Science.gov

Sample records for soil water interactions

  1. Molecular interactions of pesticides at the soil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Shirzadi, Azadeh; Simpson, Myrna J; Kumar, Rajeev; Baer, Andrew J; Xu, Yunping; Simpson, André J

    2008-08-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy combined with saturation-transfer double difference (STDD) NMR can be used to analyze the molecular-level interactions of pesticides and whole soils occurring at the soil-water interface. Here 1H HR-MAS STDD NMR has been applied to some common pesticides (trifluralin, acifluorfen, and (4-nitro-3-(trifluoromethyl) phenol) and a pesticide degradation product (1-naphthol). Results indicate that dipolar interactions, H-bonding, hydrophobic associations, and potentially pi-pi interactions are the predominant sorption mechanisms for these molecules at the soil-aqueous interface. It is evident that the physical and chemical characteristics of soil are highly influential in determining the mechanisms of pesticide sorption, as they significantly affect soil conformation. In particular, different binding mechanisms were observed for 1-naphthol in soil swollen using a buffer versus D2O, indicating that the K(oc) alone may not be enough to accurately predict the behavior of a molecule in a real soil environment. Preliminary kinetic-based studies suggest that both the swelling solvent and soil moisture content significantly influence the sequestration of trifluralin. These studies demonstrate that HR-MAS and STDD NMR are powerful and versatile tools which can be applied to expand our knowledge of the mechanistic interactions of agrochemicals at the molecular level. PMID:18754469

  2. Scaling Soil Microbe-Water Interactions from Pores to Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, S.; Katul, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    The spatial scales relevant to soil microbial activity are much finer than scales relevant to whole-ecosystem function and biogeochemical cycling. On the one hand, how to link such different scales and develop scale-aware biogeochemical and ecohydrological models remains a major challenge. On the other hand, resolving these linkages is becoming necessary for testing ecological hypotheses and resolving data-theory inconsistencies. Here, the relation between microbial respiration and soil moisture expressed in water potential is explored. Such relation mediates the water availability effects on ecosystem-level heterotrophic respiration and is of paramount importance for understanding CO2 emissions under increasingly variable rainfall regimes. Respiration has been shown to decline as the soil dries in a remarkably consistent way across climates and soil types (open triangles in Figure). Empirical models based on these respiration-moisture relations are routinely used in Earth System Models to predict moisture effects on ecosystem respiration. It has been hypothesized that this consistency in microbial respiration decline is due to breakage of water film continuity causing in turn solute diffusion limitations in dry conditions. However, this hypothesis appears to be at odds with what is known about soil hydraulic properties. Water film continuity estimated from soil water retention (SWR) measurements at the 'Darcy' scale breaks at far less negative water potential (<-0.1 MPa) levels than where microbial respiration ceases (approximately -15 MPa) as shown in the Figure (violet frequency distribution). Also, this threshold point inferred from SWR shows strong texture dependence, in contrast to the respiration curves. Employing theoretical tools from percolation theory, it is demonstrated that hydrological measurements can be spatially downscaled at a micro-level relevant to microbial activity. Such downscaling resolves the inconsistency between respiration thresholds and

  3. Study on the subgrade deformation under high-speed train loading and water-soil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian; Zhao, Guo-Tang; Sheng, Xiao-Zhen; Jin, Xue-Song

    2015-11-01

    It is important to study the subgrade characteristics of high-speed railways in consideration of the water-soil coupling dynamic problem, especially when high-speed trains operate in rainy regions. This study develops a nonlinear water-soil interaction dynamic model of slab track coupling with subgrade under high-speed train loading based on vehicle-track coupling dynamics. By using this model, the basic dynamic characteristics, including water-soil interaction and without water induced by the high-speed train loading, are studied. The main factors-the permeability coefficient and the porosity-influencing the subgrade deformation are investigated. The developed model can characterize the soil dynamic behaviour more realistically, especially when considering the influence of water-rich soil.

  4. Study on the subgrade deformation under high-speed train loading and water-soil interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian; Zhao, Guo-Tang; Sheng, Xiao-Zhen; Jin, Xue-Song

    2016-04-01

    It is important to study the subgrade characteristics of high-speed railways in consideration of the water-soil coupling dynamic problem, especially when high-speed trains operate in rainy regions. This study develops a nonlinear water-soil interaction dynamic model of slab track coupling with subgrade under high-speed train loading based on vehicle-track coupling dynamics. By using this model, the basic dynamic characteristics, including water-soil interaction and without water induced by the high-speed train loading, are studied. The main factors-the permeability coefficient and the porosity-influencing the subgrade deformation are investigated. The developed model can characterize the soil dynamic behaviour more realistically, especially when considering the influence of water-rich soil.

  5. Fecal Coliform Interaction with Soil Aggregates: Effect of Water Content and Bovine Manure Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To test the hypothesis that fecal coliform (FC) interaction with soil aggregates is affected by aggregate size, water content and bovine manure application. Methods and Results: Tyler loam soil aggregates were separated into fractions of 3.35-4.75 mm, 4.75-7.93 mm and 7.93-9.5 mm. Air-dry an...

  6. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Interacting vegetative and thermal contributions to water movement in desert soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.A.; Andraski, B.J.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Cooper, C.A.; Simunek, J.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Thermally driven water-vapor flow can be an important component of total water movement in bare soil and in deep unsaturated zones, but this process is often neglected when considering the effects of soil-plant-atmosphere interactions on shallow water movement. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the coupled and separate effects of vegetative and thermal-gradient contributions to soil water movement in desert environments. The evaluation was done by comparing a series of simulations with and without vegetation and thermal forcing during a 4.7-yr period (May 2001-December 2005). For vegetated soil, evapotranspiration alone reduced root-zone (upper 1 m) moisture to a minimum value (25 mm) each year under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. Variations in the leaf area index altered the minimum storage values by up to 10 mm. For unvegetated isothermal and nonisothermal simulations, root-zone water storage nearly doubled during the simulation period and created a persistent driving force for downward liquid fluxes below the root zone (total net flux ~1 mm). Total soil water movement during the study period was dominated by thermally driven vapor fluxes. Thermally driven vapor flow and condensation supplemented moisture supplies to plant roots during the driest times of each year. The results show how nonisothermal flow is coupled with plant water uptake, potentially influencing ecohydrologic relations in desert environments. ?? Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA. All rights reserved.

  8. Drought Impact on Water - Carbon Interaction in Soil: A Stable Isotopic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, J.; Weiler, M.; Gessler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme climatic conditions like drought introduce drastic changes in carbon and water dynamics in the plant - soil continuum, starting from carbon assimilation till carbon allocation in the soil, root water uptake till transpiration via leaves. Our objective was to study the drought impact on the dynamics of Carbon, and water cycles, as well as the interaction between them under extreme climatic conditions in the plant soil continuum. The first phase of the experiment involved 13CO2 pulse labeling of drought exposed and well-water beech microcosms, during which we monitored the 13C allocation to roots, and in the soil by measuring the CO2 concentration, ∂13C, and ∂18O of root derived CO2. We found that drought had a significant impact on, a) carbon assimilation, allocation, and translocation rate in the plant - soil system. The drought stressed plants not only assimilated fewer amounts of CO2, but also translocation of those assimilates belowground was extremely slow, and root respiration was low in comparison the well watered control plants. The second phase involved rewetting of the drought chambers (and the application of similar amounts of water to the controls) using D218O enriched water followed by an additional 13CO2 pulse labeling approach so as to study the effects of drought on the infiltration patterns of a precipitation event as well as the recovery of the carbon relations of previously drought stressed beech saplings.

  9. Interacting vegetative and thermal contributions to water movement in desert soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, C.A.; Andraski, B.J.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Cooper, C.A.; Šimůnek, J.; Wheatcraft, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Thermally driven water-vapor flow can be an important component of total water movement in bare soil and in deep unsaturated zones, but this process is often neglected when considering the effects of soil–plant–atmosphere interactions on shallow water movement. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the coupled and separate effects of vegetative and thermal-gradient contributions to soil water movement in desert environments. The evaluation was done by comparing a series of simulations with and without vegetation and thermal forcing during a 4.7-yr period (May 2001–December 2005). For vegetated soil, evapotranspiration alone reduced root-zone (upper 1 m) moisture to a minimum value (25 mm) each year under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. Variations in the leaf area index altered the minimum storage values by up to 10 mm. For unvegetated isothermal and nonisothermal simulations, root-zone water storage nearly doubled during the simulation period and created a persistent driving force for downward liquid fluxes below the root zone (total net flux ~1 mm). Total soil water movement during the study period was dominated by thermally driven vapor fluxes. Thermally driven vapor flow and condensation supplemented moisture supplies to plant roots during the driest times of each year. The results show how nonisothermal flow is coupled with plant water uptake, potentially influencing ecohydrologic relations in desert environments.

  10. Interactions between biochar and mycorrhizal fungi in a water-stressed agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Mickan, Bede S; Abbott, Lynette K; Stefanova, Katia; Solaiman, Zakaria M

    2016-08-01

    Biochar may alleviate plant water stress in association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi but research has not been conclusive. Therefore, a glasshouse experiment was conducted to understand how interactions between AM fungi and plants respond to biochar application under water-stressed conditions. A twin chamber pot system was used to determine whether a woody biochar increased root colonisation by a natural AM fungal population in a pasture soil ('field' chamber) and whether this was associated with increased growth of extraradical AM fungal hyphae detected by plants growing in an adjacent ('bait') chamber containing irradiated soil. The two chambers were separated by a mesh that excluded roots. Subterranean clover was grown with and without water stress and harvested after 35, 49 and 63 days from each chamber. When biochar was applied to the field chamber under water-stressed conditions, shoot mass increased in parallel with mycorrhizal colonisation, extraradical hyphal length and shoot phosphorus concentration. AM fungal colonisation of roots in the bait chamber indicated an increase in extraradical mycorrhizal hyphae in the field chamber. Biochar had little effect on AM fungi or plant growth under well-watered conditions. The biochar-induced increase in mycorrhizal colonisation was associated with increased growth of extraradical AM fungal hyphae in the pasture soil under water-stressed conditions. PMID:27067713

  11. Barrier erosion control test plan: Gravel mulch, vegetation, and soil water interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.; Link, S.O. )

    1988-07-01

    Soil erosion could reduce the water storage capacity of barriers that have been proposed for the disposal of near-surface waste at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Gravel mixed into the top soil surface may create a self-healing veneer that greatly retards soil loss. However, gravel admixtures may also enhance infiltration of rainwater, suppress plant growth and water extraction, and lead to the leaching of underlying waste. This report describes plans for two experiments that were designed to test hypotheses concerning the interactive effects of surface gravel admixtures, revegetation, and enhanced precipitation on soil water balance and plant abundance. The first experiment is a factorial field plot set up on the site selected as a soil borrow area for the eventual construction of barriers. The treatments, arranged in a a split-split-plot design structure, include two densities of gravel admix, a mixture of native and introduced grasses, and irrigation to simulate a wetter climate. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover are monitored with neutron moisture probes and point intercept sampling, respectively. The second experiment consists of an array of 80 lysimeters containing several different barrier prototypes. Surface treatments are similar to the field-plot experiment. Drainage is collected from a valve at the base of each lysimeter tube, and evapotranspiration is estimated by subtraction. The lysimeters are also designed to be coupled to a whole-plant gas exchange system that will be used to conduct controlled experiments on evapotranspiration for modeling purposes. 56 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Soil-water interactions: implications for the sustainability of urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, António J. D.; Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Walsh, Rory P. D.

    2015-04-01

    Cities have become recently the home for more than half of the world's population. Cities are often seen as ecological systems just a short step away from collapse [Newman 2006]. Being a human construction, cities disrupt the natural cycles and the patterns of temporal and spatial distribution of environmental and ecological processes. Urbanization produces ruptures in biota, water, energy and nutrients connectivity that can lead to an enhanced exposure to disruptive events that hamper the wellbeing and the resilience of urban communities in a global change context. And yet, mankind can't give up of these structures one step away from collapse. In this paper we visit the ongoing research at the Ribeira dos Covões peri-urban catchment, as the basis to discuss several important processes and relations in the water-soil interface: A] the impact of the build environment and consequently the increase of the impervious area on the generation and magnitude of hydrological processes at different scales, the impact on flash flood risk and the mitigation approaches. B] the pollutant sources transport and fade in urban areas, with particular emphasis in the role of vegetation and soils in the transmission of pollutants from the atmosphere to the soil and to the water processes. C] the use and the environmental services of the urban ecosystems (where the relations of water, soil and vegetation have a dominate role) to promote a better risk and resources governance. D] the special issue of urban agriculture, where all the promises of sustainability and threats to wellbeing interact, and where the soil and water relations in urban areas are more significant and have the widest and deepest implications.

  13. Interaction of soil type and carbon dioxide concentration in grassland soil pore water nitrogen concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing CO2 concentrations have been shown to limit soil nitrogen availability in terrestrial ecosystems, thereby limiting plant growth. Because changes in nitrogen availability can affect the composition of available nitrogen forms, we are interested in how changes in CO2 concentrations could af...

  14. Climate and Soil Interactions in the Context of Climate, Water, Ecosystems and Food Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, J.

    2015-12-01

    Soil as source of ecosystem services is a major component of climate resilience. Two of the critical ecosystem services derived from soil are water and nutrient cycling. High quality soils improve the capacity to absorb and retain precipitation leading to enhanced water availability to plants which increases climate resilience. The trend towards increasing variability in precipitation requires that the soil be capable of maintaining infiltration rates under extreme precipitation events. Climate resilience will occur when crop productivity is stabilized under more variable climate regimes and dependent upon having adequate soil water supplies to each crop. There is a direct relationship between soil quality and crop productivity and as the soil resource is degraded there is a greater gap between attainable and actual productivity of crop. As the soil is improved there is enhanced nutrient cycling which in turn increases nutrient availability to the crop and food security. Soil becomes the foundation of sustainable ecosystems and enhancing the quality of soil will have a benefit to food and water resources. Improving the soil will benefit humankind through multiple impacts on water, food, and ecosystems.

  15. Soil carbonates and soil water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of soil carbonates occurring as solidified masses or dispersed particles can alter soil water dynamics from what would be expected based on non-carbonate soil properties. Carbonate minerals in the soil can be derived from high carbonate parent material, additions in the form of carbonat...

  16. Investigation of Interactive Effects on Water Flow and Solute Transport in Sandy Loam Soil Using Time Domain Reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Merdun, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Surface-applied chemicals move through the unsaturated zone with complex flow and transport processes due to soil heterogeneity and reach the saturated zone, resulting in groundwater contamination. Such complex processes need to be studied by advanced measurement and modeling techniques to protect soil and water resources from contamination. In this study, the interactive effects of factors like soil structure, initial soil water content (SWC), and application rate on preferential flow and transport were studied in a sandy loam field soil using measurement (by time domain reflectometry (TDR)) and modeling (by MACRO and VS2DTI) techniques. In addition, statistical analyses were performed to compare the means of the measured and modeled SWC and EC, and solute transport parameters (pore water velocity and dispersion coefficient) in 12 treatments. Research results showed that even though the effects of soil structural conditions on water and solute transport were not so clear, the applied solution moved lower depths in the profiles of wet versus dry initial SWC and high application rate versus low application rates. The effects of soil structure and initial SWC on water and solute movement could be differentiated under the interactive conditions, but the effects of the application rates were difficult to differentiate under different soil structural and initial SWC conditions. Modeling results showed that MACRO had somewhat better performance than VS2DTI in the estimation of SWC and EC with space and time, but overall both models had relatively low performances. The means of SWC, EC, and solute transport parameters of the 12 treatments were divided into some groups based on the statistical analyses, indicating different flow and transport characteristics or a certain degree nonuniform or preferential flow and transport in the soil. Conducting field experiments with more interactive factors and applying the models with different approaches may allow better understanding

  17. Impact of interspecific interactions on the soil water uptake depth in a young temperate mixed species plantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossiord, Charlotte; Gessler, Arthur; Granier, André; Berger, Sigrid; Bréchet, Claude; Hentschel, Rainer; Hommel, Robert; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Bonal, Damien

    2014-11-01

    Interactions between tree species in forests can be beneficial to ecosystem functions and services related to the carbon and water cycles by improving for example transpiration and productivity. However, little is known on below- and above-ground processes leading to these positive effects. We tested whether stratification in soil water uptake depth occurred between four tree species in a 10-year-old temperate mixed species plantation during a dry summer. We selected dominant and co-dominant trees of European beech, Sessile oak, Douglas fir and Norway spruce in areas with varying species diversity, competition intensity, and where different plant functional types (broadleaf vs. conifer) were present. We applied a deuterium labelling approach that consisted of spraying labelled water to the soil surface to create a strong vertical gradient of the deuterium isotope composition in the soil water. The deuterium isotope composition of both the xylem sap and the soil water was measured before labelling, and then again three days after labelling, to estimate the soil water uptake depth using a simple modelling approach. We also sampled leaves and needles from selected trees to measure their carbon isotope composition (a proxy for water use efficiency) and total nitrogen content. At the end of the summer, we found differences in the soil water uptake depth between plant functional types but not within types: on average, coniferous species extracted water from deeper layers than did broadleaved species. Neither species diversity nor competition intensity had a detectable influence on soil water uptake depth, foliar water use efficiency or foliar nitrogen concentration in the species studied. However, when coexisting with an increasing proportion of conifers, beech extracted water from progressively deeper soil layers. We conclude that complementarity for water uptake could occur in this 10-year-old plantation because of inherent differences among functional groups (conifers

  18. CHEMFLO-2000: INTERACTIVE SOFTWARE FOR PREDICTING AND VISUALIZING TRANSIENT WATER AND CHEMICAL MOVEMENT IN SOILS AND ASSOCIATED UNCERTAINTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An interactive Java applet and a stand-alone application program will be developed based on the CHEMFLO model developed in the mid-1980s and published as an EPA report (EPA/600/8-89/076). The model solves Richards Equation for transient water movement in unsaturated soils, and so...

  19. Interaction of carbon dioxide enrichment and soil moisture on photosynthesis, transpiration, and water use efficiency of soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) is one of the most important oil and protein sources in the world. Interactive effect of elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) and soil water availability will have the potential impact on crops and future food security of the world under climate change scenario. A rhizotr...

  20. Spatial Heterogeneity of Soil Water after Large Rainfall Events in a Dry Forest: Interacting Canopy, Surface and Soil Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magliano, P. N.; Fernández, R. J.; Breshears, D. D.; Paez, R. A.; Jobbagy, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    Ecohydrology of dry forest depends on the proportion of rainfall that enters the soil and it is spatial distribution at the patch scale. While the central role of patch scale redistribution has been widely documented, we know less about its response to rainfall intensity and its interplay with site properties (canopy, surface, soil). Here we explore water capture (infiltrated water depth, 24 hours after a rainfall event) and its determinants at the patch scale in a forest stand of the Dry Chaco (33.47 S, 66.44 W, Argentina). Water capture from 4 large rainfall events (>30 mm) was measured along 3 transects (36 m) in 18 regularly spaced (2 m) microsites, complemented by 2 years of hourly TDR moisture measurements in 3 microsites. Twelve canopy, surface and soil variables were characterized at each microsite. As the intensity of rainfall increased across events (9 to 34 mm/h) the heterogeneity of water capture became larger (coefficient of variation from 29 to 53%). Despite the intense internal redistribution of rainfall, net runoff was virtually nil (<3%) for all events, showing high capture at the stand level. Microsite variables influencing water capture changed with rainfall intensity. Canopy and soil litter cover reduced microsite water capture for the lowest intensity event (r=-0.44 and -0.37, respectively), but favor it for the highest intensity one (r=0.44 and 0.39, respectively). On intermediate intensity events water capture was predominantly explained by microtopography (greater capture in low microsites, p<0.05). Frequent TDR measurements supported these results. Water redistribution responds to rainfall intensity, creating different water capture patterns (contrasting effects of microsite conditions) for each rainfall event, an issue that may strongly influence key ecohydrological process such as E/T partition at the stand level. This study expands our perspective on dry forest water capture by quantifying its response to rainfall intensity.

  1. Oxygen isotope fractionation effects in soil water via interaction with cations (Mg, Ca, K, Na) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerter, Erik; Finstad, Kari; Schaefer, Justin; Goldsmith, Gregory R.; Dawson, Todd; Amundson, Ronald

    2014-07-01

    In isotope-enabled hydrology, soil and vadose zone sediments have been generally considered to be isotopically inert with respect to the water they host. This is inconsistent with knowledge that clay particles possessing an electronegative surface charge and resulting cation exchange capacity (CEC) interact with a wide range of solutes which, in the absence of clays, have been shown to exhibit δ18O isotope effects that vary in relation to the ionic strength of the solutions. To investigate the isotope effects caused by high CEC clays in mineral-water systems, we created a series of monominerallic-water mixtures at gravimetric water contents ranging from 5% to 32%, consisting of pure deionized water of known isotopic composition with homoionic (Mg, Ca, Na, K) montmorillonite. Similar mixtures were also created with quartz to determine the isotope effect of non-, or very minimally-, charged mineral surfaces. The δ18O value of the water in these monominerallic soil analogs was then measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) after direct headspace CO2 equilibration. Mg- and Ca-exchanged homoionic montmorillonite depleted measured δ18O values up to 1.55‰ relative to pure water at 5% water content, declining to 0.49‰ depletion at 30% water content. K-montmorillonite enriched measured δ18O values up to 0.86‰ at 5% water content, declining to 0.11‰ enrichment at 30% water. Na-montmorillonite produces no measureable isotope effect. The isotope effects observed in these experiments may be present in natural, high-clay soils and sediments. These findings have relevance to the interpretation of results of direct CO2-water equilibration approaches to the measurement of the δ18O value of soil water. The adsorbed cation isotope effect may bear consideration in studies of pedogenic carbonate, plant-soil water use and soil-atmosphere interaction. Finally, the observed isotope effects may prove useful as molecular scale probes of the nature of mineral-water

  2. Plant Interactions with Changes in Coverage of Biological Soil Crusts and Water Regime in Mu Us Sandland, China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuqin; Pan, Xu; Cui, Qingguo; Hu, Yukun; Ye, Xuehua; Dong, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Plant interactions greatly affect plant community structure. Dryland ecosystems are characterized by low amounts of unpredictable precipitation as well as by often having biological soil crusts (BSCs) on the soil surface. In dryland plant communities, plants interact mostly as they compete for water resources, and the direction and intensity of plant interaction varies as a function of the temporal fluctuation in water availability. Since BSCs influence water redistribution to some extent, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the intensity and direction of plant interactions in a dryland plant community can be modified by BSCs. In the experiment, 14 combinations of four plant species (Artemisia ordosica, Artemisia sphaerocephala, Chloris virgata and Setaria viridis) were subjected to three levels of coverage of BSCs and three levels of water supply. The results show that: 1) BSCs affected plant interaction intensity for the four plant species: a 100% coverage of BSCs significantly reduced the intensity of competition between neighboring plants, while it was highest with a 50% coverage of BSCs in combination with the target species of A. sphaerocephala and C. virgata; 2) effects of the coverage of BSCs on plant interactions were modified by water regime when the target species were C. virgata and S. viridis; 3) plant interactions were species-specific. In conclusion, the percent coverage of BSCs affected plant interactions, and the effects were species-specific and could be modified by water regimes. Further studies should focus on effects of the coverage of BSCs on plant-soil hydrological processes. PMID:24498173

  3. CHEMFLO-2000: INTERACTIVE SOFTWARE FOR SIMULATING WATER AND CHEMICAL MOVEMENT IN UNSATURATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The movement of water and chemicals into and through soils has a large impact upon our environment and the entire ecosystem. Understanding these processes is of great importance in managing, utilizing, and protecting our natural resources. This software was written to enhance our...

  4. Space-Time Dynamics of Soil Water and Process Interactions in Semi-Arid Terrain, Colorado, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water is a dominant control of plant growth and hydrologic response in dryland (rainfed) agriculture. In agricultural fields, soil water is typically assumed to move vertically with no differential subsurface lateral flow in semi-arid regions. However, soil water dynamics in the profile can v...

  5. Interactions of soil water content heterogeneity and species diversity patterns in semi-arid steppes on the Loess Plateau of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gao-Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Nan; Wang, Dong; Shi, Zhi-Hua; Zhu, Yuan-Jun

    2014-11-01

    Soil water is a major driving force for plant community succession in semi-arid area. Many studies have focused on the relationships of species diversity-productivity, but few studies have paid attentions to the effects of soil water content heterogeneity on the plant species diversity in the semi-arid loess regions. To determine relationship of soil water content heterogeneity and plant community structure properties a semi-arid steppe on the Loess Plateau, we conducted a gradient analysis of soil water content variation and above- and below-ground properties of plant communities. Results showed that community coverage, above- and below-ground biomass were significantly and positively related to the surface soil water contents (0-5 cm). Plant diversity (Shannon index and Richness index) were closely correlated to soil water content at the soil depth of 0-10 cm. But plant height, litter biomass and root/shoot ratio were not related to soil water content. These results showed that there is an positive interaction effects for plant diversity and soil water content in the semi-arid grassland communities. Our observations indicate that change of plant species diversity is also an important community responses to soil water content heterogeneity in the semi-arid grassland ecosystem.

  6. Vegetation and soil water interactions on a tailings sand storage facility in the athabasca oil sands region of Alberta Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeth, M. A.; Chanasyk, D. S.; Burgers, T. D.

    The relationship between vegetation and soil water was studied on the Syncrude South West Sand Storage facility in the Athabasca Oil Sands region of Alberta, Canada. Soil water and relevant soil chemical and physical properties were measured at the soil surface, as well as above and below the reclamation soil and tailings sand interface, in areas of low and high vegetation cover. The interface between the reclamation soil and the tailings sand acted as a capillary barrier. Water content was highest under low vegetation cover but soil water conditions above field capacity were rare and unlikely to have impacted vegetation. Periods of water stress occurred, where volumetric water content was below wilting point; these periods were of short duration and generally typical of ecosystems in the study area. Differences in surface soil water between the two vegetation covers were attributed to evapotranspiration and/or canopy interception. Differences above and below the interface were attributed to variation in canopy cover at the surface and resulting quantities of water available for percolation through the soil profiles. At the interface of the reclamation soil and tailings sand, water movement was restricted. High and low canopy covers responded differently to precipitation events; low vegetation cover areas had greater fluctuations in volumetric water content at all depths. The occurrence of a capillary barrier effect will need to be accounted for in developing reclamation soil profiles.

  7. Exploring C-water-temperature interactions and non-linearities in soils through developments in process-based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban Moyano, Fernando; Vasilyeva, Nadezda; Menichetti, Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    Soil carbon models developed over the last couple of decades are limited in their capacity to accurately predict the magnitudes and temporal variations in observed carbon fluxes and stocks. New process-based models are now emerging that attempt to address the shortcomings of their more simple, empirical counterparts. While a spectrum of ideas and hypothetical mechanisms are finding their way into new models, the addition of only a few processes known to significantly affect soil carbon (e.g. enzymatic decomposition, adsorption, Michaelis-Menten kinetics) has shown the potential to resolve a number of previous model-data discrepancies (e.g. priming, Birch effects). Through model-data validation, such models are a means of testing hypothetical mechanisms. In addition, they can lead to new insights into what soil carbon pools are and how they respond to external drivers. In this study we develop a model of soil carbon dynamics based on enzymatic decomposition and other key features of process based models, i.e. simulation of carbon in particulate, soluble and adsorbed states, as well as enzyme and microbial components. Here we focus on understanding how moisture affects C decomposition at different levels, both directly (e.g. by limiting diffusion) or through interactions with other components. As the medium where most reactions and transport take place, water is central en every aspect of soil C dynamics. We compare results from a number of alternative models with experimental data in order to test different processes and parameterizations. Among other observations, we try to understand: 1. typical moisture response curves and associated temporal changes, 2. moisture-temperature interactions, and 3. diffusion effects under changing C concentrations. While the model aims at being a process based approach and at simulating fluxes at short time scales, it remains a simplified representation using the same inputs as classical soil C models, and is thus potentially

  8. Interaction of Actinide Species with Microorganisms & Microbial Chelators: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, & Implications for Bioremediation of Soil & Ground Water.

    SciTech Connect

    Hakim Boukhalfa Mary, P. Neu Alvin Crumbliss

    2006-03-28

    Microorganisms influence the natural cycle of major elements, including C, N, P, S, and transition metals such as Mn and Fe. Bacterial processes can also influence the behavior of actinides in soil and ground water. While radionuclides have no known biological utility, they have the potential to interact with microorganisms and to interfere with processes involving other elements such as Fe and Mn. These interactions can transform radionuclides and affect their fate and transport. Organic acids, extruded by-products of cell metabolism, can solubilize radionuclides and facilitate their transport. The soluble complexes formed can be taken up by the cells and incorporated into biofilm structures. We have examined the interactions of Pu species with bacterial metabolites, studied Pu uptake by microorganisms and examined the toxicity of Pu and other toxic metals to environmentally relevant bacteria. We have also studied the speciation of Pu(IV) in the presence of natural and synthetic chelators.

  9. Soil Erosion by Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion by water, the wearing away of the earth's surface by the forces of water and gravity, consists of rock or soil particle dislodgement, entrainment, transport, and deposition. This sequence of events occurs over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales, from raindrop splash moving par...

  10. MANE: A MULTIPHASE, AQUEOUS, NON-STEADY STATE EQUILIBRIUM MODEL FOR SIMULATING SOIL-WATER INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of chemical equilibrium models have been developed to help assess environmental chemistry problems, but few were specifically developed as research and teaching tools for use in conjunction with soil chemistry experiments. MANE model was developed to calculate equilibri...

  11. Responses of soil water percolation to dynamic interactions among rainfall, antecedent moisture and season in a forest site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Xiaoming; Liao, Kaihua; Feng, Huihui; Zhu, Qing

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of soil water percolation below the rooting zone and its responses to the dynamic interactions of different factors are important for the control of non-point source pollution. Based on 3600 scenarios in Hydrus-1D simulation, this study revealed the integrated effects of rainfall characteristics (rainfall amount, maximum rainfall intensity or MRI, time distribution characteristics of rainfall or TDC), antecedent moisture and the season on deep percolation (DP) at a forest site in Taihu Lake Basin, China. Results showed that Hydrus-1D model can well simulate the soil water dynamics at this site. Antecedent moisture had the greatest relative contribution to DP (85.7%), followed by rainfall amount (10.9%) and MRI (3.4%). As the antecedent moisture increased, the relative contribution of the season on DP increased from 0.0% to 16.4%. In comparison, that of MRI decreased from 58.7% to 38.5% and that of rainfall amount followed a bell shape pattern (greatest when the antecedent moisture was 0.26 m3 m-3). The relative contribution of antecedent moisture to DP in summer was the greatest (87.8%), while that of the rainfall was the least. The TDC influenced DP by affecting the responses of DP to other factors. When the rainfall amount was ⩾80 mm and the antecedent moisture content was ⩾0.34 m3 m-3, effect of TDC on DP could be observed. The DP of TDC_B (rainfall intensity linearly increased with time) was the lowest, while that of TDC_E (rainfall intensity kept constant with time) was the greatest. Findings of this study have practical significance for investigating the water and pollutant transport in vadose zone.

  12. Oxytetracycline interactions at the soil-water interface: effects of environmental surfaces on natural transformation and growth inhibition of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Goetsch, Heather E; Mylon, Steven E; Butler, Shane; Zilles, Julie L; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2012-10-01

    The mechanism of oxytetracycline (OTC) adsorption to a silty clay loam soil was investigated using sorption isotherm experiments, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD). Sorption data fit well to a cation-exchange capacity sorption model. Spectroscopic data indicate that the interactions between oxytetracycline and silty clay loam soil were primarily through electrostatic interactions between the protonated dimethylamino group of OTC and the negatively charged moieties on the surface of the soil. Based on XRD results, OTC adsorption appeared to inhibit the ethylene glycol solvation of the expandable clay minerals, suggesting that OTC had diffused into the clay interlayer space. The presence of adsorbed OTC did not significantly affect the transformation frequency of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii with plasmid DNA (soil alone 3 × 10(6)  ± 4 × 10(6) and soil with adsorbed OTC 4 × 10(6)  ± 0.5 × 10(6) ). Growth was inhibited by adsorbed OTC, although a greater mass of adsorbed OTC was required to achieve the same degree of inhibition as the system of dissolved OTC alone. These results suggest that the interactions of tetracyclines at the soil-water interface will affect the growth of sensitive microorganisms in soil microbial communities. PMID:22821843

  13. Groundwater-soil moisture-climate interactions: lessons from idealized model experiments with forced water table depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducharne, Agnès; Lo, Min-Hui; Decharme, Bertrand; Wang, Fuxing; Cheruy, Frédérique; Ghattas, Josefine; Chien, Rong-You; lan, Chia-Wei; Colin, Jeanne; Tyteca, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater (GW) constitutes by far the largest volume of liquid freshwater on Earth. The most active part is soil moisture (SM), recognized as a key variable of land/atmosphere interactions, especially in so-called transition zones, where/when SM varies between wet and dry values. But GW can also be stored in deeper reservoirs than soils, in particular unconfined aquifer systems, in which the saturated part is called the water table (WT). The latter is characterized by slow and mostly horizontal water flows towards the river network, with well-known buffering effects on streamflow variability. Where/when the WT is shallow enough, it can also sustain SM by means of capillary rise, thus increase evapotranspiration (ET), with potential impact on the climate system (including temperatures and precipitation). The large residence time of GW may also increase the Earth system's memory, with consequences on the persistence of extreme events, hydro-climatic predictability, and anthropogenic climate change, particularly the magnitude of regional warming. Here, our main goal is to explore the potential impacts of the water table depth (WTD) on historical climate through idealized model analyses. To this end, we force three state-of-the art land surface models (LSMs), namely CLM, ORCHIDEE, and SURFEX, with prescribed WTDs ranging from 0.5 to 10 m. The LSMs are run either off-line or coupled to their parent climate model, following LMIP/AMIP-like protocols for intercomparability. Within this framework, we want to assess the sensitivity of ET and the simulated climate to the WTD in a systematic way. In particular, we will identify and compare the patterns of the critical WTD, defined as the deepest one to achieve a significant change in ET. To this end, we estimate derivatives of ET with respect to WTD, which tell how the sensitivity of ET to a unit change in WTD evolves with WTD. In each grid-point, these derivatives can be used to define the critical WTD, given a threshold ET

  14. Triazine Soil Interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of triazine herbicides in soils is controlled by three basic processes: transformation, retention, and transport. Sorption of triazines on surfaces of soil particles is the primary means by which triazines are retained in soils. Soils are very complex mixtures of living organisms, various t...

  15. Interactions between root water uptake, groundwater levels, and soil moisture dynamics in Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite National Park, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, C.; Loheide, S. P.

    2009-12-01

    In high elevation meadow environments within the Sierra Nevada Mountains soil moisture is controlled by the position of the water table and the partitioning of evapotranspiration through root water uptake and evaporation at the land surface. Because of the relative lack of precipitation over the growing season plant communities rely on stored soil moisture and shallow groundwater during the dry summer months. Field result, from Tuolumne Meadows show both temporally and spatially dynamic soil moisture patterning caused by the timing of spring snowmelt and subsequent drying of the meadow. Through the use of numerical modeling we are able to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of soil moisture and the potential impact on water use by plant communities. Results highlight the importance of both the position of the water table in the early growing season and sediment layering within the meadow on plant water up take. These results have implications for current meadow restorations projects and stress the importance of designing projects that focus on soil moisture dynamics in order to supply sufficient water for native plant communities.

  16. Soil cultivation in vineyards alters interactions between soil biota and soil physical and hydrological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaller, Johann G.; Buchholz, Jacob; Querner, Pascal; Winter, Silvia; Kratschmer, Sophie; Pachinger, Bärbel; Strauss, Peter; Bauer, Thomas; Stiper, Katrin; Potthoff, Martin; Guernion, Muriel; Scimia, Jennifer; Cluzeau, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Several ecosystem services provided by viticultural landscapes result from interactions between soil organisms and soil parameters. However, to what extent different soil cultivation intensities in vineyards compromise soil organisms and their interactions between soil physical and hydrological properties is not well understood. In this study we examined (i) to what extent different soil management intensities affect the activity and diversity of soil biota (earthworms, Collembola, litter decomposition), and (ii) how soil physical and hydrological properties influence these interactions, or vice versa. Investigating 16 vineyards in Austria, earthworms were assessed by hand sorting, Collembola via pitfall trapping and soil coring, litter decomposition by using the tea bag method. Additionally, soil physical (water infiltration, aggregate stability, porosity, bulk density, soil texture) and chemical (pH, soil carbon content, cation exchange capacity, potassium, phosphorus) parameters were assessed. Results showed complex ecological interactions between soil biota and various soil characteristics altered by management intensity. These investigations are part of the transdisciplinary BiodivERsA project VineDivers and will ultimately lead into management recommendations for various stakeholders.

  17. Interaction between soils and gas pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpachevskii, L. O.; Goroshevskii, A. V.; Zubkova, T. A.

    2011-03-01

    The interaction between pipelines and soils manifests itself in the soil disturbance in the course of the pipe installation, in the transformation of the water and temperature regimes in the trenches, and in the appearance of corrosion and cracks on the pipe walls. The more contrasting the soil water regime in the pipe-adjacent sections of the trench, the greater the amount of the pipe damage. The damage of the pipe insulation activates the pipe corrosion. The emission of gases (H2S, CH4, CO2, CO, and H2) and the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria are the main causes of the pipes' destruction. The humus content and the redox potential decrease, and the soil density and concentrations of ferrous compounds increase in the soils of the trench zone. Accidents along pipelines occur most often in the area of serozems and chestnut soils, and this is related to the salinization in the lower soil horizons and to the contrasting soil water regime near the pipe. The number of accidents along the pipelines installed into soddy-podzolic soils is lower.

  18. Hydraulic Redistribution of Soil Water in a Drained Loblolly Pine Plantation: Quantifying Patterns and Controls over Soil-to-Root and Canopy-to-Atmosphere Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domec, J.; Noormets, A.; King, J. S.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S. G.; Gavazzi, M. J.; Strickland, S.; Boggs, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    The conversion of wetlands to intensively managed forest lands in eastern North Carolina is widespread and the consequences on water and carbon balances are not well studied. Quantification of evapotranspiration (ET), tree transpiration and their biophysical regulation are needed for assessing forest water management options. We characterized vertical variation in the diurnal and seasonal soil volumetric water content at 10 cm intervals to evaluate changes in water availability for root uptake and monitored eddy covariance ET and tree transpiration (sap flux) in a drained Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation. We also quantified the magnitude of hydraulic redistribution (HR), the passive movement of soil water from deep to shallow roots, to identify factors affecting the seasonal dynamics of root water uptake, root and plant water potentials and stomatal conductance. Soil water content varied with soil depth and total water use from the upper 1m peaked between 4 and 6.5 mm/day during the growing season and was strongly correlated and similar to ET (ET represented 90-95% of total water depletion). After periods of more than 10 days without rain, water extraction shifted to the deeper layers, and recharge from HR approached 0.5 mm/day in the upper 60 cm. However, the upper 30cm accounted for 40% of total water depletion from the upper 1m at peak water uptake (>4 mm/day), and increased to 65% during days of low water uptake (<2 mm/day), illustrating the contribution of deeper roots to water uptake during days of high evaporative demand. This result was supported by the fact that deep roots (from 30-50cm) accounted for 65% of the total water redistributed. Because of stomatal regulation to prevent water potentials from reaching critical values that would cause significant loss of tree hydraulic conductivity, maximum tree transpiration during high evaporative demand remained constant at around 3 mm/day. Tree transpiration represented on average 60% of ET. However

  19. Field study of gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions: Protective Barrier Program Status Reprt - FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.; Thiede, M.E.; Kemp, C.J.; Cadwell, L.L. Link, S.O.

    1990-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) are collaborating on a field study of the effects of gravel admixtures on plant growth and soil water storage in protective barriers. Protective barriers are engineered earthern covers designed to prevent water, plants, and animals from contacting buried waste and transporting contaminants to groundwater or the land surface. Some of the proposed designs include gravel admixtures or gravel mulches on the barrier surface to control soil loss by wind and runoff. The purpose of this study is to measure, in a field setting, the influence of surface gravel additions on soil water storage and plant cover. The study plots are located northwest of the Yakima Gate in the McGee Ranch old field. Here we report the status of work completed in FY 1989 on the creation of a data management system, a test of water application uniformity, field calibration of neutron moisture gages, and an analysis of the response of plants to various combinations of gravel admixtures and increased rainfall. 23 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Sources, interactions, and ecological impacts of organic contaminants in water, soil, and sediment: an introduction to the special series.

    PubMed

    Pignatello, Joseph J; Katz, Brian G; Li, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Agricultural and urban activities result in the release of a large number of organic compounds that are suspected of impacting human health and ecosystems: herbicides, insecticides, human and veterinary pharmaceuticals, natural and synthetic hormones, personal care products, surfactants, plasticizers, fire retardants, and others. Sorbed reservoirs of these compounds in soil represent a potentially chronic source of water contamination. This article is an introduction to a series of technical papers stemming from a symposium at the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America 2008 Annual Meeting, which was held jointly with The Geological Society of America, The Gulf Coast Association of Geological Scientists, and the Houston Geological Society, under one of the Joint Meeting's overarching themes: Emerging Trace Contaminants in Surface and Ground Water Generated from Waste Water and Solid Waste Application. The symposium emphasized the role of soils as sources, sinks, and reaction catalysts for these contaminants and the occurrence and fate of these contaminants in surface and underground water supplies. Topics covered included novel advances in analytical techniques, transport of infectious agents, occurrence and fate of veterinary pharmaceuticals, characterization of sorption mechanism, biotic and abiotic transformation reactions, the role of soil components, occurrence and fate in wastewater treatment systems, transport of engineered nanoparticles, groundwater contamination resulting from urban runoff, and issues in water reuse. Overviews of the reports, trends, gaps in our knowledge, and topics for further research are presented in this special series of papers. The technical papers in this special series reflect current gains in knowledge and simultaneously underscore how poorly we are able to predict the fate and, hence, the associated risk to ecological and human receptors of these contaminants. PMID

  1. Crop Residue and Soil Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop yield is greatly influenced by the amount of water that moves from the soil, through the plant, and out into the atmosphere. Winter wheat yield responds linearly to available soil water content at planting (bu/a = 5.56 + 5.34*inches). Therefore, storing precipitation in the soil during non-crop...

  2. Application of time-lapse ERT to Characterize Soil-Water-Disease Interactions of Citrus Orchard - Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddinti, S. R.; Kbvn, D. P.; Ranjan, S.; Suradhaniwar, S.; J, P. A.; R M, G.

    2015-12-01

    Vidarbha region in Maharashtra, India (home for mandarin Orange) experience severe climatic uncertainties resulting in crop failure. Phytopthora are the soil-borne fungal species that accumulate in the presence of moisture, and attack the root / trunk system of Orange trees at any stage. A scientific understanding of soil-moisture-disease relations within the active root zone under different climatic, irrigation, and crop cycle conditions can help in practicing management activities for improved crop yield. In this study, we developed a protocol for performing 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) at micro scale resolution to monitor the changes in resistivity distribution within the root zone of Orange trees. A total of 40 electrodes, forming a grid of 3.5 m x 2 m around each Orange tree were used in ERT survey with gradient and Wenner configurations. A laboratory test on un-disturbed soil samples of the region was performed to plot the variation of electrical conductivity with saturation. Curve fitting techniques were applied to get the modified Archie's model parameters. The calibrated model was further applied to generate the 3-D soil moisture profiles of the study area. The point estimates of soil moisture were validated using TDR probe measurements at 3 different depths (10, 20, and 40 cm) near to the root zone. In order to understand the effect of soil-water relations on plant-disease relations, we performed ERT analysis at two locations, one at healthy and other at Phytopthora affected Orange tree during the crop cycle, under dry and irrigated conditions. The degree to which an Orange tree is affected by Phytopthora under each condition is evaluated using 'grading scale' approach following visual inspection of the canopy features. Spatial-temporal distribution of moisture profiles is co-related with grading scales to comment on the effect of climatic and irrigation scenarios on the degree and intensity of crop disease caused by Phytopthora.

  3. Quantitative simulation tools to analyze up- and downstream interactions of soil and water conservation measures: supporting policy making in the Green Water Credits program of Kenya.

    PubMed

    Hunink, J E; Droogers, P; Kauffman, S; Mwaniki, B M; Bouma, J

    2012-11-30

    Upstream soil and water conservation measures in catchments can have positive impact both upstream in terms of less erosion and higher crop yields, but also downstream by less sediment flow into reservoirs and increased groundwater recharge. Green Water Credits (GWC) schemes are being developed to encourage upstream farmers to invest in soil and water conservation practices which will positively effect upstream and downstream water availability. Quantitative information on water and sediment fluxes is crucial as a basis for such financial schemes. A pilot design project in the large and strategically important Upper-Tana Basin in Kenya has the objective to develop a methodological framework for this purpose. The essence of the methodology is the integration and use of a collection of public domain tools and datasets: the so-called Green water and Blue water Assessment Toolkit (GBAT). This toolkit was applied in order to study different options to implement GWC in agricultural rainfed land for the pilot study. Impact of vegetative contour strips, mulching, and tied ridges were determined for: (i) three upstream key indicators: soil loss, crop transpiration and soil evaporation, and (ii) two downstream indicators: sediment inflow in reservoirs and groundwater recharge. All effects were compared with a baseline scenario of average conditions. Thus, not only actual land management was considered but also potential benefits of changed land use practices. Results of the simulations indicate that especially applying contour strips or tied ridges significantly reduces soil losses and increases groundwater recharge in the catchment. The model was used to build spatial expressions of the proposed management practices in order to assess their effectiveness. The developed procedure allows exploring the effects of soil conservation measures in a catchment to support the implementation of GWC. PMID:22922092

  4. Soil and Human Interactions in Maya Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, Timothy; Luzzadder-Beach, Sheryl

    2013-04-01

    Since the early 1990s, we have studied Maya interaction with soils in Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, and elsewhere. We studied upland and lowland soils, but here we focus on seasonal or 'Bajo' wetlands and perennial wetlands for different reasons. Around the bajos, the ancient Maya focused on intensive agriculture and habitation despite the difficulties their Vertisol soils posed. For the perennial wetlands, small populations spread diffusely through Mollisol and Histisol landscapes with large scale, intensive agro-ecosystems. These wetlands also represent important repositories for both environmental change and how humans responded in situ to environmental changes. Work analyzing bajo soils has recorded significant diversity but the soil and sediment record shows two main eras of soil instability: the Pleistocene-Holocene transition as rainfall fluctuated and increased and tropical forest pulsed through the region, and the Maya Preclassic to Classic 3000 to 1000 BP as deforestation, land use intensity, and drying waxed and waned. The ancient Maya adapted their bajo soil ecosystems successfully through agro-engineering but they also withdrew in many important places in the Late Preclassic about 2000 BP and Terminal Classic about 1200 BP. We continue to study and debate the importance of perennial wetland agro-ecosystems, but it is now clear that Maya interaction with these soil landscapes was significant and multifaceted. Based on soil excavation and coring with a broad toolkit of soil stratigraphy, chemistry, and paleoecology from 2001 to 2013, our results show the ancient Maya interacted with their wetland soils to maintain cropland for maize, tree crops, arrow root, and cassava against relative sea level rise, increased flooding, and aggradation by gypsum precipitation and sedimentation. We have studied these interactions across an area of 2000 km2 in Northern Belize to understand how Maya response varied and how these soil environments varied over time and distance

  5. Spatial patterns of interaction among climate variability and change, soil water deficit and transpiration in small mountain catchments of Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, K.; Tague, C.

    2011-12-01

    In snow-dominated mountain systems, a warming climate alters soil water deficit through changing the timing and magnitude of moisture inputs as precipitation and snowmelt and through changes in the timing and magnitude of evapotranspiration losses. The net effect of climate warming on soil water deficit and associated ecosystem processes ultimately depends on the interaction between changes in inputs and outputs and on vegetation, micro-climate and soil properties that control the sensitivity of soil water to changes in input/output drivers. In mountain environments, steep spatial gradients result in substantial variation in atmospheric forcing and vegetation and soil properties over relatively short spatial scales, which necessitate providing finer-scale assessment of climate change impact. Measurements of soil moisture and forest responses to climate are often made at plot scales but are limited in spatial coverage. Coupled eco-hydrologic models, applied at relatively fine (m) scales provide a method of extrapolating findings from local measurements and exploring hillslope and watershed scale impacts of climate warming on moisture deficit. In this study, we use RHESSys (Regional hydro-ecologic simulation system) combined with spatially intensive monitoring of coupled ecohydrologic variables at the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (SSCZO), located in the Sierra National Forest, California. We initially use the model to identify clusters of distinctive water deficit behavior as summarized by indices of summertime soil moisture and transpiration recessions. The resulting clusters demonstrate that both elevational differences in energy availability and topographic controls on drainage are 1st order controls on spatial patterns of summertime moisture deficit and tree transpiration. We then use these initial model clusters to guide soil moisture and sapflux data collection. The collected data are used to characterize soil moisture deficit and transpiration for

  6. Container Soil-Water Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spomer, L. Art; Hershey, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity that illustrates the relationship between the soil found in containers and soil in the ground including the amount of air and water found in each. Sponges are used to represent soil. Materials, procedures, and probable results are described. (KR)

  7. A new model for humic materials and their interactions with hydrophobic organic chemicals in soil-water or sediment-water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A generalized model of humic materials in soils and sediments, which is consistent with their observed properties, is presented. This model provides a means of understanding the interaction of hydrophobic pollutants with humic materials. In this model, it is proposed that the humic materials in soils and sediments consist of a number of different oligomers and simple compounds which result from the partial degradation of plant remains. These degradation products are stabilized by incorporation into humic aggregates bound together by weak bonding mechanisms, such as hydrogen bonding, pi bonding, and hydrophobic interactions. The resulting structures are similar to micelles or membranes, in which the interiors of the structures are hydrophobic and the exteriors are hydrophilic. Hydrophobic compounds will partition into the hydrophobic interiors of the humic micelles or "membrane-like" structures. ?? 1986.

  8. Parameter selection and testing the soil water model SOIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGechan, M. B.; Graham, R.; Vinten, A. J. A.; Douglas, J. T.; Hooda, P. S.

    1997-08-01

    The soil water and heat simulation model SOIL was tested for its suitability to study the processes of transport of water in soil. Required parameters, particularly soil hydraulic parameters, were determined by field and laboratory tests for some common soil types and for soils subjected to contrasting treatments of long-term grassland and tilled land under cereal crops. Outputs from simulations were shown to be in reasonable agreement with independently measured field drain outflows and soil water content histories.

  9. Investigation of soil-atmosphere interaction in pyroclastic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rianna, Guido; Pagano, Luca; Urciuoli, Gianfranco

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the interaction between soil and atmosphere in pyroclastic soils with a view to understanding whether and to what extent the prediction of the hydraulic (and mechanical) behaviour of geotechnical problems (cuts, slope stabilities, embankments, foundation, retaining structures) regulated by rainfall-induced fluctuations of matric suction is influenced by evaporation phenomena. Evaporation fluxes are quantified and compared with other fluxes (precipitation, run-off, deep drainage) affecting soil water content and matric suction. This work is based on the data collected through a physical model over 2 years of experimental tests. The model consisted of a 1 m3 tank, filled in this case with pyroclastic soil and exposed to natural weather elements. The system was extensively monitored to record atmospheric and soil variables. The results provided by the experiments highlight the importance of the top-soil state in determining the intensities of infiltrating rainfall and actual evaporation. The results also bring to light the significance of evaporation which, during the dry season, largely prevails over infiltration, raising suction to very high values. Also during the wet season, evaporation gives rise to a non-negligible flux with respect to the infiltrated precipitation. The reliability of two pre-existing empirical models to estimate evaporation flux is also investigated and appraised within this paper.

  10. Profiling soil water content sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) sensor system based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) principles was developed to sense soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity in 20-cm (8 inch) deep layers from the soil surface to depths of 3 m (10 ft) (patent No. 13/404,491 pending). A Cooperative R...

  11. Soil and Water: Some Teaching Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Richard B.

    1987-01-01

    Outlines six soil and water investigations that students can pursue outdoors, in nature centers, or in classrooms: soil characteristics; relationship between soil ph and plant life; what aggregates tell us; differences in soil structure; differences in rate of water absorption by soil; and soil exploration with a Berlesi funnel. (NEC)

  12. Interactive effects of soil water deficit and air vapour pressure deficit on mesophyll conductance to CO2 in Vitis vinifera and Olea europaea.

    PubMed

    Perez-Martin, A; Flexas, J; Ribas-Carbó, M; Bota, J; Tomás, M; Infante, J M; Diaz-Espejo, A

    2009-01-01

    The present work aims to study the interactive effect of drought stress and high vapour pressure deficit (VPD) on leaf gas exchange, and especially on mesophyll conductance to CO(2) (g(m)), in two woody species of great agronomical importance in the Mediterranean basin: Vitis vinifera L. cv. Tempranillo and Olea europaea L. cv. Manzanilla. Plants were grown in specially designed outdoor chambers with ambient and below ambient VPD, under both well-irrigated and drought conditions. g(m) was estimated by the variable J method from simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and fluorescence. In both species, the response to soil water deficit was larger in g(s) than in g(m), and more important than the response to VPD. Olea europaea was apparently more sensitive to VPD, so that plants growing in more humid chambers showed higher g(s) and g(m). In V. vinifera, in contrast, soil water deficit dominated the response of g(s) and g(m). Consequently, changes in g(m)/g(s) were more related to VPD in O. europaea and to soil water deficit in V. vinifera. Most of the limitations of photosynthesis were diffusional and especially due to stomatal closure. No biochemical limitation was detected. The results showed that structural parameters played an important role in determining g(m) during the acclimation process. Although the relationship between leaf mass per unit area (M(A)) with g(m) was scattered, it imposed a limitation to the maximum g(m) achievable, with higher values of M(A) in O. europaea at lower g(m) values. M(A) decreased under water stress in O. europaea but it increased in V. vinifera. This resulted in a negative relationship between M(A) and the CO(2) draw-down between substomatal cavities and chloroplasts in O. europaea, while being positive in V. vinifera. PMID:19457982

  13. Elementary soil and water engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, G.O.; Frevert, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Between 1967-1975 the Northwest lost 325 acres per day of prime farmland, the Midwest (our nation's bread basket) 493 acres, and the Southwest 548 acres per day. We lost one million acres like this each year, three million for all rural land. Six problems affect our diminishing soil and water resources: erosion, drainage, irrigation, conservation of soil moisture, efficiency of water storage, floods. The first five problems are discussed in this book.

  14. Estimating soil water retention using soil component additivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiliger, A.; Ermolaeva, O.; Semenov, V.

    2009-04-01

    Soil water retention is a major soil hydraulic property that governs soil functioning in ecosystems and greatly affects soil management. Data on soil water retention are used in research and applications in hydrology, agronomy, meteorology, ecology, environmental protection, and many other soil-related fields. Soil organic matter content and composition affect both soil structure and adsorption properties; therefore water retention may be affected by changes in soil organic matter that occur because of both climate change and modifications of management practices. Thus, effects of organic matter on soil water retention should be understood and quantified. Measurement of soil water retention is relatively time-consuming, and become impractical when soil hydrologic estimates are needed for large areas. One approach to soil water retention estimation from readily available data is based on the hypothesis that soil water retention may be estimated as an additive function obtained by summing up water retention of pore subspaces associated with soil textural and/or structural components and organic matter. The additivity model and was tested with 550 soil samples from the international database UNSODA and 2667 soil samples from the European database HYPRES containing all textural soil classes after USDA soil texture classification. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) of the volumetric water content estimates for UNSODA vary from 0.021 m3m-3 for coarse sandy loam to 0.075 m3m-3 for sandy clay. Obtained RMSEs are at the lower end of the RMSE range for regression-based water retention estimates found in literature. Including retention estimates of organic matter significantly improved RMSEs. The attained accuracy warrants testing the 'additivity' model with additional soil data and improving this model to accommodate various types of soil structure. Keywords: soil water retention, soil components, additive model, soil texture, organic matter.

  15. Interactive response of photosynthetic characteristics in Haloxylon ammodendron and Hedysarum scoparium exposed to soil water and air vapor pressure deficits.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chunmei; Wang, Jiajia; Hu, Congxia; Wang, Junhui; Ning, Pengbo; Bai, Juan

    2015-08-01

    C4 plants possess better drought tolerance than C3 plants. However, Hedysarum scoparium, a C3 species, is dominant and widely distributed in the desert areas of northwestern China due to its strong drought tolerance. This study compared it with Haloxylon ammodendron, a C4 species, regarding the interactive effects of drought stress and different leaf-air vapor pressure deficits. Variables of interest included gas exchange, the activity levels of key C4 photosynthetic enzymes, and cellular anatomy. In both species, gas exchange parameters were more sensitive to high vapor pressure deficit than to strong water stress, and the net CO2 assimilation rate (An) was enhanced as vapor pressure deficits increased. A close relationship between An and stomatal conductance (gs) suggested that the species shared a similar response mechanism. In H. ammodendron, the activity levels of key C4 enzymes were higher, including those of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-malate enzyme (NADP-ME), whereas in H. scoparium, the activity level of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-malate enzyme (NAD-ME) was higher. Meanwhile, H. scoparium utilized adaptive structural features, including a larger relative vessel area and a shorter distance from vein to stomata, which facilitated the movement of water. These findings implied that some C4 biochemical pathways were present in H. scoparium to respond to environmental challenges. PMID:26257361

  16. Water in the critical zone: soil, water and life from profile to planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkby, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Water is essential to the critical zone between bedrock and the atmosphere, and without water the soil is dead. Water provides the basis for the abundant life within the soil and, interacting with micro-organisms, drives the key processes in the critical zone. This review looks at the balances that control the flow of water through the soil, and how water movement is one of the major controls on the fluxes and transformations that control the formation, evolution and loss of material that controls the 'life' and 'health' of the soil. At regional scales, climate, acting largely through the soil hydrology, plays a major part in determining the type of soils developed - from hyper arid soils dominated by aeolian inputs, through arid and semi-arid soils with largely vertical water exchanges with the atmosphere, to temperate soils with substantial lateral drainage, and humid soils dominated by organic peats. Soil water balance controls the partition of precipitation between evaporative loss, lateral subsurface flow and groundwater recharge, and, in turn, has a major influence on the potential for plant growth and on the lateral connectivity between soils on a hillslope. Sediment and solute balances distinguish soils of accumulation from soils that tend towards a stable chemical depletion ratio. Reflecting the availability of water and the soil material, carbon balance plays a major role in soil horizonation and distinguishes soils dominated by mineral or organic components. At finer catena and catchment scales, lateral connectivity, or its absence, determines how soils evolve through the transfer of water and sediment downslope, creating more or less integrated landscapes in a balance between geomorphological and pedological processes. Within single soil profiles, the movement of water controls the processes of weathering and soil horizonation by ion diffusion, advective leaching and bioturbation, creating horizonation that, in turn, modifies the hydrological responses

  17. Water Extraction from Martian Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, J.; Bommarito, F.; Blumenstein, E.; Ellsworth, M.; Cisar, T.; McKinney, B.; Knecht, B.

    2001-01-01

    With the projected growth in space exploration, several milestones have been set for future space programs. One milestone in particular is the landing of a human on the planet Mars. However, one major barrier to the successful placement of persons on Mars is a lack of water on the Martian surface. Because of the massive quantity of water that would be necessary for a mission to Mars, it is not possible to transport the amount necessary from Earth to Mars. Water would be necessary for human consumption as well as a base for jet propulsion fuel. Past unmanned missions to Mars, such as the Viking missions of the 1970's, have revealed the presence of small quantities of water in Martian soil. Research has determined that the water in the soil can be recovered when the soil is heated to a temperature between 200 C and 500 C. Team JFEET has designed a system with the capability to extract water from the soil of Mars, and then meter and deliver the water to a storage tank for later use.

  18. WATER CONSERVATION IN SOIL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water conservation is important for agricultural, residential, industrial, and recreational users in all climatic regions, but becomes increasingly important when going from humid to semiarid and arid regions. This report briefly describes techniques that can be used to increase the storage of water...

  19. Remote sensing of soil water content at large scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content at the near surface is a critical parameter for understanding land surface atmosphere interactions, influencing surface energy balances. Using microwave radiometry, an accurate global map of surface soil water content can be generated on a near daily basis. The accuracy of the p...

  20. INTERACTION OF METHYL-TERT BUTYL ETHER AND WATER STRESS ON SEED GERMINATION AND SEEDLING GROWTH IN SOIL MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widespread contaminant in surface and ground water in the United States. Frequently irrigation is used to water fields to germinate planted seeds and sustain plant growth. A likely possibility exists that water used may have some MTBE. Our s...

  1. Simulations and field observations of root water uptake in plots with different soil water availability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Gaochao; Vanderborght, Jan; Couvreur, Valentin; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Root water uptake is a main process in the hydrological cycle and vital for water management in agronomy. In most models of root water uptake, the spatial and temporal soil water status and plant root distributions are required for water flow simulations. However, dynamic root growth and root distributions are not easy and time consuming to measure by normal approaches. Furthermore, root water uptake cannot be measured directly in the field. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate monitoring data of soil water content and potential and root distributions within a modeling framework to explore the interaction between soil water availability and root water uptake. But, most models are lacking a physically based concept to describe water uptake from soil profiles with vertical variations in soil water availability. In this contribution, we present an experimental setup in which root development, soil water content and soil water potential are monitored non-invasively in two field plots with different soil texture and for three treatments with different soil water availability: natural rain, sheltered and irrigated treatment. Root development is monitored using 7-m long horizontally installed minirhizotubes at six depths with three replicates per treatment. The monitoring data are interpreted using a model that is a one-dimensional upscaled version of root water uptake model that describes flow in the coupled soil-root architecture considering water potential gradients in the system and hydraulic conductances of the soil and root system (Couvreur et al., 2012). This model approach links the total root water uptake to an effective soil water potential in the root zone. The local root water uptake is a function of the difference between the local soil water potential and effective root zone water potential so that compensatory uptake in heterogeneous soil water potential profiles is simulated. The root system conductance is derived from inverse modelling using

  2. iSOIL: Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Peter; Werban, Ulrike; Sauer, Uta

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution soil property maps are one major prerequisite for the specific protection of soil functions and restoration of degraded soils as well as sustainable land use, water and environmental management. To generate such maps the combination of digital soil mapping approaches and remote as well as proximal soil sensing techniques is most promising. However, a feasible and reliable combination of these technologies for the investigation of large areas (e.g. catchments and landscapes) and the assessment of soil degradation threats is missing. Furthermore, there is insufficient dissemination of knowledge on digital soil mapping and proximal soil sensing in the scientific community, to relevant authorities as well as prospective users. As one consequence there is inadequate standardization of techniques. At the poster we present the EU collaborative project iSOIL within the 7th framework program of the European Commission. iSOIL focuses on improving fast and reliable mapping methods of soil properties, soil functions and soil degradation risks. This requires the improvement and integration of advanced soil sampling approaches, geophysical and spectroscopic measuring techniques, as well as pedometric and pedophysical approaches. The focus of the iSOIL project is to develop new and to improve existing strategies and innovative methods for generating accurate, high resolution soil property maps. At the same time the developments will reduce costs compared to traditional soil mapping. ISOIL tackles the challenges by the integration of three major components: (i)high resolution, non-destructive geophysical (e.g. Electromagnetic Induction EMI; Ground Penetrating Radar, GPR; magnetics, seismics) and spectroscopic (e.g., Near Surface Infrared, NIR) methods, (ii)Concepts of Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) and pedometrics as well as (iii)optimized soil sampling with respect to profound soil scientific and (geo)statistical strategies. A special focus of iSOIL lies on the

  3. A review on temporal stability of soil water contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) has been observed across a wide range of soil types, landscapes, climates and scales. A better understanding of TS SWC controls and their interactions needs to be developed. The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive inventory of publis...

  4. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake: soil and root resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir

    2014-05-01

    The macroscopic physically-based plant root water uptake (RWU) model, based on water-potential-gradient formulation (Vogel et al., 2013), was used to simulate the observed soil-plant-atmosphere interactions at a forest site located in a temperate humid climate of central Europe and to gain an improved insight into the mutual interplay of RWU parameters that affects the soil water distribution in the root zone. In the applied RWU model, the uptake rates are directly proportional to the potential gradient and indirectly proportional to the local soil and root resistances to water flow. The RWU algorithm is implemented in a one-dimensional dual-continuum model of soil water flow based on Richards' equation. The RWU model is defined by four parameters (root length density distribution, average active root radius, radial root resistance, and the threshold value of the root xylem potential). In addition, soil resistance to water extraction by roots is related to soil hydraulic conductivity function and actual soil water content. The RWU model is capable of simulating both the compensatory root water uptake, in situations when reduced uptake from dry layers is compensated by increased uptake from wetter layers, and the root-mediated hydraulic redistribution of soil water, contributing to more natural soil moisture distribution throughout the root zone. The present study focusses on the sensitivity analysis of the combined soil water flow and RWU model responses in respect to variations of RWU model parameters. Vogel T., M. Dohnal, J. Dusek, J. Votrubova, and M. Tesar. 2013. Macroscopic modeling of plant water uptake in a forest stand involving root-mediated soil-water redistribution. Vadose Zone Journal, 12, 10.2136/vzj2012.0154.

  5. Microwave remote sensing of soil water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing of soils to determine water content was considered. A layered water balance model was developed for determining soil water content in the upper zone (top 30 cm), while soil moisture at greater depths and near the surface during the diurnal cycle was studied using experimental measurements. Soil temperature was investigated by means of a simulation model. Based on both models, moisture and temperature profiles of a hypothetical soil were generated and used to compute microwave soil parameters for a clear summer day. The results suggest that, (1) soil moisture in the upper zone can be predicted on a daily basis for 1 cm depth increments, (2) soil temperature presents no problem if surface temperature can be measured with infrared radiometers, and (3) the microwave response of a bare soil is determined primarily by the moisture at and near the surface. An algorithm is proposed for monitoring large areas which combines the water balance and microwave methods.

  6. Soil water sensing for water balance, ET and WUE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil water balance can be solved for evapotranspiration (ET) using data from either weighing lysimetry or soil water sensing and measurement. Weighing lysimeters are expensive and, although accurate, are difficult to manage and afford little replication. Direct soil water measurement by coring i...

  7. Soil water sensing for water balance, ET, and WUE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil water balance can be solved for evapotranspiration (ET) using data from either weighing lysimetry or soil water sensing and measurement. Weighing lysimeters are expensive and, although accurate, are difficult to manage and afford little replication. Direct soil water measurement by coring i...

  8. Soil water repellency of Antarctic soils (Elephant Point). First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Paulo; Oliva, Marc; Ruiz Fernández, Jesus

    2015-04-01

    Hydrophobicity it is a natural properties of many soils around the world. Despite the large body of research about soil water hydrophobicity (SWR) in many environments, little information it is available about Antarctic soils and their hydro-geomorphological consequences. According to our knowledge, no previous work was carried out on this environment. Soil samples were collected in the top-soil (0-5 cm) and SWR was analysed according to the water drop penetration test. The preliminary results showed that all the soils collected were hydrophilic, however further research should be carried out in order to understand if SWR changes with soil depth and if have implications on soil infiltration during the summer season.

  9. Biophysical interactions between plant and soil: theory and practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ploeg, Martine

    2016-04-01

    Vegetation plays an essential role in the hydrological cycle, as it regulates the water flux to the atmosphere through evapotranspiration, while it is dependent on adequate water supply. Vegetation shapes the land surface by changing infiltration characteristics as a result of root growth, and controls soil moisture storage, which in turn affect runoff characteristics and groundwater recharge. Vegetation and the underlying geology are in constant interaction, wherein water plays a key role. The resilience of the coupled vegetation-soil system critically depends on its sensitivity to environmental changes. Models are a useful tool to explore interaction and feedbacks between vegetation, soil and landscape. Plants respond biochemically to their environment, while the models used for hydrology are often based on physical interactions. Gene-expression and genotype adaptation may complicate our modelling efforts in for example climate change impacts. Combination of new techniques to assess soil and plant properties facilitates assessment of biophysical interactions. This poster will review these techniques and compare the obtained insights of soil-plant relationships with the current modeling approaches.

  10. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  11. Mechanics of wheel-soil interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houland, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    An approximate theory for wheel-soil interaction is presented which forms the basis for a practical solution to the problem. It is shown that two fundamental observations render the problem determinate: (1) The line of action of the resultant of radial stresses acting at the wheel soil interface approximately bisects the wheel-soil contact angle for all values of slip. (2) A shear stress surface can be hypothesized. The influence of soil inertia forces is also evaluated. A concept of equivalent cohesion is introduced which allows a convenient experimental comparison for both cohesive and frictional soils. This theory compares favorably with previous analyses and experimental data, and shows that soil inertia forces influencing the motion of a rolling wheel can be significant.

  12. Data assimilation with soil water content sensors and pedotransfer functions in soil water flow modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water flow models are based on a set of simplified assumptions about the mechanisms, processes, and parameters of water retention and flow. That causes errors in soil water flow model predictions. Soil water content monitoring data can be used to reduce the errors in models. Data assimilation (...

  13. A minimalist probabilistic description of root zone soil water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.

    2001-01-01

    The probabilistic response of depth-integrated soil water to given climatic forcing can be described readily using an existing supply-demand-storage model. An apparently complex interaction of numerous soil, climate, and plant controls can be reduced to a relatively simple expression for the equilibrium probability density function of soil water as a function of only two dimensionless parameters. These are the index of dryness (ratio of mean potential evaporation to mean precipitation) and a dimensionless storage capacity (active root zone soil water capacity divided by mean storm depth). The first parameter is mainly controlled by climate, with surface albedo playing a subsidiary role in determining net radiation. The second is a composite of soil (through moisture retention characteristics), vegetation (through rooting characteristics), and climate (mean storm depth). This minimalist analysis captures many essential features of a more general probabilistic analysis, but with a considerable reduction in complexity and consequent elucidation of the critical controls on soil water variability. In particular, it is shown that (1) the dependence of mean soil water on the index of dryness approaches a step function in the limit of large soil water capacity; (2) soil water variance is usually maximized when the index of dryness equals 1, and the width of the peak varies inversely with dimensionless storage capacity; (3) soil water has a uniform probability density function when the index of dryness is 1 and the dimensionless storage capacity is large; and (4) the soil water probability density function is bimodal if and only if the index of dryness is <1, but this bimodality is pronounced only for artificially small values of the dimensionless storage capacity.

  14. Uptake and Hydraulic Redistribution of Soil Water in a Natural Forested Wetland and in two Contrasting Drained Loblolly Pine Plantations: Quantifying Patterns over Soil-to-Root and Canopy-to-Atmosphere Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domec, J.; King, J. S.; Noormets, A.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S. G.; Gavazzi, M. G.; Treasure, E.; Boggs, J. L.

    2009-05-01

    The conversion of wetlands to intensively managed forest lands in eastern North Carolina is widespread and the consequences on water and carbon balances are not well studied. Quantification of evapotranspiration (ET), tree transpiration and their biophysical regulation are needed for assessing forest water management options. We characterized vertical variation in the diurnal and seasonal soil volumetric water content at 10 cm intervals to evaluate changes in water availability for root uptake and monitored eddy covariance ET and tree transpiration (sap flux) in three contrasting loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stands. Those stands included a 50- yr-old wetland natural regeneration (NG), a 17-yr-old drained mid-rotation plantation (MP) and a 5-yr-old drained plantation (YP) in eastern North Carolina. We also quantified the magnitude of hydraulic redistribution (HR), the passive movement of soil water from deep to shallow roots, to identify factors affecting the seasonal dynamics of root water uptake, root and plant water potentials and stomatal conductance. In NG, soil water content was always at full saturation and total tree water use peaked between 6-7 mm/day, and this stand was used as reference. In MP, soil water content varied with soil depth and total water use from the upper 1m peaked between 4 and 6.5 mm/day during the growing season and was strongly correlated and similar to ET (ET represented 90-95% of total water depletion). In YP, soil water used was limited to the upper 30 cm and was strongly affected by summer drought by declining progressively from 0.9 mm/day in spring to 0.4 m/day in September. After periods of more than 10 days without rain, water extraction in MP shifted to the deeper layers, and recharge from HR approached 20% of ET. During days of high evaporative demand, water use in MP was comparable to NG thanks to HR and to the contribution of deeper roots to water uptake. In YP, HR never contributed for more than 8% of ET. There was no HR

  15. Least limiting water range of soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The least limiting water range (LLWR) has been developed as an index of the soil structural quality. The LLWR was defined as the region bounded by the upper and lower soil water content over which water, oxygen, and mechanical resistance become major limitations for root growth. Thus, it combines th...

  16. Current Advancements and Challenges in Soil-Root Interactions Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, A.; Huber, K.; Abesha, B.; Meunier, F.; Leitner, D.; Roose, T.; Javaux, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-12-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  17. Current advancements and challenges in soil-root interactions modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Huber, Katrin; Abesha, Betiglu; Meunier, Felicien; Leitner, Daniel; Roose, Tiina; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Roots change their surrounding soil chemically, physically and biologically. This includes changes in soil moisture and solute concentration, the exudation of organic substances into the rhizosphere, increased growth of soil microorganisms, or changes in soil structure. The fate of water and solutes in the root zone is highly determined by these root-soil interactions. Mathematical models of soil-root systems in combination with non-invasive techniques able to characterize root systems are a promising tool to understand and predict the behaviour of water and solutes in the root zone. With respect to different fields of applications, predictive mathematical models can contribute to the solution of optimal control problems in plant recourse efficiency. This may result in significant gains in productivity, efficiency and environmental sustainability in various land use activities. Major challenges include the coupling of model parameters of the relevant processes with the surrounding environment such as temperature, nutrient concentration or soil water content. A further challenge is the mathematical description of the different spatial and temporal scales involved. This includes in particular the branched structures formed by root systems or the external mycelium of mycorrhizal fungi. Here, reducing complexity as well as bridging between spatial scales is required. Furthermore, the combination of experimental and mathematical techniques may advance the field enormously. Here, the use of root system, soil and rhizosphere models is presented through a number of modelling case studies, including image based modelling of phosphate uptake by a root with hairs, model-based optimization of root architecture for phosphate uptake from soil, upscaling of rhizosphere models, modelling root growth in structured soil, and the effect of root hydraulic architecture on plant water uptake efficiency and drought resistance.

  18. A modified soil water based Richards equation for layered soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinka, F.; Ahrens, B.

    2010-09-01

    Most Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) models like TERRA-ML (implemented e.g. in the CCLM model (www.clm-community.eu)) use the soil moisture based Richards equation to simulate vertical water fluxes in soils, assuming a homogeneous soil type. Recently, high-resolution soil type datasets (e.g. BüK 1000, only for Germany (Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, BGR, www.bgr.bund.de) or Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD, version 1.1, FAO/IIASA/ISRIC/ISSCAS/JRC, March 2009)) have been developed. Deficiencies in the numerical solution of the soil moisture based Richards equation may occur if inhomogeneous soil type data is implemented, because there are possibly discontinuities in soil moisture due to various soil type characteristics. One way to fix this problem is to use the potential based Richards equation, but this may lead to problems in conservation of mass. This presentation will suggest a possible numerical solution of the soil moisture based Richards equation for inhomogeneous soils. The basic idea is to subtract the equilibrium state of it from soil moisture fluxes. This should reduce discontinuities because each soil layer aspires the equilibrium state and therefore differences might be of the same order. First sensitivity studies have been done for the Main river basin, Germany.

  19. Temporal stability of soil water content and soil water flux patterns across agricultural fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When an agricultural field is repeatedly surveyed for soil water content, sites often can be spotted where soil is consistently wetter or consistently dryer than average across the study area. Temporal stability presents significant interest for upscaling observed soil water content, improving soil ...

  20. Ecohydrological interactions between soil and trees in Alpine apple orchards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, Daniele; Scandellari, Francesca; Zanotelli, Damiano; Michael, Engel; Tagliavini, Massimo; Comiti, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Tracer-based investigations of water exchanges between soil and trees in natural forested catchments are receiving relevant attention in modern ecohydrology. However, the interactions between tree water use and the hydrological cycle in agricultural environments are still poorly understood. In this work, we use stable isotopes of water (2H and 18O) and electric conductivity as tracers to improve our understanding of the functional interrelations between water generating surface runoff and recharging groundwater, and water taken up by apple trees (Malus domestica, cv. 'Pinova') in an Alpine valley in South Tyrol, Northern Italy. From April to October 2015 we monitored two orchards approximately of the same size (roughly 400 m2) and soil texture (silt loam) located in a flat area at different distance from the Adige/Etsch River (50 m vs. 450 m). We have addressed the following questions: i) at which soil depth do apple trees take up water? ii) do apple trees take up water from shallow groundwater? iii) are there differences in the isotopic composition of the water fluxes between the two sites? Samples for isotopic analysis were taken approximately fortnightly from the river, two groundwater wells close to each field, mobile soil water (from suction cups at 25 cm and 50 cm), open area precipitation, throughfall, irrigation and sap (through a portable pressure bomb). Tightly-bound soil water was also cryogenically extracted from samples taken every 10 cm from 60 cm-long soil cores taken at three locations for each field on one occasion in mid-summer. Ancillary measurements were electrical conductivity of all water sources except for sap. In addition to meteorological and discharge data, soil moisture was continuously measured at 10 cm and 50 cm in three locations, and sap flow on three trees, for each field. Preliminary results show that two water pools with distinct isotopic signature exist: i) river water, groundwater and irrigation water show values relatively

  1. Interactive effects of ozone and climate on water use, soil moisture content and streamflow in a southern Applachian forest in the USA

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Samuel B.; Wullschleger, Stan D; Sun, G.; Nosal, M.

    2007-01-01

    Documentation of the degree and direction of effects of ozone on transpiration of canopies of mature forest trees is critically needed to model ozone effects on forest water use and growth in a warmer future climate. Patterns of sap flow in stems and soil moisture in the rooting zones of mature trees, coupled with late-season streamflow in three forested watersheds in east Tennessee, USA, were analyzed to determine relative influences of ozone and other climatic variables on canopy physiology and streamflow patterns. Statistically significant increases in whole-tree canopy conductance, depletion of soil moisture in the rooting zone, and reduced late-season streamflow in forested watersheds were detected in response to increasing ambient ozone levels. Short-term changes in canopy water use and empirically modeled streamflow patterns over a 23-yr observation period suggest that current ambient ozone exposures may exacerbate the frequency and level of negative effects of drought on forest growth and stream health.

  2. Water-Mediated Hydrophobic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-05-01

    Hydrophobic interactions are driven by the combined influence of the direct attraction between oily solutes and an additional water-mediated interaction whose magnitude (and sign) depends sensitively on both solute size and attraction. The resulting delicate balance can lead to a slightly repulsive water-mediated interaction that drives oily molecules apart rather than pushing them together and thus opposes their direct (van der Waals) attraction for each other. As a consequence, competing solute size-dependent crossovers weaken hydrophobic interactions sufficiently that they are only expected to significantly exceed random thermal energy fluctuations for processes that bury more than ˜1 nm2 of water-exposed area.

  3. Water-Mediated Hydrophobic Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-05-27

    Hydrophobic interactions are driven by the combined influence of the direct attraction between oily solutes and an additional water-mediated interaction whose magnitude (and sign) depends sensitively on both solute size and attraction. The resulting delicate balance can lead to a slightly repulsive water-mediated interaction that drives oily molecules apart rather than pushing them together and thus opposes their direct (van der Waals) attraction for each other. As a consequence, competing solute size-dependent crossovers weaken hydrophobic interactions sufficiently that they are only expected to significantly exceed random thermal energy fluctuations for processes that bury more than ∼1 nm(2) of water-exposed area. PMID:27215821

  4. Soil/Structure Interactions in Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, G. W.; Moore, R. K.; Yoo, C. H.; Bush, Thomas D., Jr.; Stallings, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    In effort to improve design of Earthquake-resistant structures, mathematical study undertaken to simulate interactions among soil, foundation, and superstructure during various kinds of vibrational excitation. System modeled as three lumped masses connected vertically by springs, with lowest mass connected to horizontal vibrator (representing ground) through springs and dashpot. Behavior of springs described by elastic or elastoplastic force/deformation relationships. Relationships used to approximate nonlinear system behavior and soil/foundation-interface behavior.

  5. Climate Change Effects on Soil Water and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, M. S.; Chandler, D. G.; Marks, D. G.

    2011-12-01

    Soil serves as the critical interface between physical changes in climate and the biological impacts of those changes. While there is general agreement among Global Climate Models concerning the amount and trend of world air temperature change in the upcoming decades, there is less agreement regarding precipitation trends and much less agreement with respect to trends in the "soil climate" (soil water content and temperature). The difficulties with soil are probably related to variable and poorly tested land surface parameterizations. Working at sites spanning a 1000 m elevation gradient in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in Idaho, we showed that, over a 45 year period, the annual air temperature increased about 2° C. During that time, the amount of precipitation remained constant, but the precipitation phase shifted considerably from snow to rain depending on site elevation. Most predictions for this environment are for drier, warmer soils. We used soil water and temperature data collected at the same sites for the past 30 years in the RCEW to determine if those trends occurred. We found no significant trend in either soil water content or temperature at any site over the 30 year period. The lack of a soil water trend is related to the vegetation dynamics in this semiarid environment, where very low leaf are index values, and very dry soils much of the year, serve to restrict the impact of increased evaporative demand on transpiration. The lack of soil temperature trends is related to interactions with vegetative and snow cover, especially snow cover, which can effectively modulate exceptionally cold air temperatures. In both cases, it is clear that climate change is not directly imprinted on the soil, but affected by interactions with what is growing in, or laying on the soil.

  6. Pesticide interactions with soils affected by olive oil mill wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keren, Yonatan; Bukhanovsky, Nadezhda; Borisover, Mikhail

    2013-04-01

    Soil pesticide sorption is well known to affect the fate of pesticides, their bioavailability and the potential to contaminate air and water. Soil - pesticide interactions may be strongly influenced by soil organic matter (SOM) and organic matter (OM)-rich soil amendments. One special OM source in soils is related to olive oil production residues that may include both solid and liquid wastes. In the Mediterranean area, the olive oil production is considered as an important field in the agricultural sector. Due to the significant rise in olive oil production, the amount of wastes is growing respectively. Olive oil mill waste water (OMWW) is the liquid byproduct in the so-called "three phase" technological process. Features of OMWW include the high content of fatty aliphatic components and polyphenols and their often-considered toxicity. One way of OMWW disposal is the land spreading, e.g., in olive orchards. The land application of OMWW (either controlled or not) is supposed to affect the multiple soil properties, including hydrophobicity and the potential of soils to interact with pesticides. Therefore, there is both basic and applied interest in elucidating the interactions between organic compounds and soils affected by OMWW. However, little is known about the impact of OMWW - soil interactions on sorption of organic compounds, and specifically, on sorption of agrochemicals. This paper reports an experimental study of sorption interactions of a series of organic compounds including widely used herbicides such as diuron and simazine, in a range of soils that were affected by OMWW (i) historically or (ii) in the controlled land disposal experiments. It is demonstrated that there is a distinct increase in apparent sorption of organic chemicals in soils affected by OMWW. In selected systems, this increase may be explained by increase in SOM content. However, the SOM quality places a role: the rise in organic compound - soil interactions may both exceed the SOM

  7. Hydrology: The diversified economics of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    Soil water that evaporates or is tapped by plants is largely separate from that which runs into streams and recharges groundwater. This finding has big implications for our understanding of water cycling. See Letter p.91

  8. Modeling abiotic processes of aniline in water-saturated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrega-Duque, J.R.; Jafvert, C.T.; Li, H.; Lee, L.S.

    2000-05-01

    The long-term interactions of aromatic amines with soils are important in defining the fate and transport of these compounds in the environment. Abiotic loss of aniline from the aqueous phase to the soil phase occurs with an initial rapid loss due to reversible mass transfer processes, followed by a slow loss due to irreversible reactions. A kinetic model describing these processes in water-saturated soils was developed and evaluated. The model assumes that instantaneous equilibrium occurs for the following reversible processes: (1) acid dissociation of the protonated organic base (BH+) in the aqueous phase; (2) ion exchange between inorganic divalent cations (D{sup 2+} = Ca{sup 2+} + Mg{sup 2+}) on the soil and the protonated organic base; and (3) partitioning of the nonionic species of aniline (B{sub aq}) to soil organic carbon. The model assumes that irreversible loss of aniline occurs through reaction of B{sub aq} with irreversible sites (C{sub ir}) on the soil. A kinetic rate constant, k{sub ir}, and the total concentration of irreversible sites, C{sub T}, were employed as adjustable model parameters. The model was evaluated as adjustable model parameters. The model was evaluated with measured mass distributions of aniline between water and five soils ranging in pH (4.4--7.3), at contact times ranging from 2 to 1,600 h. Some experiments were performed at different soil mass to water volume ratios. A good fit was obtained with a single value of k{sub ir} for all soils, pH values, and soil-water ratios. To accurately predict soil-water distributions at contact times <24 h, mass transfer of the neutral species to the soil was modeled as a kinetic process, again, assuming that ion exchange processes are instantaneous.

  9. Soil Water and Shallow Groundwater Relations in an Agricultural Hillslope

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shallow water tables contribute to soil water variations under rolling topography, and soil properties contribute to shallow water table fluctutations. Preferential flow through large soil pores can cause a rise in the water table with little increase in soil water except near the soil surface. Late...

  10. Water as a Reagent for Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaweera, Indira S.; Marti-Perez, Montserrat; Diaz-Ferrero, Jordi; Sanjurjo, Angel

    2003-03-06

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise, and the implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and provide a standalone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  11. America's Soil and Water: Condition and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1981

    A review of conditions and trends regarding soil and water resources of rural nonfederal lands of the United States is presented in this publication. Maps, charts, and graphs illustrate the data collected on various aspects of soil and water use and practice. Topic areas considered include: (1) land use patterns; (2) classes of land; (3)…

  12. Characteristics of water infiltration in layered water repellent soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrophobic soil can influence soil water infiltration, but information regarding the impacts of different levels of hydrophobicity within a layered soil profile is limited. An infiltration study was conducted to determine the effects of different levels of hydrophobicity and the position of the hyd...

  13. Acid-base characteristics of the Grass Pond watershed in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State, USA: interactions among soil, vegetation and surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEathron, K. M.; Mitchell, M. J.; Zhang, L.

    2013-07-01

    Grass Pond watershed is located within the southwestern Adirondack Mountain region of New York State, USA. This region receives some of the highest rates of acidic deposition in North America and is particularly sensitive to acidic inputs due to many of its soils having shallow depths and being generally base poor. Differences in soil chemistry and tree species between seven subwatersheds were examined in relation to acid-base characteristics of the seven major streams that drain into Grass Pond. Mineral soil pH, stream water BCS (base-cation surplus) and pH exhibited a positive correlation with sugar maple basal area (p = 0.055; 0.48 and 0.39, respectively). Black cherry basal area was inversely correlated with stream water BCS, ANC (acid neutralizing capacity)c and NO3- (p = 0.23; 0.24 and 0.20, respectively). Sugar maple basal areas were positively associated with watershed characteristics associated with the neutralization of atmospheric acidic inputs while in contrast, black cherry basal areas showed opposite relationships to these same watershed characteristics. Canonical correspondence analysis indicated that black cherry had a distinctive relationship with forest floor chemistry apart from the other tree species, specifically a strong positive association with forest floor NH4, while sugar maple had a distinctive relationship with stream chemistry variables, specifically a strong positive association with stream water ANCc, BCS and pH. Our results provide evidence that sugar maple is acid-intolerant or calciphilic tree species and also demonstrate that black cherry is likely an acid-tolerant tree species.

  14. Acid-base characteristics of the Grass Pond watershed in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State, USA: interactions between soil, vegetation and surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEathron, K. M.; Mitchell, M. J.; Zhang, L.

    2012-09-01

    Grass Pond watershed is located within the Southwestern Adirondack Mountain region of New York State, USA. This region receives some of the highest rates of acidic deposition in North America and is particularly sensitive to acidic inputs due to many of its soils having shallow depths and being generally base-poor. Differences in soil chemistry and tree species between seven subwatersheds were examined in relation to acid-base characteristics of the seven major streams that drain into Grass Pond. Mineral soil pH, stream water BCS and pH exhibited a positive correlation with sugar maple basal area (p = 0.055; 0.48 and 0.39, respectively). Black cherry basal area was inversely correlated with stream water BCS, ANCc and NO3- (p = 0.23; 0.24 and 0.20, respectively). Sugar maple basal areas were positively correlated with watershed characteristics associated with the neutralization of atmospheric acidic inputs while in contrast, black cherry basal areas showed opposite relationships to these same watershed characteristics. Canonical Correspondence Analysis indicated that black cherry had a distinctive relationship with forest floor chemistry apart from the other tree species, specifically a strong positive association with forest floor NH4 while sugar maple had a distinctive relationship with stream chemistry variables, specifically a strong positive association with stream water ANCc, BCS and pH. Our results provide evidence that sugar maple is acid-intolerant or calciphilic tree species and also demonstrate that black cherry is likely an acid-tolerant tree species.

  15. Increasing Efficiency of Water Use in Agriculture through Management of Soil Water Repellency to Optimize Soil and Water Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Demie; Kostka, Stan; McMillan, Mica; Gadd, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Water's ability to infiltrate and disperse in soils, and soil's ability to receive, transport, retain, filter and release water are important factors in the efficient use of water in agriculture. Deteriorating soil conditions, including development of soil water repellency, negatively impact hydrological processes and, consequently, the efficiency of rainfall and irrigation. Soil water repellency is increasingly being identified in diverse soils and cropping systems. Recently research has been conducted on the use of novel soil surfactants (co-formulations of alkyl polyglycoside and block copolymer surfactants) to avoid or overcome soil water repellency and enhance water distribution in soils. Results indicate that this is an effective and affordable approach to maintaining or restoring soil and water productivity in irrigated cropping systems. Results from studies conducted in Australia and the United States to determine how this technology modifies soil hydrological behavior and crop yields will be presented. A range of soils and various crops, including potatoes, corn, apples and grapes, were included. Several rates were compared to controls for effect on soil moisture levels, soil water distribution, and crop yield. An economic analysis was also conducted in some trials. Treatments improved rootzone water status, significantly increased crop yield and quality, and in some cases allowed significant reductions in water requirements. Where assessed, a positive economic return was generated. This technology holds promise as a strategy for increasing efficiency of water use in agriculture.

  16. Interaction of fecal coliforms with soil aggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land-applied manures may contain various contaminants that cause water pollution and concomitant health problems. Some of these pollutants are bacteria, and fecal coliforms (FC) have been widely used as an indicator of bacterial contamination. Experiments on bacteria attachment to soil are tradition...

  17. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  18. Water movement in stony soils: The influence of stoniness on soil water content profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Viliam; Knava, Karol

    2010-05-01

    WATER MOVEMENT IN STONY SOILS: THE INFLUENCE OF STONINESS ON SOIL WATER CONTENT PROFILES Viliam Novák, Karol Kňava Institute of Hydrology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Racianska 75, 831 02 Bratislava 3, Slovakia, e-mail: novak@uh.savba.sk Soils containing rock fragments are widespread over the world, on Europe such soil account for 30%, 60% in Mediterranean region. In comparison to fine earth soils (soil particles are less then 2 mm) stony soils contain rock fragments characterized by the low retention capacity and hydraulic conductivity. So, for stony soils -in comparison to the fine-earth soils - is typical lower hydraulic conductivity and retention capacity, which lead to the decrease decrease of infiltration rate and low water retention. So, water movement and its modeling in stony soil would differ from fine earth (usually agricultural) soil. The aim of this contribution is to demonstrate the differences in water movement in homogeneous soil (fine earth) and stony soil. The influence of different stoniness on soil water content and soil water dynamics was studied too. Windthrow at High Tatra mountains in Slovakia (November 2004) cleared nearly 12 000 ha of 80 year conifers and this event initiated complex research of windthrow impact on the ecosystem. The important part of this study was water movement in impacted area. Specific feature of the soil in this area was moraine soil consisting of fine earth, characterized as silty sand, with the relative stone content up to 0.49, increasing with depth. Associated phenomenon to the forest clearing is the decrease of rain interception and higher undercanopy precipitation. Conifers interception capacity can be three times higher than low canopy interception, and can reach up to 40% of annual precipitation in Central Europe. Stones in the soil are decreasing infiltration rate, but paradoxically increased understorey precipitation and followingly the increased cumulative infiltration led to the increase of the soil

  19. mySoil: Crowd-Sourcing Soil Water Repellency Data to Create a Global Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallin, Ingrid; Robinson, David A.; Doerr, Stefan H.; Douglas, Peter; Lawley, Russell; Shelley, Wayne; Urbanek, Emilia

    2014-05-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) alters the way water interacts with soil by impacting hydrological and biogeochemical cycling to an extent which is not yet fully understood. Most studies have focused on SWR in specific environments and habitats, mostly in Mediterranean climates, but SWR has been increasingly observed in a range of habitats from the tropics to the northern latitudes. To better assess the distribution of this phenomenon, we propose using citizen science to create a means of crowd-sourcing SWR data from around the globe using the mySoil app. The water drop penetration time (WDPT) test, in which the length of time a drop of water remains on the soil surface is measured and a corresponding qualitative water repellency class is assigned to the soil, provides useful data and is easy to use. We propose adding a simple, standardised WDPT protocol to the mySoil app and web portal so both academics and non-scientists can contribute to the collection of SWR data from around the world. The protocol would include guidelines on drop size and the number of drops to apply, and would encourage inclusion of details such as vegetation cover, soil moisture conditions, last rainfall, and broad habitat. By initially engaging with researchers to create a back bone of respondents, we believe we can develop a global assessment that will reveal the distribution of the SWR phenomenon.

  20. The soil water balance in a mosaic of clumped vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolla, Teresa; Manfreda, Salvatore; Caylor, Kelly; Gioia, Andrea; Iacobellis, Vito

    2014-05-01

    The spatio-temporal distribution of soil moisture influences the plant growth and the distribution of terrestrial vegetation. This effect is more evident in arid and semiarid ecosystems where the interaction between individuals and the water limited conditions play a fundamental role, providing environmental conditions which drive a variety of non-linear ecohydrological response functions (such as transpiration, photosynthesis, leakage). In this context, modeling vegetation patterns at multiple spatial aggregation scales is important to understand how different vegetation structures can modify the soil water distribution and the exchanged fluxes between soil and atmosphere. In the present paper, the effect of different spatial vegetation patterns, under different climatic scenarios, is investigated in a patchy vegetation mosaic generated by a random process of individual tree canopies and their accompanying root system. Vegetation pattern are generated using the mathematical framework proposed by Caylor et al. (2006) characterized by a three dimensional stochastic vegetation structure, based on the density, dispersion, size distribution, and allometry of individuals within a landscape. A Poisson distribution is applied to generate different distribution of individuals paying particular attention on the role of clumping on water distribution dynamics. The soil water balance is evaluated using the analytical expression proposed by Laio et al. (2001) to explore the influence of climate and vegetation patterns on soil water balance steady-state components (such as the average rates of evaporation, the root water uptake and leakage) and on the stress-weighted plant water uptake. Results of numerical simulations show that clumping may be beneficial for water use efficiency at the landscape scale. References Caylor, Kelly K., P. D'Odorico and I. Rodriguez Iturbe: On the ecohydrology of structurally heterogeneous semiarid landscape. Water Resour. Res., 28, W07424, 2006

  1. Water Drainage from Unsaturated Soils in a Centrifuge Permeameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas, G.; McCartney, J.; Zhang, M.

    2013-12-01

    This study involves an analysis of water drainage from an initially saturated silt layer in a centrifuge permeameter to evaluate the hydraulic properties of the soil layer in unsaturated conditions up to the point where the water phase becomes discontinuous. These properties include the soil water retention curve (SWRC) and the hydraulic conductivity function (HCF). The hydraulic properties of unsaturated silt are used in soil-atmosphere interaction models that take into account the role of infiltration and evaporation of water from soils due to atmospheric interaction. These models are often applied in slope stability analyses, landfill cover design, aquifer recharge analyses, and agricultural engineering. The hydraulic properties are also relevant to recent research concerning geothermal heating and cooling, as they can be used to assess the insulating effects of soil around underground heat exchangers. This study employs a high-speed geotechnical centrifuge to increase the self-weight of a compacted silt specimen atop a filter plate. Under a centrifuge acceleration of N times earth's gravity, the concept of geometric similitude indicates that the water flow process in a small-scale soil layer will be similar to those in a soil layer in the field that is N times thicker. The centrifuge acceleration also results in an increase in the hydraulic gradient across the silt specimen, which causes water to flow out of the pores following Darcy's law. The drainage test was performed until the rate of liquid water flow out of the soil layer slowed to a negligible level, which corresponds to the transition point at which further water flow can only occur due to water vapor diffusion following Fick's law. The data from the drainage test in the centrifuge were used to determine the SWRC and HCF at different depths in the silt specimen, which compared well with similar properties defined using other laboratory tests. The transition point at which liquid water flow stopped (and

  2. The interaction between soil erosion and soil organisms in temperate agroecosystems: nematode redistribution in tramlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Craig; Rowan, John S.; McKenzie, Blair M.; Neilson, Roy

    2014-05-01

    Arable agriculture presents a unique set of challenges, and one of the most important is soil erosion. Whilst policy and practice look towards sustainable intensification of production to ensure food security, fundamental gaps in our understanding still exist. The physical processes involved in the detachment, transport and deposition of soil are well characterised but further research considering chemical and nutrient transport, fertiliser and pesticide losses, and environmental impacts to downstream environments is still required. Furthermore the interaction between soil erosion and soil organisms have largely been ignored, even though soil organisms serve a myriad of functions essential in the provision of soil ecosystem goods and services. Here we present the findings of a field-scale experiment into soil biotic redistribution undertaken at the James Hutton Institute's Balruddery Farm, Scotland (Link Tramlines Project XDW8001). Farm vehicle-tyre wheelings left in arable fields (tramlines) to enable crop spraying during the crop growth cycle have been identified as key transport pathways for sediment and associated nutrients. We tested the hypothesis that soil organisms were also transported by tramline erosion. During the winter of 2012/13 an experiment was undertaken to measure soil organism export from unbound hillslope plots subject to four different tramline treatments set out in a randomised block design. We used soil nematodes as a model organism as they are ubiquitous and sensitive to disturbance and an established indicator taxa of biological and physico-chemical changes in soil. Tramline treatments included a control tyre (conventional tractor tyre), a control tyre with a sown tramline, a low pressure tyre with sown tramline, and a control tyre with a spiked harrow. Post-event sampling of rainfall events was undertaken, and a range of variables measured in the laboratory. The spiked harrow treatment produced the greatest overall reductions in nematode

  3. Soil water evaporation and crop residues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

  4. Water retention of biochar amended soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We analyzed the water holding capacities of soils amended with biochars made from switchgrass, pecan shells, peanut hulls, poultry litter, and hardwood sawdust. Soils were amended with 20 g/kg (44 tonnes/ha) of each biochar produced at both high (>500 degrees C) and low (<400 degrees C) temperatures...

  5. Intrusion of Soil Water through Pipe Cracks

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a series of experiments conducted at U.S. EPA’s Test and Evaluation Facility in 2013-2014 to study the intrusion of contaminated soil water into a pipe crack during simulated backflow events. A test rig was used consisting of a 3’ x 3’ x 3’ acrylic soil bo...

  6. New soil water sensors for irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective irrigation management is key to obtaining the most crop production per unit of water applied and increasing production in the face of competing demands on water resources. Management methods have included calculating crop water needs based on weather station measurements, calculating soil ...

  7. Closing the loop of the soil water retention curve

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Alsherif, N; Wayllace, Alexandra; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    The authors, to their knowledge for the first time, produced two complete principal soil water retention curves (SWRCs) under both positive and negative matric suction regimes. An innovative testing technique combining the transient water release and imbibition method (TRIM) and constant flow method (CFM) was used to identify the principal paths of SWRC in the positive pore-water pressure regime under unsaturated conditions. A negative matric suction of 9.8 kPa is needed to reach full saturation or close the loop of the SWRC for a silty soil. This work pushes the understanding of the interaction of soil and water into new territory by quantifying the boundaries of the SWRC over the entire suction domain, including both wetting and drying conditions that are relevant to field conditions such as slope wetting under heavy rainfall or rapid groundwater table rise in earthen dams or levees.

  8. Transient soil moisture profile of a water-shedding soil cover in north Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Christopher; Baumgartl, Thomas; Scheuermann, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    In current agricultural and industrial applications, soil moisture determination is limited to point-wise measurements and remote sensing technologies. The former has limitations on spatial resolution while the latter, although has greater coverage in three dimensions, but may not be representative of real-time hydrologic conditions of the substrate. This conference paper discusses the use of elongated soil moisture probes to describe the transient soil moisture profile of water-shedding soil cover trial plots in north Queensland, Australia. Three-metre long flat ribbon cables were installed at designed depths across a soil cover with substrate materials from mining activities comprising of waste rocks and blended tailings. The soil moisture measurement is analysed using spatial time domain reflectometry (STDR) (Scheuermann et al., 2009) Calibration of the flat ribbon cable's soil moisture measurement in waste rocks is undertaken in a glasshouse setting. Soil moisture retention and outflows are monitored at specific time interval by mass balance and water potential measurements. These data sets together with the soil hydrologic properties derived from laboratory and field measurements are used as input in the numerical code on unsaturated flow, Hydrus2D. The soil moisture calculations of the glasshouse calibration using this numerical method are compared with results from the STDR soil moisture data sets. In context, the purpose of the soil cover is to isolate sulphide-rich mine wastes from atmospheric interaction as oxidation and leaching of these materials may result to acid and metalliferous drainage. The long term performance of a soil cover will be described in terms of the quantities and physico-chemical characteristics of its outflows. With the soil moisture probes set at automated and pre-determined measurement time intervals, it is expected to distinguish between macropore and soil moisture flows during high intensity rainfall events and, also continuously

  9. WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

    2001-11-12

    SRI International conducted experiments in a two-year, two-phase process to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology, also known as hot water extraction (HWE) technology, to separate petroleum-related contaminants and other hazardous pollutants from soil and sediments. In this process, water with added electrolytes (inexpensive and environmentally friendly) is used as the extracting solvent under subcritical conditions (150-300 C). The use of electrolytes allows us to operate reactors under mild conditions and to obtain high separation efficiencies that were hitherto impossible. Unlike common organic solvents, water under subcritical conditions dissolves both organics and inorganics, thus allowing opportunities for separation of both organic and inorganic material from soil. In developing this technology, our systematic approach was to (1) establish fundamental solubility data, (2) conduct treatability studies with industrial soils, and (3) perform a bench-scale demonstration using a highly contaminated soil. The bench-scale demonstration of the process has shown great promise. The next step of the development process is the successful pilot demonstration of this technology. Once pilot tested, this technology can be implemented quite easily, since most of the basic components are readily available from mature technologies (e.g., steam stripping, soil washing, thermal desorption). The implementation of this technology will revolutionize the conventional use of water in soil remediation technologies and will provide a stand-alone technology for removal of both volatile and heavy components from contaminated soil.

  10. Passive Microwave Observation of Soil Water Infiltration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Thomas J.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Rawls, Walter J.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Parlange, Marc B.

    1997-01-01

    Infiltration is a time varying process of water entry into soil. Experiments were conducted here using truck based microwave radiometers to observe small plots during and following sprinkler irrigation. Experiments were conducted on a sandy loam soil in 1994 and a silt loam in 1995. Sandy loam soils typically have higher infiltration capabilities than clays. For the sandy loam the observed brightness temperature (TB) quickly reached a nominally constant value during irrigation. When the irrigation was stopped the TB began to increase as drainage took place. The irrigation rates in 1995 with the silt loam soil exceeded the saturated conductivity of the soil. During irrigation the TB values exhibited a pattern that suggests the occurrence of coherent reflection, a rarely observed phenomena under natural conditions. These results suggested the existence of a sharp dielectric boundary (wet over dry soil) that was increasing in depth with time.

  11. Simulating the fate of water in field soil crop environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameira, M. R.; Fernando, R. M.; Ahuja, L.; Pereira, L.

    2005-12-01

    grain and forage corn, respectively. Soil water was predicted with an efficiency ranging from 50 to 95% for the silty loam soil and between 56 and 72% for the sandy soil. The purposed calibration procedure allowed the model to predict crop development, yield and the water balance terms, with accuracy that is acceptable in practical applications for complex and spatially variable field conditions. An iterative method was required to account for the strong interaction between the different model components, based upon detailed experimental data on soils and crops.

  12. Geophysical Imaging of Root Architecture and Root-soil Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Roots play a critical role in controlling water and nutrient uptake, soil biogeochemical processes, as well as the physical anchorage for plants. While important processes, such as root hydraulic redistribution for optimal growth and survival have been recognized, representation of roots in climate models, e.g. its carbon storage, carbon resilience, root biomass, and role in regulating water and carbon fluxes across the rhizosphere and atmosphere interface is still challenging. Such a challenge is exacerbated because of the large variations of root architecture and function across species and locations due to both genetic and environmental controls and the lack of methods for quantifying root mass, distribution, dynamics and interaction with soils at field scales. The scale, complexity and the dynamic nature of plant roots call for minimally invasive methods capable of providing quantitative estimation of root architecture, dynamics over time and interactions with the soils. We present a study on root architecture and root-soil interactions using geophysical methods. Parameters and processes of interests include (1) moisture dynamics around root zone and its interaction with plant transpiration and environmental controls and (2) estimation of root structure and properties based on geophysical signals. Both pot and field scale studies were conducted. The pot scale experiments were conducted under controlled conditions and were monitored with cross-well electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), TDR moisture sensors and temperature probes. Pots with and without a tree were compared and the moisture conditions were controlled via a self regulated pumping system. Geophysical monitoring revealed interactions between roots and soils under dynamic soil moisture conditions and the role of roots in regulating the response of the soil system to changes of environmental conditions, e.g. drought and precipitation events. Field scale studies were conducted on natural trees using

  13. Investigation of indigenous water, salt and soil for solar ponds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The existence of salt-gradient solar ponds in nature is a strong indication that the successful exploitation of this phenomenon must account adequately for the influences of the local setting. Sun, weather and other general factors are treated elsewhere. This paper deals with water, salt, and soil. A general methodology for evaluating and, where feasible, adjusting the effects of these elements is under development. Eight essential solar pond characteristics have been identified, along with a variety of their dependencies upon properties of water, salt and soil. The comprehensive methodology, when fully developed, will include laboratory investigation in such diverse areas as brine physical chemistry, light transmission, water treatment, brine-soil interactions, sealants, and others. With the Salton Sea solar pond investigation as an example, some methods under development will be described.

  14. Influence of soil pH on properties of the soil-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Doerte

    2010-05-01

    of SWR. Sessile drop and Wilhelmy plate contact angles (CAsess and CAwpm resp.) were measured on the four samples from Germany and the data correlated with those of WDPT. The titratable surface charge of these four soils was measured at selected pH values using a particle charge detector (PCD). Changes in SWR with soil pH were found to be influenced by the density and type of sites able to interact with protons at the available surfaces of organic and mineral materials in soil. The maximum SWR occurred for soil at natural pH and where the charge density was minimal. As pH increased, negative surface charge increased due to deprotonation of sites and WDPT decreased. Two types of behaviour were observed: Those in which (i) WDPT shortened with decreasing pH and ii) WDPT was sensibly constant with decreasing pH. The data suggest that the availability and relative abundance of proton active sites at mineral surfaces, and those at organic functional groups influence the behaviour. Bayer, J. V. and G. E. Schaumann (2007). Hydrological processes 21(17): 2266 - 2275. Cerdà, A. and S. H. Doerr (2007). Hydrological Processes 21(17): 2325-2336. Dekker, L. W. and P. D. Jungerius (1990). Dunes of the European coasts, Catena-Verlag. 18: 173-183. Holzhey, C. S. (1968). Symposium on water repellent soils, Riverside, California. Karnok, K. A., E. J. Rowland, et al. (1993). Agronomy Journal 85(5): 983-986. Mataix-Solera, J., V. Arcenegui, et al. (2007). Hydrological Processes 21(17): 2300-2309. Mataix-Solera, J. and S. H. Doerr (2004). Geoderma 118(1-2): 77-88. Roper, M. M. (2005). Australian Journal of Soil research 43: 803-810.

  15. Soil-water dynamics and tree water uptake in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico (USA): a stable isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierke, Casey; Newton, B. Talon; Phillips, Fred M.

    2016-04-01

    In the southwestern United States, precipitation in the high mountains is a primary source of groundwater recharge. Precipitation patterns, soil properties and vegetation largely control the rate and timing of groundwater recharge. The interactions between climate, soil and mountain vegetation thus have important implications for the groundwater supply. This study took place in the Sacramento Mountains, which is the recharge area for multiple regional aquifers in southern New Mexico. The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen were used to determine whether infiltration of precipitation is homogeneously distributed in the soil or whether it is partitioned among soil-water `compartments', from which trees extract water for transpiration as a function of the season. The results indicate that "immobile" or "slow" soil water, which is derived primarily from snowmelt, infiltrates soils in a relatively uniform fashion, filling small pores in the shallow soils. "Mobile" or "fast" soil water, which is mostly associated with summer thunderstorms, infiltrates very quickly through macropores and along preferential flow paths, evading evaporative loss. It was found that throughout the entire year, trees principally use immobile water derived from snowmelt mixed to differing degrees with seasonally available mobile-water sources. The replenishment of these different water pools in soils appears to depend on initial soil-water content, the manner in which the water was introduced to the soil (snowmelt versus intense thunderstorms), and the seasonal variability of the precipitation and evapotranspiration. These results have important implications for the effect of climate change on recharge mechanisms in the Sacramento Mountains.

  16. Soil-water dynamics and tree water uptake in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico (USA): a stable isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierke, Casey; Newton, B. Talon; Phillips, Fred M.

    2016-06-01

    In the southwestern United States, precipitation in the high mountains is a primary source of groundwater recharge. Precipitation patterns, soil properties and vegetation largely control the rate and timing of groundwater recharge. The interactions between climate, soil and mountain vegetation thus have important implications for the groundwater supply. This study took place in the Sacramento Mountains, which is the recharge area for multiple regional aquifers in southern New Mexico. The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen were used to determine whether infiltration of precipitation is homogeneously distributed in the soil or whether it is partitioned among soil-water `compartments', from which trees extract water for transpiration as a function of the season. The results indicate that "immobile" or "slow" soil water, which is derived primarily from snowmelt, infiltrates soils in a relatively uniform fashion, filling small pores in the shallow soils. "Mobile" or "fast" soil water, which is mostly associated with summer thunderstorms, infiltrates very quickly through macropores and along preferential flow paths, evading evaporative loss. It was found that throughout the entire year, trees principally use immobile water derived from snowmelt mixed to differing degrees with seasonally available mobile-water sources. The replenishment of these different water pools in soils appears to depend on initial soil-water content, the manner in which the water was introduced to the soil (snowmelt versus intense thunderstorms), and the seasonal variability of the precipitation and evapotranspiration. These results have important implications for the effect of climate change on recharge mechanisms in the Sacramento Mountains.

  17. Visualisation and quantification of water in bulk and rhizosphere soils using X-ray Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Saoirse; Daly, Keith; Crout, Neil; Bennett, Malcolm; Pridmore, Tony; Foulkes, John; Roose, Tiina; Mooney, Sacha

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how water is distributed in soil and how it changes during the redistribution process or from root uptake is crucial for enhancing our understanding for managing soil and water resources. The application of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) to soil science research is now well established; however few studies have utilised the technique for visualising water in pore spaces due to several inherent difficulties. Here we present a new method to visualise the water content of a soil in situ and in three-dimensions at successive drying matric potentials. A water release curve was obtained for different soil types using measurements from their real pore geometries. The water, soil, air and root phases from the images were segmented using image analysis techniques and quantified. These measurements allowed us to characterise pore size, shape and connectivity for both air filled pores and water. The non-destructive technique enabled water to be visualised in situ and repeated scanning allowed wetting patterns to be analysed. The experimental results were validated against conventional laboratory derived water release curves and specifically developed mechanistic models of soil-water-root interactions. Micro-scale revelations of the water-soil-root interfaces enabled us to make macro-scale predictions on water movement in soil. The information and insights obtained on the hydraulic properties of rhizosphere and bulk soil will enhance our understanding of rhizosphere biophysics and improve current water uptake models.

  18. Soil water monitoring equipment for irrigation scheduling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equipment for monitoring soil water content and sometimes bulk electrical conductivity can be used for scheduling irrigations if the accuracy of the equipment is sufficient to avoid damanging plants and wasting water and fertilizer. Irrigation scheduling is the process of deciding when to irrigate a...

  19. Measured and simulated soil water evaporation from four Great Plains soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The amount of soil water lost during stage one and stage two soil water evaporation is of interest to crop water use modelers. The ratio of measured soil surface temperature (Ts) to air temperature (Ta) was tested as a signal for the transition in soil water evaporation from stage one to stage two d...

  20. Temperature dependence of soil water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, S.C.H. )

    1992-12-01

    To understand the process of coupled heat and water transport, the relationship between temperature and soil water potential must be known. Two clays, Avonlea bentonite and Lake Agassiz clay, are being considered as the clay-based sealing materials for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Avonlea bentonite is distinguished from Lake Agassiz clay by its high sealing potential in water. A series of experiments was performed in which the two clays were mixed with equal amounts of sand and were compacted to a dry density of 1.67 Mg/m[sup 3] under various moisture contents and temperatures. A psychrometer was placed within the compacted clay-sand to measure the soil water potential based on the electromotive force measured by the psychrometer. The results indicate that the soil water potential at a particular temperature is higher for both clay-sand mixtures than predicted by the change in the surface tension of water; this effect is much more prominent in the Avonlea bentonite and at low moisture contents. The paper presents empirical equations relating the soil water potential with the moisture content and temperature of the two clay-sand mixtures. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Spatio-temporal soil moisture distribution and subsurface water flow in the Shale Hills Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Lin, H.; Zhu, Q.

    2006-12-01

    Systematic and dynamic soil moisture monitoring is needed to characterize areal soil moisture distribution and model subsurface water flow at various scales. Further understanding of soil-water interactions is the key to explore subsurface water flow and its pathways. Hydropedologic approaches integrating soils information with hydrological processes were used to investigate subsurface water flow (vertical and lateral) and possible flow pathways in the 7.9-ha Shale Hills Catchment in central Pennsylvania. Automatic monitoring systems were installed at seven sites using an array of soil matric potential probes (Campbell Scientific 229 and Decagon matric potential probes) and water content probes (Decagon ECH2O-5). These sites are distributed at different landforms (hilltop, hillslope, and valley floor), representing five soil series (Berks, Blairton, Ernest, Rushtown, Weikert). Probes were inserted at different soil depths as well as their interfaces. The positions of probe installation were designed based on site-specific soil morphology and soil properties from laboratory analysis (e.g., soil texture, bulk density, hydraulic conductivity, water retention). A rain gauge was also installed at each monitoring site. The results showed that different soil types, even different soil layers of the same soil type, displayed different hydrological behaviors. There were evidences that lateral flow contributes to the water flow in the Shale Hills Catchment.

  2. Using soil water sensors to improve irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation water management has to do with the appropriate application of water to soils, in terms of amounts, rates, and timing to satisfy crop water demands while protecting the soil and water resources from degradation. In this regard, sensors can be used to monitor the soil water status; and som...

  3. Effect of corn or soybean row position on soil water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop plants can funnel water to the soil and increase water content more in the row relative to the interrow. Because the row intercepts more soil water after rains and higher root density, the soil may also dry out more between rains than does soil in the interrow. The purpose of this study was to ...

  4. Soil water repellency affects production and transport of CO2 and CH4 in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is known to be vital in controlling both the production and transport of C gases in soil. Water availability regulates the decomposition rates of soil organic matter by the microorganisms, while the proportion of water/air filled pores controls the transport of gases within the soil and at the soil-atmosphere interface. Many experimental studies and process models looking at soil C gas fluxes assume that soil water is uniformly distributed and soil is easily wettable. Most soils, however, exhibit some degree of soil water repellency (i.e. hydrophobicity) and do not wet spontaneously when dry or moderately moist. They have restricted infiltration and conductivity of water, which also results in extremely heterogeneous soil water distribution. This is a world-wide occurring phenomenon which is particularly common under permanent vegetation e.g. forest, grass and shrub vegetation. This study investigates the effect of soil water repellency on microbial respiration, CO2 transport within the soil and C gas fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere. The results from the field monitoring and laboratory experiments show that soil water repellency results in non-uniform water distribution in the soil which affects the CO2 and CH4 gas fluxes. The main conclusion from the study is that water repellency not only affects the water relations in the soil, but has also a great impact on greenhouse gas production and transport and therefore should be included as an important parameter during the sites monitoring and modelling of gas fluxes.

  5. Estimating In-situ Soil-Water Retention and Field Water Capacity in Two Contrasting Soil Textures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A priori knowledge of the in-situ soil field water capacity (FWC) and the soil-water retention curve for soils is important for the effective irrigation management and scheduling of many crops. The primary objective of this study was to estimate the in-situ FWC using the soil-water retention curve d...

  6. Soil Water: Advanced Crop and Soil Science. A Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Larry E.

    The course of study represents the fourth of six modules in advanced crop and soil science and introduces the agriculture student to the topic of soil water. Upon completing the three day module, the student will be able to classify water as to its presence in the soil, outline the hydrological cycle, list the ways water is lost from the soil,…

  7. Interactions between soil thermal and hydrological dynamics in the response of Alaska ecosystems to fire disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yi, Shuhua; McGuire, Anthony; Harden, Jennifer; Kasischke, Eric; Manies, Kristen L.; Hinzman, Larry; Liljedahl, Anna K.; Randerson, J.; Liu, Heping; Romanovsky, V.adimir E; Marchenko, Sergey S.; Kim, Yongwon

    2009-01-01

    Soil temperature and moisture are important factors that control many ecosystem processes. However, interactions between soil thermal and hydrological processes are not adequately understood in cold regions, where the frozen soil, fire disturbance, and soil drainage play important roles in controlling interactions among these processes. These interactions were investigated with a new ecosystem model framework, the dynamic organic soil version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model, that incorporates an efficient and stable numerical scheme for simulating soil thermal and hydrological dynamics within soil profiles that contain a live moss horizon, fibrous and amorphous organic horizons, and mineral soil horizons. The performance of the model was evaluated for a tundra burn site that had both preburn and postburn measurements, two black spruce fire chronosequences (representing space-for-time substitutions in well and intermediately drained conditions), and a poorly drained black spruce site. Although space-for-time substitutions present challenges in model-data comparison, the model demonstrates substantial ability in simulating the dynamics of evapotranspiration, soil temperature, active layer depth, soil moisture, and water table depth in response to both climate variability and fire disturbance. Several differences between model simulations and field measurements identified key challenges for evaluating/improving model performance that include (1) proper representation of discrepancies between air temperature and ground surface temperature; (2) minimization of precipitation biases in the driving data sets; (3) improvement of the measurement accuracy of soil moisture in surface organic horizons; and (4) proper specification of organic horizon depth/properties, and soil thermal conductivity.

  8. An overview of soil water sensors for salinity & irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation water management has to do with the appropriate application of water to soils, in terms of amounts, rates, and timing to satisfy crop water demands while protecting the soil and water resources from degradation. Accurate irrigation management is even more important in salt affected soils ...

  9. The impact of land use changes on water pathways, soil formation and soil functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinet, Jérémy; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Minella, Jean P. G.; Vanderborght, Jan; Govers, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    scale. The combined interpretation of these information sources will improve our understanding of the interactions between the water fluxes and the soil system under different land use systems. Combining these data with detailed studies of clay mineralogy and weathering will allow to gain first insights on how land use changes may affect biogeochemical processes and soil weathering at the landscape scale.

  10. Soil and Water Conservation Activities for Scouts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The purpose of the learning activities outlined in this booklet is to help Scouts understand some conservation principles which hopefully will lead to the development of an attitude of concern for the environment and a commitment to help with the task of using and managing soil, water, and other natural resources for long range needs as well as…

  11. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  12. SOIL AND WATER ASSESSMENT TOOL (SWAT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is the continuation of a long-term effort of nonpoint source pollution modeling with the US Department of Agriculture -Agricultural Research Service (ARS). SWAT is a continuous time model that operates on a daily time step. The objective in ...

  13. Soil Texture and Cultivar Effects on Rice (Oryza sativa, L.) Grain Yield, Yield Components and Water Productivity in Three Water Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Fugen; Soriano, Junel; Tabien, Rodante E.; Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of water regime/soil condition (continuous flooding, saturated, and aerobic), cultivar (‘Cocodrie’ and ‘Rondo’), and soil texture (clay and sandy loam) on rice grain yield, yield components and water productivity using a greenhouse trial. Rice grain yield was significantly affected by soil texture and the interaction between water regime and cultivar. Significantly higher yield was obtained in continuous flooding than in aerobic and saturated soil conditions but the latter treatments were comparable to each other. For Rondo, its grain yield has decreased with soil water regimes in the order of continuous flooding, saturated and aerobic treatments. The rice grain yield in clay soil was 46% higher than in sandy loam soil averaged across cultivar and water regime. Compared to aerobic condition, saturated and continuous flooding treatments had greater panicle numbers. In addition, panicle number in clay soil was 25% higher than in sandy loam soil. The spikelet number of Cocodrie was 29% greater than that of Rondo, indicating that rice cultivar had greater effect on spikelet number than soil type and water management. Water productivity was significantly affected by the interaction of water regime and cultivar. Compared to sandy loam soil, clay soil was 25% higher in water productivity. Our results indicated that cultivar selection and soil texture are important factors in deciding what water management option to practice. PMID:26978525

  14. Displacement of soil pore water by trichloroethylene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Aiken, G.R.; Imbrigiotta, T.E.; Goldberg, M.C.

    1994-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLS) are important pollutants because of their widespread use as chemical and industrial solvents. An example of the pollution caused by the discharge of DNAPLs is found at the Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, where trichloroethylene (TCE) has been discharged directly into the unsaturated zone. This discharge has resulted in the formation of a plume of TCE-contaminated water in the aquifer downgradient of the discharge. A zone of dark-colored groundwater containing a high dissolved organic C content has been found near the point of discharge of the TCE. The colored-water plume extends from the point of discharge at least 30 m (100 feet) downgradient. Fulvic acids isolated from the colored-waters plume, from water from a background well that has not been affected by the discharge of chlorinated solvents, and from soil pore water collected in a lysimeter installed at an uncontaminated site upgradient of the study area have been compared. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the fulvic acids from the colored waters and from the lysimeter are very similar, but are markedly different from the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of the fulvic acid from the background well. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectrum and the DOC fractionation profile of the colored groundwater and the soil pore water are very similar to each other, but quite different from those of the background water. It is proposed from these observations that this colored water is soil pore water that has been displaced by a separate DNAPL liquid phase downward to the saturated zone.

  15. Capacitive Soil Moisture Sensor for Plant Watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Thomas; Kamm, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    How can you realize a water saving and demand-driven plant watering device? To achieve this you need a sensor, which precisely detects the soil moisture. Designing such a sensor is the topic of this poster. We approached this subject with comparing several physical properties of water, e.g. the conductivity, permittivity, heat capacity and the soil water potential, which are suitable to detect the soil moisture via an electronic device. For our project we have developed a sensor device, which measures the soil moisture and provides the measured values for a plant watering system via a wireless bluetooth 4.0 network. Different sensor setups have been analyzed and the final sensor is the result of many iterative steps of improvement. In the end we tested the precision of our sensor and compared the results with theoretical values. The sensor is currently being used in the Botanical Garden of the Friedrich-Alexander-University in a long-term test. This will show how good the usability in the real field is. On the basis of these findings a marketable sensor will soon be available. Furthermore a more specific type of this sensor has been designed for the EU:CROPIS Space Project, where tomato plants will grow at different gravitational forces. Due to a very small (15mm x 85mm x 1.5mm) and light (5 gramm) realisation, our sensor has been selected for the space program. Now the scientists can monitor the water content of the substrate of the tomato plants in outer space and water the plants on demand.

  16. CHEMFLO: ONE-DIMENSIONAL WATER AND CHEMICAL MOVEMENT IN UNSATURATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An interactive software system was developed to enable decision-makers, regulators, policy-makers, scientists, consultants, and students to simulate the movement of waterand chemicals in unsaturated soils. Water movement is modeled using Richards (1931) - equation. Chemical trans...

  17. Effects of Estimating Soil Hydraulic Properties and Root Growth Factor on Soil Water Balance and Crop Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing water use efficiency (WUE) is one of the oldest goals in agricultural sciences, yet it is still not fully understood and achieved due to the complexity of soil-weather-management interactions. System models that quantify these interactions are increasingly used for optimizing crop WUE, es...

  18. Stochastic Modeling of Soil Water and Plant Water Stress Using Cumulant Expansion Theory and Its Application to Climate Change Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Lee, A.; Keem, M.; Shin, H.

    2009-12-01

    For better understanding of soil water and plant water stress dynamics, a stochastic soil water and plant water stress model will be proposed and applied to climate change impact assessment. The proposed model is derived by using cumulant expansion theory from a stochastic differential equation with stochastic rainfall forcings. This model has the advantage of providing the probabilistic solution in the form of a probability distribution function, from which the ensemble average behavior of the system can be obtained easily. Also, since this model uses only the statistics of rainfall time series, the effect of different climate conditions on the soil water and plant water stress dynamics can be incorporated effectively. The simulation result of soil water confirms that the proposed model can reproduce the observation properly and shows that the soil water behaves with consistent cycle based on the precipitation pattern. In order to understand the impact of climate change on soil water and plant water stress behaviors, the RCM data developed by Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA RCM) and the third GCM by Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis(CGCM3) are used with two time periods of 2051~2060 and 2091~2100. With all the simulation results, it can be conclude that the simulation results will be different with what climate change scenario is selected since different climate change model predicts different soil water and plant water stress behaviors. This analysis can be expected as a starting point for better understanding of the effect of soil water on ecosystem dynamics such as climate-soil-vegetation interaction. Figure 1. The evolution of the soil water PDF. The soil water PDFs have two different patterns according to wet season from June to September and dry season from October to May. From such result, it can be inferred that the mechanisms which influence the soil water behavior are different in wet and dry seasons. That is to say, in wet

  19. A Coupled Modeling Approach for Root-Soil Interaction Processes Using DuMuX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, N.; Helmig, R.; Flemisch, B.; Koch, T.

    2015-12-01

    The water and nutrient uptake of plant roots in soils have a crucial influence on soil physical processes. The interacting processes between plant roots and soil are important for several agricultural problems, for example water management or leaching of pesticides. However, the coupled mechanisms of local soil and root water flow, transport of dissolved substances, root growth, and root uptake are difficult to measure and thus experimental data are rare. Numerical models can be used to understand these complex soil-root systems and help to analyze and interpret experimental measurements. The model approach presented here couples a root system and a soil model. Crucial for this approach is the 1D-3D grid coupling which combines a 1D network grid (root system) with the 3D soil grid. Based on that grid coupling, local processes are defined, for instance the local water uptake of a single root segment. Here, the interface conditions between roots and soil play a major role and we use local grid refinement strategies to better resolve these interface processes. This grid refinement of the 3D soil grid is based on the root network (1D grid) and adapts if root growth occurs. It offers the possibility to describe processes in the soil-plant continuum in a more physical manner avoiding empirical descriptions of root water uptake as a function of bulk matric potential, osmotic potential, root length density, and transpiration rate. Our coupling approach is included into the framework of DuMux, an open-source simulator for flow and transport processes in porous media. This implementation combines biological, chemical and physical processes in soil, inside roots, and at root-soil interfaces, and is contained in a sustainable and consistent framework for the implementation. We will show example simulations describing water flow, solute transport and root growth in a soil-root system.

  20. Seasonal and long-term effects of CO2 and O3 on water loss in ponderosa pine and their interaction with climate and soil moisture

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is driven by evaporative demand, available solar energy and soil moisture (SM) as well as by plant physiological activity which may be substantially affected by elevated CO2 and O3. A multi-year study was conducted in outdoor sunlit-controlled environment ...

  1. Seasonal and long-term effects of CO2 and O3 and their interaction with climate and soil moisture on water loss in ponderosa pine

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is driven by evaporative demand, available solar energy and soil moisture as well as by physiological plant activity which may be substantially affected by elevated CO2 and O3. A multi-year study was conducted in outdoor sun-lit controlled-environment cha...

  2. Numerical Modeling of Coupled Water, Vapor and Energy in Soils and at the Soil-Atmosphere Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunek, J.; Bristow, K. L.; Saito, H.

    2015-12-01

    It is broadly accepted that mass and energy fluxes in the subsurface in general, and in arid and semi-arid regions in particular, are closely coupled and cannot be evaluated without considering their mutual interactions. However, only a few numerical models (if any) consider coupled water, vapor and energy transport in both the subsurface and at the soil-atmosphere interface. While the subsurface is commonly implemented in existing models, which often consider both isothermal and thermally induced water and vapor flow, the effects of slope inclination, slope azimuth, variable surface albedo and plant shading on incoming radiation and spatially variable surface mass and energy balance, and consequently soil moisture distribution, is rarely considered. In this presentation we discuss these missing elements and our attempts to implement them into the HYDRUS model. We demonstrate implications of some of their interactions, their impact on the spatial distributions of soil temperature and water content, and their effect on soil evaporation.

  3. Stem-root flow effect on soil-atmosphere interactions and uncertainty assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, T.-H.; Chen, J.-P.; Xue, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Soil water can rapidly enter deeper layers via vertical redistribution of soil water through the stem-root flow mechanism. This study develops the stem-root flow parameterization scheme and coupled this scheme with the Simplified Simple Biosphere model (SSiB) to analyze its effects on land-atmospheric interactions. The SSiB model was tested in a single column mode using the Lien Hua Chih (LHC) measurements conducted in Taiwan and HAPEX-Mobilhy (HAPEX) measurements in France. The results show that stem-root flow generally caused a decrease in the moisture content at the top soil layer and moistened the deeper soil layers. Such soil moisture redistribution results in significant changes in heat flux exchange between land and atmosphere. In the humid environment at LHC, the stem-root flow effect on transpiration was minimal, and the main influence on energy flux was through reduced soil evaporation that led to higher soil temperature and greater sensible heat flux. In the Mediterranean environment of HAPEX, the stem-root flow significantly affected plant transpiration and soil evaporation, as well as associated changes in canopy and soil temperatures. However, the effect on transpiration could either be positive or negative depending on the relative changes in the moisture content of the top soil vs. deeper soil layers due to stem-root flow and soil moisture diffusion processes.

  4. Surface water and groundwater interactions in coastal wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Xin, Pei; Shen, Chengji

    2014-05-01

    Salt marshes are an important wetland system in the upper intertidal zone, interfacing the land and coastal water. Dominated by salt-tolerant plants, these wetlands provide essential eco-environmental services for maintaining coastal biodiversity. They also act as sediment traps and help stabilize the coastline. While they play an active role in moderating greenhouse gas emissions, these wetlands have become increasingly vulnerable to the impact of global climate change. Salt marshes are a complex hydrological system characterized by strong, dynamic interactions between surface water and groundwater, which underpin the wetland's eco-functionality. Bordered with coastal water, the marsh system undergoes cycles of inundation and exposure driven by the tide. This leads to dynamic, complex pore-water flow and solute transport in the marsh soil. Pore-water circulations occur at different spatial and temporal scales with strong link to the marsh topography. These circulations control solute transport between the marsh soil and the tidal creek, and ultimately affect the overall nutrient exchange between the marsh and coastal water. The pore-water flows also dictate the soil aeration conditions, which in turn affect marsh plant growth. This talk presents results and findings from recent numerical and experimental studies, focusing on the pore-water flow behaviour in the marsh soil under the influence of tides and density-gradients.

  5. Response of three soil water sensors to variable solution electrical conductivity in different soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial dielectric soil water sensors may improve management of irrigated agriculture by providing continuous field soil water information. Use of these sensors is partly limited by sensor sensitivity to variations in soil salinity and texture, which force expensive, time consuming, soil specific...

  6. In-situ Field Capacity and Soil Water Retention Measurements in Two Contrasting Soil Textures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the in-situ field capacity and soil-water retention curve for soils is important for effective irrigation management and scheduling. The primary objective of this study was to estimate in-situ field capacity and soil water retention curves in the field using continually monitoring soil ...

  7. Sensible heat observations reveal soil-water evaporation dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is important at scales ranging from microbial ecology to large-scale climate. Yet, routine measurments are unable to capture rapidly shifting near-surface soil heat and water processes involved in soil-water evaporation. The objective of this study was to determine the depth a...

  8. Principles of water capture, evaporation, and soil water retention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful dryland crop production in semiarid environments is dependent upon efficient storage of precipitation and use of stored soil water supplies. The objectives of this presentation are to: 1. Summarize information regarding the effects of time of year; environmental parameters; residue orient...

  9. Sorption interactions of organic compounds with soils affected by agricultural olive mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Keren, Yonatan; Borisover, Mikhail; Bukhanovsky, Nadezhda

    2015-11-01

    The organic compound-soil interactions may be strongly influenced by changes in soil organic matter (OM) which affects the environmental fate of multiple organic pollutants. The soil OM changes may be caused by land disposal of various OM-containing wastes. One unique type of OM-rich waste is olive mill-related wastewater (OMW) characterized by high levels of OM, the presence of fatty aliphatics and polyphenolic aromatics. The systematic data on effects of the land-applied OMW on organic compound-soil interactions is lacking. Therefore, aqueous sorption of simazine and diuron, two herbicides, was examined in batch experiments onto three soils, including untreated and OMW-affected samples. Typically, the organic compound-soil interactions increased following the prior land application of OMW. This increase is associated with the changes in sorption mechanisms and cannot be attributed solely to the increase in soil organic carbon content. A novel observation is that the OMW application changes the soil-sorbent matrix in such a way that the solute uptake may become cooperative or the existing ability of a soil sorbent to cooperatively sorb organic molecules from water may become characterized by a larger affinity. The remarkable finding of this study was that in some cases a cooperative uptake of organic molecules by soils makes itself evident in distinct sigmoidal sorption isotherms rarely observed in soil sorption of non-ionized organic compounds; the cooperative herbicide-soil interactions may be characterized by the Hill model coefficients. However, no single trend was found for the effect of applied OMW on the mechanisms of organic compound-soil interactions. PMID:26183941

  10. Soil water content and soil disaggregation by disking affects PM10 emissions.

    PubMed

    Madden, Nicholaus M; Southard, Randal J; Mitchell, Jeff P

    2009-01-01

    Row crop agriculture in California's San Joaquin Valley is a major contributor of particulate matter <10 microm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10). The California Air Resources Board uses fixed PM10 emission values for various tillage operations to monitor and design attainment strategies. However, fixed emission values do not reflect emissions produced by a single implement operating under different soil conditions. This 2-yr study evaluated how PM10 mass concentrations (microg L(-1)) from disking change as a function of gravimetric soil water content (GWC), number of sequential diskings (D1, D2, D3), and the soil's weighted mean ped diameter (WMPD). Results showed PM10 increased logarithmically as the soil dried from a GWC of 14 to 4%. Average PM10 values at the lower GWCs were six to eight times greater than at the higher GWCs. Number of diskings also increased PM10, especially in drier soil. Below a GWC of 7%, PM10 for D3 was about twice that for D1. Despite strong correlations between more disking and lower WMPD, a lower WMPD did not always result in an increase in PM10. This underscored the role soil water plays in reducing PM10 at high GWCs despite low WMPDs from multiple diskings. Three-way interactions between GWC, disking, and PM10 showed, on average, that the magnitude of PM10 produced by D1 was 1.3 to 1.6 times lower than by D3, despite having insignificantly different GWC. Therefore, a disking operation can yield two different PM10 values under similar GWCs if the amount of soil disaggregation is different. Our results show that inclusion of soil parameters in PM10 emission estimates is essential to describing agriculture's role in air quality violations and to assess the value of proposed mitigation measures, such as conservation tillage. PMID:19141793

  11. Water movement through an experimental soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Panno, S.V.; Hensel, B.R.; Rehfeldt, K.R.; Herzog, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (???1 x 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 x 15 x 0.9m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20,037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water break through at the base of the liner occurs. Estimated saturated hydraulic conductivities were 2.5 x 10-9, 4.0 x 10-8, and 5.0 x 10-8 cm s-1 based on measurements of water infiltration into the liner by large- and small-ring infiltrometers and a water balance analysis, respectively. Also investigated in this research was the variability of the liner's hydraulic properties and estimates of the transit times for water and tracers. Small variances exhibited by small-ring flux data suggested that the liner was homogeneous with respect to infiltration fluxes. The predictions of water and tracer breakthrough at the base of the liner ranged from 2.4-12.6 y, depending on the method of calculation and assumptions made. The liner appeared to be saturated to a depth between 18 and 33 cm at the end of the first year of monitoring. Transit time calculations cannot be verified yet, since breakthrough has not occurred. The work conducted so far indicates that compacted soil barriers can be constructed to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement established by the U.S. EPA.A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (??? 1 ?? 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 ?? 15 ?? 0.9 m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20.037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water

  12. Temporal patterns of infiltration into a water repellent soil under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Phil; Roper, Margaret; Micin, Shayne; Jongepier, Ramona

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency causes substantial economic losses for farmers in southern Australia through impacts on crop growth and weed germination. However, recent research has demonstrated that laboratory measurements of water repellency may not be a reliable indicator of the severity of symptoms experienced in the field. In particular, crop residue retention and minimal soil disturbance led to increased water repellency, but was also associated with higher soil water contents measured at strategic times of the year. Little is known about the temporal patterns of soil water storage close to the soil surface in a water repellent sand. In this research we measured soil water content at a depth of 0.05 m at 15-minute intervals from June 2011 to October 2012, under various treatment combinations of residue retention and soil disturbance. Measurements were made in both 'crop row' and 'crop inter-row' positions. For a rainfall event (9.2 mm) in March 2012, prior to crop seeding, plots previously established with no-till absorbed significantly more water (increase in soil water content of 0.074 v/v) than plots conventionally cultivated (0.038 v/v). In June 2012 (12.6 mm), 4 weeks after crop seeding, tillage was again significant, and there was a significant interaction between tillage and 'row' or 'inter-row' position. These results demonstrate the importance of crop management in modifying the response of water repellent soils to rainfall in the field.

  13. Combining Neutron and Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Interaction of Plant Rootsand Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Sascha E.; Tötzke, Christian; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Pohlmeier, Andreas; Kaestner, Anders P.; Lehmann, Eberhard

    The soil in direct vicinity of the roots, the root-soil interface or so called rhizosphere, is heavily modified by the activity of roots, compared to bulk soil, e.g. in respect to microbiology and soil chemistry. It has turned out that the root-soil interface, though small in size, also plays a decisive role in the hydraulics controlling the water flow from bulk soil into the roots. A promising approach for the non-invasive investigation of water dynamics, water flow and solute transport is the combination of the two imaging techniques magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neutron imaging (NI). Both methods are complementary, because NI maps the total proton density, possibly amplified by NI tracers, which usually corresponds to total water content, and is able to detect changes and spatial patterns with high resolution. On the other side, nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times reflect the interaction between fluid and matrix, while also a mapping of proton spin density and thus water content is possible. Therefore MRI is able to classify different water pools via their relaxation times additionally to the water distribution inside soil as a porous medium. We have started such combined measurements with the approach to use the same samples and perform tomography with each imaging method at different location and short-term sample transfer.

  14. Interaction of methyl bromide with soil.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ting; Maciel, Gary E

    2002-02-15

    Because methyl bromide (CH3Br) is a widely used agricultural fumigant for soil disinfection, it is important to know the chemical behavior and fate of CH3Br as a result of its use for soil treatment. A solid-state 13C NMR study of 13CH3Br-treated soil and soil-component samples shows that methylation of soil organic matter may be the major pathway for degradation of CH3Br in soils. Adsorption of CH3Br on a dried clay like Ca-montmorillonite or kaolinite does not contribute directly to the degradation of CH3Br. The results are interpreted in terms of the chemical structures of separated soil fractions and the nature of the separation procedure. PMID:11878373

  15. Micelles as Soil and Water Decontamination Agents.

    PubMed

    Shah, Afzal; Shahzad, Suniya; Munir, Azeema; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N; Khan, Gul Shahzada; Shams, Dilawar Farhan; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Rana, Usman Ali

    2016-05-25

    Contaminated soil and water pose a serious threat to human health and ecosystem. For the treatment of industrial effluents or minimizing their detrimental effects, preventive and remedial approaches must be adopted prior to the occurrence of any severe environmental, health, or safety hazard. Conventional treatment methods of wastewater are insufficient, complicated, and expensive. Therefore, a method that could use environmentally friendly surfactants for the simultaneous removal of both organic and inorganic contaminants from wastewater is deemed a smart approach. Surfactants containing potential donor ligands can coordinate with metal ions, and thus such compounds can be used for the removal of toxic metals and organometallic compounds from aqueous systems. Surfactants form host-guest complexes with the hydrophobic contaminants of water and soil by a mechanism involving the encapsulation of hydrophobes into the self-assembled aggregates (micelles) of surfactants. However, because undefined amounts of surfactants may be released into the aqueous systems, attention must be paid to their own environmental risks as well. Moreover, surfactant remediation methods must be carefully analyzed in the laboratory before field implementation. The use of biosurfactants is the best choice for the removal of water toxins as such surfactants are associated with the characteristics of biodegradability, versatility, recovery, and reuse. This Review is focused on the currently employed surfactant-based soil and wastewater treatment technologies owing to their critical role in the implementation of certain solutions for controlling pollution level, which is necessary to protect human health and ensure the quality standard of the aquatic environment. PMID:27136750

  16. Interaction of Escherichia coli and Soil Particles in Runoff

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead, Richard William; Collins, Robert Peter; Bremer, Philip James

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory-scale model system was developed to investigate the transport mechanisms involved in the horizontal movement of bacteria in overland flow across saturated soils. A suspension of Escherichia coli and bromide tracer was added to the model system, and the bromide concentration and number of attached and unattached E. coli cells in the overland flow were measured over time. Analysis of the breakthrough curves indicated that the E. coli and bromide were transported together, presumably by the same mechanism. This implied that the E. coli was transported by advection with the flowing water. Overland-flow transport of E. coli could be significantly reduced if the cells were preattached to large soil particles (>45 μm). However, when unattached cells were inoculated into the system, the E. coli appeared to attach predominantly to small particles (<2 μm) and hence remained unattenuated during transport. These results imply that in runoff generated by saturation-excess conditions, bacteria are rapidly transported across the surface and have little opportunity to interact with the soil matrix. PMID:16672484

  17. Soil-Plant Nutrient Interactions on Manure-Enriched Calcareous Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient accumulations on heavily manured soils can trigger soil and plant nutrient interactions. The goal of the study was to determine the current impact of dairy manure applications on nutrient concentrations in soil and tissue for irrigated corn silage crops grown in Southern Idaho. At harvest,...

  18. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, K.; Anger, C.; Kelly, B.; Hubbard, S.; Rubin, Y.

    2010-08-15

    Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural management decisions and for reducing the potential negative environmental impacts of agriculture. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially and temporally variable, and obtaining sufficient measurements to describe the heterogeneity can be prohibitively expensive. Understanding the spatial correlation of near-surface soil water content can help optimize data acquisition and improve understanding of the processes controlling soil water content at the field scale. In this study, ground penetrating radar (GPR) methods were used to characterize the spatial correlation of water content in a three acre field as a function of sampling depth, season, vegetation, and soil texture. GPR data were acquired with 450 MHz and 900 MHz antennas, and measurements of the GPR groundwave were used to estimate soil water content at four different times. Additional water content estimates were obtained using time domain reflectometry measurements, and soil texture measurements were also acquired. Variograms were calculated for each set of measurements, and comparison of these variograms showed that the horizontal spatial correlation was greater for deeper water content measurements than for shallower measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content, while shallowly-rooted vegetation decreased the variability. Comparison of the variograms of water content and soil texture showed that soil texture generally had greater small-scale spatial correlation than water content, and that the variability of water content in deeper soil layers was more closely correlated to soil texture than were shallower water content measurements. Lastly, cross-variograms of soil texture and water content were calculated, and co-kriging of water content estimates and soil texture

  19. Evaluation and Targeting of Soil and Water Conservation Practices in the Goodwater Creek Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of our research was to identify how conservation practices, their biophysical settings, and the socio/economic constraints interact to affect water quality in the Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed. Analysis of fifteen years of flow and water quality data showed that soil and water...

  20. Quantifying nonisothermal subsurface soil water evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deol, Pukhraj; Heitman, Josh; Amoozegar, Aziz; Ren, Tusheng; Horton, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Accurate quantification of energy and mass transfer during soil water evaporation is critical for improving understanding of the hydrologic cycle and for many environmental, agricultural, and engineering applications. Drying of soil under radiation boundary conditions results in formation of a dry surface layer (DSL), which is accompanied by a shift in the position of the latent heat sink from the surface to the subsurface. Detailed investigation of evaporative dynamics within this active near-surface zone has mostly been limited to modeling, with few measurements available to test models. Soil column studies were conducted to quantify nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles using a sensible heat balance (SHB) approach. Eleven-needle heat pulse probes were used to measure soil temperature and thermal property distributions at the millimeter scale in the near-surface soil. Depth-integrated SHB evaporation rates were compared with mass balance evaporation estimates under controlled laboratory conditions. The results show that the SHB method effectively measured total subsurface evaporation rates with only 0.01-0.03 mm h-1difference from mass balance estimates. The SHB approach also quantified millimeter-scale nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles over a drying event, which has not been previously possible. Thickness of the DSL was also examined using measured soil thermal conductivity distributions near the drying surface. Estimates of the DSL thickness were consistent with observed evaporation profile distributions from SHB. Estimated thickness of the DSL was further used to compute diffusive vapor flux. The diffusive vapor flux also closely matched both mass balance evaporation rates and subsurface evaporation rates estimated from SHB.

  1. Experimental Test on Control Points Materialization for the Study of Vertical Movements of Soil and its Interactions with Ground Water Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittuari, L.; Gottardi, G.; Tini, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    In the study of soil vertical movements, one of the techniques most commonly used is the spirit levelling, now flanked by satellite SAR interferometry and by the analysis of time series acquired through permanent GNSS stations. The reliability of control points monuments varies depending both on the geological context and on the structure being representative of the investigated phenomenon. Often due to the high number of desired points or to the need of maintaining a specific areal distribution, they are fixed on existing structures (as in the common case of spirit levelling networks). This aspect is even more evident in the case of SAR interferometric analysis, where the permanent scatterers are identified on the basis of consistency in the radar response, but the points display movements measured by structures with different foundations at different depths. Starting from repeated precision levelling measurements, we verified which is the order of magnitude of movements of control points characterized by shallow foundations in cohesive soils, observing their behaviours at different depths, under simple and very common conditions such as the presence of periods of drought or rainfall. The results point-out movements in the order of 3-7 mm in the first meter of depth occurred in a week, during the transition between the period of summer drought and the first rains.

  2. Plant-soil interactions and soil carbon dynamics under climate extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Climate extremes have been suggested to increase significantly in intensity and frequency in the coming decades, and may influence ecosystem processes and the carbon cycle more profoundly than gradual climate warming. While there is a growing understanding of plant-soil interactions in extreme environments and from lab experiments, we still know very little about how such interactions affect soil carbon dynamics in real-world ecosystems exposed to climate extremes. In this talk I will give a brief overview of the topic and will present evidence from in-situ experiments on plant-soil interactions and their consequences for soil carbon dynamics under severe drought.

  3. Soil erosion by water - model concepts and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Juergen

    2010-05-01

    Soil erosion is not a continuous process but the result of isolated surface runoff events, whose erosional effects are determined by numerous temporally and spatially varying variables. Thus the monitoring of soil loss by direct observation is extremely limited with respect to space and time. Usually observation plots cover an area of less than 100 m2 and the observation period is less than 10 years. In order to estimate soil losses by water erosion for others than empirically observable conditions, mathematical models are needed, which are able to describe the interaction of the different physical mechanisms involved either statistically or on the basis of physical algorithms. Such models are absolutely essential for risk prognoses on catchment and regional scale. Besides the aspect of soil conservation the delivery of sediments and sediment bound pollutants into surface water bodies are of increasing relevance in this context. Based on an exemplary selection of existing water erosion models this contribution aims to give an overview over different mathematical approaches used for the description of particle detachment, transport and deposition of soil particles. According to the chronology in the development of soil erosion models empirical algorithms will be presented first based on the USLE approach. However, since purely empirical models like USLE are limited to the estimation of annual soil loss further attempts in soil erosion modelling are focussed on event based estimations considering the fact that soil erosion is not a continuous process but the result of isolated runoff events. One of the first models of this type was CREAMS using physically based algorithms in combination with empirical ones in order to describe the basic erosion processes. Today there are diverse soil erosion models available following in principle the CREAMS concept but using different algorithms in detail. Concerning particle detachment, transport and deposition alternative

  4. Managing pine straw harvests to minimize soil and water losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pine straw is a valuable landscape mulch because it conserves soil moisture, moderates soil temperature, inhibits weed growth, and protects the soil surface against erosion, while retaining a loose structure that allows water, air, and fertilizer to easily reach the soil surface. As a result, marke...

  5. Climate change impacts on soil and water conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 2003 report of the Soil and Water Conservation Society concluded that changes in long-term precipitation may substantial impact runoff and soil erosion. These findings call for a review of current approaches to estimating runoff and soil erosion from agricultural lands, enhancements to soil and wa...

  6. EFFECT OF SOIL AGGREGATE SIZE DISTRIBUTION ON WATER RETENTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitative information on soil water retention is in demand in hydrology, agrometeorology, agronomy, contaminant transport, and other soil-related disciplines of earth and environmental sciences. Soil aggregate composition is an important characteristic of soil structure and, as such, has been exp...

  7. Phosphorus dynamics in soils irrigated with reclaimed waste water or fresh water - A study using oxygen isotopic composition of phosphate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zohar, I.; Shaviv, A.; Young, M.; Kendall, C.; Silva, S.; Paytan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Transformations of phosphate (Pi) in different soil fractions were tracked using the stable isotopic composition of oxygen in phosphate (??18Op) and Pi concentrations. Clay soil from Israel was treated with either reclaimed waste water (secondary, low grade) or with fresh water amended with a chemical fertilizer of a known isotopic signature. Changes of ??18Op and Pi within different soil fractions, during a month of incubation, elucidate biogeochemical processes in the soil, revealing the biological and the chemical transformation impacting the various P pools. P in the soil solution is affected primarily by enzymatic activity that yields isotopic equilibrium with the water molecules in the soil solution. The dissolved P interacts rapidly with the loosely bound P (extracted by bicarbonate). The oxides and mineral P fractions (extracted by NaOH and HCl, respectively), which are considered as relatively stable pools of P, also exhibited isotopic alterations in the first two weeks after P application, likely related to the activity of microbial populations associated with soil surfaces. Specifically, isotopic depletion which could result from organic P mineralization was followed by isotopic enrichment which could result from preferential biological uptake of depleted P from the mineralized pool. Similar transformations were observed in both soils although transformations related to biological activity were more pronounced in the soil treated with reclaimed waste water compared to the fertilizer treated soil. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Seasonal changes in soil water repellency and their effect on soil CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2016-04-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) is a seasonally variable phenomenon controlled by moisture content and at the same time a regulator of the distribution and conductivity of water in the soil. The distribution and availability of water in soil is also an important factor for microbial activity, decomposition of soil organic matter and exchange of gases like CO2 and CH4 between the soil and the atmosphere. It has been therefore hypothesised that SWR by restricting water availability in soil can affect the production and the transport of CO2 in the soil and between the soil and the atmosphere. This study investigates the effect of seasonal changes in soil moisture and water repellency on CO2 fluxes from soil. The study was conducted for 3 year at four grassland and pine forest sites in the UK with contrasting precipitation. The results show the temporal changes in soil moisture content and SWR are affected by rainfall intensity and the length of dry periods between the storms. Soils exposed to very high annual rainfall (>1200mm) can still exhibit high levels of SWR for relatively long periods of time. The spatial variation in soil moisture resulting from SWR affects soil CO2 fluxes, but the most profound effect is visible during and immediately after the rainfall events. Keywords: soil water repellency, CO2 flux, hydrophobicity, preferential flow, gas exchange, rainfall

  9. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  10. Subsurface And Surface Water Flow Interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter we present basic concepts and principles underlying the phenomena of groundwater and surface water interactions. Fundamental equations and analytical and numerical solutions describing stream-aquifer interactions are presented in hillslope and riparian aquifer en...

  11. Mucilage exudation facilitates root water uptake in dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mutez; Kroener, Eva; Holz, Maire; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    As plant roots take up water and the soil dries, water depletion is expected to occur in the rhizosphere. However, recent experiments showed that the rhizosphere of lupines was wetter than the bulk soil during root water uptake. On the other hand, after irrigation the rhizosphere remained markedly dry and it rewetted only after one-two days. We hypothesize that: 1) drying/wetting rates of the rhizosphere are controlled by mucilage exuded by roots; 2) mucilage alters the soil hydraulic conductivity: in particular, wet mucilage increases the soil hydraulic conductivity and dry mucilage makes the soil water repellent; 3) mucilage exudation favors root water uptake in dry soil; and 4) dry mucilage limits water loss from roots to dry soils. We used a root pressure probe to measure the hydraulic conductance of artificial roots sitting in soils. As an artificial root we employed a suction cup with a diameter of 2 mm and a length of 45 mm. The root pressure probe gave the hydraulic conductance of the soil-root continuum during pulse experiments in which water was injected into or sucked from the soil. First, we performed experiments with roots in a relatively dry soil with a volumetric water content of 0.03. Then, we repeated the experiment with artificial roots covered with mucilage and then placed into the soil. As a model for mucilage, we collected mucilage from Chia seeds. The water contents (including that of mucilage) in the experiments with and without mucilage were equal. The pressure curves were fitted with a model of root water that includes rhizosphere dynamics. We found that the artificial roots covered with wet mucilage took up water more easily. In a second experimental set-up we measured the outflow of water from the artificial roots into dry soils. We compared two soils: 1) a sandy soil and 2) the same soil wetted with mucilage from Chia seeds and then let dry. The latter soil became water repellent. Due to the water repellency, the outflow of water from

  12. Determining the least limiting water range using limited soil data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Least Limiting Water Range (LLWR) is a useful tool to evaluate changes in soil physical condition caused by changing soil management. It incorporates limitations to plant growth based on limiting aeration, water holding capacity and soil strength. A disadvantage of the LLWR is the need to determ...

  13. Soil Water Trends During the 2005 - 2006 Drought in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water depletion is an early consequence of a meteorological drought, with the latter defined as a precipitation deficit lasting a few months to several years. Soil water in the upper soil profile (approximately first meter) is limited and highly variable because of its rapid response to precipi...

  14. Ecohydrology of root zone water fluxes and soil development in complex semiarid rangelands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Jurado, Hugo A.; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Harrison, J. Bruce J.; Guan, Huade

    2006-10-01

    In semiarid complex terrain, the landscape creates spatial niches for different types of vegetation through the effects of aspect, slope and curvature on the water and energy balance at the soil surface. The ecohydrology of rangelands is defined by the interaction of soils, plants and climate occurring on a topographic surface. While these interactions have been studied for subtle terrain, little is known about the controls exerted by terrain position, in particular terrain aspect, on ecosystem processes. Furthermore, differential plant establishment can lead to measurable differences in rates of soil development, which in turn can affect soil hydraulic properties and the surface water balance. In this study, we outline the physical mechanisms affecting plant establishment, soil development and hydrologic fluxes in semiarid complex terrain. We illustrate the interactions between vegetation, root zone water fluxes and soil development using, as an example, a small drainage basin in the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR), New Mexico. In the study basin, opposing hillslopes are characterized by marked differences in ecosystem composition and soil profile properties, with the north-facing hillslope dominated by one seed juniper (Juniperus monosperma) and the south-facing slope consisting of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata). We assess the effect of terrain aspect on root zone hydrologic fluxes and soil development in the two ecosystems by using soil observations, hydraulic properties from pedotransfer functions (PTFs), and numerical modelling of vadose zone fluxes. Modelling results show marked differences in root zone fluxes in the north-facing juniper and south-facing creosote ecosystems. Differences in the amplitude and frequency of soil water content and pressure correspond to changes in soil profile and vegetation characteristics. For example, soil properties of the calcium carbonate (CaCO3) horizons and differential plant water uptake impact the simulated

  15. Diurnal fluctuations of water and heat flows in a bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelde, K.; Thomsen, A.; Heidmann, T.; SchjøNning, P.; Jansson, P.-E.

    1998-11-01

    The complexity of coupled transport of heat and moisture at the soil surface necessitates a combination of field and numerical experiments to evaluate the interactions between liquid and vapor phase flow. The near-surface moisture and temperature conditions of a bare soil were investigated experimentally and by using the SOIL model to assess the importance of water vapor flow. During a 1-month period in early fall, intensive measurements of water content, water tension, and temperature were made in a bare soil plot. Soil thermal conductivity, measured on soil cores extracted for laboratory analysis, was found to agree with estimates based on the Kersten equation. Simulated water content and soil temperature agreed well with observations. Modeled soil vapor flow was significant compared to liquid flow only during the initial dry days when the inclusion of vapor flow improved the predicted diurnal variation in water tension. Model predictions were sensitive to an accurate representation of the soil surface energy balance, including the consideration of steep gradients in tension near the soil surface, and to the enhancement of vapor flow.

  16. Measuring and modeling water-related soil-vegetation feedbacks in a fallow plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursino, N.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Vignoli, G.; Boaga, J.

    2014-03-01

    Land fallowing is one possible response to shortage of water for irrigation. Leaving the soil unseeded implies a change of the soil functioning that has an impact on the water cycle. The development of a soil crust in the open spaces between the patterns of grass weed affects the soil properties and the field-scale water balance. The objectives of this study are to test the potential of integrated non-invasive geophysical methods and ground-image analysis and to quantify the effect of the soil-vegetation interaction on the water balance of fallow land at the local- and plot scale. We measured repeatedly in space and time local soil saturation and vegetation cover over two small plots located in southern Sardinia, Italy, during a controlled irrigation experiment. One plot was left unseeded and the other was cultivated. The comparative analysis of ERT maps of soil moisture evidenced a considerably different hydrologic response to irrigation of the two plots. Local measurements of soil saturation and vegetation cover were repeated in space to evidence a positive feedback between weed growth and infiltration at the fallow plot. A simple bucket model captured the different soil moisture dynamics at the two plots during the infiltration experiment and was used to estimate the impact of the soil vegetation feedback on the yearly water balance at the fallow site.

  17. Measuring and modelling water related soil-vegetation feedbacks in a fallow plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursino, N.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Vignoli, G.; Boaga, J.

    2013-08-01

    Land fallowing is one possible response to shortage of water for irrigation. Leaving the soil unseeded implies a change of the soil functioning that has an impact on the water cycle. The development of a soil crust in the open spaces between the patterns of grass weed affects the soil properties and the field scale water balance. The objectives of this study are to test the potential of integrated non invasive geophysical methods and ground-image analysis and to quantify the effect of the soil vegetation interaction on the water balance of a fallow land at the local and plot scale. We measured repeatedly in space and time local soil saturation and vegetation cover over two small plots located in southern Sardinia, Italy, during a controlled irrigation experiment. One plot was left unseeded and the other was cultivated. The comparative analysis of ERT maps of soil moisture evidenced a considerably different hydrologic response to irrigation of the two plots. Local measurements of soil saturation and vegetation cover were repeated in space to evidence a positive feedback between weed growth and infiltration at the fallow plot. A simple bucket model captured the different soil moisture dynamics at the two plots during the infiltration experiment and was used to estimate the impact of the soil vegetation feedback on the yearly water balance at the fallow site.

  18. Determination of Martian soil mineralogy and water content using the Thermal Analyzer for Planetary Soils (TAPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Ming, Douglas W.; Allton, Judith H.; Byers, Terry B.; Dunn, Robert P.; Gibbons, Frank L.; Pate, Daniel B.; Polette, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    Physical and chemical interactions between the surface and atmosphere of Mars can be expected to embody a strong cause-and-effect relationship with the minerals comprising the martian regolith. Many of the minerals in soils and sediments are probably products of chemical weathering (involving surface/atmosphere or surface/hydrosphere reactions) that could be expected to subsequently influence the sorption of atmospheric gases and water vapor. Therefore, identification of the minerals in martian surface soils and sediments is essential for understanding both past and present interactions between the Mars surface and atmosphere. Clearly, the most definitive mineral analyses would be achieved with well-preserved samples returned to Earth-based laboratories. In advance of a Mars sample return mission, however, significant progress could be made with in situ experiments that fill current voids in knowledge about the presence or abundance of key soil minerals such as clays (layered-structured silicates), zeolites, and various salts, including carbonates. TAPS is intended to answer that challenge by providing first-order identification of soil and sediment minerals.

  19. Soil Water Thermodynamic to Unify Water Retention Curve by Pressure Plates and Tensiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braudeau, Erik; Hovhannissian, Gaghik; Assi, Amjad; Mohtar, Rabi

    2014-10-01

    The pressure plate method is a standard method for measuring the pF curves, also called soil water retention curves, in a large soil moisture range from saturation to a dry state corresponding to a tension pressure of near 1500 kPa. However, the pressure plate can only provide discrete water retention curves represented by a dozen measured points. In contrast, the measurement of the soil water retention curves by tensiometer is direct and continuous, but limited to the range of the tensiometer reading: from saturation to near 70-80 kPa. The two methods stem from two very different concepts of measurement and the compatibility of both methods has never been demonstrated. The recently established thermodynamic formulation of the pedostructure water retention curve, will allow the compatibility of the two curves to be studied, both theoretically and experimentally. This constitutes the object of the present article. We found that the pressure plate method provides accurate measurement points of the pedostructure water retention curve h(W), conceptually the same as that accurately measured by the tensiometer. However, contrarily to what is usually thought, h is not equal to the applied air pressure on the sample, but rather, is proportional to its logarithm, in agreement with the thermodynamic theory developed in the article. The pF curve and soil water retention curve, as well as their methods of measurement are unified in a same physical theory. It is the theory of the soil medium organization (pedostructure) and its interaction with water. We show also how the hydrostructural parameters of the theoretical curve equation can be estimated from any measured curve, whatever the method of measurement. An application example using published pF curves is given.

  20. Soil management systems to improve water availability for plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klik, A.; Rosner, J.

    2009-04-01

    Due to climate change it is expected that the air temperature will increase and the amount as well as the variability of rainfall will change drastically within this century. Higher temperatures and fewer rainy days with more extreme events will increase the risk of surface runoff and erosion. This will lead to reduced soil water storage and therefore to a lower water use efficiency of plants. Soil and land management systems need to be applied and adapted to improve the amount of water stored in the soil and to ensure crop productivity functions of soils under changing climatic conditions. In a 14-yr. long field experiment, the effects of three soil management systems have been studied at three sites in Austria with respect to surface runoff, soil erosion, losses of nutrients and pesticides. Eight years after beginning of the project soil samples have been taken from different depth throughout the root zone to investigate the effects on soil properties. The results show that soil management systems with reduced tillage intensity are able to improve infiltration and soil water storage. More soil water enables plant development during longer dry periods and decreases amounts of irrigation. Overall, the higher water retention in the landscape improves the regional water balance and reduces environmental problems like soil erosion and nutrient and pesticide losses

  1. Importance of soil-water relation in assessment endpoint in bioremediated soils: Plant growth and soil physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Sawatsky, N.

    1995-12-31

    Much effort has been focused on defining the end-point of bioremediated soils by chemical analysis (Alberta Tier 1 or CCME Guideline for Contaminated Soils) or toxicity tests. However, these tests do not completely assess the soil quality, or the capability of soil to support plant growth after bioremediation. This study compared barley (Hordeum vulgare) growth on: (i) non-contaminated, agricultural topsoil, (2) oil-contaminated soil (4% total extractable hydrocarbons, or TEH), and (3) oil-contaminated soil treated by bioremediation (< 2% TEH). Soil physical properties including water retention, water uptake, and water repellence were measured. The results indicated that the growth of barley was significantly reduced by oil-contamination of agricultural topsoil. Furthermore, bioremediation did not improve the barley yield. The lack of effects from bioremediation was attributed to development of water repellence in hydrocarbon contaminated soils. There seemed to be a critical water content around 18% to 20% in contaminated soils. Above this value the water uptake by contaminated soil was near that of the agricultural topsoil. For lower water contents, there was a strong divergence in sorptivity between contaminated and agricultural topsoil. For these soils, water availability was likely the single most important parameter controlling plant growth. This parameter should be considered in assessing endpoint of bioremediation for hydrocarbon contaminated soils.

  2. Improving Soil-Vegetation Dynamics in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, G.; Munoz-Arriola, F.; Chen, X.; Kilic, A.

    2014-12-01

    A non-iterative 1D Richard's equation model is developed and implemented in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to improve the physical representation of soil-water-vegetation dynamics. SWAT's improved version (UN-SWAT) explicitly represents infiltration, soil evaporation, unsaturated water flow, root water update, and lateral drainage. Water-exchanges across the surface-subsurface and unsaturated-saturated zone interfaces are defined as the system's dependent top and bottom boundaries of the soil profile, respectively. In the continuum from the land surface to the aquifer, the top boundary of the soil profile accounts for non-ponding or ponding infiltration, as well as atmosphere-controlled or soil-controlled evaporation. Vegetation's root water update and lateral drainage are represented as sink terms in each soil layer. The soil profile is discretized by a variable number of computational nodes of the soil profile, whose bottom position is determined based on the groundwater table. UN-SWAT validation is performed by a single-HRU and a multi-HRU simulations in the Little Washita River Experimental Watershed in Oklahoma. Results prove that UN-SWAT's performance simulating the soil water movement in both space and time under complex conditions agree observed soil moisture and stream discharge data. UN-SWAT represents an improvement over other hydrologic models by providing a more accurate solution to the soil-water-vegetation model and accounting for the dynamics of climate and groundwater conditions.

  3. REGIONAL SOIL WATER RETENTION IN THE CONTIGUOUS US: SOURCES OF VARIABILITY AND VOLCANIC SOIL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water retention of mineral soil is often well predicted using algorithms (pedotransfer functions) with basic soil properties but the spatial variability of these properties has not been well characterized. A further source of uncertainty is that water retention by volcanic soils...

  4. Interactive biotic and abiotic regulators of soil carbon cycling: evidence from controlled climate experiments on peatland and boreal soils.

    PubMed

    Briones, María Jesús I; McNamara, Niall P; Poskitt, Jan; Crow, Susan E; Ostle, Nicholas J

    2014-09-01

    Partially decomposed plant and animal remains have been accumulating in organic soils (i.e. >40% C content) for millennia, making them the largest terrestrial carbon store. There is growing concern that, in a warming world, soil biotic processing will accelerate and release greenhouse gases that further exacerbate climate change. However, the magnitude of this response remains uncertain as the constraints are abiotic, biotic and interactive. Here, we examined the influence of resource quality and biological activity on the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration under different soil moisture regimes. Organic soils were sampled from 13 boreal and peatland ecosystems located in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Spain, Finland and Sweden, representing a natural resource quality range of C, N and P. They were incubated at four temperatures (4, 10, 15 and 20 °C) at either 60% or 100% water holding capacity (WHC). Our results showed that chemical and biological properties play an important role in determining soil respiration responses to temperature and moisture changes. High soil C : P and C : N ratios were symptomatic of slow C turnover and long-term C accumulation. In boreal soils, low bacterial to fungal ratios were related to greater temperature sensitivity of respiration, which was amplified in drier conditions. This contrasted with peatland soils which were dominated by bacterial communities and enchytraeid grazing, resulting in a more rapid C turnover under warmer and wetter conditions. The unexpected acceleration of C mineralization under high moisture contents was possibly linked to the primarily role of fermented organic matter, instead of oxygen, in mediating microbial decomposition. We conclude that to improve C model simulations of soil respiration, a better resolution of the interactions occurring between climate, resource quality and the decomposer community will be required. PMID:24687903

  5. WATER AS A REAGENT FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Indira S. Jayaweera; Montserrat Marti-Perez; Jordi Diaz-Ferrero; Angel Sanjurjo

    2001-03-29

    SRI International is conducting experiments to develop and evaluate hydrothermal extraction technology or hot water extraction (HWE) technology for remediating petroleum-contaminated soils. Most current remediation practices either fail to remove the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in petroleum-contaminated sites, are too costly, or require the use of organic solvents at the expense of additional contamination and with the added cost of recycling solvents. Hydrothermal extraction offers the promise of efficiently extracting PAHs and other kinds of organics from contaminated soils at moderate temperatures and pressures, using only water and inorganic salts such as carbonate. SRI has conducted experiments to measure the solubility and rate of solubilization of selected PAHs (fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, 9,10-dimethylanthracene) in water using SRI's hydrothermal optical cell with the addition of varying amounts of sodium carbonate to evaluate the efficiency of the technology for removing PAHs from the soil. SRI data shows a very rapid increase in solubility of PAHs with increase in temperature in the range 25-275 C. SRI also measured the rate of solubilization, which is a key factor in determining the reactor parameters. SRI results for fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, and 9,10-dimethylanthracene show a linear relationship between rate of solubilization and equilibrium solubility. Also, we have found the rate of solubilization of pyrene at 275 C to be 6.5 ppm/s, indicating that the equilibrium solubilization will be reached in less than 3 min at 275 C; equilibrium solubility of pyrene at 275 C is 1000 ppm. Also, pyrene and fluoranthene appear to have higher solubilities in the presence of sodium carbonate. In addition to this study, SRI studied the rate of removal of selected PAHs from spiked samples under varying conditions (temperature, pore sizes, and pH). We have found a higher removal of PAHs in the presence of sodium carbonate in both sand and

  6. Global distribution of plant-extractable water capacity of soil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunne, K.A.; Willmott, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    Plant-extractable water capacity of soil is the amount of water that can be extracted from the soil to fulfill evapotranspiration demands. It is often assumed to be spatially invariant in large-scale computations of the soil-water balance. Empirical evidence, however, suggests that this assumption is incorrect. In this paper, we estimate the global distribution of the plant-extractable water capacity of soil. A representative soil profile, characterized by horizon (layer) particle size data and thickness, was created for each soil unit mapped by FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)/Unesco. Soil organic matter was estimated empirically from climate data. Plant rooting depths and ground coverages were obtained from a vegetation characteristic data set. At each 0.5?? ?? 0.5?? grid cell where vegetation is present, unit available water capacity (cm water per cm soil) was estimated from the sand, clay, and organic content of each profile horizon, and integrated over horizon thickness. Summation of the integrated values over the lesser of profile depth and root depth produced an estimate of the plant-extractable water capacity of soil. The global average of the estimated plant-extractable water capacities of soil is 8??6 cm (Greenland, Antarctica and bare soil areas excluded). Estimates are less than 5, 10 and 15 cm - over approximately 30, 60, and 89 per cent of the area, respectively. Estimates reflect the combined effects of soil texture, soil organic content, and plant root depth or profile depth. The most influential and uncertain parameter is the depth over which the plant-extractable water capacity of soil is computed, which is usually limited by root depth. Soil texture exerts a lesser, but still substantial, influence. Organic content, except where concentrations are very high, has relatively little effect.

  7. Root anatomical phenes associated with water acquisition from drying soil: targets for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Jonathan P; Chimungu, Joseph G; Brown, Kathleen M

    2014-11-01

    Several root anatomical phenes affect water acquisition from drying soil, and may therefore have utility in breeding more drought-tolerant crops. Anatomical phenes that reduce the metabolic cost of the root cortex ('cortical burden') improve soil exploration and therefore water acquisition from drying soil. The best evidence for this is for root cortical aerenchyma; cortical cell file number and cortical senescence may also be useful in this context. Variation in the number and diameter of xylem vessels strongly affects axial water conductance. Reduced axial conductance may be useful in conserving soil water so that a crop may complete its life cycle under terminal drought. Variation in the suberization and lignification of the endodermis and exodermis affects radial water conductance, and may therefore be important in reducing water loss from mature roots into dry soil. Rhizosheaths may protect the water status of young root tissue. Root hairs and larger diameter root tips improve root penetration of hard, drying soil. Many of these phenes show substantial genotypic variation. The utility of these phenes for water acquisition has only rarely been validated, and may have strong interactions with the spatiotemporal dynamics of soil water availability, and with root architecture and other aspects of the root phenotype. This complexity calls for structural-functional plant modelling and 3D imaging methods. Root anatomical phenes represent a promising yet underexplored and untapped source of crop breeding targets. PMID:24759880

  8. Soil formation in post mining sites: the role of vegatation soil microflora and fauna interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouz, J.

    2009-04-01

    The role of vegetation and soil micro flora and fauna interaction during soil formation was studied in post mining sites in Czech Republic, Germany and USA. Vegetation and character of substrate substantially effect, micro flora, namely fungal bacterial ration, fauna composition and resulting microstructure of soil. Plants that bring more nitrogen in to the system support larger biomass of soil fauna and namely occurrence of earthworms which yield in larger bioturbation and associated faster production of A horizon in newly developing soil. Manipulation experiment show that presence of fauna have crucial effect of soil formation in these soil and positive effect of many plant species which are assumed to beneficial for reclamation is in fact indirect and caused by its positive effect on soil fauna development.

  9. Interactions between soil thermal and hydrological dynamics in the response of Alaska ecosystems to fire disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yi, S.; McGuire, A.D.; Harden, J.; Kasischke, E.; Manies, K.; Hinzman, L.; Liljedahl, A.; Randerson, J.; Liu, H.; Romanovsky, V.; Marchenko, S.; Kim, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Soil temperature and moisture are important factors that control many ecosystem processes. However, interactions between soil thermal and hydrological processes are not adequately understood in cold regions, where the frozen soil, fire disturbance, and soil drainage play important roles in controlling interactions among these processes. These interactions were investigated with a new ecosystem model framework, the dynamic organic soil version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model, that incorporates an efficient and stable numerical scheme for simulating soil thermal and hydrological dynamics within soil profiles that contain a live moss horizon, fibrous and amorphous organic horizons, and mineral soil horizons. The performance of the model was evaluated for a tundra burn site that had both preburn and postbura measurements, two black spruce fire chronosequences (representing space-for-time substitutions in well and intermediately drained conditions), and a poorly drained black spruce site. Although space-for-time substitutions present challenges in modeldata comparison, the model demonstrates substantial ability in simulating the dynamics of ??vapotranspiration, soil temperature, active layer depth, soil moisture, and water table depth in response to both climate variability and fire disturbance. Several differences between model simulations and field measurements identified key challenges for evaluating/improving model performance that include (1) proper representation of discrepancies between air temperature and ground surface temperature; (2) minimization of precipitation biases in the driving data sets; (3) improvement of the measurement accuracy of soil moisture in surface organic horizons; and (4) proper specification of organic horizon depth/properties, and soil thermal conductivity. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Monitoring soil-vegetation interactions using non-invasive geophysical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, M.; Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Rossi, M.; Vignoli, G.; Deiana, R.; Ursino, N.; Putti, M.; Majone, B.; Bellin, A.; Blaschek, M.; Duttmann, R.; Meyer, S.; Ludwig, R.; Soddu, A.; Dietrich, P.; Werban, U.

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of soil-vegetation-atmosphere interactions is of utmost importance in the solution of a number of hydrological questions and practical issues, including flood control, agricultural best practice, slope stability and impacts of climatic changes. Geophysical time-lapse monitoring can greatly contribute to the understanding of these interactions particularly for its capability to map in space and time the effects of vegetation on soil moisture content. In this work we present the results of two case studies showing the potential of hydro-geophysics in this context. The first example refers to the long term monitoring of the soil static and dynamic characteristics in an experimental site located in Sardinia (Italy). The main objective of this study is to understand the effects of soil - water - plants interactions on soil water balance. A combination of time-lapse electromagnetic induction (EMI) monitoring over wide areas and localized irrigation tests monitored by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and TDR soil moisture measurements is here used, in order to achieve quantitative field-scale estimates of moisture content from topsoil layer. Natural gamma-ray emission mapping, texture analysis and laboratory calibration of an electrical constitutive relationship on soil samples complete the dataset. We therefore observed that the growth of vegetation, with the associated below ground allocation of biomass, has a significant impact on the soil moisture dynamics. In particular vegetation extracts a large amount of water from the soil in the hot season, but it also reduces evaporation by shadowing the soil surface. In addition, vegetation enhances the soil wetting process as the root system facilitates water infiltration, thus creating a positive feedback system. The second example regards the time-lapse monitoring of soil moisture content in an apple orchard located in the Alpine region of Northern Italy (Trento). A three-dimensional cross-hole ERT

  11. Hydrologic modeling of soil water storage in landfill cover systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, F.J.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models, CREAMS and HELP, was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that CREAMS generally represented soil moisture more accurately than HELP simulations. Soil profiles that more closely resembled natural agricultural soils were more accurately modeled than highly artificial layered soil profiles. Precautions for determining parameter values for model input and for interpreting simulation results are discussed.

  12. Semiempirical model of soil water hysteresis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In order to represent hysteretic soil water retention curves accurately using as few measurements as possible, a new semiempirical model has been developed. It has two postulates related to physical characteristics of the medium, and two parameters, each with a definite physical interpretation, whose values are determined empirically for a given porous medium. Tests of the model show that it provides high-quality optimized fits to measured water content vs. matric pressure wetting curves for a wide variety of media. A practical use of this model is to provide a complete simulated main wetting curve for a medium where only a main drying curve and two points on the wetting curve have been measured. -from Author

  13. Soil water sensor response to bulk electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water monitoring using electromagnetic (EM) sensors can facilitate observations of water content at high temporal and spatial resolutions. These sensors measure soil dielectric permittivity (Ka) which is largely a function of volumetric water content. However, bulk electrical conductivity BEC c...

  14. Can surfactants affect management of non-water repellent soils?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants affect the water relations of water repellent soils but may or may not affect those of wettable soils. We studied the effects of three surfactants, Aquatrols IrrigAid Gold®, an ethylene oxide/propylene oxide block copolymer, and an alkyl polyglycoside, along with untreated tap water as ...

  15. STABLE ISOTOPES AS INDICATORS OF SOIL WATER DYNAMICS IN WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream water quality and quantity depend on discharge rates of water and nutrients from soils. However, soil-water storage is very dynamic and strongly influenced by plants. We analyzed stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to quantify spatial and temporal changes in evaporati...

  16. Interaction of water with epoxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-07-01

    The chemistries of reactants, plasticizers, solvents and additives in an epoxy paint are discussed. Polyamide additives may play an important role in the absorption of molecular iodine by epoxy paints. It is recommended that the unsaturation of the polyamide additive in the epoxy cure be determined. Experimental studies of water absorption by epoxy resins are discussed. These studies show that absorption can disrupt hydrogen bonds among segments of the polymers and cause swelling of the polymer. The water absorption increases the diffusion coefficient of water within the polymer. Permanent damage to the polymer can result if water causes hydrolysis of ether linkages. Water desorption studies are recommended to ascertain how water absorption affects epoxy paint.

  17. Reflectance of vegetation, soil, and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The ability to read the 24-channel MSS CCT tapes, select specified agricultural land use areas from the CCT, and perform multivariate statistical and pattern recognition analyses has been demonstrated. The 5 optimum channels chosen for classifying an agricultural scene were, in the order of their selection the far red visible, short reflective IR, visible blue, thermal infrared, and ultraviolet portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, respectively. Although chosen by a training set containing only vegetal categories, the optimum 4 channels discriminated pavement, water, bare soil, and building roofs, as well as the vegetal categories. Among the vegetal categories, sugar cane and cotton had distinctive signatures that distinguished them from grass and citrus. Acreages estimated spectrally by the computer for the test scene were acceptably close to acreages estimated from aerial photographs for cotton, sugar cane, and water. Many nonfarmable land resolution elements representing drainage ditch, field road, and highway right-of-way as well as farm headquarters area fell into the grass, bare soil plus weeds, and citrus categories and lessened the accuracy of the farmable acreage estimates in these categories. The expertise developed using the 24-channel data will be applied to the ERTS-1 data.

  18. Soil CO₂ dynamics in a tree island soil of the Pantanal: the role of soil water potential.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark S; Couto, Eduardo Guimarães; Pinto, Osvaldo B; Milesi, Juliana; Santos Amorim, Ricardo S; Messias, Indira A M; Biudes, Marcelo Sacardi

    2013-01-01

    The Pantanal is a biodiversity hotspot comprised of a mosaic of landforms that differ in vegetative assemblages and flooding dynamics. Tree islands provide refuge for terrestrial fauna during the flooding period and are particularly important to the regional ecosystem structure. Little soil CO₂ research has been conducted in this region. We evaluated soil CO₂ dynamics in relation to primary controlling environmental parameters (soil temperature and soil water). Soil respiration was computed using the gradient method using in situ infrared gas analyzers to directly measure CO₂ concentration within the soil profile. Due to the cost of the sensors and associated equipment, this study was unreplicated. Rather, we focus on the temporal relationships between soil CO₂ efflux and related environmental parameters. Soil CO₂ efflux during the study averaged 3.53 µmol CO₂ m⁻² s⁻¹, and was equivalent to an annual soil respiration of 1220 g C m⁻² y⁻¹. This efflux value, integrated over a year, is comparable to soil C stocks for 0-20 cm. Soil water potential was the measured parameter most strongly associated with soil CO₂ concentrations, with high CO₂ values observed only once soil water potential at the 10 cm depth approached zero. This relationship was exhibited across a spectrum of timescales and was found to be significant at a daily timescale across all seasons using conditional nonparametric spectral Granger causality analysis. Hydrology plays a significant role in controlling CO₂ efflux from the tree island soil, with soil CO₂ dynamics differing by wetting mechanism. During the wet-up period, direct precipitation infiltrates soil from above and results in pulses of CO₂ efflux from soil. The annual flood arrives later, and saturates soil from below. While CO₂ concentrations in soil grew very high under both wetting mechanisms, the change in soil CO₂ efflux was only significant when soils were wet from above. PMID:23762259

  19. Soil CO2 Dynamics in a Tree Island Soil of the Pantanal: The Role of Soil Water Potential

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark S.; Couto, Eduardo Guimarães; Pinto Jr, Osvaldo B.; Milesi, Juliana; Santos Amorim, Ricardo S.; Messias, Indira A. M.; Biudes, Marcelo Sacardi

    2013-01-01

    The Pantanal is a biodiversity hotspot comprised of a mosaic of landforms that differ in vegetative assemblages and flooding dynamics. Tree islands provide refuge for terrestrial fauna during the flooding period and are particularly important to the regional ecosystem structure. Little soil CO2 research has been conducted in this region. We evaluated soil CO2 dynamics in relation to primary controlling environmental parameters (soil temperature and soil water). Soil respiration was computed using the gradient method using in situ infrared gas analyzers to directly measure CO2 concentration within the soil profile. Due to the cost of the sensors and associated equipment, this study was unreplicated. Rather, we focus on the temporal relationships between soil CO2 efflux and related environmental parameters. Soil CO2 efflux during the study averaged 3.53 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1, and was equivalent to an annual soil respiration of 1220 g C m−2 y−1. This efflux value, integrated over a year, is comparable to soil C stocks for 0–20 cm. Soil water potential was the measured parameter most strongly associated with soil CO2 concentrations, with high CO2 values observed only once soil water potential at the 10 cm depth approached zero. This relationship was exhibited across a spectrum of timescales and was found to be significant at a daily timescale across all seasons using conditional nonparametric spectral Granger causality analysis. Hydrology plays a significant role in controlling CO2 efflux from the tree island soil, with soil CO2 dynamics differing by wetting mechanism. During the wet-up period, direct precipitation infiltrates soil from above and results in pulses of CO2 efflux from soil. The annual flood arrives later, and saturates soil from below. While CO2 concentrations in soil grew very high under both wetting mechanisms, the change in soil CO2 efflux was only significant when soils were wet from above. PMID:23762259

  20. Interaction of potassium phosphonate fungicide in laterite soil.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Anil; Velayudhan, K T; Vasu, K; Ramachandran, V; Bhai, R Susheela; Unnikrishnan, G

    2005-10-01

    Potassium phosphonate is a fungicide widely used to control Phytophthora fungi species in many crops all over the world. In this paper, an attempt has been made to study the interaction of potassium phosphonate with soil under varying pH and calcium level. Several reports available in literature indicate that the phosphonate in organic form adsorb strongly on almost all mineral surfaces and natural materials like soil and sediments. The present study conducted on laterite soil of Kerala using 2 mm sieved sample indicated that phosphonate obeys Freundlich adsorption isotherm. Though at lower concentrations, Langmuir model equally fits well, deviation was observed at higher concentrations. pH and calcium content of the soil had striking influence on the interaction of the chemical with the soil. The calcium source also appeared to influence the adsorption phenomenon. Since potassium phosphonate is extensively used to control Phytophthora fungi species in black pepper (Piper nigrum) plantations in India and liming is a standard practice followed as soil amendment in acid soils to increase the soil pH, this study may help to maintain good soil quality. PMID:17051913

  1. [Impact of biological soil crusts on soil water repellence in the hilly Loess Plateau region, China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Yun-Ge; Wang, Yuan; Yao, Chun-Zhu

    2014-03-01

    By using water drop penetration time (WDPT) and molarity of ethanol droplet (MED) methods, the soil water repellence of undisturbed biological soil crusts (biocrusts) in five successional stages, from the hilly Loess Plateau region of China was tested. The five stages of biocrusts were light cyanobacterial crust, dark cyanobacterial crust, cyanobacterial with sparse moss crust, moss and tiny cyanobacteria patches crust and moss dominated crust. The results showed that 1) the soil water repellence was markedly increased both in the intensity and persistence since the formation of biocrusts. 2) The soil water repellence showed a decrease trend along with the successional stages of biocrusts. The soil water repellence of the biocrusts with the moss coverage above 20% was significantly lower than that of the cyanobacterial crusts. 3) The soil water repellence of the biocrusts was closely related to soil moisture and the dominant organism. The soil water repellence increased with the decrease of soil water content for the moss dominated biocrusts, while changed in a bimodal curve with the decrease of soil water content for the cyanobacterial biocrusts. PMID:24984480

  2. A fragrant neighborhood: volatile mediated bacterial interactions in soil

    PubMed Central

    Schulz-Bohm, Kristin; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play essential roles in communication and competition between soil microorganisms. Here we assessed volatile-mediated interactions of a synthetic microbial community in a model system that mimics the natural conditions in the heterogeneous soil environment along the rhizosphere. Phylogenetic different soil bacterial isolates (Burkholderia sp., Dyella sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Paenibacillus sp.) were inoculated as mixtures or monoculture in organic-poor, sandy soil containing artificial root exudates (ARE) and the volatile profile and growth were analyzed. Additionally, a two-compartment system was used to test if volatiles produced by inter-specific interactions in the rhizosphere can stimulate the activity of starving bacteria in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. The obtained results revealed that both microbial interactions and shifts in microbial community composition had a strong effect on the volatile emission. Interestingly, the presence of a slow-growing, low abundant Paenibacillus strain significantly affected the volatile production by the other abundant members of the bacterial community as well as the growth of the interacting strains. Furthermore, volatiles released by mixtures of root-exudates consuming bacteria stimulated the activity and growth of starved bacteria. Besides growth stimulation, also an inhibition in growth was observed for starving bacteria exposed to microbial volatiles. The current work suggests that volatiles produced during microbial interactions in the rhizosphere have a significant long distance effect on microorganisms in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. PMID:26579111

  3. A fragrant neighborhood: volatile mediated bacterial interactions in soil.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Bohm, Kristin; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play essential roles in communication and competition between soil microorganisms. Here we assessed volatile-mediated interactions of a synthetic microbial community in a model system that mimics the natural conditions in the heterogeneous soil environment along the rhizosphere. Phylogenetic different soil bacterial isolates (Burkholderia sp., Dyella sp., Janthinobacterium sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Paenibacillus sp.) were inoculated as mixtures or monoculture in organic-poor, sandy soil containing artificial root exudates (ARE) and the volatile profile and growth were analyzed. Additionally, a two-compartment system was used to test if volatiles produced by inter-specific interactions in the rhizosphere can stimulate the activity of starving bacteria in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. The obtained results revealed that both microbial interactions and shifts in microbial community composition had a strong effect on the volatile emission. Interestingly, the presence of a slow-growing, low abundant Paenibacillus strain significantly affected the volatile production by the other abundant members of the bacterial community as well as the growth of the interacting strains. Furthermore, volatiles released by mixtures of root-exudates consuming bacteria stimulated the activity and growth of starved bacteria. Besides growth stimulation, also an inhibition in growth was observed for starving bacteria exposed to microbial volatiles. The current work suggests that volatiles produced during microbial interactions in the rhizosphere have a significant long distance effect on microorganisms in the surrounding, nutrient-depleted soil. PMID:26579111

  4. Interaction between soil moisture memory and different climate variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacke, Tobias; Hagemann, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    A large number of modelling studies show a potential impact of the soil moisture state on regional climate on different time scales. Especially for short prediction periods, perturbations of the soil moisture state may result in significant alteration of surface temperature in the following season. The physical reasoning for such effects are usually attributed to the soil moisture - temperature as well as the soil moisture - precipitation feedbacks. We designed a model experiment to investigate the time scale until the effect of arbitrary soil moisture initialization is forgotten by the model. This time period is called soil moisture memory and computed for different seasons based on an ensemble of nine, 3 year long, simulations per season. These simulations are done using the coupled land-atmosphere model ECHAM6-JSBACH, which is part of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). Soil moisture memory was found to range between few days up to several months. While the longest memory often coincides with either snow-covered conditions or follows on monsoon periods, short memory is computed prior to snow-melt and rainy seasons. Additionally, the correlations between soil moisture memory and a number of surface variables was investigated. We found that the magnitude of the initial soil moisture perturbations explains at most 50% of the spatial variation in soil moisture memory while the remaining variance is associated with soil properties and - even stronger - with dynamical variables like surface temperature, evapotranspiration and runoff. This effect differs for different seasons and soil moisture regimes which demonstrates the complexity of soil moisture - climate interactions. Further analysis will be focused on the re-occurrence of soil moisture memory after periods of insignificant memory and the possibility of memory transfer between different land surface state variables.

  5. Ecohydrology of dry regions: storage versus pulse soil water dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lauenroth, William K.; Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Bradford, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Although arid and semiarid regions are defined by low precipitation, the seasonal timing of temperature and precipitation can influence net primary production and plant functional type composition. The importance of precipitation seasonality is evident in semiarid areas of the western U.S., which comprise the Intermountain (IM) zone, a region that receives important winter precipitation and is dominated by woody plants and the Great Plains (GP), a region that receives primarily summer precipitation and is dominated by perennial grasses. Although these general relationships are well recognized, specific differences in water cycling between these regions have not been well characterized. We used a daily time step soil water simulation model and twenty sites from each region to analyze differences in soil water dynamics and ecosystem water balance. IM soil water patterns are characterized by storage of water during fall, winter, and spring resulting in relatively reliable available water during spring and early summer, particularly in deep soil layers. By contrast, GP soil water patterns are driven by pulse precipitation events during the warm season, resulting in fluctuating water availability in all soil layers. These contrasting patterns of soil water—storage versus pulse dynamics—explain important differences between the two regions. Notably, the storage dynamics of the IN sites increases water availability in deep soil layers, favoring the deeper rooted woody plants in that region, whereas the pulse dynamics of the Great Plains sites provide water primarily in surface layers, favoring the shallow-rooted grasses in that region. In addition, because water received when plants are either not active or only partially so is more vulnerable to evaporation and sublimation than water delivered during the growing season, IM ecosystems use a smaller fraction of precipitation for transpiration (47%) than GP ecosystems (49%). Recognizing the pulse-storage dichotomy in

  6. Soil-plant-biochar interactions and effects on soil C and N cycling in a wheat greenhouse pot experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michie, E.; Panzacchi, P.; Davies, C. A.; Toet, S.; Ineson, P.

    2012-04-01

    Biochar is carbon rich material, able to modify soil qualities and increase soil carbon sequestration. We investigated the benefits, interactions and mechanisms observed when adding biochar (from Miscanthus feedstock) to soil. In a greenhouse experiment with wheat grown in pots under simulated natural conditions, biochars pyrolysed at 360° C and 450° C were applied at 10, 25, and 50 tha-1, with or without nitrogen (urea). These pots were subjected to different water regimes (400 and 800 mm per year) according to a randomised block design. Growth rate, grain yield and total biomass will be related to the biochar production temperature and application rate. The effect of biochar on water availability and C and N cycling will be tested by direct measurements of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes from soil using closed dynamic and static chamber methods. Different natural 13C abundance in biochar (Δ13C≈-13) and soil organic matter (SOM; (Δ13C ≈-27) will be used to calculate the relative contribution of biochar to total soil respiration and the potential priming effect of the biochar on SOM. In addition a labelling experiment with 13CO2 will be used to trace C from the atmosphere through the plant, revealing how biochar affects C allocation in plant biomass, rhizodeposition and root respiration. Preliminary results will be presented.

  7. Predicting and mapping soil available water capacity in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Suk Young; Han, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Yihyun; Lee, Kyungdo

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge on the spatial distribution of soil available water capacity at a regional or national extent is essential, as soil water capacity is a component of the water and energy balances in the terrestrial ecosystem. It controls the evapotranspiration rate, and has a major impact on climate. This paper demonstrates a protocol for mapping soil available water capacity in South Korea at a fine scale using data available from surveys. The procedures combined digital soil mapping technology with the available soil map of 1:25,000. We used the modal profile data from the Taxonomical Classification of Korean Soils. The data consist of profile description along with physical and chemical analysis for the modal profiles of the 380 soil series. However not all soil samples have measured bulk density and water content at −10 and −1500 kPa. Thus they need to be predicted using pedotransfer functions. Furthermore, water content at −10 kPa was measured using ground samples. Thus a correction factor is derived to take into account the effect of bulk density. Results showed that Andisols has the highest mean water storage capacity, followed by Entisols and Inceptisols which have loamy texture. The lowest water retention is Entisols which are dominated by sandy materials. Profile available water capacity to a depth of 1 m was calculated and mapped for Korea. The western part of the country shows higher available water capacity than the eastern part which is mountainous and has shallower soils. The highest water storage capacity soils are the Ultisols and Alfisols (mean of 206 and 205 mm, respectively). Validation of the maps showed promising results. The map produced can be used as an indication of soil physical quality of Korean soils. PMID:23646290

  8. Predicting and mapping soil available water capacity in Korea.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suk Young; Minasny, Budiman; Han, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Yihyun; Lee, Kyungdo

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge on the spatial distribution of soil available water capacity at a regional or national extent is essential, as soil water capacity is a component of the water and energy balances in the terrestrial ecosystem. It controls the evapotranspiration rate, and has a major impact on climate. This paper demonstrates a protocol for mapping soil available water capacity in South Korea at a fine scale using data available from surveys. The procedures combined digital soil mapping technology with the available soil map of 1:25,000. We used the modal profile data from the Taxonomical Classification of Korean Soils. The data consist of profile description along with physical and chemical analysis for the modal profiles of the 380 soil series. However not all soil samples have measured bulk density and water content at -10 and -1500 kPa. Thus they need to be predicted using pedotransfer functions. Furthermore, water content at -10 kPa was measured using ground samples. Thus a correction factor is derived to take into account the effect of bulk density. Results showed that Andisols has the highest mean water storage capacity, followed by Entisols and Inceptisols which have loamy texture. The lowest water retention is Entisols which are dominated by sandy materials. Profile available water capacity to a depth of 1 m was calculated and mapped for Korea. The western part of the country shows higher available water capacity than the eastern part which is mountainous and has shallower soils. The highest water storage capacity soils are the Ultisols and Alfisols (mean of 206 and 205 mm, respectively). Validation of the maps showed promising results. The map produced can be used as an indication of soil physical quality of Korean soils. PMID:23646290

  9. Use of a Cropping System Model for Soil-Specific Optimization of Limited Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the arena of modern agriculture, system models capable of simulating the complex interactions of all the relevant processes in the soil-water-plant-atmosphere continuum are widely accepted as potential tools for decision support to optimize crop inputs of water to achieve location specific yield ...

  10. Soil carbon storage controlled by interactions between geochemistry and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetterl, Sebastian; Stevens, Antoine; Six, Johan; Merckx, Roel; van Oost, Kristof; Casanova Pinto, Manuel; Casanova-Katny, Angélica; Muñoz, Cristina; Boudin, Mathieu; Zagal Venegas, Erick; Boeckx, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    Soils are an important site of carbon storage. Climate is generally regarded as one of the primary controls over soil organic carbon, but there is still uncertainty about the direction and magnitude of carbon responses to climate change. Here we show that geochemistry, too, is an important controlling factor for soil carbon storage. We measured a range of soil and climate variables at 24 sites along a 4,000-km-long north-south transect of natural grassland and shrubland in Chile and the Antarctic Peninsula, which spans a broad range of climatic and geochemical conditions. We find that soils with high carbon content are characterized by substantial adsorption of carbon compounds onto mineral soil and low rates of respiration per unit of soil carbon; and vice versa for soils with low carbon content. Precipitation and temperature were only secondary predictors for carbon storage, respiration, residence time and stabilization mechanisms. Correlations between climatic variables and carbon variables decreased significantly after removing relationships with geochemical predictors. We conclude that the interactions of climatic and geochemical factors control soil organic carbon storage and turnover, and must be considered for robust prediction of current and future soil carbon storage.

  11. Physical and chemical effects of biochar on natural and artificial water repellent soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallin, Ingrid; Douglas, Peter; Doerr, Stefan H.; Bryant, Rob; Matthews, Ian; Charbonneau, Cecile

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency (WR) affects soils worldwide. Hydrophobic compounds accumulate in soil through organic matter decomposition, microbial activity, condensation of organic compounds during vegetation fires, or through anthropogenic impacts such as oil spills. WR hinders vegetation establishment, which can lead to soil erosion and increased runoff. Biochar is currently being evaluated for its potential to increase soil carbon and as a soil amendment. To date, the effect of biochar on water repellent soils has remained largely undetermined. This study considered the potential of biochar as both a physical and chemical amendment for water repellent soils by asking two questions: does adding biochar reduce the observed degree of soil water repellency; and does biochar remove hydrophobic compounds from soil? The potential of biochar as a physical amendment to water repellent soils was evaluated by mixing 5, 10, 25 and 40% (by weight) each of coarse and fine ground biochar with two naturally water repellent soils and measuring the water drop penetration time (WDPT) for each mixture. Biochar particles beyond the range of existing soil particle diameters increased WDPT variability, which could be explained by increased surface roughness and the resulting enhancement of water repellency effects through Cassie-Baxter interactions. Overall, fine biochar was more effective at reducing water repellency: 25% w/w rendered both soils studied wettable. Removal of hydrophobic compounds by biochar was tested by mixing 1, 5, 10, 25 and 40% biochar with acid washed sand (AWS) coated with 1.2x10-5 mol octadecane and octadecanoic acid (per gram AWS, which corresponds to approximately 50 monolayers hydrophobic compound per gram AWS). Each mix stood for 1 to 30 days in a solution of pH 3, 6 or 9 before the AWS was extracted and the quantity of hydrophobic compound remaining determined by infrared spectroscopy and/or gas chromatography. Biochar successfully removed the hydrophobic compounds

  12. The use of soil electrical resistivity to monitor plant and soil water relationships in vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillante, L.; Mathieu, O.; Bois, B.; van Leeuwen, C.; Lévêque, J.

    2015-03-01

    Soil water availability deeply affects plant physiology. In viticulture it is considered a major contributor to the "terroir" effect. The assessment of soil water in field conditions is a difficult task, especially over large surfaces. New techniques are therefore required in order to better explore variations of soil water content in space and time with low disturbance and with great precision. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) meets these requirements for applications in plant sciences, agriculture and ecology. In this paper, possible techniques to develop models that allow the use of ERT to spatialise soil water available to plants are reviewed. An application of soil water monitoring using ERT in a grapevine plot in Burgundy (north-east France) during the vintage 2013 is presented. We observed the lateral heterogeneity of ERT-derived fraction of transpirable soil water (FTSW) variations, and differences in water uptake depend on grapevine water status (leaf water potentials measured both at predawn and at solar noon and contemporary to ERT monitoring). Active zones in soils for water movements were identified. The use of ERT in ecophysiological studies, with parallel monitoring of plant water status, is still rare. These methods are promising because they have the potential to reveal a hidden part of a major function of plant development: the capacity to extract water from the soil.

  13. Quantifying crop water stress factors from soil water measurements in a limited irrigation experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying crop water stress factors from soil water measurements in a limited irrigation experiment. A correct simulation of crop responses to water stress is essential for a system model. In this study, we investigated three methods of quantifying water deficit stresses based on soil water meas...

  14. Quantification of the inevitable: the influence of soil macrofauna on soil water movement in rehabilitated open-cut mined lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, S.; Williams, E. R.

    2016-01-01

    Recolonisation of soil by macrofauna (especially ants, termites and earthworms) in rehabilitated open-cut mine sites is inevitable and, in terms of habitat restoration and function, typically of great value. In these highly disturbed landscapes, soil invertebrates play a major role in soil development (macropore configuration, nutrient cycling, bioturbation, etc.) and can influence hydrological processes such as infiltration, seepage, runoff generation and soil erosion. Understanding and quantifying these ecosystem processes is important in rehabilitation design, establishment and subsequent management to ensure progress to the desired end goal, especially in waste cover systems designed to prevent water reaching and transporting underlying hazardous waste materials. However, the soil macrofauna is typically overlooked during hydrological modelling, possibly due to uncertainties on the extent of their influence, which can lead to failure of waste cover systems or rehabilitation activities. We propose that scientific experiments under controlled conditions and field trials on post-mining lands are required to quantify (i) macrofauna-soil structure interactions, (ii) functional dynamics of macrofauna taxa, and (iii) their effects on macrofauna and soil development over time. Such knowledge would provide crucial information for soil water models, which would increase confidence in mine waste cover design recommendations and eventually lead to higher likelihood of rehabilitation success of open-cut mining land.

  15. Effects of soil management techniques on soil water erosion in apricot orchards.

    PubMed

    Keesstra, Saskia; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Brevik, Eric C; Azorin-Molina, Cesar; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Jordán, Antonio; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-05-01

    Soil erosion is extreme in Mediterranean orchards due to management impact, high rainfall intensities, steep slopes and erodible parent material. Vall d'Albaida is a traditional fruit production area which, due to the Mediterranean climate and marly soils, produces sweet fruits. However, these highly productive soils are left bare under the prevailing land management and marly soils are vulnerable to soil water erosion when left bare. In this paper we study the impact of different agricultural land management strategies on soil properties (bulk density, soil organic matter, soil moisture), soil water erosion and runoff, by means of simulated rainfall experiments and soil analyses. Three representative land managements (tillage/herbicide/covered with vegetation) were selected, where 20 paired plots (60 plots) were established to determine soil losses and runoff. The simulated rainfall was carried out at 55mmh(-1) in the summer of 2013 (<8% soil moisture) for one hour on 0.25m(2) circular plots. The results showed that vegetation cover, soil moisture and organic matter were significantly higher in covered plots than in tilled and herbicide treated plots. However, runoff coefficient, total runoff, sediment yield and soil erosion were significantly higher in herbicide treated plots compared to the others. Runoff sediment concentration was significantly higher in tilled plots. The lowest values were identified in covered plots. Overall, tillage, but especially herbicide treatment, decreased vegetation cover, soil moisture, soil organic matter, and increased bulk density, runoff coefficient, total runoff, sediment yield and soil erosion. Soil erosion was extremely high in herbicide plots with 0.91Mgha(-1)h(-1) of soil lost; in the tilled fields erosion rates were lower with 0.51Mgha(-1)h(-1). Covered soil showed an erosion rate of 0.02Mgha(-1)h(-1). These results showed that agricultural management influenced water and sediment dynamics and that tillage and herbicide

  16. Soil water balance in an unsaturated pyroclastic slope for evaluation of soil hydraulic behaviour and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirone, Marianna; Papa, Raffaele; Nicotera, Marco Valerio; Urciuoli, Gianfranco

    2015-09-01

    Flowslides in granular soils pose a major threat to life and the environment. Their initiation in unsaturated soils is regulated by rainfall infiltration which reduces the matric suction and hence shear strength. Analysis of such phenomena is of strategic importance especially when it aims to mitigate landslide risk by means of early warning systems (EWSs). In this framework, physically-based models need to reproduce the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the slopes through numerical analyses, whose main uncertainty concerns the hydraulic conditions at the boundaries of the studied domain and hydraulic conductivity functions of unsaturated soils. Hence consummate knowledge of both these factors is absolutely necessary for efficient predictions. In this paper hydraulic boundary conditions and hydraulic conductivity functions are investigated at the scale of the slope through an application of soil water balance based on in-situ monitoring at the test site of Monteforte Irpino (southern Italy). Meteorological data, matric suction and soil water content measurements were collected over four years at the test site. The soil water balance was analysed on a seasonal time scale with regard to the whole pyroclastic cover resting on the steep limestone substratum. Infiltration and runoff are estimated, interaction between the soil cover and the substratum is investigated, and the hydraulic conductivity functions operative at the site scale are defined.

  17. Soil management system for water conservation and mitigation of global change effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, A.; Florentino, A.; Lorenzo, V.

    2012-04-01

    One of the main constraints in rained agriculture is the water availability for plant growth which depends largely on the ability of the soil to allow water flow, infiltration and its storage. In Venezuela, the interaction between aggressive climatic conditions, highly susceptible soils and inadequate management systems have caused soil degradation which together with global change threatened the food production sustainability. To address this problem, we need to implement conservationist management strategies that improve infiltration rate, permeability and water holding capacity in soil and reduce water loss by protecting the soil surface. In order to study the impact of different management systems on soil water balance in a Fluventic Haplustept, the effects of 11 years of tillage and crops rotation management were evaluated in a long term field experiment located in Turén (Portuguesa state). The evaluated tillage systems were no tillage (NT) and conventional tillage (CT) and crop rotation treatments were maize (Zea mays)-cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and maize-bean (Vigna unguiculata). Treatments were established in plots arranged in a randomized block design with three replicates. The gravimetric moisture content was determined in the upper 20 cm of soil, at eight different sampling dates. Results showed increased in time of the water availability with the use of tillage and corn-cotton rotation and, better protection of the soil against raindrop impact with crop residues. Water retention capacity also increased and improved structural condition on soil surface such as infiltration, storage and water flow distribution in the rooting zone. We conclude that these strategies of land use and management would contribute to mitigate the climate change effects on food production in this region of Venezuela. Key words: Soil quality; rained agriculture; plant water availability

  18. Predicting sub-grid variability of soil water content from basic soil information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wei; Bogena, Heye; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Vanderborght, Jan; Schuh, Max; Priesack, Eckart; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of unresolved soil water content variability within model grid cells (i.e. sub-grid variability) is important for accurate predictions of land-surface energy and hydrologic fluxes. Here, we derived a closed-form expression to describe how soil water content variability depends on mean soil water content using stochastic analysis of 1D unsaturated gravitational flow based on the van Genuchten-Mualem (VGM) model. A sensitivity analysis of this closed-form expression showed that the n parameter strongly influenced both the shape and magnitude of the maximum of this relationship. In a next step, the closed-form expression was used to predict soil water content variability for eight datasets with varying soil texture using VGM parameters obtained from pedotransfer functions that rely on readily available soil information. Generally, there was good agreement between observed and predicted soil water content variability despite the obvious simplifications that were used to derive the closed-form expression (e.g. gravity flow in dry soils). A simplified closed-form expression that neglected the effect of pressure head fluctuations showed that the good performance in the dry soil range is related to the dominant role of the variability in MVG parameters determining water retention as compared to the effect of water flow. Furthermore, the novel closed-form expression was successfully used to inversely estimate the variability of hydraulic properties from observed data on soil water content variability from several test sites in Germany, China and Australia.

  19. Effect of Thickness of a Water Repellent Soil Layer on Soil Evaporation Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, S.; Im, S.; Doerr, S.

    2012-04-01

    A water repellent soil layer overlying wettable soil is known to affect soil evaporation. This effect can be beneficial for water conservation in areas where water is scarce. Little is known, however, about the effect of the thickness of the water repellent layer. The thickness of this layer can vary widely, and particularly after wildfire, with the soil temperature reached and the duration of the fire. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of thickness of a top layer of water repellent soil on soil evaporation rate. In order to isolate the thickness from other possible factors, fully wettable standard sand (300~600 microns) was used. Extreme water repellency (WDPT > 24 hours) was generated by 'baking' the sand mixed with oven-dried pine needles (fresh needles of Pinus densiflora) at the mass ratio of 1:13 (needle:soil) at 185°C for 18 hours. The thicknesses of water repellent layers were 1, 2, 3 and 7 cm on top of wettable soil. Fully wettable soil columns were prepared as a control. Soil columns (8 cm diameter, 10 cm height) were covered with nylon mesh. Tap water (50 ml, saturating 3 cm of a soil column) was injected with hypoderm syringes from three different directions at the bottom level. The injection holes were sealed with hot-melt adhesive immediately after injection. The rate of soil evaporation through the soil surface was measured by weight change under isothermal condition of 40°C. Five replications were made for each. A trend of negative correlation between the thickness of water repellent top layer and soil evaporation rate is discussed in this contribution.

  20. MODELING TOOLS FOR GROUND WATER-SURFACE WATER INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project develops algorithms for simulating the dynamic interactions between surface water and ground water in rivers and riparian streams. The algorithms rely on physically based linear response functions which describe the exchange rates and volumes of water between the str...

  1. Modeling as a tool for management of saline soils and irrigation waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal management of saline soils and irrigation waters requires consideration of many interrelated factors including, climate, water applications and timing, water flow, plant water uptake, soil chemical reactions, plant response to salinity and solution composition, soil hydraulic properties and ...

  2. Teaching Soil and Water Conservation: A Classroom and Field Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Albert B.; Fox, Adrian C.

    Compiled in this booklet are 22 activities designed to develop awareness of the importance of conservation and the wise use of soil and moisture on croplands, grasslands, and woodlands. They have been selected by Soil Conservation Service (SCS) personnel and consultants to show that the way we manage our basic natural resources, soil and water,…

  3. Soil water retention within an eroded and restored landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Significant changes in soil properties and productivity have occurred as a result of intensive row crop production. Many of these changes are related to soil loss from water, wind, and tillage erosion. Soil is lost from convex and steeper landscape positions and deposited in concave lower landscape ...

  4. Soil Water and Shallow Groundwater Relations in an Agricultural Hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logsdon, S. D.; Schilling, K. E.

    2007-12-01

    Shallow water tables contribute to soil water variations under rolling topography, and soil properties contribute to shallow water table fluctutations. Preferential flow through large soil pores can cause a rise in the water table with little increase in soil water except near the soil surface. Lateral groundwater flow can cause a large rise in water table at toeslope and depressional landscape positions. As plants transpire, water can move up into the root zone from the water table and wet soil below the root zone. Roots can utilize water in the capillary fringe. The purpose of this study was to interface automated measurements of soil water content and water table depth for determining the importance of drainage and upward movement. In 2006 soil water and water table depth were monitored at three positions: shoulder, backslope, and toeslope. Neutron access tubes were manually monitored to 2.3 m depth, and automated soil moisture was measured using CS616 probes installed at 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9 m depth. Water table depths were monitored manually and automated, but the automated measurements failed during the season at two sites. In 2007, similar measurements were made at one toeslope position, but the CS616 probes were installed at nine depths and better quality automated well depth equipment was used. The 2006 data revealed little landscape position effect on daytime soil water loss on a wetter date; however, on a dry day just before a rain, daytime water loss was greatest for the toeslope positon and least for the shoulder position. After a period of intense rain, a rapid and significant water table rise occurred at the toeslope position but little water table rise occurred at the other landscape positions. The rapid toeslope water table rise was likely caused by lateral groundwater flow whereas minor water table rise at the other positions was likely due to preferential flow since the soil had not wet up below 0.6 m. Use of automated equipment has improved

  5. Genetic by environment interactions affect plant–soil linkages

    PubMed Central

    Pregitzer, Clara C; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A

    2013-01-01

    The role of plant intraspecific variation in plant–soil linkages is poorly understood, especially in the context of natural environmental variation, but has important implications in evolutionary ecology. We utilized three 18- to 21-year-old common gardens across an elevational gradient, planted with replicates of five Populus angustifolia genotypes each, to address the hypothesis that tree genotype (G), environment (E), and G × E interactions would affect soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics beneath individual trees. We found that soil nitrogen and carbon varied by over 50% and 62%, respectively, across all common garden environments. We found that plant leaf litter (but not root) traits vary by genotype and environment while soil nutrient pools demonstrated genotype, environment, and sometimes G × E interactions, while process rates (net N mineralization and net nitrification) demonstrated G × E interactions. Plasticity in tree growth and litter chemistry was significantly related to the variation in soil nutrient pools and processes across environments, reflecting tight plant–soil linkages. These data overall suggest that plant genetic variation can have differential affects on carbon storage and nitrogen cycling, with implications for understanding the role of genetic variation in plant–soil feedback as well as management plans for conservation and restoration of forest habitats with a changing climate. PMID:23919173

  6. Lichen-moss interactions within biological soil crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruckteschler, Nina; Williams, Laura; Büdel, Burkhard; Weber, Bettina

    2015-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) create well-known hotspots of microbial activity, being important components of hot and cold arid terrestrial regions. They colonize the uppermost millimeters of the soil, being composed of fungi, (cyano-) bacteria, algae, lichens, bryophytes and archaea in varying proportions. Biocrusts protect the (semi-) arid landscape from wind and water erosion, and also increase water holding capacity and nutrient content. Depending on location and developmental stage, composition and species abundance vary within biocrusts. As species live in close contact, they are expected to influence each other, but only a few interactions between different organisms have so far been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the lichen Fulgensia fulgens whilst growing on the moss Trichostomum crispulum. While 77% of Fulgensia fulgens thalli were found growing associated with mosses in a German biocrust, up to 95% of Fulgensia bracteata thalli were moss-associated in a Swedish biocrust. In 49% (Germany) and in 78% (Sweden) of cases, thalli were observed on the moss T. crispulum and less frequently on four and three different moss species. Beneath F. fulgens and F. bracteata thalli, the mosses were dead and in close vicinity to the lichens the mosses appeared frail, bringing us to the assumption that the lichens may release substances harming the moss. We prepared a water extract from the lichen F. fulgens and used this to water the moss thalli (n = 6) on a daily basis over a time-span of three weeks. In a control setup, artificial rainwater was applied to the moss thalli (n = 6). Once a week, maximum CO2 gas exchange rates of the thalli were measured under constant conditions and at the end of the experiment the chlorophyll content of the moss samples was determined. In the course of the experiment net photosynthesis (NP) of the treatment samples decreased concurrently with an increase in dark respiration (DR). The control samples

  7. Assessing the contribution of nonhydraulic forces to the destruction of bonds between soil particles during water erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, G. A.; Bushueva, O. G.; Dobrovol'skaya, N. G.; Kiryukhina, Z. P.; Litvin, L. F.; Krasnov, S. F.

    2016-05-01

    It has been experimentally shown with monoaggregate model samples of chernozemic soil as an example that the weakening of cohesion between soil particles is due to the molecular interaction of soil particles with water as a dipole substance rather than to the hydraulic forces of the flow. Therefore, soil erosion should be considered as a two-stage process. First, the bonds between particles are weakened due to the interaction of soil particles with water; then, the particles that lost bonds with neighboring ones are entrapped by the flow. Thus, the erosion rate of a consolidated soil is determined by the destruction of bonds between particles during their interaction with water, rather than the flow velocity, although this factor also affects the erosion rate.

  8. Experimental and mathematical modeling of soil water and heat regime in selected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, Radka; Fer, Miroslav; Klement, Ales; Nikodem, Antonin; Vlasakova, Mirka; Tepla, Daniela; Jaksik, Ondrej

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge of soil thermal (heat) properties is essential when assessing heat transport in soils. Heat regime in soils associates with many other soil processes (like water evaporation and diffusion, plant transpiration, contaminants behavior etc.). Thermal properties are needed when assessing affectivity of energy gathering from soil profiles using horizontal ground heat exchangers, which is a main goal of this study. Study is focused on measuring of thermal properties (heat capacity and heat conductivity) in representative soils of the Czech Republic. Measurements were performed on soil samples taken from the surface horizons of 11 representative soil types and from 2 soil substrates (sand and loess). The measured relationships between the heat conductivity and volumetric soil-water content were described by non-linear equations (Chung and Horton, 1987). The measured relationships between the heat capacity and volumetric soil-water content were expressed using the linear equations. The greatest values of the heat conductivity were measured in sandy soils (sandy and gravely sand substrates). The average values were obtained in soils on loess substrates. Lower values were obtained for all Cambisols (variable substrates). The lowest values were measured in Stagnic Chernozem Siltic on marlite. Opposite trend was observed for the maximal heat capacity, which was mostly impacted by water content. A soil water and heat regime within the soil profile was monitored at one location. In addition the impact of various soil cover at the soil top on soil water content and temperature was measured. Soil hydraulic properties were measured using the multistep-outflow technique. The saturated hydraulic conductivities were also measured using the Guelph permeameter. Programs HYDRUS-1D and 2D/3D were used for a mathematical interpretation of the observed soil water and heat regime. Acknowledgment: Authors acknowledge the financial support of the Technology Agency of the Czech

  9. Microbial enhancement of hydrazine degradation in soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, L.T.; Street, J.J.

    1987-09-01

    In an early study, the authors reported that hydrazine was rapidly degraded in Arredondo fine sand. By comparing the degradation results in sterile and nonsterile soils, it was concluded that biological degradation was responsible for about 20% of hydrazine disappearance from soils. They isolated a heterotrophic bacterium, Achromobacter sp., from the Arredondo soil and found that the organism had a high capacity to degrade hydrazine to the nontoxic product dinitrogen gas. In the present study, the authors attempted to enhance hydrazine degradation in water and soil samples by inoculating with a hydrazine-degrading bacterium, Achromobacter sp. Factors that influence hydrazine degradation in water and soil are discussed.

  10. Nonequilibrium water dynamics in the rhizosphere: How mucilage affects water flow in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroener, Eva; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Kaestner, Anders; Carminati, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The flow of water from soil to plant roots is controlled by the properties of the narrow region of soil close to the roots, the rhizosphere. In particular, the hydraulic properties of the rhizosphere are altered by mucilage, a polymeric gel exuded by the roots. In this paper we present experimental results and a conceptual model of water flow in unsaturated soils mixed with mucilage. A central hypothesis of the model is that the different drying/wetting rate of mucilage compared to the bulk soil results in nonequilibrium relations between water content and water potential in the rhizosphere. We coupled this nonequilibrium relation with the Richards equation and obtained a constitutive equation for water flow in soil and mucilage. To test the model assumptions, we measured the water retention curve and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil mixed with mucilage from chia seeds. Additionally, we used neutron radiography to image water content in a layer of soil mixed with mucilage during drying and wetting cycles. The radiographs demonstrated the occurrence of nonequilibrium water dynamics in the soil-mucilage mixture. The experiments were simulated by numerically solving the nonequilibrium model. Our study provides conceptual and experimental evidences that mucilage has a strong impact on soil water dynamics. During drying, mucilage maintains a greater soil water content for an extended time, while during irrigation it delays the soil rewetting. We postulate that mucilage exudation by roots attenuates plant water stress by modulating water content dynamics in the rhizosphere.

  11. Critical water contents of hydrophobic soils in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landl, Magdalena; Holzinger, Ursula; Singh, Ranvir; Klik, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Soil water repellency is an important problem for pasture farming in New Zealand which causes low infiltration rates and increased surface runoff. However, the real extent of this issue is not yet evaluated. Water repellency is thought to appear on dry soils, when the water content falls below a critical limit. The main objectives of this study was 1) to investigate the effects of different amounts of infiltration water on hydrophobicity of three selected soils under grassland in the North island of New Zealand, and 2) to determine the critical water content for ten sites with five different soil types. In April 2011 undisturbed and disturbed soil samples from a brown, gley and organic soil have been taken from sites around Mount Taranaki. Soil water repellency was determined using the Water Droplet Penetration Time Test (WDPT) and the Molarity of Ethanol Droplet Test (MED). During the lab experiment four amounts of water were applied to the 270 cm³ samples: 400, 800, 1600 and 2400 mL . One test was performed with cold and one with hot (80 °C) water. Each test was replicated four times. In the leachate the amount of dissolved organic carbon was analyzed. The experiments showed that only for the brown soil water repellency decreased significantly with increasing amount of infiltration water whereas for gley soils no correlation was found. Gley soil had initially a lower degree of hydrophobicity compared to the other soils. Possibly due to the higher bulk density of these soils, the carbon compounds directly surrounding the soil particles wre rearranged rather than leached. No clear pattern could be obtained for organic soils. This may be explained by the high initial carbon content of more than 20%. It may take a much greater amount of infiltration to affect hydrophobicity. The critical contact angle of investigated soils above which water repellency is moderately persistent, was 93.8°. In May 2012 ten more sites were sampled and five soil types were investigated

  12. Water dynamics and interactions in water-polyether binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Emily E; Moilanen, David E; Levinger, Nancy E; Fayer, Michael D

    2009-04-22

    Poly(ethylene) oxide (PEO) is a technologically important polymer with a wide range of applications including ion-exchange membranes, protein crystallization, and medical devices. PEO's versatility arises from its special interactions with water. Water molecules may form hydrogen-bond bridges between the ether oxygens of the backbone. While steady-state measurements and theoretical studies of PEO's interactions with water abound, experiments measuring dynamic observables are quite sparse. A major question is the nature of the interactions of water with the ether oxygens as opposed to the highly hydrophilic PEO terminal hydroxyls. Here, we examine a wide range of mixtures of water and tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (TEGDE), a methyl-terminated derivative of PEO with 4 repeat units (5 ether oxygens), using ultrafast infrared polarization selective pump-probe measurements on water's hydroxyl stretching mode to determine vibrational relaxation and orientational relaxation dynamics. The experiments focus on the dynamical interactions of water with the ether backbone because TEGDE does not have the PEO terminal hydroxyls. The experiments observe two distinct subensembles of water molecules: those that are hydrogen bonded to other waters and those that are associated with TEGDE molecules. The water orientational relaxation has a fast component of a few picoseconds (water-like) followed by much slower decay of approximately 20 ps (TEGDE associated). The two decay times vary only mildly with the water concentration. The two subensembles are evident even in very low water content samples, indicating pooling of water molecules. Structural change as water content is lowered through either conformational changes in the backbone or increasing hydrophobic interactions is discussed. PMID:19323522

  13. Percolation behavior of tritiated water into a soil packed bed

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, T.; Katayama, K.; Uehara, K.; Fukada, S.; Takeishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    A large amount of cooling water is used in a D-T fusion reactor. The cooling water will contain tritium with high concentration because tritium can permeate metal walls at high temperature easily. A development of tritium handling technology for confining tritiated water in the fusion facility is an important issue. In addition, it is also important to understand tritium behavior in environment assuming severe accidents. In this study, percolation experiments of tritiated water in soil packed bed were carried out and tritium behavior in soil was discussed. Six soil samples were collected in Hakozaki campus of Kyushu University. These particle densities were of the same degree as that of general soils and moisture contents were related to BET surface area. For two soil samples used in the percolation experiment of tritiated water, saturated hydraulic conductivity agreed well with the estimating value by Creager. Tritium retention ratio in the soil packed bed was larger than water retention. This is considered to be due to an effect of tritium sorption on the surface of soil particles. The isotope exchange capacity estimated by assuming that H/T ratio of supplied tritiated water and H/T ratio of surface water of soil particle was equal was comparable to that on cement paste and mortar which were obtained by exposure of tritiated water vapor. (authors)

  14. EFFECTIVENESS OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION PRACTICES FOR POLLUTION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential water quality effects and economic implications of soil and water conservation practices (SWCPs) are identified. Method for estimating the effects of SWCPs on pollutant losses from croplands are presented. Mathematical simulation and linear programming models were u...

  15. Soil warming, carbon-nitrogen interactions, and forest carbon budgets.

    PubMed

    Melillo, Jerry M; Butler, Sarah; Johnson, Jennifer; Mohan, Jacqueline; Steudler, Paul; Lux, Heidi; Burrows, Elizabeth; Bowles, Francis; Smith, Rose; Scott, Lindsay; Vario, Chelsea; Hill, Troy; Burton, Andrew; Zhou, Yu-Mei; Tang, Jim

    2011-06-01

    Soil warming has the potential to alter both soil and plant processes that affect carbon storage in forest ecosystems. We have quantified these effects in a large, long-term (7-y) soil-warming study in a deciduous forest in New England. Soil warming has resulted in carbon losses from the soil and stimulated carbon gains in the woody tissue of trees. The warming-enhanced decay of soil organic matter also released enough additional inorganic nitrogen into the soil solution to support the observed increases in plant carbon storage. Although soil warming has resulted in a cumulative net loss of carbon from a New England forest relative to a control area over the 7-y study, the annual net losses generally decreased over time as plant carbon storage increased. In the seventh year, warming-induced soil carbon losses were almost totally compensated for by plant carbon gains in response to warming. We attribute the plant gains primarily to warming-induced increases in nitrogen availability. This study underscores the importance of incorporating carbon-nitrogen interactions in atmosphere-ocean-land earth system models to accurately simulate land feedbacks to the climate system. PMID:21606374

  16. Soil warming, carbon–nitrogen interactions, and forest carbon budgets

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Jerry M.; Butler, Sarah; Johnson, Jennifer; Mohan, Jacqueline; Steudler, Paul; Lux, Heidi; Burrows, Elizabeth; Bowles, Francis; Smith, Rose; Scott, Lindsay; Vario, Chelsea; Hill, Troy; Burton, Andrew; Zhou, Yu-Mei; Tang, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Soil warming has the potential to alter both soil and plant processes that affect carbon storage in forest ecosystems. We have quantified these effects in a large, long-term (7-y) soil-warming study in a deciduous forest in New England. Soil warming has resulted in carbon losses from the soil and stimulated carbon gains in the woody tissue of trees. The warming-enhanced decay of soil organic matter also released enough additional inorganic nitrogen into the soil solution to support the observed increases in plant carbon storage. Although soil warming has resulted in a cumulative net loss of carbon from a New England forest relative to a control area over the 7-y study, the annual net losses generally decreased over time as plant carbon storage increased. In the seventh year, warming-induced soil carbon losses were almost totally compensated for by plant carbon gains in response to warming. We attribute the plant gains primarily to warming-induced increases in nitrogen availability. This study underscores the importance of incorporating carbon–nitrogen interactions in atmosphere–ocean–land earth system models to accurately simulate land feedbacks to the climate system. PMID:21606374

  17. Principles of Water Flow in Real-World Soils and Related Imbalances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.

    2012-12-01

    Heterogeneities, structures, interfaces, roughness, and organisms in multiphase soil systems make the real-world soil deviated significantly from the continuum assumption. The first principle of water flow in porous media came to light in the 19th century, known as the Darcy's law, which was later modified by E. Buckingham to describe unsaturated water flow in soils. This principle is essentially a macroscopic view of steady-state water flux being linearly proportional to hydraulic gradient and hydraulic conductivity. The second principle was proposed by L.A. Richards in the 20th century, which describes the minimum pressure gradient needed to initiate water flow through the soil-air interface. This principle can be extended to provide a more cohesive explanation to a number of soil hydrologic phenomena related to various interfaces and microscopic features (such as hysteresis, hydrophobicity, and flow through layered soils). The third principle is emerging in the 21st century, where a combined macroscopic and microscopic view portrays mosaic-like complex flow regimes in heterogeneous soils in which imbalance seems to be common leading to widespread preferential flow. The dynamic interaction between preferential flow and matrix flow under changing conditions results in complex, evolving flow networks that are embedded in the matrix of land surface and subsurface. Quantification and integration of these flow principles can lead to improved prediction of water flow in real-world soils and landscapes.

  18. Measuring and Modelling water related soil - vegetation feedbacks in a fallow plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursino, Nadia; Cassiani, Giorgio; Deiana, Rita; Vignoli, Giulio; Boaga, Jacopo

    2013-04-01

    Land fallowing is one possible response to shortage of water for irrigation. Leaving the soil unseeded implies a change of the soil functioning that has an impact on the water cycle. The development of a soil crust in the open spaces between the patterns of grass weed affects the soil properties and the field scale water balance. The objective of this study was to test the potential of integrated non invasive geophysics and ground-image analysis and to quantify the effect of the soil vegetation interaction on the water balance of a fallow land at the local and plot scale. We measured repeatedly in space and time local soil saturation and vegetation cover over two small plots located in southern Sardinia, Italy, during an infiltration experiment. One plot was left unseeded and the other was cultivated. The comparative analysis of the experimental data evidenced a positive feedback between weed growth and infiltration at the fallow plot. A simple bucket model captured the different soil moisture dynamics at the two plots during the infiltration experiment and was used to estimate the impact of the soil vegetation feedback on the yearly water balance at the site.

  19. The interactive effects of soil transplant into colder regions and cropping on soil microbiology and biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; Xue, Kai; Sun, Bo; Zhang, Yuguang; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-03-01

    Soil transplant into warmer regions has been shown to alter soil microbiology. In contrast, little is known about the effects of soil transplant into colder regions, albeit that climate cooling has solicited attention in recent years. To address this question, we transplanted bare fallow soil over large transects from southern China (subtropical climate zone) to central (warm temperate climate zone) and northern China (cold temperate climate zone). After an adaptation period of 4 years, soil nitrogen components, microbial biomass and community structures were altered. However, the effects of soil transplant on microbial communities were dampened by maize cropping, unveiling a negative interaction between cropping and transplant. Further statistical analyses with Canonical correspondence analysis and Mantel tests unveiled annual average temperature, relative humidity, aboveground biomass, soil pH and NH4 (+) -N content as environmental attributes closely correlated with microbial functional structures. In addition, average abundances of amoA-AOA (ammonia-oxidizing archaea) and amoA-AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) genes were significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with soil nitrification capacity, hence both AOA and AOB contributed to the soil functional process of nitrification. These results suggested that the soil nitrogen cycle was intimately linked with microbial community structure, and both were subjected to disturbance by soil transplant to colder regions and plant cropping. PMID:24548455

  20. Coupling root architecture and pore network modeling - an attempt towards better understanding root-soil interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Daniel; Bodner, Gernot; Raoof, Amir

    2013-04-01

    Understanding root-soil interactions is of high importance for environmental and agricultural management. Root uptake is an essential component in water and solute transport modeling. The amount of groundwater recharge and solute leaching significantly depends on the demand based plant extraction via its root system. Plant uptake however not only responds to the potential demand, but in most situations is limited by supply form the soil. The ability of the plant to access water and solutes in the soil is governed mainly by root distribution. Particularly under conditions of heterogeneous distribution of water and solutes in the soil, it is essential to capture the interaction between soil and roots. Root architecture models allow studying plant uptake from soil by describing growth and branching of root axes in the soil. Currently root architecture models are able to respond dynamically to water and nutrient distribution in the soil by directed growth (tropism), modified branching and enhanced exudation. The porous soil medium as rooting environment in these models is generally described by classical macroscopic water retention and sorption models, average over the pore scale. In our opinion this simplified description of the root growth medium implies several shortcomings for better understanding root-soil interactions: (i) It is well known that roots grow preferentially in preexisting pores, particularly in more rigid/dry soil. Thus the pore network contributes to the architectural form of the root system; (ii) roots themselves can influence the pore network by creating preferential flow paths (biopores) which are an essential element of structural porosity with strong impact on transport processes; (iii) plant uptake depend on both the spatial location of water/solutes in the pore network as well as the spatial distribution of roots. We therefore consider that for advancing our understanding in root-soil interactions, we need not only to extend our root models

  1. Moditored unsaturated soil transport processes as a support for large scale soil and water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanclooster, Marnik

    2010-05-01

    The current societal demand for sustainable soil and water management is very large. The drivers of global and climate change exert many pressures on the soil and water ecosystems, endangering appropriate ecosystem functioning. The unsaturated soil transport processes play a key role in soil-water system functioning as it controls the fluxes of water and nutrients from the soil to plants (the pedo-biosphere link), the infiltration flux of precipitated water to groundwater and the evaporative flux, and hence the feed back from the soil to the climate system. Yet, unsaturated soil transport processes are difficult to quantify since they are affected by huge variability of the governing properties at different space-time scales and the intrinsic non-linearity of the transport processes. The incompatibility of the scales between the scale at which processes reasonably can be characterized, the scale at which the theoretical process correctly can be described and the scale at which the soil and water system need to be managed, calls for further development of scaling procedures in unsaturated zone science. It also calls for a better integration of theoretical and modelling approaches to elucidate transport processes at the appropriate scales, compatible with the sustainable soil and water management objective. Moditoring science, i.e the interdisciplinary research domain where modelling and monitoring science are linked, is currently evolving significantly in the unsaturated zone hydrology area. In this presentation, a review of current moditoring strategies/techniques will be given and illustrated for solving large scale soil and water management problems. This will also allow identifying research needs in the interdisciplinary domain of modelling and monitoring and to improve the integration of unsaturated zone science in solving soil and water management issues. A focus will be given on examples of large scale soil and water management problems in Europe.

  2. EFFICIENCY OF SOIL CORE AND SOIL-PORE WATER SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory column and field lysimeter study were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of soil core and soil-pore water samples to detect the migration of the organic components of land treated wastes through soil. In the laboratory, column leaching studies were performed by pac...

  3. Erosion effects on water and DOC/DIC fluxes in soils from a hummocky ground moraine landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrich, Marcus; Gerke, Horst H.; Sommer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In the arable hummocky ground moraine soil landscape, an erosion-induced spatial differentiation of soil types can be observed. Unknown is how the water flow and solute transport is affected by soil-crop interactions depending on properties of differently-developed soil horizons. The objective was to analyze these interactions and by comparing lysimeter-based measured water and solute balances for Luvisol soil monoliths extracted from differently-eroded slope locations. For a 3-years measurement period, differences in cumulative seepage water drainage of more than 76 % were observed between most and least eroded Luvisol. Although the soil types were identical, these data indicated characteristic erosion-induced spatial differentiation in the water balance of the landscape. Because the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were relatively similar for all lysimeters at the bottom (1.4 m soil depth), the DOC/DIC leaching was dominated by differences in water fluxes in this observation period (04/2011-04/2014). Results suggest that water and solute balances are depending on the degree of erosion-induced soil profile modifications. Hence for the landscape scale analysis of the landscape water and solute balances, not only the distributed soil types but also erosion-induced modifications with a single soil type should be considered.

  4. Comparison of corn transpiration, eddy covariance, and soil water loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem flow gages are used to estimate plant transpiration, but only a few studies compare transpiration with other measures of soil water loss. The purpose of this study was to compare transpiration from stem flow measurements with soil water changes estimated by daily neutron probe readings. Monitor...

  5. Automated soil water balance sensing: From layers to control volumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous sensing of soil water status has been possible in some ways since the advent of chart recorders, but the widespread adoption of soil water sensing systems did not occur until relatively inexpensive dataloggers became available in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Early systems relied on pre...

  6. Soil and Water Challenges for Pacific Northwest Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil and water conservation has been a major concern in the Inland Pacific Northwest since the onset of farming 125 years ago. Some of the highest historic water erosion rates in the USA have occurred on steep slopes in the Palouse region where soil loss averaged 45 Mg ha-1 yr-1 and could reach 450 ...

  7. Coupled Oxygen and Hydrogen Isotope Analysis of Water Along the Soil-Plant- Atmosphere Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Webb, E. A.; Longstaffe, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    The oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of water within a plant vary with transpiration rates and the isotopic composition of soil water. Both of these parameters are affected by temperature and relative humidity. A controlled-temperature, growth-chamber experiment was conducted to determine the relationships among temperature, relative humidity, soil water evaporation and plant-water isotope composition in cattails and horsetails. Typha, a cattail species that grows in wetland conditions, and Equisetum, a horsetail species that prefers dry soils, were each grown in four chambers at 15, 20, 25 and 30 degrees Celsius. The oxygen and hydrogen isotope compositions of watering water, soil water, vapour in the growth chambers and plant water from the leaves and stems were analyzed throughout the eight-month long artificial growing season. Although the oxygen isotope composition of the watering water remained constant, the soil water, atmospheric vapour and plant water were progressively enriched in oxygen-18 and deuterium in each of the four chambers from low to high temperatures as a result of increasing evaporation. The oxygen isotope composition of plant water along the length of a single stem or leaf was increasingly enriched in the heavier isotopes towards the apex. There was no significant difference in the magnitude of this trend between species. These results indicate that the isotopic composition of plant water is primarily controlled by environmental conditions. The oxygen isotope composition of the water vapour in the growing chamber increased with temperature, consistent with equilibration between the vapour and the oxygen-18 enriched soil and plant water reservoirs. The magnitude and interaction of these variables, as measured for these modern samples of cattails and horsetails, should be useful in calibrating paleoclimate proxies based on fossilized plant materials (e.g., cellulose, phytoliths).

  8. Improving Water Quality and Conserving Soil Using Soil Amendments.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conservation tillage such a no-tillage has widely been shown to control soil erosion compared to other forms of management that involved some extent of tillage. However, in no-tillage most if not all the chemicals are placed near or on the soil surface which makes their movement more likely to occu...

  9. Rhizosphere: a leverage for tolerance to water deficits of soil microflora ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérard, Annette; Ruy, Stéphane; Coronel, Anaïs; Toussaint, Bruce; Czarnes, Sonia; Legendre, Laurent; Doussan, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Microbial soil communities play a fundamental role in soil organic matter mineralization, which is a key process for plant nutrition, growth and production in agro-ecosystems. A number of these microbial processes take place in the rhizosphere: the soil zone influenced by plant roots activity, which is a "hotspot " of biological and physico-chemical activity, transfers and biomass production. The knowledge of rhizosphere processes is however still scanty, especially regarding the interactions between physico-chemical processes occurring there and soil microorganisms. The rhizosphere is a place where soil aggregates are more stable, and where bulk density, porosity, water and nutrients transfer are modified with respect to the bulk soil (e.g. because of production of mucilage, of which exo-polysaccharides (EPS) produced by roots and microorganisms. During a maize field experiment, rhizospheric soil (i.e. soil strongly adhering to maize roots) and bulk soil were sampled twice in spring and summer. These soil samples were characterized for physicochemical parameters (water retention curves and analysis of exopolysaccarides) and microflora (microbial biomass, catabolic capacities of the microbial communities assessed with the MicroRespTM technique, stability of soil microbial respiration faced to a heat-drought disturbance). We observed differences between rhizospheric and bulk soils for all parameters studied: Rhizospheric soils showed higher microbial biomasses, higher quantities of exopolysaccarides and a higher water retention capacity compared to bulk soil measurements. Moreover, microbial soil respiration showed a higher stability confronted to heat-drought stress in the rhizospheric soils compared to bulk soils. Results were more pronounced during summer compared to spring. Globally these data obtained from field suggest that in a changing climate conditions, the specific physico-biological conditions in the rhizosphere partially linked to exopolysaccarides

  10. Iron clad wetlands: Soil iron-sulfur buffering determines coastal wetland response to salt water incursion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepfer, Valerie A.; Bernhardt, Emily S.; Burgin, Amy J.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal freshwater wetland chemistry is rapidly changing due to increased frequency of salt water incursion, a consequence of global change. Seasonal salt water incursion introduces sulfate, which microbially reduces to sulfide. Sulfide binds with reduced iron, producing iron sulfide (FeS), recognizable in wetland soils by its characteristic black color. The objective of this study is to document iron and sulfate reduction rates, as well as product formation (acid volatile sulfide (AVS) and chromium reducible sulfide (CRS)) in a coastal freshwater wetland undergoing seasonal salt water incursion. Understanding iron and sulfur cycling, as well as their reduction products, allows us to calculate the degree of sulfidization (DOS), from which we can estimate how long soil iron will buffer against chemical effects of sea level rise. We show that soil chloride, a direct indicator of the degree of incursion, best predicted iron and sulfate reduction rates. Correlations between soil chloride and iron or sulfur reduction rates were strongest in the surface layer (0-3 cm), indicative of surface water incursion, rather than groundwater intrusion at our site. The interaction between soil moisture and extractable chloride was significantly related to increased AVS, whereas increased soil chloride was a stronger predictor of CRS. The current DOS in this coastal plains wetland is very low, resulting from high soil iron content and relatively small degree of salt water incursion. However, with time and continuous salt water exposure, iron will bind with incoming sulfur, creating FeS complexes, and DOS will increase.