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Sample records for soil-to-plant transfer factor

  1. Bioavailability and soil-to-plant transfer factors as indicators of potentially toxic element contamination in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Paola; Iavazzo, Pietro; Albanese, Stefano; Agrelli, Diana; De Vivo, Benedetto; Lima, Annamaria

    2014-12-01

    Soil pollution in agricultural lands poses a serious threat to food safety, and suggests the need for consolidated methods providing advisory indications for soil management and crop production. In this work, the three-step extraction procedure developed by the EU Measurement and Testing Programme and two soil-to-plant transfer factors (relative to total and bioavailable concentration of elements in soil) were applied on polluted agricultural soils from southern Italy to obtain information on the retention mechanisms of metals in soils and on their level of translocation to edible vegetables. The study was carried out in the Sarno river plain of Campania, an area affected by severe environmental degradation potentially impacting the health of those consuming locally produced vegetables. Soil samples were collected in 36 locations along the two main rivers flowing into the plain. In 11 sites, lettuce plants were collected at the normal stage of consumption. According to Italian environmental law governing residential soils, and on the basis of soil background reference values for the study area, we found diffuse pollution by Be, Sn and Tl, of geogenic origin, Cr and Cu from anthropogenic sources such as tanneries and intensive agriculture, and more limited pollution by Pb, Zn and V. It was found that metals polluting soils as a result of human activities were mainly associated to residual, oxidizable and reducible phases, relatively immobile and only potentially bioavailable to plants. By contrast, the essential elements Zn and Cu showed a tendency to become more readily mobile and bioavailable as their total content in soil increased and were more easily transported to the edible parts of lettuce than other pollutants. According to our results, current soil pollution in the studied area does not affect the proportion of metals taken up by lettuce plants and there is a limited health risk incurred. PMID:25217740

  2. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of radioactive Ca, Sm and Pd isotopes: critical assessment of the use of analogies to derive best-estimates from existing non-specific data.

    PubMed

    Henner, Pascale; Hurtevent, Pierre; Thiry, Yves

    2014-10-01

    (45)Ca, (151)Sm and (107)Pd are three radionuclides present in low to intermediate in activity radioactive wastes for which no soil-to-plant Transfer Factors (TF) values are available to be used in biosphere models for Ecological Risk Assessment. In the absence of specific radioecological studies, this work reviews and analyzes the existing literature for stable isotopes of Pd, Sm and Ca in order to derive best estimates for TF values that could be used as Transfer Factors. Alternative methods of extrapolation are also critically assessed. The values have been classified according to climatic zone, plant class and soil type for each element. The overall geometric mean TF values (for all plants and conditions) was calculated as 8.4E-02 for Pd, for which the value of radioRu in TRS-472 is also available. The mean TF for Sm was 4.2E-04. This value was lower than the TF values for radioactive Ce that are proposed as alternative values for Sm in TRS-472. The former may be relevant for long term assessments and the latter could possibly used to describe the short term (151)Sm post-release behaviour. The mean value for Ca is 2.3E-01 but varies considerably among plants of a given class due to the variety of plant Ca uptake behaviors. Alternatively, to limit this variability, Ca data content for dry plant matter, as analyzed using the phylogenetic method, could be used to derive TF values if the conservation of isotopic ratio of (45)Ca to stable Ca in soils and in plants hypothesis is taken into account. The TF for Ca in sub-tropical zones is 10-fold lower than in temperate zones. There is a lot of data available about exchangeable Ca in soil, which mean that we could calculate an available TF. The analysis shows that Ca bioavailability is also a key factor within transfer. PMID:24956582

  3. Estimation of soil-to-plant transfer factors of radiocesium in 99 wild plant species grown in arable lands 1 year after the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Jun; Enomoto, Takashi; Yamada, Masao; Ono, Toshiro; Hanafusa, Tadashi; Nagamatsu, Tomohiro; Sonoda, Shoji; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    One year after the deposition of radionuclides from the Fukushima 1 Nuclear Power Plant (A formal name is Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station) in March 2011, radiocesium (¹³?Cs, ¹³?Cs) concentrations ([Cs]) were comprehensively investigated in the wild plants of 99 species most of which were annual or summer green perennial herbs and started to grow from April 2012 at the heavily contaminated fields of paddy (three study sites) and upland (one study site) in Fukushima Prefecture. The survey was conducted three times (April, July and October) in the year. In each site, soils (soil cores of 5-cm depth) and plants (aerial shoots) were collected for determination of [Cs] on a dry weight basis, and then the transfer factor (TF) of radiocesium from soil to plant ([Cs]plant/[Cs]soil) was estimated in each species. The [Cs] values of both soils and plants largely varied. However, some species exhibited relatively high TF values (more than 0.4) (e.g., Athyrium yokoscense, Dryopteris tokyoensis, and Cyperus brevifolius), while others exhibited almost negligible values (less than 0.01) (e.g., Salix miyabeana, Humulus scandens, and Elymus tsukushiensis). In addition, judging from the 11 species grown in both paddy and upland fields, TF values were generally higher in the paddy fields. The estimation of phytoextraction efficiency of soil radiocesium by weed communities in the paddy fields suggests that the weed community is not a practical candidate for phytoremediation technique. PMID:24346655

  4. [Research advances in iron and zinc transfer from soil to plant in intercropping systems].

    PubMed

    Xia, Hai-yong; Xue, Yan-fang; Meng, Wei-wei; Yu, Li-min; Liu, Ling-yan; Zhang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Intercropping facilitates the efficient utilization of land, light, water and nutrients. It is, therefore, important to increase the biodiversity of farmland and to develop sustainable ecological agriculture in both theory and practice. Intercropping helps improve the mobilization and uptake of soil iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) and corresponding nutritional status in the plants, thus achieving grain micronutrient biofortification. In this review, phenomena of the improvement of Fe and Zn nutrition in dicotyledonous plants as affected by intercropping with gramineous plants (e.g. maize/peanut intercropping) were summarized. Moreover, the possible mechanisms in relation to interspecific rhizosphere molecular and physiological processes, as well as the changes in interspecific root morphology and distribution and microorganisms in the rhizosphere were elucidated. The accumulation, transfer and distribution of Fe and Zn in the plants in intercropping systems were also reviewed. The possible affecting factors on nutrients of Fe and Zn were analyzed. Based on the present advances in the mobilization and acquisition of soil Fe and Zn, and their accumulation and distribution in plants as well as the related management and environment influence factors, some new research questions were pointed out. Quantitative analysis, dynamic and systemic researches and field studies on Fe and Zn transfer from soil to plant in intercropping systems should be strengthened in the future. PMID:26259472

  5. Accumulation and soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides in the Nile Delta coastal black sand habitats.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, A K; Emam, M H

    2011-02-01

    The radionuclide content was estimated in the soil of three black sand habitats in the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, namely, sand mounds and coastal sand planes and dunes. In addition, a total of 14 heavy minerals found in the soils were characterized. The soil to plant transfer of uranium and thorium was tested on three black sand species, namely, Cakile maritima Scop., Senecio glaucus L. and Rumex Pictus Forssk. The transfer of thorium and uranium radionuclides from the soil to plant is complex process that is subjected to many variables; among which are the organic matter and clay content of the soil, the type of radionuclides and plant species. The study revealed a strong negative relationship between uranium and thorium uptake by S. glaucus and R. pictus and the clay and organic matter content of soil. Concentration of thorium in the soil has a negative correlation with soil-to-plant transfer factor. The study results suggest the possibility of using black sand species for phytoremediation of soils contaminated with radioactive elements. The potentiality of S. glaucus as phytoremediator of radionuclides polluted soils is greater than R. pictus which in turn outweigh C. maritima. PMID:21598782

  6. Soil-to-plant transfer of native selenium for wild vegetation cover at selected locations of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Száková, Ji?ina; Tremlová, Jana; Pegová, Kristýna; Najmanová, Jana; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    Total selenium (Se) contents were determined in aboveground biomass of wild plant species growing in two uncultivated meadows at two different locations. The soils in these locations had pseudototal (Aqua Regia soluble) Se in concentration ranges of between 0.2 and 0.3 mg kg(-1) at the first location, and between 0.7 and 1.4 mg kg(-1) at the second location. The plant species represented 29 plant families where the most numerous ones were Poaceae, Rosaceae, Fabaceae , and Asteraceae. The selenium contents in the plants varied between undetectable levels (Aegopodium podagraria, Achillea millefolium, Lotus corniculatus) and 0.158 mg kg(-1) (Veronica arvensis, Veronicaceae). The Se levels were roughly one order of magnitude lower compared to other elements with similar soil content, such as cadmium and molybdenum. The transfer factors of Se, quantifying the element transfer from soil to plants, varied between <0.001 and 0.146 with no significant differences between the locations, confirming the limited soil-plant selenium transfer regardless of location, soil Se level, and plant species. Among the plant families, no unambiguous trend to potential elevated Se uptake was observed. Low Se content in the soil and its plant availability was comparable to other Se-deficient areas within Europe. PMID:25975239

  7. Comparative Analysis Of 226Ra Soil-To-Plant Transfer In Cabbage Grown In Various Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga, M. J.; Carvalho, F. P.; Silva, L.; Gouveia, J.

    2008-08-01

    The transfer of 226Ra from soil to cabbage was compared amongst regions, namely the surroundings of Urgeiriça uranium milling tailings (GE), regions with past uranium mining activities (GN1), and regions with no uranium mining activities and no uranium deposits (GN2). Results show a slight increase of the concentration ratio values at low radium concentration in soils. Statistical analysis of the mean 226Ra activity concentrations in soil and cabbage for the three regions was carried out. The comparison of 226Ra activity concentrations in soils indicated no difference (p>0.05), between GE and GN2 and significant differences (p<0.05) between GE and GN1 and between GN1 and GN2. Similar statistical results were obtained for 226Ra activity concentrations in cabbage from the same regions. It was concluded that radium Concentration Ratio (CR) for cabbage grown in the region of the main uranium milling site (GE) is of the same order of magnitude of CR in cabagge grown in background regions (GN2). However, 226Ra CR was higher in cabagge from the region with past uranium mining activities (GN1).

  8. Modelling soil and soil to plant transfer processes of radionuclides and toxic chemicals at long time scales for performance assessment of Radwaste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Achim; Miquel, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Performance assessments for surface nuclear waste disposal facilities require simulation of transfer processes from the waste canisters to a reference group living near-by. Such simulations need to be extended over several hundred to hundred thousand years, depending on waste type, restraining possibilities to represent short term system complexity and variability. Related modelling can be simplified as long as processes are represented conservatively with assessment endpoints estimated larger compared to more realistic modelling approaches. The indicators are doses for radionuclides (RN) and risk factors for toxic chemicals (TC, i.e. heavy metals, nitrate). We discuss a new simulation tool (SCM-Andra-multilayer-model, SAMM) that, among others, allows to model situations where RN/TC move through a soil profile characterised by temporal undersaturation and root growth (soil-plant subsystem of the biosphere model compared to the adjacent saturated geosphere). SAMM describes all relevant transfer and reaction processes (advection, diffusion, root transport, radioactive decay, chemical reactions incl. sorption - desorption) using well known differential equations solved numerically within MATLAB with scenario description and parameterisation defined in Excel sheets. With this conservative approach in mind, we apply global parameters for which the solid-solution (Kd) or soil-to-plant (TF) distribution coefficients are the most relevant. Empirical data are available for homogeneous situations, such as one compartment pot experiments, but rare for entire soil profiles. Similarly soil hydrology, in particular upward and downward advective fluxes are modelled using an empirical approach solely based on key soil hydrological parameters (precipitation, evapotranspiration, irrigation, water table level) and the soil porosity. Variability of soil hydrology in space and time, likely to change drastically even on hourly bases (i.e. intense precipitation event) or within a single column (i.e. preferential flow and capillary rise) is nonetheless represented by annual averages. Changing water saturation and associated variability in redox conditions, RN/TC speciation and mobility, represents an example, where the simulation abilities with SAMM are beyond our capacity of in situ observation and measurement, restricting of course our efforts of validation. The latter is thus limited to simpler cases with parameter values stable within the soil column or throughout time. The study of more complex situations is possible with the SAMM simulation tool. For illustration, we give at least two examples, one for a RN and one for a TC; we evaluate the species initially present as well as the daughter RN and the product of reactivity of the TC. Focus is given to situations where RN/TC are present at the base of a soil column; simulation end points are concentrations at the soil surface and for specified agricultural plant species. Dose and risk calculations based on these data are carried out in classical food chain assessment tools. These illustrations are for generic sites and situations for which at least a minor component of upward advective movement is considered, keeping in mind the conservative approach mentioned above.

  9. Comparative Analysis Of {sup 226}Ra Soil-To-Plant Transfer In Cabbage Grown In Various Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Madruga, M. J.; Carvalho, F. P.; Silva, L.; Gouveia, J.

    2008-08-07

    The transfer of {sup 226}Ra from soil to cabbage was compared amongst regions, namely the surroundings of Urgeirica uranium milling tailings (GE), regions with past uranium mining activities (GN1), and regions with no uranium mining activities and no uranium deposits (GN2). Results show a slight increase of the concentration ratio values at low radium concentration in soils. Statistical analysis of the mean {sup 226}Ra activity concentrations in soil and cabbage for the three regions was carried out. The comparison of {sup 226}Ra activity concentrations in soils indicated no difference (p>0.05), between GE and GN2 and significant differences (p<0.05) between GE and GN1 and between GN1 and GN2. Similar statistical results were obtained for {sup 226}Ra activity concentrations in cabbage from the same regions. It was concluded that radium Concentration Ratio (CR) for cabbage grown in the region of the main uranium milling site (GE) is of the same order of magnitude of CR in cabagge grown in background regions (GN2). However, {sup 226}Ra CR was higher in cabagge from the region with past uranium mining activities (GN1)

  10. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Minc, Leah D.

    2013-11-20

    Transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants is one of the key mechanisms for long-term contamination of the human food chain. Nearly all computer models that address soil-to-plant uptake of radionuclides use empirically-derived transfer factors to address this process. Essentially all available soil-to-plant transfer factors are based on measurements in annual crops. Because very few measurements are available for tree fruits, samples were taken of alfalfa and oats and the stems, leaves, and fruits and nuts of almond, apple, apricot, carob, fig, grape, nectarine, pecan, pistachio (natural and grafted), and pomegranate, along with local surface soil. The samples were dried, ground, weighed, and analyzed for trace constituents through a combination of induction-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for a wide range of naturally-occurring elements. Analysis results are presented and converted to soil-to-plant transfer factors. These are compared to commonly used and internationally recommended values. Those determined for annual crops are very similar to commonly-used values; those determined for tree fruits show interesting differences. Most macro- and micronutrients are slightly reduced in fruits; non-essential elements are reduced further. These findings may be used in existing computer models and may allow development of tree-fruit-specific transfer models.

  11. Soil to plant transfer of 238 Th on a uranium

    E-print Network

    Hu, Qinhong "Max"

    the highest uptake of 238 U (TF value of 3.7!10ÿ2 ), while Chinese mustard (Brassica chinensis) had the least evident for Chinese mustard and corn (Zea mays). The root/shoot (R/S) ratios obtained for different plants.elsevier.com/locate/jenvrad #12;mustard had the smallest R/S ratios for both 226 Ra (5.3G1.2) and 232 Th (5.3G1.7), while

  12. The Transfer of Dissolved Cs-137 from Soil to Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, V.V.; Melnichenko, L.Yu.; Mason, C.F.V.; Ageyev, V.A.; Ostashko, V.V.

    2006-07-01

    Rapidly maturing plants were grown simultaneously at the same experimental sites under natural conditions at the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Roots of the plants were side by side in the soil. During two seasons we selected samples of the plants and of the soils several times every season. Content of Cs-137 in the plant and in the soil solution extracted from the samples of soils was measured. Results of measurements of the samples show that, for the experimental site, Cs-137 content in the plant varies with date of the sample selection. The plant:soil solution Cs-137 concentration ratio depends strongly on the date of selection and also on the type of soil. After analysis of the data we conclude that Cs-137 plant uptake is approximately proportional to the content of dissolved Cs-137 in the soil per unit of volume, and the plant:soil solution Cs-137 concentration ratio for the soil is approximately proportional to the soil moisture. (authors)

  13. Soil-to-Plant Concentration Ratios for Assessing Food Chain Pathways in Biosphere Models

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

    2007-10-01

    This report describes work performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report summarizes characteristics of samples of soils and groundwater from three geographical regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and analyses performed to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Because the uptake and behavior of radionuclides in plant roots, plant leaves, and animal products depends on the chemistry of the water and soil coming in contact with plants and animals, water and soil samples collected from these regions of the United States were used in experiments at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to determine radionuclide soil-to-plant concentration ratios. Crops and forage used in the experiments were grown in the soils, and long-lived radionuclides introduced into the groundwater provide the contaminated water used to water the grown plants. The radionuclides evaluated include 99Tc, 238Pu, and 241Am. Plant varieties include alfalfa, corn, onion, and potato. The radionuclide uptake results from this research study show how regional variations in water quality and soil chemistry affect radionuclide uptake. Section 3 summarizes the procedures and results of the uptake experiments, and relates the soil-to-plant uptake factors derived. In Section 4, the results found in this study are compared with similar values found in the biosphere modeling literature; the study’s results are generally in line with current literature, but soil- and plant-specific differences are noticeable. This food-chain pathway data may be used by the NRC staff to assess dose to persons in the reference biosphere (e.g., persons who live and work in an area potentially affected by radionuclide releases) of waste disposal facilities and decommissioning sites.

  14. Transfer factor: a murine model.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, M E; Kauffman, C A

    1980-01-01

    Transfer factor has been studied extensively in humans, but a satisfactory subprimate model has not been established. Using BALB/c mice immunized with complete Freund adjuvant, we show that a low-molecular-weight substance derived from disrupted spleen cells transferred sensitivity to purified protein derivative (PPD) to recipient nonimmunized BALB/c mice. Transfer was confirmed by footpad swelling to PPD in vivo and by splenic lymphocyte transformation to PPD in vitro. In recipients of transfer factor, an inverse correlation was noted between the splenic lymphocyte response to PPD and to concanavalin A. Material obtained from spleens of saline-treated BALB/c mice did not transfer sensitivity to PPD to recipient mice. PMID:7358426

  15. Literature Review and Assessment of Plant and Animal Transfer Factors Used in Performance Assessment Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, David E.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Sasser, Lyle B.

    2003-07-20

    A literature review and assessment was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update information on plant and animal radionuclide transfer factors used in performance-assessment modeling. A group of 15 radionuclides was included in this review and assessment. The review is composed of four main sections, not including the Introduction. Section 2.0 provides a review of the critically important issue of physicochemical speciation and geochemistry of the radionuclides in natural soil-water systems as it relates to the bioavailability of the radionuclides. Section 3.0 provides an updated review of the parameters of importance in the uptake of radionuclides by plants, including root uptake via the soil-groundwater system and foliar uptake due to overhead irrigation. Section 3.0 also provides a compilation of concentration ratios (CRs) for soil-to-plant uptake for the 15 selected radionuclides. Section 4.0 provides an updated review on radionuclide uptake data for animal products related to absorption, homeostatic control, approach to equilibration, chemical and physical form, diet, and age. Compiled transfer coefficients are provided for cow’s milk, sheep’s milk, goat’s milk, beef, goat meat, pork, poultry, and eggs. Section 5.0 discusses the use of transfer coefficients in soil, plant, and animal modeling using regulatory models for evaluating radioactive waste disposal or decommissioned sites. Each section makes specific suggestions for future research in its area.

  16. Factors Affecting Transfer of Training in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamnill, Siriporn; McLean, Gary N.

    2005-01-01

    To begin the validation process for the Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI) in Thailand, research replicating Holton, Bates, and Ruona's study (2000) was conducted in Thailand. The LTSI was administered to 1,029 employees. Exploratory factor analysis and MANOVA were used to identify factors. A factor structure almost identical to that of…

  17. Factors Affecting Motivation to Transfer Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seyler, Dian L.; Holton, Elwood F., III; Bates, Reid A.; Burnett, Michael F.; Carvalho, Manuel A.

    1998-01-01

    A study of trainees (n=88) in a competency-based occupational safety and health training program found that environmental factors (opportunities to use skills, peer/supervisor support, and supervisor sanctions) were most influential on motivation to transfer training. Training attitudes may be affected by prior experiences when the use of training…

  18. Soil-to-root vegetable transfer factors for (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (88)Y in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Asaduzzaman, Kh; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Y M; Bradley, D A; Mahat, R H; Nor, R M

    2014-09-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) are of fundamental importance in assessing the environmental impact due to the presence of radioactivity in soil and agricultural crops. Tapioca and sweet potato, both root crops, are popular foodstuffs for a significant fraction of the Malaysian population, and result in intake of radionuclides. For the natural field conditions experienced in production of these foodstuffs, TFs and the annual effective dose were evaluated for the natural radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and for the anthropogenic radionuclide (88)Y, the latter being a component of fallout. An experimental tapioca field was developed for study of the time dependence of plant uptake. For soil samples from all study locations other than the experimental field, it has been shown that these contain the artificial radionuclide (88)Y, although the uptake of (88)Y has only been observed in the roots of the plant Manihot esculenta (from which tapioca is derived) grown in mining soil. The estimated TFs for (226)Ra and (232)Th for tapioca and sweet potato are very much higher than that reported by the IAEA. For all study areas, the annual effective dose from ingestion of tapioca and sweet potato are estimated to be lower than the world average (290 ?Sv y(-1)). PMID:24814722

  19. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Transfer Student Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jacob T. N.; Litzler, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Transfer students' adjustment to college has received substantial attention by researchers. This focus has predominately investigated the observation of "transfer shock": a decrease in grade point average (GPA) experienced after transferring. In response to the persistent focus on transfer shock, growing attention has been directed…

  20. Studies of transport pathways of Th, rare earths, Ra-228, and Ra-226 from soil to plants and farm animals. Progress report, April 1, 1985-February 28, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Linsalata, P.

    1986-02-01

    The field study is to assess the soil-to-plant and soil-to-animal concentration factors of the naturally occurring radionuclides /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, /sup 232/Th, /sup 230/Th, and /sup 228/Th, as well as of the light rare earth elements (REE), La, Ce and Nd. Farms situated near the center of a deeply weathered alkalic intrusive known as the Pocos de Caldas (PC) plateau were selected for study because of their proximity (i.e., within a few kilometers) to what may be the largest single near-surface deposit of Th (approx.30,000 tonnes) and REE's (>100,000 tonnes) situated near the summit of a hill (the Morro do Ferro (MF)). An ancillary field study is being conducted in Orange County, New York, where a local cattleman has permitted sampling members of the herd as well as soil and feeds which are all grown on the premises. Vegetable samples and soil have also been analyzed from five additional farms in Orange County, NY. 64 refs., 25 figs., 45 tabs.

  1. From soil to plant, the journey of P through trophic relationships and ectomycorrhizal association

    PubMed Central

    Becquer, Adeline; Trap, Jean; Irshad, Usman; Ali, Muhammad A.; Claude, Plassard

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is essential for plant growth and productivity. It is one of the most limiting macronutrients in soil because it is mainly present as unavailable, bound P whereas plants can only use unbound, inorganic phosphate (Pi), which is found in very low concentrations in soil solution. Some ectomycorrhizal fungi are able to release organic compounds (organic anions or phosphatases) to mobilize unavailable P. Recent studies suggest that bacteria play a major role in the mineralization of nutrients such as P through trophic relationships as they can produce specific phosphatases such as phytases to degrade phytate, the main form of soil organic P. Bacteria are also more effective than other microorganisms or plants at immobilizing free Pi. Therefore, bacterial grazing by grazers, such as nematodes, could release Pi locked in bacterial biomass. Free Pi may be taken up by ectomycorrhizal fungus by specific phosphate transporters and transferred to the plant by mechanisms that have not yet been identified. This mini-review aims to follow the phosphate pathway to understand the ecological and molecular mechanisms responsible for transfer of phosphate from the soil to the plant, to improve plant P nutrition. PMID:25360140

  2. Seasonal variation of soil-to-plant transfer of K and fallout sup 134,137 Cs in peatland vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Bunzl, K.; Kracke, W. )

    1989-10-01

    For three plants from a peat bog (Trichophorum caespitosum, Molinia coerulea, Calluna vulgaris) the concentration of 137Cs, the ratio 137Cs:134Cs, and stable K was determined in intervals of about 14 d from June to November 1987. The results show that for two grasses, Trichophorum caespitosum and Molinia coerulea (which have only perennial roots but sprout every year while the old leaves wither), the concentration of 137Cs decreased considerably during the growing season (1800-240, respectively, 4000-320 Bq kg-1 dry weight). A remarkably similar behavior was observed for the seasonal variability of K and radiocesium in the two grass species, which resulted in a nearly constant ratio of 137Cs:K during the year. In contrast, for the evergreen plant Calluna vulgaris (heather) which was contaminated surficially by the Chernobyl fallout, the concentrations of K and 137Cs were rather constant during 1987 (leaves about 10,000; stems about 5000 Bq kg-1 dry weight), even though radiocesium was taken up by the leaves and transported within the plant. For the two grasses, the plant:soil concentration ratios (CR) were obtained separately for total 137Cs, 137Cs from the global fallout, and Chernobyl-derived 137Cs. The CR of 137Cs from the global fallout decreased for Trichophorum caespitosum from 1.9 in the spring to 0.08 in the autumn, and for Chernobyl-derived 137Cs from 1.4 to 0.2. For Molinia coerulea, a similar behavior was observed. Possible reasons for the seasonal variability of the CR values and the different behavior of 137Cs from the global fallout and from the Chernobyl debris are discussed.

  3. Transfer of Radionuclides K-40, Th-232 and Ra-226 from Mining Soil to Sawi (Japanese Mustard)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariandra, M.; Amin, Y. M.

    2008-05-20

    The uptake of naturally occurring thorium, radium and potassium by sawi (Japanese Mustard) from disused tin mining was studied. Both soil and sawi sample were collected from a vegetable farm located 15 km from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia where the farm has been operating for 22 years on a disused tin mining. By using a gamma spectroscopy system, the transfers of radionuclides from soil to plants were investigated. The highest values of radionuclides in the soil was K-40 which is 52.8 Bq kg{sup -1} and the lowest was Ra-226 which is 6.51 Bq kg{sup -1}. The activity of Th-232 is 18.5 Bq kg{sup -1}. The activity of radionuclides in the sawi sample shows higher values as compared to the soil sample. The highest values of radionuclides in the sawi were K-40 which is 446 Bq kg{sup -1} and the lowest was Ra-226 which is 17.5 Bq kg{sup -1}. The activity of Th-232 is 65.2 Bq kg{sup -1}. The concentration of radionuclides in soils and plants can be used for the determination of soil-to-plant transfer factors. The soil to plant transfer factors (TF) were calculated and observed to be 2.68 for radium-226, 3.52 for thorium-232 and the highest which is 3.97 for potassium-40.

  4. Transfer of Radionuclides K-40, Th-232 and Ra-226 from Mining Soil to Sawi (Japanese Mustard)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariandra, M.; Amin, Y. M.

    2008-05-01

    The uptake of naturally occurring thorium, radium and potassium by sawi (Japanese Mustard) from disused tin mining was studied. Both soil and sawi sample were collected from a vegetable farm located 15 km from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia where the farm has been operating for 22 years on a disused tin mining. By using a gamma spectroscopy system, the transfers of radionuclides from soil to plants were investigated. The highest values of radionuclides in the soil was K-40 which is 52.8 Bq kg-1 and the lowest was Ra-226 which is 6.51 Bq kg-1. The activity of Th-232 is 18.5 Bq kg-1. The activity of radionuclides in the sawi sample shows higher values as compared to the soil sample. The highest values of radionuclides in the sawi were K-40 which is 446 Bq kg-1 and the lowest was Ra-226 which is 17.5 Bq kg-1. The activity of Th-232 is 65.2 Bq kg-1. The concentration of radionuclides in soils and plants can be used for the determination of soil-to-plant transfer factors. The soil to plant transfer factors (TF) were calculated and observed to be 2.68 for radium-226, 3.52 for thorium-232 and the highest which is 3.97 for potassium-40.

  5. Factors Affecting Training Transfer: Participants' Motivation to Transfer Training, Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alawneh, Muhammad K.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates factors that motivate participants in learning and training activities to transfer skills, knowledge and attitude from the learning setting to the workplace. Based on training transfer theories hypothesized by Holton (1996), one of the major theories that affect an organization's learning is motivation to transfer theory.…

  6. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  7. A Compendium of Transfer Factors for Agricultural and Animal Products

    SciTech Connect

    Staven, Lissa H.; Napier, Bruce A.; Rhoads, Kathleen; Strenge, Dennis L.

    2003-06-02

    Transfer factors are used in radiological risk assessments to estimate the amount of radioactivity that could be present in a food crop or organism based on the calculated concentration in the source medium (i.e., soil or animal feed). By calculating the concentration in the food, the total intake can be estimated and a dose calculated as a result of the annual intake. This report compiles transfer factors for radiological risk assessments, using common food products, including meats, eggs, and plants. Transfer factors used were most often selected from recommended values listed by national or international organizations for use in radiological food chain transport calculations. Several methods of estimation and extrapolation were used for radionuclides not listed in the primary information sources. Tables of transfer factors are listed by element and information source for beef, eggs, fish, fruit, grain, leafy vegetation, milk, poultry, and root vegetables.

  8. Factors influencing embryo transfer success in alpacas: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Jane; Mihm, Monika; Wittek, Thomas

    2013-01-10

    Embryo transfer offers great advantages to South American camelid farmers to reach their breeding goals but the technology still plays a relatively minor role in comparison to other domestic farm animals like cattle. The aim of the present study was to analyse a data set of 5547 single or multiple ovulation embryo transfers performed in commercial alpaca farms in Australia to determine the factors that influence number and quality of embryos produced, embryo transfer success (percentage of crias born) and gestation length following transfer. Logistic binary regression identified the variables day of flushing after mating, embryo diameter, embryo quality, day of transfer after GnRH, and the age of the recipient to have significant impact on the outcome measure embryo transfer success. Transfer of smaller embryos or lower quality embryos resulted in decreased transfer success rates. Optimal days for obtaining embryos from donors were Days 8 and 9 after mating, optimal days for transfer into recipients were Days 7 and 8 after GnRH treatment. Age (>15 years) and body condition of recipients <2 also lowered transfer success rates, while the summer heat had no adverse impact. However, season did influence gestation length, while cria gender did not. In conclusion, results from the analysis of this very large dataset can underpin new recommendations to improve embryo transfer success in alpacas. PMID:23141430

  9. Factors affecting the placental transfer of actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.; Kelman, B.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to consider factors that affect the availability and transport of actinides from maternal blood, through the placenta, to the conceptus. These factors, of particular importance in scaling results from animals to man, include the route and temporal pattern of administration, the mass and physicochemical state of material administered, metabolism of the pregnant animal and fetal organs or tissue, and species-specific changes in placental structure relative to stage of gestation at exposure. Preliminary concepts for descriptive and kinetic models are proposed to integrate these results, to identify additional information required for developing more comprehensive models, and to provide a basis for scaling to human pregnancies for purposes of radiation dosimetry.

  10. Transfer of chemicals from feed to animal products: The use of transfer factors in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Leeman, W R; Van Den Berg, K J; Houben, G F

    2007-01-01

    The human risk assessment of feed contaminants has often been hampered by a lack of knowledge concerning their behaviour when consumed by livestock. To gain a better understanding of the transfer of contaminants from animal feed to animal products, a meta-analysis of public literature was made. Data concerning feed contaminant concentrations, feeding periods, residue levels in animal products, and other parameters were gathered and recorded. For each case a 'transfer factor', which was defined as the ratio of the concentration of a chemical in an animal product to the concentration of the chemical in animal feed, was calculated. Scientifically founded transfer factors were calculated and analysed for groups of chemicals based on their contaminant classes or physicochemical properties. These database-derived transfer factors enable a more accurate risk assessment in the case of a feed contamination, and enable rapid risk management decision-making and/or intervention. PMID:17164211

  11. University Technology Transfer Factors as Predictors of Entrepreneurial Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2011-01-01

    University technology transfer is a collaborative effort between academia and industry involving knowledge sharing and learning. Working closely with their university partners affords biotechnology firms the opportunity to successfully develop licensed inventions and gain access to novel scientific and technological discoveries. These factors may…

  12. Chlorophyll a Franck-Condon factors and excitation energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, J.; Voigt, J.; Small, G.J.

    1999-04-01

    The Franck-Condon factors for the S{sub 1}(Q{sub y}) {leftrightarrow} S{sub 0} electronic transition of chlorophyll (Chl) molecules are important for understanding excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. Currently, there are two sets of Chl a Frank-Condon factors for over 40 modes, one determined by spectral hole burning and the other by fluorescence line narrowing. Those obtained by the latter spectroscopy are, on average, a factor of 30 times smaller than the hole burning values. Nonline-narrowed fluorescence results for the light-harvesting complex 2 of photosystem 2 at 4.2 K are presented that agree quite well with the hole burning but not the fluorescence line narrowing values.

  13. Marine radionuclide transfer factors in chordates and a phylogenetic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Jeffree, Ross A; Oberhaensli, Francois; Teyssie, Jean-Louis

    2013-12-01

    Previous radiotracer experiments that compared multi-elemental whole organism: water transfer factors among chondrichthyan and teleost fishes, including an ICRP reference flatfish Psetta maxima, demonstrated distinctive contrasts in their bioaccumulation characteristics, with generally elevated bioaccumulation in chondrichthyans. These results supported a hypothesis that phylogenetic divergence may influence marine radionuclide transfer factors. This notion has been further evaluated in an amphioxus species Branchiostoma lanceolatum, sub-phylum Cephalochordata. This taxon diverged about 800 MYBP from a common ancestor of the teleosts and the chondrichthyans, which in turn diverged from each other around 500 MYBP. Our experimental results indicate that amphioxus is indeed more divergent in its multi-elemental bioaccumulation patterns from teleosts and chondrichthyans than they are from each other, consistent with our hypothesis. The experimental comparisons with the ICRP reference flatfish P. maxima also revealed an unexpectedly enhanced capacity in amphioxus to accumulate all eight tested trace elements from seawater, and for some by more than two orders of magnitude. These results have practical applications for the strategic selection of marine biota for further radioecological investigations to better guarantee the radiological protection of marine biodiversity. Such seemingly anomalous results for understudied biota like amphioxus and chondrichthyans suggest that more effort in marine radioecology be directed to assessing the bioaccumulatory capacities of other phylogenetic groups that have received less attention so far, particularly those that are phylogenetically more remote from commonly investigated taxa and those nominated as ICRP marine reference organisms. PMID:22800799

  14. Transfer of metals in soil-grass ecosystems under long-term N, P, K fertilization in Hesse, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2015-04-01

    With this study focuses on the influence of long-term (14 years) fertilization on metal transition from soil to plants is presented. Accumulation of metals in plants due to long-term fertilization and predicting the bioavailability and transfer of metals in the soil-plant system is of great importance with regard to human health as plants represent the first compartment of the terrestrial food chain. Soil and plant (Lolio-Cynosuretum) samples were taken from a 14 years long-term fertilization field experiment which was carried out in Hesse, Germany. Correlation coefficients, transfer factors, and regression analysis was performed for Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn to quantify the relative difference in bioavailability of metals to plants or to identify the capacity of plants to accumulate a given metal. Correlation coefficients between metals in soils and in plants show significant relationships (p<0.01) for selected metals. Metal bioavailability from soil to plant based on transfer factor (TF) was observed to decrease in the order Cd>Cu>Zn>Mn>Pb. Results of stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that Corg, CEC and bioavailable metal content are the most important predictors for plant metal uptake.

  15. The Influence Theory: Factors That Influence the Transfer Advising Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Alan L.; Dantzler, John A.; Hardy, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The transfer rate from community college to four-year institutions has been dropping for the past 70 years. In the most recent statistics, the national rate of transfer is 23% (Cohen & Brawer, 2008). In the state of Alabama the transfer rate is approximately 4%, and in the rural counties of Alabama the transfer rate hovers around 1%. Many…

  16. AIDS and transfer factor: myths, certainties and realities.

    PubMed

    Viza, D

    1996-01-01

    At the end of the 20th century, the triumph of biology is as indisputable as that of physics was at the end of the 19th century, and so is the might of the inductive thought. Virtually all diseases have been seemingly conquered and HIV, the cause of AIDS, has been fully described ten years after the onset of the epidemic. However, the triumph of biological science is far from being complete. The toll of several diseases, such as cancer, continues to rise and the pathogenesis of AIDS remains elusive. In the realm of inductive science, the dominant paradigm can seldom be challenged in a frontal attack, especially when it is apparently successful, and only what Kuhn calls "scientific revolutions" can overthrow it. Thus, it is hardly surprising that the concept of transfer factor is considered with contempt, and the existence of the moiety improbable: over forty years after the introduction of the concept, not only its molecular structure remains unknown, but also its putative mode of action contravenes dogmas of both immunology and molecular biology. And when facts challenge established dogmas, be in religion, philosophy or science, they must be suppressed. Thus, results of heterodox research become henceforth nisi-i.e., valid unless cause is shown for rescinding them, because they challenge the prevalent paradigm. However, when observations pertain to lethal disorders, their suppression in the name of dogmas may become criminal. Because of the failure of medical science to manage the AIDS pandemic, transfer factor, which has been successfully used for treating or preventing viral infections, may today overcome a priori prejudice and rejection more swiftly. In science, as in life, certainties always end up by dying, and Copernicus' vision by replacing that of Ptolemy. PMID:8993753

  17. A Developmental Study of Factors Influencing Discrimination Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Michael

    1973-01-01

    Examines the importance of (1) dimensional characteristics of stimuli present in discrimination transfer tasks, (2) having contrasting stimuli presented simultaneously, and (3) subjects age. Subjects were rural Mexican youths, ages 4 to 10. Reversal and nonreversal type discrimination transfer problems were used in the study. (DP)

  18. Relationship between the radiocesium interception potential and the transfer of radiocesium from soil to soybean cultivated in 2011 in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Akira; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Takeuchi, Megumi; Sato, Mutsuto; Nakao, Atsushi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2014-11-01

    The concentration of radiocesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) in agricultural fields around Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) was elevated after the accident in March 2011. Evaluation of soil properties that influence phytoavailability of radiocesium is important for optimal soil management to minimize radiocesium transfer to crops. In this study, soybean grain and soil samples (0-15 cm) were collected from 46 locations in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011, and (137)Cs concentrations were measured. (137)Cs concentration ranges were 11-329 Bq kg(-1)-dry in soybean grain samples, and 0.29-2.49 kBq kg(-1)-dry in soil samples. The radiocesium interception potential (RIP) values in the soil samples ranged from 0.30 to 8.61 mol kg(-1). RIP negatively correlated with total carbon content and oxalate-extractable Si and Al + 1/2 Fe in the soils, suggesting that soils rich in organic matter and poorly crystalline clays tended to have lower RIP in this region. The soil-to-plant transfer factor for (137)Cs, analyzed in relation with various soil characteristics, varied by two orders of magnitude and was significantly negatively correlated with RIP and exchangeable K concentration in soil. The results show that RIP is useful for evaluating the efficiency of radiocesium transfer from soil to plants in this region. PMID:25036920

  19. Transfer passenger needs at airports : human factors in terminal design

    E-print Network

    Brillembourg, Marie-Claire

    1982-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the needs of particular users of airport: transfer passengers. The object of this work has been to produce a set of design guidelines for terminals. these guidelines are framed upon a user-need survey ...

  20. Factors Affecting the Development of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    AKAGI, Satoshi; MATSUKAWA, Kazutsugu; TAKAHASHI, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle. PMID:25341701

  1. Relation of pulmonary vessel size to transfer factor in subjects with airflow obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, A.W.

    1983-11-01

    In a group of 61 consecutive patients undergoing assessment of airflow obstruction, a significant linear relation was demonstrated between measurements of the diameter of the midzonal pulmonary vessels on the plain chest radiographs and transfer factor (diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide) (r = 0.46, p < 0.001). Since reduction in transfer factor has been shown to relate to structural emphysema, reduction in midzone vessel caliber implies the same. However, in the individual patient neither the transfer factor nor structural emphysema can be reliably predicted from midzone vessel diameters alone.

  2. Perception of Transfer Climate Factors in the Macro and Micro Organizational Work Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggs, Byron Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study was designed to provide insight on the perceived transfer climate factors in the macro and micro organizational work environment that may influence an employee's willingness to transfer what was learned in a training program to the job. More specifically, the purpose of the study was to delineate descriptive patterns and…

  3. Cargo capacity of phages and plasmids and other factors influencing horizontal transfers of prokaryote transposable elements

    E-print Network

    Richard, Cordaux,

    Cargo capacity of phages and plasmids and other factors influencing horizontal transfers: transposable element, insertion sequence, horizontal transfer, phage, plasmid, purifying selection, prokaryote such as phages and plasmids. In a recent study, we have shown that phages are less tolerant to insertion

  4. Gene Transfer is a Major Factor in Bacterial Evolution Ruiting Lan and Peter R. Reeves

    E-print Network

    Lan, Ruiting

    Gene Transfer is a Major Factor in Bacterial Evolution Ruiting Lan and Peter R. Reeves Department of Microbiology, University of Sydney Lateral gene transfer in four strains of Salmonella enterica has been-1,286 kb, respectively. Several lines of evidence indicate that most of this DNA is from genes not present

  5. Identification and characterization of an oocyte factor required for development of porcine nuclear transfer embryos

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kei; Nagai, Kouhei; Kitamura, Naoya; Nishikawa, Tomoaki; Ikegami, Haruka; Binh, Nguyen T.; Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Mai; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Minami, Naojiro; Yamada, Masayasu; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Miyake, Masashi; Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Imai, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming of differentiated cells can be induced by oocyte factors. Despite numerous attempts, these factors and mechanisms responsible for successful reprogramming remain elusive. Here, we identify one such factor, necessary for the development of nuclear transfer embryos, using porcine oocyte extracts in which some reprogramming events are recapitulated. After incubating somatic nuclei in oocyte extracts from the metaphase II stage, the oocyte proteins that were specifically and abundantly incorporated into the nuclei were identified by mass spectrometry. Among 25 identified proteins, we especially focused on a multifunctional protein, DJ-1. DJ-1 is present at a high concentration in oocytes from the germinal vesicle stage until embryos at the four-cell stage. Inhibition of DJ-1 function compromises the development of nuclear transfer embryos but not that of fertilized embryos. Microarray analysis of nuclear transfer embryos in which DJ-1 function is inhibited shows perturbed expression of P53 pathway components. In addition, embryonic arrest of nuclear transfer embryos injected with anti–DJ-1 antibody is rescued by P53 inhibition. We conclude that DJ-1 is an oocyte factor that is required for development of nuclear transfer embryos. This study presents a means for identifying natural reprogramming factors in mammalian oocytes and a unique insight into the mechanisms underlying reprogramming by nuclear transfer. PMID:21482765

  6. Robust and Non-Negative Collective Matrix Factorization for Text-to-Image Transfer Learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Jing, Liping; Ng, Michael K

    2015-12-01

    Heterogeneous transfer learning has recently gained much attention as a new machine learning paradigm in which the knowledge can be transferred from source domains to target domains in different feature spaces. Existing works usually assume that source domains can provide accurate and useful knowledge to be transferred to target domains for learning. In practice, there may be noise appearing in given source (text) and target (image) domains data, and thus, the performance of transfer learning can be seriously degraded. In this paper, we propose a robust and non-negative collective matrix factorization model to handle noise in text-to-image transfer learning, and make a reliable bridge to transfer accurate and useful knowledge from the text domain to the image domain. The proposed matrix factorization model can be solved by an efficient iterative method, and the convergence of the iterative method can be shown. Extensive experiments on real data sets suggest that the proposed model is able to effectively perform transfer learning in noisy text and image domains, and it is superior to the popular existing methods for text-to-image transfer learning. PMID:26259080

  7. Factors affecting transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from made tea to tea infusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daohui; Zhu, Lizhong; Luo, Lan

    2006-06-14

    Factors affecting transfer percentages of 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated, including tea variety, tea/water ratio (TWR, g/mL), brewing times, washed tea or unwashed tea, and covered cup or uncovered cup. It was observed that %PAH transfer varied with tea variety and increased with the decrease of TWR. The mean %PAH transfer with TWR = 1/150 was 1.12 and 1.65 times higher than that with TWR = 1/100 and 1/50, respectively. %PAH transfer reduced greatly as the brewing times increased. The mean %PAH transfer in the first brewing time occupied 51.6% of the total three mean %PAH transfers in the three brewing times. The mean %PAH transfer decreased by 30.4% after the tea had been washed immediately before brewing. Brewing the tea within uncovered cup diminished %PAH transfer by a degree of 4.31-31.7% compared to brewing the tea within a covered cup. PMID:16756366

  8. Ultrastructural Study on Ultra-Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Transfer Factor Effects on Skin Ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadena, M. S. Reyes; Chapul, L. Sánchez; Pérez, Javiér; García, M. N. Jiménez; López, M. A. Jiménez; Espíndola, M. E. Sánchez; Perez, R. Paniagua; Hernández, N. A.; Paniagua, G.; Uribe, F.; Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodríguez

    2008-08-01

    We determined the effect of 120Hz ultra low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) on the healing process of skin in 20 Wistar rats distributed in four groups in which chronic dermal ulcers had been produced. The first two groups received a dose of the transfer factor and interferon-beta (IFN-?) every 24 h during 12 days. The third group (positive control) received only electromagnetic field (ELF) sessions, and in the fourth group (negative control), no treatment was applied. The electromagnetic field was applied through a Helmholtz coils; 30 Gauss of intensity. Results shown histological changes that improve the healing process in animals subjected to ELF together with the transfer factor.

  9. [Factors affecting activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus and related analysis technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Liang, Xin-qiang; Fu, Chao-dong; Zhu, Si-rui; Zhang, Yi-xiang; Ji, Yuan-jing

    2015-04-01

    Colloids play a key role in the transference process of phosphorus (P) in soil. Activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus have great effect on soil P pool and the surrounding water quality. This paper summarized the current studies on soil colloidal P, discussing the effects of the various factors (e. g., soil physical and chemical properties, fertilization, rainfall and soil amendments) on the transference of soil colloidal P. Some advanced analysis technologies (e.g., flow field-flow fractionation, transmission electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and nuclear magnetic resonance) and methods of reducing soil colloidal P were also involved. This review would provide important information on the mechanism of soil colloidal P transference. PMID:26259473

  10. The Role of Individual and Training Design Factors on Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatti, Muhammad Awais; Kaur, Sharan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to highlight the role of individual and training design factors on training transfer. Design/methodology/approach: A review of the literature is conducted, and this review highlights a dual role of perceived content validity in the form of increasing self-efficacy and the role of trainees' reaction. The study…

  11. Factors Contributing to the Upward Transfer of Baccalaureate Aspirants Beginning at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xueli

    2012-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with the upward transfer of baccalaureate aspirants beginning at community colleges. Based on data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 and the Postsecondary Education Transcript Study, a sequential logistic regression analysis was conducted to predict bachelor's degree-seeking community…

  12. A Transfer Learning Approach for Applying Matrix Factorization to Small ITS Datasets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voß, Lydia; Schatten, Carlotta; Mazziotti, Claudia; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Machine Learning methods for Performance Prediction in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) have proven their efficacy; specific methods, e.g. Matrix Factorization (MF), however suffer from the lack of available information about new tasks or new students. In this paper we show how this problem could be solved by applying Transfer Learning (TL),…

  13. What's Working: Program Factors Influencing California Community College Basic Skills Mathematics Students' Advancement to Transfer Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiero, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine which basic skills program factors were exhibited by successful basic skills programs that helped students advance to transfer-level mathematics. This study specifically examined California community college basic skills programs that assist students who place in mathematics courses 2 levels…

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF AN AIR-TO-LEAF VAPOR PHASE TRANSFER FACTOR FOR DIOXINS AND FURANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of an experiment in which grass was grown in a greenhouse and outdoors, and in soils of different concentration levels of dioxins and furans, were used in a modeling exercise to derive an air-to-leaf vapor phase transfer factor. The purpose of the experiment was to under...

  15. Tempered endoscopy for real groups I: geometric transfer with canonical factors

    E-print Network

    Shelstad, Diana

    subgroups of the endoscopic group as Cartan subgroups of the given group but are also given by an explicit analysis. A previous proof of the transfer of orbital integrals involved rigidly de...ned factors-extension of the endoscopic group, and we prefer to label the z-extension rather the base group as the endoscopic group

  16. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-10 LAKE ST. CLAIR HYDROLOGIC TRANSFER FACTORS

    E-print Network

    hydraulic transient models. The flow coordination is under the auspices of the River Flow Subcommittee = net ground water flux into the system = inflow into Lake St. Clair from the St. Clair River :D = lake of ground water into the lake is assumed to be negligible. The hydrologic transfer factor, T, is defined

  17. Recoil Polarization Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio to High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Puckett

    2010-02-01

    The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon characterize the effect of its internal structure on its response to an electromagnetic probe as studied in elastic electronnucleon scattering. These form factors are functions of the squared four-momentum transfer Q2 between the electron and the proton. The two main classes of observables of this reaction are the scattering cross section and polarization asymmetries, both of which are sensitive to the form factors in different ways. When considering large f momentum transfers, double-polarization observables offer superior sensitivity to the electric form factor. This thesis reports the results of a new measurement of the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton at high momentum transfer using the recoil polarization technique. A polarized electron beam was scattered from a liquid hydrogen target, transferring polarization to the recoiling protons. These protons were detected in a magnetic spectrometer which was used to reconstruct their kinematics, including their scattering angles and momenta, and the position of the interaction vertex. A proton polarimeter measured the polarization of the recoiling protons by measuring the azimuthal asymmetry in the angular distribution of protons scattered in CH2 analyzers. The scattered electron was detected in a large acceptance electromagnetic calorimeter in order to suppress inelastic backgrounds. The measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the scattered proton is directly proportional to the ratio of form factors GpE=GpM. The measurements reported in this thesis took place at Q2 =5.2, 6.7, and 8.5 GeV2, and represent the most accurate measurements of GpE in this Q2 region to date.

  18. Bactericidal Factor Produced by Haemophilus influenzae b: Partial Purification of the Factor and Transfer of Its Genetic Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Venezia, R. A.; Matusiak, P. M.; Robertson, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    When aerobically grown on complex media, Haemophilus influenzae b and unencapsulated variants, Rb strains, produced a bactericidal factor that was active against other Haemophilus species and certain genera of the Enterobacteriaceae. A total of 341 clinical isolates of Haemophilus were tested for susceptibility to the factor. Ninety-three percent of H. influenzae (nontypable), 75% of H. haemolyticus, 71% of H. parainfluenzae, and 22% of H. parahaemolyticus were susceptible. H. influenaze b strains were resistant producers of the bactericidal factor and H. influenzae f strains were susceptible nonproducers. Only one strain each of H. aegyptius and H. aphrophilus was isolated and each was susceptible and resistant, respectively. 143 clinical isolates of the Enterobacteriaceae were tested and of those 82% of Escherichia coli, 85% of Salmonella sp., and all Citrobacter sp., Shigella sp., and Yersinia sp. were sensitive to the bactericidal factor produced by H. influenzae b. Attempts to isolate the bactericidal activity from mechanically disrupted, solubilized, or osmotically shocked cells failed to release active bactericidal factor. However, we partially purified the bactericidal factor from the spent culture medium of aerobically grown H. influenzae b by a series of extractions. The ability to produce the bactericidal factor was transferable to nonproducer strains without also genetically transforming for type b encapsulation. The converse was also true in that type b capsules were produced by transformed H. influenzae Rd strains but no bactericidal factor was detected from these strains. Additionally, nitrosoguanidine-induced mutants of H. influenzae b lost the ability to produce bactericidal factor without loss of their type-specific capsule, demonstrating that production of the bactericidal factor was genetically separable from production of the type capsule of H. influenzae b. Images PMID:301008

  19. Survey of literature on convective heat transfer coefficients and recovery factors for high atmosphere thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, S.

    1973-01-01

    Heat transfer phenomena of rarefied gas flows is discussed based on a literature survey of analytical and experimental rarefied gas dynamics. Subsonic flows are emphasized for the purposes of meteorological thermometry in the high atmosphere. The heat transfer coefficients for three basic geometries are given in the regimes of free molecular flow, transition flow, slip flow, and continuum flow. Different types of heat phenomena, and the analysis of theoretical and experimental data are presented. The uncertainties calculated from the interpolation rule compared with the available experimental data are discussed. The recovery factor for each geometry in subsonic rarefied flows is also given.

  20. Strand Transfer and Elongation of HIV-1 Reverse Transcription Is Facilitated by Cell Factors In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Warrilow, David; Warren, Kylie; Harrich, David

    2010-01-01

    Recent work suggests a role for multiple host factors in facilitating HIV-1 reverse transcription. Previously, we identified a cellular activity which increases the efficiency of HIV-1 reverse transcription in vitro. Here, we describe aspects of the activity which shed light on its function. The cellular factor did not affect synthesis of strong-stop DNA but did improve downstream DNA synthesis. The stimulatory activity was isolated by gel filtration in a single fraction of the exclusion volume. Velocity-gradient purified HIV-1, which was free of detectable RNase activity, showed poor reverse transcription efficiency but was strongly stimulated by partially purified cell proteins. Hence, the cell factor(s) did not inactivate an RNase activity that might degrade the viral genomic RNA and block completion of reverse transcription. Instead, the cell factor(s) enhanced first strand transfer and synthesis of late reverse transcription suggesting it stabilized the reverse transcription complex. The factor did not affect lysis of HIV-1 by Triton X-100 in the endogenous reverse transcription (ERT) system, and ERT reactions with HIV-1 containing capsid mutations, which varied the biochemical stability of viral core structures and impeded reverse transcription in cells, showed no difference in the ability to be stimulated by the cell factor(s) suggesting a lack of involvement of the capsid in the in vitro assay. In addition, reverse transcription products were found to be resistant to exogenous DNase I activity when the active fraction was present in the ERT assay. These results indicate that the cell factor(s) may improve reverse transcription by facilitating DNA strand transfer and DNA synthesis. It also had a protective function for the reverse transcription products, but it is unclear if this is related to improved DNA synthesis. PMID:20949087

  1. Toxicity in lead salt spiked soils to plants, invertebrates and microbial processes: Unraveling effects of acidification, salt stress and ageing reactions.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Erik; Oorts, Koen; Peeters, Sofie; Lanno, Roman; Cheyns, Karlien

    2015-12-01

    The fate and effects of toxic trace metals in soil freshly spiked soluble metal salts do not mimic those of metals in the field. This study was set up to test the magnitude of effects of salinity, acidification, and ageing on toxicity of lead (Pb) to plants, invertebrates and soil microbial processes. Three soils were spiked with Pb2+ salts up to a concentration of 8000 mg Pb/kg and were tested either after spiking, after soil leaching followed by pH correction, or after a 5-year outdoor ageing period with free drainage followed by pH correction. Soil solution ionic strength exceeded 150 mmol/L in soils tested directly after spiking and this decreased partially after leaching and returned back to background values after 5-year outdoor equilibration. Chronic toxicity to two plants, two invertebrates, and three microbial endpoints was consistently found in all spiked soils that were not leached. This toxicity significantly decreased or became absent after 5 years of ageing in 19 of the 20 toxicity tests by a factor 8 (median factor; range: 1.4->50), measured by the factor increase of total soil Pb dose required to induce 10% inhibition. The toxicity of Pb in leached soils was intermediate between the other two treatments. The lowest detectable chronic thresholds (EC10) in aged soils ranged 350-5300 mg Pb/kg. Correlation analysis, including data of Pb2+ speciation in soil solution, suggests that reduced ionic strength rather than acidification or true ageing is the main factor explaining the soil treatment effects after spiking. It is suggested that future toxicity studies should test fine PbO powder as a relevant source for Pb in soils to exclude the confounding salt effects. PMID:26218561

  2. Effect of Plant and Environmental Factors on ALS-resistant Gene Transfer from ClearfieldTM Rice to Red Rice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imazethapyr-resistant gene from ClearfieldTM (CL) rice varieties transfers through pollen flow to red rice (Oryza sativa L.), a noxious weed in rice production in southern states. Factors which affect gene transfer rate include, but are not limited to, plant and environmental factors. Thus, we aimed...

  3. Analysis of spectral radiative heat transfer using discrete exchange factor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinqiu; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1993-09-01

    A solution technique is developed for spectral radiative heat-transfer problems. The formulation is based on the discrete exchange factor (DEF) method and uses Edward's (1976) wide band model to obtain spectral data. The results of the analyses of three cases were found to be in excellent agreement with those of the zonal method and differ by less than 5 percent from those of the discrete-ordinates method.

  4. Direct phylogenetic evidence for lateral transfer of elongation factor-like gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins, which show high similarity to elongation factor-1? (EF-1?), have been found in phylogenetically distantly related eukaryotes. The sporadic distribution of “EFL-containing” lineages within “EF-1?-containing” lineages indirectly, but strongly, suggests lateral gene transfer as the principal driving force in EFL evolution. However, one of the most critical aspects in the above hypothesis, the donor lineages in any putative cases of lateral EFL gene transfer, remained unclear. In this study, we provide direct evidence for lateral transfer of an EFL gene through the analyses of 10 diatom EFL genes. All diatom EFL homologues tightly clustered in phylogenetic analyses, suggesting acquisition of the exogenous EFL gene early in diatom evolution. Our survey additionally identified Thalassiosira pseudonana as a eukaryote bearing EF-1? and EFL genes and secondary EFL gene loss in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the complete genome of which encodes only the EF-1? gene. Most importantly, the EFL phylogeny recovered a robust grouping of homologues from diatoms, the cercozoan Bigelowiella natans, and the foraminifer Planoglabratella opecularis, with the diatoms nested within the Bigelowiella plus Planoglabratella (Rhizaria) grouping. The particular relationships recovered are further consistent with two characteristic sequence motifs. The best explanation of our data analyses is an EFL gene transfer from a foraminifer to a diatom, the first case in which the donor–recipient relationship was clarified. Finally, based on a reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR assay and the genome information of Thalassiosira and Phaeodactylum, we propose the loss of elongation factor function in Thalassiosira EF-1?. PMID:18458344

  5. Heat transfer and friction factors in the ribbed square convergent and divergent channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. S.; Ahn, S. W.

    2015-07-01

    Heat transfer and friction factors are reported for the measurements of turbulent flows in the convergent and divergent square channels with one-sided ribbed wall as well as two opposite in-line ribbed walls. The study covers three different hydraulic diameter ratios between inlet and exit at the test section such as Dho/Dhi = 0.75, 1.0, and 1.33 and Reynolds numbers in the range of 25,000-79,000. The channels, composing of ten isolated copper sections in the length of test section of 1 m, have the hydraulic diameter of 87.5 mm for the straight channel (Dho/Dhi = 1.0); the rib height-to-hydraulic diameter is 0.114; the rib pitch-to-height ratio equals 10. On the contrary to public opinion that the friction factor depends on the portion of the ribbed area, the total friction factor in the two opposite ribbed walls are lower than in the one-sided ribbed wall in the divergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 1.33 because the total pressure, summing positive dynamic and negative static pressures, is acted. The results show that the two opposite ribbed divergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 1.33 provides the best heat transfer enhancement and the two opposite ribbed convergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 0.75 provides the worst friction factor enhancement, and the ribbed divergent channels are generally recommended.

  6. Combined vascular endothelial growth factor-A and fibroblast growth factor 4 gene transfer improves wound healing in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Impaired wound healing in diabetes is related to decreased production of growth factors. Hence, gene therapy is considered as promising treatment modality. So far, efforts concentrated on single gene therapy with particular emphasis on vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). However, as multiple proteins are involved in this process it is rational to test new approaches. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether single AAV vector-mediated simultaneous transfer of VEGF-A and fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) coding sequences will improve the wound healing over the effect of VEGF-A in diabetic (db/db) mice. Methods Leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice were randomized to receive intradermal injections of PBS or AAVs carrying ?-galactosidase gene (AAV-LacZ), VEGF-A (AAV-VEGF-A), FGF-4 (AAV-FGF4-IRES-GFP) or both therapeutic genes (AAV-FGF4-IRES-VEGF-A). Wound healing kinetics was analyzed until day 21 when all animals were sacrificed for biochemical and histological examination. Results Complete wound closure in animals treated with AAV-VEGF-A was achieved earlier (day 19) than in control mice or animals injected with AAV harboring FGF4 (both on day 21). However, the fastest healing was observed in mice injected with bicistronic AAV-FGF4-IRES-VEGF-A vector (day 17). This was paralleled by significantly increased granulation tissue formation, vascularity and dermal matrix deposition. Mechanistically, as shown in vitro, FGF4 stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and VEGF receptor-1 expression in mouse dermal fibroblasts and when delivered in combination with VEGF-A, enhanced their migration. Conclusion Combined gene transfer of VEGF-A and FGF4 can improve reparative processes in the wounded skin of diabetic mice better than single agent treatment. PMID:20804557

  7. 100% Classification Accuracy Considered Harmful: The Normalized Information Transfer Factor Explains the Accuracy Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Valverde-Albacete, Francisco J.; Peláez-Moreno, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The most widely spread measure of performance, accuracy, suffers from a paradox: predictive models with a given level of accuracy may have greater predictive power than models with higher accuracy. Despite optimizing classification error rate, high accuracy models may fail to capture crucial information transfer in the classification task. We present evidence of this behavior by means of a combinatorial analysis where every possible contingency matrix of 2, 3 and 4 classes classifiers are depicted on the entropy triangle, a more reliable information-theoretic tool for classification assessment. Motivated by this, we develop from first principles a measure of classification performance that takes into consideration the information learned by classifiers. We are then able to obtain the entropy-modulated accuracy (EMA), a pessimistic estimate of the expected accuracy with the influence of the input distribution factored out, and the normalized information transfer factor (NIT), a measure of how efficient is the transmission of information from the input to the output set of classes. The EMA is a more natural measure of classification performance than accuracy when the heuristic to maximize is the transfer of information through the classifier instead of classification error count. The NIT factor measures the effectiveness of the learning process in classifiers and also makes it harder for them to “cheat” using techniques like specialization, while also promoting the interpretability of results. Their use is demonstrated in a mind reading task competition that aims at decoding the identity of a video stimulus based on magnetoencephalography recordings. We show how the EMA and the NIT factor reject rankings based in accuracy, choosing more meaningful and interpretable classifiers. PMID:24427282

  8. Strategic factors in the development of the National Technology Transfer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Root, Jonathan F.; Stone, Barbara A.

    1993-01-01

    Broad consensus among industry and government leaders has developed over the last decade on the importance of applying the U.S. leadership in research and development (R&D) to strengthen competitiveness in the global marketplace, and thus enhance national prosperity. This consensus has emerged against the backdrop of increasing economic competition, and the dramatic reduction of military threats to national security with the end of the Cold War. This paper reviews the key factors and considerations that shaped - and continue to influence - the development of the Regional Technoloty Transfer Centers (RTTC) and the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC). Also, the future role of the national network in support of emerging technology policy initiatives will be explored.

  9. Transfer of Cadmium from Soil to Vegetable in the Pearl River Delta area, South China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huihua; Chen, Junjian; Zhu, Li; Yang, Guoyi; Li, Dingqiang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regional Cadmium (Cd) concentration levels in soils and in leaf vegetables across the Pearl River Delta (PRD) area; and reveal the transfer characteristics of Cadmium (Cd) from soils to leaf vegetable species on a regional scale. 170 paired vegetables and corresponding surface soil samples in the study area were collected for calculating the transfer factors of Cadmium (Cd) from soils to vegetables. This investigation revealed that in the study area Cd concentration in soils was lower (mean value 0.158 mg kg?1) compared with other countries or regions. The Cd-contaminated areas are mainly located in west areas of the Pearl River Delta. Cd concentrations in all vegetables were lower than the national standard of Safe vegetables (0.2 mg kg?1). 88% of vegetable samples met the standard of No-Polluted vegetables (0.05 mg kg?1). The Cd concentration in vegetables was mainly influenced by the interactions of total Cd concentration in soils, soil pH and vegetable species. The fit lines of soil-to-plant transfer factors and total Cd concentration in soils for various vegetable species were best described by the exponential equation (), and these fit lines can be divided into two parts, including the sharply decrease part with a large error range, and the slowly decrease part with a low error range, according to the gradual increasing of total Cd concentrations in soils. PMID:25247431

  10. Single-Phase, Turbulent Heat-Transfer Friction-Factor Data Base Flow Enhanced Tb

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    Heat-exchanger designers need to know what type of performance improvement can be obtained before they will consider enhanced tubes. In particular, they need access to the heat-transfer coefficients and friction-factor values of enhanced tube types that are commercially available. To compile these data from the numerous publications and reports in the open literature is a formidable task that can discourage the designer from using them. A computer program that contains a comprehensive data base withmore »a search feature would be a handy tool for the designer to obtain an estimate of the performance improvement that can be obtained with a particular enhanced tube geometry. In addition, it would be a valuable tool for researchers who are developing and/or validating new prediction methods. This computer program can be used to obtain friction-factor and/or heat-transfer data for a broad range of internally enhanced tube geometries with forced-convective turbulent flow. The program has search features; that is the user can select data for tubes with a particular enhancement geometry range or data obtained from a particular source or publication. The friction factor data base contains nearly 5,000 points and the heat-transfer data base contains more than 4,700 points. About 360 different tube geometries are included from the 36 different sources. Data for tubes with similar geometries and the same and/or different types can be easily extracted with the sort feature of this data base and compared. Users of the program are heat-exchanger designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  11. Selection of terrestrial transfer factors for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Y.C.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter value for a radioecological assessment model is not a single value but a distribution of values about a central value. The sources that contribute to the variability of transfer factors to predict foodchain transport of radionuclides are enumerated. Knowledge of these sources, judgement in interpreting the available data, consideration of collateral information, and established criteria that specify the desired level of conservatism in the resulting predictions are essential elements when selecting appropriate parameter values for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides. 39 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  12. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I.; Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  13. Aggregated Transfer Factors For Small Mammals Collected From the Exposed Sediments Of A 137 Cs Contaminated Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, Michael H.; Jannika, G. Timothy; Wike, Lynn D

    2005-10-04

    {sup 137}Cs transfer factors were computed for small mammals collected from the dried sediment areas of a partially drained, contaminated reservoir. Soil {sup 137}Cs concentrations were heterogeneous on small and large spatial scales, with a geometric mean of 253.1 Bq/kg dry weight. About 50% of the variance in cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus tissue {sup 137}Cs levels was explained by variation in soil {sup 137}Cs levels. Soil to animal transfer factors (whole body dry weight) averaged 6.0 for cotton rats and 1.2 for cotton mice Peromyscus gossypinus. These values are similar to {sup 137}Cs transfer factors for herbivorous, homeothermic animals from other contaminated ecosystems. Site-specific transfer factors can significantly affect the estimation of dose. In the RESRAD-BIOTA dose model, the default transfer factor for {sup 137}Cs in terrestrial animals is 110 resulting in an estimate of radiation dose to terrestrial biota that is 16 times more than the dose calculated with the actual measured transfer factor.

  14. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore »the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  15. Factor IX expression in skeletal muscle of a severe hemophilia B patient 10 years after AAV-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Buchlis, George; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Radu, Antonetta; Hawk, Sarah M; Flake, Alan W; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A

    2012-03-29

    In previous work we transferred a human factor IX-encoding adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) into skeletal muscle of men with severe hemophilia B. Biopsy of injected muscle up to 1 year after vector injection showed evidence of gene transfer by Southern blot and of protein expression by IHC and immunofluorescent staining. Although the procedure appeared safe, circulating F.IX levels remained subtherapeutic (< 1%). Recently, we obtained muscle tissue from a subject injected 10 years earlier who died of causes unrelated to gene transfer. Using Western blot, IHC, and immunofluorescent staining, we show persistent factor IX expression in injected muscle tissue. F.IX transcripts were detected in injected skeletal muscle using RT-PCR, and isolated whole genomic DNA tested positive for the presence of the transferred AAV vector sequence. This is the longest reported transgene expression to date from a parenterally administered AAV vector, with broad implications for the future of muscle-directed gene transfer. PMID:22271447

  16. Factor IX expression in skeletal muscle of a severe hemophilia B patient 10 years after AAV-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Buchlis, George; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Radu, Antonetta; Hawk, Sarah M.; Flake, Alan W.; Mingozzi, Federico

    2012-01-01

    In previous work we transferred a human factor IX–encoding adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) into skeletal muscle of men with severe hemophilia B. Biopsy of injected muscle up to 1 year after vector injection showed evidence of gene transfer by Southern blot and of protein expression by IHC and immunofluorescent staining. Although the procedure appeared safe, circulating F.IX levels remained subtherapeutic (< 1%). Recently, we obtained muscle tissue from a subject injected 10 years earlier who died of causes unrelated to gene transfer. Using Western blot, IHC, and immunofluorescent staining, we show persistent factor IX expression in injected muscle tissue. F.IX transcripts were detected in injected skeletal muscle using RT-PCR, and isolated whole genomic DNA tested positive for the presence of the transferred AAV vector sequence. This is the longest reported transgene expression to date from a parenterally administered AAV vector, with broad implications for the future of muscle-directed gene transfer. PMID:22271447

  17. Foliar transfer into the biosphere: review of translocation factors to cereal grains.

    PubMed

    Colle, C; Madoz-Escande, C; Leclerc, E

    2009-09-01

    A review of the published literature about foliar transfer radionuclides to cereal grains was carried out with a special interest for translocation factors. Translocation describes the distribution of radionuclides within the plant after foliar deposition and radionuclide absorption onto the surface of leaves. It mainly depends on elements and the plant growth stage. The collected data were derived from both in-field and greenhouse experiments. They were analysed in order to select those coming from a contamination simulating a sprinkling irrigation or a rain. The data set contains 307 values. For each radionuclide the translocation factor values were sorted according to 5 characteristic stages of the cereal vegetative cycle: leaf development-tillering, stem elongation, earing-flowering, grain growth and ripening. Wheat, barley and rye have been treated together, independently of rice. For mobile elements such as cesium, the translocation factor is maximum when the contamination occurred at the earing-flowering stage. For less mobile elements such as strontium this maximum occurred for a foliar contamination at the grain growth stage. This review enabled us to propose the most probable value as well as the range of variation of translocation factors for some radionuclides according to the cereal vegetative cycle. Moreover, from these results, a radionuclide classification is proposed according to three mobility groups. PMID:19019504

  18. Friction factor and heat transfer of nanofluids containing cylindrical nanoparticles in laminar pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jianzhong; Xia, Yi; Ku, Xiaoke

    2014-10-01

    Numerical simulations of polyalphaolefins-Al2O3 nanofluids containing cylindrical nanoparticles in a laminar pipe flow are performed by solving the Navier-Stokes equation with term of cylindrical nanoparticles, the general dynamic equation for cylindrical nanoparticles, and equation for nanoparticle orientation. The distributions of particle number and volume concentration, the friction factor, and heat transfer are obtained and analyzed. The results show that distributions of nanoparticle number and volume concentration are non-uniform across the section, with larger and smaller values in the region near the pipe center and near the wall, respectively. The non-uniformity becomes significant with the increase in the axial distance from the inlet. The friction factor decreases with increasing Reynolds number. The relationships between the friction factor and the nanoparticle volume concentration as well as particle aspect ratio are dependent on the Reynolds number. The Nusselt number of nanofluids, directly proportional to the Reynolds number, particle volume concentration, and particle aspect ratio, is higher near the pipe entrance than at the downstream locations. The rate of increase in Nusselt number at lower particle volume concentration is more than that at higher concentration. Finally, the expressions of friction factor and Nusselt number as a function of particle volume concentration, particle aspect ratio, and Reynolds number are derived based on the numerical data.

  19. Laminar heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of carbon nano tube/water nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Rathnakumar, P; Mayilsamy, K; Suresh, S; Murugesan, P

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on the convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of CNT/water nanofluid through a circular tube fitted with helical screw tape inserts with constant heat flux under laminar flow condition. Nanofluids of 0.1% and 0.2% volume fractions are prepared by two step method. Thermo-physical properties like thermal conductivity and viscosity are measured by using KD2 thermal property analyzer and Brooke field cone and plate viscometer respectively. From the measurements, it is found that the viscosity increase is substantially higher than the increase in the thermal conductivity. The helical screw tape insets with twist ratios Y = 3, 2.44 and 1.78 are used to study the convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics under laminar flow in the Reynolds number range of 520-2500. It is observed that, in a plain tube, maximum enhancement in Nusselt number for 0.1% and 0.2% volume fractions of nanofluids compared to pure water is 15% and 32% respectively. With the use of inserts, maximum enhancement in Nusselt number corresponding to twist ratios of 1.78, 2.44 and 3 are obtained as 8%, 16% and 4.6% for 0.1% volume fraction of nanofluid and 5%, 4% and 12% for 0.2% volume fraction of nanofluid when compared with water in plain tube. Thermal performance factor evaluation revealed that the values at all Reynolds number for all twist ratios and both concentration of CNT nanofluid are greater than unity which indicates that helical screw tape inserts with twist ratios considered are feasible in terms of energy saving in laminar flow. PMID:24745238

  20. The effect of long-term wastewater irrigation on accumulation and transfer of heavy metals in Cupressus sempervirens leaves and adjacent soils.

    PubMed

    Farahat, Emad; Linderholm, Hans W

    2015-04-15

    Wastewater reuse for agriculture is an important management strategy in areas with limited freshwater resources, yielding potential economic and environmental benefits. Here the effects of long-term irrigation with wastewater on the nutrient contents of green and senesced leaves of Cupressus sempervirens L. were assessed for three planted forests in Egypt. Stoichiometric ratios, transfer factors for nutrients from soil to plant and enrichment factors in contaminated soils were estimated and compared to a ground water irrigated control site. Under wastewater irrigation, C. sempervirens transferred most of the estimated nutrients, particularly heavy metals, from green to senesced leaves. This could be a self-protecting mechanism under continuous wastewater irrigation. The accumulation of four metals (Zn, Mn, Cu and Cd) with transfer factors>1 for wastewater-irrigated trees, indicated the ability for metal accumulation of C. sempervirens. Stoichiometric ratios decreased under wastewater irrigation compared to the control site and global trends, which suggests nutrient disorders in these plants. The values of enrichment factors in the wastewater-irrigated soils showed remarkable availability and distribution of metals. Decreased resorption of metals by senesced leaves of C. sempervirens will add considerable amount of these metals to the soils, which will likely have adverse affects on the desert ecosystem components. PMID:25613764

  1. Targeted gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor to alveolar type II epithelial cells reduces lung fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gazdhar, Amiq; Temuri, Almas; Knudsen, Lars; Gugger, Mathias; Schmid, Ralph A; Ochs, Matthias; Geiser, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Inefficient alveolar wound repair contributes to the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent growth factor for alveolar type II epithelial cells (AECII) and may improve repair and reduce fibrosis. We studied whether targeted gene transfer of HGF specifically to AECII improves lung fibrosis in bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis. A plasmid encoding human HGF expressed from the human surfactant protein C promoter (pSpC-hHGF) was designed, and extracorporeal electroporation-mediated gene transfer of HGF specifically to AECII was performed 7 days after bleomycin-induced lung injury in the rat. Animals were killed 7 days after hHGF gene transfer. Electroporation-mediated HGF gene transfer resulted in HGF expression specifically in AECII at biologically relevant levels. HGF gene transfer reduced pulmonary fibrosis as assessed by histology, hydroxyproline determination, and design-based stereology compared with controls. Our results indicate that the antifibrotic effect of HGF is due in part to a reduction of transforming growth factor-?(1), modulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and reduction of extravascular fibrin deposition. We conclude that targeted HGF gene transfer specifically to AECII decreases bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and may therefore represent a novel cell-specific gene transfer technology to treat pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23134111

  2. Evidence for direct transfer of tissue factor from monocytes to platelets in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Sovershaev, Mikhail A; Egorina, Elena M; Osterud, Bjarne; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2012-06-01

    Varying specificity of anti-tissue factor (anti-TF) antibodies gives rise to erroneous conclusions on TF positivity of platelets. Although monocytes are a well established source of TF in whole blood, there is no consensus whether platelets express or acquire TF from external sources. To test whether platelets can acquire TF expressed in monocytes, we studied a transfer of TF-yellow fluorescent protein (TF-YFP) from monocytes nucleofected with TF-YFP to platelets in a whole blood model. Platelets isolated from whole blood were found positive for TF when immunostained with anti-TF antibody from one supplier, whereas no platelet TF antigen was found in whole blood immunostained with anti-TF antibody from another supplier. Both antibodies recognized TF in monocytes. Platelets isolated from whole blood reconstituted with monocytes expressing TF-YFP fusion protein were found positive for TF-YFP only after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, TF protein could be transferred from monocytes upon stimulation with LPS. PMID:22343684

  3. Single-Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Onar, Omer C; Miller, John M; Tang, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance. To understand the power flow through the system this paper presents a novel approach to the system model and the impact of different control parameters on the load power. The implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation is also discussed.

  4. Biota-sediment accumulation and trophic transfer factors for extremely hydrophobic polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Maruya, K.A.; Lee, R.F.

    1998-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fish, invertebrates, and sediment from a contaminated tidal creek system in coastal Georgia (USA) were traced to Aroclor 1268, a mixture of hepta through decachlorinated homologs used at a former chlor/alkali plant adjacent to the study site. The base 10 logarithm of the octanol/water partition coefficient (K{sub ow}) for the 15 most abundant Aroclor 1268 components in these samples ranged from 6.7 to >9. The composite mean biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) for these congeners was 3.1, 0.81, and 0.28 for yearling striped mullet, spotted sea trout, and grass shrimp, respectively, species representing three trophic levels of the local food web. Individual congener BSAFs were negatively correlated with log K{sub ow} for all three species. The composite mean trophic transfer factor (TTF{sub lip}), defined as the ratio of lipid-normalized PCB concentrations in fish to grass shrimp, was higher for mullet (12) than for sea trout (2.9). Individual TTF{sub lip} values were two to three times higher for Cl{sub 7} and Cl{sub 8} homologs that were substituted at all four ortho positions, suggesting a difference in PCB retention based on chlorine substitution patterns. The relative magnitude of BSAFs and TTF{sub lip} values indicated that sediment-ingesting forage species like mullet efficiently accumulate PCBs and are an important link in the food web transfer of sediment-ingesting forage in this system. The negative linear relationships between BSAF and log K{sub ow} established in this study are among the first to be reported in the field for extremely hydrophobic PCBs.

  5. Modification of an impulse-factoring orbital transfer technique to account for orbit determination and maneuver execution errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibler, J. F.; Green, R. N.; Young, G. R.; Kelly, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    A method has previously been developed to satisfy terminal rendezvous and intermediate timing constraints for planetary missions involving orbital operations. The method uses impulse factoring in which a two-impulse transfer is divided into three or four impulses which add one or two intermediate orbits. The periods of the intermediate orbits and the number of revolutions in each orbit are varied to satisfy timing constraints. Techniques are developed to retarget the orbital transfer in the presence of orbit-determination and maneuver-execution errors. Sample results indicate that the nominal transfer can be retargeted with little change in either the magnitude (Delta V) or location of the individual impulses. Additonally, the total Delta V required for the retargeted transfer is little different from that required for the nominal transfer. A digital computer program developed to implement the techniques is described.

  6. Transfer of heavy metals through terrestrial food webs: a review.

    PubMed

    Gall, Jillian E; Boyd, Robert S; Rajakaruna, Nishanta

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals are released into the environment by both anthropogenic and natural sources. Highly reactive and often toxic at low concentrations, they may enter soils and groundwater, bioaccumulate in food webs, and adversely affect biota. Heavy metals also may remain in the environment for years, posing long-term risks to life well after point sources of heavy metal pollution have been removed. In this review, we compile studies of the community-level effects of heavy metal pollution, including heavy metal transfer from soils to plants, microbes, invertebrates, and to both small and large mammals (including humans). Many factors contribute to heavy metal accumulation in animals including behavior, physiology, and diet. Biotic effects of heavy metals are often quite different for essential and non-essential heavy metals, and vary depending on the specific metal involved. They also differ for adapted organisms, including metallophyte plants and heavy metal-tolerant insects, which occur in naturally high-metal habitats (such as serpentine soils) and have adaptations that allow them to tolerate exposure to relatively high concentrations of some heavy metals. Some metallophyte plants are hyperaccumulators of certain heavy metals and new technologies using them to clean metal-contaminated soil (phytoextraction) may offer economically attractive solutions to some metal pollution challenges. These new technologies provide incentive to catalog and protect the unique biodiversity of habitats that have naturally high levels of heavy metals. PMID:25800370

  7. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Power transfer capability of wireless power transfer systems is highly dependent on the magnetic design of the primary and secondary inductors and is measured quantitatively by the coupling factor. The inductors are designed by placing the coil over a ferrite base to increase the coupling factor and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance, and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending on the placement of ferrite. Also, the addition of ferrite increases the self-inductance of the coils, and there is a probability for an overall decrease in the coupling factor. Correct placement of ferrite, on the other hand, can increase the coupling factor relatively higher than the base ferrite as it is closer to the other inductor. Ferrite being a heavy compound of iron increases the inductor weight significantly and needs to be added judiciously. Four zones have been identified in the paper, which shows different sensitivity to addition of ferrite in terms of the two inductances and coupling factor. Simulation and measurement results are presented for different air gaps between the coils and at different gap distances between the ferrite base and added ferrite. This paper is beneficial in improving the coupling factor while adding minimum weight to wireless power transfer system.

  8. Work Environment Factors Influencing the Transfer of Learning for Online Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gitonga, Jacqueline W.

    2006-01-01

    HRD professionals struggle with why a higher percentage of skills and knowledge acquired through training fail to transfer to the work environment and why transfer appears to diminish over time (Cromwell & Kolb, 2002). With increased investment in technology and professional development, it is imperative to enhance the learners' transfer process…

  9. An Analysis of Factors Contributing to the Academic Success of Transfer Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Moore, Donna Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Attrition is a growing concern among higher education institutions. Student retention has long been viewed as a measure of institutional effectiveness. The number of transfer students, particularly those who seek entry into postsecondary education by transfer from a two-year to a four-year institution, continues to increase. However, transfer

  10. Transfer of radiocesium to four cruciferous vegetables as influenced by organic amendment under different field conditions in Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Aung, Han Phyo; Djedidi, Salem; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Sohzoh; Bellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko Dorothea

    2015-02-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer of radiocesium ((137)Cs) in four cruciferous vegetables as influenced by cattle manure-based compost amendment was investigated. Komatsuna, mustard, radish and turnip were cultivated in three different (137)Cs-contaminated fields at Nihonmatsu City in Fukushima Prefecture from June to August 2012. Results revealed that organic compost amendments stimulated plant biomass production and tended to induce higher (137)Cs concentration in the cruciferous vegetables in most cases. Among the studied sites, Takanishi soil possessing low exchangeable potassium (0.10 cmolc kg(-1)) was associated with an increased concentration of (137)Cs in plants. Radiocesium transfer factor (TF) values of the vegetables ranged from 0.025 to 0.119. The increase in (137)Cs TFs was dependent on larger plant biomass production, high organic matter content, and high sand content in the studied soils. Average (137)Cs TF values for all study sites and compost treatments were higher in Komatsuna (0.072) and radish (0.059), which exhibited a higher biomass production compared to mustard and turnip. The transferability of (137)Cs to vegetables from soils was in the order Komatsuna > radish > mustard > turnip. The highest (137)Cs TF value (0.071) of all vegetables was recorded for a field where the soil had high organic matter content and a high clay proportion of 470 g kg(-1) consisting of Al-vermiculite clay mineral. PMID:25483355

  11. Perceptions of a Learning Organization and Factors within the Work Environment That Influence Transfer of Training in Law Enforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter-Johnson, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine law enforcement officers' perception of factors within the workplace that influence transfer of training and their perception of the organization being a learning organization. The study actually had three parts. First, it intended to investigate the perception of law enforcement officers regarding…

  12. FACTORS AFFECTING PERFORMANCE OF TRANSFER STUDENTS FROM 2- TO 4-YEAR COLLEGES--WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR COORDINATION AND ARTICULATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KNOELL, DOROTHY M.; MEDSKER, LELAND L.

    AN INTENSIVE STUDY WAS MADE OF THE FACTORS AFFECTING PERSISTENCE AND ACADEMIC ACCOMPLISHMENT OF STUDENTS TRANSFERRING FROM 2-YEAR (JUNIOR COLLEGE) TO 4-YEAR COLLEGES. THE OBJECTIVE WAS TO OBTAIN NORMATIVE INFORMATION ABOUT THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THESE STUDENTS. THE MAJOR STUDY GROUP WAS COMPOSED OF APPROXIMATELY 9,000 JUNIOR COLLEGE STUDENTS WHO…

  13. Hispanic Student Success: Factors Influencing the Persistence and Transfer Decisions of Latino Community College Students Enrolled in Developmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Gloria; Nora, Amaury

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a set of theoretically-derived predictor variables on the persistence and transfer of Hispanic community college students. Early models of student persistence have been validated primarily among 4-year college students. While the constructs have been well-established, the relationships of those relevant factors

  14. Learning What Matters: Exploring the Factors Affecting Learning Transfers in Child Welfare Competencies and Career Interest in Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Aries Meng-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of the factors impacting MSW students' interests and motivation to learn child welfare competencies, and how they affect learning transfer of the subject is important for the development of a knowledgeable, competent, and committed workforce that serves children and families in the United States. Practitioners need to attain…

  15. Measurements of the meson-photon transition form factors of light pseudoscalar mesons at large momentum transfer

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1998-01-01

    with the electromagnetic transitions ?*?? meson. We have measured these form factors in the momentum transfer ranges from 1.5 to 9, 20, and 30GeV(2) for ?(0), ?, and ??, respectively, and have made comparisons to various theoretical predictions....

  16. Imaging Erg and Jun transcription factor interaction in living cells using fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Camuzeaux, Barbara; Heliot, Laurent; Coll, Jean . E-mail: martine.duterque@ibl.fr

    2005-07-15

    Physical interactions between transcription factors play important roles in modulating gene expression. Previous in vitro studies have shown a transcriptional synergy between Erg protein, an Ets family member, and Jun/Fos heterodimer, members of the bZip family, which requires direct Erg-Jun protein interactions. Visualization of protein interactions in living cells is a new challenge in biology. For this purpose, we generated fusion proteins of Erg, Fos, and Jun with yellow and cyan fluorescent proteins, YFP and CFP, respectively. After transient expression in HeLa cells, interactions of the resulting fusion proteins were explored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy (FRET) in fixed and living cells. FRET between YFP-Erg and CFP-Jun was monitored by using photobleaching FRET and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Both techniques revealed the occurrence of intermolecular FRET between YFP-Erg and CFP-Jun. This is stressed by loss of FRET with an YFP-Erg version carrying a point mutation in its ETS domain. These results provide evidence for the interaction of Erg and Jun proteins in living cells as a critical prerequisite of their transcriptional synergy, but also for the essential role of the Y371 residue, conserved in most Ets proteins, in this interaction.

  17. Visualization of two transfer RNAs trapped in transit during elongation factor G-mediated translocation.

    PubMed

    Ramrath, David J F; Lancaster, Laura; Sprink, Thiemo; Mielke, Thorsten; Loerke, Justus; Noller, Harry F; Spahn, Christian M T

    2013-12-24

    During protein synthesis, coupled translocation of messenger RNAs (mRNA) and transfer RNAs (tRNA) through the ribosome takes place following formation of each peptide bond. The reaction is facilitated by large-scale conformational changes within the ribosomal complex and catalyzed by elongtion factor G (EF-G). Previous structural analysis of the interaction of EF-G with the ribosome used either model complexes containing no tRNA or only a single tRNA, or complexes where EF-G was directly bound to ribosomes in the posttranslocational state. Here, we present a multiparticle cryo-EM reconstruction of a translocation intermediate containing two tRNAs trapped in transit, bound in chimeric intrasubunit ap/P and pe/E hybrid states. The downstream ap/P-tRNA is contacted by domain IV of EF-G and P-site elements within the 30S subunit body, whereas the upstream pe/E-tRNA maintains tight interactions with P-site elements of the swiveled 30S head. Remarkably, a tight compaction of the tRNA pair can be seen in this state. The translocational intermediate presented here represents a previously missing link in understanding the mechanism of translocation, revealing that the ribosome uses two distinct molecular ratchets, involving both intra- and intersubunit rotational movements, to drive the synchronous movement of tRNAs and mRNA. PMID:24324168

  18. Factors affecting the levels of protection transferred from mother to offspring following immune challenge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The transfer of antibodies from mother to offspring is key to protecting young animals from disease and can have a major impact on responses to infection and offspring fitness. Such maternal effects also allow young that may be exposed to disease in early life to focus resources on growth and development at this critical period of development. Maternally transferred antibodies are therefore an important source of phenotypic variation in host phenotype as well as influencing host susceptibility and tolerance to infection across generations. It has previously been assumed the transfer of antibodies is passive and invariant and reflects the level of circulating antibody in the mother at the time of transfer. However, whether females may vary in the relative amount of protection transferred to offspring has seldom been explored. Results Here we show that females differ widely in the relative amount of specific blood antibodies they transfer to the embryonic environment (range 9.2%-38.4% of their own circulating levels) in Chinese painted quail (Coturnix chinensis). Relative transfer levels were unrelated to the size of a female’s own immune response. Furthermore, individual females were consistent in their transfer level, both across different stages of their immune response and when challenged with different vaccine types. The amount of antibody transferred was related to female condition, but baseline antibody responses of mothers were not. However, we found no evidence for any trade-offs between the relative amount of antibody transferred with other measures of reproductive investment. Conclusions These results suggest that the relative amount of antibodies transferred to offspring can vary significantly and consistently between females. Levels of transfer may therefore be a separate trait open to manipulation or selection with potential consequences for offspring health and fitness in both wild and domesticated populations. PMID:25057280

  19. Gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for enhanced expression and perfusion in the ischemic swine heart.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, Barbara; Strange, Robert; Navare, Sagar; Stratton, Michael; Burcus, Nina; Murray, Len; Lundberg, Cathryn; Bulysheva, Anna; Li, Fanying; Heller, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia can damage heart muscle and reduce the heart's pumping efficiency. This study used an ischemic swine heart model to investigate the potential for gene electro transfer of a plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for improving perfusion and, thus, for reducing cardiomyopathy following acute coronary syndrome. Plasmid expression was significantly greater in gene electro transfer treated tissue compared to injection of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Higher gene expression was also seen in ischemic versus non-ischemic groups with parameters 20 Volts (p<0.03), 40 Volts (p<0.05), and 90 Volts (p<0.05), but not with 60 Volts (p<0.09) while maintaining a pulse width of 20 milliseconds. The group with gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor had increased perfusion in the area at risk compared to control groups. Troponin and creatine kinase increased across all groups, suggesting equivalent ischemia in all groups prior to treatment. Echocardiography was used to assess ejection fraction, cardiac output, stroke volume, left ventricular end diastolic volume, and left ventricular end systolic volume. No statistically significant differences in these parameters were detected during a 2-week time period. However, directional trends of these variables were interesting and offer valuable information about the feasibility of gene electro transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor in the ischemic heart. The results demonstrate that gene electro transfer can be applied safely and can increase perfusion in an ischemic area. Additional study is needed to evaluate potential efficacy. PMID:25545364

  20. Gene Electro Transfer of Plasmid Encoding Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor for Enhanced Expression and Perfusion in the Ischemic Swine Heart

    PubMed Central

    Navare, Sagar; Stratton, Michael; Murray, Len; Li, Fanying

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia can damage heart muscle and reduce the heart's pumping efficiency. This study used an ischemic swine heart model to investigate the potential for gene electro transfer of a plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for improving perfusion and, thus, for reducing cardiomyopathy following acute coronary syndrome. Plasmid expression was significantly greater in gene electro transfer treated tissue compared to injection of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Higher gene expression was also seen in ischemic versus non-ischemic groups with parameters 20 Volts (p<0.03), 40 Volts (p<0.05), and 90 Volts (p<0.05), but not with 60 Volts (p<0.09) while maintaining a pulse width of 20 milliseconds. The group with gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor had increased perfusion in the area at risk compared to control groups. Troponin and creatine kinase increased across all groups, suggesting equivalent ischemia in all groups prior to treatment. Echocardiography was used to assess ejection fraction, cardiac output, stroke volume, left ventricular end diastolic volume, and left ventricular end systolic volume. No statistically significant differences in these parameters were detected during a 2-week time period. However, directional trends of these variables were interesting and offer valuable information about the feasibility of gene electro transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor in the ischemic heart. The results demonstrate that gene electro transfer can be applied safely and can increase perfusion in an ischemic area. Additional study is needed to evaluate potential efficacy. PMID:25545364

  1. External and Institutional Factors Affecting Community College Student-Transfer Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Debra L.

    A study was conducted to identify the environmental conditions and relationships between external and institutional conditions that have a significant effect upon student transfer activity. A sample of 78 colleges in 15 states were selected from institutions participating in a national transfer project; 42% were located in Texas or California. The…

  2. Aqueous Al2O3 nanofluids: the important factors impacting convective heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianguo; Ding, Yulong; Ma, Caiyun

    2014-12-01

    A high accuracy, counter flow double pipe heat exchanger system is designed for the measurement of convective heat transfer coefficients with different nanofluids. Both positive and negative enhancement of convective heat transfer of alumina nanofluids are found in the experiments. A modified equation was proposed to explain above phenomena through the physic properties of nanofluids such as thermal conductivity, special heat capacity and viscosity.

  3. Largely ignored: the impact of the threshold value for a QALY on the importance of a transferability factor.

    PubMed

    Vemer, Pepijn; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H

    2011-10-01

    Recently, several checklists systematically assessed factors that affect the transferability of cost-effectiveness (CE) studies between jurisdictions. The role of the threshold value for a QALY has been given little consideration in these checklists, even though the importance of a factor as a cause of between country differences in CE depends on this threshold. In this paper, we study the impact of the willingness-to-pay (WTP) per QALY on the importance of transferability factors in the case of smoking cessation support (SCS). We investigated, for several values of the WTP, how differences between six countries affect the incremental net monetary benefit (INMB) of SCS. The investigated factors were demography, smoking prevalence, mortality, epidemiology and costs of smoking-related diseases, resource use and unit costs of SCS, utility weights and discount rates. We found that when the WTP decreased, factors that mainly affect health outcomes became less important and factors that mainly effect costs became more important. With a WTP below 1,000, the factors most responsible for between country differences in INMB were resource use and unit costs of SCS and the costs of smoking-related diseases. Utility values had little impact. At a threshold above 10,000, between country differences were primarily due to different discount rates, utility weights and epidemiology of smoking-related diseases. Costs of smoking-related diseases had little impact. At all thresholds, demography had little impact. We concluded that, when judging the transferability of a CE study, we should consider the between country differences in WTP threshold values. PMID:20512607

  4. Factors affecting the rate of T-DNA transfer from Agrobacterium tumefaciens to Nicotiana glauca plant cells.

    PubMed

    Mozo, T; Hooykaas, P J

    1992-09-01

    Different factors involved in the early steps of the T-DNA transfer process were studied by using a beta-glucuronidase gene (gusA) as a reporter in Nicotiana glauca leaf disc transformation experiments. The levels of transient expression of the gusA gene in leaf discs infected with several strains or vir mutants correlated well with their virulence phenotype, except for virC mutants. The rate of T-DNA transfer was shown to be stimulated in the case of non-oncogenic strains by the co-transfer of small amounts of oncogenic genes. It was found that the location of the T-DNA in the Agrobacterium genome affected the T-DNA transfer rate especially in virC mutants. The virC mutants transferred the gusA-containing T-DNA located on a binary vector more efficiently than the oncogenic T-DNA of the Ti plasmid. Although wild-type strains induced high levels of gusA expression early after infection, the gusA expression appeared to be lost late after infection in the infected leaf discs. In contrast, in leaf discs infected by virC mutants the level of gusA expression increased steadily in time. A model explaining these results is presented. PMID:1511127

  5. The Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio mu(p) G**p(E)/G**p(M) at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ron; J. Glister; B. Lee; K. Allada; W. Armstrong; J. Arrington; A. Beck; F. Benmokhtar; B.L. Berman; W. Boeglin; E. Brash; A. Camsonne; J. Calarco; J. P. Chen; Seonho Choi; E. Chudakov; L. Coman; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; J. Dumas; C. Dutta; R. Feuerbach; A. Freyberger; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; R. Gilman; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; C.E. Hyde; H. Ibrahim; Y. Ilieva; C. W. de Jager; X. Jiang; M. K. Jones; A. Kelleher; E. Khrosinkova; E. Kuchina; G. Kumbartzki; J. J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; P. Markowitz; S. May-Tal Beck; E. McCullough; D. Meekins; M. Meziane; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; B.E. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Olson; M. Paolone; K. Paschke; C. F. Perdrisat; E. Piasetzky; M. Potokar; R. Pomatsalyuk; I. Pomerantz; A. Puckett; V. Punjabi; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; R. Ransome; M. Reyhan; J. Roche; Y. Rousseau; A. Saha; A.J. Sarty; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; M. Shabestari; A. Shahinyan; R. Shneor; S. ? Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; J. Song; R. Sparks; R. Subedi; S. Strauch; G. M. Urciuoli; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; X. Zhan; X. Zhu

    2007-11-01

    High precision measurements of the proton elastic form factor ratio have been made at four-momentum transfers, Q^2, between 0.2 and 0.5 GeV^2. The new data, while consistent with previous results, clearly show a ratio less than unity and significant differences from the central values of several recent phenomenological fits. By combining the new form-factor ratio data with an existing cross-section measurement, one finds that in this Q^2 range the deviation from unity is primarily due to GEp being smaller than the dipole parameterization.

  6. Overlapping Binding Sites of the Frataxin Homologue Assembly Factor and the Heat Shock Protein 70 Transfer Factor on the Isu Iron-Sulfur Cluster Scaffold Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Manicki, Mateusz; Majewska, Julia; Ciesielski, Szymon; Schilke, Brenda; Blenska, Anna; Kominek, Jacek; Marszalek, Jaroslaw; Craig, Elizabeth A.; Dutkiewicz, Rafal

    2014-01-01

    In mitochondria FeS clusters, prosthetic groups critical for the activity of many proteins, are first assembled on Isu, a 14-kDa scaffold protein, and then transferred to recipient apoproteins. The assembly process involves interaction of Isu with both Nfs1, the cysteine desulfurase serving as a sulfur donor, and the yeast frataxin homolog (Yfh1) serving as a regulator of desulfurase activity and/or iron donor. Here, based on the results of biochemical experiments with purified wild-type and variant proteins, we report that interaction of Yfh1 with both Nfs1 and Isu are required for formation of a stable tripartite assembly complex. Disruption of either Yfh1-Isu or Nfs1-Isu interactions destabilizes the complex. Cluster transfer to recipient apoprotein is known to require the interaction of Isu with the J-protein/Hsp70 molecular chaperone pair, Jac1 and Ssq1. Here we show that the Yfh1 interaction with Isu involves the PVK sequence motif, which is also the site key for the interaction of Isu with Hsp70 Ssq1. Coupled with our previous observation that Nfs1 and Jac1 binding to Isu is mutually exclusive due to partially overlapping binding sites, we propose that such mutual exclusivity of cluster assembly factor (Nfs1/Yfh1) and cluster transfer factor (Jac1/Ssq1) binding to Isu has functional consequences for the transition from the assembly process to the transfer process, and thus regulation of the biogenesis of FeS cluster proteins. PMID:25228696

  7. Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio to high momentum transfer

    E-print Network

    Puckett, Andrew James Ruehe

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon characterize the effect of its internal structure on its response to an electromagnetic probe as studied in elastic electronnucleon scattering. These form factors are functions ...

  8. Heat transfer and friction factor correlations for a solar air heater duct roughened artificially with multiple v-ribs

    SciTech Connect

    Hans, V.S.; Saini, R.P.; Saini, J.S.

    2010-06-15

    The use of artificial roughness on the underside of the absorber plate is an effective and economic way to improve the thermal performance of a solar air heater. Several experimental investigations, involving different types of roughness elements, have been carried out to improve the heat transfer from the absorber plate to air flowing in solar air heaters. This paper presents an experimental investigation carried out to study the effect of multiple v-rib roughness on heat transfer coefficient and friction factor in an artificially roughened solar air heater duct. The experiment encompassed Reynolds number (Re) from 2000 to 20000, relative roughness height (e/D) values of 0.019-0.043, relative roughness pitch (P/e) range of 6-12, angle of attack ({alpha}) range of 30-75 and relative roughness width (W/w) range of 1-10. Extensive experimentation has been conducted to collect data on heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of a rectangular duct roughened with multiple v-ribs. Using these experimental data, correlations for Nusselt number and friction factor in terms of roughness geometry and flow parameters have been developed. (author)

  9. CFD analysis of heat transfer and friction factor charaterstics in a circular tube fitted with horizontal baffles twisted tape inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Bakar Mohamad, Abu

    2013-12-01

    Swirl/vortex flow generator is an important form of passive augmentation techniques. Twisted-tape is one of the most important members of this form which is used extensively in different type heat exchangers. This paper reports the effect of twisted tape inserts on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics in circular tube under constant heat flux and laminar flow conditions using CFD simulation. Plain twisted tape inserts with twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91) and baffled twisted tape inserts with twist ratio (y = 2.93) have been used for the simulation using Fluent version 6.3.26. The results obtained by simulation matched with the literature correlations for plain tube with the discrepancy of less than ± 8% for Nusselt number and ± 6.25% for friction factor. The results have also revealed that the heat transfer in term of the Nusselt number enhanced with increases of Reynolds number, decreases of twist ratio and baffle insert. Among the various twist ratios, the twisted tape with twist ratio of y=2.93 and baffle is offered a maximum heat transfer enhancement.

  10. Transfer of Tumor Necrosis Factor-? to Rat Lung Induces Severe Pulmonary Inflammation and Patchy Interstitial Fibrogenesis with Induction of Transforming Growth Factor-?1 and Myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sime, Patricia J.; Marr, Robert A.; Gauldie, David; Xing, Zhou; Hewlett, Bryan R.; Graham, Frank L.; Gauldie, Jack

    1998-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-? is up-regulated in a variety of different human immune-inflammatory and fibrotic pulmonary pathologies. However, its precise role in these pathologies and, in particular, the mechanism(s) by which it may induce fibrogenesis are not yet elucidated. Using a replication-deficient adenovirus to transfer the cDNA of tumor necrosis factor-? to rat lung, we have been able to study the effect of transient but prolonged (7 to 10 days) overexpression of tumor necrosis factor-? in normal adult pulmonary tissue. We have demonstrated that local overexpression resulted in severe pulmonary inflammation with significant increases in neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes and, to a lesser extent, eosinophils, with a peak at day 7. By day 14, the inflammatory cell accumulation had declined, and fibrogenesis became evident, with fibroblast accumulation and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Fibrotic changes were patchy but persisted to beyond day 64. To elucidate the mechanism underlying this fibrogenesis, we examined bronchoalveolar fluids for the presence of the fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor-?1 and tissues for induction of ?-smooth muscle actin-rich myofibroblasts. Transforming growth factor-?1 was transiently elevated from day 7 (peak at day 14) immediately preceding the onset of fibrogenesis. Furthermore, there was a striking accumulation of myofibroblasts from day 7, with the most extensive and intense immunostaining at day 14, ie, coincident with the up-regulation of transforming growth factor-?1 and onset of fibrogenesis. Thus, we have provided a model of tumor necrosis factor-?-mediated pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in normal adult lung, and we suggest that the fibrogenesis may be mediated by the secondary up-regulation of transforming growth factor-?1 and induction of pulmonary myofibroblasts. PMID:9736031

  11. EXPERIMENTAL METHODOLOGIES AND PRELIMINARY TRANSFER FACTOR DATA FOR ESTIMATION OF DERMAL EXPOSURES TO PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental efforts and experimental data are described that focused on quantifying the transfer of particles on a mass basis from indoor surfaces to human skin. Methods were developed that utilized a common fluorescein-tagged Arizona Test Dust (ATD) as a possible surrogate ...

  12. Factors Affecting Persistence of Undergraduate Students in a Fisheries and Wildlife Program: Transfer Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Bjorn H. K.; Millenbah, Kelly F.; Montgomery, Robert A.; Schneider, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Transfer students are of recognized importance to postsecondary education and every year feed thousands of students into natural resources programs across America. This influx of students can have a sustaining effect on many academic programs, including fisheries and wildlife programs, which are suffering from a nation-wide decrease in interest…

  13. nature genetics volume 24 march 2000 257 Evidence for gene transfer and expression of factor IX

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    letter nature genetics · volume 24 · march 2000 257 Evidence for gene transfer and expression W. Flake4,6 & Katherine A. High4,5 Departments of 1Pediatrics, 2Genetics and 3Surgery, Stanford be addressed to K.A.H. (e-mail: high@email.chop.edu). Pre-clinical studies in mice and haemophilic dogs have

  14. Impact of plant and environmental factors on ALS-resistant gene transfer rate from ClearfieldTM rice to red rice biotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pollen-mediated transfer of ALS-resistant gene from ClearfieldTM (CL) rice to red rice can affect the population dynamics and long-term management of red rice. To mitigate gene flow, it is important to understand the plant and environmental factors which affect gene transfer rate. This experiment ai...

  15. SiC MOSFET Based Single Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Onar, Omer C; Tang, Lixin; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Campbell, Steven L; Miller , John M.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges the utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance due to variable parameters such as battery state-of-charge, coupling factor, and coil misalignment. This paper presents the implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation. The proposed SiC MOSFET based single phase active front end rectifier with PFC resulted in >97% efficiency at 137mm air-gap and >95% efficiency at 160mm air-gap.

  16. An experimental investigation into the effects turbulator profile and spacing have on heat transfer coefficients and friction factors in small cooled turbine airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslim, M. E.; Spring, S. D.

    1991-06-01

    An experimental investigation is conducted using liquid crystals to study the effects of turbulator profile and spacing on heat transfer coefficient. Friction factors are also measured and both friction factor and heat transfer results for fifteen turbulator geometries are compared. All test configurations position the turbulators on two opposite walls of a rectangular test section in a staggered arrangement with an angle of attack to the mainstream flow of 90 degrees. It is concluded that while turbulators with aspect ratios greater than unity produce higher heat transfer coefficients at the expense of higher pressure losses, 'jersey-barrier' shaped turbulators, properly spaced, are very effective in heat removal with moderate pressure losses.

  17. Processing and transfer of epidermal growth factor in developing rat jejunum and ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, R.K.; Koldovsky, O.; Korc, M.; Pollack, P.F.; Wright, S.; Davis, T.P. )

    1990-11-01

    Using everted sac technique we demonstrated the transfer of {sup 125}I-mEGF across the jejunal and ileal walls of suckling, weanling and adult rats. The transfer by the suckling rat jejunum and ileum was significantly inhibited by the presence of dinitrophenol and sodium azide or by the replacement of sodium with potassium or choline, RP-HPLC analysis detected carboxy-terminal processing of {sup 125}I-mEGF in suckling and adult rat jejunum and ileum. Suckling rat jejunum produced {sup 125}I-des(53)mEGF and {sup 125}I-des(49-53)mEGF, whereas {sup 125}I-des(48-53)mEGF was detected in suckling rat ileum or adult rat jejunum and ileum. All three forms of {sup 125}I-mEGF bound to anti-EGF antibody and EGF receptors. The receptor binding of {sup 125}I-des(53)mEGF was higher than that of {sup 125}I-mEGF, but those of {sup 125}I-des(49-53)mEGF and {sup 125}I-des(48-53)mEGF were greatly diminished. Results indicate a carboxy-terminal processing of mouse EGF during uptake and transfer in the small intestine of developing and adult rats, and the resulting products showed altered receptor binding. An identical amino acid sequence of the C-terminal pentapeptide of eGF from mouse, human and possibly rat may suggest a biological significance of C-terminal processing of EGF in the small intestine.

  18. Transfer students in STEM majors at a Midwestern University: Academic and social involvement factors that influence student success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Carlos

    There is soon-to-be a shortage of qualified U.S. workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As a result, many science-related jobs are being filled by technically-skilled foreign workers. If the U.S wants to maintain its global economic leadership, then it must ensure a continuous growth of highly-trained individuals in STEM disciplines. Therefore, American institutions of higher education, including community colleges, must identify potential factors that contribute to the lack of interest in STEM majors, as well as the low rate of success of students who enter STEM majors but struggle to finish their degrees. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of community college transfer students who are pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM majors at Iowa State University (ISU). What were their transfer experiences and what influenced their academic success in STEM. Participants were encouraged to share their transfer experiences while at the community college as well as their experiences on the ISU campus. They were also asked about their level of academic involvement, their relationships with faculty, and their participation in peer group activities prior to and after transferring. The research design included both quantitative and qualitative components, which provided an in-depth look at the experiences of STEM non-engineering and engineering students. Quantitative data include students' background characteristics, demographic information, and college activities at the community college and ISU. Qualitative data were used to illuminate students' overall transfer experience and their successful journey in STEM fields. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed a better understanding of the strategies students put into practice once they transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in pursuit of a STEM bachelor's degree. The results of this study suggest that there is an association among the background characteristics, community college experiences, university experiences, and the overall adjustment and cumulative GPA of transfer students from STEM non-engineering and engineering majors. In addition, students reported how their early experiences in science and mathematics inspired them to pursue a career in STEM. Even though students chose to go into STEM areas at the community college and university level due to prior interest, the role of academic advisors and faculty were crucial to the adjustment process. Thus, it is vital for academic advisors and faculty to assist students in researching the transfer process to four-year institutions because students need to understand why this is essential to their academic and social adjustment process. The results indicate that it is important to encourage students to interact inside and outside the classroom with other students and instructors. Also, students should become more involved in academic and social groups since these are important factors in enhancing their academic and social adjustment.

  19. Health status and risk factors associated with failure of passive transfer of immunity in newborn beef calves in Québec

    PubMed Central

    Filteau, Virginie; Bouchard, Émile; Fecteau, Gilles; Dutil, Lucie; DuTremblay, Denis

    2003-01-01

    Risk factors associated with failure of passive transfer of immunity (FPT) were evaluated among newborn beef calves in Québec. Physical examination was performed on calves born of a normal calving and blood samples were collected for determination of health status and measurement of serum concentration of immunoglobulin (Ig) G1. Of 225 calves, from 45 herds, 19 % showed FPT (serum IgG1 concentration < 10.0 g/L). Calves born in a stanchion-stall were more likely to show FPT (OR: 10.2). Calves bottle-fed colostrum were less at risk for FPT (OR: 0.06). Calf gender, month of birth, dam parity, and dam body condition score were not associated with FPT. No association was detected between FPT and health status. Special care should be given to calves born from cows in a stanchion-stall to ensure adequate colostrum intake. Failure of passive transfer of immunity should be considered with other risk factors when investigating morbidity. PMID:14664353

  20. Effects of human transfer factor on the migration of guinea-pig macrophages: is there an antigen-specific activity?

    PubMed

    Sargent, I L; Salaman, M R

    1980-09-01

    Dialysable transfer factor (TF) prepared from the buffy-coat cells of tuberculin-positive human donors exerted antigen (PPD)-dependent inhibition of migration of guinea-pig peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) provided that migration of the cells was not strongly affected by PPD alone. TF from tuberculin-negative donors did not do this. The effect could be better demonstrated with tuberculin-sensitive than with normal PEC. Differences in the actions of 'tuberculin-positive' and 'negative' TF may also be seen in the absence of antigen. In a similar but more restricted series of experiments with diphtheria toxoid (DT) as antigen, DT-dependent inhibition was observed only with 'DT-positive' TF. The findings concerning antigen-dependent inhibition in both the tuberculin and toxoid systems are compatible with the concept of an antigen-specific TF, but it is argued that they should not be taken as strong evidence of such specificity. In the tuberculin system the results suggest an alternative explanation, namely that 'tuberculin-positive' TF contains a higher level of a non-specific activity. Whether specific or not, the antigen-dependent activity probably involves a stimulatory action on antigen-induced lymphocyte activation leading to enhanced production of macrophages migration inhibition factor, and it could be related to the 'transfer' phenomenon in vivo. PMID:6159314

  1. Nonredundant roles of IL-10 and TGF-? in suppression of immune responses to hepatic AAV-factor IX gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Brad E; Martino, Ashley T; Sack, Brandon K; Cao, Ou; Liao, Gongxian; Terhorst, Cox; Herzog, Roland W

    2011-07-01

    Hepatic gene transfer using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has been shown to efficiently induce immunological tolerance to a variety of proteins. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) induced by this route suppress humoral and cellular immune responses against the transgene product. In this study, we examined the roles of immune suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) in the development of tolerance to human coagulation factor IX (hF.IX). Interestingly, IL-10 deficient C57BL/6 mice receiving gene transfer remained tolerant to hF.IX and generated Treg that suppressed anti-hF.IX formation. Effects of TGF-? blockade were also minor in this strain. In contrast, in C3H/HeJ mice, a strain known to have stronger T-cell responses against hF.IX, IL-10 was specifically required for the suppression of CD8(+) T-cell infiltration of the liver. Furthermore, TGF-? was critical for tipping the balance toward an regulatory immune response. TGF-? was required for CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Treg induction, which was necessary for suppression of effector CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses as well as antibody formation. These results demonstrate the crucial, nonredundant roles of IL-10 and TGF-? in prevention of immune responses against AAV-F.IX-transduced hepatocytes. PMID:21386826

  2. Timing factors affecting blastocyst development in equine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ho; Velez, Isabel C; Macías-García, Beatriz; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2015-04-01

    In nuclear transfer (NT), exposure of donor cell chromatin to the ooplast cytoplasm may aid reprogramming; however, the length of exposure feasible is limited by the developmental life span of the oocyte. We examined the effect of duration of nucleus-cytoplasmic exposure before activation and of in vitro maturation (IVM) in equine NT. In experiment 1, 24 h IVM and a delay of 2, 5, or 8 h between reconstruction and activation yielded 4%, 15%, and 11% blastocysts, respectively. In experiment 2, a 5-h activation delay yielded 17% and 22% blastocysts with two donor cell lines. In experiment 3, using a 5-h activation delay, the blastocyst rate was significantly higher using oocytes after 20 h IVM than after 24 h IVM; however, only 28% of oocytes were in metaphase II (MII) at 20 h. In experiment 4, oocytes were denuded of cumulus at 20 h, and those in metaphase I (MI) were returned to culture for 3 h (20+3H treatment); blastocyst rates were 30% and 27%, respectively (8-h and 5-h delay to activation, respectively). Four live foals resulted from the transfer of 17 blastocysts (24%) produced using MII oocytes and a 5- or 8-h activation delay. Use of equine oocytes immediately after reaching MII, combined with a longer delay from reconstruction to activation, increased developmental competence after equine NT. PMID:25826725

  3. Factors enhancing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egnin, M.; Mora, A.; Prakash, C. S.; Mortley, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Parameters enhancing Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of foreign genes to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cells were investigated. An intron-containing beta-glucuronidase uidA (gusA) gene under the transcriptional control of CaMV 35S promoter served as a reporter. Transformation frequency was evaluated by scoring the number of sectors expressing GUS activity on leaf and epicotyl explants. The 'Valencia Select' market type cv. New Mexico was more amenable to Agrobacterium transformation than the 'runner' market type cultivars tested (Florunner, Georgia Runner, Sunrunner, or South Runner). The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was superior in facilitating the transfer of uidA gene to peanut cells compared to the disarmed strain C58. Rinsing of explants in half-strength Murashige-Skoog (MS) media prior to infection by Agrobacterium significantly increased the transformation efficiency. The use of cocultivation media containing high auxin [1.0 or 2.5 mg/l (4.53 micromolar or 11.31 micromolar) 2,4-D] and low cytokinin [0.25 or 0.5 mg/l (1.0 micromolar or 2.0 micromolar) BA] promoted higher transformation than either hormone-free or thidiazuron-containing medium. The polarity of the epicotyl during cocultivation was important; explants incubated in an inverted (vertically) manner followed by a vertically upright position resulted in improved transformation and shoot regeneration frequencies. Preculture of explants in MS basal medium or with 2.5 mg thidiazuron per l prior to infection drastically decreased the number of transformed zones. The optimized protocol was used to obtain transient transformation frequencies ranging from 12% to 36% for leaf explants, 15% to 42% for epicotyls. Initial evidence of transformation was obtained by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by Southern analysis of regenerated plants.

  4. Factors influencing ALS-resistant gene transfer from CL (tm) rice to red rice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) is hard to control due to its genetic similarity to cultivated rice. Herbicide-resistant Clearfield ™ (CL) rice now offers an excellent option for red rice control. However, sustainability of CL technology at the producers’ level will be dictated by various factors. Promi...

  5. The Significance of Contextual Factors in African American Students' Transfer of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serpell, Zewelanji N.; Boykin, A. Wade; Madhere, Serge; Nasim, Aashir

    2006-01-01

    This study sought to address the lack of experimental research examining the influence of contextual factors on African American students' learning. A total of 162 low-income African American and White fourth graders were randomly assigned to ethnically homogeneous, communally structured groups of three to work on a motion acceleration task using…

  6. Near Threshold Neutral Pion Electroproduction at High Momentum Transfers and Generalized Form Factors

    E-print Network

    P. Khetarpal; P. Stoler; I. G. Aznauryan; V. Kubarovsky; K. P. Adhikari; D. Adikaram; M. Aghasyan; M. J. Amaryan; M. D. Anderson; S. Anefalos Pereira; M. Anghinolfi; H. Avakian; H. Baghdasaryan; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; V. Batourine; I. Bedlinskiy; A. S. Biselli; J. Bono; S. Boiarinov; W. J. Briscoe; W. K. Brooks; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; G. Charles; P. L. Cole; M. Contalbrigo; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; D. Doughty; M. Dugger; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; R. Fersch; J. A. Fleming; A. Fradi; M. Y. Gabrielyan; M. Garçon; N. Gevorgyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; W. Gohn; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; K. A. Griffioen; B. Guegan; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; C. Hanretty; N. Harrison; K. Hicks; D. Ho; M. Holtrop; C. E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; W. Kim; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; A. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; N. D. Kvaltine; S. Lewis; K. Livingston; H. Y. Lu; I. J. D. MacGregor; Y. Mao; D. Martinez; M. Mayer; B. McKinnon; C. A. Meyer; T. Mineeva; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; H. Moutarde; E. Munevar; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; R. Nasseripour; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; S. Park; E. Pasyuk; E. Phelps; J. J. Phillips; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; A. J. R. Puckett; B. A. Raue; G. Ricco; D. Rimal; M. Ripani; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; F. Sabatié; M. S. Saini; C. Salgado; N. A. Saylor; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; H. Seraydaryan; Y. G. Sharabian; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. S. Stepanyan; S. Stepanyan; I. I. Strakovsky; S. Strauch; M. Taiuti; W. Tang; C. E. Taylor; S. Tkachenko; M. Ungaro; B. Vernarsky; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; L. B. Weinstein; D. P. Weygand; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; J. Zhang; Z. W. Zhao; I. Zonta

    2012-11-29

    We report the measurement of near threshold neutral pion electroproduction cross sections and the extraction of the associated structure functions on the proton in the kinematic range $Q^2$ from 2 to 4.5 GeV$^2$ and $W$ from 1.08 to 1.16 GeV. These measurements allow us to access the dominant pion-nucleon s-wave multipoles $E_{0+}$ and $S_{0+}$ in the near-threshold region. In the light-cone sum-rule framework (LCSR), these multipoles are related to the generalized form factors $G_1^{\\pi^0 p}(Q^2)$ and $G_2^{\\pi^0 p}(Q^2)$. The data are compared to these generalized form factors and the results for $G_1^{\\pi^0 p}(Q^2)$ are found to be in good agreement with the LCSR predictions, but the level of agreement with $G_2^{\\pi^0 p}(Q^2)$ is poor.

  7. Role of chemical and ecological factors in trophic transfer of organic chemicals in aquatic food webs

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, R.W.; Gobas, F.A.P.C. . School of Resource and Environmental Management); Haffner, G.D. )

    1999-06-01

    Trophic transfer of chlorinated organic contaminants was investigated in an aquatic community composed of zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish. Biomagnification, measured as the increase in lipid-based chemical concentrations in predator over that in prey, was observed for high-K[sub OW] chemicals (log K[sub OW] > 6.3). Low-K[sub OW] chemicals (log K[sub OW] < 5.5) did not biomagnify in the food web, and chemicals with log K[sub OW] between 5.5 and 6.3 showed some evidence of biomagnification. Trophic level differences in chemical accumulation in the food web could not be attributed to bioconcentration into increasing trophic levels with increasing lipid levels, as no relationship was observed between trophic position and lipid content of organisms. Plots of contaminant-ordinated principal component scores in component space predicted the detailed diets of the species examined. It is concluded that (1) trophic interactions play a crucial role in the distribution of high-K[sub OW] chemicals but not for low-K[sub OW] chemicals and that (2) contaminant distributions provide a means to determine structure in aquatic communities.

  8. Trichostatin A specifically improves the aberrant expression of transcription factor genes in embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Oikawa, Mami; Kamimura, Satoshi; Ogonuki, Narumi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Although mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established in various species, the low developmental efficiency has hampered its practical applications. Treatment of SCNT-derived embryos with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can improve their development, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. To address this question, we analysed gene expression profiles of SCNT-derived 2-cell mouse embryos treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a potent HDAC inhibitor that is best used for mouse cloning. Unexpectedly, TSA had no effect on the numbers of aberrantly expressed genes or the overall gene expression pattern in the embryos. However, in-depth investigation by gene ontology and functional analyses revealed that TSA treatment specifically improved the expression of a small subset of genes encoding transcription factors and their regulatory factors, suggesting their positive involvement in de novo RNA synthesis. Indeed, introduction of one of such transcription factors, Spi-C, into the embryos at least partially mimicked the TSA-induced improvement in embryonic development by activating gene networks associated with transcriptional regulation. Thus, the effects of TSA treatment on embryonic gene expression did not seem to be stochastic, but more specific than expected, targeting genes that direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the 2-cell stage. PMID:25974394

  9. An Integrated Model of Transcription Factor Diffusion Shows the Importance of Intersegmental Transfer and Quaternary Protein Structure for Target Site Finding

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Hugo G.; Sewitz, Sven; Andrews, Steven S.; Lipkow, Karen

    2014-01-01

    We present a computational model of transcription factor motion that explains both the observed rapid target finding of transcription factors, and how this motion influences protein and genome structure. Using the Smoldyn software, we modelled transcription factor motion arising from a combination of unrestricted 3D diffusion in the nucleoplasm, sliding along the DNA filament, and transferring directly between filament sections by intersegmental transfer. This presents a fine-grain picture of the way in which transcription factors find their targets two orders of magnitude faster than 3D diffusion alone allows. Eukaryotic genomes contain sections of nucleosome free regions (NFRs) around the promoters; our model shows that the presence and size of these NFRs can be explained as their acting as antennas on which transcription factors slide to reach their targets. Additionally, our model shows that intersegmental transfer may have shaped the quaternary structure of transcription factors: sequence specific DNA binding proteins are unusually enriched in dimers and tetramers, perhaps because these allow intersegmental transfer, which accelerates target site finding. Finally, our model shows that a ‘hopping’ motion can emerge from 3D diffusion on small scales. This explains the apparently long sliding lengths that have been observed for some DNA binding proteins observed in vitro. Together, these results suggest that transcription factor diffusion dynamics help drive the evolution of protein and genome structure. PMID:25333780

  10. Development of a general equation to determine the transfer factor feed-to-meat for radiocesium on the basis of the body mass of domestic animals

    SciTech Connect

    Nalezinski, S.; Ruehm, W.; Wirth, E.

    1996-05-01

    Transfer factors from feed to meat (5{sub {integral}}), taken from literature for monogastric animals and ruminants have been correlated to their corresponding animal body mass (m{sub b}). Taking all data into account, a close relationship between both transfer factor and body mass becomes evident, yielding a regression function of (T{sub {integral}} = 8.0 x m{sub b}{sup {minus}0.91}) (r = -0.97). For monogastric animals (including poultry), the corresponding relationships are T{sub {integral}} = 1.9 x m{sub b}{sup {minus}0.72} (r = 0.78). The equations offer the opportunity to estimate the transfer factor for individual animals more precisely taking individual body masses into account. They are of interest for animals, on which no or only poor data concerning radiocesium transfer factors are available. The determination of radiocesium transfer factors are reduced to a simple weighing process. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. JLab Measurement of the 4He Charge Form Factor at Large Momentum Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Camsonne, Alexandre; Katramatou, A. T.; Olson, M.; Sparveris, Nikolaos; Acha, Armando; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Bryon; Arrington, John; Baldwin, Alan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Decowski, Piotr; Dutta, Chiranjib; Folts, Edward; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilman, Ronald; Gomez, Javier; Hahn, Brian; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jian; Iodice, Mauro; Kelleher, Aidan; Khrosinkova, Elena; Kievsky, A.; Kuchina, Elena; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Lee, Byungwuek; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Lott, Gordon; Lu, H.; Marcucci, Laura; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Norum, Blaine; Petratos, Gerassimos; Puckett, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segal, John; Hashemi, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Suleiman, Riad; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Viviani, Michele; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhang, W. -M.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2014-04-01

    The charge form factor of 4He has been extracted in the range 29 fm-2 <= Q2 <= 77 fm-2 from elastic electron scattering, detecting 4He nuclei and electrons in coincidence with the High Resolution Spectrometers of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. The results are in qualitative agreement with realistic meson-nucleon theoretical calculations. The data have uncovered a second diffraction minimum, which was predicted in the Q2 range of this experiment, and rule out conclusively long-standing predictions of dimensional scaling of high-energy amplitudes using quark counting.

  12. A Member of the Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Transcription Termination Factor Family Is Required for Maturation of Chloroplast Transfer RNAIle(GAU).

    PubMed

    Romani, Isidora; Manavski, Nikolay; Morosetti, Arianna; Tadini, Luca; Maier, Swetlana; Kühn, Kristina; Ruwe, Hannes; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Wanner, Gerhard; Leister, Dario; Kleine, Tatjana

    2015-09-01

    Plastid gene expression is crucial for organelle function, but the factors that control it are still largely unclear. Members of the so-called mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) family are found in metazoans and plants and regulate organellar gene expression at different levels. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mTERF6 is localized in chloroplasts and mitochondria, and its knockout perturbs plastid development and results in seedling lethality. In the leaky mterf6-1 mutant, a defect in photosynthesis is associated with reduced levels of photosystem subunits, although corresponding messenger RNA levels are unaffected, whereas translational capacity and maturation of chloroplast ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are perturbed in mterf6-1 mutants. Bacterial one-hybrid screening, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments reveal a specific interaction between mTERF6 and an RNA sequence in the chloroplast isoleucine transfer RNA gene (trnI.2) located in the rRNA operon. In vitro, recombinant mTERF6 bound to its plastid DNA target site can terminate transcription. At present, it is unclear whether disturbed rRNA maturation is a primary or secondary defect. However, it is clear that mTERF6 is required for the maturation of trnI.2. This points to an additional function of mTERFs. PMID:26152711

  13. Inadequate passive immune transfer in puppies: definition, risk factors and prevention in a large multi-breed kennel.

    PubMed

    Mila, H; Feugier, A; Grellet, A; Anne, J; Gonnier, M; Martin, M; Rossig, L; Chastant-Maillard, S

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of neonatal mortality is high in the canine species and far from well-studied. In most domestic neonates, an appropriate colostrum intake is a key element of the control of neonatal mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of passive immune transfer on puppy mortality, assessed through serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration at 2 days of age. Factors impacting passive immune transfer and the value of an oral immunoglobulin supplementation to prevent it were also analyzed. A total of 149 puppies from 34 litters (12 breeds) within one breeding kennel were included. Blood samples were collected at 2 days of age and colostrum was collected from their dams 1 day after whelping to assay IgG concentration. Puppies were weighed at birth and at 2 days of age for calculation of growth rate. Mortality was recorded until 3 weeks of age. Seventy randomly assigned puppies were orally supplemented with hyper-immunized adult plasma twice within the first 8h of life. IgG concentration at 2 days of age was significantly correlated with weight gain during the first 2 days of life. The multivariable model with litter as a random effect demonstrated that neonatal mortality was not influenced by breed size, sex, supplementation, litter size, nor colostrum IgG concentration, but by puppy IgG concentration at 2 days of age. According to the ROC curve, the minimal IgG concentration at and below which puppies were at higher risk of death was determined at 230 mg/dl. Puppy IgG concentration was significantly associated with growth rate, but not with breed size, sex, supplementation, litter size or colostrum IgG concentration in a multivariable model with litter as a random effect. This study demonstrates that neonatal mortality in puppies is related to the quality of passive immune transfer. The oral supplementation with hyper-immunized canine plasma neither decreased risk of mortality, nor improved serum IgG concentration at 2 days of age in puppies. Attention must thus be paid to early colostrum intake to control the neonatal mortality in puppies. PMID:24880625

  14. Developing Structural Equation Models To Determine Factors Contributing to Student Graduation and Retention: Are There Differences for Native Students and Transfers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Hong; Hughes, William W.; O'Rear, Michael R.; Fendley, William R., Jr.

    Studies have provided conflicting findings on who is more likely to graduate or to persist in higher education. This study examined differences between native students and transfer students in terms of graduation and retention rates, sought to discover factors that impact students' persistence in higher education, such as a student's first-term…

  15. Factors That Affect Transfer of the IncI1 ?-Lactam Resistance Plasmid pESBL-283 between E. coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Händel, Nadine; Otte, Sarah; Jonker, Martijs; Brul, Stanley; ter Kuile, Benno H.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria worldwide presents a major health threat to human health care that results in therapy failure and increasing costs. The transfer of resistance conferring plasmids by conjugation is a major route by which resistance genes disseminate at the intra- and interspecies level. High similarities between resistance genes identified in foodborne and hospital-acquired pathogens suggest transmission of resistance conferring and transferrable mobile elements through the food chain, either as part of intact strains, or through transfer of plasmids from foodborne to human strains. To study the factors that affect the rate of plasmid transfer, the transmission of an extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid from a foodborne Escherichia coli strain to the ?-lactam sensitive E. coli MG1655 strain was documented as a function of simulated environmental factors. The foodborne E. coli isolate used as donor carried a CTX-M-1 harboring IncI1 plasmid that confers resistance to ?-lactam antibiotics. Cell density, energy availability and growth rate were identified as factors that affect plasmid transfer efficiency. Transfer rates were highest in the absence of the antibiotic, with almost every acceptor cell picking up the plasmid. Raising the antibiotic concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) resulted in reduced transfer rates, but also selected for the plasmid carrying donor and recombinant strains. Based on the mutational pattern of transconjugant cells, a common mechanism is proposed which compensates for fitness costs due to plasmid carriage by reducing other cell functions. Reducing potential fitness costs due to maintenance and expression of the plasmid could contribute to persistence of resistance genes in the environment even without antibiotic pressure. Taken together, the results identify factors that drive the spread and persistence of resistance conferring plasmids in natural isolates and shows how these can contribute to transmission of resistance genes through the food chain. PMID:25830294

  16. Estimate Radiological Dose for Animals

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-12-18

    Estimate Radiological dose for animals in ecological environment using open literature values for parameters such as body weight, plant and soil ingestion rate, rad. halflife, absorbed energy, biological halflife, gamma energy per decay, soil-to-plant transfer factor, ...etc

  17. Development of a Cell-Based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Reporter for Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, R H; Steenblock, E R; Camarero, J A

    2007-03-22

    We report the construction of a cell-based fluorescent reporter for anthrax lethal factor (LF) protease activity using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This was accomplished by engineering an Escherichia coli cell line to express a genetically encoded FRET reporter and LF protease. Both proteins were encoded in two different expression plasmids under the control of different tightly controlled inducible promoters. The FRET-based reporter was designed to contain a LF recognition sequence flanked by the FRET pair formed by CyPet and YPet fluorescent proteins. The length of the linker between both fluorescent proteins was optimized using a flexible peptide linker containing several Gly-Gly-Ser repeats. Our results indicate that this FRET-based LF reporter was readily expressed in E. coli cells showing high levels of FRET in vivo in the absence of LF. The FRET signal, however, decreased 5 times after inducing LF expression in the same cell. These results suggest that this cell-based LF FRET reporter may be used to screen genetically encoded libraries in vivo against LF.

  18. BASELINE PARAMETER UPDATE FOR HUMAN HEALTH INPUT AND TRANSFER FACTORS FOR RADIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, T; Patricia Lee, P

    2007-01-31

    The purpose of this report is to update parameters utilized in Human Health Exposure calculations and Bioaccumulation Transfer Factors utilized at SRS for Performance Assessment modeling. The reason for the update is to utilize more recent information issued, validate information currently used and correct minor inconsistencies between modeling efforts performed in SRS contiguous areas of the heavy industrialized central site usage areas called the General Separations Area (GSA). SRS parameters utilized were compared to a number of other DOE facilities and generic national/global references to establish relevance of the parameters selected and/or verify the regional differences of the southeast USA. The parameters selected were specifically chosen to be expected values along with identifying a range for these values versus the overly conservative specification of parameters for estimating an annual dose to the maximum exposed individual (MEI). The end uses are to establish a standardized source for these parameters that is up to date with existing data and maintain it via review of any future issued national references to evaluate the need for changes as new information is released. These reviews are to be added to this document by revision.

  19. Adenovector-mediated gene transfer of active transforming growth factor-beta1 induces prolonged severe fibrosis in rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Sime, P J; Xing, Z; Graham, F L; Csaky, K G; Gauldie, J

    1997-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosis based upon its matrix-inducing effects on stromal cells in vitro, and studies demonstrating increased expression of total TGF-beta1 in fibrotic tissues from a variety of organs. The precise role in vivo of this cytokine in both its latent and active forms, however, remains unclear. Using replication-deficient adenovirus vectors to transfer the cDNA of porcine TGF-beta1 to rat lung, we have been able to study the effect of TGF-beta1 protein in the respiratory tract directly. We have demonstrated that transient overexpression of active, but not latent, TGF-beta1 resulted in prolonged and severe interstitial and pleural fibrosis characterized by extensive deposition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins collagen, fibronectin, and elastin, and by emergence of cells with the myofibroblast phenotype. These results illustrate the role of TGF-beta1 and the importance of its activation in the pulmonary fibrotic process, and suggest that targeting active TGF-beta1 and steps involved in TGF-beta1 activation are likely to be valuable antifibrogenic therapeutic strategies. This new and versatile model of pulmonary fibrosis can be used to study such therapies. PMID:9259574

  20. Non-invasive Bioluminescence Imaging of Myoblast-Mediated Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 Alpha Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Gheysens, Olivier; Chen, Ian Y.; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin; Chan, Carmel; Rasooly, Julia; Vaerenberg, Caroline; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Juergen K.; Deroose, Christophe; Wu, Joseph; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We tested a novel imaging strategy, in which both the survival of transplanted myoblasts and their therapeutic transgene expression, a recombinant hypoxia-inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?-VP2), can be monitored using firefly luciferase (fluc) and Renilla luciferase (hrl) bioluminescence reporter genes, respectively. Procedures The plasmid pUbi-hrl-pUbi-HIF-1?-VP2, which expresses both hrl and HIF-1?-VP2 using two ubiquitin promoters, was characterized in vitro. C2c12 myoblasts stably expressing fluc and transiently transfected with pUbi-hrl-pUbi-HIF-1?-VP2 were injected into the mouse hindlimb. Both hrl and fluc expression were monitored using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Results Strong correlations existed between the expression of hRL and each of HIF-1?-VP2, VEGF, and PlGF (r2>0.83, r2>0.82, and r2>0.97, respectively). In vivo, both transplanted cells and HIF-1?-VP2 transgene expression were successfully imaged using BLI. Conclusions An objective evaluation of myoblast-mediated gene transfer in living mice can be performed by monitoring both the survival and the transgene expression of transplanted myoblasts using the techniques developed herein. PMID:21267661

  1. Analysis of linear energy transfers and quality factors of charged particles produced by spontaneous fission neutrons from 252Cf and 244Pu in the human body.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akira; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2013-04-01

    Absorbed doses, linear energy transfers (LETs) and quality factors of secondary charged particles in organs and tissues, generated via the interactions of the spontaneous fission neutrons from (252)Cf and (244)Pu within the human body, were studied using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System (PHITS) coupled with the ICRP Reference Phantom. Both the absorbed doses and the quality factors in target organs generally decrease with increasing distance from the source organ. The analysis of LET distributions of secondary charged particles led to the identification of the relationship between LET spectra and target-source organ locations. A comparison between human body-averaged mean quality factors and fluence-averaged radiation weighting factors showed that the current numerical conventions for the radiation weighting factors of neutrons, updated in ICRP103, and the quality factors for internal exposure are valid. PMID:22908356

  2. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B.

    PubMed Central

    Armentano, D; Thompson, A R; Darlington, G; Woo, S L

    1990-01-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. We report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently gamma-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer. Images PMID:2385589

  3. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.R. Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA ); Darlington, G. ); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer and Friction Factor Characteristics in a Circular Tube Fitted with V-Cut Twisted Tape Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5?cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5?cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration. PMID:24078795

  5. Trace element mobility and transfer to vegetation within the Ethiopian Rift Valley lake areas.

    PubMed

    Kassaye, Yetneberk A; Skipperud, Lindis; Meland, Sondre; Dadebo, Elias; Einset, John; Salbu, Brit

    2012-10-26

    To evaluate critical trace element loads in native vegetation and calculate soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs), 11 trace elements (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Cd, Pb and Mn) have been determined in leaves of 9 taxonomically verified naturally growing terrestrial plant species as well as in soil samples collected around 3 Ethiopian Rift Valley lakes (Koka, Ziway and Awassa). The Cr concentration in leaves of all the plant species was higher than the "normal" range, with the highest level (8.4 mg per kg dw) being observed in Acacia tortilis from the Lake Koka area. Caper species (Capparis fascicularis) and Ethiopian dogstooth grass (Cynodon aethiopicus) from Koka also contained exceptionally high levels of Cd (1 mg per kg dw) and Mo (32.8 mg per kg dw), respectively. Pb, As and Cu concentrations were low in the plant leaves from all sites. The low Cu level in important fodder plant species (Cynodon aethiopicus, Acacia tortilis and Opuntia ficus-indicus) implies potential deficiency in grazing and browsing animals. Compared to the Canadian environmental quality guideline and maximum allowable concentration in agricultural soils, the total soil trace element concentrations at the studied sites are safe for agricultural crop production. Enrichment factor was high for Zn in soils around Lakes Ziway and Awassa, resulting in moderate to high transfer of Zn to the studied plants. A six step sequential extraction procedure on the soils revealed a relatively high mobility of Cd, Se and Mn. Strong association of most trace elements with the redox sensitive fraction and mineral lattice was also confirmed by partial redundancy analysis. TF (mg per kg dw plants/mg per kg dw soil) values based on the total (TF(total)) and mobile fractions (TF(mobile)) of soil trace element concentrations varied widely among elements and plant species, with the averaged TF(total) and TF(mobile) values ranging from 0.01-2 and 1-60, respectively. Considering the mobile fraction in soils should be available to plants, TF(mobile) values could reflect trace elements transfer to plants in the most realistic way. However, the present study indicates that TF(total) values also reflect the transfer of elements such as Mn, Cd and Se to plants more realistically than TF(mobile) values did. PMID:22907177

  6. An Exploratory Examination of Organizational Factors Leading to Transfer of Hispanic Students: A Case Study. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laden, Berta Vigil

    Hispanics are the fastest growing ethnic group nationally, yet they continue to be undereducated and underemployed. This paper discusses one community college's success in preparing and transfering Hispanic students to 4-year institutions. The study examined a San Francisco Bay Area high transfer community college, which was experiencing an…

  7. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  8. (137)Cs inter-plant concentration ratios provide a predictive tool for coral atolls with distinct benefits over transfer factors.

    PubMed

    Robison, William L; Hamilton, Terry F; Bogen, Kenneth T; Conrado, Cynthia L; Kehl, Steven R

    2008-01-01

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR) [Bqg(-1)(137)Cs in coral atoll tree food crops/Bqg(-1)(137)Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume] can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict (137)Cs concentration in tree food crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact that tree roots naturally integrate (137)Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of (137)Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in (137)Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log-normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD)=1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSDs of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD=1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10-20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples. PMID:17904254

  9. 137Cs Inter-Plant Concentration Ratios Provide a Predictive Tool for Coral Atolls with Distinct Benefits Over Transfer Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Bogen, K; Corado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2007-07-17

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR), [Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in coral atoll tree food-crops/Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume], can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict {sup 137}Cs concentration in tree food-crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact tree roots naturally integrate 137Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of {sup 137}Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in {sup 137}Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSD's of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD = 1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10 to 20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples.

  10. Transfer factor of (90)Sr and (137)Cs to lettuce and winter wheat at different growth stage applications.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Safia, Bassam; Ghani, Basem Abdul

    2015-12-01

    The effect of clay soil contamination time on the transfer factors (Fvs) of (137)Cs and (90)Sr was investigated in four different growth stages of winter wheat and lettuce crops. The experiment was performed in an open field using lysimeters. The Fvs were the ratio of the activity concentrations of the radionuclides in crops to those in soil, both as dry weight (Bq kg(-1)). Significant difference of log-Fvs was evaluated using one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Basically, Fvs of (90)Sr were higher than those of (137)Cs, despite of the application stage or crop' variety. Higher Fvs for both radionuclides were observed for lettuce in comparison to winter wheat. Fvs of (90)Sr showed comparable trends for both crops with enhanced Fvs obtained when contamination occurred in early stages, i.e. 1.20 for lettuce and 0.88 and 0.02 for winter wheat, straw and grains, respectively. Despite the fluctuation noted in the pattern of Fvs for (137)Cs, soil contaminated at the second stage gave the highest Fvs for lettuce and grains, with geometric means of 0.21 and 0.01, respectively. However, wheat-straw showed remarkable increase in Fv for the latest contamination (ripening stage), about 0.06. It could be concluded that soil contamination at early growth stages would represent high radiological risk for the scenarios studied with an exception to (137)Cs in winter wheat-straw which reflected greater hazard at the latest application. PMID:26318772

  11. Soil-to-Crop Transfer Factors of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides and Stable Elements for Long-Term Dose Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, S.; Tagami, K.

    2007-07-01

    A soil-to-crop transfer factor, TF, is a key parameter that directly affects the internal dose assessment for the ingestion pathway, however, obtaining TFs of various long-lived radionuclides occurred during operation of nuclear power plants is difficult because most of them could not be found in natural environments. In this study, therefore, we collected crops and their associated soils throughout Japan and measured more than 50 elements to obtain TFs under equilibrium conditions. The TFs were calculated for 42 elements (Li, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, Sn, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tl, Pb, Th and U) from their concentrations in both crop and soil samples. The TF is defined as the concentration of an isotope in a crop (in Bq/kg or mg/kg dry weight) divided by the concentration of the isotope in soil (in Bq.kg or mg/kg dry weight). Probability distributions of TFs for 62 upland field crops were usually log-normal type so that geometric means (GMs) were calculated. The values for the elements of interest from the viewpoint of long-term dose assessment were 2.5E-02 for Se, 7.9E-02 for Sr, 3.1E-03 for Cs, 4.2E-04 for Th and 4.6E-04 for U. Leafy vegetable showed the highest TFs for all the elements among the crop groups. It was clear that these data were usually within the 95% confidence limits of TFs compiled by IAEA in Technical Report Series 364. (authors)

  12. Robotic technology evolution and transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.

    1992-01-01

    A report concerning technology transfer in the area of robotics is presented in vugraph form. The following topics are discussed: definition of technology innovation and tech-transfer; concepts relevant for understanding tech-transfer; models advanced to portray tech-transfer process; factors identified as promoting tech-transfer; factors identified as impeding tech-transfer; what important roles do individuals fulfill in tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; robotic technology evolution; robotic technology transferred; and recommendations for successful robotics tech-transfer.

  13. Extractable copper, arsenic and antimony by EDTA solution from agricultural Chilean soils and its transfer to alfalfa plants (Medicago sativa L.).

    PubMed

    De Gregori, Ida; Fuentes, Edwar; Olivares, David; Pinochet, Hugo

    2004-01-01

    Following our research on copper, arsenic and antimony in Chilean ecosystems, a study to understand the mobility and transport of these elements from soil to plants was carried out. So, the aim of this study, which follows on from the previous work, was to demonstrate if the total concentrations of these elements or their fractions extracted by 0.05 M EDTA pH 7 from different Chilean soils correlate with the respective total concentrations in the edible tissue of alfalfa plants collected simultaneously from 20 different sites affected or unaffected by mining activities. The highest copper fractions extracted by EDTA solutions were obtained in contaminated soils from the central region (41-69%); however the northern soils presented the highest extractable fractions of arsenic (9-34%). The antimony fraction was low in all soils (0.4-8.0%). Alfalfa plants from all contaminated sites presented high copper, arsenic and antimony concentrations (19-126 mg kg(-1), 5.7-16.3 mg kg(-1) and 0.16-1.7 mg kg(-1), respectively). Statistically significant correlations were obtained between the total contents of copper and arsenic and their respective extractable fractions in soils. Good correlations were found between elements in alfalfa plants. Correlations were also obtained between the total concentrations of three elements in soils and in alfalfa plants. However, excepting for antimony in the northern samples, higher correlation coefficients were evaluated when the extractable fractions were considered. Samples from the north region presented the highest copper transfer factor and the lowest for arsenic, in spite of the high concentration of this metalloid extracted by EDTA solution in these soils. There was not a clear trend on the transfer factor for antimony, probably due to the low content of this element in alfalfa plants and/or the low recovery obtained for this element by EDTA. PMID:14737469

  14. Soil-to-soybean transfer of (99)Tc and its underground distribution in differently contaminated upland soils.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong-Ho; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Jun, In; Kim, Byung-Ho; Keum, Dong-Kwon; Kim, In-Gyu

    2014-06-01

    Pot experiments were performed in a greenhouse to investigate the soil-to-soybean transfer of (99)Tc in two different upland soils labeled with (99)TcO4(-) in two contrasting ways. One was to mix the soil with a (99)TcO4(-) solution 26 d before sowing (pre-sowing deposition: PSD), and the other was to apply the solution onto the soil surface 44 d after sowing (growing-period deposition: GPD). The soil-to-plant transfer was quantified with the transfer factor (TF, ratio of the plant concentration to the average of at-planting and at-harvest soil concentrations) or the aggregated transfer factor (TFag, ratio of the plant concentration to the deposition density). For both the depositions, the transfer of (99)Tc to aerial parts decreased in the order of leaf > stem > pod > seed. TF values (dimensionless) from the PSD were 0.22 and 0.27 (no statistically significant difference) for mature dry seeds in the respective soils, whereas a 600-fold higher value occurred for dry leaves. The post-harvest concentrations of the PSD (99)Tc in the top 20 cm soils as a whole were about half the initial concentrations. Around 25% of the total applied activity remained in the GPD soils after the harvest. The post-harvest depth profiles of the GPD (99)Tc in the two soils showed similar patterns of logarithmic activity decrease with increasing soil depths. Only 1.5-4.3% of the total applied activity was removed through the harvested biomass (seeds, pods and stems), and it was estimated that a great part of the total pant uptake returned to the soil through the fallen leaves. TFag values (m(2) kg(-1)) were about 2-4 times higher for the GPD than for the PSD. This finding and generally high root uptake of Tc may indicate that the use of empirical deposition time-dependent TFag data is particularly important for predicting the plant concentrations of Tc after its growing-period deposition. PMID:24556176

  15. A compilation of radionuclide transfer factors for the plant, meat, milk, and aquatic food pathways and the suggested default values for the RESRAD code

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.Y.; Biwer, B.M.; Yu, C.

    1993-08-01

    The ongoing development and revision of the RESRAD computer code at Argonne National Laboratory requires update of radionuclide transfer factors for the plant, meat, milk, and aquatic food pathways. Default values for these transfer factors used in published radiological assessment reports are compiled and compared with values used in RESRAD. The differences among the reported default values used in different radiological assessment codes and reports are also discussed. In data comparisons, values used in more recent reports are given more weight because more recent experimental work tends to be conducted under better-defined laboratory or field conditions. A new default value is suggested for RESRAD if one of the following conditions is met: (1) values used in recent reports are an order of magnitude higher or lower than the default value currently used in RESRAD, or (2) the same default value is used in several recent radiological assessment reports.

  16. Interaction between season and culture with insulin-like growth factor-1 on survival of in vitro produced embryos following transfer to lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Block, J; Hansen, P J

    2007-06-01

    Culture of bovine embryos in the presence of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) can increase pregnancy rates following transfer to heat-stressed, lactating dairy cows. The objective of the present experiment was to determine whether the effect of IGF-1 on post-transfer embryo survival was a general effect or one specific to heat stress. Lactating recipients (n=311) were synchronized for timed-embryo transfer at four locations. Embryos were produced in vitro and cultured with or without 100 ng/mL IGF-1. At Day 7 after anticipated ovulation (Day 0), a single embryo was randomly transferred to each recipient. Pregnancy was diagnosed at Day 21 by elevated plasma progesterone concentrations, at Days 27-32 by ultrasonography, and at Days 41-49 by transrectal palpation. Transfers were categorized into two seasons, hot or cool (based on the month of transfer). There was a tendency (P<0.09) for an interaction between embryo treatment and season for pregnancy rate at Day 21; this interaction was significant at Days 30 and 45 (P<0.02). Recipients receiving IGF-1 treated embryos had higher pregnancy rates in the hot season but not in the cool season. There was a similar interaction between embryo treatment and season for overall calving rate (P<0.05). There was also an interaction between season and treatment affecting pregnancy loss between Days 21 and 30; recipients that received IGF-1 treated embryos had less pregnancy loss during this time period in the hot season but not in the cool season. The overall proportion of male calves born was 77.5%. In conclusion, treatment of embryos with IGF-1 improved pregnancy and calving rates following the transfer of in vitro produced embryos into lactating recipients, but only under heat-stress conditions. PMID:17452048

  17. A Measurement of the neutron electric form factor at very large momentum transfer using polaried electrions scattering from a polarized helium-3 target

    SciTech Connect

    Aidan Kelleher

    2010-10-01

    Knowledge of the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the nucleon is essential for an understanding of nucleon structure. Of the form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron has been measured over the smallest range in Q{sup 2} and with the lowest precision. Jefferson Lab experiment 02-013 used a novel new polarized {sup 3}He target to nearly double the range of momentum transfer in which the neutron form factor has been studied and to measure it with much higher precision. Polarized electrons were scattered off this target, and both the scattered electron and neutron were detected. G{sup n}{sub E} was measured to be 0.0242 ± 0.0020(stat) ± 0.0061(sys) and 0.0247 ± 0.0029(stat) ± 0.0031(sys) at Q{sup 2} = 1.7 and 2.5 GeV{sup 2}, respectively.

  18. On the relation between the Deuteron Form Factor at High Momentum Transfer and the High Energy Neutron-Proton Scattering Amplitude

    E-print Network

    Gerald A. Miller; Mark Strikman

    2004-01-15

    A non-relativistic potential-model version of the factorization assumption, used in perturbative QCD calculations of hadronic form factors, is used, along with the Born approximation valid at high energies, to derive a remarkably simple relationship between the impulse approximation contribution to the deuteron form factor at high momentum transfer and the high energy neutron-proton scattering amplitude. The relation states that the form factor at a given value of $Q^2$ is proportional to the scattering amplitude at a specific energy and scattering angle. This suggests that an accurate computation of the form factors at large $Q^2$ requires a simultaneous description of the phase-shifts at a related energy, a statement that seems reasonable regardless of any derivation. Our form factor-scattering amplitude relation is shown to be accurate for some examples. However, if the potential consists of a strong short distance repulsive term and a strong longer ranged attractive term, as typically occurs in many realistic potentials, the relation is found to be accurate only for ridiculously large values of $Q$. More general arguments, using only the Schroedinger equation, suggest a strong, but complicated, relationship between the form factor and scattering amplitude. Furthermore, the use of recently obtained soft potentials, along with an appropriate current operator, may allow calculations of form factors that are consistent with the necessary phase shifts.

  19. Antitumor effect of nuclear factor-?B decoy transfer by mannose-modified bubble lipoplex into macrophages in mouse malignant ascites

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yusuke; Kawakami, Shigeru; Higuchi, Yuriko; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Patients with malignant ascites (MAs) display several symptoms, such as dyspnea, nausea, pain, and abdominal tenderness, resulting in a significant reduction in their quality of life. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play a crucial role in MA progression. Because TAMs have a tumor-promoting M2 phenotype, conversion of the M2 phenotypic function of TAMs would be promising for MA treatment. Nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) is a master regulator of macrophage polarization. Here, we developed targeted transfer of a NF-?B decoy into TAMs by ultrasound (US)-responsive, mannose-modified liposome/NF-?B decoy complexes (Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes) in a mouse peritoneal dissemination model of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma. In addition, we investigated the effects of NF-?B decoy transfection into TAMs on MA progression and mouse survival rates. Intraperitoneal injection of Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes and US exposure transferred the NF-?B decoy into TAMs effectively. When the NF-?B decoy was delivered into TAMs by this method in the mouse peritoneal dissemination model, mRNA expression of the Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 in TAMs was decreased significantly. In contrast, mRNA levels of Th1 cytokines (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-?, and IL-6) were increased significantly. Moreover, the expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor in ascites was suppressed significantly, and peritoneal angiogenesis showed a reduction. Furthermore, NF-?B decoy transfer into TAMs significantly decreased the ascitic volume and number of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells in ascites, and prolonged mouse survival. In conclusion, we transferred a NF-?B decoy efficiently by Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes with US exposure into TAMs, which may be a novel approach for MA treatment. PMID:24850474

  20. Study of complement regulatory factor H based on Forster resonance energy transfer and investigation of disease-linked genetic variants 

    E-print Network

    Pechtl, Isabell C.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma protein complement factor H (fH, 155 kDa) regulates the activity of the alternative pathway of complement activation. Factor H is monomeric, and its 20 CCP modules are arranged in a predominantly elongated ...

  1. Are the orientation and bond strength of the RCO2(-)M link key factors for ultrafast electron transfers?

    PubMed

    Luo, Peng; Karsenti, Paul-Ludovic; Brisard, Gessie; Marsan, Benoit; Harvey, Pierre D

    2015-11-24

    The photo-induced electron transfers in the "straight up" ionic assemblies [] and [][] ([]* ? or ) are ultrafast (<85 fs) indicating that it is not necessary to have a strong coordination bond or a bent geometry to obtain fast electron injection in porphyrin-containing DSSCs. PMID:26463512

  2. A Comparison of Factors Related to University Students' Learning: College-Transfer and Direct-Entry from High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acai, Anita; Newton, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Articulation agreements between colleges and universities, whereby students with two-year college diplomas can receive advancement toward a four-year university degree, are provincially mandated in some Canadian provinces and highly encouraged in others. In this study, we compared learning in college transfer and direct-entry from high school…

  3. Exploring the Contextual Factors Related to Transfer of Learning in a High School Implementation of the eMINTS Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Lorie F.

    2011-01-01

    Truly impacting teacher practices is a challenge for educational professional development (PD) providers. Typically, little attention is paid to the factors within the environment to which the educators return and how those factors will impact participants' ability to integrate what they have learned into their teaching practices. Even for…

  4. Astrophysical S factor for the radiative capture (12)N(p,gamma)(13)O determined from the (14)N((12)N,(13)O)(13)C proton transfer reaction 

    E-print Network

    Banu, A.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Fu, C.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Zhai, Y.; Carstoiu, F.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.

    2009-01-01

    REVIEW C 79, 025805 (2009) Astrophysical S factor for the radiative capture 12N( p, ? )13O determined from the 14N(12N, 13O)13C proton transfer reaction A. Banu,* T. Al-Abdullah,? C. Fu,? C. A. Gagliardi, M. McCleskey, A. M. Mukhamedzhanov, G.... Tabacaru,? L. Trache, R. E. Tribble, and Y. Zhai? Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, USA F. Carstoiu National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering ?Horia Hulubei?, R-76900 Bucharest-Magurele, Romania V...

  5. Technology Transfer Issues and a New Technology Transfer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2009-01-01

    The following are major issues that should be considered for efficient and effective technology transfer: conceptions of technology, technological activity and transfer, communication channels, factors affecting transfer, and models of transfer. In particular, a well-developed model of technology transfer could be used as a framework for…

  6. Quantifying data retention of perpendicular spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory chips using an effective thermal stability factor method

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Luc Jan, Guenole; Le, Son; Wang, Po-Kang

    2015-04-20

    The thermal stability of perpendicular Spin-Transfer-Torque Magnetic Random Access Memory (STT-MRAM) devices is investigated at chip level. Experimental data are analyzed in the framework of the Néel-Brown model including distributions of the thermal stability factor ?. We show that in the low error rate regime important for applications, the effect of distributions of ? can be described by a single quantity, the effective thermal stability factor ?{sub eff}, which encompasses both the median and the standard deviation of the distributions. Data retention of memory chips can be assessed accurately by measuring ?{sub eff} as a function of device diameter and temperature. We apply this method to show that 54?nm devices based on our perpendicular STT-MRAM design meet our 10 year data retention target up to 120?°C.

  7. Experimental determination of average turbulent heat transfer and friction factor in stator internal rib-roughened cooling channels.

    PubMed

    Battisti, L; Baggio, P

    2001-05-01

    In gas turbine cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to the hot stream are based on the increase of the inner heat transfer areas and on the promotion of the turbulence of the cooling flow. This is currently obtained by casting periodic ribs on one or more sides of the serpentine passages into the core of the blade. Fluid dynamic and thermal behaviour of the cooling flow have been extensively investigated by means of experimental facilities and many papers dealing with this subject have appeared in the latest years. The evaluation of the average value of the heat transfer coefficient most of the time is inferred from local measurements obtained by various experimental techniques. Moreover the great majority of these studies are not concerned with the overall average heat transfer coefficient for the combined ribs and region between them, but do focus just on one of them. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the average Nusselt number inside a straight ribbed duct. Series of measurements have been performed in steady state eliminating the error sources inherently connected with transient methods. A low speed wind tunnel, operating in steady state flow, has been built to simulate the actual flow condition occurring in a rectilinear blade cooling channel. A straight square channel with 20 transverse ribs on two sides has been tested for Re of about 3 x 10(4), 4.5 x 10(4) and 6 x 10(4). The ribbed wall test section is electrically heated and the heat removed by a stationary flow of known thermal and fluid dynamic characteristics. PMID:11460662

  8. Herpes simplex-mediated gene transfer of nerve growth factor protects against peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Goss, James R; Goins, William F; Lacomis, David; Mata, Marina; Glorioso, Joseph C; Fink, David J

    2002-07-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common and debilitating complication of diabetes. In animal models, neurotrophic factors can prevent progression of the neuropathy, but adverse effects prevent systemic administration in adequate doses to treat human disease. We examined whether gene transfer with replication-defective genomic herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors modified to express nerve growth factor (NGF) could be used to prevent progression of neuropathy in mice. Diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ) resulted in a sensory neuropathy manifest by a decrease in the foot sensory nerve amplitude (FSA; control = 20 +/- 0.1 microV, treated = 14 +/- 0.1 microV). Transduction of dorsal root ganglia in vivo with an HSV-based vector expressing NGF under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter (vector SHN) or the HSV latency active promoter 2 (vector SLN) by footpad inoculation 2 weeks after STZ administration protected against the decrease in FSA (22 +/- 1.4 microV and 21 +/- 1.7 microV, respectively) measured 4 weeks later. Injection of SHN into inguinal adipose tissue 2 weeks after onset of diabetes also prevented the decrease in FSA (20 +/- 3.3 microV). These results suggest that gene transfer with an NGF-producing herpes-based vector may prove useful in the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:12086954

  9. First measurement of the electromagnetic form factor of the neutral kaon at a large momentum transfer and the effect of SU(3) breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Kamal K.; Dobbs, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Bonvicini, G.

    2014-03-01

    At large momentum transfers the photon interacts with the charges and spins of the constituent partons in a hadron. It is expected that the neutral kaon can acquire finite electromagnetic form factors because its wave function is affected by the order of magnitude difference between the mass of the strange quark and that of the down quark, or flavor SU(3) breaking. We report on the first measurement of the form factor of neutral kaons at the large timelike momentum transfer of |Q2|=17.4 GeV by measuring the cross section for e+e-?KSKL at ?{s}=4.17 GeV using CLEO-c data with an integrated luminosity of 586 pb-1. We obtain F(17.4 GeV)=5.3×10-3, with a 90% C.L. interval of (2.9-8.2)×10-3. This is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than F(17.4 GeV)=(44±1)×10-3, and indicates that the effect of SU(3) breaking is small. In turn, this makes it unlikely that the recently observed strong violation of the pQCD prediction, F(|Q2|)/F(|Q2|)=f?2/fK2, which is based on the assumption of similar wave functions for the pions and kaons, can be attributed to SU(3) breaking alone.

  10. Determination of field related transfer factors for Cs-137 and Sr-90, from the fallout of the reactor accident in Chernobyl (USSR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artner, Christoph; Gerzabek, Martin H.; Horak, Othmar; Mueck, Konrad

    1991-05-01

    The plant ground transfer factor (TF) is defined. The resulting activity of the ground after radionuclide distribution causes a measurable absorption of both isotopes, Cs-137 and Sr-90, by the plants and allows to obtain TF in field conditions. Two hundred specimens of various plants were chosen. The corresponding ground specimens were taken from a zero to twenty centimeters ground layer. A survey of Cs-137 TF of various plants is given. The TF's for Sr-90 are, at least, an order of magnitude higher than those for Cs-137. In most cases, the correlation between Cs-137 TF and the measured ground activity concentration is negative. The TF's obtained for Cs-137 and Sr-90 are, in general, comparable with data which were determined long before the reactor accident by various tests with artificially contaminated grounds.

  11. Determination of nicotine in tobacco with second-order spectra data of charge-transfer complex in ethanol-water binary solvents processed by parallel factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shuqin; Liao, Lifu; Xiao, Xilin; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Du, Nan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2010-05-01

    A new spectrophotometric method for the determination of nicotine in mixtures without pre-separation has been proposed. Nicotine could react with 2,4-dinitrophenol through a charge-transfer reaction to form a colored complex. The second-order data from the visible absorption spectra of the complex in a series of ethanol-water binary solvents with various water volume fractions could be expressed as the combination of two bilinear data matrices. With the bilinear model, the second-order spectra data of mixtures containing nicotine and other interferents could be analysed by using second-order calibration algorithms, and the determination of nicotine in the mixtures could be achieved. The algorithm used here was parallel factor analysis. The method has been successfully used to determine nicotine in tobacco samples with satisfactory results.

  12. Factors which stabilize the methylamine dehydrogenase-amicyanin electron transfer protein complex revealed by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, V L; Jones, L H; Graichen, M E; Mathews, F S; Hosler, J P

    1997-10-21

    Methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH) and amicyanin form a physiologic complex within which electrons are transferred from the tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ) cofactor of MADH to the type 1 copper of amicyanin. Interactions responsible for complex formation may be inferred from the crystal structures of complexes of these proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis has been performed to probe the roles of specific amino acid residues of amicyanin in stabilizing the MADH-amicyanin complex and determining the observed ionic strength dependence of complex formation. Conversion of Phe97 to Glu severely disrupted binding, establishing the importance of hydrophobic interactions involving this residue. Conversion of Arg99 to either Asp or to Leu increased the Kd for complex formation by 2 orders of magnitude at low ionic strength, establishing the importance of ionic interactions which were inferred from the crystal structure involving Arg99. Conversion of Lys68 to Ala did not disrupt binding at low ionic strength, but it did greatly diminish the observed ionic strength dependence of complex formation that is seen with wild-type amicyanin. These results demonstrate that the physiologic interaction between MADH and amicyanin is stabilized by a combination of ionic and van der Waals interactions and that individual amino acid residues on the protein surface are able to dictate specific interactions between these soluble redox proteins. These results also indicate that the orientation of MADH and amicyanin when they react with each other in solution is the same as the orientation of the proteins which is seen in the structure of the crystallized protein complex. PMID:9335529

  13. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skin by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-11-01

    Gene therapy using wound healing-associated growth factor gene has received much attention as a new strategy for improving the outcome of tissue transplantation. We delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF) to rat free skin grafts by the use of laser-induced stress waves (LISWs); autografting was performed with the grafts. Systematic analysis was conducted to evaluate the adhesion properties of the grafted tissue; angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and reepithelialization were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and reperfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging as a function of time after grafting. Both the level of angiogenesis on day 3 after grafting and the increased ratio of blood flow on day 4 to that on day 3 were significantly higher than those in five control groups: grafting with hHGF gene injection alone, grafting with control plasmid vector injection alone, grafting with LISW application alone, grafting with LISW application after control plasmid vector injection, and normal grafting. Reepithelialization was almost completed on day 7 even at the center of the graft with LISW application after hHGF gene injection, while it was not for the grafts of the five control groups. These findings demonstrate the validity of our LISW-based HGF gene transfection to accelerate the adhesion of grafted skins.

  14. Protein Replacement Therapy and Gene Transfer in Canine Models of Hemophilia A, Hemophilia B, von Willebrand Disease, and Factor VII Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Timothy C.; Dillow, Aaron M.; Franck, Helen W.G.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Raymer, Robin A.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Arruda, Valder R.; High, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Dogs with hemophilia A, hemophilia B, von Willebrand disease (VWD), and factor VII deficiency faithfully recapitulate the severe bleeding phenotype that occurs in humans with these disorders. The first rational approach to diagnosing these bleeding disorders became possible with the development of reliable assays in the 1940s through research that used these dogs. For the next 60 years, treatment consisted of replacement of the associated missing or dysfunctional protein, first with plasma-derived products and subsequently with recombinant products. Research has consistently shown that replacement products that are safe and efficacious in these dogs prove to be safe and efficacious in humans. But these highly effective products require repeated administration and are limited in supply and expensive; in addition, plasma-derived products have transmitted bloodborne pathogens. Recombinant proteins have all but eliminated inadvertent transmission of bloodborne pathogens, but the other limitations persist. Thus, gene therapy is an attractive alternative strategy in these monogenic disorders and has been actively pursued since the early 1990s. To date, several modalities of gene transfer in canine hemophilia have proven to be safe, produced easily detectable levels of transgene products in plasma that have persisted for years in association with reduced bleeding, and correctly predicted the vector dose required in a human hemophilia B liver-based trial. Very recently, however, researchers have identified an immune response to adeno-associated viral gene transfer vector capsid proteins in a human liver-based trial that was not present in preclinical testing in rodents, dogs, or nonhuman primates. This article provides a review of the strengths and limitations of canine hemophilia, VWD, and factor VII deficiency models and of their historical and current role in the development of improved therapy for humans with these inherited bleeding disorders. PMID:19293459

  15. Enhancement of innate immune system in monocot rice by transferring the dicotyledonous elongation factor Tu receptor EFR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fen; Wang, Huiqin; Wang, Shanzhi; Jiang, Wendi; Shan, Changlin; Li, Bin; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Shiyong; Sun, Wenxian

    2015-07-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) receptor (EFR) in cruciferous plants specifically recognizes the N-terminal acetylated elf18 region of bacterial EF-Tu and thereby activates plant immunity. It has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis EFR confers broad-spectrum bacterial resistance in the EFR transgenic solanaceous plants. Here, the transgenic rice plants (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cv. Zhonghua 17) and cell cultures with constitutive expression of AtEFR were developed to investigate whether AtEFR senses EF-Tu and thus enhances bacterial resistance in the monocot plants. We demonstrated that the Xanthomonas oryzae-derived elf18 peptide induced oxidative burst and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the AtEFR transgenic rice cells and plants, respectively. Pathogenesis-related genes, such as OsPBZ1, were upregulated dramatically in transgenic rice plant and cell lines in response to elf18 stimulation. Importantly, pretreatment with elf18 triggered strong resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae in the transgenic plants, which was largely dependent on the AtEFR expression level. These plants also exhibited enhanced resistance to rice bacterial brown stripe, but not to rice fungal blast. Collectively, the results indicate that the rice plants with heterologous expression of AtEFR recognize bacterial EF-Tu and exhibit enhanced broad-spectrum bacterial disease resistance and that pattern recognition receptor-mediated immunity may be manipulated across the two plant classes, dicots and monocots. PMID:25358295

  16. Neonatal transfer of membrane-bound stem cell factor improves survival and heart function in aged mice after myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhuo; Lee, Chyan-Jang; Mejia-Guerrero, Salvador; Zhang, Yuemei; Higuchi, Koji; Li, Ren-Ke; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2012-12-01

    Stem cell mobilization to injured tissue contributes to neovascularization, resulting in regeneration after myocardial infarction (MI). We previously showed that direct cardiac injection of a recombinant lentivirus (LV) that engineers expression of membrane-bound stem cell factor (mSCF) improves outcomes immediately after MI. In this study, we evaluated the effect of neonatal LV/mSCF transduction on MI outcomes in aged mice. We constructed a recombinant LV harboring an ?-myosin heavy chain promoter that drives mSCF expression and injected it into the temporal vein of neonatal mice. One year later, sustained expression of mSCF in the adult mouse hearts was detected by genomic and quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. To evaluate the contribution of neonatal LV/mSCF delivery to recovery from MI, we induced an MI in adult LV/mSCF-transduced, LV only-transduced, and nontransduced control mice. Strikingly, LV/mSCF transduction reduced infarct scar size, enhanced angiogenesis, improved ventricular function, and significantly increased survival of the mice. Regional overexpression of CD11b, a marker of monocytes and proangiogenic cells, was observed on monocytes isolated from the infarcted hearts of LV/mSCF-transduced mice. Our data suggest a model of neonatal gene delivery that leads to sustained mSCF expression during adulthood to aid recovery from MI and prevent heart failure. PMID:22998370

  17. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skins by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    In our previous study, we delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyto growth factor (hHGF) to rat skin grafts based on laser-induced stress wave (LISW), by which production of CD31-positive cells in the grafted skins was found to be enhanced, suggesting improved angiogenesis. In this study, we validated the efficacy of this method to accelerate adhesion of grafted skins; reperfusion and reepithelialization in the grafted skins were examined. As a graft, dorsal skin of a rat was exsected and its subcutaneous fat was removed. Plasmid DNA expression vector for hHGF was injected into the graft; on its back surface a laser target with a transparent sheet for plasma confinement was placed, and irradiated with three nanosecond laser pulses at a laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm2 (532 nm; spot diameter, 3 mm) to generate LISWs. After the application of LISWs, the graft was transplanted onto its donor site. We evaluated blood flow by laser Doppler imaging and analyzed reepithelialization based on immunohistochemistry as a function of postgrafting time. It was found that both reperfusion and reepithelialization were significantly enhanced for the grafts with gene transfection than for normal grafts; reepithelialization was completed within 7 days after transplantation with the transfected grafts. These findings demonstrate that adhesion of grafted skins can be accelerated by delivering HGF gene to the grafts based on LISWs.

  18. The Charge Form Factor of the Neutron at Low Momentum Transfer from the $^{2}\\vec{\\rm H}(\\vec{\\rm e},{\\rm e}'{\\rm n}){\\rm p}$ Reaction

    E-print Network

    E. Geis; V. Ziskin; T. Akdogan; H. Arenhoevel; R. Alarcon; W. Bertozzi; E. Booth; T. Botto; J. Calarco; B. Clasie; C. B. Crawford; A. DeGrush; T. W. Donnelly; K. Dow; M. Farkhondeh; R. Fatemi; O. Filoti; W. Franklin; H. Gao; S. Gilad; D. Hasell; P. Karpius; M. Kohl; H. Kolster; T. Lee; A. Maschinot; J. Matthews; K. McIlhany; N. Meitanis; R. G. Milner; J. Rapaport; R. P. Redwine; J. Seely; A. Shinozaki; S. Sirca; A. Sindile; E. Six; T. Smith; M. Steadman; B. Tonguc; C. Tschalaer; E. Tsentalovich; W. Turchinetz; Y. Xiao; W. Xu; C. Zhang; Z. Zhou; T. Zwart

    2008-04-08

    We report new measurements of the neutron charge form factor at low momentum transfer using quasielastic electrodisintegration of the deuteron. Longitudinally polarized electrons at an energy of 850 MeV were scattered from an isotopically pure, highly polarized deuterium gas target. The scattered electrons and coincident neutrons were measured by the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST) detector. The neutron form factor ratio $G^{n}_{E}/G^{n}_{M}$ was extracted from the beam-target vector asymmetry $A_{ed}^{V}$ at four-momentum transfers $Q^{2}=0.14$, 0.20, 0.29 and 0.42 (GeV/c)$^{2}$.

  19. Transfer factors and effective half-lives of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in different environmental sample types obtained from Northern Finland: case Fukushima accident.

    PubMed

    Koivurova, Matias; Leppänen, Ari-Pekka; Kallio, Antti

    2015-08-01

    The Fukushima NPP accident caused a small but detectable cesium fallout in northern Finland, of the order of 1 Bq/m(2). This fallout transferred further to soil, water, flora and fauna. By using modern HPGe detector systems traces of (134)Cs from the Fukushima fallout were observed in various samples of biota. In northern Finland different types of environmental samples such as reindeer meat, berries, fish, lichens and wolf were collected during 2011-2013. The observed (134)Cs concentrations varied from 0.1 Bq/kg to a few Bq/kg. By using the known (134)Cs/(137)Cs ratio observed in Fukushima fallout the increase of the Fukushima accident to the (137)Cs concentrations was found to vary from 0.06 % to 6.9 % depending on the sample type. The aggregated transfer factors (Tag) and effective half-lives (Teff) for (134)Cs and (137)Cs were also determined and then compared with known values found from earlier studies which are calculated based on the fallout from the Chernobyl accident. Generally, the Tag and Teff values determined in this study were found to agree with the values found in the earlier studies. The Teff values were sample-type specific and were found to vary from 0.91 to 2.1 years for (134)Cs and the estimates for (137)Cs ranged between 1.6 and 19 years. Interestingly, the ground lichens had the longest Teff whereas the beard lichen had the shortest. In fauna, highest Tag values were determined for wolf meat ranging between 1.0 and 2.2 m(2)/kg. In flora, the highest Tag values were determined for beard lichens, ranging from 1.9 m(2)/kg to 3.5 m(2)/kg. PMID:25935505

  20. Proton elastic form factor ratios to Q{sup 2}=3.5 GeV{sup 2} by polarization transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, V.; Perdrisat, C.F.; Gerstner, G.; Pentchev, L.; Rutledge, G.; Strauch, S.; Wijesooriya, K.; Aniol, K.A.; Epstein, M.B.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Baker, F.T.; Templon, J.A.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Besson, A.; Fonvieille, H.; Jaminion, S.; Laveissiere, G.

    2005-05-01

    The ratio of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp}, was obtained by measuring P{sub t} and P{sub l}, the transverse and longitudinal recoil proton polarization components, respectively, for the elastic e{sup {yields}}p{yields}ep{sup {yields}}reaction in the four-momentum transfer squared range of 0.5 to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}. In the single-photon exchange approximation, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp} is directly proportional to P{sub t}/P{sub l}. The simultaneous measurement of P{sub t} and P{sub l} in a polarimeter reduces systematic uncertainties. The results for G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp} show a systematic decrease with increasing Q{sup 2}, indicating for the first time a definite difference in the distribution of charge and magnetization in the proton. The data have been reanalyzed and their systematic uncertainties have become significantly smaller than those reported previously.

  1. Interferon-alpha and transfer factor in the treatment of multiple sclerosis: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. AUSTIMS Research Group.

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The role of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and transfer factor (TF) in the treatment of multiple sclerosis was investigated in a prospective, multi-centric, three year, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. One hundred and eighty two patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis were randomised into three treatment groups whose compositions were found to be similar for demographic and prognostic variables including HLA status. Subcutaneous injections of IFN-alpha (3 x 10(6) units), TF (0.5 units) manufactured from leucocytes of cohabiting donors, or placebo were given twice weekly for two months, once weekly for 10 months then fortnightly for 24 months. One hundred and fifty three patients completed the injection regimen. There was no significant difference in the progression of disability for multiple sclerosis patients in either the IFN-alpha or TF-treated groups compared with the placebo group. Similarly, change in visual evoked responses (VER), and in number of oligoclonal bands (OCB) and the level of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) over the trial period did not differ significantly between the three groups. However, the IFN-alpha-treated group had significantly more reported adverse drug reactions and patient withdrawals than either of the other two groups. PMID:2659737

  2. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake

    E-print Network

    electronically access NUREG-series publications and other NRC records at NRC's Public Electronic Reading Room at http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm.html. Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG one of these two sources. 1. The Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Mail Stop

  3. Vibrational mode and collision energy effects on reaction of H2CO+ with C2H2: Charge state competition and the role of Franck-Condon factors in endoergic charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Van Devener, Brian; Anderson, Scott L.

    2005-11-01

    The effects of collision energy (Ecol) and six different H2CO+ vibrational states on the title reaction have been studied over the center-of-mass Ecol range from 0.1 to 2.6 eV, including measurements of product ion recoil velocity distributions. Ab initio and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations were used to examine the properties of complexes and transition states that might be important in mediating the reaction. Reaction is largely direct, despite the presence of multiple deep wells on the potential surface. Five product channels are observed, with a total reaction cross section at the collision limit. The competition among the major H2+ transfer, hydrogen transfer, and proton transfer channels is strongly affected by Ecol and H2CO+ vibrational excitation, providing insight into the factors that control competition and charge state "unmixing" during product separation. One of the more interesting results is that endoergic charge transfer appears to be controlled by Franck-Condon factors, implying that it occurs at large inter-reactant separations, contrary to the expectation that endoergic reactions should require intimate collisions to drive the necessary energy conversion.

  4. Influence of tube-entrance configuration on average heat-transfer coefficients and friction factors for air flowing in an Inconel tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowdermilk, Warren H; Grele, Milton D

    1950-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation was conducted with air flowing through an electrically heated Inconel tube having either a long-approach or a right-angle-edge entrance, an inside diameter of 0.402 inch, and a length of 24 inches over a range of Reynolds numbers up to 375,000 and average inside-tube-wall temperatures up to 2000 degrees R. Good correlation of heat-transfer data was obtained for both entrances, which substantiates work previously reported. A fair correlation of friction data was obtained for both entrances. The entrance configuration had little effect on the average heat-transfer and friction coefficients.

  5. Office of Technology Transfer Material Transfer Agreements

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    Office of Technology Transfer · Material Transfer Agreements · Confidentiality Agreements · Copyright / Patent Licensing The Office of Technology Transfer facilitates the transfer of innovations out of the university for public benefit TOOLS #12;Office of Technology Transfer Facilitating transfer of innovations

  6. SOLID-LIQUID PHASE TRANSFER CATALYZED SYNTHESIS OF CINNAMYL ACETATE-KINETICS AND ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE REACTION IN A BATCH REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of solid-liquid phase transfer catalysis has an advantage of carrying out reaction between two immiscible substrates, one in solid phase and the other in liquid phase, with high selectivity and at relatively low temperatures. In this study we investigated the synthesis ci...

  7. Applicability of moisture transfer parameters estimated by correlation between Biot number and lag factor (Bi-G correlation) for convective drying of eggplant slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianxi; Hou, Hongying; Chen, Junruo

    2013-11-01

    Accurate values of the moisture transfer parameters are necessary to study heat and mass transfer, particularly for the efficient design of both process and equipment. However, these parameters obtained from empirical equations or analytical solutions of Fick’s second diffusion law are generally different from each other. In order to make simulation more accurate and closer to the fact, it is necessary to perform theoretical analysis and test of available empirical equations in literatures. In this work, such efforts were made: firstly, moisture transfer parameters were evaluated by Bi-G correlation; then, the obtained parameters were substituted to Fick’s second law of diffusion model, and the model was numerically calculated with convective boundary condition. The results show that although the exponential equation fits the experimental data well, the data predicted from Fick’s second law deviate far from the experimental data. This implicates that Bi-G correlation need be further improved to obtain better accurate moisture transfer parameters.

  8. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for a successful technology transfer program and what such a program would look like are discussed. In particular, the issues associated with technology transfer in general, and within the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) environment specifically are addressed. The section on background sets the stage, identifies the barriers to successful technology transfer, and suggests actions to address the barriers either generally or specifically. The section on technology transfer presents a process with its supporting management plan that is required to ensure a smooth transfer process. Viewgraphs are also included.

  9. Additive Manufacturing/Diagnostics via the High Frequency Induction Heating of Metal Powders: The Determination of the Power Transfer Factor for Fine Metallic Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Caravias, George; Holcomb, Matthew

    2015-03-11

    Grid Logic Inc. is developing a method for sintering and melting fine metallic powders for additive manufacturing using spatially-compact, high-frequency magnetic fields called Micro-Induction Sintering (MIS). One of the challenges in advancing MIS technology for additive manufacturing is in understanding the power transfer to the particles in a powder bed. This knowledge is important to achieving efficient power transfer, control, and selective particle heating during the MIS process needed for commercialization of the technology. The project s work provided a rigorous physics-based model for induction heating of fine spherical particles as a function of frequency and particle size. This simulation improved upon Grid Logic s earlier models and provides guidance that will make the MIS technology more effective. The project model will be incorporated into Grid Logic s power control circuit of the MIS 3D printer product and its diagnostics technology to optimize the sintering process for part quality and energy efficiency.

  10. Measurement of the electric form factor of the neutron at low momentum transfers using a vector polarized deuterium gas target at BLAST

    E-print Network

    Ziskin, Vitaliy

    2005-01-01

    Elastic form factors are fundamental quantities that characterize the electromagnetic structure of the nucleon. High precision measurements of these quantities are essential in understanding the structure of hadronic matter. ...

  11. Comparison of Passively Transferred Antibodies in Bighorn and Domestic Lambs Reveals One Factor in Differential Susceptibility of These Species to Mannheimia haemolytica-Induced Pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica consistently causes fatal bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin is the primary virulence factor of this organism. BHS are more susceptible to developing fatal pneumonia than the related species Ovis aries...

  12. Measurements of the Proton Elastic-Form-Factor Ratio {mu}{sub p}G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, G.; Piasetzky, E.; Pomerantz, I.; Shneor, R.; Glister, J.; Lee, B.; Choi, Seonho; Kang, H.; Oh, Y.; Song, J.; Yan, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Armstrong, W.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Yao, H.; Arrington, J.; Solvignon, P.; Beck, A.; May-Tal Beck, S.

    2007-11-16

    High-precision measurements of the proton elastic form-factor ratio, {mu}{sub p}G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p}, have been made at four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, values between 0.2 and 0.5 GeV{sup 2}. The new data, while consistent with previous results, clearly show a ratio less than unity and significant differences from the central values of several recent phenomenological fits. By combining the new form-factor ratio data with an existing cross-section measurement, one finds that in this Q{sup 2} range the deviation from unity is primarily due to G{sub E}{sup p} being smaller than expected.

  13. Measurements of the proton elastic-form-factor ratio {mu}{sup p}G{sup p}{sub E}/G{sup p}{sub M} at low momentum transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Ron, G.; Glister, J.; Lee, B.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, W.; Arrington, J.; Physics; Tel Aviv Univ.; St. Mary's Univ.; Dalhousie Univ.; Seoul National Univ.; Univ. of Kentucky; Temple Univ.; The Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2007-01-01

    High-precision measurements of the proton elastic form-factor ratio, {mu}{sub p}G{sup p}E/G{sup p}M, have been made at four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, values between 0.2 and 0.5 GeV{sup 2}. The new data, while consistent with previous results, clearly show a ratio less than unity and significant differences from the central values of several recent phenomenological fits. By combining the new form-factor ratio data with an existing cross-section measurement, one finds that in this Q{sup 2} range the deviation from unity is primarily due to G{sup p}E being smaller than expected.

  14. Experimental studies on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid in a circular pipe under laminar flow with wire coil inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekar, M.; Suresh, S.; Chandra Bose, A.

    2010-02-15

    In this paper, fully developed laminar flow convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid flowing through a uniformly heated horizontal tube with and without wire coil inserts is presented. For this purpose, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles of 43 nm size were synthesized, characterized and dispersed in distilled water to form stable suspension containing 0.1% volume concentration of nanoparticles. The Nusselt number in the fully developed region were measured and found to increase by 12.24% at Re = 2275 for plain tube with nanofluid compared to distilled water. Two wire coil inserts made of stainless steel with pitch ratios 2 and 3 were used which increased the Nusselt numbers by 15.91% and 21.53% respectively at Re = 2275 with nanofluid compared to distilled water. The better heat transfer performance of nanofluid with wire coil insert is attributed to the effects of dispersion or back-mixing which flattens the temperature distribution and make the temperature gradient between the fluid and wall steeper. The measured pressure loss with the use of nanofluids is almost equal to that of the distilled water. The empirical correlations developed for Nusselt number and friction factor in terms of Reynolds/Peclet number, pitch ratio and volume concentration fits with the experimental data within {+-}15%. (author)

  15. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, Frank E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: international comparison of R&D expenditures in 1989; NASA Technology Transfer Program; NASA Technology Utilization Program thrusts for FY 1992 and FY 1993; National Technology Transfer Network; and NTTC roles.

  16. The effects of metallothionein 2A polymorphism on placental cadmium accumulation: Is metallothionein a modifiying factor in transfer of micronutrients to the fetus?

    PubMed

    Tekin, Deniz; Kayaalt?, Zeliha; Aliyev, Vugar; Söylemezo?lu, Tülin

    2012-04-01

    Metallothionein affects the metabolism, transport and storage of micronutrients such as zinc, copper and iron, and the detoxification of heavy metals, especially cadmium. Cd is a common, highly toxic environmental pollutant that accumulates in human placenta, elevated concentrations of which are associated with impaired zinc transfer to the fetus. This prospective study investigated the effects of metallothionein 2A (MT2A) -5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism on the accumulation of Cd in human placenta and micronutrient transfer to the fetus in 95 pregnant women and their newborns. Venous blood from the mother was collected to investigate Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe levels and MT2A polymorphism. Cord blood from the neonate and placenta was collected for metal levels. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the standard PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Metal levels were analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). Maternal blood Cd levels were statistically higher for mothers with a heterozygote genotype compared with a homozygote genotype (P<0.05). In contrast, placental Cd levels were significantly higher in mothers with a homozygote rather than a heterozygote genotype (P<0.05). No difference existed in cord blood Cd, Zn and Cu levels. However, cord blood Fe levels of newborns with heterozygote genotype mothers were higher than in others. Placental Cd levels of heterozygote genotype mothers were negatively associated with Zn in cord blood. Cd exposure at environmental levels may be associated with alteration of the umbilical cord micronutrient levels for newborns with mothers of a heterozygote genotype. PMID:21328412

  17. Optimality and Conductivity for Water Flow: From Landscapes, to Unsaturated Soils, to Plant Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-02-23

    Optimality principles have been widely used in many areas. Based on an optimality principle that any flow field will tend toward a minimum in the energy dissipation rate, this work shows that there exists a unified form of conductivity relationship for three different flow systems: landscapes, unsaturated soils and plant leaves. The conductivity, the ratio of water flux to energy gradient, is a power function of water flux although the power value is system dependent. This relationship indicates that to minimize energy dissipation rate for a whole system, water flow has a small resistance (or a large conductivity) at a location of large water flux. Empirical evidence supports validity of the relationship for landscape and unsaturated soils (under gravity dominated conditions). Numerical simulation results also show that the relationship can capture the key features of hydraulic structure for a plant leaf, although more studies are needed to further confirm its validity. Especially, it is of interest that according to this relationship, hydraulic conductivity for gravity-dominated unsaturated flow, unlike that defined in the classic theories, depends on not only capillary pressure (or saturation), but also the water flux. Use of the optimality principle allows for determining useful results that are applicable to a broad range of areas involving highly non-linear processes and may not be possible to obtain from classic theories describing water flow processes.

  18. The importance of interhemispheric transfer for foveal vision: a factor that has been overlooked in theories of visual word recognition and object perception.

    PubMed

    Brysbaert, Marc

    2004-03-01

    In this special issue of Brain and Language, we examine what implications the division between the left and the right brain half has for the recognition of words presented in the center of the visual field. The different articles are a first indication that taking into account the split between the left and the right cerebral hemisphere need not be an inescapable nuisance in models of visual word recognition but may in fact form the clue to the solution of a longstanding problem within this literature. Also, the fact that interhemispheric transfer has implications for foveal word recognition should interest laterality researchers, as it makes their findings more central to normal reading. In this introductory article, I first present a rough picture of the current (lack of) evidence for a bilateral representation of the fovea and the absence of a callosal delay. I then briefly discuss the suggestions made by the different authors on how to integrate the foveal split within current models of visual word recognition. PMID:14967210

  19. Improved measurement of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (k(ws)) with experimental factor-compensated and T(1) -normalized quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Wu, Renhua; Liu, Charng-Ming; Liu, Philip K; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI enables measurement of dilute CEST agents and microenvironment properties such as pH and temperature, holding great promise for in vivo applications. However, because of confounding concomitant radio frequency (RF) irradiation and relaxation effects, the CEST-weighted MRI contrast may not fully characterize the underlying CEST phenomenon. We postulated that the accuracy of quantitative CEST MRI could be improved if the experimental factors (labeling efficiency and RF spillover effect) were estimated and taken into account. Specifically, the experimental factor was evaluated as a function of exchange rate and CEST agent concentration ratio, which remained relatively constant for intermediate RF irradiation power levels. Hence, the experimental factors can be calculated based on the reasonably estimated exchange rate and labile proton concentration ratio, which significantly improved quantification. The simulation was confirmed with creatine phantoms of serially varied concentration titrated to the same pH, whose reverse exchange rate (k(ws)) was found to be linearly correlated with the concentration. In summary, the proposed solution provides simplified yet reasonably accurate quantification of the underlying CEST system, which may help guide the ongoing development of quantitative CEST MRI. PMID:22649044

  20. Community Colleges and the Transfer Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Mary E.

    This paper examines how the traditional transfer role of the community college has become less significant as a vocational and community-based role has assumed importance. The paper describes factors contributing to the transfer function's decline and illustrates various attitudes surrounding the issue. The history of transfer education is…

  1. Transfer of elements relevant to nuclear fuel cycle from soil to boreal plants and animals in experimental meso- and microcosms.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Tiina S; Kasurinen, Anne; Häikiö, Elina; Tervahauta, Arja; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Uranium (U), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and zinc (Zn) occur naturally in soil but their radioactive isotopes can also be released into the environment during the nuclear fuel cycle. The transfer of these elements was studied in three different trophic levels in experimental mesocosms containing downy birch (Betula pubescens), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and Scandinavian small-reed (Calamagrostis purpurea ssp. Phragmitoides) as producers, snails (Arianta arbostorum) as herbivores, and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) as decomposers. To determine more precisely whether the element uptake of snails is mainly via their food (birch leaves) or both via soil and food, a separate microcosm experiment was also performed. The element uptake of snails did not generally depend on the presence of soil, indicating that the main uptake route was food, except for U, where soil contact was important for uptake when soil U concentration was high. Transfer of elements from soil to plants was not linear, i.e. it was not correctly described by constant concentration ratios (CR) commonly applied in radioecological modeling. Similar nonlinear transfer was found for the invertebrate animals included in this study: elements other than U were taken up more efficiently when element concentration in soil or food was low. PMID:26363398

  2. Factors affecting 137Cs bio- availability under the application of different fertilizing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorkova, M. V.; Belova, N. I.

    2012-04-01

    Although it has been 25 years since the Chernobyl accident, it was generally found that radiocaesium remained bio-availability in some regions. Plant uptake of 137Cs is depended from quantity of exchangeable radionuclide and strongly influenced by soil properties. The addition of fertilizers to soil induces chemical and biological changes that influence the distribution of free ions the different phases (soil and soil solution). In this study we try to estimate influence of different soil conditions affecting the 137Cs bio-availability under the application of manure and inorganic fertilizers. Our research carried out in 2001-2008 years on contaminated after Chernobyl accident sod-podzolic soil during of prolonged field experiment. The experimental site was located in south-west of Bryansk region, Russia. Contamination density by 137Cs in the sampling point was equal to 475±30 kBq/m2. The sequence of crops in rotation was: 1) potato; 2) oats 3) lupine 4) winter rye. Three fertilizing systems were compared: organic - 80 tons per hectare of cow manure; inorganic fertilizing system - different rates of NPK (low, temperate and high) and mixed - 40 tons per hectare of cow manure + NPK. Main soil properties and chemical form of 137Cs and K (potassium) were detected. Radiocaesium activity was determined in soil and plant samples by gamma spectrometry, using a high purity Ge detectors. Overall efficiency was known to an accuracy of about 10-12%. Obtained results shows, that various fertilizing systems influence soil properties, chemical forms of 137Cs and K in soil and radionuclide soil-to-plant transfer in different ways. The highest reduction of exchangeable 137Cs in soil was found in case with application of organic fertilizers and also - temperate NPK rates. Part of exchangeable 137Cs is equal 6.8% (from total activity) in case of manure, 7.8% in case of inorganic fertilizers with control value - 10.2%. Caesium mobility in soil is affected by such soil properties as: soil pH< available phosphorus < humus content < exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ < exchangeable K+. Inorganic fertilizers in high and temperate rates decrease 137Cs transfer to crops in 2.3-5.5 times. Organic fertilizers are less efficient, but its application can decrease 137Cs accumulation by farm crops during 2-3 years. Correlation analysis shows inversely proportional dependence between organic matter content and exchangeable form of 137Cs in soil (r2 = 0.81). A linear relation between 137Cs transfer factors (TF) to plants and exchangeable radionuclide content has been found (r2=0.68). Inversely proportional relation between the mobility level of potassium, its mobile form content and TF 137Cs was detected (r2 = 0.78).

  3. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  4. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can reach their maximum effectiveness.

  5. Transfer Investigational Agent Form

    Cancer.gov

    10/02 Transfer Investigational Agent Form This form is to be used for an intra-institutional transfer, one transfer/form. Division of Cancer Prevention National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health TRANSFER FROM: Investigator transferring agent:

  6. Safety and efficacy of factor IX gene transfer to skeletal muscle in murine and canine hemophilia B models by adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Valder R.; Schuettrumpf, Joerg; Herzog, Roland W.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Robinson, Nancy; Lotfi, Yasmin; Mingozzi, Federico; Xiao, Weidong; Couto, Linda B.; High, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors (serotype 2) efficiently transduce skeletal muscle, and have been used as gene delivery vehicles for hemophilia B and for muscular dystrophies in experimental animals and humans. Recent reports suggest that AAV vectors based on serotypes 1, 5, and 7 transduce murine skeletal muscle much more efficiently than AAV-2, with reported increases in expression ranging from 2-fold to 1000-fold. We sought to determine whether this increased efficacy could be observed in species other than mice. In immunodeficient mice we saw 10- to 20-fold higher levels of human factor IX (hF.IX) expression at a range of doses, and in hemophilic dogs we observed approximately 50-fold higher levels of expression. The increase in transgene expression was due partly to higher gene copy number and a larger number of cells transduced at each injection site. In all immunocompetent animals injected withAAV-1, inhibitory antibodies to F.IX developed, but in immunocompetent mice treated with high doses of vector, inhibitory antibodies eventually disappeared. These studies emphasize that the increased efficacy of AAV-1 vectors carries a risk of inhibitor formation, and that further studies will be required to define doses and treatment regimens that result in tolerance rather than immunity to F.IX. PMID:12969984

  7. Tumor cell and connective tissue cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Transfer of platelet-derived growth factor-AB/BB to stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, C.; Branting, M.; Gerdin, B.; Rubin, K.

    1997-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying stimulation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) beta-receptors expressed on connective tissue cells in human colorectal adenocarcinoma were investigated in this study. PDGF-AB/BB, but not PDGF receptors, was expressed by tumor cells in situ, as well as in tumor cell isolates of low passage from human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In an experimental co-culture system, conditioned medium from tumor cells only marginally activated PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. In contrast, co-culturing of the two cell types led to a marked PDGF beta-receptor activation. Functional PDGF-AB/BB was found to be associated with heparinase-I-sensitive components on the tumor cell surface. PDGF-AB/BB, isolated from heparinase-I-sensitive cell surface components, induced a marked activation of PDGF beta-receptors. Furthermore, co-culturing tumor cells together with fibroblasts led to a sustained activation of PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. Double immunofluorescence staining of tissue sections from human colorectal adenocarcinoma, combined with computer-aided image analysis, revealed that nonproliferating tumor cells were the predominant cellular source of PDGF-AB/BB in the tumor stroma. In addition, PDGF-AB/BB-expressing tumor cells were found juxtapositioned to microvascular cells expressing activated PDGF beta-receptors. Confocal microscopy revealed a cytoplasmic and cell-membrane-associated expression of PDGF-AB/BB in tumor cells situated in the stroma. In contrast, epithelial cells situated in normal or tumorous acinar structures revealed only a cell-membrane-associated PDGF-AB/BB expression. The is vitro and in situ results demonstrate that tumor cells not only facilitate but also have the ability to modulate connective tissue cell responsiveness to PDGF-AB/BB in a paracrine fashion, through direct cell-cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9250160

  8. Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio From Elastic e + p -> e + p Scattering at Momentum Transfer Q^2 = 2.5, 5.2, 6.7 and 8.5 (GeV/c)^2

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur Mkrtchyan

    2012-05-31

    Among the fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dyna mics of the nucleon's quark constituents. Electromagnetic probes are traditionally preferered to the hadronic beams. The electromagnetic interaction is a powerful tool for investigating the nucleon structure since it is well understood and it reveals observables that can be directly interpreted in terms of the current carried by the quarks. Elastic scattering leads to the form factors that describe the spatial charge a nd current distributions inside the nucleon. The reaction mechanism is assumed to be one photon exchange, the electromagnetic interaction is exactly calculable in QED, and one can safely extract the information on the hadronic vertex. The most important feature of early measurements of proton form factor ratio G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} with recoil polarization technique at Q{sup 2} up to 5.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} is the sharp decline of the ratio with Q{sup 2} increases, indicating that G{sub E}{sup p} falls much faster than G{sub M}{sup p}. This contradicts to data obtained by Rosenbluth separation method. An intriguing question was whether G{sub E}{sup p} will continue to decrease or become constant when Q{sup 2} increases. New set of measurements of proton form factor ratio G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} at Q{sup 2} = 2.5, 5.2, 6.7 and 8.5 (GeV/c){sup 2} have been conducted at JLab Hall C using {approx}85% longitudinally polarized electron elastic scattering from unpolarized hydrogen target. Recoil protons were detected in the HMS magnetic spectrometer with the standard detector package, combined with newly installed trigger scintillators and Focal Plane Polarimeter. The BigCal electromagnetic calorimeter (1744 channel) have been used for electron detection. Data obtained in this experiment show that G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} ratio continued to drop with Q{sup 2} and may cross 'zero' at Q{sup 2} > 10-15 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton form factor ratio G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} obtained from cross section and polarization measurements. It was assumed that the two photon exchange contribution might be responsible for difference of G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} ratio obtained by Rosenbluth separation method and recoil polarization technique. The kinematical dependence of polarization transfer observables in elastic electron-proton scattering at Q{sup 2} = 2.5 (GeV/c){sup 2} have been used in search of effects of 2{gamma} contribution. For a wide range of values of the virtual photon polarization {epsilon} ({epsilon} = 0.15, 0.63, and 0.77), the proton form factor ratio and longitudinal polarization transfer component were measured with statistical uncertainties of {+-}0.01 and {+-}0.005, respectively. Our data provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure.

  9. Radiation View Factor With Shadowing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-24

    FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors as input data to finite element heat transfer analysis codes.

  10. Nonadiabatic anharmonic electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, P. P.

    2013-03-28

    The effect of an inner sphere, local mode vibration on an electron transfer is modeled using the nonadiabatic transition probability (rate) expression together with both the anharmonic Morse and the harmonic oscillator potential. For an anharmonic inner sphere mode, a variational analysis uses harmonic oscillator basis functions to overcome the difficulties evaluating Morse-model Franck-Condon overlap factors. Individual matrix elements are computed with the use of new, fast, robust, and flexible recurrence relations. The analysis therefore readily addresses changes in frequency and/or displacement of oscillator minimums in the different electron transfer states. Direct summation of the individual Boltzmann weighted Franck-Condon contributions avoids the limitations inherent in the use of the familiar high-temperature, Gaussian form of the rate constant. The effect of harmonic versus anharmonic inner sphere modes on the electron transfer is readily seen, especially in the exoergic, inverted region. The behavior of the transition probability can also be displayed as a surface for all temperatures and values of the driving force/exoergicity {Delta}=-{Delta}G. The temperature insensitivity of the transfer rate is clearly seen when the exoergicity equals the collective reorganization energy ({Delta}={Lambda}{sub s}) along a maximum ln (w) vs. {Delta} ridge of the surface. The surface also reveals additional regions for {Delta} where ln (w) appears to be insensitive to temperature, or effectively activationless, for some kinds of inner sphere contributions.

  11. AAV-Dominant Negative Tumor Necrosis Factor (DN-TNF) Gene Transfer to the Striatum Does Not Rescue Medium Spiny Neurons in the YAC128 Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alto, Laura Taylor; Chen, Xi; Ruhn, Kelly A.; Treviño, Isaac; Tansey, Malú G.

    2014-01-01

    CNS inflammation is a hallmark of neurodegenerative disease, and recent studies suggest that the inflammatory response may contribute to neuronal demise. In particular, increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling is implicated in the pathology of both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously shown that localized gene delivery of dominant negative TNF to the degenerating brain region can limit pathology in animal models of PD and AD. TNF is upregulated in Huntington's disease (HD), like in PD and AD, but it is unknown whether TNF signaling contributes to neuronal degeneration in HD. We used in vivo gene delivery to test whether selective reduction of soluble TNF signaling could attenuate medium spiny neuron (MSN) degeneration in the YAC128 transgenic (TG) mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD). AAV vectors encoding cDNA for dominant-negative tumor necrosis factor (DN-TNF) or GFP (control) were injected into the striatum of young adult wild type WT and YAC128 TG mice and achieved 30–50% target coverage. Expression of dominant negative TNF protein was confirmed immunohistologically and biochemically and was maintained as mice aged to one year, but declined significantly over time. However, the extent of striatal DN-TNF gene transfer achieved in our studies was not sufficient to achieve robust effects on neuroinflammation, rescue degenerating MSNs or improve motor function in treated mice. Our findings suggest that alternative drug delivery strategies should be explored to determine whether greater target coverage by DN-TNF protein might afford some level of neuroprotection against HD-like pathology and/or that soluble TNF signaling may not be the primary driver of striatal neuroinflammation and MSN loss in YAC128 TG mice. PMID:24824433

  12. Electrochemical charge transfer at a metallic electrode: a simulation study 

    E-print Network

    Pounds, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Part I Electrochemical charge transfer at a metallic electrode: a simulation study The factors which affect the rate of heterogeneous electron transfer at a metallic electrode in the context of Marcus theory are ...

  13. Technology transfer within NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.cyr, William

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer within NASA are provided. Assessment of technology transfer process, technology being transfered, issues and barriers, and observations and suggestions are addressed. Topics covered include: technology transfer within an organization (and across organization lines/codes) and space science/instrument technology and the role of universities in the technology development/transfer process.

  14. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, Kimberly R.

    1995-01-01

    The development and application of new technologies in the United States has always been important to the economic well being of the country. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been an important source of these new technologies for almost four decades. Recently, increasing global competition has emphasized the importance of fully utilizing federally funded technologies. Today NASA must meet its mission goals while at the same time, conduct research and development that contributes to securing US economic growth. NASA technologies must be quickly and effectively transferred into commercial products. In order to accomplish this task, NASA has formulated a new way of doing business with the private sector. Emphasis is placed on forming mutually beneficial partnerships between NASA and US industry. New standards have been set in response to the process that increase effectiveness, efficiency, and timely customer response. This summer I have identified potential markets for two NASA inventions: including the Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Characterization of Flaws in Metallic Tubing and the Radiographic Moire. I have also worked to establish a cooperative program with TAG, private industry, and a university known as the TAG/Industry/Academia Program.

  15. Second Chances: Investigating Athletes’ Experiences of Talent Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Talent transfer initiatives seek to transfer talented, mature individuals from one sport to another. Unfortunately talent transfer initiatives seem to lack an evidence-based direction and a rigorous exploration of the mechanisms underpinning the approach. The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify the factors which successfully transferring athletes cite as facilitative of talent transfer. In contrast to the anthropometric and performance variables that underpin current talent transfer initiatives, participants identified a range of psycho-behavioral and environmental factors as key to successful transfer. We argue that further research into the mechanisms of talent transfer is needed in order to provide a strong evidence base for the methodologies employed in these initiatives. PMID:26600303

  16. Manifestations of sequential electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Thurnauer, M.C.; Tang, J.

    1996-05-01

    An essential feature of efficient photo-initiated charge separation is sequential electron transfer. Charge separation is initiated by photoexcitation of an electron donor followed by rapid electron transfer steps from the excited donor through a series of electron acceptors, so that, after one or two successive steps, charge separation is stabilized by the physical separation between the oxidized donor and reduced acceptor. The prime example of this process is the sequential electron transfer that takes place in the purple photosynthetic bacterial reaction center, resulting in the charge separation between P{sup +} and Q{sub A}{sup -} across a biological membrane. We have developed magnetic resonance tools to monitor sequential electron transfer. We are applying these techniques to study charge separation in natural photo-synthetic systems in order to gain insights into the features of the reaction center proteins that promote efficient charge separation. As we establish what some of these factors are, we are beginning to design artificial photosynthetic systems that undergo photoinduced sequential electron transfer steps.

  17. Wireless Power Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-22

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  18. Wireless Power Transfer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-11-19

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  19. Wireless energy transfer between anisotropic metamaterials shells

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-06-15

    The behavior of strongly coupled Radial Photonic Crystals shells is investigated as a potential alternative to transfer electromagnetic energy wirelessly. These sub-wavelength resonant microstructures, which are based on anisotropic metamaterials, can produce efficient coupling phenomena due to their high quality factor. A configuration of selected constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) is analyzed in terms of its resonant characteristics. The coupling to loss ratio between two coupled resonators is calculated as a function of distance, the maximum (in excess of 300) is obtained when the shells are separated by three times their radius. Under practical conditions an 83% of maximum power transfer has been also estimated. -- Highlights: •Anisotropic metamaterial shells exhibit high quality factors and sub-wavelength size. •Exchange of electromagnetic energy between shells with high efficiency is analyzed. •Strong coupling is supported with high wireless transfer efficiency. •End-to-end energy transfer efficiencies higher than 83% can be predicted.

  20. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot has been constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors have been found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  1. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot was constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors were found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  2. Pregnancies following pronuclear stage tubal transfer.

    PubMed

    Yovich, J L; Blackledge, D G; Richardson, P A; Matson, P L; Turner, S R; Draper, R

    1987-11-01

    Pronuclear stage tubal transfer (PROST) is a technique that involves in vitro fertilization (IVF) of oocytes, followed by the transfer of pronuclear oocytes into the fallopian tubes. It has been developed for its prognostic value of confirming fertilization in couples with oligospermia or asthenospermia and enabling fertilization in cases with antispermatozoal antibodies (ASAB). PROST has provided useful diagnostic information in the management of couples who have failed to conceive in other treatment programs and has particular advantages over IVF for those receiving fresh donated oocytes for ovarian failure. Fourteen pregnancies resulted from 52 transfers, providing a pregnancy rate of 27% per transfer. The pregnancy rates were higher than a matched IVF series in the male factor and female ASAB groups and reached statistical significance for the ovum donation group. It is anticipated that both pregnancy rates and fetal wastage will be improved over conventional IVF and embryo transfer for the described infertility groups. PMID:3666189

  3. Ligand(s)-to-metal charge transfer as a factor controlling the equilibrium constants of late first-row transition metal complexes: revealing the Irving-Williams thermodynamical series.

    PubMed

    Varadwaj, Pradeep R; Varadwaj, Arpita; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2015-01-14

    A unified relationship between the experimental formation constants and the ligand(s)-to-metal charge transfer values of versatile ligand complexes of late transition series first-row bivalent metal ions is uncovered. The latter property not only explicates the Irving-Williams series but also rationalizes quantitatively Pearson's concept of hard and soft acids and bases by correlating the gas-phase to aqueous solution-phase chemistry in a broad sense. PMID:25414118

  4. HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

    E-print Network

    Lenert, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

  5. Heat Transfer Guest Editorial

    E-print Network

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Journal of Heat Transfer Guest Editorial We are indeed delighted in bringing out this special issue was showcased in diverse areas such as traditional heat and mass transfer, lab-on-chip, sensors, biomedical applica- tions, micromixers, fuel cells, and microdevices. Selected papers in the field of heat transfer

  6. Catalog Statement nstitutional Transfer

    E-print Network

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    evaluation process. Transfer Module The Ohio Board of Regents' Transfer and Articulation Policy established Policy to facilitate students' ability to tran one hio public college or university to another in order requireme s. A subsequent policy review and recommendations produced by the Articulation and Transfer

  7. Transferability of interventions in health education: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health education interventions are generally complex. Their outcomes result from both the intervention itself and the context for which they are developed. Thus, when an intervention carried out in one context is reproduced in another, its transferability can be questionable. We performed a literature review to analyze the concept of transferability in the health education field. Methods Articles included were published between 2000 and 2010 that addressed the notion of transferability of interventions in health education. Articles were analyzed using a standardized grid based on four items: 1) terminology used; 2) factors that influenced transferability; 3) capacity of the research and evaluation designs to assess transferability; and 4) tools and criteria available to assess transferability. Results 43 articles met the inclusion criteria. Only 13 of them used the exact term “transferability” and one article gave an explicit definition: the extent to which the measured effectiveness of an applicable intervention could be achieved in another setting. Moreover, this concept was neither clearly used nor distinguished from others, such as applicability. We highlight the levels of influence of transferability and their associated factors, as well as the limitations of research methods in their ability to produce transferable conclusions. Conclusions We have tried to clarify the concept by defining it along three lines that may constitute areas for future research: factors influencing transferability, research methods to produce transferable data, and development of criteria to assess transferability. We conclude this review with three propositions: 1) a conceptual clarification of transferability, especially with reference to other terms used; 2) avenues for developing knowledge on this concept and analyzing the transferability of interventions; and 3) in relation to research, avenues for developing better evaluation methods for assessing the transferability of interventions. PMID:22747988

  8. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  9. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

    1982-01-01

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  10. Technology Transfer Center | Technology Transfer Education

    Cancer.gov

    SKIP ALL NAVIGATION SKIP TO SUB MENU Search Site Standard Forms & Agreements Co-Development & Resources Careers & Training Intellectual Property & Inventions About TTC Overview NCI TTC Fellowship Program NIH Online Training Technology Transfer Education Other

  11. Thermosensitive Replication of a Kanamycin Resistance Factor

    PubMed Central

    Terawaki, Yoshiro; Takayasu, Hisao; Akiba, Tomoichiro

    1967-01-01

    A strain of Proteus vulgaris isolated from the urinary tract of a patient with postoperative pyelonephritis and resistant to sulfonamide, streptomycin, tetracycline, and kanamycin (KM) was found to transfer only KM resistance by cell-to-cell conjugation. The genetic determinant controlling the transferable KM resistance was considered to be an R factor and was designated R (KM). Successive transfer of KM resistance was demonstrated also from Escherichia coli 20S0, which received the R (KM) factor, to other substrains of E. coli K-12 or Salmonella typhimurium LT-2. The transfer of the R (KM) factor was strongly affected by the temperature at which the mating culture was kept. The transfer frequency of R (KM) at 25 C was about 105 times higher than at 37 C. The R (KM) factor was spontaneously eliminated from the host bacterial cells when P. vulgaris was cultured at 42 C, but no elimination occurred at 25 C. This elimination of the R (KM) factor at elevated temperature was also observed when the R (KM) factor infected E. coli and S. typhimurium. On the other hand, a normal R factor could not be eliminated from the same E. coli host strain by cultivation at the higher temperature. We consider the thermosensitive transfer and the spontaneous elimination of the R (KM) factor at higher temperature to depend upon thermosensitive replication of the R (KM) factor. PMID:4166554

  12. Transferring learning from faculty development to the classroom.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kim Z

    2014-12-01

    This study’s purpose was to better understand the transfer of learning by uncovering how various factors supported the integration of health information technology knowledge and skills gleaned from the Health Resources and Services Administration–funded faculty development programs into nursing education curricula. Through interviews with 20 participants from four programs, this study confirmed the importance of findings related to faculty, program, and work environment characteristics for supporting successful transfer of learning and substantiates a variety of other transfer-of-learning research. New or seldom discussed supportive individual characteristics were found, including leadership abilities, lifelong learning, ability to recognize limitations, persistence, creativity, and risk taking. The importance of networking, diversity of perspectives, postconference support, and teams in program designs were found to positively influence transfer. The variety of supportive factors and barriers in the participants’ work environments strengthens the assertions that transfer may be context dependent. Findings provided insight for recommendations to improve learning transfer. PMID:25494191

  13. Enhancement of heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, W.

    Recent publications on enhancement of heat transfer are reviewed, emphasizing the effects of roughness elements, fins, and porous surfaces. Enhancement of forced convective heat transfer on roughened surfaces, performance evaluation of enhanced surfaces, viscous flows in cooled tubes and tubes with swirlers, and active methods of enhancement are addressed. Aspects of pool boiling heat transfer are considered, including nucleate boiling heat transfer on rough surfaces and porous surfaces, and maximum and minimum heat fluxes. Evaporative heat transfer is discussed for thin-film evaporation on structured surfaces and liquid spray cooling of a heated surface. Condensation heat transfer on external surfaces is covered, including filmwise condensation on vertical finned and fluted surfaces and on horizontal tubes. In-tube boiling and condensation are treated, discussing their enhancement by fins and inserts, as well as critical heat flux in coiled, rifled, and corrugated tubes.

  14. Calculating proper transfer prices

    SciTech Connect

    Dorkey, F.C. ); Jarrell, G.A. )

    1991-01-01

    This article deals with developing a proper transfer pricing method. Decentralization is as American as baseball. While managers laud the widespread benefits of both decentralization and baseball, they often greet the term transfer price policy with a yawn. Since transfer prices are as critical to the success of decentralized firms as good pitchers are to baseball teams, this is quite a mistake on the part of our managers. A transfer price is the price charged to one division for a product or service that another division produced or provided. In many, perhaps most, decentralized organizations, the transfer pricing policies actually used are grossly inefficient and sacrifice the potential advantages of decentralization. Experience shows that far too many companies have transfer pricing policies that cost them significantly in foregone growth and profits.

  15. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Cupertino, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

  16. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  17. Analytic Couple Modeling Introducing Device Design Factor, Fin Factor, Thermal Diffusivity Factor, and Inductance Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A set of convenient thermoelectric device solutions have been derived in order to capture a number of factors which are previously only resolved with numerical techniques. The concise conversion efficiency equations derived from governing equations provide intuitive and straight-forward design guidelines. These guidelines allow for better device design without requiring detailed numerical modeling. The analytical modeling accounts for factors such as i) variable temperature boundary conditions, ii) lateral heat transfer, iii) temperature variable material properties, and iv) transient operation. New dimensionless parameters, similar to the figure of merit, are introduced including the device design factor, fin factor, thermal diffusivity factor, and inductance factor. These new device factors allow for the straight-forward description of phenomenon generally only captured with numerical work otherwise. As an example a device design factor of 0.38, which accounts for thermal resistance of the hot and cold shoes, can be used to calculate a conversion efficiency of 2.28 while the ideal conversion efficiency based on figure of merit alone would be 6.15. Likewise an ideal couple with efficiency of 6.15 will be reduced to 5.33 when lateral heat is accounted for with a fin factor of 1.0.

  18. The electronic couplings in electron transfer and excitation energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2009-04-21

    The transport of charge via electrons and the transport of excitation energy via excitons are two processes of fundamental importance in diverse areas of research. Characterization of electron transfer (ET) and excitation energy transfer (EET) rates are essential for a full understanding of, for instance, biological systems (such as respiration and photosynthesis) and opto-electronic devices (which interconvert electric and light energy). In this Account, we examine one of the parameters, the electronic coupling factor, for which reliable values are critical in determining transfer rates. Although ET and EET are different processes, many strategies for calculating the couplings share common themes. We emphasize the similarities in basic assumptions between the computational methods for the ET and EET couplings, examine the differences, and summarize the properties, advantages, and limits of the different computational methods. The electronic coupling factor is an off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix element between the initial and final diabatic states in the transport processes. ET coupling is essentially the interaction of the two molecular orbitals (MOs) where the electron occupancy is changed. Singlet excitation energy transfer (SEET), however, contains a Frster dipole-dipole coupling as its most important constituent. Triplet excitation energy transfer (TEET) involves an exchange of two electrons of different spin and energy; thus, it is like an overlap interaction of two pairs of MOs. Strategies for calculating ET and EET couplings can be classified as (1) energy-gap-based approaches, (2) direct calculation of the off-diagonal matrix elements, or (3) use of an additional operator to describe the extent of charge or excitation localization and to calculate the coupling value. Some of the difficulties in calculating the couplings were recently resolved. Methods were developed to remove the nondynamical correlation problem from the highly precise coupled cluster models for ET coupling. It is now possible to obtain reliable ET couplings from entry-level excited-state Hamiltonians. A scheme to calculate the EET coupling in a general class of systems, regardless of the contributing terms, was also developed. In the past, empirically derived parameters were heavily invoked in model description of charge and excitation energy drifts in a solid-state device. Recent advances, including the methods described in this Account, permit the first-principle quantum mechanical characterization of one class of the parameters in such descriptions, enhancing the predictive power and allowing a deeper understanding of the systems involved. PMID:19215069

  19. IONIC TRANSFERENCE NUMBERS IN CELLOPHANE MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Teorell, Torsten

    1936-01-01

    The "apparent" cation transference number within cellophane is determined for HCl, KCl, NH4Cl, NaCl, and LiCl. The method consists in measuring the E.M.F. in a concentration chain employing Ag:AgCl electrodes or calomel electrodes and calculating from formulas derived for cases of simple, unconstrained diffusion. The transference numbers and the cation mobilities relative to the chloride ion were found to be higher in the cellophane (relative cation mobilities increased about 40 per cent). The effect of the membrane is discussed. It is emphasized that with the introduction of a membrane as a liquid junction new factors are introduced, which are not considered in the formulas ordinarily used. Such factors may be activity changes due to dimensional or other reasons and particularly electrical effects exhibited by the membrane upon the ionic diffusion. Accordingly the transference number, as determined, may lack well defined physical significance. PMID:19872970

  20. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are used commonly for the correction of soft tissue imbalances and instabilities. The complete transfer and the split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon are well-accepted methods for the treatment of idiopathic equinovarus deformity in children and adults. Throughout the literature, complete and split transfer have been shown to yield significant improvements in ankle and foot range of motion and muscle function. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend one procedure over the other, although the split procedure has been advocated for consistently achieving inversion to eversion muscle balance without overcorrection. PMID:26590723

  1. Automated CADAM data transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, D.A.; Schwarz, R.K.

    1990-07-01

    This manual describes the Automated Data Transfer program developed at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., to provide an enhanced method for transferring CADAM{reg sign} drawings in both directions between MICRO CADAM{trademark} on the personal computer (PC) and CADAM on the mainframe. Section 2.0 of this manual presents an overview of the Automated CADAM Data Transfer program, describing the program's purpose; the data that it handles; the functions it performs; the hardware, software, and access requirements; and help and error functions. Section 3.0 describes the interactive menu-driven operation of the automated CADAM Data Transfer program.

  2. Nonparametric Transfer Function Models.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun M; Chen, Rong; Yao, Qiwei

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a class of nonparametric transfer function models is proposed to model nonlinear relationships between 'input' and 'output' time series. The transfer function is smooth with unknown functional forms, and the noise is assumed to be a stationary autoregressive-moving average (ARMA) process. The nonparametric transfer function is estimated jointly with the ARMA parameters. By modeling the correlation in the noise, the transfer function can be estimated more efficiently. The parsimonious ARMA structure improves the estimation efficiency in finite samples. The asymptotic properties of the estimators are investigated. The finite-sample properties are illustrated through simulations and one empirical example. PMID:20628584

  3. Settled Cryogenic Propellant Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutter, Bernard F.; Zegler, Frank; Sakla, Steve; Wall, John; Hopkins, Josh; Saks, Greg; Duffey, Jack; Chato, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Cryogenic propellant transfer can significantly benefit NASA s space exploration initiative. LMSSC parametric studies indicate that "Topping off" the Earth Departure Stage (EDS) in LEO with approx.20 mT of additional propellant using cryogenic propellant transfer increases the lunar delivered payload by 5 mT. Filling the EDS to capacity in LEO with 78 mT of propellants increases the delivered payload by 20 mT. Cryogenic propellant transfer is directly extensible to Mars exploration in that it provides propellant for the Mars Earth Departure stage and in-situ propellant utilization at Mars. To enable the significant performance increase provided by cryogenic propellant transfer, the reliability and robustness of the transfer process must be guaranteed. By utilizing low vehicle acceleration during the cryogenic transfer the operation is significantly simplified and enables the maximum use of existing, reliable, mature upper stage cryogenic-fluid-management (CFM) techniques. Due to settling, large-scale propellant transfer becomes an engineering effort, and not the technology development endeavor required with zero-gravity propellant transfer. The following key CFM technologies are all currently implemented by settling on both the Centaur and Delta IV upper stages: propellant acquisition, hardware chilldown, pressure control, and mass gauging. The key remaining technology, autonomous rendezvous and docking, is already in use by the Russians, and must be perfected for NASA whether the use of propellant transfer is utilized or not.

  4. Maximizing profits in international technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straube, W.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum profit can be introduced into international technology transfer by observing the following: (1) ethical and open dealing between the parties; (2) maximum knowledge of all facts concerning the technology, the use of the technology, the market, competition, prices, and alternatives; (3) ability to coordinate exports, service, support activities, licensing and cross licensing; and (4) knowledgeable people which put these factors together.

  5. Genetic information transfer promotes cooperation in bacteria

    E-print Network

    Misevic, Dusan

    Genetic information transfer promotes cooperation in bacteria Tatiana Dimitriua , Chantal Lottona the growth of neighboring cells. The genes coding for these cooperative traits are often propagated via mobile genetic elements and can be virulence factors from a bio- medical perspective. Here, we present

  6. Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics for [Ru(bpy)2((4,4'-PO3H2)2bpy)]2+ Sensitized TiO2 in a Dye-Sensitized Photoelectrosynthesis Cell: Factors Influencing Efficiency and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Wenjing; Brennaman, Kyle M; Concepcion, Javier J; Jurss, Jonah W.; Hoertz, Paul G; Luo, Hanlin; Chen, Chuncheng; Hanson, Kenneth G.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-04-14

    Nanosecond laser flash photolysis and photocurrent measurements have been used to investigate use of [Ru(bpy)2((4,4'-PO3H2)2bpy)]2+ attached to TiO2 nanoparticle films, TiO2-RuII, in a dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cell (DSPEC) configuration for H2 production. In these experiments, laser flash excitation of TiO2-RuII and rapid injection lead to TiO2(e-)-RuIII with subsequent TiO2(e-)-RuIII ? TiO2-RuII back electron transfer monitored on the nsec time scale with and without added triethanolamine (TEOA) and deprotonated ethylenediaminetetraacetic tetra-anion (EDTA4-) as irreversible electron transfer donors. With added TEOA or EDTA4-, a competition exists between back electron transfer and scavenger oxidation with the latter leading to H2 production in the photoelectrosynthesis cell. Reduction of TiO2(e-)-RuIII by both TEOA and EDTA4- occurs with kD ~ 106 M-1 s-1. EDTA4- is a more efficient scavenger by a factor of ~3 because of a more favorable partition equilibrium between the film and the external solution. Its increased scavenger efficiency appears in incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) measurements, in electron collection efficiencies (?coll), and in photocurrent measurements with H2 production. Evaluation of electron collection efficiencies by transient current measurements gave ?coll ~ 24% for TEOA and ~ 70% for EDTA4-. The dynamics of back electron transfer are minimized, and collection efficiencies, photocurrents, and hydrogen production are maximized by application of a positive applied bias consistent with the results of I-V measurements. A pH dependent plateau is reached at ~0 V at pH = 4.5 (EDTA4-) and at ~ -0.4 V at pH 6.7 (TEOA). The difference is qualitatively consistent with the influence of pH on electron population in trap states below the conduction band and the role they play in back electron transfer. The excitation dependence of IPCE measurements matches the spectrum of TiO2-RuII with IPCE values ~3 times higher for EDTA4- than for TEOA as noted above. Absorbed photon-to-current efficiency (APCE) values are light-intensity dependent because of the effect of multiple injection events and the influence of increasing trap site electron densities on back electron transfer. The key to efficient H2 production is minimizing back electron transfer. Application of a sufficiently positive potential relative to ECB for TiO2 accelerates loss of electrons from the film in competition with back electron transfer allowing for H2 production with efficiencies approaching 14.7% under steady-state irradiation.

  7. Intervening to Improve the Transfer to Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloyce, Jackie; Frederickson, Norah

    2012-01-01

    Evaluation data are reported on a Transfer Support Team (TST) intervention which supports pupils identified as vulnerable during secondary school transfer. Information about school concerns and broader adjustment measures were collected from TST supported pupils on three occasions and from a "typical benchmark group" on two occasions. Factors

  8. Convergent and Divergent Validity of the Learning Transfer System Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holton, Elwood F., III; Bates, Reid A.; Bookter, Annette I.; Yamkovenko, V. Bogdan

    2007-01-01

    The Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI) was developed to identify a select set of factors with the potential to substantially enhance or inhibit transfer of learning to the work environment. It has undergone a variety of validation studies, including construct, criterion, and crosscultural studies. However, the convergent and divergent…

  9. Petition to Count Transfer Work in the GPA of the Major Updated 08052014 Petition to Count Transfer Work in the GPA of the Major

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    Petition to Count Transfer Work in the GPA of the Major Updated 08052014 Petition to Count Transfer to be factored into the MGPA on a case-by-case basis. Eligible students must complete this petition to request intends to graduate. Eligibility To be eligible to petition the College to allow transfer coursework

  10. HEAT TRANSFER FOULING PART I -HEAT TRANSFER FOULING

    E-print Network

    Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

    PART I HEAT TRANSFER FOULING #12;PART I - HEAT TRANSFER FOULING 1. INTRODUCTION In industry, fouling of heat transfer surfaces has always been a recognised phenomena, although poorly understood(1 difficult. Fouling has been described as the major unresolved problem in heat transfer(6'7'8). Heat transfer

  11. Recombination Factorization

    E-print Network

    Chèze, Guillaume

    Lifting and Recombination Techniques for Absolute Factorization G. CHEZE Laboratoire J.­A. Dieudonn factorization algorithm following a ``lifting and recombination `` scheme (recombination probabilistic algorithm factorization algorithm following a ``lifting and recombination `` scheme (recombination probabilistic algorithm

  12. Technology Transfer and Technology Transfer Intermediaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Stephen M.; Flagg, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    A standard and comprehensive model is needed to evaluate and compare technology transfer systems and the stakeholders within these systems. The principle systems considered include federal laboratories, U.S. universities, the rehabilitation engineering research centers (RERCs), and large small business innovation research programs. An earlier…

  13. SEPARATIONS AND TRANSFERS CHECKLIST

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    1 SEPARATIONS AND TRANSFERS CHECKLIST This form is to be completed by the supervisor (or nominee. SUPERVISOR (OR NOMINEE) CHECKLIST Note: Please complete this checklist in conjunction with your staff member Return completed form to hrsupport@newcastle.edu.au SEPARATIONS AND TRANSFERS CHECKLIST Leave form

  14. Transferring Education for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Umer Farooque, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability stands for sustaining the past, meeting needs of the present without compromising the ability to meet future needs. It should meet the individual and social needs, present and future needs local and global needs. A sustainable education that meets this requirements surely be a transferable education; an education that transfers from…

  15. Student Equity: Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdsall, Les

    Focusing on the transfer function at Diablo Valley College (DVC), in California, this report offers 1991 and 1992 transfer data drawn from reports issued by the University of California (UC), the California State University (CSU), and the Los Angeles-based Center for the Study of Community Colleges (CSCC). Following introductory materials, the UC…

  16. new freshmen new transfers

    E-print Network

    Alwan, Abeer

    States represented Countries represented Percent 24% 4% 39% 5% 28% 92% 3% 1% 1% 3% Percent 96% 47% Number 45 85 GENDER Male Female ETHNICITY/VISA STATUS Total Domestic African American Am Indian/AK Native 18 Freshmen 42% 31% 27% Freshmen 49% 28% 8% 3% 3% 6% 24% 14% 13% Transfers 47% 53% Transfers 85% 3

  17. Automatic microbial transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Device can transfer metabolites or inhibitory agents to broth cultures of bacteria, in various stages of growth, for study. It also has application in transfer of other micro-organisms, such as yeasts, and could be useful in clinical and research laboratories. Device has been used for wide variety of purposes in experimental situations.

  18. Electrohydrodynamically enhanced heat transfer in pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Geppert, C.A.; Geppert, L.M.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1995-12-31

    The electrohydrodynamically enhanced heat transfer in pool boiling in the nucleate regime was studied using R-123 as the working fluid. An experimental apparatus was designed and built which allowed accurate measurements. The evaporator consisted of an electrically heated single horizontal smooth tube. Several different electrode designs were investigated. This study included higher heat fluxes than most of those previously reported in the literature. A summary of the previous work is provided. The results indicated that the heat transfer coefficient at a heat flux of 1.6 kW/m{sup 2} and a voltage of 10 kV was 4.6 times higher than the heat transfer coefficient without the electric field presence. However, the heat transfer coefficient at 52 kW/m{sup 2} and 10 kV was improved only by 38%. These enhancements are significant even at large heat flux levels. The power consumption for establishing the electric fields was on the order of 0.1% of the heat transfer power in the evaporator. When R-123 fluid was contaminated with a few percent ethanol, the boiling heat transfer at 3.3 kW/m{sup 2} was increased by a factor of 12.6 at 15 kV compared to zero kV. Finally, the presence of the electric fields nearly eliminated the hysteresis effect.

  19. Tendon lengthening and transfer.

    PubMed

    Fitoussi, F; Bachy, M

    2015-02-01

    Tendon lengthening and transfer are usually indicated for certain neuromuscular disorders, peripheral or central nerve injury, congenital disorder or direct traumatic or degenerative musculotendinous lesion. In musculotendinous lengthening, technique depends on muscle anatomy, degree of correction required, and the need to avoid excessive loss of force. Lengthening within the muscle or aponeurosis is stable. In the tendon, however, it may provide greater gain but is not stable and requires postoperative immobilization to avoid excessive lengthening. Tendon transfer consists in displacing a muscle's tendon insertion in order to restore function. The muscle to be transferred is chosen according to strength, architecture and course, contraction timing, intended direction, synergy and the joint moment arm to be restored. Functions to be restored have to be prioritized, and alternatives to transfer should be identified. The principles of tendon transfer require preoperative assessment of the quality of the tissue through which the transfer is to pass and of the suppleness of the joints concerned. During the procedure, transfer tension should be optimized and the neurovascular bundle should be protected. The method of fixation, whether tendon-to-bone or tendon-to-tendon suture, should be planned according to local conditions and the surgeon's experience. PMID:25572471

  20. Numerical Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Operator Perturbation: 1. Survey of operator perturbation methods W. Kalkofen; 2. Line formation in expanding atmospheres: multilevel calculations using approximate lambda operators W. R. Hamann; 3. Stellar atmospheres in non-LTE: model construction and line formation calculations using approximate lambda operators K. Werner; 4. Acceleration of convergence L. H. Auer; 5. Line formation in a time-dependent atmosphere W. Kalkofen; 6. Iterative solution of multilevel transfer problems Eugene H. Avrett and Rudolf Loeser; 7. An algorithm for the simultaneous solution of thousands of transfer equations under global constraints Lawrence S. Anderson; 8. Operator perturbation for differential equations W. Kalkofen; Part II. Polarised Radiation: 9. A gentle introduction to polarised radiative transfer David E. Rees; 10. Non-LTE polarised radiative transfer in special lines David E. Rees and Graham A. Murphy; 11. Transfer of polarised radiation using 4x4 matrices E. Landi Degli'Innocenti; 12. Radiative transfer in the presence of strong magnetic fields A. A. van Ballegooijen; 13. An integral operator technique of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry A. Peraiah; 14. Discrete ordinate matrix method M. Schmidt and R. Wehrse.

  1. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  2. Heat transfer in pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbach, T.

    1985-01-01

    The heat transfer from hot water to a cold copper pipe in laminar and turbulent flow condition is determined. The mean flow through velocity in the pipe, relative test length and initial temperature in the vessel were varied extensively during tests. Measurements confirm Nusselt's theory for large test lengths in laminar range. A new equation is derived for heat transfer for large starting lengths which agrees satisfactorily with measurements for large starting lengths. Test results are compared with the new Prandtl equation for heat transfer and correlated well. Test material for 200- and to 400-diameter test length is represented at four different vessel temperatures.

  3. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  4. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    ScienceCinema

    Covey, Debra

    2012-08-29

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  5. FLT Transfer Agreement

    Cancer.gov

    Provider: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Provider agrees to transfer to Recipient the following Production Documents (click here) for the production of 3'-deoxy-3'- [F-18] fluorothymidine ([F-18] FLT). (A) Generic Chemistry, Manufacturing and Control

  6. Smoothness- transferred random field

    E-print Network

    Wei, Donglai

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new random field (RF) model, smoothness-transfer random field (ST-RF) model, for image modeling. In the objective function of RF models, smoothness energy is defined with compatibility function to capture the ...

  7. DCIDE Material Transfer Agreement

    Cancer.gov

    MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Development of Clinical Imaging Drugs and Enhancers Program (DCIDE) has been designed to assist academic and business investigators to acquire the data necessary for them to file an Investigational

  8. Technology transfer methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labotz, Rich; Connell, Don; Kroll, Ken

    1991-01-01

    Information on technology transfer methodology is given in viewgraph form. Information is given on new systems development, the developer's perspective, barriers to providing a home for technology, and incentives for using new technologies.

  9. Transfer Log.xls

    Cancer.gov

    ANIMAL TRANSFER LOG Date of Move: ________________ Cage Type C = Auto Water NOTES: B = Water Bottle S = SMZ M = Microisolator ASP # PI GROUP NAME # CAGES [+] ROOM TO DOB COMMENTS STRAIN CODE NEW GROUP NAME NEW ROOM CAGE TYPE PEDIGREE # EAR

  10. Liquefied Natural Gas Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Chicago Bridge & Iron Company's tanks and associated piping are parts of system for transferring liquefied natural gas from ship to shore and storing it. LNG is a "cryogenic" fluid meaning that it must be contained and transferred at very low temperatures, about 260 degrees below Fahrenheit. Before the LNG can be pumped from the ship to the storage tanks, the two foot diameter transfer pipes must be cooled in order to avoid difficulties associated with sharp differences of temperature between the supercold fluid and relatively warm pipes. Cooldown is accomplished by sending small steady flow of the cryogenic substance through the pipeline; the rate of flow must be precisely controlled or the transfer line will be subjected to undesirable thermal stress.

  11. Technology transfer quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, F.C.

    1991-03-01

    The results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the DOE are regularly transferred from the laboratory to the private sector. The principal focus of PNL is on environmental research and waste management technology; other programs of emphasis include molecular science research. The technology transfer process is predicated on Quality to achieve its objectives effectively. Total quality management (TQM) concepts and principles readily apply to the development and translation of new scientific concepts into commercial products. The concept of technology transfer epitomizes the TQM tenet of continuous improvement: always striving for a better way to do things and always satisfying the customer. A successful technology transfer process adds value to society by providing new or enhanced processes, products, and services to government and commercial customers, with a guarantee of product pedigree and process validity. 2 refs.

  12. Orbital transfer trajectory optimization

    E-print Network

    Whiting, James K., 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in astronautical engineering have led to the adoption of low thrust rocket engines for spacecraft. Optimizing the orbital transfers for low thrust engines is significantly more complicated than optimizing ...

  13. Technology transfer for adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  14. FACTORS INFLUENCING TOTAL DIETARY EXPOSURE OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was developed to identify critical input parameters to assess dietary intake of young children. The model was used as a framework for understanding important factors in data collection and analysis. Factors incorporated included transfer efficiencies of pest...

  15. Three pro-nuclei (3PN) incidence factors and clinical outcomes: a retrospective study from the fresh embryo transfer of in vitro fertilization with donor sperm (IVF-D)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingzhao; Zhao, Wanqiu; Xue, Xia; Zhang, Silin; Shi, Wenhao; Shi, Juanzi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the main factors of 3PN incidence and determine whether the presence of 3PN could lead to a worse pregnancy outcome. Methods: This study included 508 IVF-D (in vitro fertilization with donor sperm) cycles from January 2013 to September 2014. The patients were divided into three groups as follows: group 1 included patients with no 3PN zygotes, group 2 included patients with 1%-25% 3PN zygotes and group 3 included patients with > 25% 3PN zygotes. Results: We observed that more retrieved oocytes and higher HCG day peak E2 value could result in 3PN incidence more easily. When the 3PN zygotes rate was > 25%, the percentages of normal fertilization (68.4% and 66.3% and 46.4%, P < 0.001), day 3 grade I+II embryos (41.2% and 38.6% and 25.8%, P < 0.001), day 3 grade I+II+III embryos (68.7% and 65.2% and 61.4%, P = 0.032) and implantation rates (52.1% and 50.8% and 45.4%, P = 0.026) were significantly lower than that in the other two groups respectively. The pregnancy rate was lower in 3PN > 25% group than that in the other two groups but there was no significant difference (65.2% and 66.7% and 55.6%, P = 0.266). The cleavage (98.3% and 97.2% and 98.2%, P = 0.063) and early abortion (7.1% and 8.0% and 8.6%, P = 0.930) rate were identical among three groups. Conclusions: More retrieved oocytes and higher HCG day peak E2 value could result in 3PN incidence more easily. Interestingly, normal fertilization rate, day-3 grade I+II embryos rate, day-3 grade I+II+III embryos rate and implantation rate were significantly lower in IVF-D cycles with a 3PN incidence of > 25%. The number of day-3 grade I+II embryos might be a key factor for pregnancy in IVF-D cycles with a 3PN incidence of > 25%. PMID:26550358

  16. Goals, Family, and Community: What Drives Tribal College Transfer Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makomenaw, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This article examines success factors for American Indian tribal college students who transfer to 4-year predominantly White institutions. The study examined the experiences of 8 tribal college transfer students to Midwest universities. Using an indigenous methodology, 3 themes were found to help American Indian tribal college transfer students…

  17. A Tale of Two Terms: Exploring Differences between Spring and Fall Transfer Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlick, Renee A.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to explore what factors contribute to transfer student success and attempted to create a model using logistic regression to help predict likeliness of transfer student success. Using a sample that included all students who transferred to Colorado State University from a regionally accredited US institution between fall 2007 and…

  18. Multiscale photosynthetic exciton transfer

    E-print Network

    A. K. Ringsmuth; G. J. Milburn; T. M. Stace

    2012-06-14

    Photosynthetic light harvesting provides a natural blueprint for bioengineered and biomimetic solar energy and light detection technologies. Recent evidence suggests some individual light harvesting protein complexes (LHCs) and LHC subunits efficiently transfer excitons towards chemical reaction centers (RCs) via an interplay between excitonic quantum coherence, resonant protein vibrations, and thermal decoherence. The role of coherence in vivo is unclear however, where excitons are transferred through multi-LHC/RC aggregates over distances typically large compared with intra-LHC scales. Here we assess the possibility of long-range coherent transfer in a simple chromophore network with disordered site and transfer coupling energies. Through renormalization we find that, surprisingly, decoherence is diminished at larger scales, and long-range coherence is facilitated by chromophoric clustering. Conversely, static disorder in the site energies grows with length scale, forcing localization. Our results suggest sustained coherent exciton transfer may be possible over distances large compared with nearest-neighbour (n-n) chromophore separations, at physiological temperatures, in a clustered network with small static disorder. This may support findings suggesting long-range coherence in algal chloroplasts, and provides a framework for engineering large chromophore or quantum dot high-temperature exciton transfer networks.

  19. Risk Factors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Risk Factors We're all at risk for heart disease ... Health Depression has been found to be a risk factor for development of heart disease. Depression occurs in ...

  20. Secondary DNA transfer of biological substances under varying test conditions.

    PubMed

    Goray, Mariya; Eken, Ece; Mitchell, Robert J; van Oorschot, Roland A H

    2010-02-01

    This research investigates factors that may influence the secondary transfer of DNA. These include the type of biological substance deposited, the nature of the primary and secondary substrate, moisture content of the deposit and type of contact between the surfaces. Results showed that secondary transfer is significantly affected by both the type of primary substrate and the moisture (wetness) of the biological sample. Porous substrates and/or dry samples diminished transfer (with on average only 0.36% of biological material being transferred from one site to another), whereas non-porous substrates and/or wet samples facilitated transfer events (approximately 50-95% of biological material was transferred from one site to another). Further, the type of secondary substrate also influenced transfer rate, with porous surfaces, absorbing transferred biological substances more readily than non-porous ones. No significant differences were observed among the biological substances tested (pure DNA, blood and saliva). Friction contact between the two substrates significantly enhanced secondary transfer compared to either passive or pressure contact. These preliminary results will assist in developing general assumptions when estimating probability of a secondary DNA transfer event under simple conditions. PMID:20129462

  1. Block Transfer Agreement Evaluation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastedo, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate for the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) the effectiveness of block transfer agreements (BTAs) in the BC Transfer System and recommend steps to be taken to improve their effectiveness. Findings of this study revealed that institutions want to expand block credit transfer;…

  2. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS

    E-print Network

    TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS Jesse w. Fussell Department of Defense 9800 Savage Road of technology transfer in this technical area in the past, to forecast prospects for technology transfer in the future, and to suggest some ideas for stimulating the process. 2. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROBLEMS Many

  3. University of Iowa Technology Transfer

    E-print Network

    Neiman, Maurine

    University of Iowa Technology Transfer & Commercialization UI innovations in the Marketplace http://research.uiowa.edu/uirf/ #12;What is Technology Transfer & Commercialization? The transfer of embryonic technologies federal funding are required to pursue technology transfer opportunities #12;How Does this Fit

  4. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Luiz G. P.; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate, which needs to be removed afterward. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied in this work, including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate’s hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate current processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene. PMID:24127582

  5. The role of the University Licensing Office in transferring intellectual property to industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Universities in the US have a significant impact on business through the transfer of technology. This transfer of technology takes various forms, including faculty communications, faculty consulting activities, and the direct transfer of technology through the licensing of patents, copyrights, and other intellectual property to industry. The topics discussed include the following: background of the MIT Technology Licensing Office (TLO), goals of the MIT TLO, MIT's technology transfer philosophy, and important factors for success in new company formation.

  6. Tech transfer outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Liebetrau, S.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides an informal summary of the conference workshop sessions. Tech Transfer Outreach '' was originally designed as an opportunity for national laboratory communications and technology transfer staff to become better acquainted and to discuss matters of mutual interest. When DOE field office personnel asked if they could attend, and then when one of our keynote speakers became a participant in the discussions, the actual event grew in importance. The conference participants--the laboratories and DOE representatives from across the nation--worked to brainstorm ideas. Their objective: identify ways to cooperate for effective (and cost-effective) technology transfer outreach. Thus, this proceedings is truly a product of ten national laboratories and DOE, working together. It candidly presents the discussion of issues and the ideas generated by each working group. The issues and recommendations are a consensus of their views.

  7. Effects of fouling in heat transfer equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapathy, V. )

    1993-03-04

    Fouling between the hot and cold streams in heat transfer equipment is a major reason boilers, heaters, and heat exchangers do not perform according to original specifications. Commonly used fluids such as water and air have well-established fouling factors. However, the factors for some industrial effluents, particularly for flue gas streams resulting from the combustion or incineration of solid or liquid fuels, can be determined only through operating experience. The paper discusses the signs of fouling, and how expensive fouling can be illustrating the second with three example problems.

  8. Jones Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Derner, Richard; Holmes, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Hallux malleus is a deformity of the great toe. There is a dorsiflexion contracture at the metatarsophalangeal joint and plantar flexion of the interphalangeal joint. The deformity is commonly attributed to muscular imbalances of the various structures acting on the great toe. Jones tendon transfer is a procedure used to remove the deforming force to the clawed hallux. It is most often performed in conjunction with a hallux interphalangeal joint fusion. Typically there is a neurologic component causing a deformity to the entire foot, necessitating adjunct procedures. The Jones tendon transfer has shown to have reproducible results. PMID:26590724

  9. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James; Baccus, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    The Logistics Reduction (LR) project within the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is tasked with reducing logistical mass and repurposing logistical items. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bags (MCTB) have been designed such that they can serve the same purpose as a Cargo Transfer Bag, the suitcase-shaped common logistics carrying bag for Shuttle and the International Space Station. After use as a cargo carrier, a regular CTB becomes trash, whereas the MCTB can be unzipped, unsnapped, and unfolded to be reused. Reuse ideas that have been investigated include partitions, crew quarters, solar radiation storm shelters, acoustic blankets, and forward osmosis water processing.

  10. Departmental technology transfer update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Roger A.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is the following: to provide the perspective of the Department of Energy (DOE); emphasize new and emerging initiatives; and address unresolved issues that might impact successful program implementation. The approach is the following: to provide a brief overview of DOE, its R&D, and its technology transfer assets; to briefly describe the evolution of DOE's enhanced technology transfer program; to report on specific progress and achievements over the past year--as the spring board for our current and future plans; to present our near and longer term plans; and to survey the remaining issues and the resolution process.

  11. Making behavioral technology transferable

    PubMed Central

    Pennypacker, H. S.; Hench, Larry L.

    1997-01-01

    The paucity of transferred behavioral technologies is traced to the absence of strategies for developing technology that is transferable, as distinct from strategies for conducting research, whether basic or applied. In the field of engineering, the results of basic research are transformed to candidate technologies that meet standardized criteria with respect to three properties: quantification, repetition, and verification. The technology of vitrification and storage of nuclear waste is used to illustrate the application of these criteria. Examples from behavior analysis are provided, together with suggestions regarding changes in practice that will accelerate the development and application of behavioral technologies. PMID:22478284

  12. Transferring Technology to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenbarger, J. Ken

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology transfer processes in which JPL has been involved to assist in transferring the technology derived from aerospace research and development to industry. California Institute of Technology (CalTech), the organization that runs JPL, is the leading institute in patents for all U.S. universities. There are several mechanisms that are available to JPL to inform industry of these technological advances: (1) a dedicated organization at JPL, National Space Technology Applications (NSTA), (2) Tech Brief Magazine, (3) Spinoff magazine, and (4) JPL publications. There have also been many start-up organizations and businesses from CalTech.

  13. Review of Orbital Propellant Transfer Techniques and the Feasibility of a Thermal Bootstrap Propellant Transfer Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, H. H.; Madison, I. B.

    1971-01-01

    This study was performed in support of the NASA Task B-2 Study Plan for Space Basing. The nature of space-based operations implies that orbital transfer of propellant is a prime consideration. The intent of this report is (1) to report on the findings and recommendations of existing literature on space-based propellant transfer techniques, and (2) to determine possible alternatives to the recommended methods. The reviewed literature recommends, in general, the use of conventional liquid transfer techniques (i.e., pumping) in conjunction with an artificially induced gravitational field. An alternate concept that was studied, the Thermal Bootstrap Transfer Process, is based on the compression of a two-phase fluid with subsequent condensation to a liquid (vapor compression/condensation). This concept utilizes the intrinsic energy capacities of the tanks and propellant by exploiting temperature differentials and available energy differences. The results indicate the thermodynamic feasibility of the Thermal Bootstrap Transfer Process for a specific range of tank sizes, temperatures, fill-factors and receiver tank heat transfer coefficients.

  14. Transfer of rare earth elements from natural metalliferous (copper and cobalt rich) soils into plant shoot biomass of metallophytes from Katanga (Democratic Republic of Congo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourret, Olivier; Lange, Bastien; Jitaru, Petru; Mahy, Grégory; Faucon, Michel-Pierre

    2014-05-01

    The geochemical behavior of rare earth elements (REE) is generally assessed for the characterization of the geological systems where these elements represent the best proxies of processes involving the occurrence of an interface between different media. REE behavior is investigated according to their concentrations normalized with respect to the upper continental crust. In this study, the geochemical fingerprint of REE in plant shoot biomass of an unique metallicolous flora (i.e., Crepidorhopalon tenuis and Anisopappus chinensis) was investigated. The plants originate from extremely copper and cobalt rich soils, deriving from Cu and Co outcrops in Katanga, Democratic Republic of Congo. Some of the species investigated in this study are able to accumulate high amounts of Cu and Co in shoot hence being considered as Cu and Co hyperaccumulators. Therefore, assessing the behavior of REE may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of metal accumulation by this flora. The data obtained in this study indicate that REE uptake by plants is not primarily controlled by their concentration and speciation in the soil as previously shown in the literature (Brioschi et al. 2013). Indeed, the REE patterns in shoots are relatively flat whereas soils patterns are Middle REE enriched. In addition, it is worth noting that Eu enrichments occur in aerial parts of the plants. These positive Eu anomalies suggest that Eu3 + can form stable organic complexes replacing Ca2 + in several biological processes as in xylem fluids associated with the general nutrient flux. Therefore, is is possible that the Eu mobility in these fluids is enhanced by its reductive speciation as Eu2 +. Eventually, the geochemical behavior of REE illustrates that metals accumulation in aerial parts of C. tenuis and A. chinensis is mainly driven by dissolved complexation. Brioschi, L., Steinmann, M., Lucot, E., Pierret, M., Stille, P., Prunier, J., Badot, P., 2013. Transfer of rare earth elements (REE) from natural soil to plant systems: implications for the environmental availability of anthropogenic REE. Plant and Soil, 366, 143-163.

  15. Transfer of technetium from soil to paddy and upland rice.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, K; Muramatsu, Y

    1995-09-01

    Soil-plant transfer factors (concentration ratio between the plant and soil) of technetium in paddy and upland rice plants were obtained from laboratory experiments. The transfer factor is one of the most important parameters for environmental radiation dose assessment. Technetim tracer (95mTcO4-) was added to the soil prior to rice cultivation. The transfer factor of technetium for the hulled grains (brown rice) of paddy rice (< or = 0.0002) was much lower than for that of upland (0.021). The transfer factors for both types of hulled grains were much lower than in the leaves. The technetium decontamination rate from hulled grains by polishing was 34%, the percentage of the weight decrease being 12%. The concentration of technetium in the soil solution collected from the paddy rice soil (flooded conditions) decreased rapidly with time due to its adsorption on the soil. In the upland rice soil (non-flooded) solution, the decrease in the technetium concentration was fairly slow. The low transfer factors for the paddy rice plants could be explained by the immobilization of technetium in the flooded soil. The oxidation-reduction potentials (Eh) in the flooded soil decreased rapidly with time. We conclude that technetium tracer added as TcO4- to flooded soil is readily transformed to an insoluble form (e.g. TcO2) under the reducing conditions provided by flooding. PMID:8558493

  16. Technology transfer within the government

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Carissa Bryce

    1992-01-01

    The report of a workshop panel concerned with technology transfer within the government is presented. The suggested subtopics for the panel were as follows: (1) transfer from non-NASA U.S. government technology developers to NASA space missions/programs; and (2) transfer from NASA to other U.S. government civil space mission programs. Two presentations were made to the panel: Roles/Value of Early Strategic Planning Within the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) to Facilitate Later Technology Transfer To and From Industry; and NOAA Satellite Programs and Technology Requirements. The panel discussion addresses the following major issues: DOD/NASA cooperation; alternative mechanisms for interagency communication and interactions; current technology transfer relationships among federal research agencies, and strategies for improving this transfer; technology transfer mechanisms appropriate to intragovernment transfer; the importance of industry as a technology transfer conduit; and measures of merit.

  17. FES Transfer Agreement

    Cancer.gov

    Provider: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Provider agrees to transfer to Recipient the following FES Production Documents (click here) for the production of [16-[18F]-fluoro-17-estradiol, [18F]FES (A) Generic Chemistry, Manufacturing and Control Section(B)

  18. FMISO Transfer Agreement

    Cancer.gov

    Provider: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Provider agrees to transfer to Recipient the following FMISO Production Documents (click here) for the production of [18F]Fluoromisonidazole, 1H-1-(3-[18f]-Fluoro-2-Hydroxy-Propyl)-2-Nitro-Imidazole, [18F]FMISO.

  19. Solar Energy: Heat Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat transfer is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The…

  20. Internal Transfer and Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager, Carolyn

    In 1989, a descriptive study was conducted of internal transfer and articulation within the context of two-year branch campuses of four-year institutions. Data were gathered from a survey sent to the chief executive officers (CEO's) of 408 campuses delivering two-year tracks within a four-year college or university. Study findings, based on…

  1. Sandro Rusconi Gene transfer

    E-print Network

    Málaga, Universidad de

    Sandro Rusconi aaaaaa UNIFR Rusconi 2003 Gene transfer: limits and potential as doping vehicle Geneva 30.09.03 AISTS 'genes & sport' workshop 1972-75 Primary school teacher (Locarno, Switzerland) 1975 on 'molecular medicine' & molecular doping: applications and problems, Gene-based doping applications

  2. Sandro Rusconi Gene transfer

    E-print Network

    Málaga, Universidad de

    Sandro Rusconi UNIFR Rusconi 2003 Gene transfer: limits and potential as doping vehicle Geneva 30.09.03 AISTS 'genes & sport' workshop 1972-75 Primary school teacher (Locarno, Switzerland) 1975-79 Graduation medicine' & molecular doping: applications and problems, Gene-based doping applications, comparison

  3. Keypoint Transfer Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Toews, M.; Langs, G.; Wells, W.; Golland, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present an image segmentation method that transfers label maps of entire organs from the training images to the novel image to be segmented. The transfer is based on sparse correspondences between keypoints that represent automatically identified distinctive image locations. Our segmentation algorithm consists of three steps: (i) keypoint matching, (ii) voting-based keypoint labeling, and (iii) keypoint-based probabilistic transfer of organ label maps. We introduce generative models for the inference of keypoint labels and for image segmentation, where keypoint matches are treated as a latent random variable and are marginalized out as part of the algorithm. We report segmentation results for abdominal organs in whole-body CT and in contrast-enhanced CT images. The accuracy of our method compares favorably to common multi-atlas segmentation while offering a speed-up of about three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, keypoint transfer requires no training phase or registration to an atlas. The algorithm’s robustness enables the segmentation of scans with highly variable field-of-view. PMID:26221677

  4. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

  5. Proton-transfer laser

    SciTech Connect

    Acuna, A.U.; Costela, A.; Munoz, J.M.

    1986-06-19

    Stimulated radiation was generated by an active medium where the population inversion results from excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer reaction. The operation of a salicylamide pulsed laser, built on this principle, is described. The laser shows a 5% energy conversion efficiency when pumped with 5-20 mJ of 308-nm radiation.

  6. The transfer matrix in four dimensional causal dynamical triangulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjørn, J.; Gizbert-Studnicki, J.; Görlich, A. T.; Jurkiewicz, J.; Loll, R.

    2013-02-01

    The Causal Dynamical Triangulation model of quantum gravity (CDT) is a proposition to regularize the path integral over space-time geometries using lattice regularization with discrete time and geometries realized as simplicial manifolds. The model admits a Wick rotation to imaginary time for each space-time configuration. Using computer simulations we determined the phase structure of the model and discovered that it predicts a de Sitter phase with a four-dimensional spherical semi-classical background geometry. The model has a transfer matrix, relating spatial geometries at adjacent (discrete lattice) times. The transfer matrix uniquely determines the theory. We show that the measurements of the scale factor of the (CDT) universe are well described by an effective transfer matrix where the matrix elements are labelled only by the scale factor. Using computer simulations we determine the effective transfer matrix elements and show how they relate to an effective minisuperspace action at all scales.

  7. Cryogenic Fluid Transfer for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses current plans and issues for exploration that involve the use of cryogenic transfer. The benefits of cryogenic transfer to exploration missions are examined. The current state of the art of transfer technology is reviewed. Mission concepts of operation for exploration are presented, and used to qualitatively discuss the performance benefits of transfer. The paper looks at the challenges faced to implement a cryogenic transfer system and suggest approaches to address them with advanced development research. Transfer rates required for exploration are shown to have already been achieved in ground test. Cost effective approaches to the required on-orbit demonstration are suggested.

  8. Cryogenic Fluid Transfer for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses current plans and issues for exploration that involve the use of cryogenic transfer. The benefits of cryogenic transfer to exploration missions are examined. The current state of the art of transfer technology is reviewed. Mission concepts of operation for exploration are presented, and used to qualitatively discuss the performance benefits of transfer. The paper looks at the challenges faced to implement a cryogenic transfer system and suggest approaches to address them with advanced development research. Transfer rates required for exploration are shown to have already been achieved in ground test. Cost-effective approaches to the required on-orbit demonstration are suggested.

  9. Training transfer: scientific background and insights for practical application.

    PubMed

    Issurin, Vladimir B

    2013-08-01

    Training transfer as an enduring, multilateral, and practically important problem encompasses a large body of research findings and experience, which characterize the process by which improving performance in certain exercises/tasks can affect the performance in alternative exercises or motor tasks. This problem is of paramount importance for the theory of training and for all aspects of its application in practice. Ultimately, training transfer determines how useful or useless each given exercise is for the targeted athletic performance. The methodological background of training transfer encompasses basic concepts related to transfer modality, i.e., positive, neutral, and negative; the generalization of training responses and their persistence over time; factors affecting training transfer such as personality, motivation, social environment, etc. Training transfer in sport is clearly differentiated with regard to the enhancement of motor skills and the development of motor abilities. The studies of bilateral skill transfer have shown cross-transfer effects following one-limb training associated with neural adaptations at cortical, subcortical, spinal, and segmental levels. Implementation of advanced sport technologies such as motor imagery, biofeedback, and exercising in artificial environments can facilitate and reinforce training transfer from appropriate motor tasks to targeted athletic performance. Training transfer of motor abilities has been studied with regard to contralateral effects following one limb training, cross-transfer induced by arm or leg training, the impact of strength/power training on the preparedness of endurance athletes, and the impact of endurance workloads on strength/power performance. The extensive research findings characterizing the interactions of these workloads have shown positive transfer, or its absence, depending on whether the combinations conform to sport-specific demands and physiological adaptations. Finally, cross-training as a form of concurrent exercising in different athletic disciplines has been examined in reference to the enhancement of general fitness, the preparation of recreational athletes, and the preparation of athletes for multi-sport activities such as triathlon, duathlon, etc. PMID:23633165

  10. Mesoscopic near-field radiative heat transfer at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, Ilari; Geng, Zhuoran; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Koppinen, Panu

    2015-03-01

    Near-field radiative heat transfer has mostly been discussed at room temperatures and/or macroscopic scale geometries. Here, we discuss our recent theoretical and experimental advances in understanding near-field transfer at ultra-low temperatures below 1K. As the thermal wavelengths increase with lowering temperature, we show that with sensitive tunnel junction bolometers it is possible to study near-field transfer up to distances ~ 10 ?m currently, even though the power levels are low. In addition, these type of experiments correspond to the extreme near-field limit, as the near-field region starts at ~ mm distances at 0.1 K, and could have theoretical power enhancement factors of the order of 1010. Preliminary results on heat transfer between two parallel metallic wires are presented. We also comment on possible areas were such heat transfer might be relevant, such as densely packed arrays of low-temperature detectors.

  11. Auto-disable syringes for immunization: issues in technology transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J. S.; Milstien, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    WHO and its partners recommend the use of auto-disable syringes, "bundled" with the supply of vaccines when donor dollars are used, in all mass immunization campaigns, and also strongly advocate their use in routine immunization programmes. Because of the relatively high price of auto-disable syringes, WHO's Technical Network for Logistics in Health recommends that activities be initiated to encourage the transfer of production technology for these syringes as a means of promoting their use and enhancing access to the technology. The present article examines factors influencing technology transfer, including feasibility, corporate interest, cost, quality assurance, intellectual property considerations, and probable time frames for implementation. Technology transfer activities are likely to be complex and difficult, and may not result in lower prices for syringes. Guidelines are offered on technology transfer initiatives for auto-disable syringes to ensure the quality of the product, the reliability of the supply, and the feasibility of the technology transfer activity itself. PMID:10680248

  12. Heat transfer between immiscible liquids enhanced by gas bubbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, G. A.; Schwarz, C. E.; Klages, J.; Klein, J.

    1982-08-01

    The phenomena of core-concrete interactions impact upon containment integrity of light water reactors (LWR) following postulated complete meltdown of the core by containment pressurization, production of combustible gases, and basemat penetration. Experiments were performed with nonreactor materials to investigate one aspect of this problem, heat transfer between overlying immiscible liquids whose interface is disturbed by a transverse non-condensable gas flux emanating from below. Hydrodynamic studies were performed to test a criterion for onset of entrainment due to bubbling through the interface and subsequent heat transfer studies were performed to assess the effect of bubbling on interfacial heat transfer rates, both with and without bubble induced entrainment. Non entraining interfacial heat transfer data with mercury-water/oil fluid pairs were observed to be bounded from below within a factor of two to three by the Szekeley surface renewal heat transfer model.

  13. Prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Gianfranco; Ferrigno, Domenico

    2004-02-01

    The best predictive models of today can predict no more than 50% of the natural variability of the disease, despite the sophisticated mathematic analyses and the dozens of variables assessed. Clearly, a universe of still unknown prognostic factors remains to be discovered. Analogous to infinity being immeasurable, the fate of the individual patient will never be calculated mathematically. As the discovery of new prognostic factors continues, however, the prediction of the outcome of patients becomes more reliable. Although some prognostic factors (eg, tumor neoangiogenesis and quality of life) are already supported by a large body of evidence, recent research has introduced new groups of prognostic factors (eg, molecular genetic markers and the subclinical activation of coagulation fibrinolysis). Other intriguing factors (eg, a state of mental depression) might also be recognized as important in the near future. A new small portion of the universe has been explored. PMID:15005288

  14. View factors between APT target components

    SciTech Connect

    Kidman, R.B.

    1998-07-01

    In a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in the accelerator production of tritium (APT) target/blanket, radiation heat transfer determines the temperature of the target components. Radiation heat-transfer analysis can only proceed if accurate component-to-component view factors are available. The authors describe and demonstrate the numerical method used to compute the view factors (also called angle factors, configuration factors, and shape factors) between complicated objects. The method is verified on simple objects that have analytic solutions, and then it is used to predict the view factors between the target components of the accelerator production of tritium target/blanket. The method is practical, easy to apply, and can accommodate difficult levels of realism.

  15. Student Services that Promote Transfer: The Transfer Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia, R.

    In an effort to improve the transfer rates of minority students from community colleges to baccalaureate granting institutions, the Illinois state legislature allocated funds to establish transfer centers at community colleges that would take a pro-active approach to reaching minority students with information about transfer. One of 26 centers…

  16. Improving NASA's technology transfer process through increased screening and evaluation in the information dissemination program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laepple, H.

    1979-01-01

    The current status of NASA's technology transfer system can be improved if the technology transfer process is better understood. This understanding will only be gained if a detailed knowledge about factors generally influencing technology transfer is developed, and particularly those factors affecting technology transfer from government R and D agencies to industry. Secondary utilization of aerospace technology is made more difficult because it depends on a transfer process which crosses established organizational lines of authority and which is outside well understood patterns of technical applications. In the absence of a sound theory about technology transfer and because of the limited capability of government agencies to explore industry's needs, a team approach to screening and evaluation of NASA generated technologies is proposed which calls for NASA, and other organizations of the private and public sectors which influence the transfer of NASA generated technology, to participate in a screening and evaluation process to determine the commercial feasibility of a wide range of technical applications.

  17. Societal and economic valuation of technology-transfer deals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Joseph S., Jr.

    2009-09-01

    The industrial adoption of concepts such as open innovation brings new legitimacy to activities technology-transfer professionals have conducted for over 20 years. This movement highlights the need for an increased understanding of the valuation of intellectual property (IP) and technology-transfer deals. Valuation, though a centerpiece of corporate finance, is more challenging when applied to the inherent uncertainty surrounding innovation. Technology-transfer professionals are often overwhelmed by the complexity and data requirements of valuation techniques and skeptical of their applicability to and utility for technology transfer. The market longs for an approach which bridges the gap between valuation fundamentals and technology-transfer realities. This paper presents the foundations of a simple, flexible, precise/accurate, and useful framework for considering the valuation of technology-transfer deals. The approach is predicated on a 12-factor model—a 3×4 value matrix predicated on categories of economic, societal, and strategic value. Each of these three categories consists of three core subcategories followed by a fourth "other" category to facilitate inevitable special considerations. This 12-factor value matrix provides a framework for harvesting data during deals and for the application of best-of-breed valuation techniques which can be employed on a per-factor basis. Future work will include framework implementation within a database platform.

  18. Tests of transfer reaction determinations of astrophysical S factors 

    E-print Network

    Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Azhari, A.; Clark, HL; Lui, YW; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Sattarov, A.; Trache, L.; Burjan, V.; Cejpek, J.; Kroha, V.; Piskor, S.; Vincour, J.

    1999-01-01

    , and H. M. Xu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 421 ~1998!. @5# G. Vancraeynest et al., Phys. Rev. C 57, 2711 ~1998!. @6# E. G. Adelberger et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 70, 1265 ~1998!; astro-ph/9805121. @7# A. M. Mukhamedzhanov et al., Phys. Rev. C 56, 1302 ~1997...

  19. Transfer learning with Gaussian processes 

    E-print Network

    Skolidis, Grigorios

    2012-06-25

    Transfer Learning is an emerging framework for learning from data that aims at intelligently transferring information between tasks. This is achieved by developing algorithms that can perform multiple tasks simultaneously, ...

  20. Andrew Watson Director, Technology Transfer

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Andrew Watson Director, Technology Transfer Abhijit Banerjee Director, Business Development Joseph Roberts Technical Specialist Daphne Emerson Alliance Manager Trish Pruis Alliance Manager Technology Transfer & Business Development Margaret Kubat Executive Assistant Brendan Rauw Vice President of TTBD

  1. Heat transfer in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, R.S. ); Crawford, M.E.; Anand, N.K. )

    1990-01-01

    This book reports on heat transfer and turbulent flow. The topics covered include fundamental research on turbulence in heat transfer processes, boundary layer flows, temperature turbulence spectrum, turbulence modeling, and applications to heat exchangers, gas turbines, and other engineering problems.

  2. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the ability of a generalized EDQNM (Eddy Damped Quasi-Normal Markovian) model to predict the underlying spectral transfer structure and all the subsequent developments of classic anisotropy indicators in physical space, when compared to recent LES results. Even if the applications mainly concern developed strong turbulence, a particular emphasis is given to the strong formal analogy of this EDQNM2 model with recent weakly nonlinear approaches to wave-turbulence.

  3. Nuclear transfer in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Hee; Maalouf, Walid E

    2015-01-01

    Ruminants were the first mammalian species to be cloned successfully by nuclear transplantation. Those experiments were designed to multiply high merit animals (Willadsen, Nature 320(6057):63-65, 1986; Prather et al., Biol Reprod 37(4):859-866, 1987; Wilmut et al., Nature 385(6619):810-813, 1997). Since then, cloning has provided us with a vast amount of knowledge and information on the reprogramming ability of somatic cells to different cell types which became an important basis for stem cell research and human medicine. Nowadays, the goals of most nuclear transfer work vary widely but in most cases the micromanipulation procedures remain the same. However, differences between species require different technical considerations. In this chapter, we describe in detail somatic cell nuclear transfer which is the foremost method for cloning ruminants with specific reference to sheep and cattle. PMID:25287336

  4. Swipe transfer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, Robert M. (Blackfoot, ID); Mills, William C. (McKeesport, PA)

    1992-01-01

    The swipe transfer assembly is a mechanical assembly which is used in conjunction with glove boxes and other sealed containments. It is used to pass small samples into or out of glove boxes without an open breach of the containment, and includes a rotational cylinder inside a fixed cylinder, the inside cylinder being rotatable through an arc of approximately 240.degree. relative to the outer cylinder. An offset of 120.degree. from end to end allows only one port to be opened at a time. The assembly is made of stainless steel or aluminum and clear acrylic plastic to enable visual observation. The assembly allows transfer of swipes and smears from radiological and other specially controlled environments.

  5. Technology Transfer and Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Katherine; Chapman, Diane; Giffith, Melanie; Molnar, Darwin

    2001-01-01

    During concurrent sessions for Materials and Structures for High Performance and Emissions Reduction, the UEET Intellectual Property Officer and the Technology Commercialization Specialist will discuss the UEET Technology Transfer and Commercialization goals and efforts. This will include a review of the Technology Commercialization Plan for UEET and what UEET personnel are asked to do to further the goals of the Plan. The major goal of the Plan is to define methods for how UEET assets can best be infused into industry. The National Technology Transfer Center will conduct a summary of its efforts in assessing UEET technologies in the areas of materials and emissions reduction for commercial potential. NTTC is assisting us in completing an inventory and prioritization by commercialization potential. This will result in increased exposure of UEET capabilities to the private sector. The session will include audience solicitation of additional commercializable technologies.

  6. Plastic container bagless transfer

    DOEpatents

    Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

    2003-11-18

    A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

  7. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  8. Technology Transfer Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Since its inception, Goddard has pursued a commitment to technology transfer and commercialization. For every space technology developed, Goddard strives to identify secondary applications. Goddard then provides the technologies, as well as NASA expertise and facilities, to U.S. companies, universities, and government agencies. These efforts are based in Goddard's Technology Commercialization Office. This report presents new technologies, commercialization success stories, and other Technology Commercialization Office activities in 1999.

  9. Pattern Transfer Nanomanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    We report programmed fluidic assembly of ˜12 nm diameter Fe3O4 nanoparticles into hierarchically-patterned architectures using the confined magnetic fields that are emitted from transitions written onto magnetic disk drive media. When combined with a controlled external field, our approach yields both laterally-programmed assemblies of nanoparticles over cm length scales and vertically-programmed periodic topography. After assembly, the 3D arrays of nanoparticles are transferred to a flexible and transparent polymer film by spin-coating and peeling. We determine the total transferred magnetic moment as a function of nanoparticle concentration and exposure time, and explain the variation in moment for low concentrations using a simple hydrodynamic model. However, this model is insufficient to explain the transferred moment at higher concentrations, likely because of the combination of dynamically-changing fields during assembly, and field-shielding near the medium surface, both of which will play an enhanced role at higher nanoparticle concentrations. We will discuss potential applications of this technology for creating optoelectronic and biomedical devices.

  10. Technology transfer initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) technology transfer activities with the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the period of April 1993 through December 1993. Early in 1993, the MSFC/TUO and UAH conceived of the concept of developing stand-alone, integrated data packages on MSFC technology that would serve industrial needs previously determined to be critical. Furthermore, after reviewing over 500 problem statements received by MSFC, it became obvious that many of these requests could be satisfied by a standard type of response. As a result, UAH has developed two critical area response (CAR) packages: CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) replacements and modular manufacturing and simulation. Publicity included news releases, seminars, articles and conference papers. The Huntsville Chamber of Commerce established the Technology Transfer Subcommittee with the charge to identify approaches for the Chamber to assist its members, as well as non-members, access to the technologies at the federal laboratories in North Alabama. The Birmingham Chamber of Commerce has expressed interest in establishing a similar technology transfer program. This report concludes with a section containing a tabulation of the problem statements, including CAR packages, submitted to MSFC from January 1992 through December 1993.

  11. 5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven

    E-print Network

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    1/120 5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering / Värme Three heat transfer mechanisms Conduction Convection Radiation 2/120 Pic: BÖ88 Åbo Akademi University | Thermal and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland #12;3/120 5.1 Conductive heat transfer Åbo Akademi

  12. Spring 2015 Heat Transfer -2

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2015 Heat Transfer - 2 Hot air at a volume flow rate of 0.15 m3 /s, atmospheric pressure) [15 points] Determine whether the heat transfer coefficient between the hot air and the duct wall can be assumed to be constant for design purposes. Calculate the heat transfer coefficient. (3) [40 points

  13. Technology Transfer Network and Affiliations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Technology Transfer Partnership program sponsors a number of organizations around the country that are designed to assist U.S. businesses in accessing, utilizing, and commercializing NASA-funded research and technology. These organizations work closely with the Technology Transfer Offices, located at each of the 10 NASA field centers, providing a full range of technology transfer and commercialization services and assistance.

  14. Assessing Software Engineering Technology Transfer

    E-print Network

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    Assessing Software Engineering Technology Transfer within NASA Marvin V. Zelkowitz Institute 20742 November, 1994 #12;Abstract Technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this re- port, we address the issue of technology transfer within the National

  15. Technology Transfer, Entrepreneurship and Innovation

    E-print Network

    Reed, Nancy E.

    Technology Transfer, Entrepreneurship and Innovation The College of Engineering at UH Ma¯noa has a strong tradition of technology transfer and entrepreneurship that supports the University of Hawai`i's innovation and technology transfer initiative. Principal units are mechanical engineering, electrical

  16. Examination of survival after transfer from peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Piraino, Beth; Wyman, A Elizabeth; Sheth, Heena

    2012-01-01

    Data on survival after transfer from peritoneal dialysis (PD) to hemodialysis (HD) is conflicting. We reviewed two decades of outcomes in a PD program to examine short-term survival after transfer from PD to HD. Of 379 patients on PD, 33% transferred to HD. The reasons for transfer were PD-related infections (340%), uremia or failure to thrive (26%), PD catheter problems or loss of mechanical skills (15%), dementia or unable to train (7%), noncompliant with PD (7%), other (10%, including gastrointestinal complications, hernia, encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis, preference, loss of ultrafiltration), and cardiac (2%). All of those transferring for "other" reasons survived 6 months, and as did all except 1 who transferred for uremia (p = 0.035). Overall survival was 92% at 3 months and 85% at 6 months. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, only score on the Charlson comorbidity index at PD start was a risk factor for dying in the first 6 months on HD: for each 1 point increase in CCI score, the hazard ratio for death was 1.4 (95% confidence interval: 1.16 to 1.74; p = 0.005). To summarize, starting a patient on PD and waiting until uremia to transfer to HD does not have a negative impact on survival. In a program with relatively low PD-related infectious complications, such complications accounted for only one third of transfers to HD. PMID:23311216

  17. EPISOME-MEDIATED TRANSFER OF DRUG RESISTANCE IN ENTEROBACTERIACEAE VII.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Nishida, Hiroshi; Ogata, Chizuko; Arai, Toshihiko; Sato, Sachiko

    1964-01-01

    Watanabe, Tsutomu (Keio University, Tokyo, Japan), Hiroshi Nishida, Chizuko Ogata, Toshihiko Arai, and Sachiko Sato. Episome-mediated transfer of drug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. VII. Two types of naturally occurring R factors. J. Bacteriol. 88:716–726. 1964.—Naturally occurring R factors are classified into two types, fi+ and fi?, depending on their fi characters. The term fi is an abbreviation of fertility inhibition and fi? and fi? mean, respectively, the presence and absence of suppression of the functions of the sex factor F of Escherichia coli K-12. It was found that fi? R factors reduce the efficiency of plating of phages ? and T1 in K-12; fi+ R factors did not have this inhibitory action. One of the fi? R factors reduced the efficiency of plating of phage T7 as well. Phages ? and T1 underwent host-induced modifications in the host carrying some fi? R factors. At least two types of fi? R factors were recognized by the types of their restriction and host-induced modification of these phages. CaCl2 exhibited antagonistic actions against the restrictions of phages ? and T1 by fi? R factors. Transduction of the ability to ferment galactose with HFT lysates of ? was reduced by fi? R factors. Ultraviolet induction of ? was not affected by any R factors. Furthermore, adsorption of phages ? and T1 was not altered by the presence of any R factors. From these results, we concluded that the suppression of progeny formation of these phages by fi? R factors is due to some step(s) after adsorption of the phages to the bacteria. Superinfection immunity and mutual exclusion were found between two different fi+ R factors but not between fi+ and fi? R factors. The two different fi? R factors were frequently genetically recombined. but fi+ and fi? R factors were not genetically recombined, as indicated by findings of independent transfer of these R factors by conjugation and by transduction from the donors having these two R factors. It was assumed from these findings that fi+ and fi? R factors are considerably different episomes having different resistance-transfer factors. Images PMID:14208512

  18. Transfer of Training: Does It Truly Happen?: An Examination of Support, Instrumentality, Retention and Learner Readiness on the Transfer Motivation and Transfer of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatti, Muhammad Awais; Battour, Mohamed Mohamed; Sundram, Veera Pandiyan Kaliani; Othman, Akmal Aini

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to highlight the importance of selected environmental, situational and individual factors in the training transfer process. Design/methodology/approach: This study proposes and tests a framework via structural equation modelling by including supervisor and peer support, instrumentality and learner readiness on…

  19. Transferring Learning to the Workplace. Seventeen Case Studies from the Real World of Training. In Action Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad, Mary L., Ed.

    Organized in three parts, this book contains an introductory chapter and 17 case studies selected to show transfer applications in a wide range of organizational settings. In part 1, two chapters review the rationale, context, and research relating to transfer: "Transfer Concepts and Research Overview" (Mary Broad); and "Success Factors in…

  20. 7 CFR 932.54 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating...Transfers. Transfers within the area of olives from one handler to another for further...permitted. Whenever such a transfer of olives is made, the transferring...

  1. 7 CFR 932.54 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating...Transfers. Transfers within the area of olives from one handler to another for further...permitted. Whenever such a transfer of olives is made, the transferring...

  2. 7 CFR 932.54 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating...Transfers. Transfers within the area of olives from one handler to another for further...permitted. Whenever such a transfer of olives is made, the transferring...

  3. 7 CFR 932.54 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating...Transfers. Transfers within the area of olives from one handler to another for further...permitted. Whenever such a transfer of olives is made, the transferring...

  4. 7 CFR 932.54 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating...Transfers. Transfers within the area of olives from one handler to another for further...permitted. Whenever such a transfer of olives is made, the transferring...

  5. Transfer reactions with HELIOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuosmaa, Alan H.

    2011-04-01

    Nucleon-transfer reactions have formed the backbone of nuclear-structure studies for several decades, providing a wealth of information about the energies, quantum numbers, and wave functions of single-particle states in nuclei throughout the nuclear chart. Current trends in nuclear-structure physics and the modern emphasis on properties of neutron-rich nuclei far from stability have renewed interest in such transfer reactions with radioactive beams. Here, the usual combination of light beam and heavy target cannot be used, and measurements must be performed in ``inverse kinematics,'' with a heavy, unstable beam incident on a light target. This arrangement introduces several technical difficulties, including the identification of the reaction products and the resolution of the states of interest in the residual nuclei. A new device, HELIOS (the HELIcal Orbit Spectrometer) at the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory, solves many of the problems encountered with inverse kinematics including particle identification and energy resolution in the center-of-mass frame. The device utilizes the uniform magnetic field of a large, superconducting solenoid to transport light reaction products from the target to a linear array of position-sensitive silicon detectors. The properties of HELIOS will be described, and examples from the initial research program that focuses on neutron transfer with the (d,p) reaction, using both stable and unstable beams with mass A = 11 to 136, will be presented. Work supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract numbers DE-FG02-04ER41320 (WMU) and DE-AC02-06CH11357 (ANL).

  6. The role of mineralization of the organic matter of soddy-podzolic and peat bog soils in the accumulation of 137Cs by plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulina, A. S.; Semenov, V. M.; Tsybul'Ka, N. N.; Shapsheeva, T. P.; Zaitsev, A. A.; Arastovich, T. V.

    2010-10-01

    The role of mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) in the mobilization of 137Cs was estimated on the basis of data on the biokinetic fractionation of the organic matter of soddy-podzolic sandy-loam and peat bog soils and on the coefficients of the soil-to-plant transfer of radiocesium under field conditions. The peat bog soils were richer than the soddy-podzolic soils in the total organic carbon (by 7.9-23.8 times), the potentially mineralizable carbon (by 2.4-6.5 times), and the carbon of the microbial biomass (by 2.9-4.6 times). The agricultural use of the soddy-podzolic and peat bog soils led to a decrease in the SOM mineralization capacity by 1.1-1.8 and 1.4-2.0 times, respectively. Simultaneously, the portions of the easily, moderately, and difficultly mineralizable fraction of the SOM active pool changed. The coefficients of the 137Cs transfer from the peat bog soils to plants were 3.3-17.6 times higher than those for the soddy-podzolic soils. The content of 137Cs in plants grown on the peat bog soils was 2-65 times higher than that in the mobile (salt-extractable) soil pool by the beginning of the growing season. Strong positive linear correlations were found between the coefficients of the soil-to-plant transfer of 137Cs and the total content of the SOM, the content of the microbial biomass, the content of the potentially mineralizable carbon, and the intensity of its mineralization. It was concluded that the decisive factors controlling the intensity of the 137Cs transfer from mineral and organic soils into plants are the SOM content and its mineralization potential. The mineralization of the SOM is accompanied by the release of both 137Cs and mineral nitrogen; the latter facilitates the transfer of radiocesium into plants.

  7. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  8. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, J.C.; Hoover, M.A.; May, K.W.; Ross, M.J.

    1990-01-23

    The patent describes in a manipulator system for use in hazardous environments including a manipulator adapted for reciprocal movement upon a guide device, a transfer platform. It comprises: a bed frame defining a generally horizontal bed projecting outwardly from the manipulator; and frame mounting means securing the bed frame to the manipulator in a generally cantilevered fashion, thereby essentially minimizing the structure necessary to support the platform outwardly of the manipulator while enhancing operator visibility of the platform and the manipulator during use of the manipulator system.

  9. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, James C.; Hoover, Mark A.; May, Kay W.; Ross, Maurice J.

    1990-01-01

    A transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed frame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control.

  10. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbins, J.C.; Hoover, M.A.; May, K.W.; Ross, M.J.

    1988-10-12

    This invention is comprised of a transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed fame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control. 5 figs.

  11. Toward improved technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, W.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a model and describes two new initiatives for improving technology transfer. The model and the initiatives call for the following paradigm shifts: (1) Be proactive instead of reactive; (2) Improve leadership skills first, then management skills; (3) Organize and execute around a few critical activities that matter the most instead of the many that matter the least; (4) Think win-win, instead of ``my way`` or ``your way``; (5) Listen first, speak second; (6) Make 1+1=1,000 instead of 2; and (7) Renew resources daily instead of intermittently.

  12. Finite thrust orbital transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    The finite thrust optimal transfer in the presence of the Earth's shadow and oblate planet perturbations is a problem of strong interest in modern telecommunication satellite design with plasmic propulsion. The Maximum Principle cannot be used in its standard form to deal with the Earth's shadow. In this paper, using a regularization of the Hamiltonian which expands the Maximum Principle application domain, we provide for the first time, the necessary conditions in a very general context for the finite thrust optimal transfer with limited power around an oblate planet. The costate in such problems is generally discontinuous. To obtain fast numerical solutions, the averaging of the Hamiltonian is introduced. Two classes of boundary conditions are analyzed and numerically solved: the minimum time and the minimum fuel at a fixed time. These two problems are the basic tools for designing the orbit raising of a satellite after the launcher injection into its separation orbit. Numerical solutions have been calculated for the more important applications of LEO to GEO/MEO missions and the results have been reported and discussed.

  13. Inferring Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lassalle, Florent; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal or Lateral Gene Transfer (HGT or LGT) is the transmission of portions of genomic DNA between organisms through a process decoupled from vertical inheritance. In the presence of HGT events, different fragments of the genome are the result of different evolutionary histories. This can therefore complicate the investigations of evolutionary relatedness of lineages and species. Also, as HGT can bring into genomes radically different genotypes from distant lineages, or even new genes bearing new functions, it is a major source of phenotypic innovation and a mechanism of niche adaptation. For example, of particular relevance to human health is the lateral transfer of antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity determinants, leading to the emergence of pathogenic lineages [1]. Computational identification of HGT events relies upon the investigation of sequence composition or evolutionary history of genes. Sequence composition-based ("parametric") methods search for deviations from the genomic average, whereas evolutionary history-based ("phylogenetic") approaches identify genes whose evolutionary history significantly differs from that of the host species. The evaluation and benchmarking of HGT inference methods typically rely upon simulated genomes, for which the true history is known. On real data, different methods tend to infer different HGT events, and as a result it can be difficult to ascertain all but simple and clear-cut HGT events. PMID:26020646

  14. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  15. Intramolecular electron transfer rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupp, Joseph T.

    The initial goals of this project were: (1) to construct pulsed-accelerated-flow and pulsed-laser (transient absorbance) instruments for intramolecular electron-transfer rate measurements, (2) to design and synthesize appropriate molecules and perform such measurements, (3) to develop further an electrochemical method for gauging site-to-site electronic coupling, and (4) to apply time-dependent Raman scattering theory to the problem of inner-shell reorganization in charge-transfer reactions. Although all four goals were met, we also found it necessary to pursue studies in some unforeseen directions. For example, early on we discovered that medium effects (aggregation and ion pairing) could play a very large, and previously unrecognized, role in some optical intervalence reactions. Given the importance of the effects to the areas above, we chose to map them in a fairly complete fashion. Also, in anticipation of possible renewal we initiated studies in a new area: bimolecular photoredox kinetics in supercritical media. Finally, in a small project carried out largely by undergraduates we examined solvent tuning effects upon lifetimes of photo-excited ruthenium am(m)ine bipyridine complexes. The key new findings and other highlights of these studies are outlined.

  16. Important Aspects of Placental-Specific Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Melissa R.; Albers, Renee E.; Keoni, Chanel; Kulkarni-Datar, Kashmira; Natale, David R.; Brown, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is a unique and highly complex organ that develops only during pregnancy and is essential for growth and survival of the developing fetus. The placenta provides the vital exchange of gases and wastes, the necessary nutrients for fetal development, acts as immune barrier that protects against maternal rejection, and produces numerous hormones and growth factors that promote fetal maturity to regulate pregnancy until parturition. Abnormal placental development is a major underlying cause of Pregnancy-Associated Disorders that often result in preterm birth. Defects in placental stem cell propagation, growth, and differentiation are major factors that affect embryonic and fetal well being and dramatically increase the risk of pregnancy complications. Understanding the processes that regulate placentation is important in determining the underlying factors behind abnormal placental development. The ability to manipulate genes in a placenta-specific manner provides a unique tool to analyze development and eliminates potentially confounding results that can occur with traditional gene knockouts. Trophoblast stem cells and mouse embryos are not overly amenable to traditional gene transfer techniques. Most viral vectors, however; have a low infection rate and often lead to mosaic transgenesis. While the traditional method of embryo transfer is intrauterine surgical implantation, the methodology reported here, combining lentiviral blastocyst infection and nonsurgical embryo transfer, leads to highly efficient and placental-specific gene transfer. Numerous advantages of our optimized procedures include increased investigator safety, a reduction in animal stress, rapid and noninvasive embryo transfer, and higher a rate of pregnancy and live birth. PMID:25110063

  17. Impact of pigeon pea biochar on cadmium mobility in soil and transfer rate to leafy vegetable spinach.

    PubMed

    Coumar, M Vassanda; Parihar, R S; Dwivedi, A K; Saha, J K; Rajendiran, S; Dotaniya, M L; Kundu, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction of heavy metals in the environment by various anthropogenic activities has become a potential treat to life. Among the heavy metals, cadmium (Cd) shows relatively high soil mobility and has high phyto-mammalian toxicity. Integration of soil remediation and ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration in soils through organic amendments, may provide an attractive land management option for contaminated sites. The application of biochar in agriculture has recently received much attention globally due to its associated multiple benefits, particularly, long-term carbon storage in soil. However, the application of biochar from softwood crop residue for heavy metal immobilization, as an alternative to direct field application, has not received much attention. Hence, a pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of pigeon pea biochar on cadmium mobility in a soil-plant system in cadmium-spiked sandy loam soil. The biochar was prepared from pigeon pea stalk through a slow pyrolysis method at 300 °C. The experiment was designed with three levels of Cd (0, 5, and 10 mg Cd kg(-1) soil) and three levels of biochar (0, 2.5, and 5 g kg(-1) soil) using spinach as a test crop. The results indicate that with increasing levels of applied cadmium at 5 and 10 mg kg(-1) soil, the dry matter yield (DMY) of spinach leaf decreased by 9.84 and 18.29 %, respectively. However, application of biochar (at 2.5 and 5 g kg(-1) soil) significantly increased the dry matter yield of spinach leaf by 5.07 and 15.02 %, respectively, and root by 14.0 and 24.0 %, respectively, over the control. Organic carbon content in the post-harvest soil increased to 34.9 and 60.5 % due to the application of biochar 2.5 and 5 g kg(-1) soil, respectively. Further, there was a reduction in the diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable cadmium in the soil and in transfer coefficient values (soil to plant), as well as its concentrations in spinach leaf and root, indicating that cadmium mobility was decreased due to biochar application. This study shows that pigeon pea biochar has the potential to increase spinach yield and reduce cadmium mobility in contaminated sandy soil. PMID:26670040

  18. Computational chemistry and aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. M.; Jaffe, R. L.; Arnold, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the radiative heating phenomena encountered during a typical aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) trajectory was made to determine the potential impact of computational chemistry on AOTV design technology. Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium radiation mechanisms were considered. This analysis showed that computational chemistry can be used to predict (1) radiative intensity factors and spectroscopic data; (2) the excitation rates of both atoms and molecules; (3) high-temperature reaction rate constants for metathesis and charge exchange reactions; (4) particle ionization and neutralization rates and cross sections; and (5) spectral line widths.

  19. Investigation of heat transfer and pressure drop in an annular channel with heat transfer intensifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltenko, E. A.; Varava, A. N.; Dedov, A. V.; Zakharenkov, A. V.; Komov, A. T.; Malakhovskii, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    Results from systematic investigations of heat transfer and pressure drop for water flow in an annular channel using an efficient method for enhancing heat transfer on a convex heating surface are presented. The main technical data of the thermal-hydraulic experimental setup are given together with a brief description of the control, monitoring, and physical parameters measurement and recording systems, as well as primary experimental data processing and storage system. The test section, the enhancement method based on setting up swirl flows, the geometrical characteristics of intensifiers, their schematic design, and installation technology are described. The experimental data are obtained in a wide range of coolant flow parameters under the conditions of single-phase convection with using intensifiers having different shapes. The test measurements carried out on a smooth annular channel showed good agreement with the classic correlations both for heat transfer and pressure drop, thereby confirming reliability of the experimental data. A considerable improvement in heat removal efficiency on the convex heating surface is obtained. The value of heat transfer coefficient is a factor of 1.8 higher than it is for smooth annular channels. The region of the values of intensifier geometrical characteristics and Reynolds numbers for which the growth of heat transfer prevails over the growth of pressure drop is established. It is shown that the maximums of heat transfer and pressure drop are observed at quite definite values of intensifier geometrical characteristics. The primary experimental data are processed and presented as a dependence of the Nusselt number on the Reynolds number for different values of the intensifier's relative fin height ?. The value of ? at which heat transfer reaches its maximum is found. The experiments were carried out in the pressure range p = 3.0-10.0 MPa and at the constant temperature of liquid at the test section inlet equal to 100°C. The influence of peripheral liquid flow swirling pitch on heat transfer and pressure drop is studied. An empirical correlation describing the dependence of heat transfer on the intensifier geometrical characteristics is obtained.

  20. Multi-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K. E.

    1998-01-20

    The optimum conditions for multi-neutron transfer have been studied in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 124}Sn at bombarding energies at and below the Coulomb barrier. The experiments were performed in inverse kinematics with a {sup 124}Sn beam bombarding a {sup 58}Ni target. The particles were identified with respect to mass and Z in the split-pole spectrograph with a hybrid focal plane detector with mass and Z-resolutions of A/{Delta}A = 150 and Z/{Delta}Z = 70. At all energies the transfer of up to 6 neutrons was observed. The yields for these transfer reactions are found to decrease by about a factor of four for each transferred neutron.

  1. Laplacian State Transfer in Coronas

    E-print Network

    Ethan Ackelsberg; Zachary Brehm; Ada Chan; Joshua Mundinger; Christino Tamon

    2015-08-22

    We prove that the corona product of two graphs has no Laplacian perfect state transfer whenever the first graph has at least two vertices. This complements a result of Coutinho and Liu who showed that no tree of size greater than two has Laplacian perfect state transfer. In contrast, we prove that the corona product of two graphs exhibits Laplacian pretty good state transfer, under some mild conditions. This provides the first known examples of families of graphs with Laplacian pretty good state transfer. Our result extends of the work of Fan and Godsil on double stars to the Laplacian setting. Moreover, we also show that the corona product of any cocktail party graph with a single vertex graph has Laplacian pretty good state transfer, even though odd cocktail party graphs have no perfect state transfer.

  2. ADAPTIVELY IMPROVING LONG DISTANCE NETWORK TRANSFERS WITH LOGISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    LaBissoniere, D.; Roche, K.

    2007-01-01

    Long distance data movement is an essential activity of modern computing. However, the congestion control mechanisms in the Internet’s Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) severely limit the bandwidth achieved by long distance data transfers. The throughput of such transfers can be improved by applying the logistical technique of breaking a single long distance transfer into multiple shorter transfers. This technique can result in signifi cantly improved throughput while still respecting the shared nature of the Internet by not attempting to circumvent the TCP congestion controls. This technique has been incorporated into an algorithm which attempts to dynamically schedule transfers for optimal throughput. The algorithm couples graph techniques with real-time latency and bandwidth measurements to discover the best path and adaptively respond to network dynamics. The algorithm shows improvements in speed and fl exibility over standard data transfer methods such as FTP. Specifi c transfers tests performed between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and a destination in Sunnyvale, CA show throughput increases by a factor of two.

  3. Heat and momentum transfer in a plane turbulent wall jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizou, P. Y.

    1981-02-01

    Relationships between heat transfer and the friction factor in turbulent convection in a jet flowing tangentially to a heated flat surface are investigated. Flow velocities, wall shearing stresses and temperature profiles were measured at nozzle slot thicknesses leading to slot Reynolds numbers ranging from 9000 to 60,000. Jet nozzle size is found to influence the correlation of the friction factor determined from the stress measurements with the thickness Reynolds number, although a single relation may be obtained by the modification of the characteristic length in the Reynolds number. The dimensionless temperature profiles in the fully developed region are observed to agree with conventional boundary layer theory, however the ratio of the Stanton number is found to depend on positional coordinate, in conflict with classical analogies between heat and momentum transfers. Results thus demonstrate the differences in heat transfer between a classical boundary layer with low turbulence stream and a wall jet.

  4. Technology transfer within the government

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John

    1992-01-01

    The report of a workshop panel concerned with technology transfer within the government is presented. The presentation is made in vugraph form. The assigned subtopic for this panel are as follows: (1) transfer from non-NASA US government technology developers to NASA space missions/programs; and (2) transfer from NASA to other US government space mission programs. A specific area of inquiry was Technology Maturation Milestones. Three areas were investigated: technology development; advanced development; and flight hardware development.

  5. Evaporation Heat Transfer of Ammonia and Pressure Drop of Warm Water for Plate Type Evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushibe, Mitsuteru; Lkegami, Yasuyuki; Monde, Masanori; Uehara, Haruo

    The performance test of three types of plate type evaporators for spring thermal energy conversion and ocean thermal energy conversion carried out. Ammonia is utilized as working fluid and warm water is utilized as heat source. An empirical correlation is proposed in order to predict the mean evaporation heat transfer coefficient of ammonia and heat transfer coefficient of warm water for plate type evaporators. The mean heat transfer coefficient and friction factor of warm water were compared with other researches.

  6. Development and Testing of Emergency Department Patient Transfer Communication Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals. The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality…

  7. Action Learning: How Learning Transfers from Entrepreneurs to Small Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Karen; Sambrook, Sally A.; Pittaway, Luke; Henley, Andrew; Norbury, Heather

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents research with small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME) owners who have participated in a leadership development programme. The primary focus of this paper is on learning transfer and factors affecting it, arguing that entrepreneurs must engage in "action" in order to "learn" and that under certain conditions…

  8. Placental transfer of the actinides and related heavy elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sikov, M.R.

    1986-11-01

    A selective literature review dealing with prenatal exposure of animals and humans to actinides and related heavy elements, comparative aspects of placental transfer and fetoplacental distribution are considered. General patterns have been derived from typical quantitative values, and used to compare similarities and dissimilarities, and to examine factors responsible for observed differences. 37 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Information transfer during contingency operations: Emergency air-ground communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    Safety related problems are reported which occur as a consequence of information transfer deficiencies that arise when air/ground communications are (or should be) used as a resource in inflight emergency situations. The system factors, the human errors, and the associated causes of these problem are defined.

  10. Post Baccalaureate Reverse Transfer Implications for Community College Student Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Myron; Turner, Mary; Barker, John

    This paper asserts that a sizeable number of students at the community college have attained a baccalaureate degree or higher and have returned to the community college to take credit courses. These post-baccalaureate reverse transfer students (PRTS) enroll in the community college for a variety of reasons, but one of the more common factors is…

  11. Transfer of Mixed Word Identification Training to a Reading Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, John; And Others

    The research reported here was designed to examine a number of factors that findings from verbal learning studies indicate should affect the recall and transfer of word identification materials. Sight word and phonics-based or rule-based learning were investigated in 112 kindergarteners who were identified as nonreaders. Groups were trained on…

  12. Do Parental Cash Transfers Weaken Performance in College?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodvarsson, Orn B.; Walker, Rosemary L.

    2004-01-01

    When parents support children in college, does this undermine the incentive to do well? The authors test the hypothesis that parental cash transfers induce college students to commit moral hazard in their studies on a sample of nearly 1300 undergraduates at two Midwestern universities. After controlling for a wide variety of factors influencing…

  13. Bilayer Approaches for Nanoparticle Phase Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kini, Gautam Chandrakanth

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are often synthesized in organic solvents due to advantages of superior size and shape control obtainable in a non-polar environment. However, many applications featuring NPs require them to be in aqueous media. To transfer NPs from oil to water, surfactants with amphiphilic (hydrophobic and hydrophilic) groups have been widely used. A popular phase-transfer approach involves formation of oil-in-water emulsions upon which the oil storing the NPs is boiled off. In the process, surfactants form bilayers with hydrophobic groups on the NPs rendering them water-dispersible. This transfer route however is limited in that NPs aggregate to form clusters which results in poor colloidal stability and for the specific case of quantum dots (QDs), adversely impacts optical properties. It has ever since remained a challenge to devise approaches that transfer NPs from oil to water as single particles without compromising NP stability and properties. We have discovered that by simple addition of salt to water during the step of emulsion formation, NP transfer efficiency can be greatly enhanced in "salty-micelles" of surfactants. The strength of this approach lies in its simplicity and generic nature in that the transfer scheme is valid for different NP, surfactant and salt types. Using a model system with cadmium selenide (CdSe) QDs as NPs, Aerosol-OT (AOT) as the surfactant and NaCl as the salt in water, we found >90% of CdSe QDs transferred in salty-micelles of AOT which was significantly higher than the 45-55% QDs that transferred in deionized-water (DI-water) micelles of AOT. In the salty-micelle environment, QDs were found to exist predominantly as single NPs with narrow size distribution, as established by light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The effects of salt were in lowering aqueous solubility of AOT through "salting-out" action and in screening repulsions between like-charged head groups of AOT molecules. Electrophoresis, thermogravimetric analysis and photoluminescence measurements using a solvatochromic dye established higher surfactant coverage with greater lateral compaction for QDs in salty-micelles over the DI-micelle counterpart. Single NP characteristics along with a hydrophobic environment in laterally compact salty-micelles resulted in better retention of optical properties of QDs. Observations of a secondary effect by salt in inducing spontaneous emulsification of a hydrocarbon (octane)/AOT/brine system were systematically investigated by tracking time-variant octane droplet size and charge. Salinity levels that determine the spontaneous curvature and phase behavior of AOT were seen to influence the initial nucleation of octane droplets and their subsequent growth. The smallest octane drops (sub 50 nm) were nucleated at the optimum cross-over salinity and emergence of the liquid crystalline phase of AOT resulted in slowest growth rates. These factors contributed towards higher transfer efficiency of NPs in salty-micelles. Two applications from formulating aqueous NP suspensions by the new phase-transfer approach are described. In the first, QD and carbon-dot (C-Dot) "nanoreporters" were formulated for oil-field reservoir characterization using Neodol 91-7 (nonionic) and Avanel S150 CGN (hybrid nonionic and anionic) as surfactants. These NPs were stable to aggregation under reservoir-representative conditions (salinities: 1M NaCl, 1M KCl and 0.55M synthetic seawater; temperatures: 70-100 °C) and demonstrated flow and transport through crushed-calcite and quartz-sand columns with high breakthrough and recovery (> 90%). In the second application, tandem assembly of a cationic polymer, multivalent salt, and NPs was investigated in a microfluidic channel where charge ratio of the polymer/salt and shear from flow and device geometry determined their assembly into higher ordered structures such as gels and capsules.

  14. Heat transfer probe

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-10-10

    Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

  15. Aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D. (Inventor); Nagy, Kornel (Inventor); Roberts, Barney B. (Inventor); Ried, Robert C. (Inventor); Kroll, Kenneth R. (Inventor); Gamble, Joe (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle which includes an aerobraking device which also serves as a heat shield in the shape of a raked-off elliptic or circular cone with a circular or elliptical base, and with an ellipsoid or other blunt shape nose. The aerobraking device is fitted with a toroid-like skirt and is integral with the support structure of the propulsion system and other systems of the space vehicle. The vehicle is intended to be transported in components to a space station in lower earth orbit where it is assembled for use as a transportation system from low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit and return. Conventional guidance means are included for autonomous flight.

  16. Technology transfer 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  17. Methane heat transfer investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    Future high chamber pressure LOX/hydrocarbon booster engines require copper-base alloy main combustion chamber coolant channels similar to the SSME to provide adequate cooling and resuable engine life. Therefore, it is of vital importance to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics and coking thresholds for LNG (94% methane) cooling, with a copper-base alloy material adjacent to the fuel coolant. High-pressure methane cooling and coking characteristics were recently evaluated using stainless-steel heated tubes at methane bulk temperatures and coolant wall temperatures typical of advanced engine operation except at lower heat fluxes as limited by the tube material. As expected, there was no coking observed. However, coking evaluations need be conducted with a copper-base surface exposed to the methane coolant at higher heat fluxes approaching those of future high chamber pressure engines.

  18. Methane heat transfer investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Future high chamber pressure LOX/hydrocarbon booster engines require copper base alloy main combustion chamber coolant channels similar to the SSME to provide adequate cooling and reusable engine life. Therefore, it is of vital importance to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics and coking thresholds for LNG (94% methane) cooling, with a copper base alloy material adjacent to he fuel coolant. High pressure methane cooling and coking characteristics recently evaluated at Rocketdyne using stainless steel heated tubes at methane bulk temperatures and coolant wall temperatures typical of advanced engine operation except at lower heat fluxes as limited by the tube material. As expected, there was no coking observed. However, coking evaluations need be conducted with a copper base surface exposed to the methane coolant at higher heat fluxes approaching those of future high chamber pressure engines.

  19. 1D transfer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Álvarez, R.; Trallero-Herrero, C.; García-Moliner, F.

    2001-07-01

    Many problems of physical interest - for instance, in statistical mechanics - are described by linear ordinary second-order differential systems for which different types of transfer matrices can be introduced and used. Focusing on heterostructures where matching at interfaces is involved, this paper discusses two of them with emphasis on one, here denoted T, which involves the linear differential form expressing the physical quantities matched at the interfaces. The mathematical background is summarized in a simple way and then T is used to study two types of heterostructures involving a large number of interfaces. Firstly, the regular periodic superlattices are studied and the role of different boundary conditions (BCs) at the end of one period is discussed. Only periodic BCs are suitable to study a simple regular superlattices but the discussion provides the background to study different approximants when the period is a largish generation of a quasi-regular heterostructure, like, for instance, a Fibonacci sequence.

  20. Transfer of fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Vuckovich, M.; Burkett, J. P.; Sallustio, J.

    1984-12-11

    Fuel assemblies of a nuclear reactor are transferred during fueling or refueling or the like by a crane. The work-engaging fixture of the crane picks up an assembly, removes it from this slot, transfers it to the deposit site and deposits it in its slot at the deposit site. The control for the crane includes a strain gauge connected to the crane line which raises and lowers the load. The strain gauge senses the load on the crane. The signal from the strain gauge is compared with setpoints; a high-level setpoint, a low-level setpoint and a slack-line setpoint. If the strain gauge signal exceeds the high-level setpoint, the line drive is disabled. This event may occur during raising of a fuel assembly which encounters resistance. The high-level setpoint may be overridden under proper precautions. The line drive is also disabled if the strain gauge signal is less than the low-level setpoint. This event occurs when a fuel assembly being deposited contacts the bottom of its slot or an obstruction in, or at the entry to the slot. To preclude lateral movement and possible damage to a fuel assembly suspended from the crane line, the traverse drive of the crane is disabled once the strain-gauge exceets the lov-level setpoint. The traverse drive can only be enabled after the strain-gauge signal is less than the slack-line set-point. This occurs when the lines has been set in slack-line setting. When the line is tensioned after slack-li ne setting, the traverse drive remains enabled only if the line has been disconnected from the fuel assembly.

  1. 40 CFR Table 33 to Subpart G of... - Saturation Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Pollutants From the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 33 Table 33 to Subpart G of Part 63—Saturation Factors Cargo carrier Mode of...

  2. 48 CFR 1816.405-274 - Award fee evaluation factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... classified information, illegal technology transfer, workplace violence resulting in criminal conviction, sabotage, compromise or denial of information technology services, equipment or property damage from... factor, if used, must include consideration of risk management (including mission success,...

  3. Key Factors in Displacement Ventilation Systems for Better IAQ 

    E-print Network

    Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2006-01-01

    This paper sets up a mathematical model of three-dimensional steady turbulence heat transfer in an air-conditioned room of multi-polluting heat sources. Numerical simulation helps identify key factors in displacement ventilation systems that affect...

  4. 40 CFR Table 33 to Subpart G of... - Saturation Factors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Pollutants From the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and Wastewater Pt. 63, Subpt. G, Table 33 Table 33 to Subpart G of Part 63—Saturation Factors Cargo carrier Mode of...

  5. Two-photon excitation energy transfer microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Periasamy, Ammasi

    2000-04-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging is a unique tool used to visualize the spaciotemporal dynamics of protein-protein interactions in living cells. We used FRET to study the dimerization of the pituitary-specific transcription factor of Pit-1 fused with blue flourescent protein and green fluorescent protein. Transcriptional activity of the GFP- and BFP-Pit-1 fusion proteins was demonstrated by their ability to activate the prolactin gene promoter. The energy transfer in the conventional fluorescence microscopy was less efficient due to photobleaching of the BFP-Pit-1 donor molecules. In our studies we developed two-photon excitation energy transfer microscopy, where the photobleaching of blue flourescent protein was considerably reduced. This 2p-FRET imaging system was used to acquire the donor and acceptor images for a living HeLa cell nucleus. We selected 732 nm from the tunable Verdi pumped ti:sapphire laser, in a way that only excites the BFP-Pit-1 and not the GFP-Pit-1 proteins. The efficiency of the 2p-FRET signal increased to 30 percent compared to the conventional FRET imaging, which clearly demonstrates that there is considerable reduction in photobleaching of donor molecules in the 2p-FRET microscopy.

  6. Transference and Counter-Transference in Treating Incarcerated Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Brad; Brekke, Karl E.

    1996-01-01

    Explores the processes involved in treating sex offenders. Focuses on how therapists can feel traumatized by this patient population, the dynamism of transference, and tactics used by sex offender patients, such as seduction, imitation, intimidation, and invalidation. Describes ways for therapists to maintain objectivity and use transference

  7. Transference, Counter-Transference, and Reflexivity in Intercultural Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Jenna Min

    2015-01-01

    The article addresses the contributions psychoanalytic theory, particularly its concepts of "transference and counter-transference," can make to our understanding of reflexivity in intercultural education (IE). After the introduction, the article is organized into three parts. The first part is a psychoanalytic discussion that focuses on…

  8. Chirped frequency transfer: a tool for synchronization and time transfer.

    PubMed

    Raupach, Sebastian M F; Grosche, Gesine

    2014-06-01

    We propose and demonstrate the phase-stabilized transfer of a chirped frequency as a tool for synchronization and time transfer. Technically, this is done by evaluating remote measurements of the transferred, chirped frequency. The gates of the frequency counters, here driven by a 10-MHz oscillation derived from a hydrogen maser, play a role analogous to the 1-pulse per second (PPS) signals usually employed for time transfer. In general, for time transfer, the gates consequently must be related to the external clock. Synchronizing observations based on frequency measurements, on the other hand, only requires a stable oscillator driving the frequency counters. In a proof of principle, we demonstrate the suppression of symmetrical delays, such as the geometrical path delay. We transfer an optical frequency chirped by around 240 kHz/s over a fiber link of around 149 km. We observe an accuracy and simultaneity, as well as a precision (Allan deviation, 18,000 s averaging interval) of the transferred frequency of around 2 × 10(-19). We apply chirped frequency transfer to remote measurements of the synchronization between two counters' gate intervals. Here, we find a precision of around 200 ps at an estimated overall uncertainty of around 500 ps. The measurement results agree with those obtained from reference measurements, being well within the uncertainty. In the present setup, timing offsets up to 4 min can be measured unambiguously. We indicate how this range can be extended further. PMID:24859656

  9. NMSU Equipment Decontamination & Transfer Form USED APPLIANCE TRANSFER to PROPERTY

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Eric E.

    NMSU Equipment Decontamination & Transfer Form USED APPLIANCE TRANSFER to PROPERTY Department: Bldg: As Department representative, I certify that this piece of equipment has been used previously for food storage://www.nmsu.edu/~safety) After completion, this form has to be returned to EH&S, MSC 3578. #12;Hazardous Materials - Equipment

  10. Learning, Intention to Transfer and Transfer in Executive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpin, Victoria; Eichenberg, Timm; Hayward, Ian; Abraham, Priya

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to understand the relationship between self-reported "intention" to transfer and self-reported "actual" transfer within a population of middle and senior executives on an executive education programme. A secondary objective was to consider the relationship between these qualitative self-reports of…

  11. Studying Transfer Students. Part II: Dimensions of Transfer Students' Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laanan, Frankie Santos

    2007-01-01

    The movement of students from community colleges to 4-year colleges or universities has been an area of inquiry that has received attention from researchers and policy makers. A plethora of research has focused on the academic outcomes of transfer students at senior institutions. Specifically, the concept of "transfer shock" has been used to…

  12. Juvenile Transfers to Criminal Court in the 1990s: Lessons Learned from Four Studies. OJJDP Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Howard N.; Sickmund, Melissa; Poe-Yamagata, Eileen

    This report presents information from four studies that investigated factors decision makers considered when transferring cases from the juvenile to the criminal justice system. All states have legal mechanisms whereby some juveniles may be transferred from the juvenile to the criminal justice system for prosecution. These decisions fall into…

  13. Microbial Evolution Is in the Cards: Horizontal Gene Transfer in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagle, Jeanne; Hay, Anthony G.

    2007-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer, the exchange of genetic material between bacteria, is a potentially important factor in the degradation of synthetic compounds introduced to the environment and in the acquisition of other characteristics including antibiotic resistance. This game-based activity illustrates the role of horizontal gene transfer in the…

  14. The Effect of Scaffolded Causal Identification in the Transfer of Experimental Design Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Stephanie A.; Klahr, David; Willows, Kevin; Magaro, Cressida

    2011-01-01

    A central goal of instruction is to enable learners to transfer acquired knowledge to appropriate future situations. One factor that likely promotes far transfer is conceptual coherence (cf. Murphy & Medin, 1985). For elementary and middle-school school children in middle-high-SES schools, "explicit" instruction on the Control of Variables…

  15. Commercializing Academic Research: Resource Effects on Performance of University Technology Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Joshua B.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated factors that may explain differential performance with university technology transfer, the process of transforming research into marketable products. Utilizing multi-source data on 108 universities, a set of internal and external resources were found to be significant predictors of one or more of three technology transfer

  16. Applications of aerospace technology in industry. A technology transfer profile: Food technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Food processing and preservation technologies are reviewed, expected technological advances are considered including processing and market factors. NASA contributions to food technology and nutrition are presented with examples of transfer from NASA to industry.

  17. Forward Transfer: Strengthening the Educational Pipeline for Latino Community College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez, Angelica L.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies factors that contribute to the forward transfer of Latino community college students, including personal drive, academic preparation, and academic and career goals. Presents qualitative interviews of 10 students, six administrators, and two counselors. (Contains 50 references.) (AUTH/NB)

  18. Natural transfer of viable microbes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileikowsky, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Gladman, B.; Horneck, G.; Lindegren, L.; Melosh, J.; Rickman, H.; Valtonen, M.; Zheng, J. Q.

    2000-01-01

    The possibility and probability of natural transfer of viable microbes from Mars to Earth and Earth to Mars traveling in meteoroids during the first 0.5 Ga and the following 4 Ga are investigated, including: --radiation protection against the galactic cosmic ray nuclei and the solar rays, dose rates as a function of the meteorite's radial column mass (radius x density), combined with dose rates generated by natural radioactivity within the meteorite; and survival curves for some bacterial species using NASA's HZETRN transport code --other factors affecting microbe survival: vacuum; central meteorite temperatures at launch, orbiting, and arrival; pressure and acceleration at launch; spontaneous DNA decay; metal ion migration --mean sizes and numbers of unshocked meteorites ejected and percentage falling on Earth, using current semiempirical results --viable flight times for the microbe species Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans R1 --the approximate fraction of microbes (with properties like the two species studied) viably arriving on Earth out of those ejected from Mars during the period 4 Ga BP to the present time, and during the 700 Ma from 4.5 to 3.8 Ga. Similarly, from Earth to Mars. The conclusion is that if microbes existed or exist on Mars, viable transfer to Earth is not only possible but also highly probable, due to microbes' impressive resistance to the dangers of space transfer and to the dense traffic of billions of martian meteorites which have fallen on Earth since the dawn of our planetary system. Earth-to-Mars transfer is also possible but at a much lower frequency.

  19. Medicaid and Family Wealth Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jinkook; Kim, Hyungsoo; Tanenbaum, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines whether the relationship between making familial wealth transfers and becoming a Medicaid recipient sheds light on the current debate about Medicaid estate planning, whereby some elders transfer their assets to their families to qualify for Medicaid. Design and Methods: Using the Health and Retirement Study, we tracked…

  20. Cooper pair transfer in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potel, G.; Idini, A.; Barranco, F.; Vigezzi, E.; Broglia, R. A.

    2013-10-01

    The second-order distorted wave Born approximation implementation of two-particle transfer direct reactions which includes simultaneous and successive transfer, properly corrected by non-orthogonality effects, is tested with the help of controlled nuclear structure and reaction inputs against data spanning the whole mass table, and showed to constitute a quantitative probe of nuclear pairing correlations.

  1. Reverse Transfer Project, Summer 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Elizabeth

    In 1986, a Reverse Transfer Project was initiated at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) in order to promote the summer school attendance at MVCC of "reverse transfer" students (i.e., students who attended another institution during the regular academic year). A mailing, containing a cover letter, informational brochure, summer catalog, and…

  2. Providing global WLCG transfer monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, J.; Dieguez Arias, D.; Campana, S.; Flix, J.; Keeble, O.; Magini, N.; Molnar, Z.; Oleynik, D.; Petrosyan, A.; Ro, G.; Saiz, P.; Salichos, M.; Tuckett, D.; Uzhinsky, A.; Wildish, T.

    2012-12-01

    The WLCG[1] Transfers Dashboard is a monitoring system which aims to provide a global view of WLCG data transfers and to reduce redundancy in monitoring tasks performed by the LHC experiments. The system is designed to work transparently across LHC experiments and across the various technologies used for data transfer. Currently each LHC experiment monitors data transfers via experiment-specific systems but the overall cross-experiment picture is missing. Even for data transfers handled by FTS, which is used by 3 LHC experiments, monitoring tasks such as aggregation of FTS transfer statistics or estimation of transfer latencies are performed by every experiment separately. These tasks could be performed once, centrally, and then served to all experiments via a well-defined set of APIs. In the design and development of the new system, experience accumulated by the LHC experiments in the data management monitoring area is taken into account and a considerable part of the code of the ATLAS DDM Dashboard is being re-used. The paper describes the architecture of the Global Transfer monitoring system, the implementation of its components and the first prototype.

  3. Electron transfer networks Murad Banaji

    E-print Network

    Banaji,. Murad

    Electron transfer networks Murad Banaji§ Stephen Baigent June 4, 2007 Abstract In this paper we study electron transfer networks. These are generalisations of electron transport chains, and consist electrons to the oxidised forms, and there are some electron inflow and outflow processes. We show

  4. Cash transfers and domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Hidrobo, Melissa; Fernald, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Violence against women is a major health and human rights problem yet there is little rigorous evidence as to how to reduce it. We take advantage of the randomized roll-out of Ecuador's cash transfer program to mothers to investigate how an exogenous increase in a woman's income affects domestic violence. We find that the effect of a cash transfer depends on a woman's education and on her education relative to her partner's. Our results show that for women with greater than primary school education a cash transfer significantly decreases psychological violence from her partner. For women with primary school education or less, however, the effect of a cash transfer depends on her education relative to her partner's. Specifically, the cash transfer significantly increases emotional violence in households where the woman's education is equal to or more than her partner's. PMID:23237793

  5. Information Transfer in Social Media

    E-print Network

    Steeg, Greg Ver

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has explored the increasingly important role of social media by examining the dynamics of individual and group behavior, characterizing patterns of information diffusion, and identifying influential individuals. In this paper we suggest a measure of causal relationships between nodes based on the information-theoretic notion of transfer entropy, or information transfer. This theoretically grounded measure is based on dynamic information, captures fine-grain notions of influence, and admits a natural, predictive interpretation. Causal networks inferred by transfer entropy can differ significantly from static friendship networks because most friendship links are not useful for predicting future dynamics. We demonstrate through analysis of synthetic and real-world data that transfer entropy reveals meaningful hidden network structures. In addition to altering our notion of who is influential, transfer entropy allows us to differentiate between weak influence over large groups and strong influence...

  6. Lunar Cube Transfer Trajectory Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Dichmann, Donald James; Clark, Pamela E.; Haapala, Amanda; Howell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Numerous Earth-Moon trajectory and lunar orbit options are available for Cubesat missions. Given the limited Cubesat injection infrastructure, transfer trajectories are contingent upon the modification of an initial condition of the injected or deployed orbit. Additionally, these transfers can be restricted by the selection or designs of Cubesat subsystems such as propulsion or communication. Nonetheless, many trajectory options can b e considered which have a wide range of transfer duration, fuel requirements, and final destinations. Our investigation of potential trajectories highlights several options including deployment from low Earth orbit (LEO) geostationary transfer orbits (GTO) and higher energy direct lunar transfer and the use of longer duration Earth-Moon dynamical systems. For missions with an intended lunar orbit, much of the design process is spent optimizing a ballistic capture while other science locations such as Sun-Earth libration or heliocentric orbits may simply require a reduced Delta-V imparted at a convenient location along the trajectory.

  7. Lunar Cube Transfer Trajectory Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Dichmann, Donald J.; Clark, Pamela; Haapala, Amanda; Howell, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Numerous Earth-Moon trajectory and lunar orbit options are available for Cubesat missions. Given the limited Cubesat injection infrastructure, transfer trajectories are contingent upon the modification of an initial condition of the injected or deployed orbit. Additionally, these transfers can be restricted by the selection or designs of Cubesat subsystems such as propulsion or communication. Nonetheless, many trajectory options can be considered which have a wide range of transfer durations, fuel requirements, and final destinations. Our investigation of potential trajectories highlights several options including deployment from low Earth orbit (LEO), geostationary transfer orbits (GTO), and higher energy direct lunar transfers and the use of longer duration Earth-Moon dynamical systems. For missions with an intended lunar orbit, much of the design process is spent optimizing a ballistic capture while other science locations such as Sun-Earth libration or heliocentric orbits may simply require a reduced Delta-V imparted at a convenient location along the trajectory.

  8. Utrecht Radiative Transfer Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Utrecht course ``The Generation and Transport of Radiation'' teaches basic radiative transfer to second-year students. It is a much-expanded version of the first chapter of Rybicki & Lightman's ``Radiative Processes in Astrophysics''. After this course, students understand why intensity is measured per steradian, have an Eddington-Barbier feel for optically thick line formation, and know that scattering upsets LTE. The text is a computer-aided translation by Ruth Peterson of my 1992 Dutch-language course. My aim is to rewrite this course in non-computer English and make it web-available at some time. In the meantime, copies of the Peterson translation are made yearly at Uppsala -- ask them, not me. Eventually it should become a textbook. The Utrecht course ``Radiative Transfer in Stellar Atmospheres'' is a 30-hour course for third-year students. It treats NLTE line formation in plane-parallel stellar atmospheres at a level intermediate between the books by Novotny and Boehm-Vitense, and Mihalas' ``Stellar Atmospheres''. After this course, students appreciate that epsilon is small, that radiation can heat or cool, and that computers have changed the field. This course is web-available since 1995 and is regularly improved -- but remains incomplete. Eventually it should become a textbook. The three Utrecht exercise sets ``Stellar Spectra A: Basic Line Formation'', ``Stellar Spectra B: LTE Line Formation'', and ``Stellar Spectra C: NLTE Line Formation'' are IDL-based computer exercises for first-year, second-year, and third-year students, respectively. They treat spectral classification, Saha-Boltzmann population statistics, the curve of growth, the FAL-C solar atmosphere model, the role of H-minus in the solar continuum, LTE formation of Fraunhofer lines, inversion tactics, the Feautrier method, classical lambda iteration, and ALI computation. The first two sets are web-available since 1998; the third will follow. Acknowledgement. Both courses owe much to previous Utrecht courses taught by the late Kees Zwaan. The third exercise set was developed by Phil Judge, Mandy Hagenaar, and Thijs Krijger. Reverse acknowledgement. If you are a user of this free material you might refer to this summary and so boost my citation standing. Corrections are also welcome.

  9. GUIDED ANGLER FISH ANNUAL CONVERSION FACTORS

    E-print Network

    GUIDED ANGLER FISH ANNUAL CONVERSION FACTORS FOR THE 2014 FISHING YEAR NOAA FISHERIES, ALASKA Individual Fishing Quota (IFQ) transferred to/from an IFQ permit holder in IPHC regulatory area 2C or 3A halibut harvested by charter vessel anglers during the most recent year without a size limit in effect

  10. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.

    1980-03-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. This material is useful for engineers, scientists, technologists, and designers of all disciplines, particularly those who design thermal systems or estimate temperatures and heat transfer rates in structures. More than 500 problem solutions and relevant data are tabulated for easy retrieval. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. A case number is assigned to each problem for cross-referencing, and also for future reference. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. At least one source reference is given so that the user can review the methods used to derive the solutions. Problem solutions are given in the form of equations, graphs, and tables of data, all of which are also identified by problem case numbers and source references.

  11. Conduction heat transfer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    VanSant, J.H.

    1983-08-01

    This text is a collection of solutions to a variety of heat conduction problems found in numerous publications, such as textbooks, handbooks, journals, reports, etc. Its purpose is to assemble these solutions into one source that can facilitate the search for a particular problem solution. Generally, it is intended to be a handbook on the subject of heat conduction. There are twelve sections of solutions which correspond with the class of problems found in each. Geometry, state, boundary conditions, and other categories are used to classify the problems. Each problem is concisely described by geometry and condition statements, and many times a descriptive sketch is also included. The introduction presents a synopsis on the theory, differential equations, and boundary conditions for conduction heat transfer. Some discussion is given on the use and interpretation of solutions. Supplementary data such as mathematical functions, convection correlations, and thermal properties are included for aiding the user in computing numerical values from the solutions. 155 figs., 92 refs., 9 tabs.

  12. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ ?. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving force for long-range proton transfer in Photosysem II and through other biological membranes. In EPT, simultaneous transfer of electrons and protons occurs on time scales short compared to the periods of coupled vibrations and solvent modes. A theory for EPT has been developed which rationalizes rate constants and activation barriers, includes temperature- and driving force (?G)-dependences implicitly, and explains kinetic isotope effects. The distance-dependence of EPT is dominated by the short-range nature of proton transfer, with electron transfer being far less demanding.Changes in external pH do not affect an EPT elementary step. Solvent molecules or buffer components can act as proton donor acceptors, but individual H2O molecules are neither good bases (pKa(H3O+) = -1.74) nor good acids (pKa(H2O) = 15.7). There are many examples of mechanisms in chemistry, in biology, on surfaces, and in the gas phase which utilize EPT. PCET and EPT play critical roles in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II and other biological reactions by decreasing driving force and avoiding high-energy intermediates.

  13. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer 

    E-print Network

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01

    ?= ? , even 12SS? ?= , 2, finally the overal efficiency of two pass thi ()12 3ww z z getting l mble parallel-flow: ( ) 21113 2 21 111 1 s s S Cr tt Crwz s ? ?? ? ?+== ?? (4) Heat-transfer efficiency of parallel-flow : and ( )1 1S 1exp (1 )NTU Cr... analysis of above flow resistance and energy cost, we know that the economy flux ratio of transfer heat-transfer means is between 0.54 and 0.85, namely sewage flux is smaller, and minC Cr min wwCVc?= . It is necessary to point out that though depending...

  14. Ground-State Proton Transfer Kinetics in Green Fluorescent Protein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Proton transfer plays an important role in the optical properties of green fluorescent protein (GFP). While much is known about excited-state proton transfer reactions (ESPT) in GFP occurring on ultrafast time scales, comparatively little is understood about the factors governing the rates and pathways of ground-state proton transfer. We have utilized a specific isotopic labeling strategy in combination with one-dimensional 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to install and monitor a 13C directly adjacent to the GFP chromophore ionization site. The chemical shift of this probe is highly sensitive to the protonation state of the chromophore, and the resulting spectra reflect the thermodynamics and kinetics of the proton transfer in the NMR line shapes. This information is complemented by time-resolved NMR, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and steady-state absorbance and fluorescence measurements to provide a picture of chromophore ionization reactions spanning a wide time domain. Our findings indicate that proton transfer in GFP is described well by a two-site model in which the chromophore is energetically coupled to a secondary site, likely the terminal proton acceptor of ESPT, Glu222. Additionally, experiments on a selection of GFP circular permutants suggest an important role played by the structural dynamics of the seventh ?-strand in gating proton transfer from bulk solution to the buried chromophore. PMID:25184668

  15. Heat transfer coefficients for staggered arrays of short pin fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    Short pin fins are often used to increase that heat transfer to the coolant in the trailing edge of a turbine blade. Due primarily to limits of casting technology, it is not possible to manufacture pins of optimum length for heat transfer purposes in the trailing edge region. In many cases the pins are so short that they actually decrease the total heat transfer surface area compared to a plain wall. A heat transfer data base for these short pins is not available in the literature. Heat transfer coefficients on pin and endwall surfaces were measured for several staggered arrays of short pin fins. The measured Nusselt numbers when plotted versus Reynolds numbers were found to fall on a single curve for all surfaces tested. The heat transfer coefficients for the short pin fins (length to diameter ratios of 1/2 and 2) were found to be about a factor of two lower than data from the literature for longer pin arrays (length to diameter ratios of about 8).

  16. Mass transfer in a 1370 C (2500 F) lithium thermal convection loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuermann, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental results from a test to evaluate interstitial element mass transfer effects on T-111, ASTAR 811C, and ASTAR 1211C after 5000 hours in flowing lithium at 1370 C (2500 F) are presented. No gross corrosion effects were observed. However, hafnium and nitrogen transfer to cooler regions within the loop were noted. Oxygen was in general removed from test specimens, but there was no evidence to indicate that it was a major factor in the mass transfer process. Carbon and hydrogen transfer were not detected.

  17. Technology transfer of NASA microwave remote sensing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akey, N. D.

    1981-01-01

    Viable techniques for effecting the transfer from NASA to a user agency of state-of-the-art airborne microwave remote sensing technology for oceanographic applications were studied. A detailed analysis of potential users, their needs and priorities; platform options; airborne microwave instrument candidates; ancillary instrumentation; and other, less obvious factors that must be considered were studied. Conclusions and recommendations for the development of an orderly and effective technology transfer of an airborne microwave system that could meet the specific needs of the selected user agencies are reported.

  18. Radiative Transfer Effects during Photoheating of the Intergalactic Medium

    E-print Network

    Tom Abel; Martin G. Haehnelt

    1999-03-06

    The thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) after reionization is to a large extent determined by photoheating. Here we demonstrate that calculations of the photoheating rate which neglect radiative transfer effects substantially underestimate the energy input during and after reionization. The neglect of radiative transfer effects results in temperatures of the IGM which are too low by a factor of two after HeII reionization. We briefly discuss implications for the absorption properties of the IGM and the distribution of baryons in shallow potential wells.

  19. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-29

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  20. Dynamical Treatment of Charge Transfer through Duplex Nucleic Acids Containing Modified Adenines

    PubMed Central

    Brancolini, Giorgia; Migliore, Agostino; Corni, Stefano; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Luque, F. Javier; Di Felice, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    We address the issue of whether chemical alterations of nucleobases are an effective tool to modulate charge transfer through DNA molecules. Our investigation uses a multi-level computational approach based on classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry. We find yet another evidence that structural fluctuations are a key factor to determine the electronic structure of double-stranded DNA. We argue that the electronic structure and charge transfer ability of flexible polymers is the result of a complex intertwining of various structural, dynamical and chemical factors. Chemical intuition may be used to design molecular wires, but this is not the sole component in the complex charge transfer mechanism through DNA. PMID:24060008

  1. Energy imparted, energy transferred, and net energy transferred

    SciTech Connect

    Attix, F.H.

    1983-01-01

    The ICRU-defined non-stochastic quantity absorbed dose is related to the stochastic quantity energy imparted. In the present paper the corresponding stochastic quantities energy transferred and net energy transferred are defined as precursors for kerma and collision kerma, respectively. This forms a rational fundamental framework for radiation dosimetry which facilitates its teaching and understanding. For neutrons collision kerma coincides with kerma, because the heavy secondaries do not lose significant energy by radiative processes (e.g., bremsstrahlung).

  2. Sources and Information on Transfer Associate Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayon, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides an annotated bibliography of articles about the effects of transfer associate degrees and related statewide transfer and articulation policies. It also provides links to transfer degree legislation in several states.

  3. 75 FR 49932 - Private Transfer Fee Covenants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Private Transfer Fee Covenants AGENCY: Federal Housing Finance Agency. ACTION: Notice of proposed guidance..., ``Guidance on Private Transfer Fee Covenants,'' to the Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae... properties encumbered by private transfer fee covenants. Such covenants appear adverse to...

  4. 7 CFR 982.456 - Interhandler transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Administrative...transfers. Each interhandler transfer of hazelnuts pursuant to § 982.56 (a) and... (c) Locations between which the hazelnuts were transferred; (d) Whether...

  5. 7 CFR 982.456 - Interhandler transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Administrative...transfers. Each interhandler transfer of hazelnuts pursuant to § 982.56 (a) and... (c) Locations between which the hazelnuts were transferred; (d) Whether...

  6. 7 CFR 982.456 - Interhandler transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Administrative...transfers. Each interhandler transfer of hazelnuts pursuant to § 982.56 (a) and... (c) Locations between which the hazelnuts were transferred; (d) Whether...

  7. 7 CFR 982.456 - Interhandler transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Administrative...transfers. Each interhandler transfer of hazelnuts pursuant to § 982.56 (a) and... (c) Locations between which the hazelnuts were transferred; (d) Whether...

  8. 7 CFR 982.456 - Interhandler transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Administrative...transfers. Each interhandler transfer of hazelnuts pursuant to § 982.56 (a) and... (c) Locations between which the hazelnuts were transferred; (d) Whether...

  9. 7 CFR 981.455 - Interhandler transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and...Interhandler transfers. (a) Transfers of almonds. Interhandler transfers of almonds pursuant to § 981.55 shall be reported...

  10. 7 CFR 981.455 - Interhandler transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and...Interhandler transfers. (a) Transfers of almonds. Interhandler transfers of almonds pursuant to § 981.55 shall be reported...

  11. 7 CFR 981.455 - Interhandler transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and...Interhandler transfers. (a) Transfers of almonds. Interhandler transfers of almonds pursuant to § 981.55 shall be reported...

  12. 7 CFR 981.455 - Interhandler transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Rules and...Interhandler transfers. (a) Transfers of almonds. Interhandler transfers of almonds pursuant to § 981.55 shall be reported...

  13. Transfer research and impact studies program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. E. (editor)

    1975-01-01

    Methods developed for stimulating interest in the transfer of NASA-originated technology are described. These include: new information packaging concepts; technology transfer via people transfer; information management systems; data bank operations; and professional communication activities.

  14. Detecting Highways of Horizontal Gene Transfer

    E-print Network

    Bansal, Mukul S.

    In a horizontal gene transfer (HGT) event, a gene is transferred between two species that do not have an ancestor-descendant relationship. Typically, no more than a few genes are horizontally transferred between any two ...

  15. Vrije Universiteit Brussel Technology Transfer Interface

    E-print Network

    Goelzer, Heiko

    Vrije Universiteit Brussel Technology Transfer Interface -connecting science and society- [for Prof. Hugo Thienpont More Information Technology Transfer Interface (TTI) Vrije Universiteit Brussel.interface@vub.ac.be - www.vubtechtransfer.be Vrije Universiteit Brussel Technology Transfer Interface -connecting science

  16. Variations in mass transfer to single endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Van Doormaal, Mark A; Zhang, Ji; Wada, Shigeo; Shaw, James E; Won, Doyon; Cybulsky, Myron I; Yip, Chris M; Ethier, C Ross

    2009-06-01

    Mass transfer between flowing blood and arterial mural cells (including vascular endothelial cells) may play an important role in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells are known to have an apical surface topography that is not flat, and hence mass transfer patterns to individual endothelial cells are likely affected by the local cellular topography. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between vascular endothelial cell surface topography and cellular level mass transfer. Confluent porcine endothelial monolayers were cultured under both shear and static conditions and atomic force microscopy was used to measure endothelial cell topography. Using finite element methods and the measured cell topography, flow and concentration fields were calculated for a typical, small, blood-borne solute. A relative Sherwood number was defined as the difference between the computed Sherwood number and that predicted by the Leveque solution for mass transfer over a flat surface: this eliminates the effects of axial location on mass transfer efficiency. The average intracellular relative Sherwood number range was found to be dependent on cell height and not dependent on cell elongation due to shear stress in culture. The mass flux to individual cells reached a maximum at the highest point on the endothelial cell surface, typically corresponding to the nucleus of the cell. Therefore, for small receptor-mediated solutes, increased solute uptake efficiency can be achieved by concentrating receptors near the nucleus. The main conclusion of the work is that although the rate of mass transfer varies greatly over an individual cell, the average mass transfer rate to a cell is close to that predicted for a flat cell. In comparison to other hemodynamic factors, the topography of endothelial cells therefore seems to have little effect on mass transfer rates and is likely physiologically insignificant. PMID:18568449

  17. From learning science to teaching science: What transfers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Danielle Boyd

    As educational researchers and teacher educators, we have the responsibility to help teachers gain the skills and knowledge necessary to provide meaningful learning activities for their students. For elementary school science, this means helping teachers create situations in which children can participate in the practices associated with scientific inquiry. Through the framework of transfer I investigated how a professional development course based on an inquiry-based physics curriculum influenced five elementary teachers teaching practices and identified the factors that led to or hindered this transfer. In this study, evidence of transfer consisted of episodes where the teachers used the ideas learned in the physics course to solve new problems such as transforming activities to be appropriate for their students and responding to unexpected students' ideas. The findings of this study highlight the many different ways that teachers use what they learn in content courses to teach science to elementary children. While some teachers transferred pedagogical practices along with the content, others transformed the content to be useful in already existing pedagogical frameworks, and still others show little or no evidence of transfer. What the teachers transferred depended upon their existing teaching context as well as their prior ideas about teaching science and physics content. Specifically, the findings of this study suggest that the teachers transferred only what they sought from the course. One implication of this study is that the sort of science training we provide teachers can affect far more than just the teachers' conceptual understanding of science and performance on written conceptual exams. Science courses have the potential to impact the sort of science education that K-5 children receive in elementary classrooms in terms of the topics taught but the way that science is represented. An additional implication is that teaching science to teachers in ways that help teachers consider how the content is useful in their classroom may facilitate transfer.

  18. Low Temperature and Modified Atmosphere: Hurdles for Antibiotic Resistance Transfer?

    PubMed

    Van Meervenne, Eva; Van Coillie, Els; Van Weyenberg, Stephanie; Boon, Nico; Herman, Lieve; Devlieghere, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Food is an important dissemination route for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Factors used during food production and preservation may contribute to the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes, but research on this subject is scarce. In this study, the effect of temperature (7 to 37°C) and modified atmosphere packaging (air, 50% CO2-50% N2, and 100% N2) on antibiotic resistance transfer from Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei to Listeria monocytogenes was evaluated. Filter mating was performed on nonselective agar plates with high-density inocula. A more realistic setup was created by performing modified atmosphere experiments on cooked ham using high-density and low-density inocula. Plasmid transfer was observed between 10 and 37°C, with plasmid transfer also observed at 7°C during a prolonged incubation period. When high-density inocula were used, transconjugants were detected, both on agar plates and cooked ham, under the three atmospheres (air, 50% CO2-50% N2, and 100% N2) at 7°C. This yielded a median transfer ratio (number of transconjugants/number of recipients) with an order of magnitude of 10(4) to 10(6). With low-density inocula, transfer was only detected under the 100% N2 atmosphere after 10-day incubation at 7°C, yielding a transfer ratio of 10(5). Under this condition, the highest bacterial density was obtained. The results indicate that low temperature and modified atmosphere packaging, two important hurdles in the food industry, do not necessarily prevent plasmid transfer from Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei to Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:26613914

  19. Risk Transfer Formula for Individual and Small Group Markets Under the Affordable Care Act

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Gregory C; Bachofer, Henry; Pearlman, Andrew; Kautter, John; Hunter, Elizabeth; Miller, Daniel; Keenan, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act provides for a program of risk adjustment in the individual and small group health insurance markets in 2014 as Marketplaces are implemented and new market reforms take effect. The purpose of risk adjustment is to lessen or eliminate the influence of risk selection on the premiums that plans charge. The risk adjustment methodology includes the risk adjustment model and the risk transfer formula. This article is the third of three in this issue of the Medicare & Medicaid Research Review that describe the ACA risk adjustment methodology and focuses on the risk transfer formula. In our first companion article, we discussed the key issues and choices in developing the methodology. In our second companion paper, we described the risk adjustment model that is used to calculate risk scores. In this article we present the risk transfer formula. We first describe how the plan risk score is combined with factors for the plan allowable premium rating, actuarial value, induced demand, geographic cost, and the statewide average premium in a formula that calculates transfers among plans. We then show how each plan factor is determined, as well as how the factors relate to each other in the risk transfer formula. The goal of risk transfers is to offset the effects of risk selection on plan costs while preserving premium differences due to factors such as actuarial value differences. Illustrative numerical simulations show the risk transfer formula operating as anticipated in hypothetical scenarios. PMID:25352994

  20. MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER

    E-print Network

    Lahey, Richard T.

    MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER "ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF FRACTAL and multiphase flow & heat transfer will be stressed. This paper will begin by reviewing some important concepts

  1. Radiation and combined heat transfer in channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tamonis, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents numerical methods of calculation of radiative and combined heat transfer in channel flows of radiating as well as nonradiating media. Results obtained in calculations for flow conditions of combustion products from organic fuel products are given and methods used in determining the spectral optical properties of molecular gases are analyzed. The book presents applications of heat transfer in solving problems. Topic covered are as follows: optical properties of molecular gases; transfer equations for combined heat transfer; experimental technique; convective heat transfer in heated gas flows; radiative heat transfer in gaseous media; combined heat transfer; and radiative and combined heat transfer in applied problems.

  2. Heat transfer, diffusion, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm

    1954-01-01

    Although it has long been known that the differential equations of the heat-transfer and diffusion processes are identical, application to technical problems has only recently been made. In 1916 it was shown that the speed of oxidation of the carbon in iron ore depends upon the speed with which the oxygen of the combustion air diffuses through the core of gas surrounding the carbon surface. The identity previously referred to was then used to calculate the amount of oxygen diffusing to the carbon surface on the basis of the heat transfer between the gas stream and the carbon surface. Then in 1921, H. Thoma reversed that procedure; he used diffusion experiments to determine heat-transfer coefficients. Recently Lohrisch has extended this work by experiment. A technically very important application of the identity of heat transfer and diffusion is that of the cooling tower, since in this case both processes occur simultaneously.

  3. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-print Network

    Walter, M.Todd

    Preparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Biomedical Engineering* Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering Information Science, Systems, & Technology Materials Science & Engineering Mechanical Engineering

  4. Heat-transfer thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.; Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal switch maintains temperature of planetary lander, within definite range, by transferring heat. Switch produces relatively large stroke and force, uses minimum electrical power, is lightweight, is vapor pressure actuated, and withstands sterilization temperatures without damage.

  5. Electrohydrodynamically enhanced condensation heat transfer 

    E-print Network

    Wawzyniak, Markus

    1993-01-01

    heat transfer both qualitatively and quantitatively. R- 1 13 is used as the working fluid. Based on visual observation for various sample electrode configurations the electrode design is optimized with respect to the amount of liquid extracted from...

  6. Power Transfer in Physical Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaeck, Jack A.

    1990-01-01

    Explores the power transfer using (1) a simple electric circuit consisting of a power source with internal resistance; (2) two different mechanical systems (gravity driven and constant force driven); (3) ecological examples; and (4) a linear motor. (YP)

  7. Technology Transfer Center | Careers & Training

    Cancer.gov

    Technology transfer is a growing field encompassing the convergence of research, innovation, and commercialization. In order to facilitate the growth of this field, several training and education opportunities are available.

  8. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  9. Technology Transfer Center | Other Resources

    Cancer.gov

    SKIP ALL NAVIGATION SKIP TO SUB MENU Search Site Standard Forms & Agreements Co-Development & Resources Careers & Training Intellectual Property & Inventions About TTC Overview NCI TTC Fellowship Program NIH Online Training Technology Transfer Education Other

  10. Tubing for augmented heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Yampolsky, J.S.; Pavlics, P.

    1983-08-01

    The objectives of the program reported were: to determine the heat transfer and friction characteristics on the outside of spiral fluted tubing in single phase flow of water, and to assess the relative cost of a heat exchanger constructed with spiral fluted tubing with one using conventional smooth tubing. An application is examined where an isolation water/water heat exchanger was used to transfer the heat from a gaseous diffusion plant to an external system for energy recovery. (LEW)

  11. Automatic computation of transfer functions

    DOEpatents

    Atcitty, Stanley; Watson, Luke Dale

    2015-04-14

    Technologies pertaining to the automatic computation of transfer functions for a physical system are described herein. The physical system is one of an electrical system, a mechanical system, an electromechanical system, an electrochemical system, or an electromagnetic system. A netlist in the form of a matrix comprises data that is indicative of elements in the physical system, values for the elements in the physical system, and structure of the physical system. Transfer functions for the physical system are computed based upon the netlist.

  12. Quantifying highly efficient incoherent energy transfer in perylene-based multichromophore arrays.

    PubMed

    Webb, James E A; Chen, Kai; Prasad, Shyamal K K; Wojciechowski, Jonathan P; Falber, Alexander; Thordarson, Pall; Hodgkiss, Justin M

    2016-01-21

    Multichromophore perylene arrays were designed and synthesized to have extremely efficient resonance energy transfer. Using broadband ultrafast photoluminescence and transient absorption spectroscopies, transfer timescales of approximately 1 picosecond were resolved, corresponding to efficiencies of up to 99.98%. The broadband measurements also revealed spectra corresponding to incoherent transfer between localized states. Polarization resolved spectroscopy was used to measure the dipolar angles between donor and acceptor chromophores, thereby enabling geometric factors to be fixed when assessing the validity of Förster theory in this regime. Förster theory was found to predict the correct magnitude of transfer rates, with measured ?2-fold deviations consistent with the breakdown of the point-dipole approximation at close approach. The materials presented, along with the novel methods for quantifying ultrahigh energy transfer efficiencies, will be valuable for applications demanding extremely efficient energy transfer, including fluorescent solar concentrators, optical gain, and photonic logic devices. PMID:26672731

  13. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body. PMID:26189698

  14. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body. PMID:26189698

  15. Sphere Drag and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhipeng; He, Boshu; Duan, Yuanyuan

    2015-07-01

    Modelling fluid flows past a body is a general problem in science and engineering. Historical sphere drag and heat transfer data are critically examined. The appropriate drag coefficient is proposed to replace the inertia type definition proposed by Newton. It is found that the appropriate drag coefficient is a desirable dimensionless parameter to describe fluid flow physical behavior so that fluid flow problems can be solved in the simple and intuitive manner. The appropriate drag coefficient is presented graphically, and appears more general and reasonable to reflect the fluid flow physical behavior than the traditional century old drag coefficient diagram. Here we present drag and heat transfer experimental results which indicate that there exists a relationship in nature between the sphere drag and heat transfer. The role played by the heat flux has similar nature as the drag. The appropriate drag coefficient can be related to the Nusselt number. This finding opens new possibilities in predicting heat transfer characteristics by drag data. As heat transfer for flow over a body is inherently complex, the proposed simple means may provide an insight into the mechanism of heat transfer for flow past a body.

  16. Transfer zones in listric normal fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Shamik

    Listric normal faults are common in passive margin settings where sedimentary units are detached above weaker lithological units, such as evaporites or are driven by basal structural and stratigraphic discontinuities. The geometries and styles of faulting vary with the types of detachment and form landward and basinward dipping fault systems. Complex transfer zones therefore develop along the terminations of adjacent faults where deformation is accommodated by secondary faults, often below seismic resolution. The rollover geometry and secondary faults within the hanging wall of the major faults also vary with the styles of faulting and contribute to the complexity of the transfer zones. This study tries to understand the controlling factors for the formation of the different styles of listric normal faults and the different transfer zones formed within them, by using analog clay experimental models. Detailed analyses with respect to fault orientation, density and connectivity have been performed on the experiments in order to gather insights on the structural controls and the resulting geometries. A new high resolution 3D laser scanning technology has been introduced to scan the surfaces of the clay experiments for accurate measurements and 3D visualizations. Numerous examples from the Gulf of Mexico have been included to demonstrate and geometrically compare the observations in experiments and real structures. A salt cored convergent transfer zone from the South Timbalier Block 54, offshore Louisiana has been analyzed in detail to understand the evolutionary history of the region, which helps in deciphering the kinematic growth of similar structures in the Gulf of Mexico. The dissertation is divided into three chapters, written in a journal article format, that deal with three different aspects in understanding the listric normal fault systems and the transfer zones so formed. The first chapter involves clay experimental models to understand the fault patterns in divergent and convergent transfer zones. Flat base plate setups have been used to build different configurations that would lead to approaching, normal offset and overlapping faults geometries. The results have been analyzed with respect to fault orientation, density, connectivity and 3D geometry from photographs taken from the three free surfaces and laser scans of the top surface of the clay cake respectively. The second chapter looks into the 3D structural analysis of the South Timbalier Block 54, offshore Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico with the help of a 3D seismic dataset and associated well tops and velocity data donated by ExxonMobil Corporation. This study involves seismic interpretation techniques, velocity modeling, cross section restoration of a series of seismic lines and 3D subsurface modeling using depth converted seismic horizons, well tops and balanced cross sections. The third chapter deals with the clay experiments of listric normal fault systems and tries to understand the controls on geometries of fault systems with and without a ductile substrate. Sloping flat base plate setups have been used and silicone fluid underlain below the clay cake has been considered as an analog for salt. The experimental configurations have been varied with respect to three factors viz. the direction of slope with respect to extension, the termination of silicone polymer with respect to the basal discontinuities and overlap of the base plates. The analyses for the experiments have again been performed from photographs and 3D laser scans of the clay surface.

  17. The treatment of normospermic infertility by gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT).

    PubMed

    Yovich, J L; Matson, P L; Blackledge, D G; Turner, S R; Richardson, P A; Yovich, J M; Edirisinghe, W R

    1988-04-01

    Gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT) was applied in 207 treatment cycles in 73 couples. The pregnancy rate in cycles with only one (2/21, 9.5%) or two (2/29, 6.9%) oocytes transferred was significantly less than that in which four oocytes (36/116, 31.0%) were replaced. The collection of more than four oocytes did not influence the pregnancy rate in that treatment cycle. The overall pregnancy rate was 24.2% (50 of 207) and was similar in the four infertility groups studied (non-occlusive tubal disorders, endometriosis, cervical factor and unexplained infertility) with 28 (56%) of the pregnancies delivered at greater than or equal to 20 weeks. The pregnancy wastage included 4 (8%) ectopic pregnancies and 3 (6%) late pregnancy losses. The 12 multiple pregnancies occurred following the transfer of three and four oocytes. PMID:3382609

  18. Forster energy transfer in chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Energy transfer properties of whole cells and chlorosome antenna complexes isolated from the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium limicola (containing bacteriochlorophyll c), Chlorobium vibrioforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll d) and Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll e) were measured. The spectral overlap of the major chlorosome pigment (bacteriochlorophyll c, d or, e) with the bacteriochlorophyll a B795 chlorosome baseplate pigment is greatest for bacteriochlorophyll c and smallest for bacteriochlorophyll e. The absorbance and fluorescence spectra of isolated chlorosomes were measured, fitted to gaussian curves and the overlap factors with B795 calculated. Energy transfer times from the bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e to B795 were measured in whole cells and the results interpreted in terms of the Forster theory of energy transfer.

  19. Targeting calcium cycling proteins in heart failure through gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    del Monte, Federica; Hajjar, Roger J

    2003-01-01

    Our understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling has improved significantly over the last 10 years. Furthermore, defects in the various steps of excitation-contraction coupling that characterize cardiac dysfunction have been identified in human and experimental models of heart failure. The various abnormalities in ionic channels, transporters, kinases and various signalling pathways collectively contribute to the ‘failing phenotype.’ However, deciphering the causative changes continues to be a challenge. An important tool in dissecting the importance of the various changes in heart failure has been the use of cardiac gene transfer. To achieve effective cardiac gene transfer a number of obstacles remain, including appropriate vectors for gene delivery, appropriate delivery systems, and a better understanding of the biology of the disease. In this review, we will examine our current understanding of these various factors. Gene transfer provides not only a potential therapeutic modality but also an approach to identifying and validating molecular targets. PMID:12509478

  20. Optimal filling factor of nanorod lenses for subwavelength imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kosulnikov, Sergey Yu.; Yankovskaya, Elizaveta A.; Maslovski, Stanislav I.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2011-12-15

    We analyze the effect of the filling factor on the imaging performance of metallic nanorod lenses. We observe that thicker nanorods allow lower reflection in the canalization regime and we find optimal values of the filling factor to achieve a transfer function with the characteristics of a perfect lens in a wide range of spatial frequencies.

  1. A 3D radiative transfer framework: II. line transfer problems

    E-print Network

    E. Baron; Peter H. Hauschildt

    2007-03-16

    Higher resolution telescopes as well as 3D numerical simulations will require the development of detailed 3D radiative transfer calculations. Building upon our previous work we extend our method to include both continuum and line transfer. We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in 3D static atmospheres. The scattering problem for line transfer is solved via means of an operator splitting (OS) technique. The formal solution is based on a long-characteristics method. The approximate $\\Lambda$ operator is constructed considering nearest neighbors {\\em exactly}. The code is parallelized over both wavelength and solid angle using the MPI library. We present the results of several test cases with different values of the thermalization parameter and two choices for the temperature structure. The results are directly compared to 1D spherical tests. With our current grid setup the interior resolution is much lower in 3D than in 1D, nevertheless the 3D results agree very well with the well-tested 1D calculations. We show that with relatively simple parallelization that the code scales to very large number of processors which is mandatory for practical applications. Advances in modern computers will make realistic 3D radiative transfer calculations possible in the near future. Our current code scales to very large numbers of processors, but requires larger memory per processor at high spatial resolution.

  2. Evaluation of Hose in Hose Transfer Line Service Life for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program

    SciTech Connect

    TORRES, T.D.

    2000-08-24

    RPP-6153, Engineering Task Plan for Hose-in-Hose Transfer System for the Interim Stabilization Program, defines the programmatic goals, functional requirements, and technical criteria for the development and subsequent installation of transfer line equipment to support Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program. RPP-6028, Specification for Hose in Hose Transfer Lines for Hanford's Interim Stabilization Program, has been issued to define the specific requirements for the design, manufacture, and verification of transfer line assemblies for specific waste transfer applications. Included in RPP-6028 are tables defining the chemical constituents of concern to which transfer lines will be exposed. Current Interim Stabilization Program planning forecasts that the at-grade transfer lines will be required to convey pumpable waste for as much as three years after commissioning. Prudent engineering dictates that the equipment placed in service have a working life in excess of this forecasted time period, with some margin to allow for future adjustments to the planned schedule. This document evaluates the effective service life of the Hose-in-Hose Transfer Lines, based on information submitted by the manufacturer and published literature. The effective service life of transfer line assemblies is a function of several factors. Foremost among these are process fluid characteristics, ambient environmental conditions, and the manufacturer's stated shelf life. This evaluation examines the manufacturer's certification of shelf life, the manufacturer's certifications of chemical compatibility with waste, and published literature on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on the mechanical properties of elastomeric materials to evaluate transfer line service life.

  3. Point-Form Analysis of Elastic Deuteron Form Factors

    E-print Network

    T. W. Allen; W. H. Klink; W. N. Polyzou

    2000-10-11

    Point-form relativistic quantum mechanics is applied to elastic electron-deuteron scattering. The deuteron is modeled using relativistic interactions that are scattering-equivalent to the nonrelativistic Argonne $v_{18}$ and Reid '93 interactions. A point-form spectator approximation (PFSA) is introduced to define a conserved covariant current in terms of single-nucleon form factors. The PFSA is shown to provide an accurate description of data up to momentum transfers of 0.5 ${\\rm GeV}^2$, but falls below the data at higher momentum transfers. Results are sensitive to the nucleon form factor parameterization chosen, particularly to the neutron electric form factor.

  4. Transfer of Aminonucleoside Nephrosis by Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, John R.; Ratte, Jean; Potter, Anne H.; Michael, Alfred F.

    1972-01-01

    The pathogenesis of aminonucleoside of puromycin (PA) nephrotic syndrome in rats was studied using renal transplantation to separate systemic from renal factors. The nephrotic syndrome was transferred by transplantation of kidneys from rats with established proteinuria. Bilaterally nephrectomized normal rats receiving kidneys removed as early as 15 min after intravenous PA injection (100 mg/kg) of donors also developed proteinuria (602±125 mg/24 hr) and a nephrotic syndrome after the usual induction period of 4-7 days observed in this disease. Arterial perfusion of isolated kidneys with PA (50 mg/kg) followed by perfusion with isotonic saline 3 min later and then transplantation to normal bilaterally nephrectomized rats led to a nephrotic syndrome. Urine protein excretion was 494±42 mg on the 7th day after transplantation. In contrast, urine protein excretion after transplantation of normal kidneys to normal bilaterally nephrectomized rats was 40±20 mg on the 7th day. Exposure of a normal kidney to a nephrotic host environment by transplantation of a normal kidney to a unilaterally nephrectomized PA-injected rat did not transfer the disease to the normal kidney. After removal of the nephrotic kidney 11-13 days after transplantation, proteinuria of the donor kidney was normal (21±13 mg on day 15). These studies indicate that pathogenesis of aminonucleoside nephrosis involves programming of the kidney directly by PA within minutes after exposure although increased urinary protein excretion does not occur until several days later. PMID:4560341

  5. Accumulative Tritium Transfer from Water into Biosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertner, Franz

    2005-07-15

    The energy balance of hydrogen isotopes in H bonds of water and biomolecules results in accumulative tritium transfer from water into biomolecules. Tests of DNA dissolved in tritiated water and of maize or barley hydroponically grown in tritiated water confirm the increase. The primary hydration shell of DNA shows an accumulation factor of {approx}1.4, and the exchangeable hydrogens inside DNA show {approx}2. Logistic growth analyses of maize and barley reveal the intrinsic growth rates of tritium 1.3 and 1.2 times larger than that of hydrogen. The higher rate of tritium than hydrogen incorporation in solid biomatter is caused by the hydration shells, which constitute an intrinsic component of biomolecules.

  6. Protein transfer to membranes upon shape deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagis, L. M. C.; Bijl, E.; Antono, L.; de Ruijter, N. C. A.; van Valenberg, H.

    2013-05-01

    Red blood cells, milk fat droplets, or liposomes all have interfaces consisting of lipid membranes. These particles show significant shape deformations as a result of flow. Here we show that these shape deformations can induce adsorption of proteins to the membrane. Red blood cell deformability is an important factor in several diseases involving obstructions of the microcirculatory system, and deformation induced protein adsorption will alter the rigidity of their membranes. Deformation induced protein transfer will also affect adsorption of cells onto implant surfaces, and the performance of liposome based controlled release systems. Quantitative models describing this phenomenon in biomaterials do not exist. Using a simple quantitative model, we provide new insight in this phenomenon. We present data that show convincingly that for cells or droplets with diameters upwards of a few micrometers, shape deformations induce adsorption of proteins at their interface even at moderate flow rates.

  7. Gene transfer rate from CL rice to diverse red rice biotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The future and sustainability of ClearfieldTM (CL) technology at the producers’ level will be dictated by various factors. Among many, prominent factors which affect the transfer of ALS-resistant gene from CL rice to red rice are: disparity in red rice biotypes and CL cultivars; flowering time of re...

  8. Brussels French "une fois": Transfer-Induced innovation or System-Internal Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treffers-Daller, Jeanine

    2005-01-01

    In language contact studies, specific features of the contact languages are often seen to be the result of transfer (interference), but it remains difficult to disentangle the role of intra-systemic and inter-systemic factors. We propose to unravel these factors in the analysis of a feature of Brussels French which many researchers attribute to…

  9. Design Considerations for Space Transfer Vehicles Using Solar Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emrich, William J.

    1995-01-01

    The economical deployment of satellites to high energy earth orbits is crucial to the ultimate success of this nations commerical space ventures and is highly desirable for deep space planetary missions requiring earth escape trajectories. Upper stage space transfer vehicles needed to accomplish this task should ideally be simple, robust, and highly efficient. In this regard, solar thermal propulsion is particularly well suited to those missions where high thrust is not a requirement. The Marshall Space Flight Center is , therefore, currently engaged in defining a transfer vehicle employing solar thermal propulsion capable of transferring a 1000 lb. payload from low Earth orbit (LEO) to a geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) using a Lockheed launch vehicle (LLV3) with three Castors and a large shroud. The current design uses liquid hydrogen as the propellant and employs two inflatable 16 x 24 feet eliptical off-axis parabolic solar collectors to focus sunlight onto a tungsten/rhenium windowless black body type absorber. The concentration factor on this design is projected to be approximately 1800:1 for the primary collector and 2.42:1 for the secondary collector for an overall concentration factor of nearly 4400:1. The engine, which is about twice as efficient as the best currently available chemical engines, produces two pounds of thrust with a specific impulse (Isp) of 860 sec. Transfer times to GEO are projected to be on the order of one month. The launch and deployed configurations of the solar thermal upper stage (STUS) are depicted.

  10. 31 CFR 306.100 - Transferable securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transferable securities. 306.100.... SECURITIES Transfer Through Judicial Proceedings § 306.100 Transferable securities. The Department will recognize valid judicial proceedings affecting the ownership of or interest in transferable securities,...

  11. Technology Transfer Center | Institutes Served By TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The Technology Transfer Center (TTC) provides technology transfer services to NCI. In addition, TTC is a designated Competitive Service Center (CSC) for technology transfer, offering to other NIH institutes a range of services from consultations to full technology transfer services. TTC serves the twelve institutes listed below.

  12. 7 CFR 331.16 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POSSESSION, USE, AND TRANSFER OF SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS § 331.16 Transfers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a select agent or toxin may only be transferred to an individual or entity registered to possess, use, or transfer that agent or toxin. A select...

  13. 7 CFR 331.16 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POSSESSION, USE, AND TRANSFER OF SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS § 331.16 Transfers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a select agent or toxin may only be transferred to an individual or entity registered to possess, use, or transfer that agent or toxin. A select...

  14. 42 CFR 73.16 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AND TOXINS § 73.16 Transfers. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section, a select agent or toxin may only be transferred to individuals or entities registered to possess, use, or transfer that agent or toxin. A select agent or toxin may only be transferred under the conditions of...

  15. 42 CFR 73.16 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AND TOXINS § 73.16 Transfers. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section, a select agent or toxin may only be transferred to individuals or entities registered to possess, use, or transfer that agent or toxin. A select agent or toxin may only be transferred under the conditions of...

  16. 7 CFR 331.16 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POSSESSION, USE, AND TRANSFER OF SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS § 331.16 Transfers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a select agent or toxin may only be transferred to an individual or entity registered to possess, use, or transfer that agent or toxin. A select...

  17. 7 CFR 331.16 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POSSESSION, USE, AND TRANSFER OF SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS § 331.16 Transfers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a select agent or toxin may only be transferred to an individual or entity registered to possess, use, or transfer that agent or toxin. A select...

  18. 42 CFR 73.16 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AND TOXINS § 73.16 Transfers. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section, a select agent or toxin may only be transferred to individuals or entities registered to possess, use, or transfer that agent or toxin. A select agent or toxin may only be transferred under the conditions of...

  19. 7 CFR 331.16 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POSSESSION, USE, AND TRANSFER OF SELECT AGENTS AND TOXINS § 331.16 Transfers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (c) of this section, a select agent or toxin may only be transferred to an individual or entity registered to possess, use, or transfer that agent or toxin. A select...

  20. 42 CFR 73.16 - Transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND TOXINS § 73.16 Transfers. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section, a select agent or toxin may only be transferred to individuals or entities registered to possess, use, or transfer that agent or toxin. A select agent or toxin may only be transferred under the conditions of...

  1. 49 CFR 193.2513 - Transfer procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2513 Transfer procedures. (a) Each transfer of LNG or other... warming will not result in overfilling or overpressure; (4) When making bulk transfer of LNG into a... gravity between the LNG being transferred and the LNG already in the container and, if necessary,...

  2. 49 CFR 193.2513 - Transfer procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2513 Transfer procedures. (a) Each transfer of LNG or other... warming will not result in overfilling or overpressure; (4) When making bulk transfer of LNG into a... gravity between the LNG being transferred and the LNG already in the container and, if necessary,...

  3. 49 CFR 193.2513 - Transfer procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Operations § 193.2513 Transfer procedures. (a) Each transfer of LNG or other... warming will not result in overfilling or overpressure; (4) When making bulk transfer of LNG into a... gravity between the LNG being transferred and the LNG already in the container and, if necessary,...

  4. Strategic directions and mechanisms in technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackin, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An outline summarizing the Working Panel discussion related to strategic directions for technology transfer is presented. Specific topics addressed include measuring success, management of technology, innovation and experimentation in the tech transfer process, integration of tech transfer into R&D planning, institutionalization of tech transfer, and policy/legislative resources.

  5. Software engineering technology transfer: Understanding the process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1993-01-01

    Technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this report, the mechanisms developed by NASA to transfer technology are explored and the actual mechanisms used to transfer software development technologies are investigated. Time, cost, and effectiveness of software engineering technology transfer is reported.

  6. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    David Hamilton

    2004-12-31

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p (~ 0 ~ p) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  7. Transferring the know-how to foreign regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, A.M.; Didyk, J.P.

    1996-08-01

    Training of regulatory personnel is becoming as important as training of operators and managers of nuclear facilities to ensure the safety of workers, the public and the environment. From a safety culture viewpoint, regulatory staff should acquire predetermined levels of knowledge and skills which would enable them to evaluate safety and assess compliance to standards, regulations, and license conditions. Training, however, becomes more challenging when this know-how is transferred to foreign regulators. This paper presents the means, methodology and factors to be considered in the development and delivery of training programs to foreign regulatory staff. Among many, two particular factors are dominant: how to ensure that the know-how is transferred, as intended, to an audience that cannot effectively communicate orally in the language of the instructor/facilitator, and having acknowledged this drawback, how to stimulate meaningful discussions and feedback.

  8. Cash transfer in Brazil and nutritional outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana Paula Bortoletto; Canella, Daniela Silva; Baraldi, Larissa Galastri; Monteiro, Carlos Augusto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the influence of conditional cash transfer programs on diet and nutrition outcomes among beneficiary families in Brazil. METHODS A systematic review of literature was carried out with original evaluation studies conducted in Brazil, including all types of clinical trials and observational studies. The search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and LILACS databases for papers published since 1990. The studies were analyzed according to the program evaluated, participants, study design, location, principal conclusions, confounding factors and methodological limitations. They were classified according to outcomes (nutritional status, dietary intake and food security) and level of evidence for the association with conditional cash transfer programs (adequacy or plausibility). RESULTS We found 1,412 non-duplicated papers. Fifteen met the eligibility criteria and twelve evaluated the Bolsa Família program. Five plausibility studies and two adequacy analyses indicated a positive influence of conditional cash transfer programs on nutritional status of the beneficiary children. The conditional cash transfer programs influence on dietary intake was analyzed in one population-based adequacy study and three cross-sectionals plausibility researches in different municipalities. All of them indicated that beneficiaries had higher food intake than non-beneficiaries. The three cross-sectional plausibility analyses suggest a positive influence of conditional cash transfer programs on the food security of the beneficiaries. The main methodological limitations found were using cross-sectional analysis and difficulties in data collection, small sample sizes and limitations of the instruments used. CONCLUSIONS The few studies found indicated a positive association between Brazilian conditional cash transfer programs and improvements in the recipients' diet and nutrition. Greater efforts to widen and qualify evaluations are needed in order to assess more comprehensively the impact of conditional cash transfer programs in Brazil. PMID:24626554

  9. Flow and heat transfer enhancement in tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of heat exchangers can be improved to perform a certain heat-transfer duty by heat transfer enhancement techniques. Enhancement techniques can be divided into two categories: passive and active. Active methods require external power, such as electric or acoustic field, mechanical devices, or surface vibration, whereas passive methods do not require external power but make use of a special surface geometry or fluid additive which cause heat transfer enhancement. The majority of commercially interesting enhancement techniques are passive ones. This paper presents a review of published works on the characteristics of heat transfer and flow in finned tube heat exchangers of the existing patterns. The review considers plain, louvered, slit, wavy, annular, longitudinal, and serrated fins. This review can be indicated by the status of the research in this area which is important. The comparison of finned tubes heat exchangers shows that those with slit, plain, and wavy finned tubes have the highest values of area goodness factor while the heat exchanger with annular fin shows the lowest. A better heat transfer coefficient ha is found for a heat exchanger with louvered finned and thus should be regarded as the most efficient one, at fixed pumping power per heat transfer area. This study points out that although numerous studies have been conducted on the characteristics of flow and heat transfer in round, elliptical, and flat tubes, studies on some types of streamlined-tubes shapes are limited, especially on wing-shaped tubes (Sayed Ahmed et al. in Heat Mass Transf 50: 1091-1102, 2014; in Heat Mass Transf 51: 1001-1016, 2015). It is recommended that further detailed studies via numerical simulations and/or experimental investigations should be carried out, in the future, to put further insight to these fin designs.

  10. Nanofluid impingement jet heat transfer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Experimental investigation to study the heat transfer between a vertical round alumina-water nanofluid jet and a horizontal circular round surface is carried out. Different jet flow rates, jet nozzle diameters, various circular disk diameters and three nanoparticles concentrations (0, 6.6 and 10%, respectively) are used. The experimental results indicate that using nanofluid as a heat transfer carrier can enhance the heat transfer process. For the same Reynolds number, the experimental data show an increase in the Nusselt numbers as the nanoparticle concentration increases. Size of heating disk diameters shows reverse effect on heat transfer. It is also found that presenting the data in terms of Reynolds number at impingement jet diameter can take into account on both effects of jet heights and nozzle diameter. Presenting the data in terms of Peclet numbers, at fixed impingement nozzle diameter, makes the data less sensitive to the percentage change of the nanoparticle concentrations. Finally, general heat transfer correlation is obtained verses Peclet numbers using nanoparticle concentrations and the nozzle diameter ratio as parameters. PMID:22340669

  11. Auroral resonance line radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gladstone, G.R. )

    1992-02-01

    A model is developed for simulating the two-dimensional radiative transfer of resonance line emissions in auroras. The method of solution utilizes Fourier decomposition of the horizontal dependence in the intensity field so that the two-dimensional problem becomes a set of one-dimensional problems having different horizontal wavenumbers. The individual one-dimensional problems are solved for using a Feautrier-type solution of the differential-integral form of the radiative transfer equation. In the limit as the horizontal wavenumber becomes much larger than the local line-center extinction coefficient, the scattering integral becomes considerably simplified, and the final source function is evaluated in closed form. The two-dimensional aspects of the model are tested against results for nonresonance radiative transfer studies, and the resonance line part of the model is tested against results of existing plane-parallel resonance line radiative transfer codes. Finally, the model is used to simulate the intensity field of O{sub I} 1,304{angstrom} for hard and soft auroras of various Gaussian horizontal widths. The results demonstrate the importance of considering the effects of two-dimensional radiative transfer when analyzing auroral resonance line data.

  12. Mass transfer from giant donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovskii, K.; Ivanova, N.

    2015-06-01

    The stability of mass transfer in binaries with convective giant donors remains an open question in modern astrophysics. There is a significant discrepancy between what the existing methods predict for a response to mass-loss of the giant itself, as well as for the mass-transfer rate during the Roche lobe overflow. Here we show that the recombination energy in the superadiabatic layer plays an important and hitherto unaccounted-for role in the donor's response to mass-loss, in particular on its luminosity and effective temperature. Our improved optically thick nozzle method to calculate the mass-transfer rate via L1 allows us to evolve binary systems for a substantial Roche lobe overflow. We propose a new, strengthened criterion for the mass-transfer instability, basing it on whether the donor experiences overflow through its outer Lagrangian point. We find that with the new criterion, if the donor has a well-developed outer convective envelope, the critical initial mass ratio for which a binary would evolve stably through the conservative mass transfer varies from 1.5 to 2.2, which is about twice as large as previously believed. In underdeveloped giants with shallow convective envelopes, this critical ratio may be even larger. When the convective envelope is still growing, and in particular for most cases of massive donors, the critical mass ratio gradually decreases to this value, from that of radiative donors.

  13. Radiation and combined heat transfer in channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tamonis, M.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a concise, practical treatment of numerical methods of calculation for radiative and combined (convection and conduction) heat transfer -- encompassing channel flows of radiating and nonradiating media. The volume offers results from calculations for various flow conditions, and analyzes methods used in determining the spectral optical properties of molecular gases. Topics considered include optical properties of molecular gases, transfer equations for combined heat transfer, experimental techniques, convective heat transfer in heat gas flows, radiative heat transfer in gaseous media, combined heat transfer, and radiative and combined heat transfer in applied problems.

  14. Measurement of thermoacoustic convection heat transfer phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parang, M.; Salah-Eddine, A.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper the results of an experimental investigation of thermoacoustic convection (TAC) heat transfer phenomenon in both zero-gravity and gravity environment are presented and compared with pure conduction heat transfer. The numerical solutions of the governing equations obtained by others for TAC heat transfer phenomenon are also discussed. The experimental results show that for rapid heating rate at a boundary, the contribution of TAC heat transfer to a gas could be significantly (one order of magnitude) higher than heat transfer rate from pure conduction. The results also show significantly reduced transient time in heat transfer processes involving thermoacoustic convective heat transfer mode in both space and gravity environment.

  15. REFLECTIONS ON THE TWO-STATE ELECTRON TRANSFER MODEL.

    SciTech Connect

    Brunschwig, B.S.

    2000-01-12

    There is general agreement that the two most important factors determining electron transfer rates in solution are the degree of electronic interaction between the donor and acceptor sites, and the changes in the nuclear configurations of the donor, acceptor, and surrounding medium that occur upon the gain or loss of an electron Ll-51. The electronic interaction of the sites will be very weak, and the electron transfer slow, when the sites are far apart or their interaction is symmetry or spin forbidden. Since electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion, energy conservation requires that, prior to the actual electron transfer, the nuclear configurations of the reactants and the surrounding medium adjust from their equilibrium values to a configuration (generally) intermediate between that of the reactants and products. In the case of electron transfer between , two metal complexes in a polar solvent, the nuclear configuration changes involve adjustments in the metal-ligand and intraligand bond lengths and angles, and changes in the orientations of the surrounding solvent molecules. In common with ordinary chemical reactions, an electron transfer reaction can then be described in terms of the motion of the system on an energy surface from the reactant equilibrium configuration (initial state) to the product equilibrium configuration (final state) via the activated complex (transition state) configuration.

  16. Calibration of a resonance energy transfer imaging system.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, M; Hensel, N F; Hartzman, R J

    1992-01-01

    A quantitative technique for the nondestructive visualization of nanometer scale intermolecular separations in a living system is described. A calibration procedure for the acquisition and analysis of resonance energy transfer (RET) image data is outlined. The factors limiting RET imaging of biological samples are discussed. Measurements required for the calibration include: (a) the spectral sensitivity of the image intensifier (or camera); (b) the transmission spectra of the emission filters; and (c) the quantum distribution functions of the energy transfer pair measured in situ. Resonance energy transfer imaging is demonstrated for two DNA specific dyes. The Förster critical distance for energy transfer between Hoechst 33342 (HO) and acridine orange (AO) is 4.5 +/- 0.7 nm. This distance is slightly greater than the distance of a single turn of the DNA helix (3.5 nm or approximately 10 base pairs), and is well below the optical diffraction limit. Timed sequences of intracellular energy transfer reveal nuclear structure, strikingly similar to that observed with confocal and electron microscopy, and may show the spatial distribution of eu- and hetero- chromatin in the interphase nuclei. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:1581499

  17. Plugging in or going wireless: strategies for interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena

    2014-01-01

    Interspecies exchange of electrons enables a diversity of microbial communities to gain energy from reactions that no one microbe can catalyze. The first recognized strategies for interspecies electron transfer were those that relied on chemical intermediates that are recycled through oxidized and reduced forms. Well-studied examples are interspecies H2 transfer and the cycling of sulfur intermediates in anaerobic photosynthetic communities. Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in which two species establish electrical contact is an alternative. Electrical contacts documented to date include electrically conductive pili, as well as conductive iron minerals and conductive carbon moieties such as activated carbon and biochar. Interspecies electron transfer is central to the functioning of methane-producing microbial communities. The importance of interspecies H2 transfer in many methanogenic communities is clear, but under some circumstances DIET predominates. It is expected that further mechanistic studies and broadening investigations to a wider range of environments will help elucidate the factors that favor specific forms of interspecies electron exchange under different environmental conditions. PMID:24904551

  18. Missing Modality Transfer Learning via Latent Low-Rank Constraint.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhengming; Shao, Ming; Fu, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Transfer learning is usually exploited to leverage previously well-learned source domain for evaluating the unknown target domain; however, it may fail if no target data are available in the training stage. This problem arises when the data are multi-modal. For example, the target domain is in one modality, while the source domain is in another. To overcome this, we first borrow an auxiliary database with complete modalities, then consider knowledge transfer across databases and across modalities within databases simultaneously in a unified framework. The contributions are threefold: 1) a latent factor is introduced to uncover the underlying structure of the missing modality from the known data; 2) transfer learning in two directions allows the data alignment between both modalities and databases, giving rise to a very promising recovery; and 3) an efficient solution with theoretical guarantees to the proposed latent low-rank transfer learning algorithm. Comprehensive experiments on multi-modal knowledge transfer with missing target modality verify that our method can successfully inherit knowledge from both auxiliary database and source modality, and therefore significantly improve the recognition performance even when test modality is inaccessible in the training stage. PMID:26241972

  19. Human Factors in Cabin Accident Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chute, Rebecca D.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Human factors has become an integral part of the accident investigation protocol. However, much of the investigative process remains focussed on the flight deck, airframe, and power plant systems. As a consequence, little data has been collected regarding the human factors issues within and involving the cabin during an accident. Therefore, the possibility exists that contributing factors that lie within that domain may be overlooked. The FAA Office of Accident Investigation is sponsoring a two-day workshop on cabin safety accident investigation. This course, within the workshop, will be of two hours duration and will explore relevant areas of human factors research. Specifically, the three areas of discussion are: Information transfer and resource management, fatigue and other physical stressors, and the human/machine interface. Integration of these areas will be accomplished by providing a suggested checklist of specific cabin-related human factors questions for investigators to probe following an accident.

  20. Trophic transfer of amphiphilic polymer coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots to Danio rerio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewinski, Nastassja A.; Zhu, Huiguang; Ouyang, Clare R.; Conner, George P.; Wagner, Daniel S.; Colvin, Vicki L.; Drezek, Rebekah A.

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the trophic transfer of nanomaterials along the food chain, we examined the potential trophic transfer and biomagnification of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in a simple freshwater food chain. Our results indicate that QDs can transfer from zooplankton to Danio rerio (zebrafish) by dietary exposure. No significant biomagnification of QDs was observed and the biomagnification factors for both adult and juvenile zebrafish were both less than one (0.04 and 0.004 respectively). The assimilation efficiency was 8% and 4% for adult and juvenile zebrafish respectively. This study is the first to examine the potential food chain transfer and biomagnification of QDs from zooplankton to zebrafish.To investigate the trophic transfer of nanomaterials along the food chain, we examined the potential trophic transfer and biomagnification of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in a simple freshwater food chain. Our results indicate that QDs can transfer from zooplankton to Danio rerio (zebrafish) by dietary exposure. No significant biomagnification of QDs was observed and the biomagnification factors for both adult and juvenile zebrafish were both less than one (0.04 and 0.004 respectively). The assimilation efficiency was 8% and 4% for adult and juvenile zebrafish respectively. This study is the first to examine the potential food chain transfer and biomagnification of QDs from zooplankton to zebrafish. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10319a