.0 nmol g(-1) (1 microg g(-1)) HgCl2, the soil did methylate mercury suggesting that there is the potential for mercury methylation. We also noted significant spatial variability in MeHg concentrations between catenas that could not be explained by other biophysical parameters, which are known to affect methylation. Given our data and previous geochemical data collected from suprapermafrost groundwater during snowmelt, it seems likely that methylation may occur during the spring melt period in the arctic. Furthermore the geochemical variability of the melt water may lead to the spatial variability observed in MeHg concentrations in this study. PMID:19081608

Oiffer, Lindsay; Siciliano, Steven D

2009-02-15

36

Methyl Mercury Production In Tropical Hydromorphic Soils: Impact Of Gold Mining  

Microsoft Academic Search

Artisanal alluvial gold mining is important in many tropical developing countries and several million people are involved worldwide. The dominant use of mercury for gold amalgamation in this activity leads to mercury accumulation in soils, to sediment contamination and to methyl mercury (MMHg) bioaccumulation along the food chain. In this presentation we will present recent data on methyl mercury production

S. Guedron; L. Charlet; J. Harris; M. Grimaldi; D. Cossa

2007-01-01

37

Bench-scale studies with mercury contaminated SRS soil  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been charactered by the Department of Enregy (DOE) - Office of Technology Development (OTD) to investigate vitrification technology for the treatment of Low Level Mixed Wastes (LLMW). In fiscal year 1995, LLW streams containing mercury and organics were targeted. This report will present the results of studies with mercury contaminated waste. In order to successfully apply vitrification technology to LLMW, the types and quantities of glass forming additives necessary for producing homogeneous glasses from the wastes had to be determined, and the treatment for the mercury portion had to also be determined. The selected additives had to ensure that a durable and leach resistant waste form was produced, while the mercury treatment had to ensure that hazardous amounts of mercury were not released into the environment.

Cicero, C.A.

1996-05-08

38

Organ mercury levels in infants with omphaloceles treated with organic mercurial antiseptic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Samples of fresh and fixed tissues from infants with exomphalos treated by thiomersal application were analysed for mercury content. The results showed that thiomersal can induce blood and organ levels of organic mercury which are well in excess of the minimum toxic level in adults and fetuses. The analysis of fresh and fixed tissues must be carefully controlled against normal

D. G. Fagan; J S Pritchard; T. W. Clarkson; M. R. Greenwood

1977-01-01

39

Mercury in terrestrial biomass and soils and factors determining atmospheric mercury sequestration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terrestrial carbon (C) pools play an important role in uptake, deposition, sequestration, and emission of atmospheric mercury (Hg). The objective of this study is to assess atmospheric Hg sequestration associated with vegetation and soil C pools in forest ecosystems. As part of an ongoing EPA STAR project, we are systematically evaluating Hg pools and fluxes associated with terrestrial C pools in all major ecosystem compartments (i.e., leaves, branches, bole, litter, soils) across selected US forest ecosystems. Results from the first five sites located in the remote western United States show that the dominant above-ground pool of mercury is associated with surface litter with smaller pools associated with leaves and branches. Mass concentrations greatly increase in the following order: green leaves, dry leaves, initial litter, partially decomposed litter, humus. Based on detailed comparison of stochiometric relationships (e.g., Hg/C and Hg/N ratios) we conclude that these concentration increases are dominated by additional atmospheric deposition retained in the decomposing plant material while exposed to the environment rather than by organic C losses during decomposition. The large majority of total ecosystem mercury, up to 98 percent, however, is sequestered belowground in the soils. Soil Hg accumulation across all sites is greatly determined by the availability of organic matter in these systems, with soil C and soil N explaining more than 90 percent of the variability in observed soil Hg stocks. Our results suggest that the availability of soil organic matter is the main determinant for retention of atmospheric inputs in soils and hence in terrestrial ecosystems. Ecosystem structure and soil organic accumulation hence determine the resilience of Hg in terrestrial ecosystems with important implication for the stability and runoff of atmospheric Hg deposition to surrounding waterbodies.

Obrist, D.; Johnson, D. W.; Lindberg, S.; Luo, Y.

2008-12-01

40

REMOVAL OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED SOILS AT THE PAVLODAR CHEMICAL PLANT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soils beneath and adjacent to the Pavlodar Chemical Plant in Kazakhstan have been contaminated with elemental mercury as a result of chlor alkali processing using mercury cathode cell technology. The work described in this paper was conducted in preparation for a demonstration of a technology to remove the mercury from the contaminated soils using a vacuum assisted thermal distillation process.

V. Y. E. KHRAPUNOV; R. A. ISAKOVA; B. L. LEVINTOV; P. D. KALB; I. M. KAMBEROV; A. TREBUKHOV

2004-01-01

41

Estimating historical atmospheric mercury concentrations from silver mining and their legacies in present-day surface soil in Potosí, Bolivia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detailed Spanish records of mercury use and silver production during the colonial period in Potosí, Bolivia were evaluated to estimate atmospheric emissions of mercury from silver smelting. Mercury was used in the silver production process in Potosí and nearly 32,000 metric tons of mercury were released to the environment. AERMOD was used in combination with the estimated emissions to approximate historical air concentrations of mercury from colonial mining operations during 1715, a year of relatively low silver production. Source characteristics were selected from archival documents, colonial maps and images of silver smelters in Potosí and a base case of input parameters was selected. Input parameters were varied to understand the sensitivity of the model to each parameter. Modeled maximum 1-h concentrations were most sensitive to stack height and diameter, whereas an index of community exposure was relatively insensitive to uncertainty in input parameters. Modeled 1-h and long-term concentrations were compared to inhalation reference values for elemental mercury vapor. Estimated 1-h maximum concentrations within 500 m of the silver smelters consistently exceeded present-day occupational inhalation reference values. Additionally, the entire community was estimated to have been exposed to levels of mercury vapor that exceed present-day acute inhalation reference values for the general public. Estimated long-term maximum concentrations of mercury were predicted to substantially exceed the EPA Reference Concentration for areas within 600 m of the silver smelters. A concentration gradient predicted by AERMOD was used to select soil sampling locations along transects in Potosí. Total mercury in soils ranged from 0.105 to 155 mg kg-1, among the highest levels reported for surface soils in the scientific literature. The correlation between estimated air concentrations and measured soil concentrations will guide future research to determine the extent to which the current community of Potosí and vicinity is at risk of adverse health effects from historical mercury contamination.

Hagan, Nicole; Robins, Nicholas; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Halabi, Susan; Morris, Mark; Woodall, George; Zhang, Tong; Bacon, Allan; Richter, Daniel De B.; Vandenberg, John

2011-12-01

42

Impact of Wildfire on Levels of Mercury in Forested Watershed Systems - Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Atmospheric deposition of mercury to remote lakes in mid-continental and eastern North America has increased approximately threefold since the mid-1800s (Swain and others, 1992; Fitzgerald and others, 1998; Engstrom and others, 2007). As a result, concerns for human and wildlife health related to mercury contamination have become widespread. Despite an apparent recent decline in atmospheric deposition of mercury in many areas of the Upper Midwest (Engstrom and Swain, 1997; Engstrom and others, 2007), lakes in which fish contain levels of mercury deemed unacceptable for human consumption and possibly unacceptable for fish-consuming wildlife are being detected with increasing frequency. In northern Minnesota, Voyageurs National Park (VNP) (fig. 1) protects a series of southern boreal lakes and wetlands situated on bedrock of the Precambrian Canadian Shield. Mercury contamination has become a significant resource issue within VNP as high concentrations of mercury in loons, bald eagle eaglets, grebes, northern pike, and other species of wildlife and fish have been found. The two most mercury-contaminated lakes in Minnesota, measured as methylmercury in northern pike (Esox lucius), are in VNP. Recent multidisciplinary U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research demonstrated that the bulk of the mercury in lake waters, soils, and fish in VNP results from atmospheric deposition (Wiener and others, 2006). The study by Wiener and others (2006) showed that the spatial distribution of mercury in watershed soils, lake waters, and age-1 yellow perch (Perca flavescens) within the Park was highly variable. The majority of factors correlated for this earlier study suggested that mercury concentrations in lake waters and age-1 yellow perch reflected the influence of ecosystem processes that affected within-lake microbial production and abundance of methylmercury (Wiener and others, 2006), while the distribution of mercury in watershed soils seemed to be partially dependent on forest disturbance, especially the historic forest fire pattern (Woodruff and Cannon, 2002). Forest fire has an essential role in the forest ecosystems of VNP (Heinselman, 1996). Because resource and land managers need to integrate both natural wildfire and prescribed fire in management plans, the potential influence of fire on an element as sensitive to the environment as mercury becomes a critical part of their decisionmaking. A number of recent studies have shown that while fire does have a significant impact on mercury at the landscape level, the observed effects of fire on aquatic environments are highly variable and unpredictable (Caldwell and others, 2000; Garcia and Carrigan, 2000; Kelly and others, 2006; Nelson and others, 2007). Caldwell and others (2000) described an increase in methylmercury in reservoir sediments resulting from mobilization and transport of charred vegetative matter following a fire in New Mexico. Krabbenhoft and Fink (2000) attributed increases in total mercury concentrations in young-of-the-year fish in the Florida Everglades to release of mercury resulting from peat oxidation following fires. A fivefold increase in whole-body mercury accumulation by rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following a fire in Alberta, Canada, apparently resulted from increased nutrient concentrations that enhanced productivity and restructured the food web of a lake within the fire's burn footprint (Kelly and others, 2006). For this study, we determined the short-term effects of forest fire on mercury concentrations in terrestrial and aquatic environments in VNP by comparing and contrasting mercury concentrations in forest soils, lake waters, and age-1 yellow perch for a burned watershed and an adjacent lake, with similar samples from watersheds and lakes with no fire activity (control watersheds and lakes). The concentration of total mercury in whole, 1-year-old yellow perch serves as a good biological indicator for monitoring trends in methylmercury conce

Woodruff, Laurel G.; Sandheinrich, Mark B.; Brigham, Mark E.; Cannon, William F.

2009-01-01

43

The use of soil mercury and radon gas surveys to assist the detection of concealed faults in Fuzhou City, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil gas approaches have been proven useful for detecting buried faults in field survey. How about their applicability in urban area? A trial soil gas survey has been conducted in an attempt to evaluate this in Fuzhou City, Southeastern China. The detection was performed by measuring the adsorbed mercury, free mercury and radon gases in soil in the sites such as crop soil, refilled soil and those with shallow groundwater levels. The resulting distributions show that anomalous concentrations of soil gases over faults are generally two to four times as much as those in the surrounding areas. The locations of peak values of absorbed and free mercury could possibly be applied to assist to determine the trend of faults. The background values of free mercury seems to be more stable and the anomalous zones narrower than those of radon gas, therefore, the free mercury method seems to be good for detection at this area, especially in those sites with shallow groundwater levels. The false gas anomalies may occur in such a site as refilled with external soil, refilled pond and abandoned construction bases.

Wang, Guangcai; Liu, Chenglong; Wang, Jihua; Liu, Wuzhou; Zhang, Peiren

2006-10-01

44

Mercury isotope compositions in North American forest soils and litters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soils represent one of the largest reservoirs of mercury on Earth, playing a critical role in the natural cycle of mercury by acting as both a sink and source. However, it is not well understood how soils sequestrate and remobilize Hg. Natural variations in stable Hg isotopes are being explored as a promising tool in studying the transformation and transport of Hg. However, Hg isotopic data in soils is scarce. In addition, the limited isotopic data that exists is significantly different from those of atmospheric Hg, which is one of the major sources of Hg to soils. For example, Hg mass independent fractionation (MIF, typically reported as ?199Hg) is positive in atmospheric wet deposition, but most soils display negative ?199Hg. MIF on 200Hg (?200Hg) is also observed in atmospheric wet deposition, but not in soils. The discrepancy between soils and atmospheric samples is still unexplained. In this study, we surveyed the Hg isotope compositions in soil profiles, litters and fresh vegetation from four different forest sites across United States (Thompson forest, WA, Truckee, CA, Niwot Ridge, CO and Howland, MA). The current results from the WA site show that soils primarily display negative mass dependent fractionation for the even isotopes (MDF, reported as ?202Hg) with values for ?202Hg of up to -2.0‰. Significant MIF for both odd isotopes is also observed in all WA soil samples and ?199Hg is mostly negative (up to -0.4‰). No MIF on 200Hg is observed in these soils. The negative ?199Hg in soils is inconsistent with the positive ?199Hg reported in atmospheric wet deposition, suggesting that either Hg transformations within or on the surface of soils and/or plants alter its isotope composition after deposition or other types of Hg deposition (e.g., Hg(0) or Hg(II) dry deposition) is more predominant. The ?199Hg/?201Hg ratio is close to 1 in the soils, which is consistent with the results of laboratory photochemical reduction of inorganic Hg(II), indicating that photochemical reduction (either on the surface of soils and vegetations, in surface water or in the atmosphere) is the plausible cause of the MIF in the soils. We are currently studying samples from the other three sites to determine the variation of Hg isotope composition in soils formed in different geological and climatic settings. We will also evaluate the correlation between Hg isotope composition in soils and organic carbon, precipitation and clay content in order to determine the key environmental factors that shape the Hg isotope composition in soils.

Zheng, W.; Obrist, D.; Bergquist, B. A.

2013-12-01

45

Phyto extraction and accumulation of mercury in selected plant species grown in soil contaminated with different mercury compounds  

SciTech Connect

The objective of our research is to screen and search for suitable plant species for phyto-remediation of mercury-contaminated soil. Currently our effort is specifically focused on mercury removal from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Site, where mercury contamination is a major concern in the Y-12 Watershed area. In order to cost effectively implement those remediation efforts currently planned for FY09, it is necessary now to obtain an improved understanding of biological means of removing mercury and mercury compounds from the Oak Ridge ecosystem. Phyto-remediation is a technology that uses various plants to degrade, extract, contain, or immobilize contaminants from soil and water. In particular, phyto-extraction is the uptake of contaminants by plant roots and translocation within the plants to shoots or leaves. Contaminants are generally removed by harvesting the plants. We have investigated phyto-extraction of mercury from contaminated soil by using some of the known metal accumulating wild plants since no natural plant species with mercury hyper-accumulating properties has yet been identified. Different natural plant species have been studied for mercury uptake, accumulation, toxicity and overall mercury removal efficiency. Various mercury compounds, such as HgS, HgCl{sub 2} and Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, were used as contaminant sources. Different types of soil were examined and chosen for phyto-remediation experiments. We have applied microscopy and diffuse reflectance spectrometry as well as conventional analytical chemistry to monitor the phyto-remediation processes of mercury uptake, translocation and accumulation; and the physiological impact of mercury contaminants on selected plant species. Our results indicate that certain plant species, such as beard grass (Polypogon monospeliensis), accumulated a very limited amount of mercury in the shoots (<65 mg/kg), even though root mercury accumulation is significant (maximum 2298 mg/kg). Consequently, this plant species may not be suitable for mercury phyto-remediation. Other plant species, such as Indian mustard (Brassica juncea), a well-studied metal accumulator, exhibited severe chlorosis symptoms during some experiments. Among all the plant species studied, Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittata) accumulated significant amount of mercury in both roots and shoots and hence may be considered as a potential candidate for mercury phyto-extraction. During one experiment, brake ferns accumulated 540 mg/kg and 1469 mg/kg in shoots after 18 days of growing in soils treated with 500 ppm and 1000 ppm HgCl{sub 2} powder, respectively; no visual stress symptoms were observed. We also studied mercury phyto-remediation using aged soils that contaminated HgS, HgCl{sub 2}, and Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. We have found that up to hundreds of ppm mercury can be accumulated in the roots of Indian mustard plants grown with soil contaminated by mercury sulfide; HgS is assumed to be the most stable and also the predominant mercury form in Oak Ridge flood plain soils. We have also started to investigate different mercury uptake mechanisms, such as root uptake of soil contaminant and foliar mercury accumulation from ambient air. (authors)

Su, Y.; Han, F.; Shiyab, S.; Monts, D.L. [Mississippi State Univ., Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET), Starkville, MS (United States)

2007-07-01

46

Phytoextraction and Accumulation of Mercury in Selected Plant Species Grown in Soil Contaminated with Different Mercury Compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of our research is to screen and search for suitable plant species for phytoremediation of mercury-contaminated soil. Currently our effort is specifically focused on mercury removal from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Site, where mercury contamination is a major concern in the Y-12 Watershed area. In order to cost effectively implement those remediation efforts currently

Y. Su; F. Han; S. Shiyab; D. L. Monts

47

MERCURY BAKEOFF: TECHNOLOGY COMPARISON FOR THE TREATMENT OF MIXED WASTE MERCURY CONTAMINATED SOILS AT BNL  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Over440 yd,of radioactively contaminated soil containing toxic mercury was generated during a ComprehensiveEnvironmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action atBrookhaven,National Laboratory (BNL). The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Scienceand,Technology Mixed Waste Focus Area (DOE MWFA) is sponsoring a comparison of severaltechnologies that may be used to treat these wastes and similar wastes at BNL and

P. D. KALB; J. W. ADAMS; L. W. MILIAN; G. PENNY; J. BROWER; A. LOCKWOOD

1999-01-01

48

Elevated CO2 Effects on Mercury Content of Forest Soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fossil fuel combustion is the primary anthropogenic source of both CO2 and mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere. Terrestrial vegetation can act as a conduit for transferring atmospheric Hg into soils and freshwater systems. While the effects of CO2 on both terrestrial plants and soils have been well-studied, the impacts of these CO2 induced changes on Hg cycling are unknown. We found that elevated CO2 resulted in increased Hg concentration in forest soils. Soil Hg concentration in the top 20cm of soils was 26% greater and total Hg content was 22% greater under elevated CO2 (ambient + 200ppmv), relative to ambient at two FACE sites: Duke Forest, NC and Oak Ridge, TN. However, there was no significant CO2 effect on Hg inputs via leaf litter. Soil Hg was significantly correlated with soil organic matter and acidity, suggesting that CO2 mediated changes in soil properties may be affecting soil Hg content. Elevated atmospheric CO2 has the potential to increase the Hg trapping efficiency of soils, with still unknown effects on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem function.

Natali, S. M.; Lerdau, M.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.

2006-12-01

49

Remediation aspect of microbial changes of plant rhizosphere in mercury contaminated soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoremediation, an approach that uses plants to remediate contaminated soil through degradation, stabilization or accumulation,\\u000a may provide an efficient solution to some mercury contamination problems. This paper presents growth chamber experiments that\\u000a tested the ability of plant species to stabilize mercury in soil. Several indigenous herbaceous species and Salix viminalis were grown in soil collected from a mercury-contaminated site in

Aleksandra Sas-Nowosielska; Regina Galimska-Stypa; Rafa? Kucharski; Urszula Zielonka; Eugeniusz Ma?kowski; Laymon Gray

2008-01-01

50

Mercury Levels in Infants Receiving Routine Immunizations  

MedlinePLUS

... in Infants Receiving Routine Immunizations Study I: Infant Metabolism of Thimerosal versus Methyl Mercury NIAID-supported studies ... Lancet 360:1737-1741 (2002). Study II: Thimerosal Metabolism in Infants Receiving Routine Immunizations NIAID conducted a ...

51

Comparison of immunoassay field tests and laboratory results for PCB, PAH, BTEX, and mercury contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Immunoassay tests were used as in situ field screening tools for simultaneous assessment and remediation of soil contaminated with mercury and organics (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and BTEX). Soil samples from approximately 200 sites including metering and compressor stations were investigated along gas pipelines. The suspected contamination originated from formerly used mercury manometers and pipeline liquids. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used for the detection of organic and mercury contaminants. ELISA combines selective antibodies with sensitive enzyme reactions to produce semiquantitative analytical systems capable of detecting very low levels of chemicals. Color sample tubes were compared to the color of standard tubes to semiquantitate the amount of mercury, PCB, PAH, and BBTEX present in the samples. Two standards were tested in order to eliminate the effects of false negatives (e.g., contaminant not detected when present) or false positives (e.g., contamination detected when not present). For verification purposes, selected samples that were determined to be below action level with the immunoassay tests were sent to the laboratory.

Hammes, U. [IT Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-09-01

52

Fractionation studies of mercury in soils and sediments: a review of the chemical reagents used for mercury extraction.  

PubMed

Mercury in contaminated soils and sediments could be extracted by various chemical reagents in order to determine the different mercury species and partitions, providing useful information of toxicology, bioavailability and biogeochemical reactivity. Unfortunately, at present, neither specific extractants nor standard protocols exist for the isolation of particular mercury species. Although there has been considerable research focused on reagents for extracting mercury species, there is still little consensus. Thus, workers are advised to select the most appropriate reagent based on the nature of their sample, and to take all possible steps to validate the analyses performed. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the current reagents used for determining total mercury and its speciation as well as fractionation such as methylmercury, ethylmercury, elemental mercury, mercury sulphide and organically bound mercury by supposed selective (one reagent) and sequential (several reagents) extractions. The gathering information presented here bring to light the need for standard protocol for which the used chemical reagents should take into account the particular chemistry of mercury associated with specific properties of soil and sediment. Beside this required scheme, appropriate reference materials are also demanded. PMID:19046672

Issaro, N; Abi-Ghanem, C; Bermond, A

2009-01-01

53

Trace-level mercury removal from surface water  

SciTech Connect

Many sorbents have been developed for the removal of mercury and heavy metals from waters; however, most of the data published thus far do not address the removal of mercury to the target levels represented in this project. The application to which these sorbents are targeted for use is the removal of mercury from microgram-per-liter levels to low nanogram-per-liter levels. Sorbents with thiouronium, thiol, amine, sulfur, and proprietary functional groups were selected for these studies. Mercury was successfully removed from surface water via adsorption onto Ionac SR-4 and Mersorb resins to levels below the target goal of 12 ng/L in batch studies. A thiol-based resin performed the best, indicating that over 200,000 volumes of water could be treated with one volume of resin. The cost of the resin is approximately $0.24 per 1,000 gal of water.

Klasson, K.T.; Bostick, D.T.

1998-06-01

54

Mercury pollution in the Tapajos River basin, Amazon: mercury level of head hair and health effects.  

PubMed

There is increasing concern about the potential neurotoxic effects of exposure to methylmercury for the 6 million people living in the Amazon, even in regions situated far away from the gold mines (garimpos), considered to be the major source of mercury pollution. In November 1998, a spot investigation on mercury contamination was conducted in three fishing villages (Barreiras, Rainha, and Sao Luiz do Tapajos) on the Tapajos River, an effluent of the Amazon, situated several hundred kilometers downstream from the gold-mining areas. A total of 132 fishermen and their families volunteered for the current study. As was anticipated, the total mercury levels in the head hair collected from the fishing villages were relatively high (14.1-20.8 ppm on the average) and the number of subjects with a high total mercury level over 10 ppm (the least upper bound of a normal value) was 103 (78.0%) in total, along with various symptoms, thereby suggesting wide mercury contamination in the Tapajos River basin. Moreover, in view of the absence of other diseases (e.g., alcoholism or malaria), a high intake of fish containing a methylmercury level, and high hair mercury levels in addition to the various symptoms such as sensory disturbance (especially glove-and-stocking type, which is characteristic of Minamata disease), tremor, failure in two-point discrimination, and slight balancing failure, several subjects examined were diagnosed with mild Minamata disease. The findings obtained suggest, thus, that the mercury pollution in the Amazon should be crucially observed for head hair mercury level and health in a much broader region. PMID:11686639

Harada, M; Nakanishi, J; Yasoda, E; Pinheiro, M C; Oikawa, T; de Assis Guimarâes, G; da Silva Cardoso, B; Kizaki, T; Ohno, H

2001-10-01

55

Mercury  

SciTech Connect

Papers are presented on future observations of and missions to Mercury, the photometry and polarimetry of Mercury, the surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry, the Goldstone radar observations of Mercury, the radar observations of Mercury, the stratigraphy and geologic history of Mercury, the geomorphology of impact craters on Mercury, and the cratering record on Mercury and the origin of impacting objects. Consideration is also given to the tectonics of Mercury, the tectonic history of Mercury, Mercury's thermal history and the generation of its magnetic field, the rotational dynamics of Mercury and the state of its core, Mercury's magnetic field and interior, the magnetosphere of Mercury, and the Mercury atmosphere. Other papers are on the present bounds on the bulk composition of Mercury and the implications for planetary formation processes, the building stones of the planets, the origin and composition of Mercury, the formation of Mercury from planetesimals, and theoretical considerations on the strange density of Mercury.

Vilas, F.; Chapman, C.R.; Matthews, M.S.

1988-01-01

56

Mercury poisoning dentistry: high-level indoor air mercury contamination at selected dental sites.  

PubMed

Abstract Mercury (Hg), also known as quick silver, is an essential constituent of dental amalgam. It is a toxic substance of global concern. Children are more at risk from mercury poisoning which affects their neurological development and brain. In the past, a number of studies at dental sites in many countries have been carried out and reported. The present report briefly describes and discusses our recent investigations carried out at 34 dental sites (teaching institutions, hospitals and private clinics) in Pakistan. It is evident from the data that at many sites the indoor mercury vapor levels exceed far above the permissible limit recommended for safe physical and mental health. At these sites, public in general and the medical, paramedical staff and vulnerable population in particular, are at most serious risk to health resulting from exposure to toxic and hazardous mercury. To minimize such risk, some of the recommendations are, best in-house environmental practices for occupational health and safety, mercury contaminated waste reduction at source, mercury specific legislation and ratification of Minamata convention on mercury by Pakistan and other world governments at the earliest time possible. PMID:24552960

Khwaja, Mahmood A; Abbasi, Maryam Shabbir

2014-01-01

57

Mercury emission and dispersion models from soils contaminated by cinnabar mining and metallurgy.  

PubMed

The laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS) and dispersion models were used to investigate the kinetics of mercury emission flux (MEF) from contaminated soils. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentration (26-9770 ?g g(-1)) surrounding a decommissioned mercury-mining area (Las Cuevas Mine), and a former mercury smelter (Cerco Metalúrgico de Almadenejos), in the Almadén mercury mining district (South Central Spain), were collected. Altogether, 14 samples were analyzed to determine the variation in mercury emission flux (MEF) versus distance from the sources, regulating two major environmental parameters comprising soil temperature and solar radiation. In addition, the fraction of the water-soluble mercury in these samples was determined in order to assess how MEF from soil is related to the mercury in the aqueous soil phase. Measured MEFs ranged from less than 140 to over 10,000 ng m(-2) h(-1), with the highest emissions from contaminated soils adjacent to point sources. A significant decrease of MEF was then observed with increasing distance from these sites. Strong positive effects of both temperature and solar radiation on MEF was observed. Moreover, MEF was found to occur more easily in soils with higher proportions of soluble mercury compared to soils where cinnabar prevails. Based on the calculated Hg emission rates and with the support of geographical information system (GIS) tools and ISC AERMOD software, dispersion models for atmospheric mercury were implemented. In this way, the gaseous mercury plume generated by the soil-originated emissions at different seasons was modeled. Modeling efforts revealed that much higher emissions and larger mercury plumes are generated in dry and warm periods (summer), while the plume is smaller and associated with lower concentrations of atmospheric mercury during colder periods with higher wind activity (fall). Based on the calculated emissions and the model implementation, yearly emissions from the "Cerco Metalúrgico de Almadenejos" decommissioned metallurgical precinct were estimated at 16.4 kg Hg y(-1), with significant differences between seasons. PMID:22037967

Llanos, Willians; Kocman, David; Higueras, Pablo; Horvat, Milena

2011-12-01

58

Comparison of Adsorbed Mercury Screening Method With Cold-Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry for Determination of Mercury in Soil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A field screening method for the determination of elemental mercury in environmental soil samples involves the thermal desorption of the mercury from the sample onto gold and then the thermal desorption from the gold to a gold-film mercury vapor analyzer. This field screening method contains a large number of conditions that could be optimized for the various types of soils encountered. In this study, the conditions were optimized for the determination of mercury in silty clay materials, and the results were comparable to the cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometric method of determination. This paper discusses the benefits and disadvantages of employing the field screening method and provides the sequence of conditions that must be optimized to employ this method of determination on other soil types.

Easterling, Donald F.; Hovanitz, Edward S.; Street, Kenneth W.

2000-01-01

59

[Geochemical characteristics of radon and mercury in soil gas in Lhasa, Tibet, China].  

PubMed

The geochemical characteristics of radon and mercury in soil gas in Lhasa and vicinity are investigated based on the measurements of Rn and Hg concentrations, and environmental quality for Rn and Hg in soil gas was evaluated by means of the index of geoaccumulation. The data of Rn and Hg of 1 579 sampling site indicate that the values of environmental-geochemical background of Rn and Hg are 7 634.9 Bq/m3, 41.5 ng/m3 with standard deviations of 2.7 Bq/m3, 2.2 ng/m3, respectively. The environmental quality for Rn in soil gas is better in the west and east parts of studied area, but becomes moderate pollution (level III) in the north part of the central area. Rn is derived from radioactive elements in granitic sediments in the intermountain basin and granite base, which are the major sources of pollution. The environmental quality for Hg in soil gas becomes gradually polluted from the suburban to the center of urban, and the highest pollution reaches level IV. The background of Hg in soil gas is mainly controlled by compositions of sediments, but the Hg pollution caused by human waste and religionary use of mercury. PMID:17633651

Zhou, Xiao-Cheng; Du, Jian-Guo; Wang, Chuan-Yuan; Cao, Zhong-Quan; Yi, Li; Liu, Lei

2007-03-01

60

Mercury Residues in Soil Around a Large Coal-Fired Power Plant.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Seventy soil samples were collected on a radial grid around the Four Corners power plant. The soil samples were analyzed for total mercury using a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Even though the plant emits 1-2% of all the mercury released by ...

A. B. Crockett R. R. Kinnison

1979-01-01

61

Application of a mer-lux biosensor for estimating bioavailable mercury in soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

A previously described bioassay using a mer-lux gene fusion for detection of bioavailable mercury was applied for the estimation of the bioavailable fraction of mercury in soil. The bioavailable fraction is defined here as being part of the water leachable fraction. Due to masking of light emission of soil particles leachates had to be cleaned prior to assays. Filtration of

Lasse D Rasmussen; Søren J Sørensen; Ralph R Turner; Tamar Barkay

2000-01-01

62

MERCURY IN THE ENVIRONMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Mercury is released from a variety of sources and exhibits a complicated chemistry. According to the Mercury Study Report to Congress, mercury fluxes and budgets in water, soil, and other media have increased by a factor of two to five over pre-industrial levels. The primary expo...

63

Mercury exposure may suppress baseline corticosterone levels in juvenile birds.  

PubMed

Mercury exposure has been associated with a wide variety of negative reproductive responses in birds, however few studies have examined the potential for chick impairment via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The HPA axis regulates corticosterone levels during periods of stress. We examined the relationship between baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations and mercury concentrations in down feathers of recently hatched (<3 days) and blood of older (15-37 days) Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) chicks in San Francisco Bay, California. Baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in blood of older chicks (decreasing by 81% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and number of fledgling chicks within the colony and chick age. In recently hatched chicks, baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were weakly negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in down feathers (decreasing by 45% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for stronger positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and colony nest abundance and date. These results indicate that chronic mercury exposure may suppress baseline corticosterone concentrations in tern chicks and suggests that a juvenile bird's ability to respond to stress may be reduced via the downregulation of the HPA axis. PMID:22578153

Herring, Garth; Ackerman, Joshua T; Herzog, Mark P

2012-06-01

64

Mercury Exposure May Suppress Baseline Corticosterone Levels in Juvenile Birds.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mercury exposure has been associated with a wide variety of negative reproductive responses in birds, however few studies have examined the potential for chick impairment via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The HPA axis regulates corticosterone levels during periods of stress. We examined the relationship between baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations and mercury concentrations in down feathers of recently hatched (Sterna forsteri) chicks in San Francisco Bay, California. Baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in blood of older chicks (decreasing by 81% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and number of fledgling chicks within the colony and chick age. In recently hatched chicks, baseline fecal corticosterone metabolite concentrations were weakly negatively correlated with mercury concentrations in down feathers (decreasing by 45% across the range of observed mercury concentrations) while accounting for stronger positive correlations between corticosterone concentrations and colony nest abundance and date. These results indicate that chronic mercury exposure may suppress baseline corticosterone concentrations in tern chicks and suggests that a juvenile bird's ability to respond to stress may be reduced via the downregulation of the HPA axis.

Herring, Garth; Ackerman, Josh T.; Herzog, Mark P.

2012-01-01

65

Increased blood mercury levels in patients with Alzheimer's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary.   Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that leads to dementia and death. In addition to several\\u000a genetic parameters, various environmental factors may influence the risk of getting AD. In order to test whether blood levels\\u000a of the heavy metal mercury are increased in AD, we measured blood mercury concentrations in AD patients (n = 33), and compared

C. Hock; G. Drasch; S. Golombowski; F. Müller-Spahn; B. Willershausen-Zönnchen; P. Schwarz; U. Hock; J. H. Growdon; R. M. Nitsch

1998-01-01

66

Summary of: Relationship between mercury levels in blood and urine and complaints of chronic mercury toxicity from amalgam restorations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim To determine whether patients complaining of oral and medical symptoms perceived to be associated with chronic mercury toxicity have elevated mercury levels in their blood and urine.Methods The study group in this audit were 56 patients presenting to an oral medicine unit with complaints perceived to be related to chronic mercury toxicity. Their symptoms and co-morbidity were charted and

S. Porter

2010-01-01

67

Relationship between mercury levels in blood and urine and complaints of chronic mercury toxicity from amalgam restorations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim To determine whether patients complaining of oral and medical symptoms perceived to be associated with chronic mercury toxicity have elevated mercury levels in their blood and urine.Methods The study group in this audit were 56 patients presenting to an oral medicine unit with complaints perceived to be related to chronic mercury toxicity. Their symptoms and co-morbidity were charted and

J. Eyeson; I. House; Y. H. Yang; K. A. A. S. Warnakulasuriya

2010-01-01

68

Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

... of the lungs Medication to remove mercury and heavy metals from the body INORGANIC MERCURY For inorganic mercury ... McGraw Hill; 2008:chap 365. Baum CR. Mercury: Heavy metals and inorganic agents. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, ...

69

Self-Transmissible Mercury Resistance Plasmids with Gene-Mobilizing Capacity in Soil Bacterial Populations: Influence of Wheat Roots and Mercury Addition  

PubMed Central

A set of mercury resistance plasmids was obtained from wheat rhizosphere soil amended or not amended with mercuric chloride via exogenous plasmid isolation by using Pseudomonas fluorescens R2f, Pseudomonas putida UWC1, and Enterobacter cloacae BE1 as recipient strains. The isolation frequencies were highest from soil amended with high levels of mercury, and the isolation frequencies from unamended soil were low. With P. putida UWC1 as the recipient, the isolation frequency was significantly enhanced in wheat rhizosphere compared to bulk soil. Twenty transconjugants were analyzed per recipient strain. All of the transconjugants contained plasmids which were between 40 and 50 kb long. Eight selected plasmids were distributed among five groups, as shown by restriction digestion coupled with a similarity matrix analysis. However, all of the plasmids formed a tight group, as judged by hybridization with two whole-plasmid probes and comparisons with other plasmids in dot blot hybridization analyses. The results of replicon typing and broad-host-range incompatibility (Inc) group-specific PCR suggested that the plasmid isolates were not related to any previously described Inc group. Although resistance to copper, resistance to streptomycin, and/or resistance to chloramphenicol was found in several plasmids, catabolic sequences were generally not identified. One plasmid, pEC10, transferred into a variety of bacteria belonging to the ? and ? subdivisions of the class Proteobacteria and mobilized as well as retromobilized the IncQ plasmid pSUP104. A PCR method for detection of pEC10-like replicons was used, in conjunction with other methods, to monitor pEC10-homologous sequences in mercury-polluted and unpolluted soils. The presence of mercury enhanced the prevalence of pEC10-like replicons in soil and rhizosphere bacterial populations.

Smit, Eric; Wolters, Anneke; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

1998-01-01

70

Increases in mercury emissions from desert soils in response to rainfall and irrigation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As part of an international Hg flux intercomparison at the Steamboat Springs, Nevada, geothermal area, several dynamic soil flux chambers and micrometeorological gradient systems were operated over desert soils in early September 1997. A series of unanticipated convective rain cells impacted the site with the first rainfall in ˜90 days, and the initial 4-cm rainfall increased soil moisture from ˜0.01 to 0.06% (vol/vol). Several chambers were operating prior to the events, and two were deployed over wet soils following rainfall. Rainfall resulted in an immediate and steep rise in ambient air Hg concentrations and soil Hg emissions which persisted for 12-24 hours. Fluxes increased most quickly and to a greater degree over the wettest soils, and the rate of increase was related to chamber design and flushing rate. The flux response was also apparent in the micrometeorological data. In general, soil emissions increased by an order of magnitude following the rain, and reached levels ˜6 times above those at the same time the previous day. These fluxes were significantly correlated with temperature, radiation, humidity, wind speed, and soil moisture. After drying for ˜40 hours, selected soil plots were manually irrigated with low-Hg-distilled water. Mercury emissions responded similarly across the three treated sites, uniformly increasing from ˜60 ng m-2 h-1 pretreatment to ˜650 ng m-2 h-1 posttreatment, which was a factor of ˜6 higher than adjacent control soils. Possible causes of the increases in flux include soil gas displacement, desorption of Hg° by water molecules, and desorption of Hg(II) and subsequent reduction in solution. The kinetics of the flux response, combined with local soil and climatic conditions, suggest that Hg emissions were responding primarily to soil moisture and solar radiation. These data have interesting implications for the role of changing regional climates on biogeochemical cycling of Hg.

Lindberg, S. E.; Zhang, H.; Gustin, M.; Vette, A.; Marsik, F.; Owens, J.; Casimir, A.; Ebinghaus, R.; Edwards, G.; Fitzgerald, C.; Kemp, J.; Kock, H. H.; London, J.; Majewski, M.; Poissant, L.; Pilote, M.; Rasmussen, P.; Schaedlich, F.; Schneeberger, D.; Sommar, J.; Turner, R.; WallschläGer, D.; Xiao, Z.

1999-09-01

71

Fractional mercury levels in Brazilian gold refiners and miners.  

PubMed

A field study survey of individuals residing in the region of Para, Brazil, was conducted to determine fractional mercury levels in individuals at risk for exposure in the Brazilian Amazon region. Subjects with a history of exposure to mercury either in the gold mining or refining industry, or exposure to these processes through proximity were included. Three groups were identified as either having recent (less than 2 d since last exposure), intermediate (less than 60 d), or remote (greater than 60 d) exposure to mercury vapors. Fractional blood and urinary mercury levels were assessed for these groups. Group I (recent) had the highest geometric mean blood 24.8 (SD 44.1, range 7.6-158.8) micrograms/L and urine 75.6 (SD 213.4, range 6.5-735.9) micrograms/g-cr (microgram mercury per gram of creatinine) mercury; intermediate (group II) geometric mean blood 7.6 (SD 5.5, range 2.2-19.4) micrograms/L and urine levels 23.8 (SD 84.0, range 7.8-297.0) micrograms/g-cr; the lowest levels in remote exposure (group III): geometric mean blood 5.6 (SD 3.3, range 3.1-14.3) micrograms/L and urine 7.0 (SD 9.8, range 3.1 to 32.9) micrograms/g-cr. The fraction of organic was lowest in group I (32.4%), higher in group II (65.7%), and highest in group III (72.2%). While the frequency of symptoms was comparable in the recent and intermediate groups (2.6 mean, SD 2.3, range 0-8, and 3.1 mean, SD 1.9, range 0-7, symptoms per patient), those with remote exposure demonstrated the highest rate of reporting (6.4 mean, SD 4.1, range 0-11, symptoms per patient). There is significant exposure to mercury for those working in or living near the mining and refining industry. Blood and urine levels are a better marker of recent than remote exposure. The fraction of organic mercury increases with time since exposure. Symptoms may be persistent and low levels of blood and urine mercury do not exclude remote or cumulative toxicity. PMID:7837306

Aks, S E; Erickson, T; Branches, F J; Naleway, C; Chou, H N; Levy, P; Hryhorczuk, D

1995-01-01

72

Initial investigation of soil mercury geochemistry as an aid to drill site selection in geothermal systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mercury-in-soil survey was conducted at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), Utah, to evaluate mercury soil geochemistry as a method of selecting exploration well sites in a hot-water geothermal system. Samples of -80 mesh soil were collected at 30.5 m intervals along traverses crossing known structures, surficial geothermal alteration, and exploration well sites, and were analyzed

R. M. Capuano; R. W. Bamford

1978-01-01

73

Distribution and mobility of mercury in soils of a gold mining region, Cuyuni river basin, Venezuela.  

PubMed

An extensive and remote gold mining region located in the East of Venezuela has been studied with the aim of assessing the distribution and mobility of mercury in soil and the level of Hg pollution at artisanal gold mining sites. To do so, soils and pond sediments were sampled at sites not subject to anthropological influence, as well as in areas affected by gold mining activities. Total Hg in regionally distributed soils ranged between 0.02 mg kg(-1) and 0.40 mg kg(-1), with a median value of 0.11 mg kg(-1), which is slightly higher than soil Hg worldwide, possibly indicating long-term atmospheric input or more recent local atmospheric input, in addition to minor lithogenic sources. A reference Hg concentration of 0.33 mg kg(-1) is proposed for the detection of mining affected soils in this region. Critical total Hg concentrations were found in the surrounding soils of pollutant sources, such as milling-amalgamation sites, where soil Hg contents ranged from 0.16 mg kg(-1) to 542 mg kg(-1) with an average of 26.89 mg kg(-1), which also showed high levels of elemental Hg, but quite low soluble+exchangeable Hg fraction (0.02-4.90 mg kg(-1)), suggesting low Hg soil mobility and bioavailability, as confirmed by soil column leaching tests. The vertical distribution of Hg through the soil profiles, as well as variations in soil Hg contents with distance from the pollution source, and Hg in pond mining sediments were also analysed. PMID:21215510

Santos-Francés, F; García-Sánchez, A; Alonso-Rojo, P; Contreras, F; Adams, M

2011-04-01

74

Vertical variations in the concentration of mercury in soils around Sakurajima Volcano, Southern Kyushu, Japan.  

PubMed

In an effort to estimate the influence of mercury emitted from Sakurajima Volcano, Southern Kyushu, Japan, on the accumulation of mercury in soil, the vertical distribution of total mercury in soils was investigated together with organic matter content and grain size. The soils were sampled at a thickness of 1 cm from the surface to depth of 1 m at five locations on Sakurajima and two control locations, i.e. Takatoge approximately 11 km southeast and Suzuyama 22 km southwest of the volcano. The concentration in soils increased with the distance from the volcano and was 6.5+/-1.9 ngg(-1) (n=335), 29.0+/-15.6 ngg(-1) (n=100) and 229+/-105 ngg(-1) (n=103) for Sakurajima, Takatoge and Suzuyama, respectively. The concentration of mercury correlated with the amount of organic matter, but not with grain size distribution. The sedimentation rate for Sakurajima, Takatoge and Suzuyama was estimated from geological data to be approximately 1.3, 0.083 and 0.0048 cmyear(-1), respectively. The relatively fast sedimentation of Sakurajima soil was caused by the frequent precipitation of volcanic ash. The annual deposition of mercury estimated for Sakurajima, Takatoge and Suzuyama from the mercury concentration, sedimentation rate and soil density was 9 x 10(4), 3 x 10(4) and 2 x 10(4) ngm(-2)year(-1), respectively. Although the soil of Sakurajima had the lowest concentration among the three sites, it received the largest amount of mercury. PMID:12663186

Tomiyasu, Takashi; Okada, Morimichi; Imura, Ryusuke; Sakamoto, Hayao

2003-03-20

75

Survey of helium in soils and soil gases and mercury in soils at Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area, Utah  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concentrations of helium and mercury in soils and of helium in soil gases were surveyed in part of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area to see what relationship helium and mercury concentrations might have to geothermal features of the area. High concentrations of helium occurred over the producing geothermal field, in an area of high temperature gradients.

Hinkle

1980-01-01

76

Mercury and plants in contaminated soils. 1: Uptake, partitioning, and emission to the atmosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

The uptake, distribution, and subsequent emission of mercury to the atmosphere were investigated in five plant species (Lepidium latifolium [L.], Artemisia douglasiana [Bess in Hook], Caulanthus sp. [S. Watson], Fragaria vesca [L.], and Eucalyptus globulus [Labill]) with different ecological and physiological attributes. Transfer coefficients for mercury in the soil-plant system were calculated. Plant-to-atmosphere emissions of mercury were determined using a

Todd L. Leonard; M. S. Gustin; G. C. J. Fernandez; G. E. Jr. Taylor

1998-01-01

77

Mercury and plants in contaminated soils. 1: Uptake, partitioning, and emission to the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The uptake, distribution, and subsequent emission of mercury to the atmosphere were investigated in five plant species (Lepidium latifolium [L.], Artemisia douglasiana [Bess in Hook], Caulanthus sp. [S. Watson], Fragaria vesca [L.], and Eucalyptus globulus [Labill]) with different ecological and physiological attributes. Transfer coefficients for mercury in the soil-plant system were calculated. Plant-to-atmosphere emissions of mercury were determined using a controlled environment gas-exchange system and ranged from 10 to 93 mg/m{sup 2}/h in the light; emissions in the dark were an order of magnitude less. Transfer coefficients for mercury within the soil-plant system increased acropetally (root-to-leaf axis) by orders of magnitude. Estimated mercury emissions from plants in the Carson River Drainage Basin of Nevada over the growing season (0.5 mg/m{sup 2}) add to the previously reported soil mercury emissions (8.5 mg/m{sup 2}), resulting in total landscape emissions of 9 mg/m{sup 2}. For L. latifolium, 70% of the mercury taken up by the roots during the growing season was emitted to the atmosphere. For every one molecule of mercury retained in foliage of L. latifolium, 12 molecules of mercury were emitted. Within this arid ecosystem, mercury emissions are a dominant pathway of the mercury cycle. Plants function as conduits for the interfacial transport of mercury from the geosphere to the atmosphere, and this role is undervalued in models of the behavior of mercury in terrestrial exosystems and in the atmosphere on a global scale.

Leonard, T.L.; Gustin, M.S.; Fernandez, G.C.J. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Taylor, G.E. Jr. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). Dept. of Biology

1998-10-01

78

[Comparison of air/soil mercury exchange between warm and cold season in Hongfeng Reservoir region].  

PubMed

In July 2002 and March 2003, the mercury exchange flux between soil and air was measured using dynamic flux chamber method in Hongfeng Reservoir region. Mercury exchange flux is (27.4 +/- 40.1) ng x (m2 x h)(-1) (n = 255) and (5.6 +/- 19.4) ng x (m2 x h)(-1) (n = 192) in summer and winter respectively. The correlation coefficient between mercury flux and solar radiation, air temperature, soil temperature is 0.74, 0.83 and 0.80 in summer, and 0.88, 0.56 and 0.59 in winter. From the data, it was found that the mercury emission is stronger in summer than that in winter, and compared to winter, mercury exchange between soil and air depends more on meteorological conditions in summer. PMID:15330437

Wang, Shao-feng; Feng, Xin-bin; Qiu, Guang-le; Fu, Xue-wu

2004-01-01

79

Atmospheric mercury inputs in montane soils increase with elevation: evidence from mercury isotope signatures  

PubMed Central

The influence of topography on the biogeochemical cycle of mercury (Hg) has received relatively little attention. Here, we report the measurement of Hg species and their corresponding isotope composition in soil sampled along an elevational gradient transect on Mt. Leigong in subtropical southwestern China. The data are used to explain orography-related effects on the fate and behaviour of Hg species in montane environments. The total- and methyl-Hg concentrations in topsoil samples show a positive correlation with elevation. However, a negative elevation dependence was observed in the mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) signatures of Hg isotopes. Both a MIF (?199Hg) binary mixing approach and the traditional inert element method indicate that the content of Hg derived from the atmosphere distinctly increases with altitude.

Zhang, Hua; Yin, Run-sheng; Feng, Xin-bin; Sommar, Jonas; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Sapkota, Atindra; Fu, Xue-wu; Larssen, Thorj?rn

2013-01-01

80

Mercury Source Zone Identification using Soil Vapor Sampling and Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Development and demonstration of reliable measurement techniqes that can detect and help quantify the nature and extent of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in the subsurface are needed to reduce certainties in the decision making process and increase the effectiveness of remedial actions. We conducted field tests at the Y-12 National Security Complex (NSC) in Oak Ridge, TN, to determine if sampling and analysis of Hg(0) vapors in the shallow subsurface (<0.3 m depth) can be used to as an indicator of the location and extent of Hg(0) releases in the subsurface. We constructed a rigid PVC pushprobe assembly, which was driven into the ground. Soil gas samples were collected through a sealed inner tube of the assembly and analyzed immediately in the field with a Lumex and/or Jerome Hg(0) analyzer. Time-series sampling showed that Hg vapor concentrations were fairly stable over time suggesting that the vapor phase Hg(0) was not being depleted and that sampling results were not dependent on the soil gas purge volume. Hg(0) vapor data collected at over 200 pushprobe locations at 3 different release sites correlated well to areas of known Hg(0) contamination. Vertical profiling of Hg(0) vapor concentrations conducted at 2 locations provided information on the vertical distribution of Hg(0) contamination in the subsurface. We concluded from our studies that soil gas sampling and analysis can be conducted rapidly and inexpensively at a large scale to help identify areas contaminated with Hg(0).

Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, Carrie L [ORNL] [ORNL; Lester, Brian P [ORNL] [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL] [ORNL; Southworth, George R [ORNL] [ORNL; Bogle, Mary Anna [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Pierce, Eric M [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01

81

Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

... has several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If heated, it is a ... products. Metallic mercury is used in glass thermometers, silver dental fillings, and button batteries. Mercury salts may ...

82

Mercury accumulation trends in Florida Everglades and Savannas Marsh flooded soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global and regional increases in atmospheric mercury (Hg) concentrations have previously been identified as the cause of increased mercury accumulation rates in north temperate lakes in Sweden, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. Atmospheric deposition can often account for elevated Hg concentrations in fish from these systems. Mercury levels in sportfish collected from some areas of the Florida Everglades and Savannas Marsh exceed

B. E. Rood; J. F. Gottgens; J. J. Delfino; C. D. Earle; T. L. Crisman

1995-01-01

83

Glutathione enzyme and selenoprotein polymorphisms associate with mercury biomarker levels in Michigan dental professionals  

PubMed Central

Mercury is a potent toxicant of concern to both the general public and occupationally exposed workers (e.g., dentists). Recent studies suggest that several genes mediating the toxicokinetics of mercury are polymorphic in humans and may influence inter-individual variability in mercury accumulation. This work hypothesizes that polymorphisms in key glutathione synthesizing enzyme, glutathione s-transferase, and selenoprotein genes underlie inter-individual differences in mercury body burden as assessed by analytical mercury measurement in urine and hair, biomarkers of elemental mercury and methylmercury, respectively. Urine and hair samples were collected from a population of dental professionals (n=515), and total mercury content was measured. Average urine (1.06±1.24 ug/L) and hair mercury levels (0.49±0.63 ug/g) were similar to national U.S. population averages. Taqman assays were used to genotype DNA from buccal swab samples at 15 polymorphic sites in genes implicated in mercury metabolism. Linear regression modeling assessed the ability of polymorphisms to modify the relationship between mercury biomarker levels and exposure sources (e.g., amalgams, fish consumption). Five polymorphisms were significantly associated with urine mercury levels (GSTT1 deletion), hair mercury levels (GSTP1-105, GSTP1-114, GSS 5’), or both (SEPP1 3’UTR). Overall, this study suggests that polymorphisms in selenoproteins and glutathione-related genes may influence elimination of mercury in the urine and hair or mercury retention following exposures to elemental mercury (via dental amalgams) and methylmercury (via fish consumption).

Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Wang, Yi; Gillespie, Brenda; Werner, Robert; Franzblau, Alfred; Basu, Niladri

2012-01-01

84

Accumulation of mercury in rice grain and cabbage grown on representative Chinese soils*  

PubMed Central

A pot culture experiment was carried out to investigate the accumulation properties of mercury (Hg) in rice grain and cabbage grown in seven soil types (Udic Ferrisols, Mollisol, Periudic Argosols, Latosol, Ustic Cambosols, Calcaric Regosols, and Stagnic Anthrosols) spiked with different concentrations of Hg (CK, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 2.00, and 4.00 mg/kg). The results of this study showed that Hg accumulation of plants was significantly affected by soil types. Hg concentration in both rice grain and cabbage increased with soil Hg concentrations, but this increase differed among the seven soils. The stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that pH, Mn(II), particle size distribution, and cation exchange capacity have a close relationship with Hg accumulation in plants, which suggested that physicochemical characteristics of soils can affect the Hg accumulation in rice grain and cabbage. Critical Hg concentrations in seven soils were identified for rice grain and cabbage based on the maximum safe level for daily intake of Hg, dietary habits of the population, and Hg accumulation in plants grown in different soil types. Soil Hg limits for rice grain in Udic Ferrisols, Mollisol, Periudic Argosols, Latosol, Ustic Cambosols, Calcaric Regosols, and Stagnic Anthrosols were 1.10, 2.00, 2.60, 2.78, 1.53, 0.63, and 2.17 mg/kg, respectively, and critical soil Hg levels for cabbage are 0.27, 1.35, 1.80, 1.70, 0.69, 1.68, and 2.60 mg/kg, respectively.

Liu, Chun-fa; Wu, Cheng-xian; Rafiq, Muhammad T.; Aziz, Rukhsanda; Hou, Dan-di; Ding, Zhe-li; Lin, Zi-wen; Lou, Lin-jun; Feng, Yuan-yuan; Li, Ting-qiang; Yang, Xiao-e

2013-01-01

85

Unified Science Information Model for SoilSCAPE using the Mercury Metadata Search System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

SoilSCAPE (Soil moisture Sensing Controller And oPtimal Estimator) introduces a new concept for a smart wireless sensor web technology for optimal measurements of surface-to-depth profiles of soil moisture using in-situ sensors. The objective is to enable a guided and adaptive sampling strategy for the in-situ sensor network to meet the measurement validation objectives of spaceborne soil moisture sensors such as the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. This work is being carried out at the University of Michigan, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Southern California, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory we are using Mercury metadata search system [1] for building a Unified Information System for the SoilSCAPE project. This unified portal primarily comprises three key pieces: Distributed Search/Discovery; Data Collections and Integration; and Data Dissemination. Mercury, a Federally funded software for metadata harvesting, indexing, and searching would be used for this module. Soil moisture data sources identified as part of this activity such as SoilSCAPE and FLUXNET (in-situ sensors), AirMOSS (airborne retrieval), SMAP (spaceborne retrieval), and are being indexed and maintained by Mercury. Mercury would be the central repository of data sources for cal/val for soil moisture studies and would provide a mechanism to identify additional data sources. Relevant metadata from existing inventories such as ORNL DAAC, USGS Clearinghouse, ARM, NASA ECHO, GCMD etc. would be brought in to this soil-moisture data search/discovery module. The SoilSCAPE metadata records will also be published in broader metadata repositories such as GCMD, data.gov. Mercury can be configured to provide a single portal to soil moisture information contained in disparate data management systems located anywhere on the Internet. Mercury is able to extract, metadata systematically from HTML pages or XML files using a variety of methods including OAI-PMH [2]. The Mercury search interface then allows users to perform simple, fielded, spatial and temporal searches across a central harmonized index of metadata. Mercury supports various metadata standards including FGDC, ISO-19115, DIF, Dublin-Core, Darwin-Core, and EML. This poster describes in detail how Mercury implements the Unified Science Information Model for Soil moisture data. References: [1] Devarakonda R., et al. Mercury: reusable metadata management, data discovery and access system. Earth Science Informatics (2010), 3(1): 87-94. [2] Devarakonda R., et al. Data sharing and retrieval using OAI-PMH. Earth Science Informatics (2011), 4(1): 1-5.

Devarakonda, R.; Lu, K.; Palanisamy, G.; Cook, R. B.; Santhana Vannan, S.; Moghaddam, M.; Clewley, D.; Silva, A.; Akbar, R.

2013-12-01

86

Spatial variability of mercury emissions from soils in a southeastern US urban environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

We quantified gaseous mercury (Hg0) fluxes over soil surfaces in an urban setting during the winters of 2003 and 2004 across the metropolitan area of Tuscaloosa,\\u000a AL. The objective was to provide a first inspection of the local spatial variability of mercury flux in an urban area. Flux\\u000a sampling took place on bare, undisturbed, soil surfaces within four evenly spaced

Mark C. Gabriel; Derek G. Williamson; Steve Brooks; Hong Zhang; Steve Lindberg

2005-01-01

87

Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site offers information on the planet Mercury. Some topics include: the atmosphere, surface, and interior of Mercury, missions to Mercury, recent discoveries, and myths and culture related to Mercury. There are also numerous pictures and additional websites to find more information.

2005-06-07

88

Modelling the sensitivity of soil mercury storage to climate-induced changes in soil carbon pools  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Substantial amounts of mercury (Hg) in the terrestrial environment reside in soils and are associated with soil organic carbon (C) pools, where they accumulated due to increased atmospheric deposition resulting from anthropogenic activities. The purpose of this study was to examine potential sensitivity of surface soil Hg pools to global change variables, particularly affected by predicted changes in soil C pools, in the contiguous US. To investigate, we included a soil Hg component in the Community Land Model based on empirical statistical relationships between soil Hg / C ratios and precipitation, latitude, and clay; and subsequently explored the sensitivity of soil C and soil Hg densities (i.e., areal-mass) to climate scenarios in which we altered annual precipitation, carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and temperature. Our model simulations showed that current sequestration of Hg in the contiguous US accounted for 15 230 metric tons of Hg in the top 0-40 cm of soils, or for over 300 000 metric tons when extrapolated globally. In the simulations, US soil Hg pools were most sensitive to changes in precipitation because of strong effects on soil C pools, plus a direct effect of precipitation on soil Hg / C ratios. Soil Hg pools were predicted to increase beyond present-day values following an increase in precipitation amounts and decrease following a reduction in precipitation. We found pronounced regional differences in sensitivity of soil Hg to precipitation, which were particularly high along high-precipitation areas along the West and East Coasts. Modelled increases in CO2 concentrations to 700 ppm stimulated soil C and Hg accrual, while increased air temperatures had small negative effects on soil C and Hg densities. The combined effects of increased CO2, increased temperature and increased or decreased precipitation were strongly governed by precipitation and CO2 showing pronounced regional patterns. Based on these results, we conclude that the combination of precipitation and CO2 should be emphasised when assessing how climate-induced changes in soil C may affect sequestration of Hg in soils.

Hararuk, O.; Obrist, D.; Luo, Y.

2013-04-01

89

Methyl Mercury Production In Tropical Hydromorphic Soils: Impact Of Gold Mining.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Artisanal alluvial gold mining is important in many tropical developing countries and several million people are involved worldwide. The dominant use of mercury for gold amalgamation in this activity leads to mercury accumulation in soils, to sediment contamination and to methyl mercury (MMHg) bioaccumulation along the food chain. In this presentation we will present recent data on methyl mercury production in hydromorphic soils and tailing ponds from a former gold mining area located in French Guiana (South America). Comparison of specific fluxes between a pristine sub watershed and the contaminated watershed shows that former mining activities lead to a large enhancement of dissolved and particulate MMHg emissions at least by a factor of 4 and 6, respectively. MMHg production was identified in sediments from tailing ponds and in surrounding hydromorphic soils. Moreover, interstitial soil water and tailing pond water profiles sampled in an experimental tailing pond demonstrate the presence of a large MMHg production in the suboxic areas. Both tailing ponds and hydromorphic soils present geochemical conditions that are favorable to bacterial mercury methylation (high soil Hg content, high aqueous ferric iron and dissolved organic carbon concentrations). Although sulfate-reducing bacteria have been described as being the principal mercury methylating bacteria, the positive correlation between dissolved MMHg and ferrous iron concentrations argue for a significant role of iron-reducing bacteria. Identifications by sequencing fragments of 16S rRNA from total soil DNA support these interpretations. This study demonstrates that current and past artisanal gold mining in the tropics lead to methyl mercury production in contaminated areas. As artisanal activities are increasing with increasing gold prices, the bio- magnification of methyl mercury in fish presents an increasing threat to local populations whose diet relies on fish consumption.

Guedron, S.; Charlet, L.; Harris, J.; Grimaldi, M.; Cossa, D.

2007-12-01

90

Mercury levels in pristine and gold mining impacted aquatic ecosystems of Suriname, South America.  

PubMed

Mercury levels in sediment and predatory fish were measured for 53 localities in Suriname. The average mercury level in bottom sediment surpassed the Canadian standard for sediment in most localities, except the coastal plains. Of the predatory fish, 41 % had a mercury level above the European Union standard for human consumption of 0.5 ?g g(-1). Highest mercury levels were found in fish from the Brokopondo Reservoir and from the Upper Coppename River. High levels of mercury in fish in pristine areas are explained by atmospheric transportation of mercury with the northeastern trade winds followed by wet deposition. Contrary to gold mining areas, where mercury is bound to drifting sediments, in "pristine" areas the mercury is freely available for bio-accumulation and uptake. Impacts on piscivorous reptiles, birds, and mammals are unknown, but likely to be negative. PMID:22669686

Ouboter, Paul E; Landburg, Gwendolyn A; Quik, Jan H M; Mol, Jan H A; van der Lugt, Frank

2012-12-01

91

Phytoremediation of mercury in pristine and crude oil contaminated soils: Contributions of rhizobacteria and their host plants to mercury removal.  

PubMed

The rhizospheric soils of three tested legume crops: broad beans (Vicia faba), beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and pea (Pisum sativum), and two nonlegume crops: cucumber (Cucumis sativus) and tomato, (Lycopersicon esculentum) contained considerable numbers (the magnitude of 10(5)g(-1) soil) of bacteria with the combined potential for hydrocarbon-utilization and mercury-resistance. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA coding genes of rhizobacteria associated with broad beans revealed that they were affiliated to Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Exiquobacterium aurantiacum, Pseudomonas veronii, Micrococcus luteus, Brevibacillus brevis, Arthrobacter sp. and Flavobacterium psychrophilum. These rhizobacteria were also diazotrophic, i.e. capable of N(2) fixation, which makes them self-sufficient regarding their nitrogen nutrition and thus suitable remediation agents in nitrogen-poor soils, such as the oily desert soil. The crude oil attenuation potential of the individual rhizobacteria was inhibited by HgCl(2), but about 50% or more of this potential was still maintained in the presence of up to 40 mgl(-1) HgCl(2). Rhizobacteria-free plants removed amounts of mercury from the surrounding media almost equivalent to those removed by the rhizospheric bacterial consortia in the absence of the plants. It was concluded that both the collector plants and their rhizospheric bacterial consortia contributed equivalently to mercury removal from soil. PMID:20833430

Sorkhoh, N A; Ali, N; Al-Awadhi, H; Dashti, N; Al-Mailem, D M; Eliyas, M; Radwan, S S

2010-11-01

92

Survey of helium in soils and soil gases and mercury in soils at Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The concentrations of helium and mercury in soils and of helium in soil gases were surveyed in part of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area to see what relationship helium and mercury concentrations might have to geothermal features of the area. High concentrations of helium occurred over the producing geothermal field, in an area of high temperature gradients. Low concentrations of helium in soils occurred over an area of visible hydrotheormal activity. High concentrations of mercury coincided with areas of high thermal gradients and low resistivity.

Hinkle, M.E.

1980-01-01

93

Mercury in plants, soil, and water from a caustic chlorine industry  

SciTech Connect

The use of elemental mercury in caustic-chlorine industries and subsequent discharge of waste on leaching to waterbodies, create widespread environmental problems. In addition to water-borne mercury, atmospheric emissions of mercury and its transport to biological systems, have received much attention of the environmental scientists. The present piece of work was designed to study the residual mercury level in the vegetation, and mercury concentration in the effluent and solid waste of a caustic-chlorine industry situated near Ganjam, Orissa, India. The industry is situated on the bank of the Rushikulya river estuary and discharges the effluent to the same estuary joining the Bay of Bengal.

Shaw, B.P.; Sahu, A.; Panigrahy, A.K.

1986-02-01

94

REMOVAL OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED SOILS AT THE PAVLODAR CHEMICAL PLANT.  

SciTech Connect

Soils beneath and adjacent to the Pavlodar Chemical Plant in Kazakhstan have been contaminated with elemental mercury as a result of chlor alkali processing using mercury cathode cell technology. The work described in this paper was conducted in preparation for a demonstration of a technology to remove the mercury from the contaminated soils using a vacuum assisted thermal distillation process. The process can operate at temperatures from 250-500 C and pressures of 0.13kPa-1.33kPa. Following vaporization, the mercury vapor is cooled, condensed and concentrated back to liquid elemental mercury. It will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification process developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as described in a companion paper at this conference. The overall project objectives include chemical and physical characterization of the contaminated soils, study of the influence of the soil's physical-chemical and hydro dynamical characteristics on process parameters, and laboratory testing to optimize the mercury sublimation rate when heating in vacuum. Based on these laboratory and pilot-scale data, a full-scale production process will be designed for testing. This paper describes the soil characterization. This work is being sponsored by the International Science and Technology Center.

KHRAPUNOV, V. YE.; ISAKOVA, R.A.; LEVINTOV, B.L.; KALB, P.D.; KAMBEROV, I.M.; TREBUKHOV, A.

2004-09-25

95

Total mercury concentrations in an industrialized catchment, the Thur River basin (north-eastern France): geochemical background level and contamination factors.  

PubMed

River bottom sediments and soils were collected from the industrialized Thur River basin (north-eastern France) to assess mercury contamination. The regional geochemical background level of total mercury was evaluated to calculate mercury contamination factors (Fc) in soils and river bottom sediments. Our estimate of the mean background mercury levels in river sediments and soils, not affected by human activities, was 232 ng x g(-1) (range: 27-406 ng x g(-1)). Sediments contaminated by the effluent from a chlor-alkali plant yielded the highest contamination factors (Fc=1784). Contamination factors of surficial soils within 1 km of the industrial site range from 6.3 to 43.6. This contamination is attributed to diffuse atmospheric deposition from this local plant. However, even upstream from this industrial area elevated contamination factors were recorded for river bottom sediments (Fc=3.2 to 26.4) and for one alluvial soil profile (Fc=10). This is possibly due to past pollution resulting from waste water discharges. Mercury contamination in the different horizons of alluvial soils is not correlated with soil organic carbon content, but may be the result of occasional accidental pollution arising from the introduction of contaminated suspended particulate matter by the Thur River during periods of flooding. PMID:12738301

Rémy, S; Prudent, P; Hissler, C; Probst, J L; Krempp, G

2003-07-01

96

Hair mercury levels versus freshwater fish consumption in household members of Swedish angling societies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hair mercury levels were determined in 143 individuals from households of members in angling societies in an area of Sweden with many lakes that have freshwater fish with relatively high mercury levels. Thus, the individuals had a potentially high intake of methyl mercury. The mean mercury concentration of pike and perch was approximately 0.7mg\\/g. One-third of the subjects consumed these

Cecilia Johnsson; Gerd Sallsten; Andrejs Schutz; Anna Sjors; Lars Barregarda

97

Antioxidants and metallothionein levels in mercury-treated mice.  

PubMed

Acute effects of mercury on mouse blood, kidneys, and liver were evaluated. Mice received a single dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl2, 4.6 mg/kg, subcutaneously) for three consecutive days. We investigated the possible beneficial effects of antioxidant therapy (N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2) compared with the sodium salt of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid (DMPS), an effective chelating agent in HgCl2 exposure in mice. We also verified whether metallothionein (MT) induction might be involved in a possible mechanism of protection against HgCl2 poisoning and whether different treatments would modify MT levels and other toxicological parameters. The results demonstrated that HgCl2 exposure significantly inhibited delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (delta-ALA-D) activity in liver and only DMPS treatment prevented the inhibitory effect. Mercuric chloride caused an increase in renal non-protein thiol groups (NPSH) and none of the treatments modified renal NPSH levels. Urea concentration was increased after HgCl2 exposure. NAC plus (PhSe)2 was partially effective in protecting against the effects of mercury. DMPS and (PhSe)2 were effective in restoring the increment in urea concentration caused by mercury. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities and ascorbic acid levels were not modified after mercury exposure. Mercuric chloride poisoning caused an increase in hepatic and renal MT levels and antioxidant treatments did not modify this parameter. Our data indicated a lack of therapeutic effect of the antioxidants tested. PMID:16964587

Brandão, R; Santos, F W; Farina, M; Zeni, G; Bohrer, D; Rocha, J B T; Nogueira, C W

2006-11-01

98

Influence of particle size distribution, organic carbon, pH and chlorides on washing of mercury contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Feasibility of soil washing to remediate Hg contaminated soil was studied. Dry sieving was performed to evaluate Hg distribution in soil particle size fractions. The influence of dissolved organic matter and chlorides on Hg dissolution was assessed by batch leaching tests. Mercury mobilization in the pH range of 3-11 was studied by pH-static titration. Results showed infeasibility of physical separation via dry sieving, as the least contaminated fraction exceeded the Swedish generic guideline value for Hg in soils. Soluble Hg did not correlate with dissolved organic carbon in the water leachate. The highest Hg dissolution was achieved at pH 5 and 11, reaching up to 0.3% of the total Hg. The pH adjustment was therefore not sufficient for the Hg removal to acceptable levels. Chlorides did not facilitate Hg mobilization under acidic pH either. Mercury was firmly bound in the studied soil thus soil washing might be insufficient method to treat the studied soil. PMID:24873713

Xu, Jingying; Kleja, Dan B; Biester, Harald; Lagerkvist, Anders; Kumpiene, Jurate

2014-08-01

99

Increases in mercury emissions from desert soils in response to rainfall and irrigation  

SciTech Connect

As part of an international Hg flux intercomparison at the Steamboat Springs, Nevada, geothermal area, several dynamic soil flux chambers and micrometeorological gradient systems were operated over desert soils in early September 1997. A series of unanticipated convective rain cells impacted the site with the first rainfall in {approximately}90 days, and the initial 4-cm rainfall increased soil moisture from {approximately}0.01 to 0.06{percent} (vol/vol). Several chambers were operating prior to the events, and two were deployed over wet soils following rainfall. Rainfall resulted in an immediate and steep rise in ambient air Hg concentrations and soil Hg emissions which persisted for 12{endash}24 hours. Fluxes increased most quickly and to a greater degree over the wettest soils, and the rate of increase was related to chamber design and flushing rate. The flux response was also apparent in the micrometeorological data. In general, soil emissions increased by an order of magnitude following the rain, and reached levels {approximately}6 times above those at the same time the previous day. These fluxes were significantly correlated with temperature, radiation, humidity, wind speed, and soil moisture. After drying for {approximately}40 hours, selected soil plots were manually irrigated with low-Hg-distilled water. Mercury emissions responded similarly across the three treated sites, uniformly increasing from {approximately}60 ng m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} pretreatment to {approximately}650 ng m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} posttreatment, which was a factor of {approximately}6 higher than adjacent control soils. Possible causes of the increases in flux include soil gas displacement, desorption of Hg{degree} by water molecules, and desorption of Hg(II) and subsequent reduction in solution. The kinetics of the flux response, combined with local soil and climatic conditions, suggest that Hg emissions were responding primarily to soil moisture and solar radiation. These data have interesting implications for the role of changing regional climates on biogeochemical cycling of Hg.

Lindberg, S.E.; Zhang, H.; Gustin, M.; Vette, A.; Marsik, F.; Owens, J.; Casimir, A.; Ebinghaus, R.; Edwards, G.; Fitzgerald, C.; Kemp, J.; Kock, H.H.; London, J.; Majewski, M.; Poissant, L.; Pilote, M.; Rasmussen, P.; Schaedlich, F.; Schneeberger, D.; Sommar, J.; Turner, R.; Wallschlaeger, D.; Xiao, Z. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)] [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

1999-09-01

100

Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lithograph shows mosaic images of Mercury, captured by the Mariner 10 spacecraft. The images are accompanied by a brief description and history, some statistical facts, and a list of significant dates in the exploration of Mercury.

101

Risk, Mercury Levels, and Birds: Relating Adverse Laboratory Effects to Field Biomonitoring  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an abundance of field data on levels of mercury in a variety of organisms and there are a number of studies that demonstrate the adverse effects of mercury on laboratory animals, but few studies examine the relationship between the two. Thus it is often difficult to determine the ecological relevance of mercury concentrations found in nature, or to

Joanna Burger; Michael Gochfeld

1997-01-01

102

Hg contents in soils and olive-tree (Olea Europea, L.) leaves from an area affected by elemental mercury pollution (Jódar, SE Spain).  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data from soil and olive tree leaves around a decommissioned chlor-alkali plant are presented in this communication. The factory was active in the period 1977-1991, producing during these years a heavily pollution of Guadalquivir River and hydrargyrism in more than local 45 workers. It is located at 7 km South of Jódar, a locality with some 12,120 inhabitants. Mercury usage was general in this type of plants, but at present it is being replaced by other types of technologies, due to the risks of mercury usage in personal and environment. A soil geochemistry survey was carried out in the area, along with the analysis of olive-tree leaves (in the plots with this culture) from the same area. 73 soil samples were taken at two different depths (0-15 cm and 15-30 cm), together with 41 olive tree samples. Mercury content of geologic and biologic samples was determined by means of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Zeeman Effect, using a Lumex RA-915+ device with the RP-91C pyrolysis attachment. Air surveys were carried our using a RA-915M Lumex portable analytical device. Soil mercury contents were higher in topsoil than in the deeper soil samples, indicating that incorporation of mercury was due to dry and wet deposition of mercury vapors emitted from the plant. Average content in topsoil is 564.5 ng g-1. Hg contents in olive-tree leaves were in the range 46 - 453 ng g-1, with an average of 160.6 ng g-1. This level is slightly lower than tolerable level for agronomic crops established by Kabata-Pendias (2001) in 200 ng g-1. We have also compared soil and leaf contents for each sampling site, finding a positive and significant correlation (R=0.49), indicating that Hg contents in the leaves are linked to Hg contents in the soils. BAC (Bioaccumulation Absorption Coefficient, calculated as ratio between soil and leaf concentration) is 0.28 (consistent with world references, BAC = 0.7), considered "medium" in comparison with other mineral elements. Main conclusions of this research work are the following: i) The Jódar decommissioned chlor-alkali plant is still a mercury source 20 years after its cease of activities without any reclamation measures; ii) The activity of the plant has produced an important dissemination of mercury in the surrounding environment; and iii) The corresponding pollution levels, in particular in soils, may suppose a risk to the main crops of the area (olive trees present significant accumulation of Hg in leaf).

López-Berdonces, Miguel Angel; María Esbrí, José; Amorós, José Angel; Lorenzo, Saturnino; Fernández-Calderón, Sergio; Higueras, Pablo; Perez-de-los-Reyes, Caridad

2014-05-01

103

Mercury flux measurements in a naturally enriched area: Correlation with environmental conditions during the Nevada Study and Tests of the Release of Mercury From Soils (STORMS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

An international intercomparison of micrometerological techniques and dynamic flux chamber methods applied to measure mercury fluxes was conducted from September 1 to 4, 1997, during the Nevada Study and Tests of the Release of Mercury From Soils (STORMS) in Reno, Nevada. Nine research groups from four countries met in the Steamboat Springs, Nevada Geothermal Area, to participate in the first

Laurier Poissant; Martin Pilote; Alain Casimir

1999-01-01

104

Speciation, distribution, and transport of mercury in contaminated soils from Descoberto, Minas Gerais, Brazil.  

PubMed

This work describes an investigation of mercury contamination in an abandoned gold mining site in the rural area of Descoberto, Minas Gerais, Brazil, whose inhabitants have reported "silver balls" present in the soil. Different granulometric fractions of soil samples and sedimented material from rainwater retention tanks in this area were analyzed for total mercury, organic matter, and mercury speciation by thermodesorption/atomic absorption spectrometry. The results showed mercury concentrations in the soils in the range of (0.0371-161) mg kg(-1), and the occurrence of Hg(0) oxidation. Some samples had concentrations as high as 90 mg kg(-1) with the majority as Hg(2+), which is important information in order to understand the biogeochemical behavior of mercury in contaminated sites and to apply the appropriate remediation technology. The retention boxes and tank samples showed that fine particles with high mercury content (3.3-90) mg kg(-1) are leached from the contaminated area, which reveals the need for efficient control of this material to prevent the contamination of stream waters. This study is an example that may be useful for other contaminated sites. PMID:19436865

Durão Júnior, Walter Alves; Palmieri, Helena Eugênia Leonhardt; Trindade, Mauro Campos; de Aquino Branco, Otávio Eurico; Filho, Carlos Alberto Carvalho; Fleming, Peter Marschall; da Silva, José Bento Borba; Windmöller, Cláudia Carvalhinho

2009-05-01

105

A laboratory based experimental study of mercury emission from contaminated soils in the River Idrijca catchment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results obtained by a laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS) focused on investigating the kinetics of the mercury emission flux (MEF) from contaminated soils of the Idrija Hg-mine region, Slovenia are presented. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentrations (4-417 ?g g-1) and land cover (forest, meadow and alluvial soil) alongside the River Idrijca were analysed to determine the variation in MEF versus distance from the source, regulating three major environmental parameters comprising soil temperature, soil moisture and solar radiation. MEFs ranged from less than 2 to 530 ng m-2 h-1, with the highest emissions from contaminated alluvial soils and soils near the mining district in the town of Idrija. A significant decrease of MEF was then observed with increasing distance from these sites. The results revealed a strong positive effect of all three parameters investigated on momentum MEF. The light-induced flux was shown to be independent of the soil temperature, while the soil aqueous phase seems to be responsible for recharging the pool of mercury in the soil available for both the light- and thermally-induced flux. The overall flux response to simulated environmental conditions depends greatly on the form of Hg in the soil. Higher activation energies are required for the overall process to occur in soils where insoluble cinnabar prevails compared to soils where more mobile Hg forms and forms available for transformation processes are dominant.

Kocman, D.; Horvat, M.

2010-02-01

106

A laboratory based experimental study of mercury emission from contaminated soils in the River Idrijca catchment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results obtained by a laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS) focused on investigating the kinetics of the mercury emission flux (MEF) from contaminated soils of the Idrija Hg-mine region, Slovenia are presented. Representative soil samples with respect to total Hg concentrations (4-417 ?g g-1) and land cover (forest, meadow and alluvial soil) alongside the River Idrijca were analysed to determine the variation in MEF versus distance from the source, regulating three major environmental parameters comprising soil temperature, soil moisture and solar radiation. MEFs ranged from less than 2 to 530 ng m-2 h-1, with the highest emissions from contaminated alluvial soils and soils near the mining district in the town of Idrija. A significant decrease of MEF was then observed with increasing distance from these sites. The results revealed a strong positive effect of all three parameters investigated on momentum MEF. The light-induced flux was shown to be independent of the soil temperature, while the soil aqueous phase seems to be responsible for recharging the pool of mercury in the soil available for both the light- and thermally-induced flux. The overall flux response to simulated environmental conditions depends greatly on the form of Hg in the soil. Higher activation energies are required for the overall process to occur in soils where insoluble cinnabar prevails compared to soils where more mobile Hg forms and forms available for transformation processes are dominant.

Kocman, D.; Horvat, M.

2009-11-01

107

The sorption characteristics of mercury as affected by organic matter content and/or soil properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The determination and description of the mercury sorption extend on soil is significant for potential environmental toxic effects. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of mercury sorption at different soil samples and vermicomposts. Mercury interactions with soil organic matter were studied using three soils with different physical-chemical properties - fluvisol, cambisol, and chernozem. Moreover, three different vermicomposts based on various bio-waste materials with high organic matter content were prepared in special fermentors. First was a digestate, second was represented by a mixture of bio-waste from housing estate and woodchips, and third was a garden bio-waste. In the case of vermicompost, the fractionation of organic matter was executed primarily using the resin SuperliteTM DAX-8. Therefore, the representation of individual fractions (humic acid, fulvic acid, hydrophilic compounds, and hydrophobic neutral organic matter) was known. The kinetics of mercury sorption onto materials of interest was studied by static sorption experiments. Samples were exposed to the solution with known Hg concentration of 12 mg kg-1 for the time from 10 minutes to 24 hours. Mercury content in the solutions was measured by the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Based on this data, the optimum conditions for following sorption experiments were chosen. Subsequently, the batch sorption tests for all soil types and vermicomposts were performed in solution containing variable mercury concentrations between 1 and 12 mg kg-1. Equilibrium concentration values measured in the solution after sorption and calculated mercury content per kilogram of the soil or the vermi-compost were plotted. Two basic models of sorption isotherm - Langmuir and Freundlich, were used for the evaluation of the mercury sorption properties. The results showed that the best sorption properties from studied soil were identified in chernozem with highest cation exchange capacity. The highest amount of mercury was adsorbed by the vermicompost from garden bio-waste. This vermicompost contained the most humic acids and the least amount of other fractions of organic matter. Acknowledgements: Financial support for these investigations was provided by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic; Project No. 503/12/0682 and Czech University of Life Science Prague; Project No. 21140/1313/3130.

Šípková, Adéla; Šillerová, Hana; Száková, Ji?ina

2014-05-01

108

Volcanism and soil mercury on Mars - Consequences for terrestrial microorganisms  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An earth-Mars depletion formula proposed by Anders and Owen for volatiles is used to calculate a range of putative Hg levels for Martian volcanic soils based upon analyzed samples from Hawaii. The range is about 50-150 microgram per kg. When applied either in conventional or special media (e.g., basalt powder), these levels of Hg are effective inhibitors of the growth of earth microorganisms. Taken together with other hostile chemical and physical factors, volcanic toxicants would appear to provide a further deterrent to the accidental establishment of terrestrial microbiota on Mars.

Siegel, B. Z.; Siegel, S. M.

1978-01-01

109

ASSESSING MERCURY LEVELS IN THE WASTEWATER OF AN AGING RESEARCH LABORATORY BUILDING  

PubMed Central

Increasingly stringent restrictions on mercury concentrations in wastewater discharge may be problematic for aging research laboratory facilities. Relatively high levels of mercury compounds may exist and concentrate deep in the plumbing system and their sediments, resulting in elevated wastewater concentrations. This study was conducted to assess total mercury levels in an aging laboratory building wastewater system. Wastewater outflow, sink trap water, and pipe sediment samples were collected from the building. The Jerome 431™ Mercury Vapor Analyzer was assessed as a tool for screening lab sink trap drains for mercury deposition. Results revealed that the three day average for mercury discharge from this single structure, if not diluted by other waters, would be above the local total release parameters to the wastewater treatment plant. The sink traps did not contain a majority of the mercury; however, the pipe sediment and outflow samples revealed consistently elevated concentrations.

Ragan, Gregory A.; Gregory Alvord, W.

2007-01-01

110

A Simple Approach for Measuring Emission Patterns of Vapor Phase Mercury under Temperature-Controlled Conditions from Soil  

PubMed Central

In an effort to study the possible effects of climate change on the behavior of atmospheric mercury (Hg), we built a temperature–controlled microchamber system to measure its emission from top soils. To this end, mercury vapour emission rates were investigated in the laboratory using top soil samples collected from an urban area. The emissions of Hg, when measured as a function of soil temperature (from ambient levels up to 70°C at increments of 10°C), showed a positive correlation with rising temperature. According to the continuous analyses of the Hg vapor given off by the identical soil samples, evasion rate diminished noticeably with increasing number of repetitions. The experimental results, if examined in terms of activation energy (Ea), showed highly contrasting patterns between the single and repetitive runs. Although the results of the former exhibited Ea values smaller than the vaporization energy of Hg (i.e., <14?Kcal?mol?1), those of the latter increased systematically with increasing number of repetitions. As such, it is proposed that changes in the magnitude of Ea values can be used as a highly sensitive criterion to discriminate the important role of vaporization from other diverse (biotic/abiotic) processes occurring in the soil layer.

Kim, Ki-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-On; Jung, Myung-Chae; Oh, Jong-Min; Brown, Richard J. C.

2012-01-01

111

Impacts of mercury contaminated mining waste on soil quality, crops, bivalves, and fish in the Naboc River area, Mindanao, Philippines.  

PubMed

Rice paddy fields in the Naboc area, near Monkayo on the island of Mindanao, Philippines, have been irrigated four times a year over the last decade using Naboc River water contaminated with mercury (Hg) by artisanal gold mining in the Diwalwal area. Silt containing up to at least 90 mg Hg/kg (d.w.) has been deposited in rice paddy fields during the 1990s and this has been repeatedly mixed into the rice root zone through ploughing. Hg in the rice paddy field soils averages 24 mg Hg/kg and generally exceeds the UK and Canadian soil quality thresholds for agricultural soils as well as the proposed Dutch Intervention value and the USEPA soil ingestion Soil Screening Level (SSL) for inorganic Hg. Much lower Hg concentrations (0.05-0.99 mg/kg) within the range expected for uncontaminated soils, characterise soils on which corn and bananas are cultivated, largely because these are not irrigated with Hg-contaminated water from the Naboc River. The estimated total weekly MeHg intake for a person living in the Naboc area related to the weekly consumption of 2.1 kg of rice grown on Hg-contaminated soils (15 microg MeHg) in conjunction with 1 kg of fish (220 microg MeHg) and 100 g of mussels (50 microg MeHg) from the Naboc River, would total 285 microg MeHg (equivalent to 4.75 microg/kg bw for a 60 kg adult), which is nearly three times the JECFA PTWI of 1.6 microg/kg bw. This will significantly contribute to the population mercury exposure and might explain why 38% of the local inhabitants were classified as Hg intoxicated during a mercury toxicity assessment [Drasch GS, Böse, O'Reilly S, Beinhoff C, Roider G, Maydl S. The Mt. Diwata study on the Philippines 1999-assessing mercury intoxication of the population by small scale gold mining. Sci Total Environ 2001; 267(1-3): 151-168.]. PMID:16398996

Appleton, J D; Weeks, J M; Calvez, J P S; Beinhoff, C

2006-02-01

112

Evaluating the effects of sub-zero temperature cycling on mercury flux from soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A number of mechanisms have been shown to facilitate the flux of mercury from soils, although at sub-zero temperatures, there is evidence to suggest that alternate mechanisms may exist. Field studies at sub-zero temperatures have observed spikes in flux under certain conditions however very little laboratory work has been done to characterize the specific effects or mechanisms. A Dynamic Flux Chamber (DFC) and Tekran Model 2537A were used to analyse mercury flux from a naturally enriched soil. Soil moisture contents were varied between 30%, 60%, and 75% of field capacity while temperatures were cycled between 0 and -25 °C. The results, which were compared to room temperature baseline runs, showed that, at sub-zero temperatures, the mercury flux was suppressed in general. However, during the temperature cycling runs, soil flux spikes were evident during positive temperature change or warming. A one-way ANOVA by ranks proved that statistically significant fluxes were occurring during the runs at 30% and 60% of field capacity for positive rates of temperature changes. Arrhenius plots showed that for positive soil temperatures flux and temperature correlated well with the Arrhenius relationship. At sub-zero conditions however, no relationship was present, indicating another mechanism was present. The proposed mechanism for this enhanced flux is the physical evacuation of interstitial pore space gaseous mercury by the expansion and contraction of the freeze-thaw cycle.

Corbett-Hains, Hamish; Walters, Nicholas E.; Van Heyst, Bill J.

2012-12-01

113

Fate and transport of ambient mercury and applied mercury isotope in terrestrial upland soils: insights from the METAALICUS watershed.  

PubMed

The fate of mercury (Hg) deposited on forested upland soils depends on a wide array of biogeochemical and hydrological processes occurring in the soil landscape. In this study, Hg in soil, soilwater, and streamwater were measured across a forested upland subcatchment of the METAALICUS watershed in northwestern Ontario, Canada, where a stable Hg isotope (spike Hg) was applied to distinguish newly deposited Hg from Hg already resident in the watershed (ambient Hg). In total, we were able to account for 45% of the total mass of spike Hg applied to the subcatchment during the entire loading phase of the experiment, with approximately 22% of the total mass applied now residing in the top 15 cm of the mineral soil layer. Decreasing spike Hg/ambient Hg ratios with depth in the soil and soilwater suggest that spike Hg is less mobile than ambient Hg over shorter time scales. However, the transport of spike Hg into the mineral soil layer is enhanced in depressional areas where water table fluctuation is more extreme. While we expect that this pool of Hg is now effectively sequestered in the mineral horizon, future disturbance of the soil profile could remobilize this stored Hg in runoff. PMID:24383823

Oswald, Claire J; Heyes, Andrew; Branfireun, Brian A

2014-01-21

114

Mercury and Selenium in Fish from the Savannah River: Species, Trophic Level, and Locational Differences  

Microsoft Academic Search

Levels of contaminants in fish are of considerable interest because of potential effects on the fish themselves, as well as on other organisms that consume them. In this article we compare the mercury levels in muscle tissue of 11 fish species from the Savannah River, as well as selenium levels because of its known protective effect against mercury toxicity. We

Joanna Burger; Karen F. Gaines; C. Shane Boring; Warren L. Stephens; Joel Snodgrass; Michael Gochfeld

2001-01-01

115

Arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury in surface soils, Pueblo, Colorado: Implications for population health risk  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Decades of intensive industrial and agricultural practices as well as rapid urbanization have left communities like Pueblo, Colorado facing potential health threats from pollution of its soils, air, water and food supply. To address such concerns about environmental contamination, we conducted an urban geochemical study of the city of Pueblo to offer insights into the potential chemical hazards in soil and inform priorities for future health studies and population interventions aimed at reducing exposures to inorganic substances. The current study characterizes the environmental landscape of Pueblo in terms of heavy metals, and relates this to population distributions. Soil was sampled within the city along transects and analyzed for arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead (Pb). We also profiled Pueblo's communities in terms of their socioeconomic status and demographics. ArcGIS 9.0 was used to perform exploratory spatial data analysis and generate community profiles and prediction maps. The topsoil in Pueblo contains more As, Cd, Hg and Pb than national soil averages, although average Hg content in Pueblo was within reported baseline ranges. The highest levels of As concentrations ranged between 56.6 and 66.5 ppm. Lead concentrations exceeded 300 ppm in several of Pueblo's residential communities. Elevated levels of lead are concentrated in low-income Hispanic and African-American communities. Areas of excessively high Cd concentration exist around Pueblo, including low income and minority communities, raising additional health and environmental justice concerns. Although the distribution patterns vary by element and may reflect both industrial and non-industrial sources, the study confirms that there is environmental contamination around Pueblo and underscores the need for a comprehensive public health approach to address environmental threats in urban communities. ?? Springer 2006.

Diawara, D. M.; Litt, J. S.; Unis, D.; Alfonso, N.; Martinez, L. A.; Crock, J. G.; Smith, D. B.; Carsella, J.

2006-01-01

116

Effects of low dietary levels of methyl mercury on mallard reproduction  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mallard ducks were fed a control diet or a diet containing 0.5 ppm or 3 ppm mercury (as methylmercury dicyandiamide). Health of adults and reproductive success were studied. The dietary level of 3 ppm mercury had harmful effects on reproduction, although it did not appear to affect the health of the adults during the 12 months of dosage. Ducks that were fed the diet containing 0.5 ppm mercury reproduced as well as controls, and ducklings from parents fed 0.5 ppm mercury grew faster in the first week of life than did controls....The greatest harm to reproduction associated with the diet containing 3 ppm mercury was an increase in duckling mortality, but reduced egg laying and increased embryonic mortality also occurred....During the peak of egg laying, eggs laid by controls tended to be heavier than eggs laid by ducks fed either level of mercury; however, there seemed to be no eggshell thinning associated with mercury treatment. Levels of mercury reached about 1 ppm in eggs from ducks fed a dietary dosage of 0.5 ppm mercury and between 6 and 9 ppm in the eggs from ducks fed 3 ppm mercury.

Heinz, G.

1974-01-01

117

An evaluation of mercury levels in Louisiana fish: trends and public health issues.  

PubMed

To characterize statewide fish tissue mercury levels in edible finfish the first comprehensive analysis of Louisiana's fish tissue mercury database was conducted. Analyses were based on fifteen years of fish tissue mercury data collected from 368 waterbodies between 1994 and 2008 (n=14,344). The overall objectives of this study were to establish baseline fish tissue mercury levels; and evaluate species-specific temporal and spatial trends in fish tissue mercury levels. Fish tissue mercury levels ranged from 0.001 ppm (the detection limit) to 5.904 ppm for king mackerel; with an overall geometric mean of 0.218 ppm. Ninety-five percent of samples had mercury levels below the FDA's action level of 1.0 ppm for methylmercury in commercial food. Forty-four percent of all samples had mercury levels above the U.S. EPA's methylmercury fish tissue criterion of 0.3 ppm for sportfish. Species of potential concern include cobia, king mackerel, blackfin tuna, greater amberjack, spotted bass, bowfin, largemouth bass and freshwater drum. There was a significant but small decline in statewide length-adjusted largemouth bass mercury levels between 1994-1999 to 2003-2008 (p<0.05). The highest fish mercury levels were observed in Pearl, Calcasieu, Mermentau, Ouachita, Pontchartrain and Sabine basins. Length-adjusted largemouth bass mercury levels were significantly higher in wetlands and rivers/streams vs. lakes; and in wetlands vs. estuaries (p<0.05). Data were analyzed from a public health perspective to make recommendations for optimizing monitoring and outreach. PMID:20855108

Katner, Adrienne; Sun, Mei-Hung; Suffet, Mel

2010-11-01

118

SEVERAL MECHANISMS OF MERCURY RESISTANCE FOUND IN SOIL ISOLATES FROM PAVLODAR, KAZAKHSTAN  

EPA Science Inventory

Abdrashitova, Svetlava A., M.A. Ilyushchenko, A. Yu Kalmykv, S.A. Aitkeldieva, Wendy J. Davis-Hoover and Richard Devereux. In press. Several Mechanisms of Mercury Resistance Found in Soil Isolates from Pavlodar, Kazakhstan (Abstract). To be presented at the Battelle Conference on...

119

The influence of depth on mercury levels in pelagic fishes and their prey  

PubMed Central

Mercury distribution in the oceans is controlled by complex biogeochemical cycles, resulting in retention of trace amounts of this metal in plants and animals. Inter- and intra-specific variations in mercury levels of predatory pelagic fish have been previously linked to size, age, trophic position, physical and chemical environmental parameters, and location of capture; however, considerable variation remains unexplained. In this paper, we focus on differences in ecology, depth of occurrence, and total mercury levels in 9 species of commercially important pelagic fish (Thunnus obesus, T. albacares, Katsuwonus pelamis, Xiphias gladius, Lampris guttatus, Coryphaena hippurus, Taractichthys steindachneri, Tetrapturus audax, and Lepidocybium flavobrunneum) and in numerous representatives (fishes, squids, and crustaceans) of their lower trophic level prey sampled from the central North Pacific Ocean. Results indicate that total mercury levels of predatory pelagic fishes and their prey increase with median depth of occurrence in the water column and mimic concentrations of dissolved organic mercury in seawater. Stomach content analysis results from this study and others indicate a greater occurrence of higher-mercury containing deeper-water prey organisms in the diets of the deeper-ranging predators, X. gladius, T. obesus, and L. guttatus. While present in trace amounts, dissolved organic mercury increases with depth in the water column suggesting that the mesopelagic habitat is a major entry point for mercury into marine food webs. These data suggest that a major determinant of mercury levels in oceanic predators is their depth of forage.

Choy, C. Anela; Popp, Brian N.; Kaneko, J. John; Drazen, Jeffrey C.

2009-01-01

120

Vertical profile measurements of soil air suggest immobilization of gaseous elemental mercury in mineral soil.  

PubMed

Evasion of gaseous elemental Hg (Hg(0)g) from soil surfaces is an important source of atmospheric Hg, but the volatility and solid-gas phase partitioning of Hg(0) within soils is poorly understood. We developed a novel system to continuously measure Hg(0)g concentrations in soil pores at multiple depths and locations, and present a total of 297 days of measurements spanning 14 months in two forests in the Sierra Nevada mountains, California, U.S. Temporal patterns showed consistent pore Hg(0)g concentrations below levels measured in the atmosphere (termed Hg(0)g immobilization), ranging from 66 to 94% below atmospheric concentrations throughout multiple seasons. The lowest pore Hg(0)g concentrations were observed in the deepest soil layers (40 cm), but significant immobilization was already present in the top 7 cm. In the absence of sinks or sources, pore Hg(0)g levels would be in equilibrium with atmospheric concentrations due to the porous nature of the soil matrix and gas diffusion. Therefore, we explain decreases in pore Hg(0)g in mineral soils below atmospheric concentrations--or below levels found in upper soils as observed in previous studies--with the presence of an Hg(0)g sink in mineral soils possibly related to Hg(0)g oxidation or other processes such as sorption or dissolution in soil water. Surface chamber measurements showing daytime Hg(0)g emissions and nighttime Hg(0)g deposition indicate that near-surface layers likely dominate net atmospheric Hg(0)g exchange resulting in typical diurnal cycles due to photochemcial reduction at the surface and possibly Hg(0)g evasion from litter layers. In contrast, mineral soils seem to be decoupled from this surface exchange, showing consistent Hg(0)g uptake and downward redistribution--although our calculations indicate these fluxes to be minor compared to other mass fluxes. A major implication is that once Hg is incorporated into mineral soils, it may be unlikely subjected to renewed Hg(0)g re-emission from undisturbed, background soils emphasizing the important role of soils in sequestering past and current Hg pollution loads. PMID:24428735

Obrist, Daniel; Pokharel, Ashok K; Moore, Christopher

2014-02-18

121

Fish mercury levels in relation to characteristics of hydroelectric reservoirs in Newfoundland, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury levels in fish have been demonstrated to increase after impoundment with augmented levels of mercury predicted to decline as the reservoir ages. Previous research in Newfoundland predicted return rates in the order of 10 to 12 years for landlocked Atlantic salmon or ouananiche (Salmo salar) and 7 years for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). In order to test the validity

K. J. French; M. R. Anderson; D. A. Scruton; L. J. Ledrew

1998-01-01

122

Mercury pollution in the Tapajos River basin, Amazon Mercury level of head hair and health effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is increasing concern about the potential neurotoxic effects of exposure to methylmercury for the 6 million people living in the Amazon, even in regions situated far away from the gold mines (garimpos), considered to be the major source of mercury pollution. In November 1998, a spot investigation on mercury contamination was conducted in three fishing villages (Barreiras, Rainha, and

Masazumi Haradaa; Maria da Conceicao; N. Pinheiroc; Hideki Ohnod

123

Characterization of mercury species in soils by HPLC–ICP-MS and measurement of fraction removed by diffusive gradient in thin films  

Microsoft Academic Search

The properties and behaviour of Hg depend on both the oxidation state and the chemical form: the bioavailability, toxicity, persistence and accumulation of mercury in the food web are strongly influenced by chemical speciation. The present work aims to determine the chemical forms of mercury present in soil and to evaluate the fraction of mercury in soil solution available to

I. Cattani; S. Spalla; G. M. Beone; A. A. M. Del Re; R. Boccelli; M. Trevisan

2008-01-01

124

A Prospective Clinical Study on Blood Mercury Levels Following Endodontic Root-end Surgery with Amalgam  

PubMed Central

Introduction The purpose of this clinical study was to compare the blood mercury levels before and after endodontic surgery using amalgam as a root-end filling material. Materials and Methods Fourteen patients requiring periradicular surgery participated in this prospective clinical study. A zinc-free amalgam was employed as root-end filling material. Blood samples were collected at three intervals: immediately before, immediately after and one week postoperatively. Mercury content of the blood was determined using gold amalgamation cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Obtained data were analyzed using analysis of variance for repeated measures and paired t-test. Results The mean (SD) of blood mercury levels was 2.20 (0.24) ng/mL immediately before surgery, 2.24 (0.28) ng/mL immediately after surgery and 2.44 (0.17) ng/mL one week after the periradicular surgery. The blood mercury level one week post-operative was significantly higher than both blood mercury levels immediately before (P<0.001) and immediately after (P=0.005) the surgery. Conclusion Placement of an amalgam retroseal during endodontic surgery can increase blood mercury levels after one week. The mercury levels however, are still lower than the toxic mercury levels. We suggest using more suitable and biocompatible root-end filling materials.

Saatchi, Masoud; Shadmehr, Elham; Talebi, Seyed Morteza; Nazeri, Mohsen

2013-01-01

125

Accumulation, transfer, and environmental risk of soil mercury in a rapidly industrializing region of the Yangtze River Delta, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Mercury (Hg) accumulation and transfer in soil ecosystems has been altered on local, regional, and even global scales, and\\u000a their environmental risk has increasingly been a concern to the public and the scientific community.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  A county level region in Zhangjiagang County, the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region of China and a factory with Hg-contaminated\\u000a wastewater discharging within the

Biao Huang; Mei Wang; Lianxiang Yan; Weixia Sun; Yongcun Zhao; Xuezheng Shi; David C. Weindorf

2011-01-01

126

Effect of teeth amalgam on mercury levels in the colostrums human milk in Lenjan.  

PubMed

Human milk is usually the only source of food for infants during the first 4 to 5 months of their life. Maternal environmental mercury exposure is directly related to fish consumption or amalgam filling. In this research, 38 human milk samples were collected from mothers of Lenjan area who were not occupationally exposed with mercury. Mercury concentration in human milk was determined by AMA254 Mercury Analyzer. A level of mercury was examined in relation to somatometric, demographic and dental amalgam parameters. Obtained results showed that only dental amalgam significantly increased the mercury level in human milk (p?< 0.001). The mean mercury concentrations in milk of mothers without teeth fillings (n?= 13), with one to three teeth fillings (n?= 10), and four to eight teeth fillings (n?= 15) were 2.87, 5.47, and 13.33 ?g/l, respectively. The result of this study also showed a positive correlation of mercury milk levels with the number of teeth fillings of the mother (p?< 0.05, r?= 0.755). The estimated weekly intake of mercury of a breastfed infant in this study was, in some cases, higher than provisional tolerance weekly intake recommended by FAO/WHO, which pose a threat to their health. PMID:21494835

Norouzi, Elaheh; Bahramifar, Nader; Ghasempouri, Seyed Mahmoud

2012-01-01

127

Blood Lead and Mercury Levels in Pregnant Women in the United States, 2003-2008. NCHS Data Brief, No. 52.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Chemical exposure during pregnancy is potentially harmful to the developing fetus, as the placenta cannot protect against heavy metals such as lead and mercury. Cord blood mercury levels have been associated with childhood cognitive function. High levels ...

J. D. Parker L. Jones P. Mendola

2010-01-01

128

Field analytical techniques for mercury in soils technology evaluation. Topical report, November 1994--March 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the evaluation of the four field analytical techniques for mercury detection in soils, namely (1) an anodic stripping voltametry technique (ASV) developed and tested by General Electric Corporation; (2) a static headspace analysis (SHSA) technique developed and tested by Dr. Ralph Turner of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; (3) the BiMelyze{reg_sign} Mercury Immunoassay (Bio) developed and tested by BioNebraska, Inc.; and (4) a transportable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument/technique developed and tested by Spectrace, Inc.

Solc, J.; Harju, J.A.; Grisanti, A.A.

1998-02-01

129

Mercury and selenium in fish from the Savannah river: species, trophic level, and locational differences.  

PubMed

Levels of contaminants in fish are of considerable interest because of potential effects on the fish themselves, as well as on other organisms that consume them. In this article we compare the mercury levels in muscle tissue of 11 fish species from the Savannah River, as well as selenium levels because of its known protective effect against mercury toxicity. We sampled fish from three stretches of the river: upstream, along, and downstream the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, a former nuclear material production facility. We test the null hypothesis that there were no differences in mercury and selenium levels in fish tissue as a function of species, trophic level, and location along the river. There were significant interspecific differences in mercury levels, with bowfin (Amia calva) having the highest levels, followed by largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and pickerel (Esox niger). Sunfish (Lepomis spp.) had the lowest levels of mercury. As expected, these differences generally reflected trophic levels. There were few significant locational differences in mercury levels, and existing differences were not great, presumably reflecting local movements of fish between the sites examined. Selenium and mercury concentrations were positively correlated only for bass, perch (Perca flavescens), and red-breasted sunfish (Lepomis auritus). Mercury levels were positively correlated with body mass of the fish for all species except American eel (Anguilla rostrata) and bluegill sunfish (L. macrochirus). The mercury and selenium levels in fish tissue from the Savannah River are similar to or lower than those reported in many other studies, and in most cases pose little risk to the fish themselves or to other aquatic consumers, although levels in bowfin and bass are sufficiently high to pose a potential threat to high-level consumers. PMID:11683594

Burger, J; Gaines, K F; Boring, C S; Stephens, W L; Snodgrass, J; Gochfeld, M

2001-10-01

130

Correlations Between Gene Expression and Mercury Levels in Blood of Boys With and Without Autism  

PubMed Central

Gene expression in blood was correlated with mercury levels in blood of 2- to 5-year-old boys with autism (AU) compared to age-matched typically developing (TD) control boys. This was done to address the possibility that the two groups might metabolize toxicants, such as mercury, differently. RNA was isolated from blood and gene expression assessed on whole genome Affymetrix Human U133 expression microarrays. Mercury levels were measured using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed and partial correlations between gene expression and mercury levels were calculated, after correcting for age and batch effects. To reduce false positives, only genes shared by the ANCOVA models were analyzed. Of the 26 genes that correlated with mercury levels in both AU and TD boys, 11 were significantly different between the groups (P(Diagnosis*Mercury) ? 0.05). The expression of a large number of genes (n = 316) correlated with mercury levels in TD but not in AU boys (P ? 0.05), the most represented biological functions being cell death and cell morphology. Expression of 189 genes correlated with mercury levels in AU but not in TD boys (P ? 0.05), the most represented biological functions being cell morphology, amino acid metabolism, and antigen presentation. These data and those in our companion study on correlation of gene expression and lead levels show that AU and TD children display different correlations between transcript levels and low levels of mercury and lead. These findings might suggest different genetic transcriptional programs associated with mercury in AU compared to TD children. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12640-009-9137-7) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Green, Peter G.; Tian, Yingfang; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Pessah, Isaac N.; Hansen, Robin; Yang, Xiaowei; Teng, Jennifer; Gregg, Jeffrey P.; Ashwood, Paul; Van de Water, Judy; Sharp, Frank R.

2009-01-01

131

Correlations between gene expression and mercury levels in blood of boys with and without autism.  

PubMed

Gene expression in blood was correlated with mercury levels in blood of 2- to 5-year-old boys with autism (AU) compared to age-matched typically developing (TD) control boys. This was done to address the possibility that the two groups might metabolize toxicants, such as mercury, differently. RNA was isolated from blood and gene expression assessed on whole genome Affymetrix Human U133 expression microarrays. Mercury levels were measured using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed and partial correlations between gene expression and mercury levels were calculated, after correcting for age and batch effects. To reduce false positives, only genes shared by the ANCOVA models were analyzed. Of the 26 genes that correlated with mercury levels in both AU and TD boys, 11 were significantly different between the groups (P(Diagnosis*Mercury) ? 0.05). The expression of a large number of genes (n = 316) correlated with mercury levels in TD but not in AU boys (P ? 0.05), the most represented biological functions being cell death and cell morphology. Expression of 189 genes correlated with mercury levels in AU but not in TD boys (P ? 0.05), the most represented biological functions being cell morphology, amino acid metabolism, and antigen presentation. These data and those in our companion study on correlation of gene expression and lead levels show that AU and TD children display different correlations between transcript levels and low levels of mercury and lead. These findings might suggest different genetic transcriptional programs associated with mercury in AU compared to TD children. PMID:19937285

Stamova, Boryana; Green, Peter G; Tian, Yingfang; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Pessah, Isaac N; Hansen, Robin; Yang, Xiaowei; Teng, Jennifer; Gregg, Jeffrey P; Ashwood, Paul; Van de Water, Judy; Sharp, Frank R

2011-01-01

132

Glutathione enzyme and selenoprotein polymorphisms associate with mercury biomarker levels in Michigan dental professionals  

SciTech Connect

Mercury is a potent toxicant of concern to both the general public and occupationally exposed workers (e.g., dentists). Recent studies suggest that several genes mediating the toxicokinetics of mercury are polymorphic in humans and may influence inter-individual variability in mercury accumulation. This work hypothesizes that polymorphisms in key glutathione synthesizing enzyme, glutathione s-transferase, and selenoprotein genes underlie inter-individual differences in mercury body burden as assessed by analytical mercury measurement in urine and hair, biomarkers of elemental mercury and methylmercury, respectively. Urine and hair samples were collected from a population of dental professionals (n = 515), and total mercury content was measured. Average urine (1.06 {+-} 1.24 ug/L) and hair mercury levels (0.49 {+-} 0.63 ug/g) were similar to national U.S. population averages. Taqman assays were used to genotype DNA from buccal swab samples at 15 polymorphic sites in genes implicated in mercury metabolism. Linear regression modeling assessed the ability of polymorphisms to modify the relationship between mercury biomarker levels and exposure sources (e.g., amalgams, fish consumption). Five polymorphisms were significantly associated with urine mercury levels (GSTT1 deletion), hair mercury levels (GSTP1-105, GSTP1-114, GSS 5 Prime ), or both (SEPP1 3 Prime UTR). Overall, this study suggests that polymorphisms in selenoproteins and glutathione-related genes may influence elimination of mercury in the urine and hair or mercury retention following exposures to elemental mercury (via dental amalgams) and methylmercury (via fish consumption). -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the influence of 15 polymorphisms on urine and hair Hg levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Urine and hair Hg levels in dental professionals were similar to the US population. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GSTT1 and SEPP1 polymorphisms associated with urine Hg levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accumulation of Hg in hair following exposure from fish was modified by genotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GSTP1, GSS, and SEPP1 polymorphisms influenced Hg accumulation in hair.

Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Wang, Yi [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Gillespie, Brenda [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Werner, Robert [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States) [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, 325 E. Eisenhower Parkway Suite 100, Ann Arbor, MI 48108 (United States); Franzblau, Alfred [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Basu, Niladri, E-mail: niladri@umich.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan School of Public Health, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2011-12-15

133

Mercury in vegetation and organic soil at an upland boreal forest site in Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied an upland boreal forest plot located in the Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada, to measure the total mercury content in vegetation and organic soil with a view to assessing the potential for mercury release during forest fires. The study area consists of two stands of vegetation regrown after fires 39 and 130 years ago, with different carbon

H. R. Friedli; L. F. Radke; N. J. Payne; D. J. McRae; T. J. Lynham; T. W. Blake

2007-01-01

134

Studies of Mercury in High Level Waste Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

During nuclear weapons production, nuclear reactor target and fuel rods were processed in F- and H-Canyons. For the target rods, a caustic dissolution of the aluminum cladding was performed prior to nitric acid dissolution of the uranium metal targets in the large canyon dissolvers. To dissolve the aluminum cladding and the U-Al fuel, mercury in the form of soluble mercury

Wilmarth

2003-01-01

135

Dry deposition of gaseous elemental mercury to plants and soils using mercury stable isotopes in a controlled environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Uptake of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg 0(g)) by three plant species and two soil types was measured using mercury vapor enriched in the 198 isotope ( 198Hg 0(g)). The plant species and soil types were: White Ash ( Fraxinus Americana; WA); White Spruce ( Picea Glauca; WS); Kentucky Bluegrass ( Poa Partensis; KYBG); Plano Silt Loam (4% organic matter; PSL); and Plainfield Sand/Sparta Loamy Sand (1.25-1.5% organic matter: PS). The plants and soils were exposed to isotopically enriched Hg 0(g) in a 19 m 3 controlled environment room for 7 days under optimal plant growth conditions (20 °C, 140 Wm -2 between 300 nm and 700 nm; 70% RH) and atmospherically relevant Hg 0(g) concentrations. Mercury was recovered from the samples using acidic digestions and surface leaches, and then analyzed for enrichments in 198Hg by ICPMS. The method was sensitivity enough that statistically significant enrichments in 198Hg were measured in the plant foliage at the end of Day 1. Whole leaf digestions and surface-selective leaches revealed that accumulative uptake was predominantly to the interior of the leaf under the conditions studied. Uptake fluxes for WA increased between the first and third days and remained constant thereafter (WA; Day 1 = 7 ± 2 × 10 -5 ng m -2 s -1; Days 3-7 = 1.3 ± 0.1 × 10 -4 ng m -2 s -1; where m 2 refers to one sided leaf area). KYBG demonstrated similar behavior although no Day 3 measurement was available (Day 1 = 7.5 ± 0.5 × 10 -5 ng m -2 s -1; Day 7 = 1.2 ± 0.1 × 10 -4 ng m -2 s -1). Fluxes to White Spruce were lower, with little difference between Days 1 and 3 followed by a decrease at Day 7 (WS; Days 1-3 = 5 ± 2 × 10 -5 ng m -2 s -1; Day 7 = 2.4 ± 0.2 × 10 -5 ng m -2 s -1). Uptake of Hg to soils was below the method detection limit for those media (PSL = 3 × 10 -2 ng m -2 s -1; PS = 3 × 10 -3 ng m -2 s -1) over the 7 day study period. Foliar resistances calculated for each species compared well to previous studies.

Rutter, Andrew P.; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Creswell, Joel E.; Olson, Michael R.; Robinson, Michael; Collins, Ryan M.; Parman, Andrew M.; Katzman, Tanya L.; Mallek, Justin L.

2011-02-01

136

Background levels of atmospheric mercury in Kagoshima City, and influence of mercury emission from Sakurajima Volcano, Southern Kyushu, Japan  

PubMed

Vapor phase mercury concentration was determined daily for 1 year (Jan. 1996-Jan. 1997) in order to present the levels of atmospheric mercury in Kagoshima City and to estimate the influence of mercury emission from Sakurajima Volcano, southern Kyushu, Japan. The atmospheric mercury was collected on a porous gold collector at Kagoshima University and was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry; Kagoshima University of Kagoshima City is located approximately 11 km west of Sakurajima Volcano. The mercury concentration obtained was in the range 1.2-52.5 ng m(-3) (mean 10.8 ng m(-3), n = 169). The atmospheric concentration varied from season to season; the concentration was high in summer and lower in winter. A linear relation was obtained by plotting ln[Hg/ng m(-3)] vs. 1/T for the north, south and west winds with correlation coefficients of -0.76, -0.79 and -0.83, respectively, but no such dependency was found for the east wind (r = -0.035). When the wind is blowing from the east, Kagoshima City is on the leeward side of the volcano. The impact of the fumarolic activity of the volcano on ambient air in the city was evident in the disappearance of temperature dependency with the appearance of the east wind. Atmospheric mercury concentration except for the east wind was considered to be background levels of Kagoshima City. As background levels, 8.1 +/- 5.3 ng m(-3), 14.8 +/- 7.9 ng m(-3), 13.9 +/- 11.7 ng m(-3) and 4.4 +/- 1.6 ng m(-3) (mean +/- S.D.) were obtained for spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. PMID:11032152

Tomiyasu; Nagano; Sakamoto; Yonehara

2000-10-01

137

ECOLOGICAL SOIL SCREENING LEVELS FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES AND PLANTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) are being developed for 24 inorganic and inorganic chemicals for soil invertebrates and plants using procedures developed by a Task Group of the USEPA Eco-SSL Work Group. The Eco-SSL Work Group is a collaboration among USEPA, DoD, DOE, ...

138

Effects of Mercury and Selenium on Serum Transaminase Levels of Quail, Hens and Rats.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Three studies were conducted in an effort to quantitatively evaluate some of the early effects and nutrient interactions of methyl mercury (CH3-HG) in Cotournix quail, Leghorn hens, and Sprague-Dawley rats. Mercury was added to the diets at levels ranging...

S. O. Welsh J. H. Soares B. R. Stilling H. Lagally

1973-01-01

139

Atmospheric mercury pollution at an urban site in central Taiwan: mercury emission sources at ground level.  

PubMed

Total gaseous mercury (Hg) (TGM), gaseous oxidized Hg (GOM), and particulate-bound Hg (PBM) concentrations and dry depositions were measured at an urban site in central Taiwan. The concentrations were 6.14±3.91 ng m(-3), 332±153, and 71.1±46.1 pg m(-3), respectively. These results demonstrate high Hg pollution at the ground level in Taiwan. A back trajectory plot shows the sources of the high TGM concentration were in the low atmosphere (<500 m) and approximately 50% of the air masses coming from upper troposphere (>500 m) were associated with low TGM concentrations. This finding implies that Hg is trapped in the low atmosphere and comes from local Hg emission sources. The conditional probability function (CPF) reveals that the plumes of high TGM concentrations come from the south and northwest of the site. The plume from the south comes from two municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs). However, no significant Hg point source is located to the northwest of the site; therefore, the plumes from the northwest are hypothesized to be related to the combustion of agricultural waste. Dry deposition fluxes of Hg measured at this site considerably exceeded those measured in North America. Overall, this area is regarded as a highly Hg contaminated area because of local Hg emission sources. PMID:22316589

Huang, Jiaoyan; Liu, Chia-Kuan; Huang, Ci-Song; Fang, Guor-Cheng

2012-04-01

140

Dietary Predictors of Maternal Prenatal Blood Mercury Levels in the ALSPAC Birth Cohort Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Very high levels of prenatal maternal mercury have adverse effects on the developing fetal brain. It has been suggested that all possible sources of mercury should be avoided. However, although seafood is a known source of mercury, little is known about other dietary components that contribute to the overall levels of blood mercury. Objective: Our goal was to quantify the contribution of components of maternal diet to prenatal blood mercury level. Methods: Whole blood samples and information on diet and sociodemographic factors were collected from pregnant women (n = 4,484) enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). The blood samples were assayed for total mercury using inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry. Linear regression was used to estimate the relative contributions of 103 dietary variables and 6 sociodemographic characteristics to whole blood total mercury levels (TBM; untransformed and log-transformed) based on R2 values. Results: We estimated that maternal diet accounted for 19.8% of the total variation in ln-TBM, with 44% of diet-associated variability (8.75% of the total variation) associated with seafood consumption (white fish, oily fish, and shellfish). Other dietary components positively associated with TBM included wine and herbal teas, and components with significant negative associations included white bread, meat pies or pasties, and french fries. Conclusions: Although seafood is a source of dietary mercury, seafood appeared to explain a relatively small proportion of the variation in TBM in our UK study population. Our findings require confirmation, but suggest that limiting seafood intake during pregnancy may have a limited impact on prenatal blood mercury levels. Citation: Golding J, Steer CD, Hibbeln JR, Emmett PM, Lowery T, Jones R. 2013. Dietary predictors of maternal prenatal blood mercury levels in the ALSPAC birth cohort study. Environ Health Perspect 121:1214–1218;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206115

Steer, Colin D.; Hibbeln, Joseph R.; Emmett, Pauline M.; Lowery, Tony; Jones, Robert

2013-01-01

141

Mercury Levels in Locally Manufactured Mexican Skin-Lightening Creams  

PubMed Central

Mercury is considered one of the most toxic elements for plants and animals. Nevertheless, in the Middle East, Asia and Latin America, whitening creams containing mercury are being manufactured and purchased, despite their obvious health risks. Due to the mass distribution of these products, this can be considered a global public health issue. In Mexico, these products are widely available in pharmacies, beauty aid and health stores. They are used for their skin lightening effects. The aim of this work was to analyze the mercury content in some cosmetic whitening creams using the cold vapor technique coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). A total of 16 skin-lightening creams from the local market were investigated. No warning information was noted on the packaging. In 10 of the samples, no mercury was detected. The mercury content in six of the samples varied between 878 and 36,000 ppm, despite the fact that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that the limit for mercury in creams should be less than 1 ppm. Skin creams containing mercury are still available and commonly used in Mexico and many developing countries, and their contents are poorly controlled.

Peregrino, Claudia P.; Moreno, Myriam V.; Miranda, Silvia V.; Rubio, Alma D.; Leal, Luz O.

2011-01-01

142

Unexpectedly high mercury level in pelleted commercial fish feed  

SciTech Connect

An unexpectedly high mercury (Hg) level was found in a pelleted commercial fish feed used to feed fish in laboratory and fish farm settings. Mean total Hg (T-Hg) concentration in the commercial fish pellets was 66 ppb. Mean total selenium (T-Se) concentration in the pellets was 1,120 ppb (ranging from 790 to 1,360 ppb). Total Hg and Se in the whole blood of Sacramento blackfish and in the fish feed were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). During a 10-week sampling period T-Hg in blood fluctuated between 35 and 56 ppb. A highly significant, positive correlation was found between T-Hg in the fish blood and in the fish feed through the sampling period. On the other hand, no correlation was found between T-Se in the fish feed and T-Hg or T-Se blood level. Researchers working with fish in Hg studies need to know that fish pellets may contain Hg and to consider the influence of these pellets in their results.

Choi, M.H. [Nalco Chemical Co., Naperville, IL (United States); Cech, J.J. Jr. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology

1998-10-01

143

Study on the reduction of atmospheric mercury emissions from mine waste enriched soils through native grass cover in the Mt. Amiata region of Italy.  

PubMed

Atmospheric mercury emissions from mine-waste enriched soils were measured in order to compare the mercury fluxes of bare soils with those from other soils covered by native grasses. Our research was conducted near Mt. Amiata in central Italy, an area that was one of the largest and most productive mining centers in Europe up into the 1980s. To determine in situ mercury emissions, we used a Plexiglas flux chamber connected to a portable mercury analyzer (Lumex RA-915+). This allowed us to detect, in real time, the mercury vapor in the air, and to correlate this with the meteorological parameters that we examined (solar radiation, soil temperature, and humidity). The highest mercury flux values (8000ngm(-2)h(-1)) were observed on bare soils during the hours of maximum insulation, while lower values (250ngm(-2)h(-1)) were observed on soils covered by native grasses. Our results indicate that two main environmental variables affect mercury emission: solar radiation intensity and soil temperature. The presence of native vegetation, which can shield soil surfaces from incident light, reduced mercury emissions, a result that we attribute to a drop in the efficiency of mercury photoreduction processes rather than to decreases in soil temperature. This finding is consistent with decreases in mercury flux values down to 3500ngm(-2)h(-1), which occurred under cloudy conditions despite high soil temperatures. Moreover, when the soil temperature was 28°C and the vegetation was removed from the experimental site, mercury emissions increased almost four-fold. This increase occurred almost immediately after the grasses were cut, and was approximately eight-fold after 20h. Thus, this study demonstrates that enhancing wild vegetation cover could be an inexpensive and effective approach in fostering a natural, self-renewing reduction of mercury emissions from mercury-contaminated soils. PMID:23477569

Fantozzi, L; Ferrara, R; Dini, F; Tamburello, L; Pirrone, N; Sprovieri, F

2013-08-01

144

Blood mercury levels among fish consumers residing in areas with high environmental burden.  

PubMed

Mercury is a ubiquitous, persistent toxicant found in the environment. In water, mercury bioaccumulates up the food chain and leads to high concentrations in fish. Consumption of contaminated fish is the major source of exposure to mercury in the US. The objective of this study was to enroll persons living in areas selected by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to have high mercury concentrations and who consume at least 6o z of locally caught fish per week to determine the feasibility of monitoring future trends among a population identified as highly exposed. Blood samples were collected at time of interview and analyzed for mercury. Participants (n=287) were enrolled from North Carolina, Maryland, and South Dakota. Participants reported eating an average of five servings of fish per week. The overall geometric mean for total mercury was 0.75 ?g L(-1), with North Carolina having the highest mean level (2.02 ?g L(-1)). Overall, 42% of the study population had levels greater than the US geometric mean 0.83 ?g L(-1). The number of servings of fish consumed was not found to be associated with blood mercury levels. We were able to identify some persons with elevated mercury concentrations living in areas identified by EPA; however, identifying and monitoring a highly exposed population over time would be challenging. PMID:22153999

Wolkin, Amy; Hunt, Danielle; Martin, Colleen; Caldwell, Kathleen L; McGeehin, Michael A

2012-03-01

145

Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) planet profile provides data and images of the planet Mercury. These data include planet size, distance from the Sun, rotation and revolution times, temperature, atmospheric composition, density, and albedo. Images of the planet include general surface features such as crater basins, the Caloris Basin, and other images taken by the Mariner 10 spacecraft.

146

Total mercury in mushrooms and underlying soil substrate from the Borecka Forest, Northeastern Poland.  

PubMed

Total mercury concentrations were determined by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy in 240 composite samples of the caps, 240 of the stalks, and 16 of the whole fruiting bodies of 13 species of wild mushrooms and in 256 samples of underlying soil substrate collected from the Borecka Forest and the adjacent area in 1998. The area of the study is a background site with no known local sources of mercury emission. The mercury concentrations of the fruiting bodies varied largely (range between 14 and 14,000 ng/g dry weight) depending on the site and mushroom species investigated, but were less varied in soil samples (between 5 and 86 ng/g dry weight). The fruiting bodies of king bolete (Boletus edulis) showed greatest content of mercury. King bolete and yellow-cracking bolete (Xerocomus subtomentosus) collected from the Borecka Forest both contained in the caps around threefold greater concentrations of mercury than were noted for the same species collected from the surrounding area with 9,900 +/- 2,700 and 3,600 +/- 1,400, and 480 +/- 190 and 160 +/- 70 ng/g dry weight, respectively. Apart from the king bolete, relatively elevated concentrations of mercury were quantified also in a whole fruiting bodies of common puffball (Lycoperdon perlatum) with 3,400 +/- 1,300 ng/g as well as in the caps and stalks of common scaber stalk (Leccinum scabrum) with 1,200 +/- 740 and 1,100 +/- 380 ng/g dry weight. In other species investigated, the mercury concentrations were below 1,000 ng/g dry weight, and the smallest values were noted for crab-scended brittle gills (Russula xerampelina) with 60 +/- 20 in the caps and 40 +/- 20 ng/g dry weight in the stalks. For the species such as larch bolete, bay bolete (Xerocomus badius), yellow-cracking bolete, king bolete, common scaber stalk, fly agaric (Amanita muscaria), crab-scented brittle gills, honey mushroom (Amariella mellea) and safron milk cap (Lactarius deliciosus) a positive correlation (0.01 < p < 0.05) between the mercury content and size (diameter) of the caps was found, and in some cases also between mercury content of the stalks and size (height) of the fruiting body. The bioconcentration factor (BCF) values of total mercury were greatest for king bolete, i.e., 250 +/- 65 in the caps and 140 +/- 47 in the stalks, while for the other species investigated were between 200 +/- 91 and 1.8 +/- 0.5 in the caps, and 94 +/- 57 and 1.7 +/- 0.4 in the stalks. Nevertheless, despite great values of BCF of mercury indicated for some species and also a positive correlation between mercury content of the caps/stalks and underlying soil substrate, subsequent coefficients of determination were usually below 40%, and only for bay bolete (stalk), yellow-cracking bolete (cap), common scaber stalk (cap), hard bolete (Leccinum griseum) (cap, stalk), crab-scented gills (stalk), and honey mushroom (cap) were up to 68, 82, 42, 82, 51, 74, and 45%, respectively. The values of the cap/stalk Hg quotient were greatest for larch bolete (Suillus flavus) collected from the Borecka Forest (4.4 +/- 1.3) and for honey mushroom (2.7 +/- 0.9) from the adjacent area. PMID:11815805

Falandysz, J; Gucia, M; Skwarzec, B; Frankowska, A; Klawikowska, K

2002-02-01

147

Hair mercury level of coastal communities in Malaysia: a linkage with fish consumption  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hair mercury level was assessed in four coastal communities in Malaysia with relation to fish consumption between gender,\\u000a age, and rural and urban area. Mercury level was found at a range of 0.01–21.00 (?g\\/g dry wt). The average mercury levels\\u000a were 13.69, 10.85, 9.94, and 6.78 ?g\\/g dry wt for communities in Kedah, Terengganu, Johor, and Selangor, respectively. The\\u000a same order

Parvaneh Hajeb; Jinap Selamat; Ahmad Ismail; Fatimah Abu Bakar; Jamilah Bakar; Hanifah Nuryani Lioe

2008-01-01

148

Mercury-resistant rhizobial bacteria isolated from nodules of leguminous plants growing in high Hg-contaminated soils.  

PubMed

A survey of symbiotic bacteria from legumes grown in high mercury-contaminated soils (Almadén, Spain) was performed to produce a collection of rhizobia which could be well adapted to the environmental conditions of this region and be used for restoration practices. Nineteen Hg-tolerant rhizobia were isolated from nodules of 11 legume species (of the genera Medicago, Trifolium, Vicia, Lupinus, Phaseolus, and Retama) and characterized. Based on their growth on Hg-supplemented media, the isolates were classified into three susceptibility groups. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and the effective concentrations that produce 50% mortality identified the patterns of mercury tolerance and showed that 15 isolates were tolerant. The dynamics of cell growth during incubation with mercury showed that five isolates were unaffected by exposure to Hg concentrations under the MICs. Genetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene assigned ten strains to Rhizobium leguminosarum, six to Ensifer medicae, two to Bradyrhizobium canariense, and one to Rhizobium radiobacter. Inoculation of host plants and analysis of the nodC genes revealed that most of them were symbiotically effective. Finally, three isolates were selected for bioremediation processes with restoration purposes on the basis of their levels of Hg tolerance, their response to high concentrations of this heavy metal, and their genetic affiliation and nodulation capacity. PMID:22246528

Ruiz-Díez, Beatriz; Quiñones, Miguel A; Fajardo, Susana; López, Miguel A; Higueras, Pablo; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes

2012-10-01

149

Spatial and Temporal Evolution of Mercury in Post-fire Soils in Southern California Watersheds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wildfires are well known sources of mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere, but there is a paucity of data characterizing how fire impacts the transport of Hg to surface waters where methylation can occur. Because post-fire storm events have the potential to carry large sediment loads to a stream system, it is important to understand the effects of wildfire on Hg binding and relative variability in terrestrial soils in order to assess its transport potential in burned watersheds. It has been widely reported that Hg stored in surface soils is lost to the atmosphere due to volatilization during wildfire and that higher metal concentrations are associated with fine-grained particle fractions due to higher surface area/volume ratios, and consequently, available binding sites. Following southern California's September 2006 Day Fire, seasonal terrestrial sampling was undertaken at burned and unburned soils over a 1.5 year period to assess both immediate and long term impacts of the fire on Hg binding in the soils of Piru Creek watershed. Freshly burned soils exhibited the loss of Hg at the surface that would be expected due to volatilization during the fire, but this was followed by a sharp increase in [Hg] in surface soils over the subsequent recovery period that was not seen in the unburned soils. Soils were also size-fractionated and Hg was measured on each grain size. Mercury in the fine grained soil fraction (<250 um) was not significantly higher than that measured in the coarser grain size fractions. This is contrary to the behavior observed in the unburned soils and has implications for modeling Hg transport to surface waters as a function of hill slope erosional processes and sediment re- distribution in burned watersheds.

Burke, M. P.; Ferreira, M.; Mendez, C. B.; Navarro, B. I.; Jay, J. A.; Hogue, T. S.

2008-12-01

150

Normal and lethal mercury levels in human beings.  

PubMed

Ethyl mercury in the form of Granosan M was used as a fungicide in dressing grains in Iraq. Disregarding warnings and precautions by the authorities, some villagers used this grain in making their bread. Tissue specimens of poisoned people were analysed for total mercury contents using the flameless atomic absorption spectroscopic technique. The analytical method used is highly sensitive (1 ppb/1% absorbance), and the precision in terms of relative standard deviation (RSD) was about 1.5%. The ranges of mercury content in ppm units in the two cases of poisoning were 8-9 for the kidneys, 6-7 for livers, 3-5 for the cerebella, and about 15 for the blood. The analyses included some other tissues as well. Control values were also present. These were obtained from human beings who died by accident and showed no signs of mercury poisoning. PMID:968912

Hilmy, M I; Rahim, S A; Abbas, A H

1976-01-01

151

Increased mercury in forest soils under elevated carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Fossil fuel combustion is the primary anthropogenic source of both CO2 and Hg to the atmosphere. On a global scale, most Hg that enters ecosystems is derived from atmospheric Hg that deposits onto the land surface. Increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO2 may affect Hg deposition to terrestrial systems and storage in soils through CO2-mediated changes in plant and soil properties. We show, using free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments, that soil Hg concentrations are almost 30% greater under elevated atmospheric CO2 in two temperate forests. There were no direct CO2 effects, however, on litterfall, throughfall or stemflow Hg inputs. Soil Hg was positively correlated with percent soil organic matter (SOM), suggesting that CO2-mediated changes in SOM have influenced soil Hg concentrations. Through its impacts on SOM, elevated atmospheric CO2 may increase the Hg storage capacity of soils and modulate the movement of Hg through the biosphere. Such effects of rising CO2, ones that transcend the typically studied effects on C and nutrient cycling, are an important next phase for research on global environmental change.

Natali, Susan M. [State University of New York, Stony Brook; Sa_udo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A. [University of Southern California; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Finzi, Adrien C [Boston University; Lerdau, Manuel T. [University of Virginia

2008-01-01

152

Importance of Forest Composition on Mercury Deposition through Litterfall and Accumulation in Soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Upland forests receive greater atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg) than non-forested areas. In addition to wet deposition of Hg, forests are subjected to Hg deposition in throughfall and litterfall: dry deposition to leaves may be subsequently leached in throughfall; elemental Hg may enter leaves and be later deposited in the leaf litter (litterfall). This research evaluated the importance of forest type on the Total Hg (THg) flux in litterfall and on THg accumulation in organic soil horizons. Eighteen research sites were sampled throughout Vermont, USA. Mercury concentration was measured in senescing leaves of dominant tree species (16 species in total) in three forest types (low-elevation coniferous, mixed, and deciduous/Northern Hardwood forest). Leaf traps were used to measure the litterfall flux. Upper soil horizons were sampled and analyzed for mercury and carbon. Mercury concentration in senescing leaves varied significantly between tree species. Some hardwood species had higher THg concentration in leaves than coniferous species. Striped maple (Acer pensylvanicum) had significantly higher THg concentration than any other species. Total Hg concentration was negatively correlated with leaf height on the tree. Leaf surface-to-weight ratio was positively correlated with THg. The calculated THg flux in litterfall varied from 12 to 28 ug/m2/yr; there was no significant difference between forest types. Results showed an unexpectedly high THg concentration in understory trees. The assumption that needles have greater THg concentration than leaves needs to be revisited; forest structure needs to be taken into account. Total Hg concentration and THg to carbon ratio were consistent within soil horizons but differed among horizons. Similar to other studies, THg concentration was lower in the Oi horizon (litter layer) and peaked in the Oe horizon (fermentation layer) before declining in the humified Oa and/or A horizons. Mineral soil (A horizons) tended to have greater THg pools due to their greater bulk density compared with organic soil horizons (e.g. Oa). Deciduous sites had on average thinner Oe horizons and shallower mineral A horizons compared to sites with more coniferous species. Because of these two factors, deciduous sites had greater THg pools in the upper soil profile (9 cm) than sites with more coniferous species. These results indicate that factors affecting the depth of organic soil horizons need to be taken into account when comparing THg pools between sites. Soil pools are affected both by the THg concentration and the density of the soil.

Juillerat, J. I.; Ross, D. S.

2010-12-01

153

Mercury levels and relationships in water, sediment, and fish tissue in the Willamette Basin, Oregon.  

PubMed

In Oregon's Willamette River Basin (the Basin), health advisories currently limit consumption of fish that have accumulated methylmercury (MeHg) to levels posing a significant human health risk. These advisories created the requirement for a mercury total maximum daily load for the Basin, which required a greater understanding of the behavior, distribution, and levels of mercury and MeHg in the Basin. In 2002, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality initiated a study to measure (using ultraclean techniques) mercury and MeHg levels in water, sediment, and fish samples collected throughout the Basin. Results from the Middle Fork (nominal background) suggested that naturally occurring surface-water concentrations of mercury and MeHg would on an annual average basis be expected in the range of 0.5 to 1.0 and 0.04 to 0.06 ng L(-1), respectively. Concentrations in the Coast Fork (Cottage Grove), which were markedly higher, are likely the result of historical mining discharges. The possibility exists that wetlands alone could contribute the dissolved MeHg levels (approximately 0.04 ng L(-1)) observed in the Main Stem. Mercury levels in sediment were similar, and near background, in the Main Stem, Coast Fork (Row River), and Middle Fork but significantly increased in the Coast Fork (Cottage Grove). Fish tissue mercury levels were typically highest in piscivorous and lowest in invertivorous species but highest in the Coast Fork (Cottage Grove). In the Coast Fork and Cottage Grove Reservoir, discharges from historical mercury mining activities appear to have significantly impacted water, sediment, and fish tissue levels; however these impacts do not appear to extend into the Main Stem. Basinwide mercury data are at present too spottily distributed to determine whether significant mercury point sources exist along the Main Stem. PMID:15750769

Hope, B K; Rubin, J R

2005-04-01

154

Mercury in urban soils with various types of land use in Beijing, China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury (Hg) concentration was investigated for 127 urban soil samples collected from business area (BA), classical garden (CG), culture and education area (CEA), public green space (PGS), residential area (RA) and roadside area (RSA) in Beijing. The median of Hg concentration in Beijing was 0.26 mg\\/kg. The value in CG was much higher than the other 5 types of land use,

Xi Chen; Xinghui Xia; Shan Wu; Fan Wang; Xuejun Guo

2010-01-01

155

An Exploration of Mercury Soils Treatment Technologies for the Y-12 Plant - 13217  

SciTech Connect

There are a number of areas at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that have been contaminated with mercury due to historical mercury use and storage. Remediation of these areas is expected to generate large volumes of waste that are Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristically hazardous. These soils will require treatment to meet RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) prior to disposal. URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) performed a feasibility assessment to evaluate on-site and off-site options for the treatment and disposal of mercury-contaminated soil from the Y-12 Site. The focus of the feasibility assessment was on treatment for disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) located on the Oak Ridge Reservation. A two-phase approach was used in the evaluation process of treatment technologies. Phase 1 involved the selection of three vendors to perform treatability studies using their stabilization treatment technology on actual Y-12 soil. Phase II involved a team of waste management specialists performing an in-depth literature review of all available treatment technologies for treating mercury contaminated soil using the following evaluation criteria: effectiveness, feasibility of implementation, and cost. The result of the treatability study and the literature review revealed several viable on-site and off-site treatment options. This paper presents the methodology used by the team in the evaluation of technologies especially as related to EMWMF waste acceptance criteria, the results of the physical treatability studies, and a regulatory analysis for obtaining regulator approval for the treatment/disposal at the EMWMF. (authors)

Wrapp, John [UCOR, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [UCOR, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Julius, Jonathon [DOE Oak Ridge (United States)] [DOE Oak Ridge (United States); Browning, Debbie [Strata-G, LLC, 2027 Castaic Lane, Knoxville, TN, 37932 (United States)] [Strata-G, LLC, 2027 Castaic Lane, Knoxville, TN, 37932 (United States); Kane, Michael [RSI, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [RSI, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Whaley, Katherine [RSI, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [RSI, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Estes, Chuck [EnergySolutions, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [EnergySolutions, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Witzeman, John [RSI, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States)] [RSI, P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States)

2013-07-01

156

Mercury uptake and distribution in Lavandula stoechas plants grown in soil from Almadén mining district (Spain).  

PubMed

This work studies mercury root uptake by Lavandula stoechas var. Kew Red (lavender) and the distribution of this metal through the plant under greenhouse conditions along three consecutive seasons. Mercury concentration in plant tissues and in the different products obtained from lavender plants (essential oil, toilet water and in lavender tea) was assessed in order to evaluate the possible cultivation of lavender as a profitable alternative land use to mercury mining in the Almadén area once the mine had been closed down. Mercury concentration in useful parts of the plant was low (0.03-0.55 mg kg(-1)). Likewise, the essential oil, toilet water and tea obtained from these plants presented very low mercury levels, below the detection limit of the used equipment (<0.5 microg kg(-1)). In the case of the obtained tea, according to the recommendations given by the World Health Organization, the maximum daily intake of it without intoxication risk would be 85.2l. So, although other sources of mercury intake should also be considered in order to elaborate a complete toxicological risk assessment. Lavender data, obtained under this greenhouse working conditions, shows that lavender cultivation could be an alternative crop in the Almadén area. PMID:19699252

Sierra, M J; Millán, R; Esteban, E

2009-11-01

157

Soil mercury and CO2 emissions and their relationship under controlled laboratory conditions: Effects of oxygen depletion and soil sterilization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Terrestrial carbon (C) pools play an important role in uptake, deposition, sequestration, and emission of atmospheric mercury (Hg). Thus, we investigated the fate of Hg during C mineralization processes using a laboratory flux set-up to evaluate to what degree decomposition of organic matter leads to emission and re- emission of Hg to the atmosphere, increased mobilization within terrestrial ecosystems, or long-term sequestration. Our laboratory system was supplied by air from pressurized tanks and allowed concurrent measurements of Hg and CO2 fluxes from 6 replicate soils chambers under controlled environmental conditions. Experimental treatments of flux samples included manipulations of C mineralization rates (by means of O2 depletion, sterilization, etc.). Results showed an excellent control on soil fluxes and highly accurate and replicable measurements of soil Hg and CO2 (i.e., mineralization) fluxes and little direct relationships between soil mineralization and Hg emission rates. Surprisingly though, soil Hg emissions increased in soils under anaerobic conditions (depletion of O2) indicating that low soil redox potential and/or anaerobic microbes might enhance Hg emission from terrestrial soils.

Berger, C.; Fain, X.; Obrist, D.

2008-12-01

158

Study on the reduction of atmospheric mercury emissions from mine waste enriched soils through native grass cover in the Mt. Amiata region of Italy  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric mercury emissions from mine-waste enriched soils were measured in order to compare the mercury fluxes of bare soils with those from other soils covered by native grasses. Our research was conducted near Mt. Amiata in central Italy, an area that was one of the largest and most productive mining centers in Europe up into the 1980s. To determine in situ mercury emissions, we used a Plexiglas flux chamber connected to a portable mercury analyzer (Lumex RA-915+). This allowed us to detect, in real time, the mercury vapor in the air, and to correlate this with the meteorological parameters that we examined (solar radiation, soil temperature, and humidity). The highest mercury flux values (8000 ng m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}) were observed on bare soils during the hours of maximum insulation, while lower values (250 ng m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}) were observed on soils covered by native grasses. Our results indicate that two main environmental variables affect mercury emission: solar radiation intensity and soil temperature. The presence of native vegetation, which can shield soil surfaces from incident light, reduced mercury emissions, a result that we attribute to a drop in the efficiency of mercury photoreduction processes rather than to decreases in soil temperature. This finding is consistent with decreases in mercury flux values down to 3500 ng m{sup ?2} h{sup ?1}, which occurred under cloudy conditions despite high soil temperatures. Moreover, when the soil temperature was 28 °C and the vegetation was removed from the experimental site, mercury emissions increased almost four-fold. This increase occurred almost immediately after the grasses were cut, and was approximately eight-fold after 20 h. Thus, this study demonstrates that enhancing wild vegetation cover could be an inexpensive and effective approach in fostering a natural, self-renewing reduction of mercury emissions from mercury-contaminated soils. -- Highlights: ? Mercury air/surface exchange from grass covered soil is different from bare soil. ? Light enhances mercury emissions and is the main parameter driving the process. ? The presence of wild vegetation covering the soil reduces mercury emission. ? Vegetative covers could be a solution to reduce atmospheric mercury pollution.

Fantozzi, L., E-mail: l.fantozzi@iia.cnr.it [CNR-Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, c/o: UNICAL-Polifunzionale, 87036 Rende (Italy); Ferrara, R., E-mail: romano.ferrara@pi.ibf.cnr.it [CNR-Institute of Biophysics, San Cataldo Research Area, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Dini, F., E-mail: fdiniprotisti@gmail.com [University of Pisa, Department of Biology, Via A. Volta 4, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Tamburello, L., E-mail: ltamburello@biologia.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Department of Biology, Via Derna 1, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Pirrone, N.; Sprovieri, F. [CNR-Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, c/o: UNICAL-Polifunzionale, 87036 Rende (Italy)] [CNR-Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, c/o: UNICAL-Polifunzionale, 87036 Rende (Italy)

2013-08-15

159

Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prior to the flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft, Mercury was the least investigated and most poorly known terrestrial planet (Kuiper 1970, Devine 1972). Observational difficulties caused by its proximity to the Sun as viewed from Earth caused the planet to remain a small, vague disk exhibiting little surface contrast or details, an object for which only three major facts were known: 1. its bulk density is similar to that of Venus and Earth, much greater than that of Mars and the Moon; 2. its surface reflects electromagnetic radiation at all wavelengths in the same manner as the Moon (taking into account differences in their solar distances); and 3. its rotation period is in 2/3 resonance with its orbital period. Images obtained during the flyby by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 (and the two subsequent flybys on 21 September 1974 and 16 March 1975) revealed Mercury's surface in detail equivalent to that available for the Moon during the early 1960's from Earth-based telescopic views. Additionally, however, information was obtained on the planet's mass and size, atmospheric composition and density, charged-particle environment, and infrared thermal radiation from the surface, and most significantly of all, the existence of a planetary magnetic field that is probably intrinsic to Mercury was established. In the following, this new information is summarized together with results from theoretical studies and ground-based observations. In the quantum jumps of knowledge that have been characteristic of "space-age" exploration, the previously obscure body of Mercury has suddenly come into sharp focus. It is very likely a differentiated body, probably contains a large Earth-like iron-rich core, and displays a surface remarkably similar to that of the Moon, which suggests a similar evolutionary history.

Gault, D. E.; Burns, J. A.; Cassen, P.; Strom, R. G.

1977-01-01

160

Low-Cost Options for Moderate Levels of Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

On March 15, 2005, EPA issued the Clean Air Mercury Rule, requiring phased-in reductions of mercury emissions from electric power generators. ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL and industry partners, is conducting evaluations of EPRI's TOXECON II{trademark} process and of high-temperature reagents and sorbents to determine the capabilities of sorbent/reagent injection, including activated carbon, for mercury control on different coals and air emissions control equipment configurations. DOE/NETL targets for total mercury removal are {ge}55% (lignite), {ge}65% (subbituminous), and {ge}80% (bituminous). Based on work done to date at various scales, meeting the removal targets appears feasible. However, work needs to progress to more thoroughly document and test these promising technologies at full scale. This is the final site report for tests conducted at MidAmerican's Louisa Station, one of three sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The other two sites in the program are MidAmerican's Council Bluff Station and Entergy's Independence Station. MidAmerican's Louisa Station burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and employs hot-side electrostatic precipitators with flue gas conditioning for particulate control. This part of the testing program evaluated the effect of reagents used in the existing flue gas conditioning on mercury removal.

Sharon Sjostrom

2006-03-31

161

Low-Level Mercury Can Enhance Procoagulant Activity of Erythrocytes: A New Contributing Factor for Mercury-Related Thrombotic Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Associations between cardiovascular diseases and mercury have been frequently described, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Objectives We investigate the procoagulant activation of erythrocytes, an important contributor to thrombosis, by low-level mercury to explore the roles of erythrocytes in mercury-related cardiovascular diseases. Methods We used freshly isolated human erythrocytes and ex vivo and in vivo thrombosis models in rats to investigate mercury-induced procoagulant activity. Results Prolonged exposure to low-dose mercuric ion (Hg2+; 0.25–5 ?M for 1–48 hr) induced erythrocyte shape changes from discocytes to echinocytes to spherocytes, accompanied by microvesicle (MV) generation. These MVs and remnant erythrocytes expressed phosphatidylserine (PS), an important mediator of procoagulant activation. Hg2+ inhibited flippase, an enzyme that recovers PS into the inner leaflet of the cell membrane, and activated scramblase, an enzyme that alters lipid asymmetry in the cell membrane. Consistent with these activity changes, Hg2+ increased intracellular calcium and depleted ATP and protein thiol. A thiol supplement reversed Hg2+-induced MV generation and PS exposure and inhibited the increase in calcium ion (Ca2+) and depletion of ATP, indicating that free-thiol depletion was critical to Hg2+-mediated procoagulant activity. The procoagulant activity of Hg2+-treated erythrocytes was demonstrated by increased thrombin generation and endothelial cell adhesion. We further confirmed Hg2+-mediated procoagulant activation of erythrocytes in ex vivo and in vivo rat thrombosis models, where Hg2+ treatment (0.5–2.5 mg/kg) increased PS exposure and thrombus formation significantly. Conclusion This study demonstrated that mercury could provoke procoagulant activity in erythrocytes through protein-thiol depletion–mediated PS exposure and MV generation, ultimately leading to enhanced thrombosis.

Lim, Kyung-Min; Kim, Sujin; Noh, Ji-Yoon; Kim, Keunyoung; Jang, Won-Hee; Bae, Ok-Nam; Chung, Seung-Min; Chung, Jin-Ho

2010-01-01

162

Development of a technique for the analysis of inorganic mercury salts in soils by gas chromatography\\/mass spectrometry 1 1 Dedicated to the memory of Al Nier  

Microsoft Academic Search

A technique has been developed to analyze environmentally relevant samples for organic and inorganic mercury compounds. A solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was used as a sampling medium in both water and water\\/soil slurries. Quantification of inorganic mercury was accomplished through a chemical alkylation reaction designed to convert an inorganic mercury salt to an organomercury compound prior to GC\\/MS analysis;

Christopher M Barshick; Stacy-Ann Barshick; Phillip F Britt; Derek A Lake; Michael A Vance; Elisabeth B Walsh

1998-01-01

163

A comparison of mercury levels in feathers and eggs of osprey (Pandion haliaetus) in the North American Great Lakes.  

PubMed

Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) eggs and chick feathers were collected for mercury analysis from nests at four Great Lakes study areas in Ontario (three "naturally formed" lakes in southern Ontario and one reservoir in northern Ontario) and two New Jersey study areas in 1991-1994. Adult osprey feathers were sampled from three Great Lakes study areas in 1991. Feathers sampled from chicks (approximately 28-35 days old) appear to be better indicators of local contaminant conditions since spatial patterns of mercury in known prey, yellow perch (Perca flavescens), also collected in these areas, were more similar to chick feathers than to eggs. Mercury levels were less variable in chick feathers than in eggs. Estimates of biomagnification factors using prey of known size at these areas were also less variable in feathers than in eggs. At naturally formed lakes, no significant correlation in mercury levels between eggs and chick feathers from the same nest was apparent, suggesting that the source of mercury contamination was not the same in these two tissues: mercury levels in eggs reflect mercury acquired on the breeding grounds, wintering grounds, and migratory route; mercury levels in chick feathers reflect local dietary conditions on the breeding grounds. Mercury levels in both osprey eggs and chick feathers were higher at the Ogoki Reservoir than at naturally formed lakes. Adult osprey feathers had higher mercury concentrations than chick feathers. Mercury levels in osprey eggs, chick feathers, and adult feathers did not approach levels associated with toxic reproductive effects. PMID:9419264

Hughes, K D; Ewins, P J; Clark, K E

1997-11-01

164

Development and application of a laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS) for the investigation of the kinetics of mercury emissions from soils.  

PubMed

Recent measurements at different locations suggest that the emission of mercury from soils may play a more pronounced role in the global mercury cycle as suggested by global emission inventories and global mercury cycling models. For up scaling and modelling of mercury emissions from soils a comprehensive assessment of the processes controlling the emission of mercury from soils is imperative. We have developed a laboratory flux measurement system (LFMS) to study the effect of major environmental variables on the emission of mercury under controlled conditions. We have investigated the effects of turbulent mixing, soil temperature and solar radiation on the emission of mercury from soils. The emission of mercury from soils is constant over time under constant experimental conditions. The response of the mercury emission flux to variations of the atmospheric transfer parameters such as turbulence requires a rapid adjustment of the equilibrium that controls the Hg(o) concentration in the soil air. It has been shown that the light-induced flux is independent of the soil temperature and shows a strong spectral response to UV-B. PMID:16831509

Bahlmann, Enno; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Ruck, Wolfgang

2006-10-01

165

Mercury speciation in floodplain soils and sediments along a contaminated river transect  

SciTech Connect

A novel mercury-specific sequential extraction procedure (SEP) for the assessment of mercury (Hg) speciation in soils and sediments, with emphasis on studying the interaction between Hg and organic matter (OM), was developed and tested. It was applied to determine Hg speciation in floodplain topsoils and surface sediments along the Hg-contaminated part of the river Elbe, and to simultaneously derive some information on the (re)mobilization potentials for Hg from these matrices. The majority of the total Hg in the ecosystem today is bound in the floodplains, which also still geographically reflect the historic emission record. Most of the Hg in both matrices is bound strongly to OM, suggesting low availability. However, distinct differences between Hg speciation in the floodplain soils and sediments were also discovered. Mercury deposited in the floodplains shows speciation patterns that indicate stronger fixation compared with Hg in the sediments. This difference is attributed to the association of Hg with larger quantities of OM, which presumably also has higher molecular weight (MW). By comparison, Hg in the sediments was distributed among weaker binding forms, which are more likely to liberate Hg. Particularly, sediments showed a total lack of sulfidic binding forms for Hg. Pronounced geographical trends were detected in the Hg speciation along the river transect, with a general downstream shift from weaker to stronger binding forms, probably due to increased association with OM. These studies indicate that Hg speciation in riverine ecosystems is dynamic and reflects the chemical mechanisms underlying (bio) geochemical processes like distribution and transport.

Wallschlaeger, D.; Desai, M.V.M.; Spengler, M. [GKSS Forschungszentrum GmbH, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Chemische Analytik; Wilken, R.D. [Johannes-Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences

1998-09-01

166

Urinary level of homovanillic acid and mercury in autistic children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catecholamines and their metabolites affect children's nervous system. Dopamine is an important neurotransmitter in the brain. In the routine analysis for diagnostics of diseases, the dopamine metabolite homovanillic acid (HVA) is determined. Mercury is a neurotoxic agent and can cause different undesirable effects on the brain. In the present work a putative correlation between HVA, the main metabolite of dopamine,

Joanna Ka?u?na-Czapli?ska; Ewa Socha; Monika Michalska; Jacek Rynkowski

2011-01-01

167

Water and soil biotic relations in Mercury distribution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The distribution of Hg is considered both in terms of its availability in soil fractions and the relationship between Hg in plant samples and Hg in ambient soils or other supportive media. The plants were grouped by habitat into epipedic-epiphytic (mosses, lichens) and endopedic-aquatic-marine (Basidiomycetes and algae) samples; nonvascular and vascular forms were also distinguished. Sources included Alaska, Hawaii, New England and Iceland. Brief consideration was also given to Hg distribution in a plant-animal-soil community. Data were expressed in terms of plant Hg content and plant substratum concentration ratio. Average Hg contents and concentration ratios, and modal ranges for the ratios were determined. The results showed similar average Hg contents in all groups (126 to 199 ppb) but a low value (84 ppb) in the lichens; terrestrial forms had ratios of 3.5 to 7.6 whereas the marine algae yielded a figure of 78.7. A secondary mode in the range 0 to 0.1 appeared only in the Alaska-New England Group, over 500 km distant from active thermal sites. Evidence for both exclusion and concentration behavior was obtained.

Siegel, S. M.; Siegel, B. Z.; Puerner, N.; Speitel, T.; Thorarinsson, F.

1975-01-01

168

Where does the mercury in gaseous fluxes from soil come from? An applied stable isotope experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The flux of gaseous mercury from soils is controlled by a number of physico-chemical factors including temperature, soil mercury concentration, boundary layer conditions, soil moisture, and often most notably, solar radiation. It has been presumed that the shallowest soils constitute the main source of Hg for evasion since this Hg is closer to the surface and since the organic horizon and shallow A-horizon soils generally have the most organic matter, where Hg is sorbed and accumulated. The evidence for the predominance of near surface soil as the principal source of Hg for evasion has generally been correlational in nature however and no direct experimental evidence currently exists. This experimental laboratory study directly assessed the depth from which Hg evades by labeling different soil layers (1cm in thickness) with an enriched Hg stable isotope and measuring Hg fluxes under constant, but relatively low light conditions. Fluxes were measured using a dynamic flux chamber coupled to high-precision air pumps and gold traps. The gold traps were thermally desorbed and Hg isotopes were measured by ICP-MS. Under dry soil conditions, we found that most labeled Hg fluxes were very low, with no discernible pattern in relation to tracer depth. In some dry condition measurements where tracer fluxes were significant (up to 69 ng/m2 h), they were four or more times less than measurements made with wetter soils. When soils were wetted to field capacity and then allowed to dry over time, measured surface fluxes peaked approximately 24 hours after wetting and quickly declined. The largest fluxes (270 ng/m2 h) measured after wetting were observed when the isotope enriched layer constituted the surface layer. Significant fluxes were measured after wetting when the enriched layer was at 0, 1 and 2 cm, and fluxes generally decreased exponentially with depth. Fluxes after wetting, when the enriched layer was 5cm below the surface, were non-significant. Our data provide direct evidence to corroborate previous assumptions that the upper 2 cm of soil do indeed constitute the principal zone of Hg source and Hg transport for soil Hg emissions to the atmosphere.

Mazur, Maxwell; Eckley, Chris; Mitchell, Carl

2013-04-01

169

Mercury flux measurements in a naturally enriched area: Correlation with environmental conditions during the Nevada Study and Tests of the Release of Mercury From Soils (STORMS)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An international intercomparison of micrometerological techniques and dynamic flux chamber methods applied to measure mercury fluxes was conducted from September 1 to 4, 1997, during the Nevada Study and Tests of the Release of Mercury From Soils (STORMS) in Reno, Nevada. Nine research groups from four countries met in the Steamboat Springs, Nevada Geothermal Area, to participate in the first international flux intercomparison ever attempted for mercury. The highly heterogeneous soil Hg concentrations and complex landscape within the study area (4 ha) were unfavorable for spatial intercomparison of Hg fluxes between the research groups. However, reliable and correlated Hg fluxes were measured between our micrometerological technique and a dynamic flux chamber method (r2 = 0.29), run side by side (5 m). Hg fluxes and their relationships with environmental factors were complex. After ˜90 days of dry condition, a series of storm events impacted the site and increased the soil moisture from <0.5 to 6.6%. This appeared to promote strong Hg evasion during the transition period from dry to wet soil conditions. However, the subsequent relationship between soil moisture and Hg flux was significantly negatively correlated. Multivariate analysis was applied to extract the principal components (principal component analysis). Three principal components were extracted (explained up to 79% of the total variance) and discussed with respect to their environmental signification. Environmental conditions under southern wind sectors were optimal to promote Hg fluxes. Turbulence rather than Hg air concentrations seemed to be the main factor promoting the determined Hg fluxes during this study.

Poissant, Laurier; Pilote, Martin; Casimir, Alain

1999-09-01

170

Mapping of mercury contents in soil and air in a decommissioned mining and metallurgical area from the Almadén mercury mining district (Spain): The Almadenejos area.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Almadenejos is a small town located some 14 km to the East of Almadén, and has been the site of mining and metallurgical activity, linked to the world-class Almadén mercury mining district: the now-abandoned cinnabar (HgS) mines of Vieja Concepción (active in 1699-1800), Nueva Concepción (active in 1794-1861, 1943-1945 and 1960-1967) and El Entredicho (active in Arabs times, and 1981-1997) are located on its neighbourhood, as well as the Almadenejos decommissioned metallurgical precinct (active 1794-1861),what makes the area one of the most contaminated ones of the district. We present here results and maps of a survey including soils sampling with mercury analysis and other pedological parameters, as well as determinations of mercury inmission in the atmosphere, using a common sampling grid. Analysis of soils samples has been carried out using a LUMEX RA-915+ mercury analyser, with RA-91 pyrolysis chamber, and air determinations, using the same RA-915+ device in air analysis mode. The maps have been obtained by means of SURFER 8 software, as well as by ArcGIS software, and puts forward contaminated areas centred inside the metallurgical precinct, with up to 1.5% Hg in soils and up to 20.000 ng Hg•m-3 in the atmosphere.

Martínez-Coronado, A.; Llanos, W.; Oyarzun, R.; Esbrí, J. M.; Higueras, P.

2009-04-01

171

Blood Mercury Level and Its Determinants among Dental Practitioners in Hamadan, Iran  

PubMed Central

Objective: Exposure to mercury can occur in occupational and environmental settings. During clinical work with dental amalgam, the dental personnel are exposed to both metallic mercury and mercury vapor. The aim of the present study was to investigate blood mercury level (BML) and its determinants among dentists practicing in Hamadan city, Iran. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was done on all dental practitioners of Hamadan (n=43). Dentists were asked to complete a questionnaire, and then 5 ml blood samples were obtained from them. After preparation, mercury concentration of each sample was measured by cold vapor atomic absorption device. Pearson correlation test and regression models served for statistical analysis. Results: The mean blood concentration of mercury was 6.3 ?g/l (SD=1.31 range 4.15–8.93). BML was positively associated with age, years in practice, working hours per day, number of amalgam restorations per day, number of amalgam removal per week, sea food consumption, working years in present office, using amalgam powder, using diamond bur for amalgam removal, dry sterilization of amalgam contaminated instruments, and deficient air ventilation. Conclusion: BML of dentists in Hamadan was higher than standards. Working hours and number of amalgam restorations per day were significantly correlated with blood mercury.

Kasraei, Sh.; Mortazavi, H.; Vahedi, M.; Bakianian Vaziri, P.; Assary, MJ.

2010-01-01

172

Fish mercury levels in lakes—adjusting for Hg and fish-size covariation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accurate estimates of lake-specific mercury levels are vital in assessing the environmental impact on the mercury content in fish. The intercepts of lake-specific regressions of Hg concentration in fish vs. fish length provide accurate estimates when there is a prominent Hg and fish-size covariation. Commonly used regression methods, such as analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and various standardization techniques are less

Lars Sonesten

2003-01-01

173

Effects of mercury and selenium on serum transaminase levels of quail, hens and rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three studies were conducted in an effort to quantitatively evaluate some of the early effects and nutrient interactions of methyl mercury (CHâ-Hg) in Cotournix quail, Leghorn hens, and Sprague-Dawley rats. Mercury was added to the diets at levels ranging from 0.5 to 32 ppm. In addition, selenium (Se), cystine, and fish protein concentrate were added in various combinations to some

S. O. Welsh; J. H. Jr. Soares; B. R. Stilling; H. Lagally

1973-01-01

174

Mercury in Fish-eating Communities of the Andean Amazon, Napo River Valley, Ecuador  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory study aimed to examine the relationship between fish eating habits, human mercury levels, and mercury levels in fish in three communities of the Napo River Valley, Ecuadorian Andean Amazon, a region without gold mining but with significant deforestation and volcanic soils with naturally high mercury levels. By recognizing the politicoeconomic factors which cause deforestation, the cultural factors which

Jena Webb; Nicolas Mainville; Donna Mergler; Marc Lucotte; Oscar Betancourt; Robert Davidson; Edwin Cueva; Edy Quizhpe

2004-01-01

175

Characterization of soils from an industrial complex contaminated with elemental mercury  

SciTech Connect

Historical use of liquid elemental mercury (Hg(0){sub l}) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN, USA, resulted in large deposits of Hg(0){sub l} in the soils. The fate and distribution of the spilled Hg(0) are not well characterized. In this study we evaluated analytical tools for characterizing the speciation of Hg in the contaminated soils and then used the analytical techniques to examine the speciation of Hg in two soil cores collected at the site. These include x-ray fluorescence (XRF), soil Hg(0) headspace analysis, and total Hg determination by acid digestion coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption (HgT). XRF was not found to be suitable for evaluating Hg concentrations in heterogeneous soils containing low concentration of Hg or Hg(0) because Hg concentrations determined using this method were lower than those determined by HgT analysis and the XRF detection limit is 20 mg/kg. Hg(0){sub g} headspace analysis coupled with HgT measurements yielded good results for examining the presence of Hg(0){sub l} in soils and the speciation of Hg. The two soil cores are highly heterogeneous in both the depth and extent of Hg contamination, with Hg concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 8400 mg/kg. In the first core, Hg(0){sub l} was distributed throughout the 3.2 m depth, whereas the second core, from a location 12 m away, contained Hg(0){sub l} in a 0.3 m zone only. Sequential extractions showed organically associated Hg dominant at depths with low Hg concentration. Soil from the zone of groundwater saturation showed reducing conditions and the Hg is likely present as Hg-sulfide species. At this depth, lateral Hg transport in the groundwater may be a source of Hg detected in the soil at the deeper soil depths. Overall, characterization of soils containing Hg(0){sub l} is difficult because of the heterogeneous distribution of Hg within the soils. This is exacerbated in industrial facilities where fill materials make up much of the soils and historical and continued reworking of the subsurface has remobilized the Hg. -- Highlights: • Presence of Hg(0) and chemical transformations control the Hg speciation in soil. • Redox reactions can result in the mobilization and sequestration of Hg in soils. • Analysis of soils containing Hg(0) is complex due to sample heterogeneity.

Miller, Carrie L., E-mail: millercl@ornl.gov; Watson, David B.; Lester, Brian P.; Lowe, Kenneth A.; Pierce, Eric M.; Liang, Liyuan

2013-08-15

176

Characterization of soils from an industrial complex contaminated with elemental mercury  

SciTech Connect

Historic use of liquid elemental mercury (Hg(0)l) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN, USA resulted in large deposits of Hg(0)l in the soils. An evaluation of analytical tools for characterizing the speciation of Hg in the soils at the Y-12 facility was conducted and these tequniques were used to examine the speciation of Hg in two soil cores collect at the site. These include X-ray fluorescence (XRF), soil Hg(0) headspace analysis, and total Hg determination by acid digestion coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption. Hg concentrations determined using XRF, a tool that has been suggestions for quick onsite characterization of soils, were lower than concentrations determined by HgT analysis and as a result this technique is not suitable for the evaluation of Hg concentrations in heterogeneous soils containing Hg(0)l. Hg(0)g headspace analysis can be used to examine the presence of Hg(0)l in soils and when coupled with HgT analysis an understanding of the speciation of Hg in soils can be obtained. Two soil cores collected within the Y-12 complex highlight the heterogeneity in the depth and extent of Hg contamination, with Hg concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 8400 mg/kg. At one location Hg(0)l was distributed throughout 3.2 meters of core whereas the core from a location only 12 meters away only contained Hg(0)l in 0.3 m zone of the core. Sequential extractions, used to examine the forms of Hg in the soils, indicated that at depths within the core that have low Hg concentrations organically associated Hg is dominant. Soil from the zone of groundwater inundation showed reduced characteristics and the Hg is likely present as Hg-sulfide species. At this location it appears that Hg transported within the groundwater is a source of Hg to the soil. Overall the characterization of Hg in soils containing Hg(0) l is difficult due to the heterogeneous distribution within the soils and this challenge is enhanced in industrial facilities in which fill material comprise most of the soils and historical and continuing reworking of the subsurface has remobilized the Hg.

Miller, Carrie L [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Lester, Brian P [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

2013-01-01

177

A basin-specific aquatic food web biomagnification model for estimation of mercury target levels.  

PubMed

In the Willamette River Basin (WRB, Oregon, USA), health advisories currently limit consumption of fish that have accumulated methylmercury (MeHg) to levels posing a potential health risk for humans. Under the Clean Water Act, these advisories create the requirement for a total maximum daily load (TMDL) for mercury in the WRB. A TMDL is a calculation of the maximum amount of a pollutant that a body of water can receive and still meet water-quality standards. Because MeHg is known to biomagnify in aquatic food webs, a basin-specific biomagnification factor can be used, given a protective fish tissue criterion, to estimate total mercury concentrations in surface waters required to lower advisory mercury concentrations currently in fish in the WRB. This paper presents an aquatic food web biomagnification model that simulates inorganic mercury (Hg(II)) and MeHg accumulation in fish tissue and estimates WRB-specific biomagnification factors for resident fish species of concern to stakeholders. Probabilistic (two-dimensional Monte Carlo) techniques propagate parameter variability and uncertainty throughout the model, providing decision makers with credible range information and increased flexibility in establishing a specific mercury target level. The model predicts the probability of tissue mercury concentrations in eight fish species within the range of concentrations measured in these species over 20 years of water-quality monitoring. Estimated mean biomagnification factor values range from 1.12 x 10(6) to 7.66 x 10(6) and are within the range of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency national values. Several WRB-specific mercury target levels are generated, which very by their probability of affording human health protection relative to the federal MeHg tissue criterion of 0.30 mg/kg. Establishing a specific numeric target level is, however, a public policy decision, and one that will require further discussions among WRB stakeholders. PMID:14552019

Hope, Bruce

2003-10-01

178

Geochemical background of zinc, cadmium and mercury in anthropically influenced soils in a semi-arid zone (SE, Spain)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work seeks to establish the geochemical background for three potentially toxic trace elements (Zn, Cd and Hg) in a pilot zone included in the DesertNet project in the province of Murcia. The studied area, known as Campo de Cartagena, Murcia (SE Spain) is an area of intensive agriculture and has been much affected over the years by anthropic activity. The zone can be considered an experimental pilot zone for establishing background levels in agricultural soils. Sixty four samples were collected and corresponded to areas subjected to high and similar agricultural activity or soils with natural vegetation, which correspond to abandoned agricultural areas. The Zn content was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The Cd content was determined by electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry and mercury content was determined by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. Geostatistical analysis consisting of kriging and mapping was performed using the geostatistical analyst extension of ArcGIS 8.3. Zinc values ranged from 10 mg kg-1 to 151 mg kg-1, with an average value of 45 mg kg-1. Cadmium values ranged between 0.1 mg kg-1 and 0.9mg kg-1, with a mean value of 0.3 mg kg-1 and mercury values ranged from 0.1 mg kg-1 to 2.3 mg kg-1, with a mean value of 0.5 mg kg-1. At a national level, the Spanish Royal Decree 9/2005 proposes toxicological and statistical approaches to establish background values. According to the statistical approach, background values consist of the median value for the selected element. The background values for Zn, Cd and Hg in the studied area were 40 mg kg-1 for Zn, 0.3 mg kg-1 for Cd and 0.4 mg kg-1 for Hg.

García-Lorenzo, M. L.; Pérez-Sirvent, C.; Martínez-Sánchez, M. J.; Molina, J.; Tudela, M. L.; Hernández-Córdoba, M.

2009-04-01

179

Mercury accumulation in grass and forb species as a function of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and mercury exposures in air and soil.  

PubMed

The goal of this study was to investigate the potential for atmospheric Hg degrees uptake by grassland species as a function of different air and soil Hg exposures, and to specifically test how increasing atmospheric CO(2) concentrations may influence foliar Hg concentrations. Four common tallgrass prairie species were germinated and grown for 7 months in environmentally controlled chambers using two different atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg major; 3.7+/-2.0 and 10.2+/-3.5 ng m(-3)), soil Hg (<0.01 and 0.15+/-0.08 micro g g(-1)), and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) (390+/-18, 598+/-22 micro mol mol(-1)) exposures. Species used included two C4 grasses and two C3 forbs. Elevated CO(2) concentrations led to lower foliar Hg concentrations in plants exposed to low (i.e., ambient) air Hg degrees concentrations, but no CO(2) effect was apparent at higher air Hg degrees exposure. The observed CO(2) effect suggests that leaf Hg uptake might be controlled by leaf physiological processes such as stomatal conductance which is typically reduced under elevated CO(2). Foliar tissue exposed to elevated air Hg degrees concentrations had higher concentrations than those exposed to low air Hg degrees , but only when also exposed to elevated CO(2). The relationships for foliar Hg concentrations at different atmospheric CO(2) and Hg degrees exposures indicate that these species may have a limited capacity for Hg storage; at ambient CO(2) concentrations all Hg absorption sites in leaves may have been saturated while at elevated CO(2) when stomatal conductance was reduced saturation may have been reached only at higher concentrations of atmospheric Hg degrees . Foliar Hg concentrations were not correlated to soil Hg exposures, except for one of the four species (Rudbeckia hirta). Higher soil Hg concentrations resulted in high root Hg concentrations and considerably increased the percentage of total plant Hg allocated to roots. The large shifts in Hg allocation patterns-notably under soil conditions only slightly above natural background levels-indicate a potentially strong role of plants in belowground Hg transformation and cycling processes. PMID:16631233

Millhollen, A G; Obrist, D; Gustin, M S

2006-10-01

180

Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.  

SciTech Connect

Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

2012-05-15

181

Electronic Characterization of Defects in Narrow Gap Semiconductors-Comparison of Electronic Energy Levels and Formation Energies in Mercury Cadmium Telluride, Mercury Zinc Telluride, and Mercury Zinc Selenide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have used a Green's function technique to calculate the energy levels and formation energy of deep defects in the narrow gap semiconductors mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT) and mercury zinc selenide (MZS). The formation energy is calculated from the difference between the total energy with an impurity cluster and the total energy for the perfect crystal. Substitutional (including antisite), interstitial (self and foreign), and vacancy deep defects are considered. Relaxation effects are calculated (with molecular dynamics). By use of a pseudopotential, we generalize the ideal vacancy model so as to be able to consider relaxation for vacancies. Different charge states are considered and the charged state energy shift (as computed by a modified Haldane-Anderson model) can be twice that due to relaxation. Different charged states for vacancies were not calculated to have much effect on the formation energy. For all cases we find deep defects in the energy gap only for cation site s-like orbitals or anion site p-like orbitals, and for the substitutional case only the latter are appreciably effected by relaxation. For most cases for MCT, MZT, MZS, we consider x (the concentration of Cd or Zn) in the range appropriate for a band gap of 0.1 eV. For defect energy levels, the absolute accuracy of our results is limited, but the precision is good, and hence chemical trends are accurately predicted. For the same reason, defect formation energies are more accurately predicted than energy level position. We attempt, in Appendix B, to calculate vacancy formation energies using relatively simple chemical bonding ideas due to Harrison. However, these results are only marginally accurate for estimating vacancy binding energies. Appendix C lists all written reports and publications produced for the grant. We include abstracts and a complete paper that summarizes our work which is not yet available.

Patterson, James D.

1996-01-01

182

Characterization of soils from an industrial complex contaminated with elemental mercury.  

PubMed

Historical use of liquid elemental mercury (Hg(0)l) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN, USA, resulted in large deposits of Hg(0)l in the soils. The fate and distribution of the spilled Hg(0) are not well characterized. In this study we evaluated analytical tools for characterizing the speciation of Hg in the contaminated soils and then used the analytical techniques to examine the speciation of Hg in two soil cores collected at the site. These include x-ray fluorescence (XRF), soil Hg(0) headspace analysis, and total Hg determination by acid digestion coupled with cold vapor atomic absorption (HgT). XRF was not found to be suitable for evaluating Hg concentrations in heterogeneous soils containing low concentration of Hg or Hg(0) because Hg concentrations determined using this method were lower than those determined by HgT analysis and the XRF detection limit is 20 mg/kg. Hg(0)g headspace analysis coupled with HgT measurements yielded good results for examining the presence of Hg(0)l in soils and the speciation of Hg. The two soil cores are highly heterogeneous in both the depth and extent of Hg contamination, with Hg concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 8400mg/kg. In the first core, Hg(0)l was distributed throughout the 3.2m depth, whereas the second core, from a location 12m away, contained Hg(0)l in a 0.3m zone only. Sequential extractions showed organically associated Hg dominant at depths with low Hg concentration. Soil from the zone of groundwater saturation showed reducing conditions and the Hg is likely present as Hg-sulfide species. At this depth, lateral Hg transport in the groundwater may be a source of Hg detected in the soil at the deeper soil depths. Overall, characterization of soils containing Hg(0)l is difficult because of the heterogeneous distribution of Hg within the soils. This is exacerbated in industrial facilities where fill materials make up much of the soils and historical and continued reworking of the subsurface has remobilized the Hg. PMID:23809204

Miller, Carrie L; Watson, David B; Lester, Brian P; Lowe, Kenneth A; Pierce, Eric M; Liang, Liyuan

2013-08-01

183

Assessment of the pollutants in farming soils and waters around untreated abandoned Türkönü mercury mine (Turkey).  

PubMed

There are several abandoned Hg mines located in western Turkey. Hg production in these mines was eventually halted in the early 1990 s because of low prices and environmental concerns (Gemici, 2004). However, acid mine drainage waste causes potential environmental problems near the Hg mines. In Türkönü Hg mine (Fig. 1) nearly 7,000 flasks of mercury had been produced in recent years. In 1965 a private company began to investigate the deposit and by 1968 had installed a 100-tpd rotary furnace. Since, the ore supply has been inadequate and the furnace plant used to process ore hauled from other deposits. Mercury production was terminated in 1975, owing to low prices, and in 1976 the furnace plant was used to process antimony ore (Yildiz and Bailey, 1978). Areas near the mine are currently being used for agricultural purposes. Soils are directly influenced by contaminants, leaching from the mine wastes, which are transported by surface waters in the rainy season. The aim of this study is to evaluate the geochemical dispersal within soil and water,of Hg derived from the abandoned Türkönü mine relating to past mining activities. PMID:17476451

Gemici, Unsal; Tarcan, Gültekin

2007-07-01

184

Pituitary gland levels of mercury, selenium, iron, and zinc in an Alzheimer`s disease study  

SciTech Connect

Mercury, iron, selenium, and zinc imbalances have been observed in comparisons between Alzheimer`s disease (AD) and control subject brains. Analyses of the pituitary gland have demonstrated that this organ retains relatively high concentrations of trace elements, including mercury, iron, and zinc. Our previous work has shown that the pituitary glands of AD and control subjects are typically higher in these trace elements than brain samples from the same subject. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to compare the pituitary trace element levels of AD and control subjects. This study also describes the intrasubject relationships of brain trace element levels to those in the pituitary gland of AD and control subjects.

Cornett, C.R.; Markesbery, W.R.; Wekstein, D.R.; Ehmann, W.D. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31

185

The effects of land use change on mercury distribution in soils of Alta Floresta, Southern Amazon.  

PubMed

This study presents the spatial distribution, degree of contamination and storage capacity of Hg in surface forest and pasture soils from Alta Floresta, Southern Amazon, a significant gold mining site from 1980 to 1996. During that period, average annual gold production was about 6.5 tons, with an estimated Hg annual emission to the environment of about 8.8 tons, 60-80% of it being emitted to the atmosphere. Mercury sources to the region are mining sites and gold-dealer shops at the city of Alta Floresta, where gold is smelted and commercialized. Mercury concentrations in forest soils (15-248 ng g(-1), average=61.9 ng g(-1)) were 1.5-3.0 times higher than in pasture soils (10-74 ng g(-1), average=33.8 ng g(-1)), suggesting strong re-mobilization after deforestation. Highest Hg concentrations were found within a distance of 20-30 km from mining sites in both soil types. The influence of the refining operations within the city of Alta Floresta, however, was less clear. Somewhat higher concentrations were observed only within a 5 km radius from the city center where gold-dealer shops are located. Wind direction controls the spatial distribution of Hg. Background concentrations (15-50 ng g(-1)) were generally found at the outer perimeter of the sampling grid, about 40 km from sources. This suggests that Hg released from mining and refining activities undergoes rapid deposition. Estimated cumulative Hg burdens for the first 10 cm of soil averaged 8.3 mg m(-2) and 4.9 mg m(-2), for forest and pasture soils respectively and compare well with ultisols and hydromorphic oxisols, but were lower than those found in yellow-red and yellow latosols and podsols from other Amazonian areas. Our results show that changing land use in the Amazon is a strong re-mobilizing agent of Hg deposited on soils from the atmosphere. PMID:14987810

Lacerda, Luiz D; de Souza, Margareth; Ribeiro, Mario G

2004-05-01

186

Symptoms of intoxication in dentists associated with exposure to low levels of mercury.  

PubMed

The present study examined the effects of occupational exposure of a group of dentists to low levels of mercury. The study population consisted of 106 dentists and 94 general practitioners (referent group), from private and public clinics in Shiraz city. Subjects were requested to complete a questionnaire on demographic variables, suspicious symptoms of intoxication and work practices. Additionally, atmospheric and urinary concentrations of mercury were measured by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy technique. The data were analysed by ?(2) test, independent sample t-test and multivariate logistic regression analysis, where applicable. Both groups were similar as far as most demographic and socioeconomic variables, but age and number of personal amalgam fillings, were concerned. Median of atmospheric concentration of mercury was found to be 3.35 ?g/m(3). Likewise, the urinary concentration of mercury in dentists was estimated to be 3.16 ?g/g creatinine. This value was significantly higher than that of the referent group. Similarly, analysis of the data revealed that neuropsychological, muscular, respiratory, cardiovascular and dermal symptoms were more prevalent in dentists. Our findings indicate that occupational exposure of dentists to mercury, even at low levels, is associated with a significant increase in the prevalence of symptoms of intoxication. PMID:21173523

Neghab, Masoud; Choobineh, Alireza; Hassan Zadeh, Jafar; Ghaderi, Ebrahim

2011-01-01

187

Air-surface exchange of mercury with soils amended with ash materials  

SciTech Connect

Air-surface exchange of mercury (Hg) was measured from soil low in Hg amended with four different ash materials: a wood ash containing {approximately} 10% coal ash, amixture of two subbituminous coal fly ashes, a subbituminous coal ash containing {approximately} 10% petroleum coke ash and an ash from incinerated municipal sewage sludge (4.3 mg/kg Hg) using a dynamic flux chamber. Ash was added to soil to simulate agricultural supplements, soil stabilization, and pad layers used in livestock areas. For the agricultural amendment, {approximately} 0.4% ash was well mixed into the soil. To make the stabilized soil that could be used for construction purposes, {approximately} 20% ash was mixed into soil with water. The pad layer consisted of a wetted 1-cm layer of ash material on the soil surface. Diel trends of Hg flux were observed for all of the substrates with significantly higher Hg emissions during the day and negligible flux or deposition of Hg during the night. Hg fluxes, which were measured in the summer months, were best correlated with solar radiation, temperature, and air O{sub 3} concentrations. Mean Hg fluxes measured outdoors for unamended soils ranged from 19 to 140 ng/m{sup 2} day, whereas those for soil amended with ash to simulate an agricultural application ranged from 7.2 to 230 ng/m{sup 2} day. Fluxes for soil stabilized with ash ranged from 77 to 530 ng/m{sup 2} day and for soil with pads constructed of ash ranged from -50 to 90 ng/m{sup 2} day. Simple analytical tests were performed to assess whether algorithms based on these tests could be used to predict Hg fluxes observed outdoors using the flux chamber. Based on this study, no consistent relationships could be developed. More work is needed to assess long-term and seasonal variations in Hg flux from substrates before annual estimates of emissions can be developed. 45 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Jody Ericksen; Mae Sexauer Gustin [University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV (United States). Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences

2006-07-15

188

Xylem sap as a pathway for total mercury and methylmercury transport from soils to tree canopy in the boreal forest  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conifer needles are an important link in the cycling of Total Mercury (THg) and Methylmercury (MeHg) in the boreal ecosystem due to the high THg and MeHg concentrations in litterfall. Translocation within the tree of Hg from soils to the crown canopy has been assumed to be a minor source of the Hg in litterfall. This paper, however, is the

Kevin H. Bishop; Ying-Hua Lee; John Munthe; Etienne Dambrine

1998-01-01

189

Mercury in seabird feathers: Insight on dietary habits and evidence for exposure levels in the western Indian Ocean  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breast feathers were used to estimate mercury levels in six marine birds nesting in the tropical western Indian Ocean, i.e. Sooty Tern (Sterna fuscata), Brown Noddy (Anous stolidus), Lesser Noddy (Anous tenuirostris), Audubon Shearwater (Puffinus lherminieri bailloni), Barau's Petrel (Pterodroma baraui) and the White-tailed Tropicbird (Phaethon lepturus). Juveniles consistently showed lower plumage mercury than adults. The lowest mean level was

Jessica Kojadinovic; Paco Bustamante; Carine Churlaud; Richard P. Cosson; Matthieu Le Corre

2007-01-01

190

Biogeochemical factors affecting mercury methylation rate in two contaminated floodplain soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An automated biogeochemical microcosm system allowing controlled variation of redox potential (EH) in soil suspensions was used to assess the effect of various factors on the mobility of mercury (Hg) as well as on the methylation of Hg in two contaminated floodplain soils with different Hg concentrations (approximately 5 mg kg-1 Hg and >30 mg kg-1 Hg). The experiment was conducted under stepwise variation from reducing (approximately -350 mV at pH 5) to oxidizing conditions (approximately 600 mV at pH 5). Results of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis indicate the occurrence of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) such as Desulfobacter species (10me16:0, cy17:0, 10me18:0, cy19:0) or Desulfovibrio species (18:2?6,9), which are considered to promote Hg methylation. The products of the methylation process are lipophilic, highly toxic methyl mercury species such as the monomethyl mercury ion [MeHg+], which is named as MeHg here. The ln(MeHg/Hgt) ratio is assumed to reflect the net production of monomethyl mercury normalized to total dissolved Hg (Hgt) concentration. This ratio increases with rising dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to Hgt ratio (lnDOC/lnHgt ratio) (R2 = 0.39, p < 0.0001, n = 63) whereas the relation between ln(MeHg/Hgt) ratio and lnDOC is weaker (R2 = 0.09; p < 0.05; n = 63). In conclusion, the DOC/Hgt ratio might be a more important factor for the Hg net methylation than DOC alone in the current study. Redox variations seem to affect the biogeochemical behavior of dissolved inorganic Hg species and MeHg indirectly through related changes in DOC, sulfur cycle, and microbial community structure whereas E,H and pH values, as well as concentration of dissolved Fe,3+/Fe2+ and Cl- seem to play subordinate roles in Hg mobilization and methylation under our experimental conditions.

Frohne, T.; Rinklebe, J.; Langer, U.; Du Laing, G.; Mothes, S.; Wennrich, R.

2011-09-01

191

Molecular field analysis of trophic relationships in soil-dwelling invertebrates to identify mercury, lead and cadmium transmission through forest ecosystems.  

PubMed

Contamination pathways in complex food chains in soil ecosystems can be difficult to elucidate. Molecular analysis of predator gut content can, however, rapidly reveal previously unidentified trophic interactions between invertebrates and thereby uncover pathways of pollutant spread. Here, we measured concentrations of the toxic metals lead, cadmium and mercury in carabid beetle predators and their prey. Invertebrates were sampled at one control and four heavy metal-polluted sites to reveal the impact of diet composition and seasonal variation in prey availability on metal burden in carabids and metal transfer pathways through forest ecosystems. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of carabid diet composition based on PCR analysis of gut contents at the forest community level, rather than in cultivated fields. Extensive screening using group- and species-specific primers revealed that carabids ate primarily earthworms and slugs, as well as smaller numbers of woodlice and springtails. Metal concentrations in carabids correlated with seasonal changes in diet. Mercury accumulated in beetle predators more than in their slug prey. As earthworms, slugs and carabid beetles are the major prey of many birds and mammals, prey-predator transfer and associated toxicity are major risks at mercury-contaminated sites. Carabids may be useful bioindicators for assessing the impact of pollutants on soil ecosystems, as long as species and seasonal factors are taken into account. PMID:24138157

Seri? Jelaska, Lucija; Jurasovi?, Jasna; Brown, David S; Vaughan, Ian P; Symondson, William O C

2014-08-01

192

Population correlates of circulating mercury levels in Korean adults: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV  

PubMed Central

Background Prior studies focused on bioaccumulation of mercury (Hg) and on large, long-lived fish species as the major environmental source of Hg, but little is known about consumption of small-sized fish or about non-dietary determinants of circulating Hg levels. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whole blood mercury concentration (WBHg) and its major dietary and non-dietary correlates in Korean adults. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 3,972 (male?=?1,994; female?=?1,978) participants who completed the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV, 2008 to 2009. Relevant factors included diet, geographic location of residence, demographics, and lifestyle. WBHg concentration was measured using cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Multivariable linear models assessed independent correlates of dietary and non-dietary factors for WBHg levels. Results Median levels of WBHg were 5.1 ?g/L in men and 3.7 ?g/L in women. Higher levels of fish/shellfish intake were associated with higher levels of WBHg. Higher consumption of small-sized fish was linked to higher levels of WBHg. Non-dietary predictors of higher WBHg were being male, greater alcohol consumption, higher income and education, overweight/obesity, increasing age, and living in the southeast region. Conclusions Both dietary and non-dietary factors were associated with WBHg levels in the Korean population. There is significant geographic variation in WBHg levels; residents living in the mid-south have higher WBHg levels. We speculate that uncontrolled geographic characteristics, such as local soil/water content and specific dietary habits are involved.

2014-01-01

193

Locational Differences in Mercury and Selenium Levels in 19 Species of Saltwater Fish from New Jersey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals who fish, and their families that ingest self-caught fish, make decisions about where to fish, what type of fish to eat, and the quantity of fish to eat. While federal and state agencies often issue consumption advisories for some fish with high mercury (Hg) concentrations, advisories seldom provide the actual metal levels to the general public. There are few

Joanna Burger; Christian Jeitner; Michael Gochfeld

2011-01-01

194

Bioaccumulation of trace mercury in trophic levels of benthic, benthopelagic, pelagic fish species, and sea birds from Arvand River, Iran.  

PubMed

In this study, concentration of mercury was determined in the trophic levels of benthic, benthopelagic, pelagic fish species, and river birds from Arvand River, located in the Khuzestan province in the lowlands of southwestern Iran at the head of the Persian Gulf. The order of mercury concentrations in tissues of the fish species was as follows: liver>gill>muscle and in tissues of the kingfisher species was as follows: feather>liver>kidney>muscle. Therefore, liver in fish and feather in kingfisher exhibited higher mercury concentration than the other tissues. There was a positive correlation between mercury concentrations in fish and kingfisher species with size of its food items. We expected to see higher mercury levels in tissues of female species because they are larger and can eat larger food items. The results of this study show that the highest mean mercury level were found in the kingfisher (Anas crecca), followed by benthic (Epinephelus diacanthus), benthopelagic (Chanos chanos), and pelagic fish (Strongylura strongylura). Mean value of mercury in fish species, S. strongylura were (0.61 ?g g(-1) dry weight), C. chanos (0.45 ?g g(-1) dry weight), E. diacanthus (0.87 ?g g(-1) dry weight), and in kingfisher species A. crecca was (2.64 ?g g(-1) dry weight). Significant correlation between mercury concentration in fish and kingfisher may be related to high variability of mercury in the fish. PMID:24174062

Hosseini, Mehdi; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad Bagher; Parsa, Yaghob

2013-12-01

195

Mercury in soils, lakes, and fish in Voyageurs National Park (Minnesota): Importance of atmospheric deposition and ecosystem factors  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Concentrations of methylmercury in game fish from many interior lakes in Voyageurs National Park (MN, U.S.A.) substantially exceed criteria for the protection of human health. We assessed the importance of atmospheric and geologic sources of mercury to interior lakes and watersheds within the Park and identified ecosystem factors associated with variation in methylmercury contamination of lacustrine food webs. Geologic sources of mercury were small, based on analyses of underlying bedrock and C-horizon soils, and nearly all mercury in the O- and A-horizon soils was derived from atmospheric deposition. Analyses of dated sediment cores from five lakes showed that most (63% ?? 13%) of the mercury accumulated in lake sediments during the 1900s was from anthropogenic sources. Contamination of food webs was assessed by analysis of whole, 1-year-old yellow perch (Perca flavescens), a regionally important prey fish. The concentrations of total mercury in yellow perch and of methylmercury in lake water varied substantially among lakes, reflecting the influence of ecosystem processes and variables that affect the microbial production and abundance of methylmercury. Models developed with the information-theoretic approach (Akaike Information Criteria) identified lake water pH, dissolved sulfate, and total organic carbon (an indicator of wetland influence) as factors influencing methylmercury concentrations in lake water and fish. We conclude that nearly all of the mercury in fish in this seemingly pristine landscape was derived from atmospheric deposition, that most of this bioaccumulated mercury was from anthropogenic sources, and that both watershed and lacustrine factors exert important controls on the bioaccumulation of methylmercury. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

Wiener, J. G.; Knights, B. C.; Sandheinrich, M. B.; Jeremiason, J. D.; Brigham, M. E.; Engstrom, D. R.; Woodruff, L. G.; Cannon, W. F.; Balogh, S. J.

2006-01-01

196

Legacy mercury and stoichiometry with C, N, and S in soil, pore water, and stream water across the upland-wetland interface: The influence of hydrogeologic setting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mechanisms influencing retention, biogeochemical cycling, and release of legacy mercury within soils of forests and wetlands remain poorly understood. We quantified mercury pool size and stoichiometry with carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur across forest-wetland transects and among wetlands of different hydrogeologic settings in the Adirondack region of New York State. Average total mercury pool size in soils (to 50 cm depth) was greater in forests (17.5 mg/m2) than in wetlands (6.1 mg/m2; p < 0.010). The average mercury pool size (to 50 cm depth) in shallow-peat riparian wetlands (9.3 mg/m2) was greater than in deep-peat riparian (5.4 mg/m2; p = 0.099) or headwater wetlands (3.6 mg/m2; p = 0.046). Accumulation of mercury was enhanced at the forest-wetland interface. In mineral horizons of the forest soil and in shallow-peat riparian wetlands, mercury was positively correlated with carbon (r2 = 0.73-0.96) and nitrogen (r2 = 0.82-0.93), but not sulfur. In contrast, mercury and sulfur were strongly correlated in headwater wetland peat (r2 = 0.73). Dissolved mercury was correlated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in pore water and stream water of deep-peat and shallow-peat riparian wetlands (r2 = 0.46-0.73), but not in headwater wetland pore water. In headwater outlet streams, dissolved mercury was correlated with DOC (r2 = 0.62), but the slope was only one third that in riparian streams. Hydrogeologic setting influences decomposition processes, biogeochemical cycling of mercury, and hydrologic transport that in turn, govern the size and stoichiometry of mercury pools across the upland-wetland interface and among different wetland types. Ultimately, mobilization of legacy mercury into aquatic ecosystems from forest soils and wetlands likely depends upon decomposition dynamics and hydrologic flow paths.

Demers, Jason D.; Yavitt, Joseph B.; Driscoll, Charles T.; Montesdeoca, Mario R.

2013-06-01

197

[Mercury poisoning].  

PubMed

Mercury is a widespread heavy metal with potential severe impacts on human health. Exposure conditions to mercury and profile of toxicity among humans depend on the chemical forms of the mercury: elemental or metallic mercury, inorganic or organic mercury compounds. This article aims to reviewing and synthesizing the main knowledge of the mercury toxicity and its organic compounds that clinicians should know. Acute inhalation of metallic or inorganic mercury vapours mainly induces pulmonary diseases, whereas chronic inhalation rather induces neurological or renal disorders (encephalopathy and interstitial or glomerular nephritis). Methylmercury poisonings from intoxicated food occurred among some populations resulting in neurological disorders and developmental troubles for children exposed in utero. Treatment using chelating agents is recommended in case of symptomatic acute mercury intoxication; sometimes it improves the clinical effects of chronic mercury poisoning. Although it is currently rare to encounter situations of severe intoxication, efforts remain necessary to decrease the mercury concentration in the environment and to reduce risk on human health due to low level exposure (dental amalgam, fish contamination by organic mercury compounds…). In case of occupational exposure to mercury and its compounds, some disorders could be compensated in France. Clinicians should work with toxicologists for the diagnosis and treatment of mercury intoxication. PMID:20579784

Bensefa-Colas, L; Andujar, P; Descatha, A

2011-07-01

198

An exploratory study of total mercury levels in archaeological caribou hair from northwest Alaska.  

PubMed

Over the past ten years, total mercury (THg) levels have been surveyed in Alaskan wildlife and fish as part of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment (AMAP). Beyond these studies there is little historical data on THg levels in important subsistence species for people in Alaska. A survey of THg in caribou hair from archaeological deposits would provide data to develop temporal trends for this region of the Arctic. Caribou hair from a Western Thule settlement beneath the Alaska native village of Deering (ca. AD 1150) show variability in hair THg values, with a mean level (86 ng/g) which is in the range that is observed in modern Rangifer sp. (caribou and reindeer). Hair from House 1 had a THg mean level of 99.6 ng/g and hair from House 2 had a THg mean of 64.2 ng/g. This is the earliest reported record of mercury in caribou associated with human subsistence activities in the western North American Arctic, and is a first step toward compilation of a needed database through which to measure and evaluate exposure to mercury by people who rely heavily on caribou as a food source. We hypothesize that similarity in mercury values in archaeological samples of caribou and in contemporary samples would give an additional perspective on human exposure to mercury through caribou harvest and consumption today. Since this hypothesis will be more useful if evaluated at a regional rather than global scale, further studies will be needed at different archaeological sites across Alaska to determine the generality of this observation in relation to geographic scale. PMID:16876850

Gerlach, S Craig; Duffy, Lawrence K; Murray, Maribeth S; Bowers, Peter M; Adams, Rachel; Verbrugge, David A

2006-12-01

199

Estimation and Mapping of Wet and Dry Mercury Deposition Across Northeastern North America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whereas many ecosystem characteristics and processes influence mercury accumulation in higher trophic-level organisms, the mercury flux from the atmosphere to a lake and its watershed is a likely factor in potential risk to biota. Atmospheric deposition clearly affects mercury accumulation in soils and lake sediments. Thus, knowledge of spatial patterns in atmospheric deposition may provide information for assessing the relative

Eric K. Miller; Alan Vanarsdale; Gerald J. Keeler; Ann Chalmers; Laurier Poissant; Neil C. Kamman; Raynald Brulotte

2005-01-01

200

Are liver and renal lesions in East Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) associated with high mercury levels?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: In the Arctic, polar bears (Ursus maritimus) bio-accumulate mercury as they prey on polluted ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus). Studies have shown that polar bears from East Greenland are among the most mercury polluted species in the Arctic. It is unknown whether these levels are toxic to liver and kidney tissue. METHODS: We investigated the

Christian Sonne; Rune Dietz; Pall S Leifsson; Gert Asmund; Erik W Born; Maja Kirkegaard

2007-01-01

201

Influence of methylmercury from tributary streams on mercury levels in Savannah River Asiatic clams  

Microsoft Academic Search

Average methylmercury levels in five Savannah River tributary streams, sampled 11 times over 2 years (0.170 ng\\/l), were nearly twice as high as in the Savannah River (0.085 ng\\/l). Total mercury levels in the tributaries (2.98 ng\\/l) did not differ significantly from the river (2.59 ng\\/l). All of the tributaries drained extensive wetlands that would be expected to support comparatively

M. H Paller; C. H Jagoe; H Bennett; H. A Brant; J. A Bowers

2004-01-01

202

The association between amalgam dental surfaces and urinary mercury levels in a sample of Albertans, a prevalence study  

PubMed Central

Objective The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between number of dental amalgam surfaces and urinary mercury levels. Methods This study uses participant data from a large philanthropic chronic disease prevention program in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Urine samples were analysed for mercury levels (measured in ?g/g-creatinine). T-tests were used to determine if differences in urine mercury were statistically significant between persons with no dental amalgam surfaces and one or more dental amalgam surfaces. Linear regression was used to estimate the change in urinary mercury per amalgam surface. Results Urinary mercury levels were statistically significantly higher in participants with amalgam surfaces, with an average difference of 0.55 ?g/g-creatinine. Per amalgam surface, we estimated an expected increase of 0.04 ?g/g-creatinine. Measured urinary mercury levels were also statistically significantly higher in participants with dental amalgam surfaces following the oral administration of 2,3-dimercaptopropane-l-sulfonate (DMPS) and meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) which are used to mobilize mercury from the blood and tissues. Discussion Our estimates indicate that an individual with seven or more dental amalgam surfaces has 30% to 50% higher urinary mercury levels than an individual without amalgams. This is consistent with past literature that has identified seven amalgam surfaces as an unsafe level of exposure to mercury vapor. Our analysis suggests that continued use of silver amalgam dental fillings for restorative dentistry is a non-negligible, unnecessary source of mercury exposure considering the availability of composite resin alternatives.

2013-01-01

203

Mercury vapor pressure of flue gas desulfurization scrubber suspensions: effects of pH level, gypsum, and iron.  

PubMed

Calcium-based scrubbers designed to absorb HCl and SO(2) from flue gases can also remove oxidized mercury. Dissolved mercury halides may have an appreciable partial vapor pressure. Chemical reduction of the dissolved mercury may increase the Hg emission, thereby limiting the coremoval of mercury in the wet scrubbing process. In this paper we evaluate the effects of the pH level, different gypsum qualities, and iron in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber suspensions. The impact of these parameters on mercury vapor pressure was studied under controlled laboratory conditions in model scrubber suspensions. A major influence is exerted by pH values above 7, considerably amplifying the mercury concentration in the vapor phase above the FGD scrubber suspension. Gypsum also increases the mercury re-emission. Fe(III) decreases and Fe(II) increases the vapor pressure significantly. The consequences of the findings for a reliable coremoval of mercury in FGD scrubbers are discussed. It is shown that there is an increased risk of poor mercury capture in lime-based FGD scrubbers in comparison to limestone FGD scrubbers. PMID:22324514

Schuetze, Jan; Kunth, Daniel; Weissbach, Sven; Koeser, Heinz

2012-03-01

204

Hair mercury levels in pregnant women in Mahshahr, Iran: fish consumption as a determinant of exposure.  

PubMed

MeHg is a well-documented neurotoxicant even at low levels of exposure. Developing brain, in particular, is vulnerable to that. Through bioaccumulating to differing degrees in various fish species, it can have serious adverse effects on the development and functioning of the human central nervous system, especially during prenatal exposure. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate mercury concentration in hair samples of pregnant women living in Mahshahr located in Khuzestan province, Iran. It assessed the association between fish consumption and specific characteristics that can influence exposure. From April to June 2008, 149 pregnant women were invited to participate in this study. An interview administered questionnaire was used to collect information about age, body weight, height, fish (fresh, canned and shrimp) consumption, pregnancy stage, residence duration, education level, family income and number of dental amalgam fillings. The obtained results showed that the geometric mean and range for hair total Hg concentration was 3.52 microg/g (0.44-53.56 microg/g). About 5.4% of mothers had hair total Hg levels in excess of 10 microg/g. Maternal hair mercury level was less than threshold level of WHO (5 microg/g). As expected, there was a clear increase in hair Hg with reported fresh marine fish consumption (p=0.04). The highest mean for hair mercury level in a group who consumed fish several times per week, was 4.93 microg/g. Moreover, a significant effect of age and residential time on Hg concentration in the hair of the women was found. Pregnant women in Mahshahr consumed large amounts of fish; consequently, most of their offspring were prenatally exposed to moderately high levels of mercury. The results found suggest that pregnant women should decrease their fish consumption. PMID:20655095

Salehi, Zohreh; Esmaili-Sari, Abbas

2010-09-15

205

Mercury Contamination of Aquatic Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) factsheet contains information about US mercury contamination. Issues discussed include how mercury becomes a toxicological problem through bioaccumulation, human effects of mercury toxicity, and levels of atmospheric mercury. Mercury levels in fish are examined to determine how mercury gets into the environment and into the food chain.

Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Rickert, D. A.

206

Mercury levels in coral reefs along the Caribbean coast of Central America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediment and coral skeleton samples from 23 coral reefs along the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica and Panama (1497 km) were evaluated for total mercury (Hg). High levels of pollution were found in the entire region with averages of 18.9 and 71.3 ppb in coral skeletons and sediments respectively. Significantly higher contamination was found in Panamanian corals (21.4 ppb) while

Elia M. Garc; APO AA

207

Blood Levels of Lead, Cadmium, and Mercury in Residents of Tehran  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monitoring of toxic trace elements for human blood has been of interest to researchers in the fields of environmental chemistry\\u000a and medical science. The amount of blood toxic elements can reflect the disease state of the person or the environment where\\u000a that person resides or works. Chronic, low-level exposure to toxic metals such as lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and mercury

Leila Farzin; Mojtaba Amiri; Hadi Shams; Mohammad Amin Ahmadi Faghih; Mohammad Esmail Moassesi

2008-01-01

208

Mercury Air\\/Surface Exchange Kinetics of Background Soils of the Tahquamenon River Watershed in the Michigan Upper Peninsula  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air\\/surface exchange of mercury was investigated over background soils at five sites in the Tahquamenon River watershed in the Michigan Upper Peninsula in the summer of 1998. Measurements of Hg fluxes were performed during middayperiods using the ORNL Teflon dynamic flux chamber. Mean Hg emission fluxes were 1.4±0.3–2.4±1.0 ng m-2 hr-1 for three shaded forest sites and 7.6±1.7 ng m-2

H. Zhang; S. E. Lindberg; F. J. Marsik; G. J. Keeler

2001-01-01

209

The soil–air exchange characteristics of total gaseous mercury from a large-scale municipal landfill area  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cycle of mercury (Hg) from a gigantic landfill area (area ?2.72km2) was investigated by conducting micrometeorological measurements of its exchange rates across soil–air boundary during the spring season of 2000. Based on this field campaign, we attempted to provide various insights into the Hg exchange processes, especially with respect to the decoupling of the mixed signatures of complex source

Ki-Hyun Kim; Min-Young Kim; Gangwoong Lee

2001-01-01

210

Influence of methylmercury from tributary streams on mercury levels in Savannah River Asiatic clams.  

PubMed

Average methylmercury levels in five Savannah River tributary streams, sampled 11 times over 2 years (0.170 ng/l), were nearly twice as high as in the Savannah River (0.085 ng/l). Total mercury levels in the tributaries (2.98 ng/l) did not differ significantly from the river (2.59 ng/l). All of the tributaries drained extensive wetlands that would be expected to support comparatively high rates of methylation. Mercury concentrations in Asiatic clams (Corbicula fluminea) collected from the discharge plumes of Savannah River tributaries (average of 0.044 microg/g wet weight) were significantly (P<0.001) higher than in Asiatic clams collected from the Savannah River upstream from the tributary mouths (average of 0.017 microg/g wet weight). These results indicate that streams draining wetlands into coastal plain rivers can create localized areas of elevated methylmercury with resulting increases in the mercury levels of river biota. PMID:15144790

Paller, M H; Jagoe, C H; Bennett, H; Brant, H A; Bowers, J A

2004-06-01

211

Mercury in the River Nura and its floodplain, Central Kazakhstan: II. Floodplain soils and riverbank silt deposits.  

PubMed

A unique and serious case of mercury pollution has occurred in the River Nura and its floodplain in Central Kazakhstan, where mercury-rich wastewater from an acetaldehyde plant was discharged largely without treatment for several decades. In the river, the mercury became associated with millions of tonnes of power station fly ash, forming a new type of deposit known as 'technogenic silt'. During spring floods these highly contaminated silts are transported downstream and are dispersed over the floodplain, leading to widespread contamination of the land. A detailed survey of the floodplain was carried out to investigate the extent of pollution and to assess the need for remediation. Total mercury concentrations in the topsoils of the floodplain ranged from near background levels to over 100 mg/kg. Mercury concentrations in river bank deposits were found to range from a mean of 73.3 mg/kg Hg in the most contaminated section of the river to a mean of 13.4 mg/kg Hg at a distance of 70 km downstream. Concentrations were lower than corresponding concentrations in the riverbed within the first 25 km from the source of the pollution, but thereafter they were significantly higher. The results show that over the past 30-40 years a large proportion of the contaminated sediments from the river was deposited on the 70 km of banks and in the floodplain below the pollution source. Topsoils of the floodplain and silt deposits located on or close to the river banks contain an estimated 53 t and 65 t of mercury respectively, with an additional 62 t in a small natural swamp which was formerly used as a waste disposal area. The contamination is serious but relatively localized, with > 70% of the total amount of mercury in topsoils and > 90% of mercury in river bank deposits located within 25 km from the source. PMID:11032115

Heaven, S; Ilyushchenko, M A; Kamberov, I M; Politikov, M I; Tanton, T W; Ullrich, S M; Yanin, E P

2000-10-01

212

Monitoring and assessment of mercury pollution in the vicinity of a chloralkali plant. IV. Bioconcentration of mercury in in situ aquatic and terrestrial plants at Ganjam, India.  

PubMed

In situ aquatic and terrestrial plants including a few vegetable and crop plants growing in and around a chloralkali plant at Ganjam, India were analyzed for concentrations of root and shoot mercury. The aquatic plants found to bioconcentrate mercury to different degrees included Marsilea spp., Spirodela polyrhiza, Jussiea repens, Paspalum scrobiculatam, Pistia stratiotes, Eichhornia crassipes, Hygrophila schulli, Monochoria hastata and Bacopa monniera. Among wild terrestrial plants Chloris barbata, Cynodon dactylon, Cyperus rotundus and Croton bonplandianum were found growing on heavily contaminated soil containing mercury as high as 557 mg/kg. Analysis of mercury in root and shoot of these plants in relation to the mercury levels in soil indicated a significant correlation between soil and plant mercury with the exception of C. bonplandianum. Furthermore, the tolerance to mercury toxicity was highest with C. barbata followed by C. dactylon and C. rotundus, in that order. The rice plants analyzed from the surrounding agricultural fields did not show any significant levels of bioconcentrated mercury. Of the different vegetables grown in a contaminated kitchen garden with mercury level at 8.91 mg/kg, the two leafy vegetables, namely cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and amaranthus (Amaranthus oleraceous), were found to bioconcentrate mercury at statistically significant levels. The overall study indicates that the mercury pollution is very much localized to the specific sites in the vicinity of the chloralkali plant. PMID:1536599

Lenka, M; Panda, K K; Panda, B B

1992-02-01

213

Elemental Mercury Vapour Toxicity: Treatment and Levels in Plasma and Urine  

Microsoft Academic Search

1 We report two cases of acute mercury vapour intoxication in humans. The mercury vapour was released from smelting alloys (gold-mercury amalgam). The alloy was apparently contaminated with an unknown amount of mercury.2 Within half an hour of the incident, the victims began having moderate headache, nausea, lumbar pain and shortness of breath at rest. The patients were treated with

P. Houeto; P. Sandouk; F. J. Baud; P. Levillain

1994-01-01

214

Complexation of Mercury(II) in Soil Organic Matter: EXAFS Evidence for Linear Two-Coordination with Reduced Sulfur Groups  

SciTech Connect

The chemical speciation of inorganic mercury (Hg) is to a great extent controlling biologically mediated processes, such as mercury methylation, in soils, sediments, and surface waters. Of utmost importance are complexation reactions with functional groups of natural organic matter (NOM), indirectly determining concentrations of bioavailable, inorganic Hg species. Two previous extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopic studies have revealed that reduced organic sulfur (S) and oxygen/nitrogen (O/N) groups are involved in the complexation of Hg(II) to humic substances extracted from organic soils. In this work, covering intact organic soils and extending to much lower concentrations of Hg than before, we show that Hg is complexed by two reduced organic S groups (likely thiols) at a distance of 2.33 Angstroms in a linear configuration. Furthermore, a third reduced S (likely an organic sulfide) was indicated to contribute with a weaker second shell attraction at a distance of 2.92-3.08 Angstroms. When all high-affinity S sites, corresponding to 20-30% of total reduced organic S, were saturated, a structure involving one carbonyl-O or amino-N at 2.07 Angstroms and one carboxyl-O at 2.84 Angstroms in the first shell, and two second shell C atoms at an average distance of 3.14 Angstroms, gave the best fit to data. Similar results were obtained for humic acid extracted from an organic wetland soil. We conclude that models that are in current use to describe the biogeochemistry of mercury and to calculate thermodynamic processes need to include a two-coordinated complexation of Hg(II) to reduced organic sulfur groups in NOM in soils and waters.

Skyllberg,U.; Bloom, P.; Qian, J.; Lin, C.; Bleam, W.

2006-01-01

215

Association between Low-level Mercury Exposure and Neurobehavioral Functions in Korean Adults Living in a Coastal City  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the association between low-level mercury exposure and neurobehavioral functions in adults living in coastal regions of Korea. Methods We selected 172 adults aged 20-65 years living in a city in the coastal region of Korea. A sociodemographic survey was conducted, mercury levels in the blood, urine, and hair were measured, and the associations according to computerized neurobehavioral tests were determined using univariate analysis. After adjustment for associated variables, a multivariate linear regression analysis was performed. Results The geometric mean mercury levels in the blood, urine, and hair were 5.41 µg/L (range, 0.00-15.84 µg/L), 1.17 µg/g-creatinine (range, 0.00-32.86 µg/g-creatinine), and 1.37 mg/kg (range, 0.42-6.56 mg/kg), respectively. Variables that were associated with simple reaction time according to the neurobehavioral test results were age and urine mercury level. Variables associated with choice reaction time were the recent use of Korean traditional medicine and urine mercury level. Variables associated with the right-hand finger tapping speed test were age, gender, smoking behavior, education level, monthly household income, and urine mercury level. Variables associated with the left-hand finger tapping speed test were age, gender, education level, and urine mercury level. After adjustment for associated variables, there was no significant association between urine mercury level and simple reaction time (?=25.96; p=0.47), choice reaction time (?=50.37; p=0.32), or the number of left-hand finger taps (?=-1.54; p=0.21). However, urine mercury level was significantly associated with the number of right-hand finger taps (?=-3.86; p=0.01). Conclusions We found no evidence that low-level mercury exposure in adults is associated with deficits in neurobehavioral functions. A longer follow-up study is required to confirm this conclusion.

Kim, Rock Bum; Kim, Byoung-Gwon; Kim, Yu-Mi; Hong, Young-Seoub; You, Chang-Hun

2013-01-01

216

Mercury in the Grisette, Amanita vaginata Fr. and soil below the fruiting bodies.  

PubMed

This study examined the mercury concentration in the Grisette Amanita vaginata Fr. and soil below the fruiting bodies collected between 2000 and 2008 from the wild at seven distant sites across Poland. The Hg content in samples was determined by cold atomic absorption method (CV-AAS) at a wavelength of 253.7 nm. Mean Hg contents varied from 0.096 ± 0.052 to 0.48 ± 0.13 mg kg(-1) dry matter (dm) in caps (range, 0.043-0.73 mg kg(-1)), from 0.047 ± 0.02 to 0.23 ± 0.07 mg kg(-1) dm (range, 0.028-0.47 mg kg(-1)) in stipes, and in underlying soil were from 0.035 ± 0.018 to 0.096 ± 0.036 mg kg(-1) dm (range, 0.017 to 0.16 mg kg(-1)). The median Qc/s values ranged from 1.2 to 2.2 (mean 1.2 ± 0.4 to 2.1 ± 0.5) indicating that Hg content in stipes was generally lower than in caps. This mushroom species has some potential to bioconcentrate Hg in the fruiting bodies, as the values of the bioconcentration factor (BCF) varied for the sites between 1.2 ± 0.6 to 11 ± 5 for caps and 0.61 ± 0.26 to 7.4 ± 3.9 for stipes. Also available literature data on Hg in A. vaginata are reviewed and discussed. PMID:24813987

Drewnowska, Ma?gorzata; Nnorom, Innocent Chidi; Falandysz, Jerzy

2014-07-01

217

How humic substances dominate mercury geochemistry in contaminated floodplain soils and sediments  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of mercury (Hg) and humic substances (hs) was studied in floodplain topsoils and surface sediments of the contaminated German river Elbe. An intimate coupling exists between the geochemical cycles of Hg and organic carbon (OC) in this ecosystem. Humic substances exert a dominant influence on several important parallel geochemical pathways of Hg, including binding, transformation, and transport processes. Significant differences exist between the Hg-hs associations in floodplains and sediments. Both humic acids (ha) and fulvic acids (fa) contribute to Hg binding in the sediments. In contrast, ultrafiltration experiments proved that Hg in the floodplain soils is almost exclusively bound to very large humic acids (ha) with a nominal molecular weight (MW) > 300,000. Successive cation and anion exchange experiments demonstrated that those Hg-ha complexes are inert toward competition by other cations, and also apparently predominantly electroneutral. Speciation transformation reactions in the solid phase were investigated by sequential extraction and thermal release experiments. Upon addition of Hg model compounds to a sediment matrix, all species were transformed to the same new speciation pattern, regardless of their original speciation. The accompanying alterations in availability and solubility were partially due to interconversion between the different Hg redox states, including Hg(I). Simultaneously, partial transformation of added Hg{sup 2+} into volatile Hg compounds (35% in 10 d) was observed. Finally, Hg association with water-soluble ha continuously increased downstream, indicating that hs play a key role in both lateral and longitudinal Hg transport in the Elbe ecosystem.

Wallschlaeger, D.; Desai, M.V.M.; Spengler, M.; Windmoeller, C.C.; Wilken, R.D. [GKSS Forschungszentrum GmbH, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Chemische Analytik

1998-09-01

218

Determination of Ultratrace Levels of Mercury in SRM 2781 Domestic Sludge by Combustion RNAA  

SciTech Connect

The domestic sludge SRM 2781 was collected from Denver, Colorado, sewage disposal district 1 (DMSDD) in the early 1990s. The DMSDD calls this material 'domestic' because only light industry is present in this district. The term 'domestic' differs from an 'industrial' label by the amount of heavy industry present in the area. The determination of mercury and other toxic elements in these sludges is important to monitor the sources and pathways of environmental exposure to these materials. Analytical results for the determination of total mercury in SRM 2781, domestic sludge, by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) are listed in Table I. These analyses were made to measure the total mercury for use in the certification process of this reference material. The control sample data agreed well with the certified values and confirm the methods, procedures, and corrections used. This RNAA combustion procedure is effective in producing high-quality analytical data at the microgram/kilogram concentration level in both the organic and inorganic matrices of these samples. The procedure has both high sensitivity and freedom from significant reagent blanks when properly performed.

Bruce R. Norman; Donald A. Becker; Richard T. Lostritto

2000-11-12

219

Mercury interferes with endogenous antioxidant levels in Yukon River subsistence-fed sled dogs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Before adopting modern corn-and-grain-based western processed diets, circumpolar people had a high fat and protein subsistence diet and exhibited a low incidence of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Some health benefits are attributable to a subsistence diet that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants. Pollution, both global and local, is a threat to wild foods, as it introduces contaminants into the food system. Northern indigenous people and their sled dogs are exposed to a variety of contaminants, including mercury, that accumulate in the fish and game that they consume. The sled dogs in Alaskan villages are maintained on the same subsistence foods as their human counterparts, primarily salmon, and therefore they can be used as a food systems model for researching the impact of changes in dietary components. In this study, the antioxidant status and mercury levels were measured for village sled dogs along the Yukon River. A reference kennel, maintained on a nutritionally balanced commercial diet, was also measured for comparison. Total antioxidant status was inversely correlated with the external stressor mercury.

Dunlap, Kriya L.; Reynolds, Arleigh J.; Gerlach, S. Craig; Duffy, Lawrence K.

2011-10-01

220

Content and chemical form of mercury and selenium in soil, sludge, and fertilizer materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The content and chemical from of Hg and Se were determined for several samples of municipal sewage sludge and sludge ash, garden soil having a history of sludge and residential compost application, and selected fertilizer materials (peat moss, cow manure, residential compost, composted municipal refuse and sewage sludge, Miloganite). Municipal sewage sludge had the highest levels of total Hg (averaging

Chris J. Cappon

1984-01-01

221

Determination of the potential for release of mercury from combustion product amended soils: part 2--coal fly ash generated stabilized soil and degradation products.  

PubMed

The potential for mercury (Hg) releases to the air and water from three soils, two subbituminous coal fly ashes, and mixtures of these materials as stabilized soil was assessed. In addition, the potential for Hg release from crushed stabilized material mixed into soil simulating degradation over time was investigated. In general, atmospheric Hg deposition was measured for the ash and materials made using the ash with the higher Hg concentration (ash 1, 0.25 microg x g(-1)), whereas the second ash material (ash 2; approximately 0.08 microg x g(-1)) and materials generated using this ash exhibited emission as the dominant flux. Fluxes measured from stabilized material were less than that measured for the pure ash material but of the same direction. Although the stabilized and degraded stabilized materials exhibited Hg fluxes that were significantly different from base soils, values were within the range reported for low Hg-containing background soils. Because of limitations of the experimental design (i.e., reduced light exposures and measurement of flux from dry materials) reported fluxes are most likely underestimates of that which would occur in the natural environment. Materials made to simulate degradation of the stabilized material did not exhibit higher releases than the stabilized material alone. Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP; EPA method 1312) results showed that the chemistry of a soil, especially pH, may influence the amount of Hg released to soil solutions, with more acidic soils potentially enhancing Hg release. PMID:19044165

Gustin, Mae Sexauer; Xin, Mei; Ericksen, Jody; Fernandez, George C

2008-11-01

222

A new, catchment-scale model for simulating methyl and total mercury in soils and surface waters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury (Hg) is a potent and persistent neurotoxin. It is subject to long-range atmospheric transport, accumulates in catchment soils, and can pose health risks to humans and animals both at the point of use as well as in remote locations. Elevated concentrations of methyl mercury (MeHg) in fish are related to atmospheric Hg deposition and have resulted in fish consumption advisories in many parts of North America and Fennoscandia. After more than 150 years of elevated Hg deposition in Europe and North America, there remains a large inventory of Hg in the terrestrial catchments of lakes, which continues to be exported to receiving waters despite decreasing atmospheric inputs. While a substantial Hg pool exists in boreal catchment soils, fluxes of Hg from catchments via stream runoff tend to be much lower than atmospheric Hg inputs. Terrestrial catchments receiving similar atmospheric Hg inputs can have markedly different patterns of Hg output in stream water. Considering the importance of catchment processes in determining Hg flux to lakes and subsequent MeHg concentrations in fish, there is a need to characterize Hg cycling and transport in boreal and temperate forest-covered catchments. We present a new, catchment-scale, process-based dynamic model for simulating Hg in soils and surface waters. The Integrated Catchments Model for Mercury (INCA-Hg) simulates transport of gaseous, dissolved and solid Hg and transformations between elemental (Hg0), ionic (Hg(II)) and MeHg in natural and semi-natural landscapes. The mathematical description represents the model as a series of linked, first-order differential equations describing chemical and hydrological processes in catchment soils and waters which control surface water Hg dynamics and subsequent fluxes to lakes and other receiving waters. The model simulates daily time series between one and one hundred years long and can be applied to catchments ranging in size from <1 to ~10000 km2. Here we present applications of the model to two boreal forest headwater catchments in central Canada where we were able to reproduce observed patterns of stream water total mercury (THg) and MeHg fluxes and concentrations. Model performance was assessed using Monte Carlo techniques. Simulated in-stream THg and MeHg concentrations were sensitive to hydrologic controls and terrestrial and aquatic process rates. Our results show the need for new research to better quantify in-situ methylation and demethylation rates in soils and surface waters and for additional surveys of soil Hg concentrations. These data are needed for constraining model simulations of the effects of changing climate, Hg deposition and land management on fluxes of THg and MeHg.

Futter, M. N.; Poste, A. E.; Whitehead, P. G.; Dillon, P. J.

2012-04-01

223

Mercury and selenium levels in 19 species of saltwater fish from New Jersey as a function of species, size, and season.  

PubMed

There are few data on risks to biota and humans from mercury levels in saltwater fish. This paper examines mercury and selenium levels in muscle of 19 species of fish caught by recreational fisherfolk off the New Jersey shore, as a function of species of fish, size, and season, and risk of mercury to consumers. Average mercury levels ranged from 0.01 ppm (wet weight) (Menhaden Brevoortia tyrannus) to 1.83 ppm (Mako Shark Isurus oxyrinchus). There were four categories of mercury levels: very high (only Mako), high (averaging 0.3-0.5 ppm, 3 species), medium (0.14-0.20 ppm, 10 species), and low (below 0.13 ppm, 5 species). Average selenium levels for the fish species ranged from 0.18 ppm to 0.58 ppm, and had lower variability than mercury (coefficient of variation=38.3 vs 69.1%), consistent with homeostatic regulation of this essential element. The correlation between mercury and selenium was significantly positive for five and negative for two species. Mercury levels showed significant positive correlations with fish size for ten species. Size was the best predictor of mercury levels. Selenium showed no consistent relationship to fish length. Over half of the fish species had some individual fish with mercury levels over 0.3 ppm, and a third had fish with levels over 0.5 ppm, levels that pose a human health risk for high end consumers. Conversely several fish species had no individuals above 0.5 ppm, and few above 0.3 ppm, suggesting that people who eat fish frequently, can reduce their risk from mercury by selecting which species (and which size) to consume. Overall, with the exception of shark, Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus), Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) and Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis), the species sampled are generally medium to low in mercury concentration. Selenium:mercury molar ratios were generally above 1:1, except for the Mako shark. PMID:21292311

Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

2011-03-15

224

Mercury in soil near a long-term air emission source in southeastern Idaho  

USGS Publications Warehouse

At the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in southeastern Idaho, a 500??C fluidized bed calciner was intermittently operated for 37 years, with measured Hg emission rates of 9-11 g/h. Surface soil was sampled at 57 locations around the facility to determine the spatial distribution of Hg fallout and surface Hg variability, and to predict the total residual Hg mass in the soil from historical emissions. Measured soil concentrations were slightly higher (p<0.05) within 5 km of the source but were overall very low (15-20 ng/g) compared to background Hg levels published for similar soils in the USA (50-70 ng/g). Concentrations decreased 4%/cm with depth and were found to be twice as high under shrubs and in depressions. Mass balance calculations accounted for only 2.5-20% of the estimated total Hg emitted over the 37-year calciner operating history. These results suggest that much of the Hg deposited from calciner operations may have been reduced in the soil and re-emitted as Hg(0) to the global atmospheric pool.

Abbott, M. L.; Susong, D. D.; Olson, M.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.

2003-01-01

225

Effect of lifestyles on the blood mercury level in Korean adults.  

PubMed

Mercury (Hg) is widely distributed in the environment and oral exposure is a main route in the general population. In this study, we estimated the dietary intake of Hg and its relationship with blood Hg levels in Korean adults. The study subjects were recruited from three different districts (rural: 189, coastal: 208 and urban: 184). We used a general questionnaire to collect information about demographic factors, lifestyles and diet. Dietary habits were studied using the 24-h recall method. The estimation of Hg intake was performed using the database of Hg contents in 128 Korean foods based on the previous studies. Blood Hg was analyzed using Direct Mercury Analyzer with the gold-amalgam method. Daily intake of Hg by diet was estimated at 13.57 ?g (0.22 ?g/kg body weight). The geometric mean Hg concentration in whole blood was 3.92 ?g/L. Blood Hg level and Hg intake by diet was higher in coastal areas than in urban or rural areas, respectively. Blood Hg level correlated with the intake of Hg consumed from diet. Seafood was highly responsible and account for 75.6% of total dietary Hg intake. In this study, blood Hg concentrations were found to be significantly affected by sex, age, individual lifestyles and especially the amount of seafood intake, which might play an important role in determining blood Hg levels in Korean adults. PMID:23155199

Kim, N-Y; Ahn, S-J; Ryu, D-Y; Choi, B-S; Kim, H; Yu, I-J; Park, J-D

2013-06-01

226

Mercury environment monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a development of analytical techniques and a portable high selective analyzer for measuring mercury content in the atmosphere, water, soil and biological objects to use them in ecological monitoring and to control technological processes with mercury and the compounds thereof. Provision of mercury monitoring is made from background to maximum permissible concentration (MPC).

Antipov, A. B.; Genina, E. Y.; Melnikov, N. G.; Kashkan, G. V.

1995-10-01

227

REVIEW OF STATE SOIL CLEANUP LEVELS FOR DIOXIN (DECEMBER 2009)  

EPA Science Inventory

This final report summarizes a survey of state soil cleanup levels for dioxin and characterizes the science underlying these values. The objective of this project was to summarize existing state cleanup levels for dioxin in soil, together with their scientific bases where availa...

228

Successful Characterization and Remedial Contour of Highly Contaminated Mercury Soil at the Y-12 National Security Complex - 13593  

SciTech Connect

An area known as the 81-10 pad within the footprint of the Y-12 National Security Complex, suspected to be heavily contaminated with mercury, was slated for characterization in support of a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) milestone to be accomplished by September 30, 2012. A full remedial design report (RDR) required the soil in Exposure Unit -9 (EU-9) to be fully characterized for a number of contaminates of concern including mercury. The goal of this characterization effort was to determine what soil, if any, would need to be removed for the protection of industrial workers and impacts to the surface and ground water. Funding for this project was made available using buy-back scope under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The EU-9 soil unit involved 3 different classifications which were determined as follows: Class 1: Known to have been impacted, contamination is likely; Class 2: Suspected to have been impacted, contamination is unknown; Class 3: Area not known to have been impacted, contamination unlikely. Due to various sampling and analysis events since the 1980's, significant mercury contamination was expected under the concrete pad of an area known as 81-10. Mercury contamination outside of the boundary of this pad within the EU-9 footprint was not known and therefore an original planned estimate of 1,461 cubic meters of material were expected to be heavily contaminated with mercury requiring removal, treatment and disposal. Through the use of a highly effective nature and extent sampling and analysis design that involved a hybrid of statistically-based and judgmental sampling, the actual remedial contour requiring removal was approximately 717 cubic meters, roughly 12% of the original estimate. This characterization approach was executed in full compliance with the Record of Decision (ROD) [1] documents that were agreed upon by the U.S. Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. In addition, the RDR was completed ahead of the FFA milestone date of September 30, 2012. (authors)

White, Aaron; Rigas, Michael [U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Birchfield, Joseph W. III [1528 Paxton Drive Knoxville, TN 37918 (United States)] [1528 Paxton Drive Knoxville, TN 37918 (United States)

2013-07-01

229

Effects of In-Office and Home Bleaching Gels on the Surface Mercury Levels of Dental Amalgam  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different in-office and home bleaching gels on the surface mercury levels of dental amalgam. Methods: Sixty disk-shaped amalgam specimens (GS-80, SDI- Australia) were prepared and randomly divided into the following treatment groups: 1. Distilled water (control); 2. 15% home-bleach carbamide peroxide (Opalescence PF, Ultra dent, USA) applied for 6 h/day for 3 weeks; and 3. 35% in-office bleach carbamide peroxide (Opalescence Quick, Ultradent) applied for 30 min/week for 3 weeks. Levels of mercury were measured as weight percentages using an energy dispersive x-ray micro-analyzer detector connected to an electron microscope. Data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey tests (P<.05). Results: There were no significant differences between the surface mercury levels measured following treatment with the tested home-bleach and in-office bleach products (P=0.71). However, both materials yielded significantly more mercury levels than that of the control group (P<.001). Conclusions: The tested bleaching products significantly elevated the surface mercury levels of amalgam in vitro.

Oskoee, Parnian Alizadeh; Kahnamoui, Mahdi Abed; Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Zadfattah, Firooz; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh

2010-01-01

230

Mercury retorting of calcine waste, contaminated soils and railroad ballast at the Idaho National Egineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been involved in nuclear reactor research and development for over 40 years. One of the earliest major projects involved the development of a nuclear powered aircraft engine, a long-term venture which used mercury as a shielding medium. Over the course of several years, a significant amount of mercury was spilled along the railroad tracks where the test engines were transported and stored. In addition, experiments with volume reduction of waste through a calcine process employing mercury as a catalyst resulted in mercury contaminated calcine waste. Both the calcine and Test Area North wastes have been identified in Department of Energy Action Memorandums to be retorted, thereby separating the mercury from the various contaminated media. Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company awarded the Mercury Retort contract to ETAS Corporation and assigned Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. to manage the treatment field activities. The mercury retort process entails a mobile unit which consists of four trailer-mounted subsystems requiring electricity, propane, and a water supply. This mobile system demonstrates an effective strategy for retorting waste and generating minimal secondary waste.

Cotten, G.B.; Rothermel, J.S. [Parsons Engineering Science, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Sherwood, J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heath, S.A.; Lo, T.Y.R. [ETAS Corporation (United States)

1996-02-28

231

Examination of blood levels of mercurials in practicing dentists using cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The toxicity of mercury compounds in dentistry has been an issue of increase concern. Relatively few data are available concerning the possible in vivo biotransformation of elemental mercury from dental amalgam into more toxic organic mercurials. The present study was designed to evaluate the existence of this in vivo pathway in dentists who work in a confined environment where metallic

S. B. Chang; C. Siew; S. E. Gruninger

2009-01-01

232

Mercury pollution in fish from South China Sea: levels, species-specific accumulation, and possible sources.  

PubMed

Both total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) levels in fish collected from South China Sea (SCS) were studied to understand Hg pollution in Chinese tropical marine ecosystems. The average THg concentrations in fish species ranged from 39.6 ?g/kg for rabbitfish (Siganus fuscessens) to 417 ?g/kg for thornfish (Terapon jarbua), while those of MeHg varied from 13 ?g/kg (rabbitfish) to 176 ?g/kg (thornfish). The median values of MeHg/THg ratios in different fish species ranged from 36 to 85%. Significant inter-species differences of THg and MeHg in fish were observed due to feeding habits and fish sizes. Overall, carnivorous fish had higher levels of THg, MeHg and MeHg/THg ratios than omnivorous and herbivorous fish. High Hg levels in fish of the SCS were probably related to Hg input from atmospheric deposition and anthropogenic activities. PMID:24721134

Liu, Jinling; Xu, Xiangrong; Yu, Shen; Cheng, Hefa; Hong, Yiguo; Feng, Xinbin

2014-05-01

233

Mercury accumulation by lower trophic-level organisms in lentic systems within the Guadalupe River watershed, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The water columns of four reservoirs (Almaden, Calero, Guadalupe and Lexington Reservoirs) and an abandoned quarry pit filled by Alamitos Creek drainage for recreational purposes (Lake Almaden) were sampled on September 14 and 15, 2004 to provide the first measurements of mercury accumulation by phytoplankton and zooplankton in lentic systems (bodies of standing water, as in lakes and reservoirs) within the Guadalupe River watershed, California. Because of widespread interest in ecosystem effects associated with historic mercury mining within and downgradient of the Guadalupe Riverwatershed, transfer of mercury to lower trophic-level organisms was examined. The propensity of mercury to bioaccumulate, particularly in phytoplankton and zooplankton at the base of the food web, motivated this attempt to provide information in support of developing trophic-transfer and solute-transport models for the watershed, and hence in support of subsequent evaluation of load-allocation strategies. Both total mercury and methylmercury were examined in these organisms. During a single sampling event, replicate samples from the reservoir water column were collected and processed for dissolved-total mercury, dissolved-methylmercury, phytoplankton mercury speciation, phytoplankton taxonomy and biomass, zooplankton mercury speciation, and zooplankton taxonomy and biomass. The timing of this sampling event was coordinated with sampling and analysis of fish from these five water bodies, during a period of the year when vertical stratification in the reservoirs generates a primary source of methylmercury to the watershed. Ancillary data, including dissolved organic carbon and trace-metal concentrations as well as vertical profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance and pH, were gathered to provide a water-quality framework from which to compare the results for mercury. This work, in support of the Guadalupe River Mercury Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Study, provides the first measurements of mercury trophic transfer through planktonic communities in this watershed. It is worth reemphasizing that this data set represents a single ?snap shot? of conditions in water bodies within the Guadalupe River watershed to: (1) fill gaps in trophic transfer information, and (2) provide a scientific basis for future process-based studies with enhanced temporal and spatial coverage. This electronic document was unconventionally formatted to enhance the accessibility of information to a wide range of interest groups.

Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Moon, Gerald E.; Husby, Peter; Lincoff, Andrew; Carter, James L.; Croteau, Marie-Noele

2005-01-01

234

Scalp hair and saliva as biomarkers in determination of mercury levels in Iranian women: amalgam as a determinant of exposure.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between mercury concentrations in saliva and hair in women with amalgam fillings and its relation with age and number of amalgam fillings. Eighty-two hair and saliva samples were collected randomly from Iranian women who have the same fish consumption pattern and free from occupational exposures. The mean+/-SD age of these women was 29.37+/-8.12 (ranged from 20 to 56). The determination of Hg level in hair samples was carried out by the LECO, AMA 254, Advanced Mercury Analyzer according to ASTM, standard No. D-6722. Mercury concentration in saliva samples was analyzed by PERKIN-ELMER 3030 Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The mean+/-SD mercury level in the women was 1.28+/-1.38 microg/g in hair and 4.14+/-4.08 microg/l in saliva; and there were positive correlation among them. A significant correlation was also observed between Hg level of saliva (Spearman's rho=0.93, P<0.001) and hair (Spearman's rho=0.92, P<0.001) with number of amalgam fillings. According to the results, we can conclude that amalgam fillings may be an effective source for high Hg concentration in hair and releasing the mercury to the saliva samples. PMID:20034733

Fakour, H; Esmaili-Sari, A; Zayeri, F

2010-05-15

235

A simple field test for the detection of mercury in polluted water, air and soil samples  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple field test for the detection of mercury is described. The test is based on the ligand exchange reaction where hexacyanoferrate(III) exchanges its cyanide ions with chromogenic organic ligand succinyl dihydroxamic acid (SDHA). In the reaction the colourless SDHA reacts with yellow K3Fe(CN)6 to give a greenish blue coloured complex in a slightly acidic solution containing mercury. The reaction

Lata Cherian; V. K. Gupta

1990-01-01

236

Soil organic matter must be restored to near original levels  

SciTech Connect

Burning of fossil fuels globally helps put 3 billion metric tons of carbon into the atmosphere per year more than is removed by all carbon sinks, By far the best use of that carbon would be to arrange sufficient extra plan growth and then transfer that plant growth into new stable soil organic matter. Twenty or more years of such effort would immensely improve the soils of the world. Any fraction of it would help decrease the threat of global greenhouse warming. A great worldwide goal should be to increase levels of soil organic matter levels considerably. It should be possible. The most important research relating to soil organic matter is perhaps yet to be done. Elucidation of the regulators involved in the build-up and decomposition processes of various types of soil organic matter deserves high priority. It should be possible to develop technologies where the regulators can be managed and controlled for the beneficial purpose of increasing levels of soil organic matter. The role of calcium in stabilizing soil organic matter needs more study. Genetic engineering of specific microorganisms may be needed to increase levels of soil organic matter.

Wallace, A. (Wallace Laboratories, El Segundo, CA (United States))

1994-01-01

237

Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

1995-01-01

238

Soil gas surveying at low-level radioactive waste sites.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Soil gas sampling is a useful screening technique for determining whether volatile organic compounds are present at low-level radioactive waste burial sites. The technique was used at several DOE sites during the DOE Environmental Survey to determine the ...

A. B. Crockett K. S. Moor L. C. Hull

1990-01-01

239

A modified EK method with an I-/I2 lixiviant assisted and approaching cathodes to remedy mercury contaminated field soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wanshan mercury mine is the largest cinnabar deposit in Guizhou, China. Few effective methods had been achieved to remedy Hg heavily contaminated field soils. In this paper, a modified EK method with approaching cathodes (AC-EK) and an I-/I2 lixiviant was described to remedy mercury-contaminated field soils near Wanshan mercury mine. Paddy Soil I and Paddy Soil II were sampled and contained 576.73 ± 45.50 and 491.35 ± 4.73 mg/kg Hg, respectively. Although they contained 6.9 and 9.4% organic matter respectively, more than 92 and 89% Hg were removed by AC-EK within 5 days. Removal ratio increased by 0.21 and 0.68 times using EK process with ACs over that with one single cathode (SC-EK). AC-EK method saved nearly 26.4-28.1% electric power as compared to SC-EK method. As an I-/I2 lixiviant solution was used to solubilize HgS(HgO) during EK process, the bonding of Hg to organic functional S groups should be less important than the binding to inner sites of organic matter in soil. The relationship between EK remediation effect and soil organic matter content was fitted to a linear model. It turned out that when soil OM increased by 1.0%, EK removal ratio (%) of Hg would decrease by 2.63%.

Shen, Zhemin; Zhang, Jianda; Qu, Liya; Dong, Zeqin; Zheng, Shenshen; Wang, Wenhua

2009-05-01

240

Evaluating the spatial variation of total mercury in young-of-year yellow perch (Perca flavescens), surface water and upland soil for watershed-lake systems within the southern Boreal Shield  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The primary objective of this research is to investigate relationships between mercury in upland soil, lake water and fish tissue and explore the cause for the observed spatial variation of THg in age one yellow perch (Perca flavescens) for ten lakes within the Superior National Forest. Spatial relationships between yellow perch THg tissue concentration and a total of 45 watershed and water chemistry parameters were evaluated for two separate years: 2005 and 2006. Results show agreement with other studies where watershed area, lake water pH, nutrient levels (specifically dissolved NO3--N) and dissolved iron are important factors controlling and/or predicting fish THg level. Exceeding all was the strong dependence of yellow perch THg level on soil A-horizon THg and, in particular, soil O-horizon THg concentrations (Spearman ?? = 0.81). Soil B-horizon THg concentration was significantly correlated (Pearson r = 0.75) with lake water THg concentration. Lakes surrounded by a greater percentage of shrub wetlands (peatlands) had higher fish tissue THg levels, thus it is highly possible that these wetlands are main locations for mercury methylation. Stepwise regression was used to develop empirical models for the purpose of predicting the spatial variation in yellow perch THg over the studied region. The 2005 regression model demonstrates it is possible to obtain good prediction (up to 60% variance description) of resident yellow perch THg level using upland soil O-horizon THg as the only independent variable. The 2006 model shows even greater prediction (r2 = 0.73, with an overall 10??ng/g [tissue, wet weight] margin of error), using lake water dissolved iron and watershed area as the only model independent variables. The developed regression models in this study can help with interpreting THg concentrations in low trophic level fish species for untested lakes of the greater Superior National Forest and surrounding Boreal ecosystem. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

Gabriel, M. C.; Kolka, R.; Wickman, T.; Nater, E.; Woodruff, L.

2009-01-01

241

The role of vegetation and soil in the biogeochemical cycling of mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The major purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the role plants play in regulating atmospheric Hg exchange with vegetated landscapes at an individual plant, and at ecosystem level. Investigation of ecosystem level measurements showed that large mesocosms could not be used for directly quantifying Hg flux from low-Hg containing substrates without a reliable system blank. Designs that minimize the mesocosm (volume)/(area of interest) ratio are recommended (Chapter 2). Smaller scale plant and soil Hg fluxes quantified using dynamic flux chambers were used to determine the air-surface Hg exchange from tallgrass prairie ecosystem housed in mesocosms (Chapter 3). Plant foliage was found to be a sink for atmospheric Hg, with uptake influenced by plant functional type and age. Emissions of Hg from vegetated and litter-covered soil were lower than fluxes from adjacent bare soil and the difference between the two was seasonally dependent and greatest when canopy coverage was greatest. Thus, an index of plant canopy development (canopy greenness) was used to model Hg flux from vegetated soil. Mass balance for the ecosystem housed in mesocosms showed that the tallgrass prairie was a net sink of atmospheric Hg, annually transferring 7.4 mug Hg m-2 to soil pool. Relative importance of stomatal versus non-stomatal routes of the foliar Hg exchange was assessed (Chapter 4). The non-stomatal route was shown to be an important way of Hg uptake into plant tissue in low humidity air, although details of uptake are not understood. The final objective addressed in this dissertation was to model Hg exchange from three biomes with background Hg concentrations using Geographic Information System (GIS) framework, and evaluate their importance in the regional and global Hg exchange (Chapter 5). Without taking into account foliar Hg uptake from the air, Hg emissions from desert, grassland and deciduous forest in the continental US were roughly estimated to be 5-7 tones per year. Plant canopy assimilation of air Hg (17 tones year-1) balanced the emissions, and the modeled domain was a net sink of atmospheric Hg, annually removing 10-12 tons Hg from the atmosphere.

Stamenkovic, Jelena

242

Seasonal, locational and size variations in mercury and selenium levels in striped bass (Morone saxatilis) from New Jersey.  

PubMed

We examined total mercury and selenium levels in muscle of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) collected from 2005 to 2008 from coastal New Jersey. Of primary interest was whether there were differences in mercury and selenium levels as a function of size and location, and whether the legal size limits increased the exposure of bass consumers to mercury. We obtained samples mainly from recreational anglers, but also by seine and trawl. For the entire sample (n=178 individual fish), the mean (±standard error) for total mercury was 0.39±0.02 ?g/g (=0.39 ppm, wet weight basis) with a maximum of 1.3 ?g/g (=1.3 ppm wet weight). Mean selenium level was 0.30±0.01 ?g/g (w/w) with a maximum of 0.9 ?g/g). Angler-caught fish (n=122) were constrained by legal size limits to exceed 61 cm (24 in.) and averaged 72.6±1.3 cm long; total mercury averaged 0.48±0.021 ?g/g and selenium averaged 0.29±0.01 ?g/g. For comparable sizes, angler-caught fish had significantly higher mercury levels (0.3 vs 0.21 ?g/g) than trawled fish. In both the total and angler-only samples, mercury was strongly correlated with length (Kendall tau=0.37; p<0.0001) and weight (0.38; p<0.0001), but was not correlated with condition or with selenium. In the whole sample and all subsamples, total length yielded the highest r(2) (up to 0.42) of any variable for both mercury and selenium concentrations. Trawled fish from Long Branch in August and Sandy Hook in October were the same size (68.9 vs 70.1cm) and had the same mercury concentrations (0.22 vs 0.21 ppm), but different selenium levels (0.11 vs 0.28 ppm). The seined fish (all from Delaware Bay) had the same mercury concentration as the trawled fish from the Atlantic coast despite being smaller. Angler-caught fish from the North (Sandy Hook) were larger but had significantly lower mercury than fish from the South (mainly Cape May). Selenium levels were high in small fish, low in medium-sized fish, and increased again in larger fish, but overall selenium was correlated with length (tau=0.14; p=0.006) and weight (tau=0.27; p<0.0001). Length-squared contributed significantly to selenium models, reflecting the non-linear relationship. Inter-year differences were explained partly by differences in sizes. The selenium:mercury molar ratio was below 1:1 in 20% of the fish and 25% of the angler-caught fish. Frequent consumption of large striped bass can result in exposure above the EPA's reference dose, a problem particularly for fetal development. PMID:22226733

Gochfeld, Michael; Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

2012-01-01

243

Soil mercury and CO2 emissions and their relationship under controlled laboratory conditions: Effects of oxygen depletion and soil sterilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terrestrial carbon (C) pools play an important role in uptake, deposition, sequestration, and emission of atmospheric mercury (Hg). Thus, we investigated the fate of Hg during C mineralization processes using a laboratory flux set-up to evaluate to what degree decomposition of organic matter leads to emission and re- emission of Hg to the atmosphere, increased mobilization within terrestrial ecosystems, or

C. Berger; X. Fain; D. Obrist

2008-01-01

244

Energies and widths of atomic core-levels in liquid mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High-resolution measurements of the photoinduced X-ray emission of liquid mercury were performed, using a transmission DuMond-type crystal spectrometer for transitions above 11 keV and a reflection von Hamos-type crystal spectrometer for transitions below 11 keV. The target X-ray fluorescence was produced by irradiating the sample with the Bremsstrahlung from X-ray tubes. The energies and natural linewidths of 6 K-shell, 26 L-shell and 2 M-shell X-ray transitions were determined. Using a least-squares-fit method to solve the two sets of equations derived from the observed transition energies and transition widths the binding energies of the subshells K to M5 and O1 and the level widths of the subshells K to N5 and O1 could also be determined.

Maillard, Y.-P.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.

2010-04-01

245

Using native epiphytic ferns to estimate the atmospheric mercury levels in a small-scale gold mining area of West Java, Indonesia.  

PubMed

Mercury pollution is caused by artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) operations along the Cikaniki River (West Java, Indonesia). The atmosphere is one of the primary media through which mercury can disperse. In this study, atmospheric mercury levels are estimated using the native epiphytic fern Asplenium nidus complex (A. nidus) as a biomonitor; these estimates shed light on the atmospheric dispersion of mercury released during mining. Samples were collected from 8 sites along the Cikaniki Basin during September-November, 2008 and September-November, 2009. The A. nidus fronds that were attached to tree trunks 1-3m above the ground were collected and measured for total mercury concentration using cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) after acid-digestion. The atmospheric mercury was collected using porous gold collectors, and the concentrations were determined using double-amalgam CVAAS. The highest atmospheric mercury concentration, 1.8 × 10(3) ± 1.6 × 10(3) ngm(-3), was observed at the mining hot spot, and the lowest concentration of mercury, 5.6 ± 2.0 ngm(-3), was observed at the remote site from the Cikaniki River in 2009. The mercury concentrations in A. nidus were higher at the mining village (5.4 × 10(3) ± 1.6 × 10(3) ngg(-1)) than at the remote site (70 ± 30 ngg(-1)). The distribution of mercury in A. nidus was similar to that in the atmosphere; a significant correlation was observed between the mercury concentrations in the air and in A. nidus (r=0.895, P<0.001, n=14). The mercury levels in the atmosphere can be estimated from the mercury concentration in A. nidus using a regression equation: log (Hg(A.nidu)/ngg(-1))=0.740 log (Hg(Air)/ngm (-3)) - 1.324. PMID:22595529

Kono, Yuriko; Rahajoe, Joeni S; Hidayati, Nuril; Kodamatani, Hitoshi; Tomiyasu, Takashi

2012-09-01

246

Concentration and spatial variability of mercury and other heavy metals in surface soil samples of periurban waste mine tailing along a transect in the Almadén mining district (Spain)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury (Hg) is one of the elements with increasing environmental significance. A total of 22 samples (soils, rocks and gels)\\u000a were collected along a 6 km transect around the Valdeazogues River valley in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula (Almadén,\\u000a Spain). Samples were characterized by different soil types of depositional sequences associated with mining tailings, type\\u000a and system tracts: 15 surface

P. Conde Bueno; E. Bellido; J. A. Martín Rubí; R. Jiménez Ballesta

2009-01-01

247

Development of novel activated carbon-based adsorbents for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect

In addition to naturally occurring mercury sources, anthropogenic activities increase the mercury loading to the environment. Although not all produced mercury is dissipated directly into the environment, only minor portions of the total production are stocked or recycled, and the rest of the mercury and its compounds is finally released in some way into atmosphere, surface waters and soil, or ends in landfills dumps, and refuse. Since mercury and its compounds are highly toxic, their presence in the environment constitutes potential impact on all living organisms, including man. The first serious consequence of industrial mercury discharges causing neurological disorder even death occurred in Minimata, Japan in 1953. Systematic studies showed that mercury poisoning is mainly found in fish-eating populations. However, various levels of mercury are also found in food other than fish. During the past several decades, research has been conducted on the evaluation of risks due to exposure to mercury and the development of control technologies for mercury emissions. In 1990, the Clean Air Act Amendments listed mercury, along with 10 other metallic species, as a hazardous air pollutant (HAP). This has further stimulated research for mercury control during the past several years. The impact of mercury on humans, sources of mercury in the environment, current mercury control strategies and the objective of this research are discussed in this section.

Radisav D. Vidic

1999-03-01

248

POPULATION-LEVEL RESPONSE OF THE COMMON LOON TO MERCURY IN TWO CANADIAN PROVINCES: A MATRIX MODELING APPROACH  

EPA Science Inventory

We used data collected from Common Loon Gavia immer populations in two Canadian provinces to demonstrate a matrix population modeling approach for evaluating population-level responses to stressors and to understand how these populations may have responded to mercury contaminatio...

249

Influence of ecological factors and of land use on mercury levels in fish in the Tapajós River basin, Amazon  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury (Hg) contamination of riparian communities and of environmental compartments of the Amazon can be directly related to the occupation of the territory. The objective of this study was to identify the characteristics of aquatic environments that are associated with high levels of Hg in ichthyofauna. Our research aimed at determining the influence of variables related to fish ecology, types

D. Sampaio da Silva; M. Lucotte; S. Paquet; R. Davidson

2009-01-01

250

Follow-up of mercury levels in fish, human hair and urine in the Madeira and Tapajós basins, Amazon, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informal economy of gold mining has contaminated some important river basins in Amazon. Follow-up studies on critical compartments showed some areas with high Hg levels in fish as well as in human hair samples. Average Hg in piscivorous fish in the Madeira river itself was 846 ppb (N=284) with a maximum of 3921 ppb. Mercury in fish from non polluted

O Malm; JRD Guimarães; MB Castro; WR Bastos; JP Viana; FJP Branches; EG Silveira; WC Pfeiffer

1997-01-01

251

Behavior of mercury in bio-systems. II. Depuration of /sup 203/Hg/sup 2 +/ in various trophic levels  

SciTech Connect

Using radiotracer techniques, the depuration rates for methylmercury at three trophic levels in an aquatic ecosystem are examined. Bacteria (decomposers), mosquito larvae (primary consumers), and fish (secondary consumers) were studied. Results indicated that depuration rates for mercury were temperature dependent - the rate of depuration increased with increase in temperature (up to 45/sup 0/C)

Hamdy, M.K.; Prabhu, N.V.

1984-01-01

252

Total mercury levels in hair, toenail, and urine among women free from occupational exposure and their relations to renal tubular function  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the relations among total mercury levels in hair, toenail, and urine, together with potential effects of methylmercury intake on renal tubular function, we determined their levels, and urinary N-acetyl-{beta}-d-glucosaminidase activity (NAG) and {alpha}{sub 1}-microglobulin (AMG) in 59 women free from occupational exposures, and estimated daily mercury intakes from fish and other seafood using a food frequency questionnaire. Mercury levels (mean+/-SD) in the women were 1.51+/-0.91{mu}g/g in hair, 0.59+/-0.32{mu}g/g in toenail, and 0.86+/-0.66{mu}g/g creatinine in urine; and, there were positive correlations among them (P<0.001). The daily mercury intake of 9.15+/-7.84{mu}g/day was significantly correlated with total mercury levels in hair, toenail, and urine (r=0.551, 0.537, and 0.604, P<0.001). Among the women, the NAG and AMG were positively correlated with both the daily mercury intake and mercury levels in hair, toenail, and urine (P<0.01); and, these relations were almost similar when using multiple regression analysis to adjust for possible confounders such as urinary cadmium (0.47+/-0.28{mu}g/g creatinine) and smoking status. In conclusion, mercury resulting from fish consumption can explain total mercury levels in hair, toenail, and urine to some degree (about 30%), partly through the degradation into the inorganic form, and it may confound the renal tubular effect of other nephrotoxic agents. Also, the following equation may be applicable to the population neither with dental amalgam fillings nor with occupational exposures: [hair mercury ({mu}g/g)]=2.44x[toenail mercury ({mu}g/g)].

Ohno, Tomoko [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Sakamoto, Mineshi [Department of Epidemiology, National Institute for Minamata Disease, Minamata 867-0008 (Japan); Kurosawa, Tomoko [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Dakeishi, Miwako [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Iwata, Toyoto [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan); Murata, Katsuyuki [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Akita University School of Medicine, 1-1-1 Hondo, Akita 010-8543 (Japan)]. E-mail: winestem@med.akita-u.ac.jp

2007-02-15

253

Mercury availability by operationally defined fractionation in granulometric distributions of soils and mine wastes from an abandoned cinnabar mine.  

PubMed

Mercury contamination from historic cinnabar mines represents a potential risk to the environment. Asturias, in Northern Spain, was one of the largest metallurgic and mining producer areas of Hg in Europe during the 20(th) century until the end of activities in 1974. Mining operations have caused Hg release and dispersion throughout the area. In this study, soils collected from calcine piles and surrounding soils at an abandoned Hg mine and metallurgical plant in Mieres (Asturias, Spain) were distributed in different particle-size subsamples. Fractionation of Hg was performed by means of a Hg-specific sequential extraction procedure complemented with the selective determination of organic Hg fraction by a specific extraction method. Extremely high concentrations of total Hg were found in calcine piles. Concentrations and mobility of Hg decreased markedly with the distance in soils located 25 m both above and below the chimney of the metallurgical plant. The sequential extraction results indicated that Hg is primarily found as elemental Hg followed by sulfide Hg in the finest subsamples. However, this distribution is inverted in the coarser grain fractions where sulfide Hg prevails. Calcine piles exhibited exceptionally high values of mobile Hg (up to 5350 ?g g(-1) in the finest subsample). Accumulation of Hg in the elemental Hg fraction was observed at decreasing grain size which is indicative of deposition of Hg vapors from the metallurgical plant. Enrichment of sulfide Hg was found in the finest subsamples of soils sampled below the chimney (up to 99 ?g g(-1)). Significant organic Hg contents were observed in the soil samples (up to 2.8 ?g g(-1)), higher than those found in other abandoned Hg mining sites. A strong correlation was observed between organic Hg and Hg humic and fulvic complexes, as well as with the elemental Hg fraction. This indicates that both humic and fulvic material and elemental Hg must be the primary variables controlling Hg methylation in these soils. PMID:24664209

Fernández-Martínez, R; Loredo, J; Ordóñez, A; Rucandio, I

2014-04-22

254

A coupled monitoring network to conduct an assessment of mercury transformation and mobilization in floodplain soils: South River, Virginia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury (Hg) was used between 1929 and 1950 by the DuPont plant in the production of rayon acetate fiber in Waynesboro, Virginia and released into the South River. The contamination of Hg was discovered in the 1970s and remained elevated in water, soil, sediments, and biota. The primary goal of this study is to investigate the processes that govern biogeochemical transformation and mobilization of Hg in floodplain soils at South River Mile 3.5, characterize geochemical gradients in soils and how they change over time, and to enable targeted sampling at Hg loading hot spots. The biogeochemical data will play a supporting role and be used to further develop our understanding of the processes controlling the leaching of Hg and our conceptual model. Our over-arching hypothesis is to test if leaching of bank soils is a significant source of dissolved or colloidal inorganic Hg. This effort requires an interdisciplinary geochemical approach and sensor technology to understand the interactions between floodplain soil, groundwater, and river. Our investigation will include 10 months' worth data from a number of state-of-the-art in-situ monitoring sensors, such as custom-designed redox probes, soil moisture, temperature, pressure, and conductivity installed at the site. Our preliminary results showed that the concentration of total Hg in soils was up to 900 mg/kg (wet weight).There is a significant redox gradient across the floodplain soil profile. Within the top 40 -70 cm, major changes in redox conditions from oxidizing (Eh ?+600 mV) to very reducing (Eh ?-300 mV) corresponded to heavy rainfall and overbank flooding events. High variations in stream stage may govern the surface water - groundwater exchange facilitating the downward or upward movement of the capillary fringe and saturated zone through the soil horizons, affecting soil redox potential, stability of Hg-bearing minerals and leaching of inorganic Hg into dissolved and colloidal phases. These phases may be directly transported to the South River or methylated within the saturated zone of the bank and subsequently released.

Lazareva, O.; Sparks, D. L.; Landis, R.; Ptacek, C. J.; Hicks, S.; Montgomery, D.

2013-12-01

255

Trophic calculations reveal the mechanism of population-level variation in mercury concentrations between marine ecosystems: case studies of two polar seabirds.  

PubMed

The incorporation of quantitative trophic level analysis in ecotoxicological studies provides explanatory power to identify the factors, trophic or environmental, driving population-level variation in mercury exposure at large geographic scales. In the Antarctic marine ecosystem, mercury concentrations and stable isotope values in Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) were compared between the Antarctic Peninsula and the Ross Sea. Correcting tissue ?(15)N values for baseline ?(15)N values revealed population-level differences in trophic position which contributes to differences in mercury. Data from Thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) were synthesized from published values from Baffin Bay and Svalbard to demonstrate the utility of baseline ?(15)N values in identifying differences in environmental mercury exposure independent of diet. Here, we demonstrate the importance of calculating population-specific trophic level data to uncover the source of variation in mercury concentrations between geographically distinct populations of marine predators. PMID:23993395

Brasso, Rebecka L; Polito, Michael J

2013-10-15

256

Mercury in Wetlands, Adirondack Region of New York State  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wetlands play a prominent role in the cycling of mercury by harboring bacteria that transform mercury into methyl mercury, a neurotoxin, and by having high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that interact with mercury transport. We are measuring total mercury and methyl mercury in vegetation, soil, surface water, and ground water in the Sunday Lake watershed, in which wetlands

J. B. Yavitt; M. Kalicin; C. T. Driscoll; R. Newton; R. Munson

2001-01-01

257

Acute effects of mercuric chloride on intracellular GSH levels and mercury distribution in the fish Oreochromic aureus  

SciTech Connect

In recent years there has been much interest in the effects of trace metals on intracellular levels of reduced glutathione (GSH). Most of the research has been performed on rats. As GSH is ubiquitous in living organisms it is of interest to establish a relationship between mercury intoxication and intracellular GSH levels in fish; especially as fish living in rivers and coastal areas are often expose to mercury as an aquatic pollutant. The role of GSH in fish trace metal toxicity has not been thoroughly investigated. The distribution of total glutathione (oxidized + reduced) in selected black sea bass organs seems to follow the established pattern for mammalian organs. Thus, it would appear that teleostian and mammalian glutathione metabolism may have many similarities. There are few reports concerning the effects of mercury during the first few hours of exposure. The aim of this investigation is to establish any changes in organ GSH and mercury levels following just 2 h exposure to mercuric chloride (HgCl/sub 2/).

Allen, P.; Min, S.Y.; Keong, W.M.

1988-02-01

258

Investigation of Increased Mercury Levels in the Fisheries of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) is supporting Oak Ridge's remediation efforts by performing this study. MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) has performed a series of literature reviews and bench-scale testing to further evaluate the mercury problem in the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) at Oak Ridge. The primary problem is that total mercury (HgT) levels in LEFPC water decrease, while HgT levels in sunfish muscle tissue increase, with distance away from the National Security Complex (NSC), despite extensive source control efforts at the facility. Furthermore, dissolved methylmercury (d-MeHg) levels increase downstream from the NSC, especially during warm weather and/or high flow events. MSE performed four test series that focused on conversion of dissolved and colloidal forms of elemental mercury (Hg deg.A) to methyl mercury (MeHg) by algal-bacterial bio-films (periphyton) present in the stream-bed of LEFPC; MeHg production by these bio-films under anoxic versus oxic conditions was the critical measurement taken. The bench-scale testing for Phase I was completed November 2005. The final reporting and the planning for Phase II testing are in progress. (authors)

Byrne-Kelly, D.; Cornish, J.; Hart, A. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., (United States); Southworth, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Simms, L. [Bechtel Jacobs Company (United States)

2006-07-01

259

Residential mercury contamination and exposure in Huancavelica, Peru  

EPA Science Inventory

Between 1564 and 1810, nearly 17,000 metric tons of mercury (Hg) vapor were released from cinnabar refining in the small town of Huancavelica, Peru, much of which was locally deposited. Ambient soil Hg concentrations are among the highest levels in surface soil in the world, rang...

260

Mercury hair levels and factors that influence exposure for residents of Huancavelica, Peru  

EPA Science Inventory

Between 1564 and 1810, nearly 17,000 metric tons of mercury (Hg) vapor were released to the environment during cinnabar refining in the small town of Huancavelica, Peru. The present study characterizes individual exposure to mercury using total and speciated Hg from residential s...

261

Mercury Levels in Mink ( Mustela vison ) and River Otter ( Lontra canadensis ) from Northeastern North America  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aquatic ecosystems have received mercury released from anthropogenic sources. The northeast region of North America is at especially high risk because of local and regional emission sources, prevailing wind patterns, and certain hydrological and biogeochemical features. Here we examine regional variation in total mercury (Hg) in brain, liver, and fur from otter and mink collected across New York, New England,

David E. Yates; David T. Mayack; Kenneth Munney; David C. Evers; Andrew Major; Taranjit Kaur; Robert J. Taylor

2005-01-01

262

SMOS CATDS Level 3 products, Soil Moisture and Brightness Temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ESA's (European Space Agency) SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission, operating since november 2009, is the first satellite dedicated to measuring the surface soil moisture and the ocean salinity. The CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) has developed the CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS) ground segment. The CATDS provides temporal synthesis products (referred to as level 3) of soil moisture, which are now covering the whole SMOS period, i.e. since January 2010. These products have different time resolutions: daily products, 3-day global products (insuring a complete coverage of the Earth surface), 10-day composite products, and monthly averaged products. Moreover, a new product provides brightness temperatures at H and V polarizations which are computed at fixed incidence angles every 5 degrees. As the instrument measures L-band brightness temperatures at the antenna frame (X/Y polarizations), a rotation is applied to transform the observations to V/H polarizations. All the CATDS products are presented in the NetCDF format and on the EASE grid (Equal Area Scalable Earth grid) with a spatial resolution of ~ 25*25 km2 The soil moisture level 3 algorithm is based on ESA's (European Space Agency) level 2 retrieval scheme with the improvement of using several overpasses (3 at most) over a 7-day window. The use of many revisits is expected to improve the retrieved soil moisture. This communication aims at presenting the soil moisture and brightness temperature products from the CATDS as well as the other geophysical parameters retrieved, such as the vegetation optical depth or the dielectric constant of the surface. SMOS Level 3 soil moisture. 3-days aggregation product, the best estimation of soil moisture is chosen.

Berthon, L.; Mialon, A.; Al Bitar, A.; Cabot, F.; Kerr, Y. H.

2012-12-01

263

Fate and aqueous transport of mercury in light of the Clean Air Mercury Rule for coal-fired electric power plants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury is a hazardous air pollutant emitted to the atmosphere in large amounts. Mercury emissions from electric power generation sources were estimated to be 48 metric tons/year, constituting the single largest anthropogenic source of mercury in the U.S. Settled mercury species are highly toxic contaminants of the environment. The newly issued Federal Clean Air Mercury Rule requires that the electric power plants firing coal meet the new Maximum Achievable Mercury Control Technology limit by 2018. This signifies that all of the air-phase mercury will be concentrated in solid phase which, based on the current state of the Air Pollution Control Technology, will be fly ash. Fly ash is utilized by different industries including construction industry in concrete, its products, road bases, structural fills, monifills, for solidification, stabilization, etc. Since the increase in coal combustion in the U.S. (1.6 percent/year) is much higher than the fly ash demand, large amounts of fly ash containing mercury and other trace elements are expected to accumulate in the next decades. The amount of mercury transferred from one phase to another is not a linear function of coal combustion or ash production, depends on the future states of technology, and is unknown. The amount of aqueous mercury as a function of the future removal, mercury speciation, and coal and aquifer characteristics is also unknown. This paper makes a first attempt to relate mercury concentrations in coal, flue gas, fly ash, and fly ash leachate using a single algorithm. Mercury concentrations in all phases were examined and phase transformation algorithms were derived in a form suitable for probabilistic analyses. Such important parameters used in the transformation algorithms as Soil Cation Exchange Capacity for mercury, soil mercury selectivity sequence, mercury activity coefficient, mercury retardation factor, mercury species soil adsorption ratio, and mercury Freundlich soil adsorption isotherm coefficients were derived. Mercury air-phase removal efficiency was studied as a function of dominant mercury species vapor pressures, the amount of chlorine, sorbent injection rate and adsorption capacities, and process temperature and modifications. A mercury air phase removal algorithm was derived which defines the future removal efficiencies as a function of activated carbon injection rate. Mercury adsorption on soil was studied as a function of Mercury Mass Law incorporating the dominant aquatic mercury species, pH, chlorine and sulfur concentrations, and the amount of complexed hydroxyl groups. Aquatic mercury longitudinal plume delineation was studied using the Domenico and Robbins function. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed using random number series (5000) for all of the variables in the Domenico and Robbins and mercury retardation functions. The probability that the Maximum Contaminant Level for mercury will be exceeded was found to be equal approximately 1 percent of all soil-related fly ash applications.

Arzuman, Anry

264

Sequencing Bands of Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis Fingerprints for Characterization and Microscale Distribution of Soil Bacterium Populations Responding to Mercury Spiking  

PubMed Central

Two major emerging bands (a 350-bp band and a 650-bp band) within the RISA (ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) profile of a soil bacterial community spiked with Hg(II) were selected for further identification of the populations involved in the response of the community to the added metal. The bands were cut out from polyacrylamide gels, cloned, characterized by restriction analysis, and sequenced for phylogenetic affiliation of dominant clones. The sequences were the intergenic spacer between the rrs and rrl genes and the first 130 nucleotides of the rrl gene. Comparison of sequences derived from the 350-bp band to The GenBank database permitted us to identify the bacteria as being mostly close relatives to low G+C firmicutes (Clostridium-like genera), while the 650-bp band permitted us to identify the bacteria as being mostly close relatives to ?-proteobacteria (Ralstonia-like genera). Oligonucleotide probes specific for the identified dominant bacteria were designed and hybridized with the RISA profiles derived from the control and spiked communities. These studies confirmed the contribution of these populations to the community response to the metal. Hybridization of the RISA profiles from subcommunities (bacterial pools associated with different soil microenvironments) also permitted to characterize the distribution and the dynamics of these populations at a microscale level following mercury spiking.

Ranjard, Lionel; Brothier, Elisabeth; Nazaret, Sylvie

2000-01-01

265

Measurements of Mercury Released from Solidified/Stabilized Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed during FY 1999-2000 in support of treatment demonstrations conducted for the Mercury Working Group of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area. In order to comply with the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), DOE must use one of these procedures for wastes containing mercury at levels above 260 ppm: a retorting/roasting treatment or an incineration treatment (if the wastes also contain organics). The recovered radioactively contaminated mercury must then be treated by an amalgamation process prior to disposal. The DOE Mixed Waste Focus Area and Mercury Working Group are working with the EPA to determine if some alternative processes could treat these types of waste directly, thereby avoiding for DOE the costly recovery step. They sponsored a demonstration in which commercial vendors applied their technologies for the treatment of two contaminated waste soils from Brookhaven National Laboratory. Each soil was contaminated with {approx}4500 ppm mercury; however, one soil had as a major radioelement americium-241, while the other contained mostly europium-152. The project described in this report addressed the need for data on the mercury vapor released by the solidified/stabilized mixed low-level mercury wastes generated during these demonstrations as well as the comparison between the untreated and treated soils. A related work began in FY 1998, with the measurement of the mercury released by amalgamated mercury, and the results were reported in ORNL/TM-13728. Four treatments were performed on these soils. The baseline was obtained by thermal treatment performed by SepraDyne Corp., and three forms of solidification/stabilization were employed: one using sulfur polymer cement (Brookhaven National Laboratory), one using portland cement [Allied Technology Group (ATG)], and a third using proprietary additives (Nuclear Fuel Services).

Mattus, C.H.

2001-04-19

266

DEVELOPMENT AND TEST APPLICATION A SCREENING-LEVEL MERCURY FATE MODEL AND TOOL FOR EVALUATING WILDLIFE EXPOSURE RISK FOR SURFACE WATERS WITH MERCURY-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS (SERAFM)  

EPA Science Inventory

Complex chemical cycling of mercury in aquatic ecosystems means that tracing the linkage between anthropogenic and natural loadings of mercury to watersheds and water bodies and associated concentrations in the environment are difficult to establish without the assistance of nume...

267

Superpredation increases mercury levels in a generalist top predator, the eagle owl.  

PubMed

Superpredation can increase the length of the food chain and potentially lead to mercury (Hg) bioaccumulation in top predators. We analysed the relationship of Hg concentrations in eagle owls Bubo bubo to diet composition and the percentage of mesopredators in the diet. Hg levels were measured in the adult feathers of eagle owls from 33 owl territories in the south-western Iberian Peninsula, and in three trophic levels of their prey: primary consumers, secondary consumers and mesopredators. In addition, we studied 6,181 prey in the eagle owl diet. Hg concentrations increased along the food chain, but the concentrations in eagle owls showed considerable variation. The Hg concentration in eagle owls increased when the percentage of mesopredators in the diet increased and the percentage of primary consumers decreased. Superpredation is often related to food stress, and the associated increase in accumulation of Hg may cause additional negative effects on vertebrate top predators. Hg levels in these eagle owl populations are relatively low, but future monitoring is recommended. PMID:21298339

Lourenço, Rui; Tavares, Paula C; del Mar Delgado, Maria; Rabaça, João E; Penteriani, Vincenzo

2011-06-01

268

Influence of socio-demographic and diet determinants on the levels of mercury in preschool children from a Mediterranean island.  

PubMed

Mercury levels measured in 302 hair samples of 4 year-old children from Menorca (western Mediterranean Sea) are reported. Their concentrations, arithmetic mean 1.4 ?g/g, ranging between 0.040 ?g/g and 10 ?g/g, were higher than in other children inland populations but lower than in previously studied island cohorts, e.g. Faroe, Madeira and Seychelles. 20% of the samples were above the WHO recommended values. Higher concentrations in females than males were observed. Frequent consumption of fish and other seafood were significantly related to the observed mercury concentrations. Oily fish was the main source of this pollutant but shellfish and squid consumption were also associated with high mercury concentrations. Maternal smoking, occupational status or previous siblings were also found to significantly influence the levels of this pollutant. McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities used to assess children's motor and cognitive abilities did not show association with mercury concentrations at 4 years of age. PMID:23959058

Garí, Mercè; Grimalt, Joan O; Torrent, Maties; Sunyer, Jordi

2013-11-01

269

Tolerance of soil flagellates to increased NaCl levels.  

PubMed

The ability of heterotrophic flagellates to survive and adapt to increasing salinities was investigated in this study. Whole soil samples were subjected to salinities corresponding to marine conditions and clonal cultures were used to perform growth and adaptation experiments at a wide range of different salinities (0-50 ppm). More morphotypes tolerant to elevated NaCl levels were found in road verge soil that was heavily exposed to de-icing salt than in less exposed soils, though there were fewer tolerant than intolerant morphotypes in all soils examined. Heterotrophic flagellates isolated on a freshwater medium from a non-exposed soil were unable to thrive at salinities above 15 ppt, and showed reduced growth rates even at low salt salinities (1-5 ppt). The findings suggest that heterotrophic soil flagellates are less tolerant to NaCl than their aquatic relatives, possibly due to their long evolutionary history in soil, and support the idea that identical morphospecies may differ considerably with respect to physiology PMID:12188223

Ekelund, Flemming

2002-01-01

270

Behavior of mercury, lead, cesium, and uranyl ions on four SRS soils  

SciTech Connect

Samples of four Savannah River Site (SRS) soils were tested for sorption behavior with Hg{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and Cs{sup +} ions. The purpose of the study was to determine the selectivity of the different soils for these ions alone and in the presence of the competing cations, H{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. Distribution constants, Kd`s, for the test ions in various solutions have been determined for the four soils. In general, sorption by all of the soils appeared to be more complex than a simple ion exchange or adsorption process. In particular, the presence of organic matter in soil increased the capacity of the soil due to its chelating ability. Similar soils did not react similarly toward each metal cation.

Bibler, J.P.; Marson, D.B.

1992-03-20

271

Behavior of mercury, lead, cesium, and uranyl ions on four SRS soils  

SciTech Connect

Samples of four Savannah River Site (SRS) soils were tested for sorption behavior with Hg[sup 2+], Pb[sup 2+], UO[sub 2][sup 2+], and Cs[sup +] ions. The purpose of the study was to determine the selectivity of the different soils for these ions alone and in the presence of the competing cations, H[sup +] and Ca[sup 2+]. Distribution constants, Kd's, for the test ions in various solutions have been determined for the four soils. In general, sorption by all of the soils appeared to be more complex than a simple ion exchange or adsorption process. In particular, the presence of organic matter in soil increased the capacity of the soil due to its chelating ability. Similar soils did not react similarly toward each metal cation.

Bibler, J.P.; Marson, D.B.

1992-03-20

272

Towards Prenatal Biomonitoring in North Carolina: Assessing Arsenic, Cadmium, Mercury, and Lead Levels in Pregnant Women  

PubMed Central

Exposure to toxic metals during the prenatal period carries the potential for adverse developmental effects to the fetus, yet such exposure remains largely unmonitored in the United States. The aim of this study was to assess maternal exposure to four toxic metals (arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead (Pb)) in a cohort of pregnant women in North Carolina. We analyzed blood samples submitted to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services for blood typing to assess toxic metal levels in pregnant women (n?=?211) across six North Carolina counties. Whole blood metal concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The association between maternal characteristics, including county of residence, age, and race, and metal exposure was analyzed using multiple linear regression analysis. A large fraction of the blood samples showed detectable levels for each of the four metals. Specifically, As (65.7%), Cd (57.3%), Hg (63.8%), and Pb (100%) were detected in blood samples. Moreover, compared with adult females participating in the Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals and guidelines for pregnant women, some women in the sample population exceeded benchmark levels of Cd, Hg, and Pb. Evidence from this pilot study indicates that pregnant women in North Carolina are exposed to As, Cd, Hg, and Pb and suggests that factors related to maternal county of residence and race may impact maternal exposure levels. As increased levels of one or more of these metals in utero have been associated with detrimental developmental and reproductive outcomes, further study is clearly warranted to establish the impacts to newborns.

Sanders, Alison P.; Flood, Kaye; Chiang, Shu; Herring, Amy H.; Wolf, Leslie; Fry, Rebecca C.

2012-01-01

273

Mercury toxicity in plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury poisoning has become a problem of current interest as a result of environmental pollution on a global scale. Natural\\u000a emissions of mercury form two-thirds of the input; manmade releases form about one-third. Considerable amounts of mercury\\u000a may be added to agricultural land with sludge, fertilizers, lime, and manures. The most important sources of contaminating\\u000a agricultural soil have been the

Manomita Patra; Archana Sharma

2000-01-01

274

Assessment of soil organic matter fluxes at the EU level  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil has a complex relationship with climate change. Soil helps take carbon dioxide out of the air and as such it absorbs millions of tons each year, but with the Earth still warming micro-organisms grow faster, consume more soil organic matter and release carbon dioxide. The net result is a relative decline in soil organic carbon. With a growing population and higher bio-energy demands, more land is likely to be required for settlement, for commercial activity and for bio-energy production. Conversions from terrestrial ecosystems to urban and commercial activity will alter both the production and losses of organic matter, and have an indirect impact on potential SOM levels. Conversions between different terrestrial ecosystems have a direct impact on SOM levels. Net SOM losses are reported for several land conversions, e.g. from grassland to arable land, from wetlands to drained agricultural land, from crop rotations to monoculture, reforestation of agricultural land. In the context of looking for measures to support best practices to manage soil organic matter in Europe we propose a method to assess soil organic matter fluxes at the EU level. We adopt a parsimonious approach that is comparable to the nutrient balance approaches developed by the OECD and Eurostat. We describe the methodology and present the initial results of a European carbon balance indicator that uses existing European statistical and land use change databases. The carbon balance consists of the following components: organic matter production (I), organic matter losses (O), land use changes that effect both production and losses (E). These components are set against the (mostly legislative) boundary conditions that determine the maximum input potential (MIP) for soil organic matter. In order to budget SOM losses due to mineralisation, runs will be made with a multi-compartment SOM model that takes into account management practices, climate and different sources of organic matter.

Gobin, Anne; Campling, Paul

2010-05-01

275

Zinc movement in sewage-sludge-treated soils as influenced by soil properties, irrigation water quality, and soil moisture level  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A soil column study was conducted to assess the movement of Zn in sewage-sludge-amended soils. Varables investigated were soil properties, irrigation water quality, and soil moisture level. Bulk samples of the surface layer of six soil series were packed into columns, 10.2 cm in diameter and 110 cm in length. An anaerobically digested municipal sewage sludge was incorporated into the top 20 cm of each column at a rate of 300 mg ha-1. The columns were maintained at moisture levels of saturation and unsaturation and were leached with two waters of different quality. At the termination of leaching, the columns were cut open and the soil was sectioned and analyzed. Zinc movement was evaluated by mass balance accounting and correlation and regression analysis. Zinc movement in the unsaturated columns ranged from 3 to 30 cm, with a mean of 10 cm. The difference in irrigation water quality did not have an effect on Zn movement. Most of the Zn applied to the unsaturated columns remained in the sludge-amended soil layer (96.1 to 99.6%, with a mean of 98.1%). The major portion of Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer accumulated in the 0- to 3-cm depth (35.7 to 100%, with a mean of 73.6%). The mean final soil pH values decreased in the order: saturated columns = sludge-amended soil layer > untreated soils > unsaturated columns. Total Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer was correlated negatively at P = 0.001 with final pH (r = -0.85). Depth of Zn movement was correlated negatively at P = 0.001 with final pH (r = -0.91). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the final pH accounted for 72% of the variation in the total amounts of Zn leached from the sludge-amended soil layer of the unsaturated columns and accounted for 82% of the variation in the depth of Zn movement among the unsaturated columns. A significant correlation was not found between Zn and organic carbon in soil solutions, but a negative correlation significant at P = 0.001 was found between pH and Zn (r = -0.61).

Welch, J. E.; Lund, L. J.

1989-01-01

276

The processing of simulated high-level radioactive waste sludges containing nitrites and mercury  

SciTech Connect

The reaction of formic acid with simulated alkaline sludge containing mercury and nitrite was studied in an engineering-scale facility. Quantification of offgas production was performed, with the major offgases being CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. A small amount of CO was also found. The NO{sub x} was scrubbed in the offgas condenser and formed very acidic solutions of nitrous and nitric acids. These acids dissolved mercury that was stripped from the sludge. However, the overall efficiency of mercury stripping was greater than expected, and the final mercury concentration in the sludge was lower than expected. The NO{sub x} in the offgas also caused large temperature rises in the offgas system due to the exothermic reaction of NO with O{sub 2}. This temperature rise had a detrimental effect on the performance of the Formic Acid Vent Condenser, such that redesign is being contemplated. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Zamecnik, J.R.; Hutson, N.D.; Ritter, J.A.; Carter, J.T.

1991-01-01

277

Effects of phosphate buffer capacity on critical levels and relationships between soil tests and labile phosphate in wheat growing soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-nine soils from northern New South Wales were used to examine the effects of phosphate buffer capacity on (i) the extraction of labile phosphate by four soil tests, (ii) the relationships between the four soil tests, and (iii) the critical level of each soil test required for near-maximum yield of wheat under field conditions. The results confirmed the principle, recently

I. C. R. Holford

1980-01-01

278

Degradation of metaflumizone in soil: impact of varying moisture, light, temperature, atmospheric CO2 level, soil type and soil sterilization.  

PubMed

Soil is a major sink for the bulk of globally used pesticides. Hence, fate of pesticides in soil under the influence of various biotic and abiotic factors becomes important for evaluation of stability and safety. This paper presents the impact of varying moisture, light, temperature, atmospheric CO(2) level, soil type and soil sterilization on degradation of metaflumizone, a newly registered insecticide in India. Degradation of metaflumizone in soil followed the first order reaction kinetics and its half life values varied from ~20 to 150 d. Under anaerobic condition, degradation of metaflumizone was faster (t(½) 33.4 d) compared to aerobic condition (t(½) 50.1 d) and dry soil (t(½) 150.4 d). Under different light exposures, degradation was the fastest under UV light (t(½) 27.3 d) followed by Xenon light (t(½) 43 d) and dark condition (t(½) 50.1 d). Degradation rate of metaflumizone increased with temperature and its half life values ranged from 30.1 to 100.3d. Elevated atmospheric CO(2) level increased the degradation in soil (t(½) 20.1-50.1 d). However, overall degradation rate was the fastest at 550 ppm atmospheric CO(2) level, followed by 750 ppm and ambient level (375 ppm). Degradation of metaflumizone was faster in Oxisol (pH 5.2, Total Organic Carbon 1.2%) compared to Inceptisol (pH 8.15, TOC 0.36%). In sterile soil, only 5% dissipation of initial concentration was observed after 90 d of sampling. Under various conditions, 4-cyanobenzoic acid (0.22-1.86 mg kg(-1)) and 4-trifluoromethoxy aniline (0.21-1.23 mg kg(-1)) were detected as major degradation products. PMID:23102725

Chatterjee, Niladri Sekhar; Gupta, Suman; Varghese, Eldho

2013-01-01

279

INVESTIGATION OF THE LIGHT ENHANCED EMISSION OF MERCURY FROM NATURALLY ENRICHED SUBSTRATES. (R827622E02)  

EPA Science Inventory

Incident radiation has been reported to facilitate mercury release from soils. In this study the influence of light on mercury emissions from substrates amended with pure synthetic mercury species, and from naturally and anthropogenically mercury-enriched substrates were inves...

280

Bromacil and diuron residue levels in Florida citrus soils.  

PubMed

The widespread use of herbicides in Florida citrus groves raises the possibility of residue accumulation following repeated applications. To determine residue levels of commonly used herbicides, soil samples were taken from large experimental plots in commercial groves in Polk and Hardee Counties. Bromacil and diuron had been applied in combination at both locations for 7-8 years. Analyses of samples showed low levels of both herbicides at various soil depths to 60 cm. Only a small amount of bromacil was detectable one year after applications, but diuron levels were higher. Continuous applications at recommended rates and frequencies have resulted in maximum bromacil and diuron levels of 3.9 percent and 13.1 percent, respectively, of their total application. PMID:714631

Tucker, D P

1978-09-01

281

Follow-up of mercury levels in fish, human hair and urine in the Madeira and Tapajós basins, Amazon, Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informal economy of gold mining has contaminated some important river basins in Amazon. Follow-up studies on critical compartments\\u000a showed some areas with high Hg levels in fish as well as in human hair samples. Average Hg in piscivorous fish in the Madeira\\u000a river itself was 846 ppb (N=284) with a maximum of 3921 ppb. Mercury in fish from non polluted

O. Malm; J. R. D. Guimarães; M. B. Castro; W. R. Bastos; J. P. Viana; F. J. P. Branches; E. G. Silveira; W. C. Pfeiffer

1997-01-01

282

Histopathological Changes Induced by Chronic Nonlethal Levels of Elsan, Mercury, and Ammonia in the Small Intestine of Channa punctatus (Bloch)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Histopathological changes in the intestine of Channa punctatus induced by chronic nonlethal levels of Elsan (211 ppb), mercury (16.7 ppb), and ammonia (15.64 ppm) were studied at 7-day intervals for 90 days and the data were presented only for days (7, 28, 63, and 90) when the most conspicuous changes were noted after treatment. In the earlier phases of Elsan

S. Banerjee; S. Bhattacharya

1995-01-01

283

Mercury levels in surface waters of the Carson River-Lahontan reservoir system, Nevada: Influence of historic mining activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total mercury (HgT), methylmercury (MeHg), and other operationally defined Hg species were determined on water samples collected from a river-reservoir system impacted by historic mine wastes. Simultaneously, a comprehensive study was undertaken to determine the influence of some major physico-chemical parameters on the fate of Hg within the system. Total Hg levels showed an increase from background concentrations of 4

J. C. Bonzongo; K. J. Heim; J. J. Warwick; W. B. Lyons

1996-01-01

284

Estimation and mapping of wet and dry mercury deposition across northeastern North America  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Whereas many ecosystem characteristics and processes influence mercury accumulation in higher trophic-level organisms, the mercury flux from the atmosphere to a lake and its watershed is a likely factor in potential risk to biota. Atmospheric deposition clearly affects mercury accumulation in soils and lake sediments. Thus, knowledge of spatial patterns in atmospheric deposition may provide information for assessing the relative risk for ecosystems to exhibit excessive biotic mercury contamination. Atmospheric mercury concentrations in aerosol, vapor, and liquid phases from four observation networks were used to estimate regional surface concentration fields. Statistical models were developed to relate sparsely measured mercury vapor and aerosol concentrations to the more commonly measured mercury concentration in precipitation. High spatial resolution deposition velocities for different phases (precipitation, cloud droplets, aerosols, and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM)) were computed using inferential models. An empirical model was developed to estimate gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) deposition. Spatial patterns of estimated total mercury deposition were complex. Generally, deposition was higher in the southwest and lower in the northeast. Elevation, land cover, and proximity to urban areas modified the general pattern. The estimated net GEM and RGM fluxes were each greater than or equal to wet deposition in many areas. Mercury assimilation by plant foliage may provide a substantial input of methyl-mercury (MeHg) to ecosystems. ?? 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

Miller, E. K.; Vanarsdale, A.; Keeler, G. J.; Chalmers, A.; Poissant, L.; Kamman, N. C.; Brulotte, R.

2005-01-01

285

Mercury, cadmium and lead concentrations in different ecophysiological groups of earthworms in forest soils.  

PubMed

Bioaccumulation of Hg, Cd and Pb by eight ecophysiologically distinct earthworm species was studied in 27 polluted and uncontaminated forest soils. Lowest tissue concentrations of Hg and Cd occurred in epigeic Lumbricus rubellus and highest in endogeic Octolasion cyaneum. Soils dominated by Dendrodrilus rubidus possess a high potential of risk of Pb biomagnification for secondary predators. Bioconcentration factors (soil-earthworm) followed the sequence ranked Cd>Hg>Pb. Ordination plots of redundancy analysis were used to compare HM concentrations in earthworm tissues with soil, leaf litter and root concentrations and with soil pH and CEC. Different ecological categories of earthworms are exposed to Hg, Cd and Pb in the topsoil by atmospheric deposition and accumulate them in their bodies. Species differences in HM concentrations largely reflect differences in food selectivity and niche separation. PMID:18400348

Ernst, Gregor; Zimmermann, Stefan; Christie, Peter; Frey, Beat

2008-12-01

286

Relationship between mercury accumulation in young-of-the-year yellow perch and water-level fluctuations  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A three-year (2001 -2003) monitoring effort of 14 northeastern Minnesota lakes was conducted to document relationships between water-level fluctuations and mercury bioaccumulation in young-of-the-year (YOY) yellow perch (Perca flavescens) collected in the fall of each year at fixed locations. Six of those lakes are located within or adjacent to Voyageurs National Park and are influenced by dams on the outlets of Rainy and Namakan lakes. One site on Sand Point Lake coincides with a location that has nine years of previous monitoring suitable for addressing the same issue over a longer time frame. Mean mercury concentrations in YOY yellow perch at each sampling location varied significantly from year to year. For the 12-year monitoring site on Sand Point Lake, values ranged from 38 ng gww-1 in 1998 to 200 ng gww -1 in 2001. For the 14-lake study, annual mean concentrations ranged by nearly a factor of 2, on average, for each lake over the three years of record. One likely factor responsible for these wide variations is that annual water-level fluctuations are strongly correlated with mercury levels in YOY perch for both data sets. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

Sorensen, J. A.; Kallemeyn, L. W.; Sydor, M.

2005-01-01

287

The Occurrence of MerR and MerC Gene Sequences Among Mercury Resistant Determinants in River Sediments Containing Elevated Levels of Mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sediments in the River Yare, Norfolk, UK have been contaminated with mercury by the discharge of heavy metal-laden effluents from a local chemical company. In this study probes specific for different genes within commonly occurring gram-negative mercury resistance determinants were used to investigate the occurrence of the mercury resistance transposons Tn21 and Tn501 in bacteria isolated from river-sediments. This work

B. Olson; S. Ford; John Lester

1987-01-01

288

Levels of PCBs and PAHs in Bahrain soil  

SciTech Connect

The concentration of PCBs in the soil of Bahrain has been determined using GC-ECD. PCBs were detected in only few of the samples analysed. In the contaminated soils, the concentrations of PCBs were in the range of 0.2-72.7 {mu}g/g. These values were compared with published data from industrial countries. Soil samples collected from different parts of the country were also analysed for PAHs using GC-MS. The concentrations of the various PAHs fall within the range 0.01-42.58 {mu}g/g. The samples collected from an aluminum smelter area showed the highest level of PAHs. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Al-Haddad, A. [Univ. of Bahrain (Bahrain)] [Univ. of Bahrain (Bahrain); Madany, I.M.; Abdullah, F.J. [Arabian Gulf Univ., Bahrain (Bahrain)] [Arabian Gulf Univ., Bahrain (Bahrain)

1993-12-31

289

Assessment of Total Mercury Level in Fish Collected from East Calcutta Wetlands and Titagarh Sewage Fed Aquaculture in West Bengal, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total mercury levels were quantified in Tilapia mossambicus, Cirrhinus mrigela and Labio rohita, captured from East Calcutta Wetlands and Titagarh sewage fed aquaculture ponds. The bioconcentration factor of collected\\u000a fish was assessed. Total mercury level ranged from 0.073 to 0.94 ?g\\/g in both pre and post monsoon season. T. mossambicus in both season and C. mrigela at pre monsoon, cross

Subarna Bhattacharyya; Punarbasu Chaudhuri; Siddartha Dutta; Subhas Chandra Santra

2010-01-01

290

Analysis of mercury levels in historical bone material from syphilitic subjects--pilot studies (short report).  

PubMed

The aim of the present work is to study the remains of seven individuals with typical symptoms of tertiary syphilis in terms of mercury content in bones, thereby verifying whether they were subjected to treatment and, if they were, how long their organisms were exposed to toxic mercury fumes. Mercury was used, mainly in the Middle Ages and in the early modern period, as a preventive measure in case of individuals suffering from syphilis, a venereal disease, and also leprosy. Syphilitic patients treated this way should demonstrate increased concentration of mercury in their bones. The skeletons studied in the present work originate from various archaeological sites in southern and north-central Poland. The analyses concerned individuals with diagnosed syphilis as well as healthy individuals who constituted the control group. The analyses were performed by the LA-ICP-MS technique, with the use of laser Nd: YAG, Macro, 266 nm, New Wave, USA, coupled with Spectrometer Elan DRC-e Perkin Elmer, USA. The content analysis of the studied bone material revealed with high probability that the contact method of mercurial treatment was used only in the case of two women from north-central Poland, deceased at the turn of the 15th century at the earliest. PMID:22928357

Kepa, Ma?gorzata; Koz?owski, Tomasz; Szostek, Krzysztof; Drozd, Alicja; Walas, Stanis?aw; Mrowiec, Halina; Stepa?czak, Beata; G?ab, Henryk; Grupa, Ma?gorzata

2012-07-01

291

Measurements of Mercury Released From Solidified/Stabilized Waste Forms-FY2002  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed during FY 2002 in support of treatment demonstrations conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) Mercury Working Group. To comply with the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), DOE must use one of the following procedures for mixed low-level radioactive wastes containing mercury at levels above 260 ppm: a retorting/roasting treatment or (if the wastes also contain organics) an incineration treatment. The recovered radioactively contaminated mercury must then be treated by an amalgamation process prior to disposal. The DOE MWFA Mercury Working Group is working with EPA to determine whether some alternative processes could be used to treat these types of waste directly, thereby avoiding a costly recovery step for DOE. In previous years, demonstrations were performed in which commercial vendors applied their technologies for the treatment of radiologically contaminated elemental mercury as well as radiologically contaminated and mercury-contaminated waste soils from Brookhaven National Laboratory. The test results for mercury release in the headspace were reported in two reports, ''Measurements of Mercury Released from Amalgams and Sulfide Compounds'' (ORNL/TM-13728) and ''Measurements of Mercury Released from Solidified/Stabilized Waste Forms'' (ORNL/TM-2001/17). The current work did not use a real waste; a surrogate sludge had been prepared and used in the testing in an effort to understand the consequences of mercury speciation on mercury release.

Mattus, C.H.

2003-02-17

292

Lead, mercury, cadmium, chromium, and arsenic levels in eggs, feathers, and tissues of Canada geese of the New Jersey Meadowlands.  

PubMed

The New Jersey Meadowlands are located within the heavily urbanized New York/New Jersey Harbor Estuary and have been subject to contamination due to effluent and runoff from industry, traffic, and homes along the Hackensack River and nearby waterways. These extensive wetlands, though heavily impacted by development and pollution, support a wide array of bird and other wildlife species. Persistent contaminants may pose threats to birds in these habitats, affecting reproduction, egg hatchability, nestling survival, and neurobehavioral development. Metals of concern in the Meadowlands include arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury. These metals were analyzed in eggs, feathers, muscle, and liver of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) breeding in four wetland sites. We sampled geese collected during control culling (n=26) and collected eggs from goose nests (n=34). Levels of arsenic were below the minimum quantification level (MQL) in most samples, and cadmium and mercury were low in all tissues sampled. Chromium levels were high in feather samples. Mercury levels in eggs of Canada geese, an almost exclusively herbivorous species, were lower (mean ±SE 4.29±0.30?g/g wet weight) than in eggs of omnivorous mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and insectivorous red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and marsh wrens (Cistothorus palustris) from the Meadowlands, consistent with trophic level differences. However, lead levels were higher in the goose eggs (161±36.7ng/g) than in the other species. Geese also had higher levels of lead in feathers (1910±386ng/g) than those seen in Meadowlands passerines. By contrast, muscle and liver lead levels were within the range reported in waterfowl elsewhere, possibly a reflection of metal sequestration in eggs and feathers. Elevated lead levels may be the result of sediment ingestion or ingestion of lead shot and sinkers. Finally, lead levels in goose liver (249±44.7ng/g) and eggs (161±36.7ng/g) may pose a risk if consumed frequently by humans. Mill Creek, the site with the most documented prior contamination, had significantly elevated cadmium, chromium, mercury, and lead in goose tissues. PMID:21679937

Tsipoura, Nellie; Burger, Joanna; Newhouse, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Gochfeld, Michael; Mizrahi, David

2011-08-01

293

A dose-dependent relationship between mercury exposure from dental amalgams and urinary mercury levels: a further assessment of the Casa Pia Children's Dental Amalgam Trial.  

PubMed

Dental amalgams are a commonly used dental restorative material, and amalgams are about 50% mercury (Hg). In our study, urinary Hg levels was examined in children of age 8-18 years, with and without dental amalgam fillings, from a completed clinical trial (parent study) that was designed to evaluate the potential health consequences of prolonged exposure to Hg from dental amalgam fillings. Our study was designed to determine whether there was a significant dose-dependent correlation between increasing Hg exposure from dental amalgams and urinary Hg levels. Hg exposure depends on the size and number of teeth with dental amalgams. Overall, consistent with the results observed in the parent study, there was a statistically significant dose-dependent correlation between cumulative exposure to Hg from dental amalgams and urinary Hg levels, after covariate adjustment. Further, it was observed that urinary Hg levels increased by 18% to 52% among 8 to 18 year old individuals, respectively, with an average exposure to amalgams, in comparison to study subjects with no exposure to amalgams. The results of our study suggest that dental amalgams contribute to ongoing Hg exposure in a dose-dependent fashion. PMID:21803780

Geier, D A; Carmody, T; Kern, J K; King, P G; Geier, Mark R

2012-01-01

294

Total Blood Mercury Levels and Depression among Adults in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2008  

PubMed Central

Background Mercury is a neurotoxicant linked with psychiatric symptoms at high levels of exposure. However, it is unclear whether an association is present at the low exposure levels in the US adult population. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional associations of total blood mercury and depression were assessed in 6,911 adults age ?20 in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2005–2008. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 was used to assess depression (high likelihood of a depressive spectrum disorder diagnosis; score 5–27). Results Unadjusted survey weighted logistic regression suggested that higher total blood mercury was associated with lower odds of depression (Odds Ratio ?=?0.49, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.36–0.65, comparing the highest and lowest mercury quintiles). This association largely disappeared after adjustment for sociodemographic variables (income-poverty ratio, education, marital status). However, in age-stratified analyses, this inverse relationship remained in older adults (age ?40) even after adjustment for sociodemographic variables. Simulation analyses adjusting for expected confounding effects of fish intake suggested that the inverse relationship among older adults may be plausibly attributed to residual confounding (Odds Ratio ?=?0.75, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.50–1.12, comparing the highest and lowest mercury quintiles). Conclusions Higher total blood mercury was not associated with increased odds of depression. The lower odds of depression in older adults with higher total blood mercury may be due to residual confounding.

Ng, Tsz Hin H.; Mossey, Jana M.; Lee, Brian K.

2013-01-01

295

The organic contamination level based on the total soil mass is not a proper index of the soil contamination intensity  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Concentrations of organic contaminants in common productive soils based on the total soil mass give a misleading account of actual contamination effects. This is attributed to the fact that productive soils are essentially water-saturated, with the result that the soil uptake of organic compounds occurs principally by partition into the soil organic matter (SOM). This report illustrates that the soil contamination intensity of a compound is governed by the concentration in the SOM (Com) rather than by the concentration in whole soil (Cs). Supporting data consist of the measured levels and toxicities of many pesticides in soils of widely differing SOM contents and the related levels in in-situ crops that defy explanation by the Cs values. This SOM-based index is timely needed for evaluating the contamination effects of food crops grown in different soils and for establishing a dependable priority ranking for intended remediation of numerous contamination sites.

Hung, H. -W.; Daniel, Sheng, G.; Lin, T. -F.; Su, Y.; Chiou, C. T.

2009-01-01

296

DEVELOPMENT OF ECOLOGICAL SOIL SCREENING LEVELS FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES AND PLANTS FROM PEER-REVIEWED LITERATURE  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, as part of a collaborative effort among government and industry representatives, is developing Ecologic Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) for approximately 25 of the most common pollutants found at Superfund sites. As part of this effort, ...

297

Soil radon levels measured with SSNTD's and the soil radium content  

Microsoft Academic Search

The source of the radon gas 222Rn in the ground air is the soil and the bedrock underneath. The potential radon level in the ground is given by the content of 226Ra in the ground. The presence of 226Ra is in turn dependent on the amount of 238U in the ground, and these two isotopes are not always found to

G. Jönsson; C. Baixeras; R. Devantier; W. Enge; K. Freyer; R. Ghose; H.-C. Treutler

1999-01-01

298

REVIEW OF PUBLISHED LITERATURE FOR MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY AND METHYL MERCURY LEVELS FOR FISH AND FISH-EATING BIRDS IN CARSON RIVER  

EPA Science Inventory

This project involves conducting a literature search with the goal of identifying "robust" methods for measuring mercury concentrations in biological tissues. Mercury is a significant contaminant of concern in Region 9, due in large part to the extensive mining activities of the...

299

[Mercury fluxes from conifer-broadleaf forested field in central subtropical forest zone].  

PubMed

Total gaseous mercury fluxes of forested field soils in the subtropical forest zones, Chongqing, Southwestern China were continually monitored from April 2011 to March 2012 to provide insights into the characteristics of gaseous mercury flux with conifer-broadleaf forest covers. Samples were collected from surfaces of forest fields as the most representative terrestrial surfaces in Jinyun Mountain. Simultaneously, meteorological parameters at the soil level relating to GEM fluxes, such as soil temperature, air humidity, and solar radiation were analyzed, and variations of atmospheric GEM concentration were examined. The results showed that annual averaged fluxes from soils in the forest and open-air site were (16.82 +/- 6.70) ng x (m2 x h)(-1), which was significantly higher than that in the natural background area. Moreover, there was a clear seasonal variation on the forest field. In growing season, the average mercury flux was (22.23 +/- 13.19) ng x (m2 x h)(-1), while in dormant season the value was (6.01 +/- 4. 05) ng x (m2 x h)(-1). Diurnal variation characteristics of mercury fluxes were closely related to solar radiation on the forest field. Mercury fluxes of the soils were significantly correlated with soil temperature, air temperature and relative humidity, which may be caused by the relationship between solar radiation intensity and mercury emission fluxes from soils. PMID:24720190

Ma, Ming; Wang, Ding-Yong; Shen, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Rong-Guo; Huang, Li-Xin

2014-01-01

300

LEVEL AND EXTENT OF MERCURY CONTAMINATION IN OREGON, USA, LOTIC FISH  

EPA Science Inventory

Because of growing concern with widespread mercury contamination of fish tissue, we sampled 154 streams and rivers throughout Oregon using a probability design. To maximize the sample size we took samples of small and large fish, where possible, from wadeable streams and boatable...

301

Influence of illegal gold mining on mercury levels in fish of North Sulawesi's Minahasa Peninsula, (Indonesia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

North Sulawesi's Minahasa Peninsula currently is experiencing intense illegal gold mining activity. It has been estimated that 200 t of mercury are used annually in Indonesia in the recovery of gold from the illegal mines. To date no study has assessed the environmental impact of this illegal activity on the nearby aquatic biota. To address this concern, we compared tissue

Joice L. Kambey; A. p. Farrell; L. i. Bendell-young

2001-01-01

302

40 CFR Appendix Xiii to Part 266 - Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units These are exempt mercury-bearing materials...261, appendix VIII organic constituents when...manufacturers or users of mercury or mercury products...wastewater treatment plant sludge and filter...mercury contained in soil [59 FR...

2010-07-01

303

40 CFR Appendix Xiii to Part 266 - Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units These are exempt mercury-bearing materials...261, appendix VIII organic constituents when...manufacturers or users of mercury or mercury products...wastewater treatment plant sludge and filter...mercury contained in soil [59 FR...

2009-07-01

304

Neurodevelopmental Effects of Low-level Prenatal Mercury Exposure From Maternal Fish Consumption in a Mediterranean Cohort: Study Rationale and Design  

PubMed Central

Background Mercury is a neurotoxic environmental pollutant. However, the literature on the neurodevelopmental effect of low-level prenatal mercury exposure from maternal fish intake is inconsistent. We assessed the association between prenatal mercury exposure and infant neurodevelopment in coastal areas of 4 Mediterranean countries. Methods This was a prospective cohort study that planned to enroll approximately 1700 mother–infant pairs. Pregnant women and their newborn children were recruited in selected hospitals of the study areas. Biological samples, including maternal hair and cord blood, were collected from mothers and children, and the concentrations of mercury and other elements were measured. Exposures to lifestyle, environmental, and social factors were assessed through questionnaires. The main outcome was child neurodevelopment at 18 months, as measured by the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition. Conclusions This cohort has a number of strengths. First, mercury concentration was measured in several biological samples, which allows for a better understanding of mercury kinetics and is useful for sensitivity analyses. Therefore, we expect to be able to adjust for the potential confounding effects of lifestyle and social factors and for the effects of other elements that were measured in the biological samples. Finally, this is a multinational study and thus permits assessment of the relation between mercury and child neurodevelopment in different populations.

Valent, Francesca; Horvat, Milena; Sofianou-Katsoulis, Aikaterini; Spiric, Zdravko; Mazej, Darja; Little, D'Anna; Prasouli, Alexia; Mariuz, Marika; Tamburlini, Giorgio; Nakou, Sheena; Barbone, Fabio

2013-01-01

305

Mercury Calculator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive calculator produced by Teachers' Domain helps you determine the mercury levels in various types of fish, and enables you to make more informed choices about which fish are safe to eat and which should be avoided or eaten infrequently.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2010-12-23

306

Fish mercury levels appear to be increasing lately: a report from 40 years of monitoring in the province of ontario, Canada.  

PubMed

Recent mercury levels and trends reported for North America suggest a mixed (positive/negative) outlook for the environmental mercury problem. Using one of the largest consistent monitoring data sets in the world, here we present long-term and recent mercury trends in Walleye, Northern Pike, and Lake Trout from the Province of Ontario, Canada, which contains about one-third of the world's fresh water and covers a wide geographical area (1.5 and 3 times larger than France and Germany, respectively). Overall, the results indicate that the fish mercury levels either declined (0.01-0.07 ?g/g decade) or remained stable between the 1970s and 2012. The rates of mercury decline were substantially greater (mostly 0.05-0.31 ?g/g decade) during the 1970s/80s possibly in response to reductions in mercury emissions. However, Walleye and Pike levels have generally increased (0.01-0.27 ?g/g decade) in recent years (1995-2012), especially for northern Ontario (effect sizes for differences between the two periods ranged from 0.39 to 1.04). Proportions of Walleye and Pike locations showing a flat or increasing trend increased from 26-44% to 59-73% between the 1970s/80s and 1995-2012. Mercury emissions in North America have declined over the last few decades, and as such it is logical to expect recovery in fish mercury levels; however, other factors such as global emissions, climate change, invasive species, and local geochemistry are likely affecting the response time and magnitude. PMID:24678891

Gandhi, Nilima; Tang, Rex W K; Bhavsar, Satyendra P; Arhonditsis, George B

2014-05-20

307

Groundwater Modeling Of Mercury Pollution At A Former Mercury Cell Chlor Alkali Facility In Pavoldar, Kazakhstan  

EPA Science Inventory

In Kazakhstan, there is a serious case of mercury pollution near the city of Pavlodar from an old mercury cell chlor-alkali plant. The soil, sediment, and water is severly contaminated with mercury and mercury compounds as a result of the industrial activity of this chemical pla...

308

Mercury exposure, serum antinuclear/antinucleolar antibodies, and serum cytokine levels in mining populations in Amazonian Brazil: a cross-sectional study.  

PubMed

Mercury is an immunotoxic substance that has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in rodent models, characterized by lymphoproliferation, overproduction of immunoglobulin (IgG and IgE), and high circulating levels of auto-antibodies directed at antigens located in the nucleus (antinuclear auto-antibodies, or ANA) or the nucleolus (antinucleolar auto-antibodies, or ANoA). We have reported elevated levels of ANA and ANoA in human populations exposed to mercury in artisanal gold mining, though other confounding variables that may also modulate ANA/ANoA levels were not well controlled. The goal of this study is to specifically test whether occupational and environmental conditions (other than mercury exposure) that are associated with artisanal gold mining affect the prevalence of markers of autoimmune dysfunction. We measured ANA, ANoA, and cytokine concentrations in serum and compared results from mercury-exposed artisanal gold miners to those from diamond and emerald miners working under similar conditions and with similar socio-economic status and risks of infectious disease. Mercury-exposed gold miners had higher prevalence of detectable ANA and ANoA and higher titers of ANA and ANoA as compared to diamond and emerald miners with no occupational mercury exposure. Also, mercury-exposed gold miners with detectable ANA or ANoA in serum had significantly higher concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma in serum as compared to the diamond and emerald miners. This study provides further evidence that mercury exposure may lead to autoimmune dysfunction and systemic inflammation in affected populations. PMID:20176347

Gardner, Renee M; Nyland, Jennifer F; Silva, Ines A; Ventura, Ana Maria; de Souza, Jose Maria; Silbergeld, Ellen K

2010-05-01

309

(Mercury as an environmental pollutant)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference Mercury as an Environmental Pollutant'' and presented a technical poster entitled Biotransformations of Mercury in Contaminated and Control Streams in Relation to the Abundance of Microbial Gene Sequences Encoding Mercury Resistance.'' Although a great deal of the subject matter of the conference dealt with the biogeochemical cycling of mercury in aquatic and terrestrial systems which have not been subjected directly to industrial pollution, several presentations addressed contamination scenarios similar to those at the Oak Ridge site. These included one presentation concerning application of ion exchange resins in the treatment of mercury-contaminated wastewater and soil, and several concerning the role of mercury-resistant bacteria in biotransformations of mercury at contaminated sites. The Swedish experience with various methods of treating lakes to reduce mercury in fish was the subject of several presentations and one field trip.

Turner, R.R.

1990-06-28

310

Tuna fish diet influences cat behavior. [Elevated levels of selenium and mercury in commercial tuna fish cat food  

SciTech Connect

When observed in their home cages, cats fed commercial tuna fish cat food were less active, vocalized less, and spent more time on the floor and more time eating than cats fed commercial beef cat food. There were no differences in response to human handling between the two groups. There were no differences in learning ability on a two-choice point maze or in reversal learning in the same maze between beef- and tuna-fed cats. The behavior of the groups differed in a 15-min open field test only in the number of toys contacted. Cats fed the tuna had elevated tissue levels of mercury and selenium.

Houpt, K.A.; Essick, L.A.; Shaw, E.B.; Alo, D.K.; Gilmartin, J.E.; Gutenmann, W.H.; Littman, C.B.; Lisk, D.J.

1988-01-01

311

Levels of mercury in alligators ( Alligator mississippiensis) collected along a transect through the Florida Everglades  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of a multi-agency study of alligator health, 28 American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) were captured along a transect through the Florida Everglades in 1999. Liver and tail muscle tissues were sampled and analyzed on a wet weight basis for total mercury (THg) using cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry. All tissues had detectable concentrations of THg that ranged from 0.6 to

D. G Rumbold; L. E Fink; K. A Laine; S. L Niemczyk; T Chandrasekhar; S. D Wankel; C Kendall

2002-01-01

312

Levels, chemical fractionation, and solubility of lead in roadside soils of Caracas, Venezuela  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author investigated the level, chemical fractions, and solubility of Pb in several roadside soils of heavily traveled areas of Caracas, Venezuela. Using 1 N HNOâ extraction, he studied the levels of lead in 25 roadside soil samples and found a very high level of Pb (average enrichment factor 21.0), indicating a strong lead pollution of Caracas roadside soils by

J. GARCIA-MIRAGAYA

1984-01-01

313

Plasma mercury levels in Hong Kong residents: in relation to fish consumption.  

PubMed

Mercury exposure is of particular concern since mercury is a neurotoxin and the developing fetus is most sensitive to its adverse effect. Human blood is routinely used as an indicator for the evaluation of human exposure to Hg. To investigate Hg species in human plasma for Hong Kong residents and the relationship between fish consumption and Hg species in plasma, 151 plasma samples were analyzed for Hg species. The mean values of total Hg (THg) and methyl-mercury (MeHg) concentration in plasma were 0.62 and 0.28 ?g/L, respectively. No significant differences were observed between females and males as well as among age groups. Fish consumption rate was significantly positively correlated with MeHg concentrations in plasma, which demonstrated that plasma could be a biomarker for human MeHg exposure. Two methods were used to estimate human MeHg exposure. One was based on fish MeHg content and fish consumption rate (EDI(Fish)), another was employed by converting MeHg concentration in blood to MeHg exposure amount (EDI(Blood)). A significant positive correlation was observed between EDI(Blood) and EDI(Fish), and no significant difference was found between EDI(Blood) and EDI(Fish). These results demonstrated that fish consumption was the major source of MeHg for humans. PMID:23680090

Liang, Peng; Qin, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Chan; Zhang, Jin; Cao, Yucheng; Wu, Sheng-Chun; Wong, Chris K C; Wong, Ming H

2013-10-01

314

Residue levels of polychlorobiphenyls, ?DDT, and mercury in bird species commonly preyed upon by the peregrine falcon ( Falco peregrinus Tunst.) in Sweden  

Microsoft Academic Search

The levels of polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), SDDT, and total mercury were analyzed in samples of common prey species of the peregrine falcon in two falcon territories, one in northern and one in southern Sweden. Resident and herbivorous prey species showed low residue levels, while elevated levels were found in birds feeding on animals in aquatic habitats. According to biomass, waders accounted

Peter Lindberg; Tjelvar Odsjö; Lars Reutergftrdh

1985-01-01

315

Mercury and Organochlorines in Black Bream, Acanthopagrus butcheri, from the Gippsland Lakes, Victoria, Australia: Evidence for Temporal Increases in Mercury levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total mercury and organochlorine insecticide (?-HCH, lindane, ?-HCH, heptachlor, ?-HCH, aldrin, heptachlor epoxide, ?- and ?-endosulfan, dieldrin, 4,4?–DDE, endrin, 4,4?-DDD, 4,4?-DDT) concentrations were measured in black bream from 10 widely separated sites within the estuarine Gippsland Lakes, Victoria south-east Australia. Mercury concentrations (mean 0.22 ?g g?1 wet weight) in the axial muscle tissues were below the maximum concentration in fish

G. Fabris; T. Theodoropoulos; A. Sheehan; B. Abbott

1999-01-01

316

Styrofoam debris as a potential carrier of mercury within ecosystems.  

PubMed

The present paper falls within the trend of research into interactions between various pollutants emitted anthropogenically into the environment and focuses on mercury and styrofoam debris. The study covers part of the Southern Baltic's drainage area. Apart from styrofoam and beach sand, the research involved mosses, which are bioindicators of atmospheric metal pollution. The research has shown that mercury present in the environment becomes associated with styrofoam debris. The median for mercury concentrations in virgin styrofoam samples (0.23 ng g(-1) dry weight (d.w.)) and in beach sand samples (0.69 ng g(-1) d.w.) was an order of magnitude lower than in the styrofoam debris (5.20 ng g(-1) d.w.). The highest mercury content observed in styrofoam debris (3,863 ng g(-1) d.w.) exceeded the standards for bottom sediment and soil. The binding of mercury to styrofoam debris takes place in water, and presumably also through contact with the ground. A significant role in this process was played by biotic factors, such as the presence of biofilm and abiotic ones, such as solar radiation and the transformations of mercury forms related to it. As a result, mercury content in styrofoam debris underwent seasonal changes, peaking in summertime. Furthermore, the regional changes of mercury content in the studied debris seem to reflect the pollution levels of the environment. PMID:24057963

Graca, Bo?ena; Be?dowska, Magdalena; Wrzesie?, Patrycja; Zgrundo, Aleksandra

2014-02-01

317

Mercury migration into ground water, a literature study  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a broad review of the technical literature dealing with mercury migration in the soil. The approach followed was to identify relevant articles by searching bibliographic data bases, obtaining the promising articles and searching these articles for any additional relevant citations. Eight catagories were used to organize the literature, with a review and summary of each paper. Catagories used were the following: chemical states of mercury under environmental conditions; diffusion of mercury vapor through soil; solubility and stability of mercury in environmental waters; transport of mercury on colloids; models for mercury migration through the environment; analytical techniques; retention of mercury by soil components; formation of organomecurials.

Carlton, W.H.; Carden, J.L.; Kury, R.; Eichholz, G.G.

1994-11-01

318

GEMAS: Mercury in European agricultural and grazing land soils - sources and environmental risk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Agricultural (Ap, Ap-horizon, 0-20 cm) and grasing land soil samples (Gr, 0-10 cm) were collected from a large part of Europe (33 countries, 5.6 million km2) at an average density of 1 sample site/2500 km2. The resulting more than 2 x 2000 soil samples were air dried, sieved to <2 mm and analysed for their Hg concentrations following an aqua regia extraction. Median concentrations for Hg are 0.030 mg/kg (range: <0.003 - 1.56 mg/kg) for the Ap samples and 0.035 mg/kg (range:<0.003 - 3.12 mg/kg) for the Gr samples. Only 5 Ap and 10 Gr samples returned Hg concentrations above 0.5 mg/kg. In the geochemical maps the continental-scale distribution of the element is clearly dominated by geology. Climate plays also an important role, Hg accumulates in those areas of northern Europe where a wet and cold climate favors the build-up of organic material. Typical anthropogenic sources like coal fired power plants, chlor-alkaline factories, metal smelters and urban agglomerations are hardly visible at the continental scale but can have a major impact at the local scale.

Tore Ottesen, Rolf; Birke, Manfred; Gosar, Mateja; Reimann, Clemens

2014-05-01

319

[Comparison of various spatial interpolation methods for non-stationary regional soil mercury content].  

PubMed

Accurate delineating of the spatial distribution of soil heavy metal content is essential for pollution assessment and remediation. The objective of this paper is to evaluate various spatial interpolation methods, including ordinary Kriging (OK), simple Kriging (SK), lognormal Kriging (LNK), universal Kriging (UK), disjunctive Kriging (DK) and inverse distance weighting interpolation (IDW) for estimating soil surface Hg content with lognormal distribution, the linear and second-order polynomial trend, and to determine the optimal interpolation method. The predicted errors, statistical feature values and prediction maps obtained by different interpolation methods were compared. The result indicated that first-order trend OK method performed better than both zero and second-order OK methods. Within the method of first-order trend OK, Gaussian semi-variogram model performed better than both the spherical and exponential models. The method using transformed data performed worse than the methods without data transformation because of the 'distortion' effect arising from log transformation. Those with trend effect were better than those without trend effect. First-order trend UK method is the best method among the six methods studied, while the IDW method is the least. PMID:15327270

Hu, Ke-lin; Li, Bao-guo; Lu, Yi-zhong; Zhang, Feng-rong

2004-05-01

320

Mercury contamination in vicinity of secondary copper smelters in Fuyang, Zhejiang Province, China: Levels and contamination in topsoils  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, we aim to investigate the extent of soil contamination by Hg, particularly by anthropogenic Hg, and tentatively estimate the total Hg (HgT) accumulation in topsoils (0–15cm) in Fuyang, Zhejiang Province—a secondary Cu smelter of China. The results show that the levels of soil Hg in the vicinity of the smelters have been substantially elevated following local

Xuebin Yin; Chunxia Yao; Jing Song; Zhibo Li; Changbo Zhang; Wei Qian; De Bi; Chenxi Li; Ying Teng; Longhua Wu; Hongdong Wan; Yongming Luo

2009-01-01

321

Effects of environmental levels of cadmium, lead and mercury on human renal function evaluated by structural equation modeling.  

PubMed

A relationship between exposure to heavy metals, including lead and cadmium, and renal dysfunction has long been suggested. However, modeling of the potential additive, or synergistic, impact of metals on renal dysfunction has proven to be challenging. In these studies, we used structural equation modeling (SEM), to investigate the relationship between heavy metal burden (serum and urine levels of lead, cadmium and mercury) and renal function using data from the NHANES database. We were able to generate a model with goodness of fit indices consistent with a well-fitting model. This model demonstrated that lead and cadmium had a negative relationship with renal function, while mercury did not contribute to renal dysfunction. Interestingly, a linear relationship between lead and loss of renal function was observed, while the maximal impact of cadmium occurred at or above serum cadmium levels of 0.8 ?g/L. The interaction of lead and cadmium in loss of renal function was also observed in the model. These data highlight the use of SEM to model interaction between environmental contaminants and pathophysiology, which has important implications in mechanistic and regulatory toxicology. PMID:24769258

Trzeciakowski, Jerome P; Gardiner, Lesley; Parrish, Alan R

2014-07-01

322

Progress and Future Plans for Mercury Remediation at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - 13059  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), along with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has identified mercury contamination at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) as the highest priority cleanup risk on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The historic loss of mercury to the environment dwarfs any other contaminant release on the ORR. Efforts over the last 20 years to reduce mercury levels leaving the site in the surface waters of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) have not resulted in a corresponding decrease in mercury concentrations in fish. Further reductions in mercury surface water concentrations are needed. Recent stimulus funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) has supported several major efforts involving mercury cleanup at Y-12. Near-term implementation activities are being pursued with remaining funds and include design of a centrally located mercury treatment facility for waterborne mercury, treatability studies on mercury-contaminated soils, and free mercury removal from storm drains. Out-year source removal will entail demolition/disposal of several massive uranium processing facilities along with removal and disposal of underlying contaminated soil. As a National Priorities List (NPL) site, cleanup is implemented under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and directed by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) between DOE, EPA, and TDEC. The CERCLA process is followed to plan, reach approval, implement, and monitor the cleanup. (authors)

Wilkerson, Laura O. [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [DOE Oak Ridge, P.O. Box 2001, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); DePaoli, Susan M. [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)] [Pro2Serve, 1100 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Turner, Ralph [P.O. Box 421, Squamish, BC V8B 0A4 (United States)] [P.O. Box 421, Squamish, BC V8B 0A4 (United States)

2013-07-01

323

Temporal trends (1989–2011) in levels of mercury and other heavy metals in feathers of fledgling great egrets nesting in Barnegat Bay, NJ  

SciTech Connect

There is an abundance of data for levels of metals from a range of species, but relatively few long-term time series from the same location. In this paper I examine the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in feathers from fledgling great egrets (Ardea alba) collected at nesting colonies in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey from 1989 to 2011. The primary objectives were to test the null hypotheses that (1) There were no temporal differences in metal levels in feathers of fledgling great egrets, and (2) Great egrets nesting in different areas of Barnegat Bay (New Jersey) did not differ in metal levels. There were significant yearly variations in levels of all heavy metals in feathers of fledgling great egret, but levels decreased significantly from 1989 to 2011 only for lead (1470 ppb to 54.3 ppb), cadmium (277 ppb to 30.5 ppb), and manganese (only since 1996; 2669 ppb to 329 ppb)). Although mercury levels decreased from 2003–2008 (6430 ppb to 1042 ppb), there was no pattern before 2003, and levels increased after 2008 to 2610 ppb in 2011. Lead, cadmium, chromium, manganese and mercury were higher in feathers from great egrets nesting in the northern part of the bay, and selenium was highest in feathers from mid-bay. The lack of a temporal decline in mercury levels in feathers of great egrets is cause for concern, since the high levels in feathers from some years (means as high as 6430 ppb) are in the range associated with adverse effects (5000 ppb for feathers). -- Highlights: ? Metals were monitored in feathers of great egrets from Barnegat Bay, New Jersey. ? Levels of cadmium and lead decreased significantly from 1989–2011. ? Mercury levels in feathers from great egrets did not decline from 1989–2011. ? Metal levels were generally higher in great egrets and black-crowned night heron feathers than in snowy egrets.

Burger, Joanna, E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8082, USA and also with Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)] [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8082, USA and also with Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, New Jersey (United States)

2013-04-15

324

Mercury in Fish from a Sulfate-Amended Wetland Mesocosm  

SciTech Connect

This study used an experimental model of a constructed wetland to evaluate the risk of mercury methylation when the soil is amended with sulfate. The model was planted with Schoenoplectus californicus, and the sediments were varied during construction to provide a control and two levels of sulfate treatment.

Harmon, S.M.

2003-05-29

325

Mercury Exposure and Children's Health  

PubMed Central

Acute or chronic mercury exposure can cause adverse effects during any period of development. Mercury is a highly toxic element; there is no known safe level of exposure. Ideally, neither children nor adults should have any mercury in their bodies because it provides no physiological benefit. Prenatal and postnatal mercury exposures occur frequently in many different ways. Pediatricians, nurses, and other health care providers should understand the scope of mercury exposures and health problems among children and be prepared to handle mercury exposures in medical practice. Prevention is the key to reducing mercury poisoning. Mercury exists in different chemical forms: elemental (or metallic), inorganic, and organic (methylmercury and ethyl mercury). Mercury exposure can cause acute and chronic intoxication at low levels of exposure. Mercury is neuro-, nephro-, and immunotoxic. The development of the child in utero and early in life is at particular risk. Mercury is ubiquitous and persistent. Mercury is a global pollutant, bio-accumulating, mainly through the aquatic food chain, resulting in a serious health hazard for children. This article provides an extensive review of mercury exposure and children’s health.

Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan; McCarty, Kathleen M.; Steckling, Nadine; Lettmeier, Beate

2011-01-01

326

Experimental manipulation of water levels in two French riverine grassland soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this experimental study, we simulated the effects of different river flooding regimes on soil nutrient availability, decomposition and plant production in floodplain grasslands. This was done to investigate the influences of soil water contents on nutrient cycling. Water levels were manipulated in mesocosms with intact soil turfs from two French floodplain grasslands. Three water levels were established: a `wet'

Mark van Oorschot; Nils van Gaalen; Ed Maltby; Natalie Mockler; Andrew Spink

2000-01-01

327

Trace level voltammetric determination of heavy metals and total mercury in tea matrices (Camellia sinensis).  

PubMed

An analytical procedure regarding the voltammetric determination of mercury(II), copper(II), lead(II), cadmium(II) and zinc(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) in matrices involved in food chain is proposed. In particular, tea leaves were analyzed as real samples. The digestion of each matrix was carried out using a concentrated HCl-HNO3-H2SO4 acidic attack mixture; 0.01 mol L(-1) EDTA-Na2+ 0.15 mol L(-1) NaCl + 0.5 mol L(-1) HCl was employed as the supporting electrolyte. The voltammetric measurements were carried out using a conventional three electrode cell, employing, as working electrodes, a gold electrode (GE) and a stationary hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The analytical procedure has been verified on the standard reference materials Spinach Leaves NIST-SRM 1570a, Tomato Leaves NIST-SRM 1573a and Apple Leaves NIST-SRM 1515. For all the elements, the precision as repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (sr) was of the order of 3-5%, while the trueness, expressed as relative error (e) was of the order of 3-7%. Once set up on the standard reference materials, the analytical procedure was applied to commercial tea leaves samples. A critical comparison with spectroscopic measurements is also discussed. PMID:24416778

Melucci, Dora; Locatelli, Marcello; Locatelli, Clinio

2013-12-01

328

Environmental Geochemistry of Mercury Mines in Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey fact sheet investigates potential environmental contamination around naturally occurring, mercury-rich mineral deposits in Alaska. Testing of mercury levels in streams and sediments is described, as well as mercury levels in fish downstream from mines and the environmental effects of mercury entering the food chain.

329

Mercury concentrations in breast feathers of three upper trophic level marine predators from the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element distributed globally through atmospheric transport. Agattu Island, located in the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska, has no history of point-sources of Hg contamination. We provide baseline levels of total mercury (THg) concentrations in breast feathers of three birds that breed on the island. Geometric mean THg concentrations in feathers of fork-tailed storm-petrels (Oceanodroma furcata; 6703 ± 1635, ng/g fresh weight [fw]) were higher than all other species, including snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus; 2105 ± 1631, ng/g fw), a raptor with a diet composed largely of storm-petrels at Agattu Island. There were no significant differences in mean THg concentrations of breast feathers among adult Kittlitz’s murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris; 1658 ± 1276, ng/g fw) and chicks (1475 ± 671, ng/g fw) and snowy owls. The observed THg concentrations in fork-tailed storm-petrel feathers emphasizes the need for further study of Hg pollution in the western Aleutian Islands.

Kaler, Robb S. A.; Kenney, Leah A.; Bond, Alexander L.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.

2014-01-01

330

Mercury concentrations in breast feathers of three upper trophic level marine predators from the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska.  

PubMed

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element distributed globally through atmospheric transport. Agattu Island, located in the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska, has no history of point-sources of Hg contamination. We provide baseline levels of total mercury (THg) concentrations in breast feathers of three birds that breed on the island. Geometric mean THg concentrations in feathers of fork-tailed storm-petrels (Oceanodroma furcata; 6703 ± 1635, ng/g fresh weight [fw]) were higher than all other species, including snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus; 2105 ± 1631, ng/g fw), a raptor with a diet composed largely of storm-petrels at Agattu Island. There were no significant differences in mean THg concentrations of breast feathers among adult Kittlitz's murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris; 1658 ± 1276, ng/g fw) and chicks (1475 ± 671, ng/g fw) and snowy owls. The observed THg concentrations in fork-tailed storm-petrel feathers emphasizes the need for further study of Hg pollution in the western Aleutian Islands. PMID:24656750

Kaler, Robb S A; Kenney, Leah A; Bond, Alexander L; Eagles-Smith, Collin A

2014-05-15

331

LOCAL IMPACTS OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.  

SciTech Connect

Mercury is a neurotoxin that accumulates in the food chain and is therefore a health concern. The primary human exposure pathway is through fish consumption. Coal-fired power plants emit mercury and there is uncertainty over whether this creates localized hot spots of mercury leading to substantially higher levels of mercury in water bodies and therefore higher exposure. To obtain direct evidence of local deposition patterns, soil and vegetations samples from around three U.S. coal-fired power plants were collected and analyzed for evidence of hot spots and for correlation with model predictions of deposition. At all three sites, there was no correlation between modeled mercury deposition and either soil concentrations or vegetation concentrations. It was estimated that less than 2% of the total mercury emissions from these plants deposited within 15 km of these plants. These small percentages of deposition are consistent with the literature review findings of only minor perturbations in environmental levels, as opposed to hot spots, near the plants. The major objective of the sampling studies was to determine if there was evidence for hot spots of mercury deposition around coal-fired power plants. From a public health perspective, such a hot spot must be large enough to insure that it did not occur by chance, and it must increase mercury concentrations to a level in which health effects are a concern in a water body large enough to support a population of subsistence fishers. The results of this study suggest that neither of these conditions has been met.

SULLIVAN, T.M.; BOWERMAN, B.; ADAMS, J.; MILIAN, L.; LIPFERT, F.; SUBRAMANIAM, S.; BLAKE, R.

2005-09-21

332

DEVELOPING ECOLOGICAL SOIL SCREENING LEVELS: BENCHMARK VALUES FOR SOIL INVERTEBRATES, PLANTS, AND MICROBIAL FUNCTIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Soils are repositories for environmental contaminants (COCs) in terrestrial ecosystems. Time, effort, and money repeatedly are invested in literature-based evaluations of potential soil-ecotoxicity......

333

Spatial variability in mercury cycling and relevant biogeochemical controls in the Florida Everglades.  

PubMed

Spatial patterns in mercury cycling and bioaccumulation at the landscape level in the Everglades were investigated by collecting and analyzing multimedia samples for mercury species and biogeochemical characteristics from 228 randomly located stations. Higher total mercury (THg) in environmental compartments (surface water, soil, flocculent detrital material (floc), and periphyton) generally occurred in the northern and central Everglades, but higher THg in water and periphyton in the Everglades National Park was an exception. Multiple biogeochemical characteristics, such as surface water dissolved organic matter (DOC(sw)), pH, chloride, and compositional properties of solid compartments (soil and floc), were identified to be important factors controlling THg distribution. Methylmercury (MeHg) was also higher in the northern Everglades for water, soil, and floc, but not for periphyton. Higher mosquitofish THg and bioaccumulation factor were observed in the central and southern Everglades, partially in accordance with periphyton MeHg distribution, but not in the "hot spot" areas of water, soil, or floc MeHg. The discrepancy in mercury bioaccumulation and mercury distribution in environmental compartments suggests that in addition to MeHg production, biogeochemical controls that make MeHg available to aquatic organisms, such as DOC(sw) and compositional properties of soil and floc, are important in mercury bioaccumulation. PMID:19603647

Liu, Guangliang; Cai, Yong; Mao, Yuxiang; Scheidt, Daniel; Kalla, Peter; Richards, Jennifer; Scinto, Leonard J; Tachiev, Georgio; Roelant, David; Appleby, Charlie

2009-06-15

334

Mercury emission and plant uptake of trace elements during early stage of soil amendment using flue gas desulfurization materials.  

PubMed

A pilot-scale field study was carried out to investigate the distribution of Hg and other selected elements (i.e., As, B, and Se), i.e., emission to ambient air, uptake by surface vegetation, and/or rainfall infiltration, after flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material is applied to soil. Three FGD materials collected from two power plants were used. Our results show Hg released into the air and uptake in grass from all FGD material-treated soils were all higher (P < 0.1) than the amounts observed from untreated soil. Hg in the soil amended with the FGD material collected from a natural oxidation wet scrubber (i.e., SNO) was more readily released to air compared to the other two FGD materials collected from the synthetic gypsum dewatering vacuum belt (i.e., AFO-gypsum) and the waste water treatment plant (i.e., AFO-CPS) of a forced oxidation FGD system. No Hg was detected in the leachates collected during the only 3-hour, 1-inch rainfall event that occurred throughout the 4-week testing period. For every kilogram of FGD material applied to soil, AFO-CPS released the highest amount of Hg, B, and Se, followed by SNO, and AFO gypsum. Based on the same energy production rate, the land application of SNO FGD material from Plant S released higher amounts of Hg and B into ambient air and/or grass than the amounts released when AFO-gypsum from Plant A was used. Using FGD material with lower concentration levels of Hg and other elements of concern does not necessary post a lower environmental risk. In addition, this study demonstrates that considering only the amounts of trace elements uptake in surface vegetation may under estimate the overall release of the trace elements from FGD material-amended soils. It also shows, under the same soil amendment conditions, the mobility of trace elements varies when FGD materials produced from different processes are used. PMID:22442930

Cheng, Chin-Min; Chang, Yung-Nan; Sistani, Karamat R; Wang, Yen-Wen; Lu, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Chia-Wei; Dong, Jing-Hong; Hu, Chih-Chung; Pan, Wei-Ping

2012-02-01

335

Molecular mechanisms triggered by mercury.  

PubMed

Mercury is an ubiquitous environmental toxin that causes a wide range of adverse health effects in humans. Three forms of mercury exist: elemental, inorganic and organic. Each of them has its own profile of toxicity. Exposure to mercury typically occurs by inhalation or ingestion. Mercury can be an indoor air pollutant, however industry emission remains the most important source of inhaled mercury. Furthermore, fresh water and ocean fish may contain large amounts of mercury and dental amalgam can be another important source of inorganic and mercury vapor. The present review discusses the current information on mercury toxicity and the distinct toxicologic profile of the three forms of mercury. The existing therapeutics, new therapeutics development or agents for treating mercury poisoning will also discussed. Since in general low levels of mercurial are tolerable, herein, we also discuss the defensive mechanisms developed by the cell to protect itself against mercury injury. This aspect may be useful to provide a biological protection against toxic effects exerted by mercury or by specific forms of mercury in view of a medicinal purposes. PMID:18077077

Guzzi, GianPaolo; La Porta, Caterina A M

2008-02-01

336

Uptake and speciation of mercury and selenium in vegetable crops grown on compost-treated soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The uptake and speciation of Hg and Se were assessed for the edible portion of 16 different vegetable crops grown on a garden plot which had been exclusively treated with residential compost for 6 yr. This study was conducted under actual field conditions typical of residential gardening and utilized organic gardening techniques. Crops had methylmercury levels averaging 12.8 % of

Chris J. Cappon

1987-01-01

337

ON-SITE MERCURY ANALYSIS OF SOIL AT HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES BY IMMUNOASSAY AND ASV  

EPA Science Inventory

Two field methods for Hg, immunoassay and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV), that can provide onsite results for quick decisions at hazardous waste sites were evaluated. Each method was applied to samples from two Superfund sites that contain high levels of Hg; Sulphur Bank Me...

338

Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, and selenium levels in blood of four species of turtles from the Amazon in Brazil.  

PubMed

Using blood as a method of assessing metal levels in turtles may be useful for populations that are threatened or endangered or are decreasing. In this study the levels of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), and selenium (Se) in blood of four species of turtles from the tributaries of the Rio Negro in the Amazon of Brazil were examined. The turtles included the six-tubercled Amazon (river) turtle (Podocnemis sextuberculata), red-headed Amazon (river) turtle (Podocnemis erythrocephala), big-headed Amazon (river) turtle (Peltocephalus dumerilianus), and matamata turtle (Chelus fimbriatus). Blood samples were taken from the vein in the left hind leg of each turtle. There were significant interspecific differences in the sizes of the turtles from the Rio Negro, and in concentrations of Pb, Hg, and Se; the smallest species (red-headed turtles) had the highest levels of Pb in their blood, while Se levels were highest in big-headed turtles and lowest in red-headed turtles. Hg in blood was highest in matamata, intermediate in big-headed, and lowest in the other two turtles. Even though females were significantly larger than males, there were no significant differences in metal levels as a function of gender, and the only relationship of metals to size was for Cd. Variations in metal levels among species suggest that blood may be a useful bioindicator. Metal levels were not high enough to pose a health risk to the turtles or to consumers, such as humans. PMID:19953418

Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Schneider, Larissa; Vogt, Richard; Gochfeld, Michael

2010-01-01

339

Root zone soil moisture from the assimilation of screen-level variables and remotely sensed soil moisture  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In most operational NWP models, root zone soil moisture is constrained using observations of screen-level temperature and relative humidity. While this generally improves low-level atmospheric forecasts, it often leads to unrealistic model soil moisture. Consequently, several NWP centers are moving toward also assimilating remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture observations. Within this context, an EKF is used to compare the assimilation of screen-level observations and near-surface soil moisture data from AMSR-E into the ISBA land surface model over July 2006. Several issues regarding the use of each data type are exposed, and the potential to use the AMSR-E data, either in place of or together with the screen-level data, is examined. When the two data types are assimilated separately, there is little agreement between the root zone soil moisture updates generated by each, indicating that for this experiment the AMSR-E data could not have replaced the screen-level data to obtain similar surface turbulent fluxes. For the screen-level variables, there is a persistent diurnal cycle in the model-observations bias, which is not related to soil moisture. The resulting diurnal cycle in the analysis increments demonstrates how assimilating screen-level observations can lead to unrealistic soil moisture updates, reinforcing the need to assimilate alternative data sets. However, when the two data types are assimilated together, the near-surface soil moisture provides a much weaker constraint of the root zone soil moisture than the screen-level observations do, and the inclusion of the AMSR-E data does not substantially change the results compared to the assimilation of screen-level variables alone.

Draper, C. S.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Walker, J. P.

2011-01-01

340

Does shift in oxygen level in soil air affect the trace gases emissions?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biogenic processes in soil such as, trace gasses emissions are influenced by presence or absence of oxygen as it is a dominant final acceptor of electrons for number of biochemical processes. However, it is unknown that trace gases emissions from soil are influenced by the level of oxygen or not. To understand the impact of oxygen level on CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions, five contrasting soils which differ in land use and other properties, were incubated at constant temperature and moisture in an automated chamber measurement system. Automated system continuously (30 mL/min) flushed the chambers holding soil samples with inlet air of known composition and the outlet air, sampling the headspace of the column, was connected to an automated multiport stream selection valve (Valco) that directed the air stream from different columns sequentially to instrumental part (LiCOR6262,PICARRO2101i and PICCARO2301). Other greenhouse gases and isotopes (?13C & D) of CH4 were sampled weekly using 2L flasks. Oxygen levels in inlet air were switched weekly, started from 20% followed by 10, 5, 2.5, 1, 0%, and all levels were repeated in reverse fashion (from 1 to 20%).The results showed that soil respiration was higher in soils that were rich in soil organic matter with higher microbial biomass. Three out of five soils exhibited a gradual decrease in soil respiration while shifting higher to lower O2 levels but no such impact was recorded during gradual increase in O2 level. The lowest respiration rates in all soil types were recorded under anaerobic conditions. Forest soils were rich in soil organic carbon and respired more CO2 than grassland or cropland soils. All soils oxidized CH4, except one grassland soil which was acidic in nature (pH=4.1), in the presence of O2 at all levels. Amount of CH4 oxidized varied among soil types and was highest in forest soils. Under anaerobic condition CH4 oxidation was not observed in any soil, while two soils (cropland and one grassland) emitted methane but at very low concentrations. Large amount of N2O emissions were recorded under 0% O2 level, and the amount of N2O emitted was higher in forest soils than grassland soils. In conclusion, the variable impact of oxygen levels on trace gases emissions depends on soil and trace gas type.

malghani, S.; Gleixner, G.; Trumbore, S.

2013-12-01

341

Cloud point extraction and spectrophotometric determination of mercury species at trace levels in environmental samples.  

PubMed

A new micelle-mediated separation and preconcentration method was developed for ultra-trace quantities of mercury ions prior to spectrophotometric determination. The method is based on cloud point extraction (CPE) of Hg(II) ions with polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114) in the presence of chelating agents such as 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and 4-(2-thiazolylazo) resorcinol (TAR). Hg(II) ions react with both PAN and TAR in a surfactant solution yielding a hydrophobic complex at pH 9.0 and 8.0, respectively. The phase separation was accomplished by centrifugation for 5 min at 3500 rpm. The calibration graphs obtained from Hg(II)-PAN and Hg(II)-TAR complexes were linear in the concentration ranges of 10-1000 ?g L(-1) and 50-2500 ?g L(-1) with detection limits of 1.65 and 14.5 ?g L(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were 1.85% and 2.35% in determinations of 25 and 250 ?g L(-1) Hg(II), respectively. The interference effect of several ions were studied and seen commonly present ions in water samples had no significantly effect on determination of Hg(II). The developed methods were successfully applied to determine mercury concentrations in environmental water samples. The accuracy and validity of the proposed methods were tested by means of five replicate analyses of the certified standard materials such as QC Metal LL3 (VWR, drinking water) and IAEA W-4 (NIST, simulated fresh water). PMID:22265535

Ulusoy, Halil ?brahim; Gürkan, Ramazan; Ulusoy, Songül

2012-01-15

342

Introduction of mercury resistant bacterial strains to Hg(II) amended soil microcosms increases the resilience of the natural microbial community to mercury stress  

SciTech Connect

Heavy metals are among the most important groups of pollutant compounds, and they are highly persistent in the soil environment. Techniques that can be used for the remediation of heavy metal contaminated environments thus need to be evolved. In the present study we evaluated the effect of introducing a Hg resistance plasmid in subsurface soil communities. This was done in microcosms with DOE subsurface soils amended with 5-10 ppm of HgCl2. Two microcosms were set up. In microcosm A we studied the effect of adding strain S03539 containing either the Hg resistance conjugative plasmid, pJORD 70, or the Hg resistance mobilizable plasmid, pPB117. In microcosm B we studied the effect of adding strain KT2442 with and without pJORD70. For both microcosms, the effect on the resilience of the indigenous bacterial community as well as the effect on the soil concentration of Hg was evaluated.

de Lipthay, Julia R.; Rasmussen, Lasse D.; Serensen, Soren J.

2004-03-17

343

Contamination assessment of mercury and arsenic in roadway dust from Baoji, China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The physicochemical properties and the contamination levels of mercury and arsenic in roadway dust from Baoji, NW China were investigated using an Atomic Fluorescence Spectrophotometer. Contamination levels were assessed based on the geoaccumulation index and the enrichment factor. The results show that magnetic susceptibilities of roadway dust were higher than Holocene loess-soil of central Shaanxi Loess Plateau. The mean contents of organic matter, PM10 and PM100 were 8.8%, 21.8% and 98.6%, respectively. Mercury concentration ranged from 0.48 to 2.32 ?g g -1, with a mean value of 1.11 ?g g -1, 17.1 times the Chinese soil mercury background value and 37 times the Shaanxi soil mercury background value. Arsenic concentration ranged from 9.0 to 42.8 ?g g -1, with a mean value of 19.8 ?g g -1, 1.8 times the Chinese and Shaanxi soil arsenic background values. The geoaccumlation index and enrichment factor indicate that mercury in the dust mainly originated from anthropogenic sources with ratings of "strongly polluted" and "strongly to extremely polluted", whereas arsenic in dust originated from both natural and anthropogenic sources, with a ratings of "moderately to strongly polluted" and "strongly polluted". Industrial activities, such as a coal-fired power station, coke-oven plant, and cement manufacturing plant, augmented by vehicular traffic, are the anthropogenic sources of mercury and arsenic in the roadway dust.

Lu, Xinwei; Li, Loretta Y.; Wang, Lijun; Lei, Kai; Huang, Jing; Zhai, Yuxiang

344

Relationships between phosphorus levels in soil and in runoff from corn production systems.  

PubMed

Phosphorus-enriched runoff from cropland can hasten eutrophication of surface waters. A soil P level exceeding crop needs due to long-term fertilizer and/or manure applications is one of several potential sources of increased P losses in runoff from agricultural systems. Field experiments were conducted at locations representative of three major soil regions in Wisconsin in corn (Zea mays L.) production systems to determine the effect of tillage, recent manure additions, soil P extraction method, and soil sampling depth (0-2, 0-5, and 0-15 cm) on the relationship between soil test P level and P concentrations in runoff. Runoff from simulated rainfall (75 mm h(-1)) was collected from 0.83-m2 areas for 1 h after rainfall initiation and analyzed for dissolved phosphorus (DP), total phosphorus (TP), and sediment. The DP fraction of the TP concentration in runoff ranged from 5 to 17% among sites with most of the variation in TP due to varying sediment concentration on the well-drained silt loam soils and to soil test P level on the poorly drained silty clay loam soil. In 213 observations across a range of soils and managements, good relationships occurred between soil test P level and DP concentration in runoff for most of the tests and sampling depths used. Recent manure additions and high levels of surface cover from corn residue sometimes masked this relationship. The slope of DP relative to soil test P level was markedly higher on the silty clay loam soil than on the silt loam soils possibly due to soil permeability-infiltration rate differences. Agronomic soil P tests were as effective as environmentally oriented soil P tests for predicting DP concentrations in runoff. PMID:12549571

Andraski, Todd W; Bundy, Larry G

2003-01-01

345

Mercury levels in muscle of six species of turtles eaten by people along the Rio Negro of the Amazon basin.  

PubMed

Mercury levels in the Amazon River are generally high, but there are no published studies on Hg levels in turtles from the region. In this study, levels of Hg were examined in the muscle of six species of turtles in the Rio Negro in the Amazon basin of Brazil, including Podocnemis unifilis, Podocnemis expansa, Podocnemis erythrocephala, Podocnemis sextuberculata, Peltocephalus dumerilianus, and Chelus fimbriatus. It is important to analyze Hg levels in chelonians in this region because of the potential health risk to humans and other receptors that eat them, as well as their potential use as bioindicators. The effect of sex, weight, and carapace length on Hg concentrations in turtle muscle was examined to determine if the levels represent a health risk to riverine people. There was a significant interspecific difference in Hg levels but no differences as a function of size or gender. The highest Hg level was found in Chelus fimbriatus (mean = 432 ppb, standard deviation +/- 196 ppb), followed by Peltocephalus dumerilianus (106 +/- 41 ppb), Podocnemis expansa (62 +/- 49 ppb), P. sextuberculata (61 +/- 40 ppb), P. unilifis (35 +/- 17 ppb), and P. erythrocephala (33.1 +/- 17 ppb). Of the species studied, the piscivorous C. fimbriatus had the highest Hg level. Hg levels in turtles were similar to the levels found in fish from the same basin. Levels of Hg in the muscle of C. fimbriatus are sufficiently high to pose a potential risk to humans who consume them. This study represents the first comparative study of Hg levels in muscle of six species of turtles. PMID:19621205

Schneider, Larissa; Belger, Lauren; Burger, Joanna; Vogt, Richard C; Ferrara, Camila R

2010-02-01

346

MERCURY IN MARINE LIFE DATABASE  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of the Mercury in Marine Life Project is to organize information on estuarine and marine species so that EPA can better understand both the extent of monitoring for mercury and level of mercury contamination in the biota of coastal environments. This report follows a ...

347

ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION  

EPA Science Inventory

The current state of our scientific understanding the mercury cycle tells us that most of the mercury getting into fish comes from atmospheric deposition, but methylation of that mercury in aquatic systems is required for the concentrations in fish to reach harmful levels. We st...

348

The soil-air exchange characteristics of total gaseous mercury from a large-scale municipal landfill area  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cycle of mercury (Hg) from a gigantic landfill area (area ˜2.72 km 2) was investigated by conducting micrometeorological measurements of its exchange rates across soil-air boundary during the spring season of 2000. Based on this field campaign, we attempted to provide various insights into the Hg exchange processes, especially with respect to the decoupling of the mixed signatures of complex source processes. According to our analysis, the cycle of Hg in the study site appeared to be affected significantly by the vent processes; excessive amount of Hg was expected to be released via ventpipes penetrating up to 60 m depths of the deep landfilled waste layer. The influence of these vent source processes was reflected very sensitively by the windrose pattern. The data collected during the non-easterly winds were representing the typical pattern for a strong source area in which upward emission is predominant in both strength and frequency. On the other hand, the data collected from the easterly winds were characterized by excessive deposition of Hg which we suspect is due mostly to the nearest vent located easterly from our measurement spot. The unique characteristics of each data group, divided by windrose pattern, were consistent from apparent difference in: (1) the absolute magnitude of gradient/flux data sets, (2) frequency of exchange for each of two vertical directions, and (3) E/ D (emission/deposition) ratios for most relevant parameters. The analysis of the short-term variability of exchange patterns over a 24-h scale, also exhibited that the patterns for two different conditions were quite contrasting as a function of time. The magnitude of bidirectional fluxes in the present study is significantly high with values of 254±224 ( N=71 emissions out of 79 fluxes quantified during non-easterly winds) and -1164±1276 ng m -2 h -1 ( N=14 depositions out of 16 fluxes during easterly winds), respectively. If the computed emission rate is extrapolated, we estimate that annual emission of Hg from the study area can amount to approximately 6 kg which is comparable with the estimates for other areas around the globe under strong Hg-pollution.

Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Gangwoong

349

Changes in brain monoamine levels and monoamine oxidase activity in the catfish, Clarias batrachus, during chronic treatments with mercurials  

SciTech Connect

In mammals, the central nervous system is the primary target for CH{sub 3}Hg poisoning which is clinically known as Minamata disease. Hg is a widely recognized neurotoxin and has been reported to impair brain monoamine neurotransmitter metabolism. Reports on effects of Hg on brain monoamine activity in fishes are scarce. In the present study, therefore, changes in the brain monoamine levels and the degradation enzyme, monoamine oxidase (MAO), are described in the catfish, Clarias batrachus, exposed to sublethal concentrations of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}-inorganic Hg), methylmercuric chloride (CH{sub 3}HgCl-organic Hg), and a commercial mercurial fungicide formulation, emisan 6 (methoxyethyl Hg-organic Hg) for 45, 90 and 180 d during gonadal recrudescence. These intervals correspond to late preparatory, prespawning and spawning phases, respectively, of the annual reproductive cycle of the catfish.

Kirubagaran, R.; Joy, K.P. (Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India))

1990-07-01

350

Using Sulfate-Amended Sediment Slurry Batch Reactors to Evaluate Mercury Methylation  

SciTech Connect

In the methylated form, mercury represents a concern to public health primarily through the consumption of contaminated fish tissue. Research conducted on the methylation of mercury strongly suggests the process is microbial in nature and facilitated principally by sulfate-reducing bacteria. This study addressed the potential for mercury methylation by varying sulfate treatments and wetland-based soil in microbial slurry reactors with available inorganic mercury. Under anoxic laboratory conditions conducive to growth of naturally occurring sulfate-reducing bacteria in the soil, it was possible to evaluate how various sulfate additions influenced the methylation of inorganic mercury added to overlying water. Treatments included sulfate amendments ranging from 25 to 500 mg/L (0.26 to 5.2 mM) above the soil's natural sulfate level. This study also provided an assessment of mercury methylation relative to sulfate-reducing bacterial population growth and subsequent sulfide production. Mercury methylation in sulfate treatments did not exceed that of the non-amended control during a 35-day incubation. However, increases in methylmercury concentration were linked to bacterial growth and sulfate reduction. A time lag in methylation in the highest treatment correlated with an equivalent lag in bacterial growth.

Harmon, S.M.

2003-05-29

351

Production of root-derived material and associated microbial growth in soil at different nutrient levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maize plants were grown for 42 days in a sandy soil at two different mineral nutrient levels, in an atmosphere containing 14CO2. The 14C and total carbon contents of shoots, roots, soil and soil microbial biomass were measured 28, 35 and 42 days after germination. Relative growth rates of shoots and roots decreased after 35 days at the lower nutrient

R. Merckx; A. Dijkstra; A. den Hartog; J. A. Veen

1987-01-01

352

Changes in surface levels of mercury, silver, tin, and copper of dental amalgam treated with carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide in vitro  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The effect of 10% carbamide peroxide or 10% hydrogen peroxide on the surface levels of mercury, silver, tin, and copper of amalgam fillings was tested in vitro with scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometric microanalysis.Study design. Samples of amalgam were treated for 14 and 28 days with either 10% carbamide peroxide or 10% hydrogen peroxide solutions and compared

Ilan Rotstein; Chaim Mor; Joel R Arwaz

1997-01-01

353

Stabilization of a Mixed Waste Sludge Surrogate Containing More Than 260 PPM Mercury (1).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In an earlier demonstration of an innovative mercury stabilization technology for the Department of Energy, ATG's full-scale process stabilized mercury in soils that initially contained more than 260 ppm of mercury of unknown speciation. The treated waste...

W. J. Smith F. Feizollahi R. Brimley

2002-01-01

354

Groundwater Modeling of Mercury Pollution at a Former Mercury Cell Chlor Alkali Facility in Pavlodar City, Kazakhstan  

EPA Science Inventory

In northern Kazakhstan, there is a serious case of mercury pollution near the city of Pavlodar from an old mercury cell chlor-alkali plant. The soil, sediment, and water is severely contaminated with mercury and mercury compounds as a result of the industrial activity of this ch...

355

Soil Lead and Other Metal Levels in Industrial, Residential and Nature Reserve Areas in Singapore  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of pressure feedback microwave digestion technique has permitted rapid and efficient digestion of soil and sediment samples. The evaluation of different acid mixtures to digest soil samples were studied by mixed-level orthogonal array design. The selected acid mixture of HCl-HNO3-HF was employed in the survey of Pb, Zn, Cu, Cr and Mn in soil samples. Surface soil samples

C. Y. Zhou; M. K. Wong; L. L. Koh; Y. C. Wee

1997-01-01

356

Current approaches of the management of mercury poisoning: need of the hour  

PubMed Central

Mercury poisoning cases have been reported in many parts of the world, resulting in many deaths every year. Mercury compounds are classified in different chemical types such as elemental, inorganic and organic forms. Long term exposure to mercury compounds from different sources e.g. water, food, soil and air lead to toxic effects on cardiovascular, pulmonary, urinary, gastrointestinal, neurological systems and skin. Mercury level can be measured in plasma, urine, feces and hair samples. Urinary concentration is a good indicator of poisoning of elemental and inorganic mercury, but organic mercury (e.g. methyl mercury) can be detected easily in feces. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a rapid, cheap and sensitive method for detection of thymine bound mercuric ions. Silver nanoparticles are used as a sensitive detector of low concentration Hg2+ ions in homogeneous aqueous solutions. Besides supportive therapy, British anti lewisite, dimercaprol (BAL), 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA. succimer) and dimercaptopropanesulfoxid acid (DMPS) are currently used as chelating agents in mercury poisoning. Natural biologic scavengers such as algae, azolla and other aquatic plants possess the ability to uptake mercury traces from the environment.

2014-01-01

357

Current approaches of the management of mercury poisoning: need of the hour.  

PubMed

Mercury poisoning cases have been reported in many parts of the world, resulting in many deaths every year. Mercury compounds are classified in different chemical types such as elemental, inorganic and organic forms. Long term exposure to mercury compounds from different sources e.g. water, food, soil and air lead to toxic effects on cardiovascular, pulmonary, urinary, gastrointestinal, neurological systems and skin. Mercury level can be measured in plasma, urine, feces and hair samples. Urinary concentration is a good indicator of poisoning of elemental and inorganic mercury, but organic mercury (e.g. methyl mercury) can be detected easily in feces. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are a rapid, cheap and sensitive method for detection of thymine bound mercuric ions. Silver nanoparticles are used as a sensitive detector of low concentration Hg2+ ions in homogeneous aqueous solutions. Besides supportive therapy, British anti lewisite, dimercaprol (BAL), 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA. succimer) and dimercaptopropanesulfoxid acid (DMPS) are currently used as chelating agents in mercury poisoning. Natural biologic scavengers such as algae, azolla and other aquatic plants possess the ability to uptake mercury traces from the environment. PMID:24888360

Rafati-Rahimzadeh, Mehrdad; Rafati-Rahimzadeh, Mehravar; Kazemi, Sohrab; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar

2014-01-01

358

Spatial variability of the soil erodibility parameters and their relation with the soil map at subgroup level.  

PubMed

This project takes a look at the variation of the parameters related to soil erodibility (fractions of clay, silt, fine and coarse sand; organic matter, permeability, and structure) coming from soil pits from the Community of Madrid's soil map (Spain), according to Soil Taxonomy at subgroup level. It draws the conclusion that map erodibility shouldn't be estimated from a soil map because the K factor obtained does not present significant differences among the different types of soil. One or more key factors related with soil erodibility must be taken into account if erodibility maps are to be drawn. This research has shown that silt and structure could be considered key factors for erodibility maps of the area, but not significant differences have been found in important factors such as clay or organic matter due to the wide range of data variance. In order to elaborate erosion risk maps the use of the K factor from the physiographical map is a good alternative. When data are grouped according to these criteria significant differences in K factor are shown. Erodibility was greater in soils developed over gypsic material, with a value of 0.63+/-0.28, than in high plateaus (locally know as alcarrias), with a value of 0.40+/-0.18. In order to adequately represent soil erodibility, a kriging geostatistic technique is used, which reduces the variation of the factors considered when they are found to correlate, as is the case with the parameters considered to calculate K factor. PMID:17379278

Pérez-Rodríguez, Raquel; Marques, Maria Jose; Bienes, Ramón

2007-05-25

359

CONSERVATION TILLAGE IMPACTS ON NATIONAL SOIL AND ATMOSPHERIC CARBON LEVELS  

EPA Science Inventory

Soil organic matter is the largest global terrestrial C pool and is a source of CO2, CH4 and other greenhouse gases. hanges in soil organic C (SOC) content and fossil fuel C emissions in response to conversion of conventional tillage to conservation tillage in the contiguous USA ...

360

The effect of fire on mercury cycling in the soils of forested watersheds: Acadia National Park, Maine, U.S.A  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study compares mercury (Hg) and methylmercury (MeHg) distribution in the soils of two forested stream watersheds at Acadia National Park, Maine, U.S.A. Cadillac Brook watershed, which burned in 1947, has thin soils and predominantly deciduous vegetation. It was compared to the unburned Hadlock Brook watershed, with thicker soil and predominantly coniferous vegetation. Soils in both watersheds were primarily well drained. The fire had a significant impact on the Cadillac watershed, by raising the soil pH, altering the vegetation, and reducing carbon and Hg pools. Total Hg content was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in Hadlock soils (0.18 kg Hg ha-1) compared to Cadillac soils (0. 13 kg Hg ha-1). Hadlock O horizon had an average Hg concentration of 134??48 ng Hg g-1 dry weight, compared to 103??23 ng Hg g-1 dry weight in Cadillac O horizon. Soil pH was significantly higher in all soil horizons at Cadillac compared to Hadlock soils. This difference was especially significant in the O horizon, where Cadillac soils had an average pH of 3.41??0.22 compared to Hadlock soils with an average pH of 2.99??0.13. To study the mobilization potential of Hg in the O horizons of the two watersheds, batch adsorption experiments were conducted, and the results were modeled using surface complexation modeling. The results of Hg adsorption experiments indicated that the dissolved Hg concentration was controlled by the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration. The adsorption isotherms suggest that Hg is more mobile in the O horizon of the unburned Hadlock watershed because of higher solubility of organic carbon resulting in higher DOC concentrations in that watershed. Methylmercury concentrations, however, were consistently higher in the burned Cadillac O horizon (0.20??0.13 ng Hg g-1 dry weight) than in the unburned Hadlock O horizon (0.07??0.07 ng Hg g-1 dry weight). Similarly, Cadillac soils possessed a higher MeHg content (0.30 g MeHg ha-1) than Hadlock soils (0.16 g MeHg ha-1). The higher MeHg concentrations in Cadillac soils may reflect generally faster rates of microbial metabolism due to more rapid nutrient cycling and higher soil pH in the deciduous forest. In this research, we have shown that the amount of MeHg is not a function of the total pool of Hg in the watershed. Indeed, MeHg was inversely proportional to total Hg, suggesting that landscape factors such as soil pH, vegetation type, or land use history (e.g., fire) may be the determining factors for susceptibility to high Hg in biota. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publisher. Printed in the Netherlands.

Amirbahman, A.; Ruck, P. L.; Fernandez, I. J.; Haines, T. A.; Kahl, J. S.

2004-01-01

361

Poly-Use Multi-Level Sampling Rod to Measure Soil-Gas Exchange in Glacier Forefield Soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The forefields of receding glaciers provide unique opportunities to investigate initial microbial processes in the vadose zone and their role in soil formation. Various studies revealed a surprising diversity of microbes and of their strategies to cope with the extreme conditions in this C- and N-limited environment. In the forefield of receding glaciers as well as in developed soils microorganisms are the driving force for the exchange of greenhouse gases between soil and atmosphere. However, in young and developing soils, little is known about soil-gas exchange and the activities of the involved microorganisms. Knowledge of soil-gas composition and gas diffusion at various depths in a soil profile allows for the precise calculation of gas fluxes among different depths within the vadose zone and at the soil-atmosphere boundary. The acquisition of undisturbed soil-gas samples at a high depth-resolution is difficult, and the estimation of soil-gas diffusion coefficients requires knowledge of volumetric water content at the exact location of gas sampling. By using conventional techniques, e.g. the burial of permanent probes, these tasks are virtually impossible to accomplish in a remote glacier forefield dominated by rocks and boulders. We developed a novel poly-use multi-level sampling rod (PULSAR) primarily consisting of two devices: a newly-designed multi-level sampler (MLS) for soil-gas sampling, and a commercially available profile probe (PR2) for non-invasive multi-level water content measurements. These devices fit into the same access tubes (ATs) of 1.1m length, which need to be pre-installed into the soil with the help of a steel rod. We modified the ATs to feature eight 1mm diameter holes each at 20 sampling depths in intervals of 5cm. Our MLS can be inserted into the ATs and allows for the selective extraction of soil-gas from each sampling depth. The interspaces between the sampling depths are sealed by inflatable rubber membranes for the time of sampling. Once soil-gas has been extracted, soil water content can be measured with the PR2 probe at each sampled depth. After gas concentration analysis, knowledge of water content and soil-gas composition at 20 different depths allows for the quantification of depth-resolved soil-gas fluxes and calculation of microbial production and degradation rates in situ with minimal disturbance. The PULSAR concept was applied to investigate greenhouse gas fluxes in the forefields of two receding glaciers on calcareous and siliceous bedrock in the Swiss Alps. We installed a total of 33 ATs distributed among three soil-age groups of approx. 10, 40 and 70 years. Soil-gas sampling and water content measurements were performed twice during the snow-free season. In between sampling, the ATs were sealed with inflatable rubber tubes featuring iButton® temperature loggers. The resulting data will provide valuable insights into the development of gas exchange of these young soils, while illustrating the feasibility of the PULSAR in soils with high skeleton contents.

Nauer, P. A.; Schroth, M. H.; Zeyer, J. A.

2012-12-01

362

Assessment of nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminth levels in soils in Yenagoa Metropolis, Niger Delta.  

PubMed

In order to assess the prevalence of nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths in the Yenagoa Metropolis, 480 soil samples were collected from five communities for 12 months. The soil samples were collected along two transects from the waterfront and community playgrounds. Analysis was by standard methods. The results obtained from the study described in this article showed that 44.79% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 40.34%-49.24%) of the soil samples tested positive for nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths. Ascaris lumbricoides was the most common helminth with a prevalence rate of 35% (95% CI = 30.73%-39.27%). Mixed occurrence of nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths was 10.21%. Although the community playgrounds had a higher prevalence of nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths than the waterfront (p > .05), more cases of mixed occurrence of nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths occurred in the waterfront than the community playgrounds (p > .05). The wet season had a higher prevalence rate of nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths than the dry season (p < .05). The observed high prevalence of nonzoonotic soil-transmitted helminths in soil is considered a potential public health risk to swimmers and children playing outdoors in the Yenagoa metropolis. PMID:24645421

Bariweni, Perekibina A; Ekweozor, Ikem K E; Ogbonna, David N

2014-01-01

363

Soil Oxidant Levels and the Chemical State of Chlorine and Sulfur at the Phoenix Landing Site  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Wet Chemical Laboratory a component instrument of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer on the Mars Phoenix Lander, was used to perform a comprehensive chemical characterization of martian soil as it interacted in real time with liquid water. Both sulfate and perchlorate were detected in Phoenix soils indicating a history of extensive oxidative alteration. However, the pH and the oxidation-reduction potential of Phoenix soil/solutions were moderate and controlled by soil carbonates, which indicates that levels of redox active species in the soils are very low. The time dependent responses of the WCL sensors have been examined to determine the upper limits of soil oxidants, including oxychlorine and reactive oxygen species, in Phoenix soils. The quantitative limits of these and related oxidizers are used to evaluate the stability and age of soil perchlorate as well as the chemical state of chlorine, sulfur, and carbon at the Phoenix landing site.

Quinn, R. C.

2012-12-01

364

Evaluation of SMAP Level 2 Soil Moisture Algorithms Using SMOS Data  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) mission are global measurements of soil moisture and land freeze/thaw state at 10 km and 3 km resolution, respectively. SMAP will provide soil moisture with a spatial resolution of 10 km with a 3-day revisit time at an accuracy of 0.04 m3/m3 [1]. In this paper we contribute to the development of the Level 2 soil moisture algorithm that is based on passive microwave observations by exploiting Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite observations and products. SMOS brightness temperatures provide a global real-world, rather than simulated, test input for the SMAP radiometer-only soil moisture algorithm. Output of the potential SMAP algorithms will be compared to both in situ measurements and SMOS soil moisture products. The investigation will result in enhanced SMAP pre-launch algorithms for soil moisture.

Bindlish, Rajat; Jackson, Thomas J.; Zhao, Tianjie; Cosh, Michael; Chan, Steven; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni; Colliander, Andreas; Kerr, Yann; Shi, J. C.

2011-01-01

365

Impacts of mercury contaminated mining waste on soil quality, crops, bivalves, and fish in the Naboc River area, Mindanao, Philippines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rice paddy fields in the Naboc area, near Monkayo on the island of Mindanao, Philippines, have been irrigated four times a year over the last decade using Naboc River water contaminated with mercury (Hg) by artisanal gold mining in the Diwalwal area. Silt containing up to at least 90 mg Hg\\/kg (d.w.) has been deposited in rice paddy fields during

J. D. Appleton; J. P. S. Calvez; C. Beinhoff

2006-01-01

366

Assessment of mercury toxicity by the changes in oxygen consumption and ion levels in the freshwater snail, Pila globosa, and the mussel, Lamellidens marginalis  

SciTech Connect

There are many studies on mercury toxicity in freshwater fishes but very few on freshwater molluscs (Wright 1978) though they serve as bio-indicators of metal pollution. A few reports on marine gastropods and bivalves indicated the importance of these animals in metal toxicity studies. Hence, in the present study, the level of tolerance of the freshwater gastropod Pila globosa and of a freshwater bivalve Lamellidens marginalis mercury at lethal and sublethal levels was determined and compared with the rate of whole animal oxygen consumption and the level of sodium, potassium and calcium ions in the hepatopancreas and the foot of these animals. As the period of exposure is one of the important factors in toxicity studies, the level of tolerance was determined at 120 hours of exposure and the other parameters were analyzed at 1, 3 and 5 days in lethal and at 1, 7 and 15 days in sublethal concentrations.

Sivaramakrishna, B.; Radhakrishnaiah, K.; Suresh, A. (Sri Krishnadevaraya Univ., Andhra Pradesh (India))

1991-06-01

367

Mercury mobility at the Carson River Superfund Site, west-central Nevada, USA: Interpretation of mercury speciation data in mill tailings, soils, and sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Carson River Superfund Site in west-central Nevada is an area of Hg-contaminated soil, sediment, water, air, and biola resulting from the amalgamation milling of Ag-Au ores of the Comstock lode worked approximately a century ago. In order to develop an understanding of the behavior, transport, and fate of Hg at this site, a technique was developed to estimate the

Paul J. Lechler; Jerry R. Miller; Liang-Chi Hsu; Mario O. Desilets

1997-01-01

368

Maternal and umbilical cord blood levels of mercury, lead, cadmium, and essential trace elements in Arctic Canada  

SciTech Connect

Maternal and umbilical cord blood levels of mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and the trace elements copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and selenium (Se) are reported for Inuit, Dene/Metis, Caucasian, and Other nonaboriginal participants from Arctic Canada. This is the first human tissue monitoring program covering the entire Northwest Territories and Nunavut for multiple contaminants and establishes a baseline upon which future comparisons can be made. Results for chlorinated organic pesticides and PCBs for these participants have been reported elsewhere. Between May 1994 and June 1999, 523 women volunteered to participate by giving their written informed consent, resulting in the collection of 386 maternal blood samples, 407 cord samples, and 351 cord:maternal paired samples. Geometric mean (GM) maternal total mercury (THg) concentrations ranged from 0.87{mu}g/L (SD=1.95) in the Caucasian group of participants (n=134) to 3.51{mu}g/L (SD=8.30) in the Inuit group (n=146). The GM of the Inuit group was 2.6-fold higher than that of the Dene/Metis group (1.35{mu}g/L, SD=1.60, n=92) and significantly higher than those of all other groups (P<0.0001). Of Inuit women participants, 3% (n=4) were within Health Canada's level of concern range (20-99{mu}g/L) for methylmercury (MeHg) exposure. Of Inuit and Dene/Metis cord samples, 56% (n=95) and 5% (n=4), respectively, exceeded 5.8{mu}g/L MeHg, the revised US Environmental Protection Agency lower benchmark dose. GM maternal Pb was significantly higher in Dene/Metis (30.9{mu}g/L or 3.1{mu}g/dL; SD=29.1{mu}g/L) and Inuit (31.6{mu}g/L, SD=38.3) participants compared with the Caucasian group (20.6{mu}g/L, SD=17.9) (P<0.0001). Half of all participants were smokers. GM blood Cd in moderate smokers (1-8 cigarettes/day) and in heavy smokers (>8 cigarettes/day) was 7.4-fold higher and 12.5-fold higher, respectively, than in nonsmokers. The high percentage of smokers among Inuit (77%) and Dene/Metis (48%) participants highlights the need for ongoing public health action directed at tobacco prevention, reduction, and cessation for women of reproductive age. Pb and THg were detected in more than 95% of all cord blood samples, with GMs of 21 {mu}g/L and 2.7{mu}g/L, respectively, and Cd was detected in 26% of all cord samples, with a GM of 0.08{mu}g/L. Cord:maternal ratios from paired samples ranged from 0.44 to 4.5 for THg, from 0.5 to 10.3 for MeHg, and 0.1 to 9.0 for Pb. On average, levels of THg, MeHg, and Zn were significantly higher in cord blood than in maternal blood (P<0.0001), whereas maternal Cd, Pb, Se, and Cu levels were significantly higher than those in cord blood (P<0.0001). There was no significant relationship between methylmercury and selenium for the range of MeHg exposures in this study. Ongoing monitoring of populations at risk and traditional food species, as well as continued international efforts to reduce anthropogenic sources of mercury, are recommended.

Butler Walker, Jody [J. Butler Walker and Associates, 15 Balsam Crescent, Whitehorse, YT Y1A 4V6 (Canada)]. E-mail: jody@butlerwalker.ca; Houseman, Jan [Formerly Inuvik Regional Human Contaminants Monitoring Program coordinators, Inuvik, NT (Canada); Seddon, Laura [Formerly Mackenzie and Kitikmeot Maternal and Cord Blood Monitoring Program coordinators, Yellowknife, NT (Canada); McMullen, Ed [J. Butler Walker and Associates, Whitehorse, YT (Canada); Tofflemire, Karen [Formerly Inuvik Regional Human Contaminants Monitoring Program coordinators, Inuvik, NT (Canada); Mills, Carole [Formerly Mackenzie and Kitikmeot Maternal and Cord Blood Monitoring Program coordinators, Yellowknife, NT (Canada); Corriveau, Andre [Government of the Northwest Territories (GNWT), Department of Health and Social Services, Yellowknife, NT (Canada); Weber, Jean-Philippe [Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Institut national de sante publique du Quebec, Sainte-Foy, QC (Canada); LeBlanc, Alain [Laboratoire de Toxicologie, Institut national de sante publique du Quebec, Sainte-Foy, QC (Canada); Walker, Mike [Health Canada, Safe Environments Programme, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Donaldson, Shawn G. [Health Canada, Safe Environments Programme, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Van Oostdam, Jay [Health Canada, Safe Environments Programme, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

2006-03-15

369

Mercury: Mid-infrared (3-13.5 µm) observations show heterogeneous composition, presence of intermediate and basic soil types, and pyroxene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Aerospace Corporation's Broadband Array Spectrograph System (BASS) mounted on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii was used to obtain spectral measurements of Mercury's thermal emission on March 21, 1998 (45-85 deg longitude), and on May 12, 1998 (68-108 deg longitude). The spectra show heterogeneous composition on Mercury's surface between longitudes 45-85 deg and about 68-108 deg. These observations include measurements from 3-6 ?m, a spectral region not previously covered by mid-infrared spectroscopy. Excellent quality data were obtained in the atmospheric windows between 3-4.2 and 4.6-5.5 ?m. These wavelength regions exhibit high emissivity characteristic of a regolith with strong thermal gradients maintained in a vacuum environment with spectra dominated by grain sizes of about 30 ?m. Emission peaks are present at 3.5 and 5 ?m in the 45-85 deg longitude data. The 5 ?m peak has been tentatively attributed to clino-pyroxene. Data were also obtained in the 7.5-13.5 ?m spectral region. Spectra obtained during both observing periods show well-defined emissivity maxima (EM) in the spectral vicinity (between 7.7-9.2 ?m) of the Christiansen frequency of silicate soils. The location of the EM for longitudes 45-85 deg (7.9 ?m) is consistent with a surface composition of intermediate SiO2 content. The overall spectral shape is similar to that obtained previously at the same location with different instrumentation. In the region 68-108 deg longitude, three EM are observed at 7.8, 8.2, and 9.2 ?m, indicating the presence of distinctly different surface composition from the other location. Comparisons of these data to other mid-infrared spectra of Mercury's surface and asteroids, and of the different instrumentation used in observations are included.

Sprague, A. L.; Emery, J. P.; Donaldson, K. L.; Russell, R. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Mazuk, A. L.

2002-09-01

370

Mercury Bioconcentration Factors in American Alligators ( Alligator mississippiensis) in the Florida Everglades  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alligators inhabiting the Florida Everglades contain elevated levels of mercury within their tissues due to accumulation of mercury in the sediments. The objective of this study was to determine the mercury bioconcentration factors (BCFs) in the alligators based on mercury concentrations in the alligator tissues and mercury levels in the water column. Data from studies on mercury concentrations in the

Bernine Khan; Berrin Tansel

2000-01-01

371

Mercury, lead and cadmium levels in the urine of 170 Spanish adults: a pilot human biomonitoring study.  

PubMed

Human biomonitoring is a well-recognized tool for estimating the exposure of human populations to environmental pollutants. However, information regarding biomarker concentrations of many environmental chemicals in the general population is limited for many countries. The Spanish Environment Ministry has recently funded a human biomonitoring study on the Spanish general population. This study aims to determine reference levels for several biomarkers, especially heavy metals, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and cotinine, in urine, whole blood, serum and hair, and will involve 2000 volunteers throughout Spain. Samples were taken during 2009-2010 and analyses are currently underway. The results presented herein were obtained in a pilot study carried out in the Madrid region. The study group comprised 170 volunteers, of which 79% were female and 21% male (age: 23-66 years). All participants were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding diet and living habits and provides a morning urine sample. The geometric means for total mercury (Hg), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) were 1.23, 1.11 and 0.25 ?g/g creatinine, respectively. Levels of Pb and Hg were higher than those reported for the general population in the USA and Germany, whereas Cd was in the same range (CDC, 2009; Becker et al., 2003). The values reported here are similar to those reported in other Spanish studies. PMID:21968334

Castaño, Argelia; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jinny E; Cañas, Ana; Esteban, Marta; Navarro, Carmen; Rodríguez-García, Ana C; Arribas, Misericordia; Díaz, Gema; Jiménez-Guerrero, José A

2012-02-01

372

Method for Measuring Enriched Levels of Deuterium in Soil Water.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes procedures for analyzing hydrogen isotope ratios. Hydrogen is separated from liquid water or soil water by reacting the water with heated uranium. An isotope-ratio mass spectrometer determines the atom % deuterium in the hydrogen to ...

J. L. Oliphant T. F. Jenkins A. R. Tice

1982-01-01

373

Environmental impact of mercury and other heavy metals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The environmental impact of heavy metals is reviewed. One significant source of emissions of heavy metals to air is waste incineration. Consumer batteries contributes significantly to this problem, as well as to heavy metal leakage to groundwater from landfill deposits. The situation in Sweden is used as an example to describe how the deposition from the atmosphere still is increasing the load of heavy metals, like mercury, cadmium and lead, in top soils and aquatic sediments. Critical factors and effect levels for Hg, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn and As are discussed. Specific questions like mercury contents in present battery waste and heavy metal contents in new and future secondary batteries are addressed.

Lindqvist, Oliver

374

ENVIRONMENTAL CHAMBER STUDIES OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN THE ATMOSPHERE  

EPA Science Inventory

Mercury is released into the environment through both natural and anthropogenic pathways. The cycling and fate of mercury in atmospheric, soil, and water ecosystems is impacted by various factors, including chemical transformation and transport. An understanding of these proces...

375

Short-Term Effects of Land Leveling on Irrigation-Related Some Soil Properties in a Clay Loam Soil  

PubMed Central

There are few studies conducted on the short-term effects of land leveling on soil water holding capacity. The objectives of this study were to analyze the short-term effects of land leveling on the magnitudes, variances, spatial variability, and distributions of surface (0–20?cm) and subsurface (20–40?cm) soil properties of bulk density, field capacity, permanent wilting point, water holding capacity and particle size fractions. The study was conducted in a 1.2?ha field with clay loam soil located on the low terraces of Yesilirmak River, Tokat, Turkey. According to the paired t-test results, water holding capacity, and bulk density significantly increased, while permanent wilting point (P ? 0.001) and field capacity (P ? 0.05) significantly decreased for surface soil due to land leveling. The reasons for the increases in WHC values in both cut and fill areas (29%, and 12%, resp.) of surface soil are look like the much more decreases in PWP values than those of FC values and the increases in BD values. The moderate positive linear relationship between the surface soil clay contents and cut depths through cut areas (r = 0.64) was also determined in this study.

Oztekin, Tekin

2013-01-01

376

Dynamic modelling of the long term behaviour of cadmium, lead and mercury in Swiss forest soils using CHUM-AM.  

PubMed

The applicability of the dynamic soil model CHUM-AM was tested to simulate concentrations of Cd, Pb and Hg in five Swiss forest soils. Soil cores of up to 50 cm depth were sampled and separated into two defined soil layers. Soil leachates were collected below the litter by zero-tension lysimeters and at 15 and 50 cm soil depths by tension lysimeters over two years. The concentrations of Cd, Pb and Hg in the solid phase and soil solution were measured by ICP-MS (Cd, Pb) or CV-AFS (Hg). Measured metal concentrations were compared with modelled concentrations using CHUM-AM. Additionally we ran the model with three different deposition scenarios (current deposition; maximum acceptable deposition according to the Swiss ordinance on Air Pollution Control; critical loads according to CLRTAP) to predict metal concentrations in the soils for the next 1000 years. Assuming current loads concentrations of Cd and Pb showed varying trends (increasing/decreasing) between the soils. Soils rich in organic carbon or with a high pH value showed increasing trends in Cd and Pb concentrations whereas the concentrations in the other soils decreased. In contrast Hg concentrations are predicted to further increase in all soils. Critical limits for Pb and Hg will partly be exceeded by current loads or by the critical loads proposed by the CLRTAP but the critical limits for Cd will rarely be reached within the next 1000 years. In contrast, maximal acceptable deposition will partly lead to concentrations above the critical limits for Pb in soils within the next 400 years, whereas the acceptable deposition of Cd will not lead to concentrations above the proposed critical limits. In conclusion the CHUM-AM model is able to accurately simulate heavy metal (Cd, Pb and Hg) concentrations in Swiss forest soils of various soil properties. PMID:24080414

Rieder, Stephan R; Tipping, Edward; Zimmermann, Stefan; Graf-Pannatier, Elisabeth; Waldner, Peter; Meili, Markus; Frey, Beat

2014-01-15

377

Mercury and trace element contents of Donbas coals and associated mine water in the vicinity of Donetsk, Ukraine  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mercury-rich coals in the Donets Basin (Donbas region) of Ukraine were sampled in active underground mines to assess the levels of potentially harmful elements and the potential for dispersion of metals through use of this coal. For 29 samples representing c11 to m3 Carboniferous coals, mercury contents range from 0.02 to 3.5 ppm (whole-coal dry basis). Mercury is well correlated with pyritic sulfur (0.01 to 3.2 wt.%), with an r2 of 0.614 (one outlier excluded). Sulfides in these samples show enrichment of minor constituents in late-stage pyrite formed as a result of interaction of coal with hydrothermal fluids. Mine water sampled at depth and at surface collection points does not show enrichment of trace metals at harmful levels, indicating pyrite stability at subsurface conditions. Four samples of coal exposed in the defunct open-cast Nikitovka mercury mines in Gorlovka have extreme mercury contents of 12.8 to 25.5 ppm. This coal was formerly produced as a byproduct of extracting sandstone-hosted cinnabar ore. Access to these workings is unrestricted and small amounts of extreme mercury-rich coal are collected for domestic use, posing a limited human health hazard. More widespread hazards are posed by the abandoned Nikitovka mercury processing plant, the extensive mercury mine tailings, and mercury enrichment of soils extending into residential areas of Gorlovka.

Kolker, A.; Panov, B. S.; Panov, Y. B.; Landa, E. R.; Conko, K. M.; Korchemagin, V. A.; Shendrik, T.; McCord, J. D.

2009-01-01

378

Northern Idaho house dust and soil lead levels compared to the Bunker Hill Superfund Site.  

PubMed

House dust has been identified as a major exposure medium for lead (Pb) in children. High levels of Pb in soil an