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Sample records for soil-to-plant transfer factor

  1. Soil-to-plant transfer factors for radiocesium and radiostrontium in agricultural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nisbet, A.F.; Woodman, R.F.M.

    2000-03-01

    A database of soil-to-plant transfer factors for radiocesium and radiostrontium has been compiled for arable crops from published and unpublished sources. The database is more extensive than previous compilations of data published by the International Union of Radioecologists, containing new information for Scandinavia and Greece in particular. It also contains ancillary data on important soil characteristics. The database is sub-divided into 28 soil-crop combinations, covering four soil types and seven crop groups. Statistical analyses showed that transfer factors for radiocesium could not generally be predicted as a function of climatic region, type of experiment, age of contamination, or silt characteristics. However, significant relationships accounting for more than 30% of the variability in transfer factor were identified between transfer factors for radiostrontium and soil pH/organic matter status for a few soil-crop combinations. Best estimate transfer factors for radiocesium and radiostrontium were calculated for 28 soil-crop combinations, based on their geometric means: only the edible parts were considered. To predict the likely value of future individual transfer factors, 95% confidence intervals were also derived. A comparison of best estimate transfer factors derived in this study with recommended values published by the International Union of Radioecologists in 1989 and 1992 was made for comparable soil-crop groupings. While there were no significant differences between the best estimate values derived in this study and the 1992 data, radiological assessments that still use 1989 data may be unnecessarily cautious.

  2. Transfer factors of natural radionuclides and (137)Cs from soil to plants used in traditional medicine in central Serbia.

    PubMed

    Djelic, Gorica; Krstic, Dragana; Stajic, Jelena M; Milenkovic, Biljana; Topuzovic, Marina; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Vucic, Dusica; Zeremski, Tijana; Stankovic, Milan; Kostic, Dragana

    2016-07-01

    Transfer factors of natural radionuclides and (137)Cs from soil to plants used in traditional medicine were determined. The transfer factors (TF) were calculated as Bq kg(-1) of dry plant per Bq kg(-1) of dry soil. Mass activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs in soil and plant samples were measured with high purity germanium detector (HPGe). The concentrations of As, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined, as well as the cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the content of exchangeable cations (Ca, Mg, K, Na). Wide ranges of values were obtained for all the metals, especially for Cr and Ni. The Absalom model was used for determination of the amount of (137)Cs transferred from soil to plant based on soil characteristics such as pH, exchangeable potassium, humus and clay contents. The estimated transfer factors were in the range from 0.011 to 0.307 with an arithmetic mean of 0.071, median of 0.050, geometric mean of 0.053 and geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.08. This value agreed well with that calculated from the measurements of 0.069, geometric mean 0.040 and GSD 3.19. Correlations between radionuclides, metals, physicochemical properties and transfer factors were determined by Spearman correlation coefficient. There was a strong positive correlation between (137)Cs transfer factor and the ratio of transfer factor for K and (137)Cs. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was performed in order to identify some pattern of data. PMID:27082759

  3. Variability of the soil-to-plant radiocaesium transfer factor for Japanese soils predicted with soil and plant properties.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Shinichiro; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Sweeck, Lieve; Van Hees, May; Wannijn, Jean; Smolders, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Food chain contamination with radiocaesium (RCs) in the aftermath of the Fukushima accident calls for an analysis of the specific factors that control the RCs transfer. Here, soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF) of RCs for grass were predicted from the potassium concentration in soil solution (mK) and the Radiocaesium Interception Potential (RIP) of the soil using existing mechanistic models. The mK and RIP were (a) either measured for 37 topsoils collected from the Fukushima accident affected area or (b) predicted from the soil clay content and the soil exchangeable potassium content using the models that had been calibrated for European soils. An average ammonium concentration was used throughout in the prediction. The measured RIP ranged 14-fold and measured mK varied 37-fold among the soils. The measured RIP was lower than the RIP predicted from the soil clay content likely due to the lower content of weathered micas in the clay fraction of Japanese soils. Also the measured mK was lower than that predicted. As a result, the predicted TFs relying on the measured RIP and mK were, on average, about 22-fold larger than the TFs predicted using the European calibrated models. The geometric mean of the measured TFs for grass in the affected area (N = 82) was in the middle of both. The TFs were poorly related to soil classification classes, likely because soil fertility (mK) was obscuring the effects of the soil classification related to the soil mineralogy (RIP). This study suggests that, on average, Japanese soils are more vulnerable than European soils at equal soil clay and exchangeable K content. The affected regions will be targeted for refined model validation. PMID:26717351

  4. Bioavailability and soil-to-plant transfer factors as indicators of potentially toxic element contamination in agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Paola; Iavazzo, Pietro; Albanese, Stefano; Agrelli, Diana; De Vivo, Benedetto; Lima, Annamaria

    2014-12-01

    Soil pollution in agricultural lands poses a serious threat to food safety, and suggests the need for consolidated methods providing advisory indications for soil management and crop production. In this work, the three-step extraction procedure developed by the EU Measurement and Testing Programme and two soil-to-plant transfer factors (relative to total and bioavailable concentration of elements in soil) were applied on polluted agricultural soils from southern Italy to obtain information on the retention mechanisms of metals in soils and on their level of translocation to edible vegetables. The study was carried out in the Sarno river plain of Campania, an area affected by severe environmental degradation potentially impacting the health of those consuming locally produced vegetables. Soil samples were collected in 36 locations along the two main rivers flowing into the plain. In 11 sites, lettuce plants were collected at the normal stage of consumption. According to Italian environmental law governing residential soils, and on the basis of soil background reference values for the study area, we found diffuse pollution by Be, Sn and Tl, of geogenic origin, Cr and Cu from anthropogenic sources such as tanneries and intensive agriculture, and more limited pollution by Pb, Zn and V. It was found that metals polluting soils as a result of human activities were mainly associated to residual, oxidizable and reducible phases, relatively immobile and only potentially bioavailable to plants. By contrast, the essential elements Zn and Cu showed a tendency to become more readily mobile and bioavailable as their total content in soil increased and were more easily transported to the edible parts of lettuce than other pollutants. According to our results, current soil pollution in the studied area does not affect the proportion of metals taken up by lettuce plants and there is a limited health risk incurred. PMID:25217740

  5. Study on the radioactivity and soil-to-plant transfer factor of (226)Ra, (234)U and (238)U radionuclides in irrigated farms from the northwestern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F; Alkhomashi, N; Almasoud, Fahad I

    2016-08-01

    The present study addresses the soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) of (226)Ra, (234)U and (238)U for 13 types of vegetables and agricultural crops planted under semi-arid environment in the northwestern part of Saudi Arabia. Crop plants along with plant-growing soils were collected from selected farms, which are irrigated from the non-renewable Saq aquifer, and investigated for their radioactivity content by means of alpha spectrometry after applying a radiochemical separation procedure. Hence, TF data for plant roots, green parts (stem and leaves) and fruits were calculated and contrasted to those reported in the literature. Substantial differences were observed in the TFs of Ra and U radioisotopes among plant species. In crop fruits, eggplant exhibited the highest uptake of (226)Ra (TF value of 0.11), while beans (0.16) have the highest TF for (234)U and (238)U. The geometric mean TF values indicated that the crop roots tend to accumulate Ra and U about four to six-folds higher than fruits. The relation between TF values and soil concentrations showed a weak correlation. Activity ratios between radionuclides in crop plants indicated the preferential translocation of U in fruits than Ra even though Ra is more available for root uptake. The fruit/root (F/R) ratios obtained for the investigated plants shown that pepper had the smallest F/R ratios (0.07 ± 0.01, 0.12 ± 0.02 and 0.11 ± 0.02 for (226)Ra, (234)U and (238)U, respectively), while the highest F/R ratios were observed in potatoes (0.71 ± 0.15, 0.44 ± 0.10 and 0.40 ± 0.08 for (226)Ra, (234)U and (238)U, respectively). The TF and F/R ratios data of natural radionuclides in the study region can hopefully improve the scientific knowledge for future studies. PMID:27108351

  6. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of radioactive Ca, Sm and Pd isotopes: critical assessment of the use of analogies to derive best-estimates from existing non-specific data.

    PubMed

    Henner, Pascale; Hurtevent, Pierre; Thiry, Yves

    2014-10-01

    (45)Ca, (151)Sm and (107)Pd are three radionuclides present in low to intermediate in activity radioactive wastes for which no soil-to-plant Transfer Factors (TF) values are available to be used in biosphere models for Ecological Risk Assessment. In the absence of specific radioecological studies, this work reviews and analyzes the existing literature for stable isotopes of Pd, Sm and Ca in order to derive best estimates for TF values that could be used as Transfer Factors. Alternative methods of extrapolation are also critically assessed. The values have been classified according to climatic zone, plant class and soil type for each element. The overall geometric mean TF values (for all plants and conditions) was calculated as 8.4E-02 for Pd, for which the value of radioRu in TRS-472 is also available. The mean TF for Sm was 4.2E-04. This value was lower than the TF values for radioactive Ce that are proposed as alternative values for Sm in TRS-472. The former may be relevant for long term assessments and the latter could possibly used to describe the short term (151)Sm post-release behaviour. The mean value for Ca is 2.3E-01 but varies considerably among plants of a given class due to the variety of plant Ca uptake behaviors. Alternatively, to limit this variability, Ca data content for dry plant matter, as analyzed using the phylogenetic method, could be used to derive TF values if the conservation of isotopic ratio of (45)Ca to stable Ca in soils and in plants hypothesis is taken into account. The TF for Ca in sub-tropical zones is 10-fold lower than in temperate zones. There is a lot of data available about exchangeable Ca in soil, which mean that we could calculate an available TF. The analysis shows that Ca bioavailability is also a key factor within transfer. PMID:24956582

  7. [Research advances in iron and zinc transfer from soil to plant in intercropping systems].

    PubMed

    Xia, Hai-yong; Xue, Yan-fang; Meng, Wei-wei; Yu, Li-min; Liu, Ling-yan; Zhang, Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Intercropping facilitates the efficient utilization of land, light, water and nutrients. It is, therefore, important to increase the biodiversity of farmland and to develop sustainable ecological agriculture in both theory and practice. Intercropping helps improve the mobilization and uptake of soil iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) and corresponding nutritional status in the plants, thus achieving grain micronutrient biofortification. In this review, phenomena of the improvement of Fe and Zn nutrition in dicotyledonous plants as affected by intercropping with gramineous plants (e.g. maize/peanut intercropping) were summarized. Moreover, the possible mechanisms in relation to interspecific rhizosphere molecular and physiological processes, as well as the changes in interspecific root morphology and distribution and microorganisms in the rhizosphere were elucidated. The accumulation, transfer and distribution of Fe and Zn in the plants in intercropping systems were also reviewed. The possible affecting factors on nutrients of Fe and Zn were analyzed. Based on the present advances in the mobilization and acquisition of soil Fe and Zn, and their accumulation and distribution in plants as well as the related management and environment influence factors, some new research questions were pointed out. Quantitative analysis, dynamic and systemic researches and field studies on Fe and Zn transfer from soil to plant in intercropping systems should be strengthened in the future. PMID:26259472

  8. Accumulation and soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides in the Nile Delta coastal black sand habitats.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, A K; Emam, M H

    2011-02-01

    The radionuclide content was estimated in the soil of three black sand habitats in the Mediterranean coast of Egypt, namely, sand mounds and coastal sand planes and dunes. In addition, a total of 14 heavy minerals found in the soils were characterized. The soil to plant transfer of uranium and thorium was tested on three black sand species, namely, Cakile maritima Scop., Senecio glaucus L. and Rumex Pictus Forssk. The transfer of thorium and uranium radionuclides from the soil to plant is complex process that is subjected to many variables; among which are the organic matter and clay content of the soil, the type of radionuclides and plant species. The study revealed a strong negative relationship between uranium and thorium uptake by S. glaucus and R. pictus and the clay and organic matter content of soil. Concentration of thorium in the soil has a negative correlation with soil-to-plant transfer factor. The study results suggest the possibility of using black sand species for phytoremediation of soils contaminated with radioactive elements. The potentiality of S. glaucus as phytoremediator of radionuclides polluted soils is greater than R. pictus which in turn outweigh C. maritima. PMID:21598782

  9. Nonlinear transfer of elements from soil to plants: impact on radioecological modeling.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Tiina S; Kolehmainen, Mikko; Roivainen, Päivi; Kumlin, Timo; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2016-08-01

    In radioecology, transfer of radionuclides from soil to plants is typically described by a concentration ratio (CR), which assumes linearity of transfer with soil concentration. Nonlinear uptake is evidenced in many studies, but it is unclear how it should be taken into account in radioecological modeling. In this study, a conventional CR-based linear model, a nonlinear model derived from observed uptake into plants, and a new simple model based on the observation that nonlinear uptake leads to a practically constant concentration in plant tissues are compared. The three models were used to predict transfer of (234)U, (59)Ni and (210)Pb into spruce needles. The predictions of the nonlinear and the new model were essentially similar. In contrast, plant radionuclide concentration was underestimated by the linear model when the total element concentration in soil was relatively low, but within the range commonly observed in nature. It is concluded that the linear modeling could easily be replaced by a new approach that more realistically reflects the true processes involved in the uptake of elements into plants. The new modeling approach does not increase the complexity of modeling in comparison with CR-based linear models, and data needed for model parameters (element concentrations) are widely available. PMID:27262316

  10. Soil to plant transfer of radionuclides: predicting the fate of multiple radioisotopes in plants.

    PubMed

    Willey, Neil J

    2014-07-01

    Predicting soil-to-plant transfer of radionuclides is restricted by the range of species for which concentration ratios (CRs) have been measured. Here the radioecological utility of meta-analyses of phylogenetic effects on alkali earth metals will be explored for applications such as 'gap-filling' of CRs, the identification of sentinel biomonitor plants and the selection of taxa for phytoremediation of radionuclide contaminated soils. REML modelling of extensive CR/concentration datasets shows that the concentrations in plants of Ca, Mg and Sr are significantly influenced by phylogeny. Phylogenetic effects of these elements are shown here to be similar. Ratios of Ca/Mg and Ca/Sr are known to be quite stable in plants so, assuming that Sr/Ra ratios are stable, phylogenetic effects and estimated mean CRs are used to predict Ra CRs for groups of plants with few measured data. Overall, there are well quantified plant variables that could contribute significantly to improving predictions of the fate radioisotopes in the soil-plant system. PMID:24011856

  11. Soil-to-plant transfer of native selenium for wild vegetation cover at selected locations of the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Száková, Jiřina; Tremlová, Jana; Pegová, Kristýna; Najmanová, Jana; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    Total selenium (Se) contents were determined in aboveground biomass of wild plant species growing in two uncultivated meadows at two different locations. The soils in these locations had pseudototal (Aqua Regia soluble) Se in concentration ranges of between 0.2 and 0.3 mg kg(-1) at the first location, and between 0.7 and 1.4 mg kg(-1) at the second location. The plant species represented 29 plant families where the most numerous ones were Poaceae, Rosaceae, Fabaceae , and Asteraceae. The selenium contents in the plants varied between undetectable levels (Aegopodium podagraria, Achillea millefolium, Lotus corniculatus) and 0.158 mg kg(-1) (Veronica arvensis, Veronicaceae). The Se levels were roughly one order of magnitude lower compared to other elements with similar soil content, such as cadmium and molybdenum. The transfer factors of Se, quantifying the element transfer from soil to plants, varied between <0.001 and 0.146 with no significant differences between the locations, confirming the limited soil-plant selenium transfer regardless of location, soil Se level, and plant species. Among the plant families, no unambiguous trend to potential elevated Se uptake was observed. Low Se content in the soil and its plant availability was comparable to other Se-deficient areas within Europe. PMID:25975239

  12. Soil-to-plant halogens transfer studies 1. Root uptake of radioiodine by plants.

    PubMed

    Kashparov, V; Colle, C; Zvarich, S; Yoschenko, V; Levchuk, S; Lundin, S

    2005-01-01

    Long-term controlled experiments under natural conditions in the field have been carried out in the Chernobyl Exclusion zone in order to determine the parameters governing radioiodine transfer to plants from four types of soils (podzoluvisol, greyzem and typical and meadow chernozem) homogeneously contaminated in the 20-cm upper layer with an addition of (125)I. An absence of (125)I depletion in arable soil layers due to volatilization was noted up to one year after contamination. During one year, depletion due to the vertical migration of radioiodine from the arable layer of each of the soils did not exceed 4% of the total (125)I content. Radioiodine concentration ratios (CR) were obtained in radish roots, lettuce leaves, bean pods, and wheat grain and straw. The highest CR values were observed in podzoluvisol: 0.01-0.03 for radish roots and lettuce leaves, 0.003-0.004 for bean pods and 0.001 for wheat grains. In the other three soils, these values were one order of magnitude lower. The parameters relating to changes in radioiodine bioavailability were determined, based on the contamination dynamics of plants in field conditions. PMID:15603907

  13. Comparative Analysis Of 226Ra Soil-To-Plant Transfer In Cabbage Grown In Various Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga, M. J.; Carvalho, F. P.; Silva, L.; Gouveia, J.

    2008-08-01

    The transfer of 226Ra from soil to cabbage was compared amongst regions, namely the surroundings of Urgeiriça uranium milling tailings (GE), regions with past uranium mining activities (GN1), and regions with no uranium mining activities and no uranium deposits (GN2). Results show a slight increase of the concentration ratio values at low radium concentration in soils. Statistical analysis of the mean 226Ra activity concentrations in soil and cabbage for the three regions was carried out. The comparison of 226Ra activity concentrations in soils indicated no difference (p>0.05), between GE and GN2 and significant differences (p<0.05) between GE and GN1 and between GN1 and GN2. Similar statistical results were obtained for 226Ra activity concentrations in cabbage from the same regions. It was concluded that radium Concentration Ratio (CR) for cabbage grown in the region of the main uranium milling site (GE) is of the same order of magnitude of CR in cabagge grown in background regions (GN2). However, 226Ra CR was higher in cabagge from the region with past uranium mining activities (GN1).

  14. Inter-cultivar variation in soil-to-plant transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Penrose, B; Johnson Née Payne, K A; Arkhipov, A; Maksimenko, A; Gaschak, S; Meacham, M C; Crout, N J M; White, P J; Beresford, N A; Broadley, M R

    2016-05-01

    Radiocaesium and radiostrontium enter the human food chain primarily via soil-plant transfer. However, uptake of these radionuclides can differ significantly within species (between cultivars). The aim of this study was to assess inter-cultivar variation in soil-to-plant transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium in a leafy crop species, Brassica oleracea. This study comprised four independent experiments: two pot experiments in a controlled environment artificially contaminated with radiocaesium, and two field experiments in an area contaminated with radiocaesium and radiostrontium in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Radiocaesium concentration ratios varied 35-fold among 27 cultivars grown in pots in a controlled environment. These 27 cultivars were then grown with a further 44 and 43 other cultivars in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone in 2003 and 2004, respectively. In the field-grown cultivars radiocaesium concentration ratios varied by up to 35-fold and radiostrontium concentration ratios varied by up to 23-fold. In three of these experiments (one pot experiment, two field experiments) one out of the 27 cultivars was found to have a consistently lower radiocaesium concentration ratio than the other cultivars. The two field experiments showed that, five out of the 66 cultivars common to both experiments had consistently lower radiocaesium concentration ratios, and two cultivars had consistently lower radiostrontium concentration ratios. One cultivar had consistently lower radiocaesium and radiostrontium concentration ratios. The identification of cultivars that have consistently lower radiocaesium and/or radiostrontium concentration ratios suggests that cultivar selection or substitution may be an effective remediation strategy in radiologically contaminated areas. Future research should focus on plant species that are known to be the largest contributors to human dose. PMID:26945429

  15. Proposal for new best estimates for the soil solid-liquid distribution coefficient and soil-to-plant transfer of nickel.

    PubMed

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Van Hees, May; Olyslaegers, Geert; Vidal, Miquel

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compile data, based on an extensive literature survey, for the soil solid-liquid distribution coefficient (K(d)) and soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF) for nickel. The K(d) best estimates were calculated for soils grouped according to texture and organic matter content (sand, loam, clay and organic) and soil cofactors affecting soil-nickel interaction, such as pH, organic matter, and clay content. Variability in K(d) was better explained by pH than by soil texture. Nickel TF estimates were presented for major crop groups (cereals, leafy vegetables, non-leafy vegetables, root crops, tubers, fruits, herbs, pastures/grasses and fodder), and also for plant compartments within crop groups. Transfer factors were also calculated per soil group, as defined by their texture and organic matter content. Furthermore an evaluation of transfer factor dependency on specific soil characteristics was performed following regression analysis. The derived estimates were compared with parameter estimates currently in use. PMID:19223096

  16. Factors associated with the suppressiveness of sugarcane soils to plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Graham R; Rames, Emily; Stirling, A Marcelle; Hamill, Sharon

    2011-09-01

    Observations in three Australian sugarcane fields suggested that the soil just under the trash blanket (the covering of crop residue that remains on the soil surface after crops are harvested) was suppressive to plant-parasitic nematodes. Roots were concentrated in this upper layer of soil but plant-parasitic nematode populations were relatively low and roots showed few signs of nematode damage. Root biomass was much lower 15 cm further down the soil profile, where root health was poor and populations of plant-parasitic nematodes were 3-5 times higher than near the soil surface. A bioassay in which Radopholus similis (a nematode that does not occur in sugarcane soils) was inoculated into heat-sterilized and untreated soils, confirmed that biological factors were limiting nematode populations in some of the soils, with soil from 0-2 cm much more suppressive than soil from 15-17 cm. Surface soil from one site was highly suppressive, as only 16% of R. similis recoverable from heated soil were retrieved from this soil after 8 days. Numerous soil chemical, biochemical, and biological properties were measured, and non-linear regression analysis identified two major groups of factors that were significantly associated with suppressiveness. One group reflected the amount of organic matter in soil (total C, total N, and labile C) and the other was associated with the size of the free-living nematode community (total numbers of free-living nematodes, and numbers of plant associates, bacterial feeders, fungal feeders, and carnivores). These results suggested that suppressiveness was biologically mediated and was sustained by C inputs from crop residues and roots. Since nematode-trapping fungi in the test soils could not be quantified using traditional dilution plating methods, their possible role as suppressive agents was assessed by generating TRFLP profiles with Orbiliales-specific primers, and by sequencing cloned PCR products. Although the molecular data were obtained

  17. Impact of temperature on the dynamics of organic matter and on the soil-to-plant transfer of Cd, Zn and Pb in a contaminated agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Jean-Yves; Denaix, L; Lacoste, J; Sappin-Didier, V; Nguyen, C; Schneider, A

    2016-02-01

    Predicting the soil-to-plant transfer of metals in the context of global warming has become a major issue for food safety. It requires a better understanding of how the temperature alters the bioavailability of metals in cultivated soils. This study focuses on one agricultural soil contaminated by Cd, Zn and Pb. DGT measurements were performed at 10, 20 and 30 °C to assess how the bioavailability of metals was affected by a rise in soil temperature. A lettuce crop was cultivated in the same conditions to determine if the soil-to-plant transfer of metals increased with a rise in soil temperature. A gradual decline in Cd and Zn bioavailability was observed from 10 to 30 °C, which was attributed to more intense complexation of metals in the pore water at higher temperatures. Together with its aromaticity, the affinity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) for metals was indeed suspected to increase with soil temperature. One main output of the present work is a model which satisfactorily explains the thermal-induced changes in the characteristics of DOM reported in Cornu et al. (Geoderma 162:65-70, 2011) by assuming that the mineralization of initial aliphatic compounds followed a first-order reaction, increased with soil temperature according to the Arrhenius law, and due to a priming effect, led to the appearance of aromatic molecules. The soil-to-plant transfer of Cd and Zn was promoted at higher soil temperatures despite a parallel decrease in Cd and Zn bioavailability. This suggests that plant processes affect the soil-to-plant transfer of Cd and Zn the most when the soil temperature rises. PMID:26452657

  18. Caesium-137 soil-to-plant transfer for representative agricultural crops of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants in post-Chernobyl steppe landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramonova, Tatiana; Komissarova, Olga; Turykin, Leonid; Kuzmenkova, Natalia; Belyaev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986 had a large-scale action on more than 2.3 million hectares agricultural lands in Russia. The area of radioactively contaminated chernozems of semi-arid steppe zone with initial levels of Cs-137 185-555 kBq/m2 in Tula region received the name "Plavsky radioactive hotspot". Nowadays, after the first half-life period of Cs-137 arable chernozems of the region are still polluted with 3-6-fold excess above the radioactive safety standard (126-228 kBq/m2). Therefore, qualitative and quantitative characteristics of Cs-137 soil-to-plant transfer are currently a central problem for land use on the territory. The purpose of the present study was revealing the biological features of Cs-137 root uptake from contaminated arable chernozems by different agricultural crops. The components of a grass mixture growing at the central part of Plavsky radioactive hotspot with typical dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants - galega (Galega orientalis, Fabaceae family) and bromegrass (Bromus inermis, Gramineae family) respectively - were selected for the investigation, that was conducted during the period of harvesting in 2015. An important point was that the other factors influenced on Cs-137 soil-to-plant transfer - the level of soil pollution, soil properties, climatic conditions, vegetative phase, etc. - were equal. So, biological features of Cs-137 root uptake could be estimated the most credible manner. As a whole, general discrimination of Cs-137 root uptake was clearly shown for both agricultural crops. Whereas Cs-137 activity in rhizosphere 30-cm layer of arable chernozem was 371±74 Bq/kg (140±32 kBq/m2), Cs-137 activities in plant biomass were one-two orders of magnitude less, and transfer factor (TF) values (the ratio of the Cs-137 activities in vegetation and in soil) not exceeded 0.11. At the same time bioavailability of Cs-137 for bromegrass was significantly higher than for galega: TFs in total biomass of the

  19. Effect of industrial pollution on the distribution of 137Cs in soil and the soil-to-plant transfer in a pine forest in SW Finland.

    PubMed

    Outola, Iisa; Pehrman, Reijo; Jaakkola, Timo

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of industrial pollution on the distribution of radiocaesium in soil and on its transfer from soil to plants. The study was started in September 2000 in four Scots pine stands located at distances of 0.5, 2, 4 and 8 km along a transect running SE from the Cu-Ni smelter at Harjavalta in SW Finland. Annual emissions from the smelter in 1990 were 80 t of Cu, 31 t of Ni and 9000 t of SO(2), and in 1999 these were 5.9, 0.8 and 3400 t, respectively. At each site, soil profiles were sampled with a corer, and samples were separated into litter (L), organic soil layer (O) and mineral soil layers (B, E). Mushrooms, lichens (Cladina spp. and Cetraria islandica), lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) and crowberry (Empetrum nigrum) plants were collected at each site, except at a distance of 0.5 km, where only mushrooms were available. In the organic soil layer, 137Cs activity decreased from 8000 Bq/m(2) at a distance of 8 km from the smelter to 1500 Bq/m(2) at a distance of 0.5 km; in litter, 137Cs concentration increased from 6300 Bq/m(2) at 8 km to 14000 Bq/m(2) at 0.5 km. 137Cs activity concentration decreased significantly in plants, mushrooms and lichens as the pollution load increased. In lichens, 137Cs activity decreased from 910 Bq/kg at 8 km to 170 Bq/kg at 2 km, while in lingonberry it decreased from 1470 to 20 Bq/kg and in crowberry from 310 to 20 Bq/kg. Aggregated transfer factors for 137Cs decreased in a similar way in lingonberry from 7.6x10(-2) m(2)/kg at 8 km to 7.7x10(-4) m(2)/kg at 2 km and in crowberry from 1.6x10(-2) to 7.9x10(-4) m(2)/kg. PMID:12606162

  20. The transfer of radiocesium from soil to plants: Mechanisms, data, and perspectives for potential countermeasures in Japan.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Erik; Tsukada, Hirofumi

    2011-07-01

    The recent events at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Japan, have raised questions about radiocesium (137Cs) transfer from soil to agricultural plants. This transfer has been studied extensively in Europe following the Chernobyl accident, in Soviet Ukraine in 1986. This article briefly discusses whether that transfer may be different in Japan in the aftermath of the Fukushima accident. PMID:21608115

  1. Modelling soil and soil to plant transfer processes of radionuclides and toxic chemicals at long time scales for performance assessment of Radwaste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Achim; Miquel, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Performance assessments for surface nuclear waste disposal facilities require simulation of transfer processes from the waste canisters to a reference group living near-by. Such simulations need to be extended over several hundred to hundred thousand years, depending on waste type, restraining possibilities to represent short term system complexity and variability. Related modelling can be simplified as long as processes are represented conservatively with assessment endpoints estimated larger compared to more realistic modelling approaches. The indicators are doses for radionuclides (RN) and risk factors for toxic chemicals (TC, i.e. heavy metals, nitrate). We discuss a new simulation tool (SCM-Andra-multilayer-model, SAMM) that, among others, allows to model situations where RN/TC move through a soil profile characterised by temporal undersaturation and root growth (soil-plant subsystem of the biosphere model compared to the adjacent saturated geosphere). SAMM describes all relevant transfer and reaction processes (advection, diffusion, root transport, radioactive decay, chemical reactions incl. sorption - desorption) using well known differential equations solved numerically within MATLAB with scenario description and parameterisation defined in Excel sheets. With this conservative approach in mind, we apply global parameters for which the solid-solution (Kd) or soil-to-plant (TF) distribution coefficients are the most relevant. Empirical data are available for homogeneous situations, such as one compartment pot experiments, but rare for entire soil profiles. Similarly soil hydrology, in particular upward and downward advective fluxes are modelled using an empirical approach solely based on key soil hydrological parameters (precipitation, evapotranspiration, irrigation, water table level) and the soil porosity. Variability of soil hydrology in space and time, likely to change drastically even on hourly bases (i.e. intense precipitation event) or within a single

  2. Comparative Analysis Of {sup 226}Ra Soil-To-Plant Transfer In Cabbage Grown In Various Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Madruga, M. J.; Carvalho, F. P.; Silva, L.; Gouveia, J.

    2008-08-07

    The transfer of {sup 226}Ra from soil to cabbage was compared amongst regions, namely the surroundings of Urgeirica uranium milling tailings (GE), regions with past uranium mining activities (GN1), and regions with no uranium mining activities and no uranium deposits (GN2). Results show a slight increase of the concentration ratio values at low radium concentration in soils. Statistical analysis of the mean {sup 226}Ra activity concentrations in soil and cabbage for the three regions was carried out. The comparison of {sup 226}Ra activity concentrations in soils indicated no difference (p>0.05), between GE and GN2 and significant differences (p<0.05) between GE and GN1 and between GN1 and GN2. Similar statistical results were obtained for {sup 226}Ra activity concentrations in cabbage from the same regions. It was concluded that radium Concentration Ratio (CR) for cabbage grown in the region of the main uranium milling site (GE) is of the same order of magnitude of CR in cabagge grown in background regions (GN2). However, {sup 226}Ra CR was higher in cabagge from the region with past uranium mining activities (GN1)

  3. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Minc, Leah D.

    2013-11-20

    Transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants is one of the key mechanisms for long-term contamination of the human food chain. Nearly all computer models that address soil-to-plant uptake of radionuclides use empirically-derived transfer factors to address this process. Essentially all available soil-to-plant transfer factors are based on measurements in annual crops. Because very few measurements are available for tree fruits, samples were taken of alfalfa and oats and the stems, leaves, and fruits and nuts of almond, apple, apricot, carob, fig, grape, nectarine, pecan, pistachio (natural and grafted), and pomegranate, along with local surface soil. The samples were dried, ground, weighed, and analyzed for trace constituents through a combination of induction-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for a wide range of naturally-occurring elements. Analysis results are presented and converted to soil-to-plant transfer factors. These are compared to commonly used and internationally recommended values. Those determined for annual crops are very similar to commonly-used values; those determined for tree fruits show interesting differences. Most macro- and micronutrients are slightly reduced in fruits; non-essential elements are reduced further. These findings may be used in existing computer models and may allow development of tree-fruit-specific transfer models.

  4. The Transfer of Dissolved Cs-137 from Soil to Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, V.V.; Melnichenko, L.Yu.; Mason, C.F.V.; Ageyev, V.A.; Ostashko, V.V.

    2006-07-01

    Rapidly maturing plants were grown simultaneously at the same experimental sites under natural conditions at the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Roots of the plants were side by side in the soil. During two seasons we selected samples of the plants and of the soils several times every season. Content of Cs-137 in the plant and in the soil solution extracted from the samples of soils was measured. Results of measurements of the samples show that, for the experimental site, Cs-137 content in the plant varies with date of the sample selection. The plant:soil solution Cs-137 concentration ratio depends strongly on the date of selection and also on the type of soil. After analysis of the data we conclude that Cs-137 plant uptake is approximately proportional to the content of dissolved Cs-137 in the soil per unit of volume, and the plant:soil solution Cs-137 concentration ratio for the soil is approximately proportional to the soil moisture. (authors)

  5. Carryover of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from soil to plants.

    PubMed

    Stahl, T; Heyn, J; Thiele, H; Hüther, J; Failing, K; Georgii, S; Brunn, H

    2009-08-01

    Within the scope of a joint project to study soil-to-plant carryover of polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs), five cultivated plants (spring wheat, oats, potatoes, maize, and perennial ryegrass) were sown or planted in Mitscherlich pots. Six variants per species were used, each with a different concentration level of PFOA and PFOS (from 0.25 to 50 mg/kg as aqueous solution) to detect possible concentration dependence in the transfer of these two PFCs from soil to plant. PFOA and PFOS were detected by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after appropriate sample preparation (partial drying, mincing, homogenizing, extraction). Since PFOA and PFOS presently represent the most widely studied PFCs, they are classified as "leading compounds." The results show that concentrations of PFOA/PFOS in the plants vary greatly, depending on the concentrations applied to the soil. PFOA values were higher than PFOS values in all plants except potatoes, in which these differences could be quite substantial. From the results presented here it can be seen that uptake and storage are much more intensive in the vegetative portion of the plant than relocation in the storage organs. This is particularly evident from the the comparison of concentrations found in the grain and ear and those in the straw or rest of the plant in spring wheat, oats, and maize. Transfer from "soil to crops" provides a possible explanation for the presence of PFCs in foodstuffs and in human body fluids such as blood, plasma, serum, or breast milk. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a statistically significant, concentration-dependent carryover of PFOA and PFOS in crop plants can take place, which would provide a potential entrance point for these substances into the food chain. PMID:19112561

  6. Soil-to-Plant Concentration Ratios for Assessing Food Chain Pathways in Biosphere Models

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

    2007-10-01

    This report describes work performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report summarizes characteristics of samples of soils and groundwater from three geographical regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and analyses performed to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Because the uptake and behavior of radionuclides in plant roots, plant leaves, and animal products depends on the chemistry of the water and soil coming in contact with plants and animals, water and soil samples collected from these regions of the United States were used in experiments at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to determine radionuclide soil-to-plant concentration ratios. Crops and forage used in the experiments were grown in the soils, and long-lived radionuclides introduced into the groundwater provide the contaminated water used to water the grown plants. The radionuclides evaluated include 99Tc, 238Pu, and 241Am. Plant varieties include alfalfa, corn, onion, and potato. The radionuclide uptake results from this research study show how regional variations in water quality and soil chemistry affect radionuclide uptake. Section 3 summarizes the procedures and results of the uptake experiments, and relates the soil-to-plant uptake factors derived. In Section 4, the results found in this study are compared with similar values found in the biosphere modeling literature; the study’s results are generally in line with current literature, but soil- and plant-specific differences are noticeable. This food-chain pathway data may be used by the NRC staff to assess dose to persons in the reference biosphere (e.g., persons who live and work in an area potentially affected by

  7. Literature Review and Assessment of Plant and Animal Transfer Factors Used in Performance Assessment Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, David E.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Sasser, Lyle B.

    2003-07-20

    A literature review and assessment was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update information on plant and animal radionuclide transfer factors used in performance-assessment modeling. A group of 15 radionuclides was included in this review and assessment. The review is composed of four main sections, not including the Introduction. Section 2.0 provides a review of the critically important issue of physicochemical speciation and geochemistry of the radionuclides in natural soil-water systems as it relates to the bioavailability of the radionuclides. Section 3.0 provides an updated review of the parameters of importance in the uptake of radionuclides by plants, including root uptake via the soil-groundwater system and foliar uptake due to overhead irrigation. Section 3.0 also provides a compilation of concentration ratios (CRs) for soil-to-plant uptake for the 15 selected radionuclides. Section 4.0 provides an updated review on radionuclide uptake data for animal products related to absorption, homeostatic control, approach to equilibration, chemical and physical form, diet, and age. Compiled transfer coefficients are provided for cow’s milk, sheep’s milk, goat’s milk, beef, goat meat, pork, poultry, and eggs. Section 5.0 discusses the use of transfer coefficients in soil, plant, and animal modeling using regulatory models for evaluating radioactive waste disposal or decommissioned sites. Each section makes specific suggestions for future research in its area.

  8. Factors Affecting Transfer of Training in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamnill, Siriporn; McLean, Gary N.

    2005-01-01

    To begin the validation process for the Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI) in Thailand, research replicating Holton, Bates, and Ruona's study (2000) was conducted in Thailand. The LTSI was administered to 1,029 employees. Exploratory factor analysis and MANOVA were used to identify factors. A factor structure almost identical to that of…

  9. From soil to plant, the journey of P through trophic relationships and ectomycorrhizal association

    PubMed Central

    Becquer, Adeline; Trap, Jean; Irshad, Usman; Ali, Muhammad A.; Claude, Plassard

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is essential for plant growth and productivity. It is one of the most limiting macronutrients in soil because it is mainly present as unavailable, bound P whereas plants can only use unbound, inorganic phosphate (Pi), which is found in very low concentrations in soil solution. Some ectomycorrhizal fungi are able to release organic compounds (organic anions or phosphatases) to mobilize unavailable P. Recent studies suggest that bacteria play a major role in the mineralization of nutrients such as P through trophic relationships as they can produce specific phosphatases such as phytases to degrade phytate, the main form of soil organic P. Bacteria are also more effective than other microorganisms or plants at immobilizing free Pi. Therefore, bacterial grazing by grazers, such as nematodes, could release Pi locked in bacterial biomass. Free Pi may be taken up by ectomycorrhizal fungus by specific phosphate transporters and transferred to the plant by mechanisms that have not yet been identified. This mini-review aims to follow the phosphate pathway to understand the ecological and molecular mechanisms responsible for transfer of phosphate from the soil to the plant, to improve plant P nutrition. PMID:25360140

  10. Seasonal variation of soil-to-plant transfer of K and fallout sup 134,137 Cs in peatland vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Bunzl, K.; Kracke, W. )

    1989-10-01

    For three plants from a peat bog (Trichophorum caespitosum, Molinia coerulea, Calluna vulgaris) the concentration of 137Cs, the ratio 137Cs:134Cs, and stable K was determined in intervals of about 14 d from June to November 1987. The results show that for two grasses, Trichophorum caespitosum and Molinia coerulea (which have only perennial roots but sprout every year while the old leaves wither), the concentration of 137Cs decreased considerably during the growing season (1800-240, respectively, 4000-320 Bq kg-1 dry weight). A remarkably similar behavior was observed for the seasonal variability of K and radiocesium in the two grass species, which resulted in a nearly constant ratio of 137Cs:K during the year. In contrast, for the evergreen plant Calluna vulgaris (heather) which was contaminated surficially by the Chernobyl fallout, the concentrations of K and 137Cs were rather constant during 1987 (leaves about 10,000; stems about 5000 Bq kg-1 dry weight), even though radiocesium was taken up by the leaves and transported within the plant. For the two grasses, the plant:soil concentration ratios (CR) were obtained separately for total 137Cs, 137Cs from the global fallout, and Chernobyl-derived 137Cs. The CR of 137Cs from the global fallout decreased for Trichophorum caespitosum from 1.9 in the spring to 0.08 in the autumn, and for Chernobyl-derived 137Cs from 1.4 to 0.2. For Molinia coerulea, a similar behavior was observed. Possible reasons for the seasonal variability of the CR values and the different behavior of 137Cs from the global fallout and from the Chernobyl debris are discussed.

  11. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of Transfer Student Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jacob T. N.; Litzler, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Transfer students' adjustment to college has received substantial attention by researchers. This focus has predominately investigated the observation of "transfer shock": a decrease in grade point average (GPA) experienced after transferring. In response to the persistent focus on transfer shock, growing attention has been directed…

  12. Soil-to-root vegetable transfer factors for (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (88)Y in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Asaduzzaman, Kh; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Amin, Y M; Bradley, D A; Mahat, R H; Nor, R M

    2014-09-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs) are of fundamental importance in assessing the environmental impact due to the presence of radioactivity in soil and agricultural crops. Tapioca and sweet potato, both root crops, are popular foodstuffs for a significant fraction of the Malaysian population, and result in intake of radionuclides. For the natural field conditions experienced in production of these foodstuffs, TFs and the annual effective dose were evaluated for the natural radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and for the anthropogenic radionuclide (88)Y, the latter being a component of fallout. An experimental tapioca field was developed for study of the time dependence of plant uptake. For soil samples from all study locations other than the experimental field, it has been shown that these contain the artificial radionuclide (88)Y, although the uptake of (88)Y has only been observed in the roots of the plant Manihot esculenta (from which tapioca is derived) grown in mining soil. The estimated TFs for (226)Ra and (232)Th for tapioca and sweet potato are very much higher than that reported by the IAEA. For all study areas, the annual effective dose from ingestion of tapioca and sweet potato are estimated to be lower than the world average (290 μSv y(-1)). PMID:24814722

  13. [Uptake of radionuclides from soil to plant and the discovery of 226Ra, 232Th hyperaccumulator].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Chen, Di-Yun; Song, Gang; Yue, Yu-Mei

    2011-04-01

    11 sorts of plant samples and corresponding soil samples were collected in Conghua and Taishan, Pearl River Delta. The specific activity of 238U, 226Ra, 232Th and 40K of samples were investigated by using HPGe-gamma-ray spectra analysis. The results showed that the average specific activity of 238U, 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in soil samples were 151.8, 146.3, 226.6, 665.5 Bq/kg, which were higher than the average values of China and the world. The concentration of 238U in all sort of plants are very low and most of them are lower than detection limit, while the values of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were high. The contents of 226Ra and 232Th in Dicranopteris dichotoma were the highest, whose average specific activity is 285.9, 986.2 Bq/kg respectively. The average bioconcentration factors (BFs)of 26Ra, 232Th of Dicranopteris dichotoma were 2.20, 4.23, respectively, the other 10 sort of plants have BFs of 2266Ra, 232Th were in the range of 10(-1)-10(-2). The bioconcentration factors and the translocation factors of 226Ra, 232Th of Dicranopteris dichotoma. were all bigger than 1, so Dicranopteris dichotoma can be defined as hyperaccumulator of 226Ra and 232Th. PMID:21717763

  14. Studies of transport pathways of Th, rare earths, Ra-228, and Ra-226 from soil to plants and farm animals. Progress report, April 1, 1985-February 28, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Linsalata, P.

    1986-02-01

    The field study is to assess the soil-to-plant and soil-to-animal concentration factors of the naturally occurring radionuclides /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, /sup 232/Th, /sup 230/Th, and /sup 228/Th, as well as of the light rare earth elements (REE), La, Ce and Nd. Farms situated near the center of a deeply weathered alkalic intrusive known as the Pocos de Caldas (PC) plateau were selected for study because of their proximity (i.e., within a few kilometers) to what may be the largest single near-surface deposit of Th (approx.30,000 tonnes) and REE's (>100,000 tonnes) situated near the summit of a hill (the Morro do Ferro (MF)). An ancillary field study is being conducted in Orange County, New York, where a local cattleman has permitted sampling members of the herd as well as soil and feeds which are all grown on the premises. Vegetable samples and soil have also been analyzed from five additional farms in Orange County, NY. 64 refs., 25 figs., 45 tabs.

  15. Factors Affecting Training Transfer: Participants' Motivation to Transfer Training, Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alawneh, Muhammad K.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates factors that motivate participants in learning and training activities to transfer skills, knowledge and attitude from the learning setting to the workplace. Based on training transfer theories hypothesized by Holton (1996), one of the major theories that affect an organization's learning is motivation to transfer theory.…

  16. Racial and Cultural Factors and Learning Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Closson, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Baldwin and Ford (1988) specifically include learner characteristics as one of three key inputs into the learning transfer process but infrequently (actually almost never) has race, ethnicity, or culture been included as a variable when describing trainee characteristics. For the most part one is left to speculate as to the potential influence…

  17. Some Factors Influencing Transfer of Simulator Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro, Paul W.

    Studies of transfer of training may be used to determine whether simulator training improves pilot performance in an aircraft. Some approaches to determining simulator training effectiveness, such as surveys of pilot and instructor opinions, are not considered particularly reliable. Several other approaches have also been suggested. One factor…

  18. Ingestion Pathway Transfer Factors for Plutonium and Americium

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-07-28

    Overall transfer factors for major ingestion pathways are derived for plutonium and americium. These transfer factors relate the radionuclide concentration in a given foodstuff to deposition on the soil. Equations describing basic relationships consistent with Regulatory Guide 1.109 are followed. Updated values and coefficients from IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 364 are used when a available. Preference is given to using factors specific to the Savannah River Site.

  19. Transfer of Radionuclides K-40, Th-232 and Ra-226 from Mining Soil to Sawi (Japanese Mustard)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariandra, M.; Amin, Y. M.

    2008-05-01

    The uptake of naturally occurring thorium, radium and potassium by sawi (Japanese Mustard) from disused tin mining was studied. Both soil and sawi sample were collected from a vegetable farm located 15 km from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia where the farm has been operating for 22 years on a disused tin mining. By using a gamma spectroscopy system, the transfers of radionuclides from soil to plants were investigated. The highest values of radionuclides in the soil was K-40 which is 52.8 Bq kg-1 and the lowest was Ra-226 which is 6.51 Bq kg-1. The activity of Th-232 is 18.5 Bq kg-1. The activity of radionuclides in the sawi sample shows higher values as compared to the soil sample. The highest values of radionuclides in the sawi were K-40 which is 446 Bq kg-1 and the lowest was Ra-226 which is 17.5 Bq kg-1. The activity of Th-232 is 65.2 Bq kg-1. The concentration of radionuclides in soils and plants can be used for the determination of soil-to-plant transfer factors. The soil to plant transfer factors (TF) were calculated and observed to be 2.68 for radium-226, 3.52 for thorium-232 and the highest which is 3.97 for potassium-40.

  20. Transfer of Radionuclides K-40, Th-232 and Ra-226 from Mining Soil to Sawi (Japanese Mustard)

    SciTech Connect

    Hariandra, M.; Amin, Y. M.

    2008-05-20

    The uptake of naturally occurring thorium, radium and potassium by sawi (Japanese Mustard) from disused tin mining was studied. Both soil and sawi sample were collected from a vegetable farm located 15 km from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia where the farm has been operating for 22 years on a disused tin mining. By using a gamma spectroscopy system, the transfers of radionuclides from soil to plants were investigated. The highest values of radionuclides in the soil was K-40 which is 52.8 Bq kg{sup -1} and the lowest was Ra-226 which is 6.51 Bq kg{sup -1}. The activity of Th-232 is 18.5 Bq kg{sup -1}. The activity of radionuclides in the sawi sample shows higher values as compared to the soil sample. The highest values of radionuclides in the sawi were K-40 which is 446 Bq kg{sup -1} and the lowest was Ra-226 which is 17.5 Bq kg{sup -1}. The activity of Th-232 is 65.2 Bq kg{sup -1}. The concentration of radionuclides in soils and plants can be used for the determination of soil-to-plant transfer factors. The soil to plant transfer factors (TF) were calculated and observed to be 2.68 for radium-226, 3.52 for thorium-232 and the highest which is 3.97 for potassium-40.

  1. Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Charge and Excitation Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Piotrowiak

    2004-09-28

    We report the and/or state of several subprojects of our DOE sponsored research on Electronic and Nuclear Factors in Electron and Excitation Transfer: (1) Construction of an ultrafast Ti:sapphire amplifier. (2) Mediation of electronic interactions in host-guest molecules. (3) Theoretical models of electrolytes in weakly polar media. (4) Symmetry effects in intramolecular excitation transfer.

  2. A Compendium of Transfer Factors for Agricultural and Animal Products

    SciTech Connect

    Staven, Lissa H.; Napier, Bruce A.; Rhoads, Kathleen; Strenge, Dennis L.

    2003-06-02

    Transfer factors are used in radiological risk assessments to estimate the amount of radioactivity that could be present in a food crop or organism based on the calculated concentration in the source medium (i.e., soil or animal feed). By calculating the concentration in the food, the total intake can be estimated and a dose calculated as a result of the annual intake. This report compiles transfer factors for radiological risk assessments, using common food products, including meats, eggs, and plants. Transfer factors used were most often selected from recommended values listed by national or international organizations for use in radiological food chain transport calculations. Several methods of estimation and extrapolation were used for radionuclides not listed in the primary information sources. Tables of transfer factors are listed by element and information source for beef, eggs, fish, fruit, grain, leafy vegetation, milk, poultry, and root vegetables.

  3. Transfer of chemicals from feed to animal products: The use of transfer factors in risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Leeman, W R; Van Den Berg, K J; Houben, G F

    2007-01-01

    The human risk assessment of feed contaminants has often been hampered by a lack of knowledge concerning their behaviour when consumed by livestock. To gain a better understanding of the transfer of contaminants from animal feed to animal products, a meta-analysis of public literature was made. Data concerning feed contaminant concentrations, feeding periods, residue levels in animal products, and other parameters were gathered and recorded. For each case a 'transfer factor', which was defined as the ratio of the concentration of a chemical in an animal product to the concentration of the chemical in animal feed, was calculated. Scientifically founded transfer factors were calculated and analysed for groups of chemicals based on their contaminant classes or physicochemical properties. These database-derived transfer factors enable a more accurate risk assessment in the case of a feed contamination, and enable rapid risk management decision-making and/or intervention. PMID:17164211

  4. Deuteron form factor measurements at low momentum transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlimme, B. S.; Achenbach, P.; Beričič, J.; Böhm, R.; Bosnar, D.; Correa, L.; Distler, M. O.; Esser, A.; Fonvieille, H.; Friščić, I.; Griffioen, K. A.; Huan, Y.; Kegel, S.; Kohl, Y.; Merkel, H.; Mihovilovič, M.; Müller, J.; Müller, U.; Pochodzalla, J.; Schoth, M.; Schulz, F.; Sfienti, C.; Širca, S.; Štajner, S.; Thiel, M.; Weber, A.

    2016-03-01

    A precise measurement of the elastic electron-deuteron scattering cross section at four-momentum transfers of 0.24 fm-1 ≤ Q ≤ 2.7 fm-1 has been performed at the Mainz Microtron. In this paper we describe the utilized experimental setup and the necessary analysis procedure to precisely determine the deuteron charge form factor from these data. Finally, the deuteron charge radius rd can be extracted from an extrapolation of that form factor to Q2 = 0.

  5. University Technology Transfer Factors as Predictors of Entrepreneurial Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2011-01-01

    University technology transfer is a collaborative effort between academia and industry involving knowledge sharing and learning. Working closely with their university partners affords biotechnology firms the opportunity to successfully develop licensed inventions and gain access to novel scientific and technological discoveries. These factors may…

  6. Axial form factor of the nucleon at large momentum transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikin, I. V.; Braun, V. M.; Offen, N.

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the emerging possibilities to study threshold pion electroproduction at large momentum transfers at Jefferson Laboratory following the 12 GeV upgrade, we provide a short theory summary and an estimate of the nucleon axial form factor for large virtualities in the Q2=1 - 10 GeV2 range using next-to-leading-order light-cone sum rules.

  7. Chlorophyll a Franck-Condon factors and excitation energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, J. ||; Voigt, J.; Small, G.J. |

    1999-04-01

    The Franck-Condon factors for the S{sub 1}(Q{sub y}) {leftrightarrow} S{sub 0} electronic transition of chlorophyll (Chl) molecules are important for understanding excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. Currently, there are two sets of Chl a Frank-Condon factors for over 40 modes, one determined by spectral hole burning and the other by fluorescence line narrowing. Those obtained by the latter spectroscopy are, on average, a factor of 30 times smaller than the hole burning values. Nonline-narrowed fluorescence results for the light-harvesting complex 2 of photosystem 2 at 4.2 K are presented that agree quite well with the hole burning but not the fluorescence line narrowing values.

  8. Studies on Resistance Transfer Factor Deoxyribonucleic Acid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Richard P.; Falkow, Stanley

    1970-01-01

    A variant of the derepressed R factor, R1, which does not contain any of the drug resistance markers, and represents, in large part, the resistance transfer factor (RTF) was studied in Escherichia coli. RTF deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was specifically labeled in a female cell after conjugation. Physical characterization of the molecule showed that RTF possessed an average molecular weight of 50 × 106 daltons and a buoyant density of 1.709 g/cm3. By comparison to R1, we calculate that the region of DNA carrying the drug resistance genes is therefore about 20% of the R1 molecule and has a buoyant density of approximately 1.716 g/cm3. These results support the hypothesis that the single species of R-factor DNA observed in E. coli represents a composite of the 1.709 and 1.716 g/cm3 replicons seen in Proteus. PMID:4919749

  9. Preparation and properties of the specific anti-influenza virus transfer factor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Specific anti-influenza virus and normal transfer factors prepared in an experimental animal model, the pig, have been tested for their components, characteristics, and activity of known specificity. Two transfer factors are small molecular mixture which consist entirely or partly of polypeptides and polynucleosides. Moreover, the biological activity of transfer factors could be approved by Rosettes test and specific skin test. The study would lay a foundation for the research and development of other specific transfer factor. PMID:20836866

  10. AIDS and transfer factor: myths, certainties and realities.

    PubMed

    Viza, D

    1996-01-01

    At the end of the 20th century, the triumph of biology is as indisputable as that of physics was at the end of the 19th century, and so is the might of the inductive thought. Virtually all diseases have been seemingly conquered and HIV, the cause of AIDS, has been fully described ten years after the onset of the epidemic. However, the triumph of biological science is far from being complete. The toll of several diseases, such as cancer, continues to rise and the pathogenesis of AIDS remains elusive. In the realm of inductive science, the dominant paradigm can seldom be challenged in a frontal attack, especially when it is apparently successful, and only what Kuhn calls "scientific revolutions" can overthrow it. Thus, it is hardly surprising that the concept of transfer factor is considered with contempt, and the existence of the moiety improbable: over forty years after the introduction of the concept, not only its molecular structure remains unknown, but also its putative mode of action contravenes dogmas of both immunology and molecular biology. And when facts challenge established dogmas, be in religion, philosophy or science, they must be suppressed. Thus, results of heterodox research become henceforth nisi-i.e., valid unless cause is shown for rescinding them, because they challenge the prevalent paradigm. However, when observations pertain to lethal disorders, their suppression in the name of dogmas may become criminal. Because of the failure of medical science to manage the AIDS pandemic, transfer factor, which has been successfully used for treating or preventing viral infections, may today overcome a priori prejudice and rejection more swiftly. In science, as in life, certainties always end up by dying, and Copernicus' vision by replacing that of Ptolemy. PMID:8993753

  11. Soil-to-crop transfer factors of tellurium.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guosheng; Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2014-09-01

    Stable tellurium (Te) concentrations in 148 sets of agricultural soil and associated crop samples were measured in this study to obtain soil-to-crop transfer factor (TF) of Te. We used a recently developed simple method that applies digestion of samples with aqua regia and sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to measure low Te levels in these samples. Geometric mean (GM) concentrations of Te in soil and crops were 75μgkg(-1)-dry (range: 15-850μgkg(-1)-dry) and 1.8μgkg(-1)-dry (range: 0.1-120μgkg(-1)-dry), respectively; the Te concentration range was significantly wider in crops than in soil. Using these data, we calculated TFs and obtained their range from 1.3×10(-3) to 1.1×10(-1). The GM of TF for upland field crops was calculated to be 2.0×10(-2) and for brown rice was 3.1×10(-2); all crop types had the similar GMs of their TF values. Data comparison for TF of Te was carried out with six elements, which are present in anionic forms in soil environment like Te is, i.e. P, Br, As, Se, Mo, and I. TFs of Te and I showed the highest correlation factor for upland field crops by t-test (r=0.577, p<0.001), but no correlation was found for brown rice. We considered it likely that different water management practices in upland fields and paddy fields affected the Te transfer from soil to crops. PMID:24997965

  12. A study of estrogen metabolic clearance rates and transfer factors

    PubMed Central

    Hembree, W. C.; Bardin, C. W.; Lipsett, M. B.

    1969-01-01

    We have attempted to measure the metabolic clearance rates (MCR) and the transfer factors of estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1) during 2-hr and 12-hr infusions. When estradiol-3H was infused for 2 hr, apparent equilibrium was reached at 70 min; the 12-hr infusions showed that plasma estradiol-3H levels increased slowly throughout the infusion. When estrone-3H was infused, constancy of estrone-3H levels was not attained in either the 2-hr infusions or in the two 12-hr infusions. The tritium level in the metabolite of the infused estrogen did not become constant in 50% of the short infusions and increased during all the long infusions. Thus, the conversion ratios CE1E2 and CE2E1 continually changed and transfer factors could not be calculated. The apparent “MCR'S” calculated on the basis of the 2-hr studies expressed as liters/24 hr per m2 ±SD were: “MCRE1” (women) 980 ±94, (men) 1170 ±95; “MCRE2” (women) 615 ±17, (men) 830 ±30. The estradiol “MCR's” differed significantly between men and women. “MCRE2” was the same using either estradiol-14C or -3H and was unchanged by the infusion of 170 μg of estradiol daily. Postmenopausal women had estrogen “MCR's” in the same range as premenopausal women. Excess glucocorticoids increased the “MCRE2.” PMID:5822587

  13. Initial solidification phenomena: Factors affecting heat transfer in strip casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolli, Paolo

    In the last few years a few companies have announced the final stage of the commercial development of strip casting of steels. In strip casting heat extraction and productivity are limited by the thermal resistance at the interface between processed material and moving mold (rolls for twin-roll strip casters). Among many factors influencing interfacial heat transfer, films of various composition, either formed during casting or deposited before casting on the surface of the rolls, melt superheat and gas atmosphere composition can have a significantly positive or negative effect on the achieved heat transfer rate. From an industrial point view, methods to improve interfacial heat transfer rates must be found, in order to increase productivity. The objective of this research project is to assess if it is feasible to improve heat transfer rates during solidification of steel in direct contact with a copper mold: (1) by the application of thin coatings on the mold surface; (2) by adding a reactive gas species containing sulfur in the gas shrouding where casting is performed. To address the former, solidification experiments were performed with the mold surface either kept uncoated or coated with coatings of different compositions. To address the latter, the experiments were performed in gas shrouding atmospheres with or without sulphydric acid. It was observed that the resulting heat extraction rates were improved by the application of certain coatings and by the addition of H2S to the gas atmosphere. These findings prove that the application of coatings and the use of small amounts of reactive gaseous species containing sulfur may be methods to increase productivity in strip casting. The effect of superheat and the effect of naturally deposited oxides (Mn-oxide) were also evaluated experimentally. A numerical study of the effect of the critical undercooling on the productivity of a twin-roll strip caster showed that the maximum allowable casting speed can be increased

  14. Uptake and transfer factors of 137Cs by mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, G

    1992-01-01

    The 137Cs content of 118 species (668 samples) of higher fungi collected in the period from August 1984 to October 1989 at three different locations in Styria, Austria, was determined by gamma-spectrometry. The Cs-content of most mushrooms has been increasing since September 1986. In order to find out which factors determine the 137Cs-contamination of mushrooms and the transfer-value soil to mushroom, the concentration of total and plant-available radiocesium in soils as well as the pH-value, the content of humus, clay, silt, sand, exchangeable cations, the composition of the clay minerals, and the particle size distribution of the soils of two different locations were examined. The higher the 137Cs contamination of the soil, the thicker the layer of humus and the higher the content of humus, the lower the pH-value, and the lower the amount of essential cations, especially of K+, the higher the amount of 137Cs plant-available will be. Therefore, the contamination of the mushrooms in the coniferous forest of Koralpenblick (1000 m) is higher than in the mixed forest at the Rosenberg around Graz at approx. 500 m height. Of 26 different species of mushrooms measured at both sites, only 61% show the highest TF-values soil to mushrooms also at the Koralpenblick. In the spruce forest at Koralpenblick there are many species of mushrooms with high 137Cs-contamination which were not found at the Rosenberg. However, the properties of the species to which a mushroom belongs are more important than environmental conditions and soil properties. The transfer values of 40K stay within narrow bounds, whereas those of 137Cs differ widely. PMID:1589573

  15. Effects of stress and other environmental factors on horizontal plasmid transfer assessed by direct quantification of discrete transfer events.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Anders R; Kroer, Niels

    2007-03-01

    Selection pressure may affect the horizontal transfer of plasmids. The inability to distinguish between gene transfer and the growth of transconjugants complicates testing. We have developed a method that enables the quantification of discrete transfer events. It uses large numbers of replicate matings (192 or 384) in microtiter wells and the counting of transfer-positive and transfer-negative wells. We applied the method to study the transfer of the IncP1 plasmid pRO103 between Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida strains. pRO103 encodes resistance to mercury and tetracycline and partial degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). The results showed positive correlation between transfer and donor metabolic activity, and an optimal temperature for transfer of 29 degrees C. On stimulation of donor activity, the optimal temperature was decreased to 24.5 degrees C. HgCl(2) above 1.0 microg L(-1) negatively affected transfer, whereas 2,4-D up to 0.3 mM had no effect. The negative effect of mercury was shown to be a result of stressing of the recipient. No effects of mercury on transfer could be detected by traditional filter mating. Thus, the method is superior to filter mating and, as the experimental design allows the manipulation of individual parameters, it is ideal for the assessment and comparison of effects of environmental factors on plasmid transfer. PMID:17100984

  16. Transfer of metals in soil-grass ecosystems under long-term N, P, K fertilization in Hesse, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2015-04-01

    With this study focuses on the influence of long-term (14 years) fertilization on metal transition from soil to plants is presented. Accumulation of metals in plants due to long-term fertilization and predicting the bioavailability and transfer of metals in the soil-plant system is of great importance with regard to human health as plants represent the first compartment of the terrestrial food chain. Soil and plant (Lolio-Cynosuretum) samples were taken from a 14 years long-term fertilization field experiment which was carried out in Hesse, Germany. Correlation coefficients, transfer factors, and regression analysis was performed for Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn to quantify the relative difference in bioavailability of metals to plants or to identify the capacity of plants to accumulate a given metal. Correlation coefficients between metals in soils and in plants show significant relationships (p<0.01) for selected metals. Metal bioavailability from soil to plant based on transfer factor (TF) was observed to decrease in the order Cd>Cu>Zn>Mn>Pb. Results of stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that Corg, CEC and bioavailable metal content are the most important predictors for plant metal uptake.

  17. Standardisation of gas mixtures for estimating carbon monoxide transfer factor.

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, A. H.; Laszlo, G.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The American Thoracic Society recommends that the inspired concentration used for the estimation of carbon monoxide transfer factor (TLCO) mixture should be 0.25-0.35% carbon monoxide, 10-14% helium, 17-21% oxygen, balance nitrogen. Inspired oxygen influences alveolar oxygen and hence carbon monoxide uptake, such that transfer factor increases by 0.35% per mm Hg decrease in alveolar oxygen. To aid in the standardisation of TLCO either a known inspired oxygen concentration should be used, or TLCO should be corrected to a standard inspired oxygen concentration. The range of gas mixtures used in practice and the implications for cost and accuracy have been investigated. METHODS--A questionnaire was sent to 185 respiratory units in the UK requesting information on (1) the method used to estimate TLCO, (2) the manufacturer of the equipment, (3) the mixture used, (4) whether "medical quality" gas was ordered, and (5) the level of satisfaction with supplier service. RESULTS--Replies were received from 106 units. Most used the single breath breath holding method for which 17 different test mixtures were ordered. One unit also used the single breath exhalation method. Inspired oxygen ranged from 17.94% to 25%, giving a wide variation in alveolar oxygen and hence TLCO. Forty seven units ordered a specific inspired oxygen, the rest ordering "air" as balance. The cost per litre of gas varied greatly, with the mixture 14% helium, 0.28% carbon monoxide, balance air (17.9% oxygen) and 10% helium, 0.28% carbon monoxide, balance air (18.8% oxygen) being cheapest to produce. Ordering a specific inspired oxygen concentration increased the cost. Large cylinders of gas were cheaper for the same mixture. The mixture for the exhalation method was the most expensive. Sixty seven units ordered "medical quality" gas and six assumed this was supplied. Twenty nine (27%) were dissatisfied with their supplier due to (1) poor service, (2) long delivery times, (3) costs, or (4

  18. Factors Differentiating Hospital Transfers from Long-term Care Facilities with High and Low Transfer Rates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teresi, Jeanne A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined differences among nursing homes in rates at which they transfer patients to hospitals. Data from nursing staff and charts on 286 most recent transfers from 10 nursing homes revealed that, from relatively equivalent patient populations, high-rate facilities transferred more chronically ill, physically frail patients and patients with…

  19. General and specific factors in the intersensory transfer of form.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. L.; Warm, J. S.; Schumsky, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    This study assessed the relative contributions of specific and nonspecific components to intersensory transfer between vision and touch. A paired-associate paradigm was used in which visual metric figures and their tactual analogs served as stimuli, and familiar adjectives were the responses. Positive intersensory transfer, characterized by symmetry across modalities was obtained. The contribution of nonspecific learning to this effect was negligible. Intersensory transfer was found to be less efficient than the empirically determined maximum level of intrasensory transfer possible in this task.

  20. Student Perceptions of Factors Contributing to Community-College-to-University Transfer Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gard, Dwight R.; Paton, Valerie; Gosselin, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The transfer process includes areas such as academic preparation and advisement, transfer evaluation, financial aid, and psychosocial factors. A descriptive, exploratory method was employed to capture the perceptions of a transfer student cohort regarding their experiences in transitioning from lower division community college enrollment to…

  1. Factors in the Transfer of Governance-Facilitation Skills within Farmers' Marketing Organizations in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miiro, Richard F.; Mazur, Robert E.; Matsiko, Frank B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Training transfer has been examined for formal industrial and service organizations in developed countries but rarely for rural organizations in sub-Saharan Africa. This study sought to identify transfer system factors that best explain the transfer of governance-facilitation skills provided to leaders of farmers' marketing organizations…

  2. High Quality Factor Resonators for Inductive Power Transfer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadrezaei, Mohammad

    In this dissertation, the Inductive Power Transfer (IPT) systems for multi-MHz frequency of operation are investigated, and new ideas for magnetic link inductive coils are presented. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  3. Factors Affecting the Development of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    AKAGI, Satoshi; MATSUKAWA, Kazutsugu; TAKAHASHI, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle. PMID:25341701

  4. Relationship between the radiocesium interception potential and the transfer of radiocesium from soil to soybean cultivated in 2011 in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Akira; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Takeuchi, Megumi; Sato, Mutsuto; Nakao, Atsushi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2014-11-01

    The concentration of radiocesium ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) in agricultural fields around Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) was elevated after the accident in March 2011. Evaluation of soil properties that influence phytoavailability of radiocesium is important for optimal soil management to minimize radiocesium transfer to crops. In this study, soybean grain and soil samples (0-15 cm) were collected from 46 locations in Fukushima Prefecture in 2011, and (137)Cs concentrations were measured. (137)Cs concentration ranges were 11-329 Bq kg(-1)-dry in soybean grain samples, and 0.29-2.49 kBq kg(-1)-dry in soil samples. The radiocesium interception potential (RIP) values in the soil samples ranged from 0.30 to 8.61 mol kg(-1). RIP negatively correlated with total carbon content and oxalate-extractable Si and Al + 1/2 Fe in the soils, suggesting that soils rich in organic matter and poorly crystalline clays tended to have lower RIP in this region. The soil-to-plant transfer factor for (137)Cs, analyzed in relation with various soil characteristics, varied by two orders of magnitude and was significantly negatively correlated with RIP and exchangeable K concentration in soil. The results show that RIP is useful for evaluating the efficiency of radiocesium transfer from soil to plants in this region. PMID:25036920

  5. The Influence of Transfer System Factors and Training Elapsed Time on Transfer in a Healthcare Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihalko, Beverly J.

    2010-01-01

    Organizations and other sponsors of training face increasing pressure to demonstrate the value or impact of their training programs on individual and organizational performance. A critical element in the validation of training effectiveness is the permanent transfer of learned knowledge, skills, and behaviors to the workplace. The generalization…

  6. Relation of pulmonary vessel size to transfer factor in subjects with airflow obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Musk, A.W.

    1983-11-01

    In a group of 61 consecutive patients undergoing assessment of airflow obstruction, a significant linear relation was demonstrated between measurements of the diameter of the midzonal pulmonary vessels on the plain chest radiographs and transfer factor (diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide) (r = 0.46, p < 0.001). Since reduction in transfer factor has been shown to relate to structural emphysema, reduction in midzone vessel caliber implies the same. However, in the individual patient neither the transfer factor nor structural emphysema can be reliably predicted from midzone vessel diameters alone.

  7. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL FACTORS IN TRANSFER OF TRAINING, PHASE I. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STOLUROW, LAWRENCE M.

    A FINAL REPORT WAS MADE OF THE ACTIVITIES PURSUED IN PHASE 1 OF A 10-YEAR PROJECT DEALING WITH THE PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL FACTORS INVOLVED IN TRANSFER OF TRAINING. PHASE I CONSISTED OF A SURVEY OF THE EXISTENT DATA AND CONCEPTS OF TRANSFER OF TRAINING IN AN ATTEMPT (1) TO SUMMARIZE, INTEGRATE, CONSOLIDATE, AND INTERPRET RESEARCH FINDINGS…

  8. Perception of Transfer Climate Factors in the Macro and Micro Organizational Work Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diggs, Byron Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study was designed to provide insight on the perceived transfer climate factors in the macro and micro organizational work environment that may influence an employee's willingness to transfer what was learned in a training program to the job. More specifically, the purpose of the study was to delineate descriptive patterns and…

  9. Simulation of a Wireless Power Transfer System for Electric Vehicles with Power Factor Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Pickelsimer, Michael C; Tolbert, Leon M; Ozpineci, Burak; Miller, John M

    2012-01-01

    Wireless power transfer has been a popular topic of recent research. Most research has been done to address the limitations of coil-to-coil efficiency. However, little has been done to address the problem associated with the low input power factor with which the systems operate. This paper details the steps taken to analyze a wireless power transfer system from the view of the power grid under a variety of loading conditions with and without power factor correction.

  10. Factors affecting the efficiency of embryo transfer in the domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Li, Ziyi; Sun, Xingshen; Chen, Juan; Leno, Gregory H; Engelhardt, John F

    2006-07-15

    Embryo transfer (ET) to recipient females is a foundational strategy for a number of assisted reproductive technologies, including cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer. In an attempt to develop efficient ET in domestic ferrets, factors affecting development of transferred embryo were investigated. Unilateral and bilateral transfer of zygotes or blastocysts in the oviduct or uterus was evaluated in recipient nulliparous or primiparous females. Developing fetuses were collected from recipient animals 21 days post-copulation and examined. The percentage of fetal formation was different (P<0.05) for unilateral and bilateral transfer of zygotes (71%) in nulliparous females with bilateral transfer (56%) in primiparous recipients. The percentage (90%) of fetal formation in nulliparous recipients following unilateral transfer of blastocysts was higher (P<0.05) than that observed in primiparous recipients with bilateral ET (73%). Notably, the percentage of fetal formation was higher (P<0.05) when blastocyts were transferred as compared to zygotes (90% versus 71%). Transuterine migration of embryos occurred following all unilateral transfers and also in approximately 50% of bilateral transfers with different number of embryos in each uterine horn. These data will help to facilitate the development of assisted reproductive strategies in the ferret and could lead to the use of this species for modeling human disease and for conservation of the endangered Mustelidae species such as black-footed ferret and European mink. PMID:16330092

  11. Factors that influence passive transfer of immunoglobulins in foals.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, M M; Tran, T; Baldwin, J L; Pritchard, E L

    1992-01-15

    Effects of farm management, breed, mare age, gestation duration, and climatologic factors on colostral specific gravity, colostral IgG concentration, and foal serum IgG concentration were evaluated. Climatologic variables measured were daily maximal, minimal, and mean air temperature, precipitation, average relative humidity, and total solar radiation. Presuckle, postpartum colostrum samples were collected from 140 Standardbred, 94 Thoroughbred, and 59 Arabian mares from January through June during 1985 and 1986. Thoroughbred (farm A, n = 61; farm B, n = 33) and Arabian (farm C, n = 45; farm D, n = 14) mares were located in Ocala, Fla; Standardbred mares (farm E) were in Montgomery, NY. Mares from farms A, B, D, and E foaled in box stalls, and mares from farm C foaled in sand paddocks. Mares with premature lactation greater than 12 hours were not included in the study. Foals were clinically normal at birth and suckled colostrum without assistance within 2 hours of parturition. Specific gravity of presuckle colostrum samples was measured by use of an equine colostrometer. Blood samples were collected 18 hours after parturition from 253 of the 293 foals (n = 45, 25, 32, 13, 138 on farms A through E, respectively) to determine serum concentration of IgG. The IgG concentrations in colostrum and serum were measured by single radial immunodiffusion. Data were analyzed by multiple regression or chi 2 analysis. The most important determinants of foal serum IgG concentration were the IgG content and specific gravity of presuckle colostrum samples (P less than 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1559872

  12. A simple parameterization for quality factor as a function of linear energy transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a simple analytic approximation of the radiation quality factor (Q) as a function of linear energy transfer for use in radiation protection calculations. The paper also presents estimated quality factors in water for protons over a broad range of incident energies. It is shown that the quality factors are less than unity for all proton energies greater than 13 MeV.

  13. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd. PMID:808340

  14. Factors affecting transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from made tea to tea infusion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daohui; Zhu, Lizhong; Luo, Lan

    2006-06-14

    Factors affecting transfer percentages of 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated, including tea variety, tea/water ratio (TWR, g/mL), brewing times, washed tea or unwashed tea, and covered cup or uncovered cup. It was observed that %PAH transfer varied with tea variety and increased with the decrease of TWR. The mean %PAH transfer with TWR = 1/150 was 1.12 and 1.65 times higher than that with TWR = 1/100 and 1/50, respectively. %PAH transfer reduced greatly as the brewing times increased. The mean %PAH transfer in the first brewing time occupied 51.6% of the total three mean %PAH transfers in the three brewing times. The mean %PAH transfer decreased by 30.4% after the tea had been washed immediately before brewing. Brewing the tea within uncovered cup diminished %PAH transfer by a degree of 4.31-31.7% compared to brewing the tea within a covered cup. PMID:16756366

  15. Ultrastructural Study on Ultra-Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Transfer Factor Effects on Skin Ulcers

    SciTech Connect

    Cadena, M. S. Reyes; Chapul, L. Sanchez; Perez, Javier; Garcia, M. N. Jimenez; Lopez, M. A. Jimenez; Espindola, M. E. Sanchez; Perez, R. Paniagua; Hernandez, N. A.; Paniagua, G.; Uribe, F.; Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez

    2008-08-11

    We determined the effect of 120Hz ultra low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) on the healing process of skin in 20 Wistar rats distributed in four groups in which chronic dermal ulcers had been produced. The first two groups received a dose of the transfer factor and interferon-beta (IFN-{beta}) every 24 h during 12 days. The third group (positive control) received only electromagnetic field (ELF) sessions, and in the fourth group (negative control), no treatment was applied. The electromagnetic field was applied through a Helmholtz coils; 30 Gauss of intensity. Results shown histological changes that improve the healing process in animals subjected to ELF together with the transfer factor.

  16. Energy transfer between a nanosystem and its host fluid: A multiscale factorization approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Espinosa-Duran, John M.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2014-02-21

    Energy transfer between a macromolecule or supramolecular assembly and a host medium is considered from the perspective of Newton's equations and Lie-Trotter factorization. The development starts by demonstrating that the energy of the molecule evolves slowly relative to the time scale of atomic collisions-vibrations. The energy is envisioned to be a coarse-grained variable that coevolves with the rapidly fluctuating atomistic degrees of freedom. Lie-Trotter factorization is shown to be a natural framework for expressing this coevolution. A mathematical formalism and workflow for efficient multiscale simulation of energy transfer is presented. Lactoferrin and human papilloma virus capsid-like structure are used for validation.

  17. Ultrastructural Study on Ultra-Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields and Transfer Factor Effects on Skin Ulcers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadena, M. S. Reyes; Chapul, L. Sánchez; Pérez, Javiér; García, M. N. Jiménez; López, M. A. Jiménez; Espíndola, M. E. Sánchez; Perez, R. Paniagua; Hernández, N. A.; Paniagua, G.; Uribe, F.; Nava, J. J. Godina; Segura, M. A. Rodríguez

    2008-08-01

    We determined the effect of 120Hz ultra low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) on the healing process of skin in 20 Wistar rats distributed in four groups in which chronic dermal ulcers had been produced. The first two groups received a dose of the transfer factor and interferon-beta (IFN-β) every 24 h during 12 days. The third group (positive control) received only electromagnetic field (ELF) sessions, and in the fourth group (negative control), no treatment was applied. The electromagnetic field was applied through a Helmholtz coils; 30 Gauss of intensity. Results shown histological changes that improve the healing process in animals subjected to ELF together with the transfer factor.

  18. Energy transfer between a nanosystem and its host fluid: A multiscale factorization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereda, Yuriy V.; Espinosa-Duran, John M.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2014-02-01

    Energy transfer between a macromolecule or supramolecular assembly and a host medium is considered from the perspective of Newton's equations and Lie-Trotter factorization. The development starts by demonstrating that the energy of the molecule evolves slowly relative to the time scale of atomic collisions-vibrations. The energy is envisioned to be a coarse-grained variable that coevolves with the rapidly fluctuating atomistic degrees of freedom. Lie-Trotter factorization is shown to be a natural framework for expressing this coevolution. A mathematical formalism and workflow for efficient multiscale simulation of energy transfer is presented. Lactoferrin and human papilloma virus capsid-like structure are used for validation.

  19. Factors affecting the efficiency of foal production in a commercial oocyte transfer program.

    PubMed

    Riera, Fernando L; Roldán, Jaime E; Gomez, José; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    Transfer of donor oocytes to the oviducts of inseminated recipient mares (oocyte transfer, OT) presents a valuable method for production of foals from otherwise infertile mares. Little information is available, however, on factors affecting success of OT in a clinical setting. We report the findings over three breeding seasons in a commercial OT program developed at an equine embryo transfer center in Argentina. Overall, 25 mares were enrolled, and 197 follicle aspiration procedures were performed. The average mare age was 23 years. Follicle aspiration was performed with a needle placed through the flank; the oocyte recovery rate per follicle aspirated was 149 of 227 (66%). Induction of donor ovulation with deslorelin + hCG resulted in a significantly higher oocyte recovery rate than did induction with deslorelin alone (75% vs. 58%). There was no significant effect of mare age (17-20, 21-24, or 25-27 years) on oocyte recovery rate. Twelve oocytes were degenerating or lost during handling; transfer of the remaining 137 oocytes resulted in 42 pregnancies (31%) at 14 days. Of these, 32 (23% per transfer) went on to produce a foal or ongoing pregnancy. Transfer of oocytes recovered with a compact cumulus, without donor follicle induction, or less than 20 hours after induction was associated with a significantly reduced pregnancy rate (1/16, 6%), as was use of noncycling, hormone-treated recipients (2/22, 9%). To evaluate management factors affecting pregnancy rate, noncycling, hormone-treated recipients were disregarded, and only procedures using mature (expanded cumulus) oocytes recovered and transferred on the standard schedule (n = 99) were included. Mare age did not significantly affect rates of pregnancy or pregnancy loss. Similar pregnancy rates were obtained using recipients inseminated from 1 to 27 hours before transfer. Counterintuitively, insemination of recipients immediately (1-2 hours) after aspiration of the recipient follicle was associated with

  20. The Role of Individual and Training Design Factors on Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatti, Muhammad Awais; Kaur, Sharan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to highlight the role of individual and training design factors on training transfer. Design/methodology/approach: A review of the literature is conducted, and this review highlights a dual role of perceived content validity in the form of increasing self-efficacy and the role of trainees' reaction. The study…

  1. Monte Carlo direct view factor and generalized radiative heat transfer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mc Williams, J. L.; Scates, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    Computer programs find the direct view factor from one surface segment to another using the Monte carlo technique, and the radioactive-transfer coefficients between surface segments. An advantage of the programs is the great generality of problems treatable and rapidity of solution from problem conception to receipt of results.

  2. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL FACTORS IN TRANSFER OF TRAINING, PHASE I. QUARTERLY REPORTS 2 AND 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STOLUROW, LAWRENCE M.

    PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL FACTORS INVOLVED IN THE TRANSFER OF TRAINING WERE STUDIED BY USE OF PROGRAMED SELF-INSTRUCTION USING TEACHING MACHINES. THIS MEDIUM WAS CHOSEN BECAUSE IT PROVIDES LABORATORY-LIKE CONDITIONS SUCH AS STABILIZED METHODS, AND STIMULUS CONTROL INCLUDING CONTROL OF TEACHER PERSONALITY, PLUS A STEP-BY-STEP RECORD OF THE…

  3. Factors Associated with Transfer of Training in Workplace E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Ji-Hye; Wentling, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of factors associated with e-learning, particularly computer attitudes and usability, on transfer of training in workplace e-learning courses. Design/methodology/approach--This study relied on quantitative data obtained from four online survey questionnaires. The sample of this study…

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF AN AIR-TO-LEAF VAPOR PHASE TRANSFER FACTOR FOR DIOXINS AND FURANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Results of an experiment in which grass was grown in a greenhouse and outdoors, and in soils of different concentration levels of dioxins and furans, were used in a modeling exercise to derive an air-to-leaf vapor phase transfer factor. The purpose of the experiment was to under...

  5. A Transfer Learning Approach for Applying Matrix Factorization to Small ITS Datasets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voß, Lydia; Schatten, Carlotta; Mazziotti, Claudia; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Machine Learning methods for Performance Prediction in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS) have proven their efficacy; specific methods, e.g. Matrix Factorization (MF), however suffer from the lack of available information about new tasks or new students. In this paper we show how this problem could be solved by applying Transfer Learning (TL),…

  6. Factors Influencing Pronunciation Accuracy: L1 Negative Transfer, Task Variables and Individual Aptitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qian

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of three factors on pronunciation accuracy of Chinese adult foreign language learners. Ten target sounds including phonemes and syllables are included in the pre-test, an analysis of which shows that the mispronunciation of the randomly chosen target sounds mainly results from L1 negative transfer. It is…

  7. Factors Contributing to the Upward Transfer of Baccalaureate Aspirants Beginning at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xueli

    2012-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with the upward transfer of baccalaureate aspirants beginning at community colleges. Based on data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 and the Postsecondary Education Transcript Study, a sequential logistic regression analysis was conducted to predict bachelor's degree-seeking community…

  8. Toxicity in lead salt spiked soils to plants, invertebrates and microbial processes: Unraveling effects of acidification, salt stress and ageing reactions.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Erik; Oorts, Koen; Peeters, Sofie; Lanno, Roman; Cheyns, Karlien

    2015-12-01

    The fate and effects of toxic trace metals in soil freshly spiked soluble metal salts do not mimic those of metals in the field. This study was set up to test the magnitude of effects of salinity, acidification, and ageing on toxicity of lead (Pb) to plants, invertebrates and soil microbial processes. Three soils were spiked with Pb2+ salts up to a concentration of 8000 mg Pb/kg and were tested either after spiking, after soil leaching followed by pH correction, or after a 5-year outdoor ageing period with free drainage followed by pH correction. Soil solution ionic strength exceeded 150 mmol/L in soils tested directly after spiking and this decreased partially after leaching and returned back to background values after 5-year outdoor equilibration. Chronic toxicity to two plants, two invertebrates, and three microbial endpoints was consistently found in all spiked soils that were not leached. This toxicity significantly decreased or became absent after 5 years of ageing in 19 of the 20 toxicity tests by a factor 8 (median factor; range: 1.4->50), measured by the factor increase of total soil Pb dose required to induce 10% inhibition. The toxicity of Pb in leached soils was intermediate between the other two treatments. The lowest detectable chronic thresholds (EC10) in aged soils ranged 350-5300 mg Pb/kg. Correlation analysis, including data of Pb2+ speciation in soil solution, suggests that reduced ionic strength rather than acidification or true ageing is the main factor explaining the soil treatment effects after spiking. It is suggested that future toxicity studies should test fine PbO powder as a relevant source for Pb in soils to exclude the confounding salt effects. PMID:26218561

  9. Transfer of Drug Resistance Factors to the Dimorphic Bacterium CAULOBACTER CRESCENTUS

    PubMed Central

    Ely, Bert

    1979-01-01

    The P-type drug resistance factors RP4, RK2, R702, R68.45, and the N-type drug resistance factor R46 are transferred to Caulobacter crescentus at high frequencies. They are stably maintained and their antibiotic resistances are expressed. Experiments with RP4 have shown that intergeneric transfer of RP4 occurs with greater than 90% of the recipient cells in filter matings between Escherichia coli donors and C. crescentus recipients. Reciprocal matings with C. crescentus donors are less efficient, but still occur at a frequency of 10-1. C. crescentus strains maintain RP4 as a plasmid, are sensitive to RP4-specific phage, and segregate phage-resistant cells at a frequency of 10-4 to 10-5. The RP4 plasmid can be used in several ways: (1) the RP4 plasmid will promote chromosomal exchange between C. crescentus strains at frequencies ranging from 10-6 to 10-8; (2) RP4 will promote the transfer of nonconjugative colE1 plasmids from E. coli to C. crescentus; once transferred, the colE1 plasmid is stably maintained under nonselective conditions, can be transferred serially, and segregates independently from RP4; and (3) RP4 can be used to introduce transposons into the C. crescentus chromosome, providing the basis for additional genetic techniques. PMID:378764

  10. 134Cs transfer factors to green gram and soybean as influenced by waste mica.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasa Chari, M; Manjaiah, K M; Sachdev, P; Sachdev, M S

    2012-02-01

    Greenhouse pot culture experiment was carried out to study the (134)Cs transfer factors from soils to green gram and soybean as influenced by waste mica application (@ 0, 10, 20, 40 g mica kg(-1) soil) and compared with muriate of potash (MOP) application (0.17 g kg(-1) soil). For the study, the soils were contaminated with (134)Cs radionuclide @ 37 kBq kg(-1) soil. The shoot biomass and K uptake by crops were significantly improved with waste mica application (@ 40 g kg(-1) soil). Compared to control, waste mica and MOP application significantly improved the yield, K content in plant and its uptake. Amongst the soils, crops grown in vertisol recorded higher shoot biomass compared to inceptisol and ultisol. Irrespective of the treatments, higher (134)Cs transfer factors were seen in ultisol (0.30) as compared to inceptisol (0.16) and vertisol (0.13). It was observed that higher the K concentration in soil and plant, lowered (134)Cs transfer to green gram and soybean. The study recommended that waste mica @ 20 g kg(-1) would be useful for checking the (134)Cs transfer factors from soils to green gram and soybean. PMID:22115435

  11. The ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient in the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Benyi; Lu, Yigang

    2008-10-01

    Based on several hypotheses about the process of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction, the onflow around the solute granule is figured out by the Navier-Stocks equation. In combination with the Higbie’s solute infiltration model, the link between the mass-transfer coefficient and the velocity of flow is found. The mass-transfer coefficient with the ultrasonical effect is compared with that without the ultrasonical effect, and then a new parameter named the ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient is brought forward, which describes the mathematical model of the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction process enhanced by ultrasonic. The model gives out the relationships among the ultrasonical power, the ultrasonical frequency, the radius of solute granule and the ultrasonic-enhanced factor of mass-transfer coefficient. The results calculated by this model fit well with the experimental data, including the extraction of Coix Lacryma-jobi Seed Oil (CLSO) and Coix Lacryma-jobi Seed Ester (CLSE) from coix seeds and the extraction of Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) from the alga by means of the ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (USFE) and the supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE) respectively. This proves the rationality of the ultrasonic-enhanced factor model. The model provides a theoretical basis for the application of ultrasonic-enhanced supercritical fluid extraction technique.

  12. Recoil polarization measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew Puckett

    2009-12-01

    Electromagnetic form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon that describe the effect of its internal quark structure on the cross section and spin observables in elastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Double-polarization experiments have become the preferred technique to measure the proton and neutron electric form factors at high momentum transfers. The recently completed GEp-III experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility used the recoil polarization method to extend the knowledge of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio GpE/GpM to Q2 = 8.5 GeV2. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the experiment.

  13. Scale-model charge-transfer technique for measuring enhancement factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kositsky, J.; Nanevicz, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Determination of aircraft electric field enhancement factors is crucial when using airborne field mill (ABFM) systems to accurately measure electric fields aloft. SRI used the scale model charge transfer technique to determine enhancement factors of several canonical shapes and a scale model Learjet 36A. The measured values for the canonical shapes agreed with known analytic solutions within about 6 percent. The laboratory determined enhancement factors for the aircraft were compared with those derived from in-flight data gathered by a Learjet 36A outfitted with eight field mills. The values agreed to within experimental error (approx. 15 percent).

  14. Survey of literature on convective heat transfer coefficients and recovery factors for high atmosphere thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, S.

    1973-01-01

    Heat transfer phenomena of rarefied gas flows is discussed based on a literature survey of analytical and experimental rarefied gas dynamics. Subsonic flows are emphasized for the purposes of meteorological thermometry in the high atmosphere. The heat transfer coefficients for three basic geometries are given in the regimes of free molecular flow, transition flow, slip flow, and continuum flow. Different types of heat phenomena, and the analysis of theoretical and experimental data are presented. The uncertainties calculated from the interpolation rule compared with the available experimental data are discussed. The recovery factor for each geometry in subsonic rarefied flows is also given.

  15. Experimental methodologies and preliminary transfer factor data for estimation of dermal exposures to particles.

    PubMed

    Rodes, C E; Newsome, J R; Vanderpool, R W; Antley, J T; Lewis, R G

    2001-01-01

    Developmental efforts and experimental data that focused on quantifying the transfer of particles on a mass basis from indoor surfaces to human skin are described. Methods that utilized a common fluorescein-tagged Arizona Test Dust (ATD) as a possible surrogate for housedust and a uniform surface dust deposition chamber to permit estimation of particle mass transfer for selected dust size fractions were developed. Particle transfers to both wet and dry skin were quantified for contact events with stainless steel, vinyl, and carpeted surfaces that had been pre-loaded with the tagged test dust. To better understand the representativeness of the test dust, a large housedust sample was collected and analyzed for particle size distribution by mass and several metals (Pb, Mn, Cd, Cr, and Ni). The real housedust sample was found to have multimodal size distributions (mg/g) for particle-phase metals. The fluorescein tagging provided surface coatings of 0.11-0.36 ng fluorescein per gram of dust. The predominant surface location of the fluorescein tag would best represent simulated mass transfers for contaminant species coating the surfaces of the particles. The computer-controlled surface deposition chamber provided acceptably uniform surface coatings with known particle loadings on the contact test panels. Significant findings for the dermal transfer factor data were: (a) only about 1/3 of the projected hand surface typically came in contact with the smooth test surfaces during a press; (b) the fraction of particles transferred to the skin decreased as the surface roughness increased, with carpeting transfer coefficients averaging only 1/10 those of stainless steel; (c) hand dampness significantly increased the particle mass transfer; (d) consecutive presses decreased the particle transfer by a factor of 3 as the skin surface became loaded, requiring approximately 100 presses to reach an equilibrium transfer rate; and (e) an increase in metals concentration with decreasing

  16. Strand Transfer and Elongation of HIV-1 Reverse Transcription Is Facilitated by Cell Factors In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Warrilow, David; Warren, Kylie; Harrich, David

    2010-01-01

    Recent work suggests a role for multiple host factors in facilitating HIV-1 reverse transcription. Previously, we identified a cellular activity which increases the efficiency of HIV-1 reverse transcription in vitro. Here, we describe aspects of the activity which shed light on its function. The cellular factor did not affect synthesis of strong-stop DNA but did improve downstream DNA synthesis. The stimulatory activity was isolated by gel filtration in a single fraction of the exclusion volume. Velocity-gradient purified HIV-1, which was free of detectable RNase activity, showed poor reverse transcription efficiency but was strongly stimulated by partially purified cell proteins. Hence, the cell factor(s) did not inactivate an RNase activity that might degrade the viral genomic RNA and block completion of reverse transcription. Instead, the cell factor(s) enhanced first strand transfer and synthesis of late reverse transcription suggesting it stabilized the reverse transcription complex. The factor did not affect lysis of HIV-1 by Triton X-100 in the endogenous reverse transcription (ERT) system, and ERT reactions with HIV-1 containing capsid mutations, which varied the biochemical stability of viral core structures and impeded reverse transcription in cells, showed no difference in the ability to be stimulated by the cell factor(s) suggesting a lack of involvement of the capsid in the in vitro assay. In addition, reverse transcription products were found to be resistant to exogenous DNase I activity when the active fraction was present in the ERT assay. These results indicate that the cell factor(s) may improve reverse transcription by facilitating DNA strand transfer and DNA synthesis. It also had a protective function for the reverse transcription products, but it is unclear if this is related to improved DNA synthesis. PMID:20949087

  17. [Team-based community psychiatry: importance of context factors and transferability of evidence from studies].

    PubMed

    Weinmann, S; Gühne, U; Kösters, M; Gaebel, W; Becker, T

    2012-07-01

    The German Society for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Neurology (DGPPN) guidelines on psychosocial interventions for people with severe mental illness appraise the transferability of results of trials evaluating community-based mental health services to the German situation. This assessment has to draw on research results on factors determining effectiveness. This must be seen against the background of a lack of high-quality trials in Germany. The article discusses system, context and setting factors related to the transfer of evidence on community-based service models from other countries. These issues are discussed on the basis of evidence concerning the models of case management, assertive community treatment and community mental health teams. International differences in study findings are highlighted and the importance of treatment-as-usual in influencing study results is emphasized. The more control services including elements of community-based care there are and the less the pressure to reduce inpatient treatment (threshold to inpatient care admission), the smaller the relative effect sizes of innovative care models will be.In the absence of direct evidence, careful examination of transferability is required before introducing health care models. Research has revealed solid evidence for several factors influencing the effects of innovative community mental health care. Among key factors in the care of people with severe mental illness, home visits and joint team responsibility for both psychiatric and social care were identified. This evidence can facilitate the adaptation of successful mental health care models in Germany. PMID:22688090

  18. Measured elemental transfer factors for boreal hunter/gatherer scenarios: fish, game and berries.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, S C; Long, J M; Sanipelli, B

    2010-11-01

    The environmental assessment of long-term nuclear waste management requires data to estimate food chain transfers for radionuclides in various environmental settings. For key elements such as iodine (I) and chlorine (Cl), there is a paucity of transfer factor data, particularly outside of agricultural food chains. This study dealt with transfers of I, Cl and 28 other elements to foods that would be typical of boreal hunter/gatherer lifestyles, as well as being common foods for modern recreational and subsistence hunters. Food/substrate concentration ratios (CRs) and related transfer factors for eight species of widely distributed fish, whitetail deer (Odocoileus virginianus), Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and wild blueberries (Vaccinium myrtilloides) were measured and compared to the literature. Limited data were obtained for caribou (Rangifer tarandus), elk (Cervus elaphus) and moose (Alces americanus). Freshwater sediment Kd values and CRs for a ubiquitous freshwater macrophyte were also obtained. The CRs for I in fish were 29Lkg(-1) in edible muscle (fillets) of large-bodied species and 85Lkg(-1) for whole, small-bodied fish. The logCRs for fish and macrophytes were correlated across elements. For several elements, the Kds for sediments in deep water were approximately 4-fold higher than for littoral samples. The elemental transfers to wild animals for some elements were notably different than the literature indicates for domestic animals. It is argued that the transfer data obtained using indigenous elements from real environmental settings, as opposed to contaminant elements in experimental or impacted environments, are especially relevant to assessment of long-term impacts. PMID:20619514

  19. Transfer Students in STEM Majors: Gender Differences in the Socialization Factors that Influence Academic and Social Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Dimitra Lynette

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to examine the socialization factors of community college transfer students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM); (b) to examine the socialization factors that impact the academic and social adjustment of community college transfer students in STEM majors; and (c) to understand how female…

  20. Effect of Plant and Environmental Factors on ALS-resistant Gene Transfer from ClearfieldTM Rice to Red Rice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Imazethapyr-resistant gene from ClearfieldTM (CL) rice varieties transfers through pollen flow to red rice (Oryza sativa L.), a noxious weed in rice production in southern states. Factors which affect gene transfer rate include, but are not limited to, plant and environmental factors. Thus, we aimed...

  1. Social Factors that Impact Women's Practice of Breast Self-Examination: A Challenge to the Transfer of Training Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Patricia A.; Flannery, Daniele D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the qualitative study was to understand how social factors might help or hinder the training transfer process. Specifically, this qualitative research looked at the meanings a group of women attached to social factors that might influence their practice of breast self-exam. Implications for transfer of training are suggested.…

  2. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND EDUCATIONAL FACTORS IN TRANSFER OF TRAINING, SECTION TWO--BIBLIOGRAPHY OF STUDIES OF TRANSFER OF TRAINING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STOLUROW, LAWRENCE M.; AND OTHERS

    THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY ON TRANSFER OF LEARNING STUDIES WAS COMPLETED FOR U.S. OFFICE OF EDUCATION CONTRACT NO. 4-20-002 AS APPENDIX "A" (SECTION TWO) TO THE FINAL REPORT. IT CONTAINS 1,775 TITLES FROM THE PERIOD 1890 TO 1966 ON TRANSFER OF LEARNING. THE CONCERN WAS TO COMPILE THE EMPIRICALLY BASED PRINCIPLES RELATING TO TRANSFER OF TRAINING IN A FORM…

  3. Factors that influence the use of safe patient transfer technique in home care service.

    PubMed

    Skoglind-Öhman, Ingegerd; Kjellberg, Katarina

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to explore whether home care service personnel used knowledge and skills in transfer technique in their daily work; knowledge and skills gained by participating in training programmes, and to identify factors that may hinder and support their use. Focus group interviews were held with 2 home care service groups in 2 Swedish towns. Individual interviews were conducted with the personnel's managers, unit leaders and safety representatives. Qualitative content analysis was used. The findings revealed that the personnel tried to use their knowledge and skills. However, there were both hindering and supporting factors for the use of safe work technique. The findings indicate that training programmes in transfer technique should not be implemented as isolated actions without considering the physical environment, the wishes of persons receiving care and their relatives, the work organisation, the safety culture and the role of managers. PMID:22152508

  4. Analysis of spectral radiative heat transfer using discrete exchange factor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinqiu; Naraghi, M. H. N.

    1993-09-01

    A solution technique is developed for spectral radiative heat-transfer problems. The formulation is based on the discrete exchange factor (DEF) method and uses Edward's (1976) wide band model to obtain spectral data. The results of the analyses of three cases were found to be in excellent agreement with those of the zonal method and differ by less than 5 percent from those of the discrete-ordinates method.

  5. Transfer of spleen cells expanded by T cell growth factor suppresses arthritis induced in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, H; Tsunematsu, T

    1987-01-01

    The effects of transfer of T cell growth factor (TCGF)-expanded spleen cells after concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation into syngeneic Lewis rats were studied. The recipient rats were immunized with complete Freund's adjuvant for induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA) or chick type II collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant for induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) on day 0. Each of 5 X 10(7) cultured cells without mitogenic stimulation, 2 X 10(7) Con A-stimulated cells, or 1 X 10(7) TCGF-expanded cells cultured for 8 days (4 days X 2 culture cycles) after Con A stimulation was given on days 0 and 7. Both transfers of the cultured cells without stimulation and TCGF-expanded cells markedly diminished the severity of AA and CIA. On the contrary, transfer of Con A-stimulated cells led to no suppressive activity. In addition, transfer to TCGF-expanded cells significantly lowered the titre of anti-type II collagen antibody compared to that of control rats. The transfer of 1 X 10(7) TCGF-expanded cells was optimal for suppressing AA, in terms of cell number. This observation suggests that these cells were much more effective than were the unstimulated cultured cells, for which more than five times the number was required for the same suppressive activity. As far as the phenotypic proportion of helper (W3/13) and suppressor (OX-8) cells is concerned, we found no significant differences between the cultured cell groups and the freshly separated spleen cell group. The precise mechanism of these suppressive effects is the subject of further study. The transfer of TCGF-expanded cells appears to have a potent immunomodulatory effect. PMID:3497743

  6. Direct phylogenetic evidence for lateral transfer of elongation factor-like gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins, which show high similarity to elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), have been found in phylogenetically distantly related eukaryotes. The sporadic distribution of “EFL-containing” lineages within “EF-1α-containing” lineages indirectly, but strongly, suggests lateral gene transfer as the principal driving force in EFL evolution. However, one of the most critical aspects in the above hypothesis, the donor lineages in any putative cases of lateral EFL gene transfer, remained unclear. In this study, we provide direct evidence for lateral transfer of an EFL gene through the analyses of 10 diatom EFL genes. All diatom EFL homologues tightly clustered in phylogenetic analyses, suggesting acquisition of the exogenous EFL gene early in diatom evolution. Our survey additionally identified Thalassiosira pseudonana as a eukaryote bearing EF-1α and EFL genes and secondary EFL gene loss in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the complete genome of which encodes only the EF-1α gene. Most importantly, the EFL phylogeny recovered a robust grouping of homologues from diatoms, the cercozoan Bigelowiella natans, and the foraminifer Planoglabratella opecularis, with the diatoms nested within the Bigelowiella plus Planoglabratella (Rhizaria) grouping. The particular relationships recovered are further consistent with two characteristic sequence motifs. The best explanation of our data analyses is an EFL gene transfer from a foraminifer to a diatom, the first case in which the donor–recipient relationship was clarified. Finally, based on a reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR assay and the genome information of Thalassiosira and Phaeodactylum, we propose the loss of elongation factor function in Thalassiosira EF-1α. PMID:18458344

  7. Heat transfer and friction factors in the ribbed square convergent and divergent channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. S.; Ahn, S. W.

    2016-06-01

    Heat transfer and friction factors are reported for the measurements of turbulent flows in the convergent and divergent square channels with one-sided ribbed wall as well as two opposite in-line ribbed walls. The study covers three different hydraulic diameter ratios between inlet and exit at the test section such as Dho/Dhi = 0.75, 1.0, and 1.33 and Reynolds numbers in the range of 25,000-79,000. The channels, composing of ten isolated copper sections in the length of test section of 1 m, have the hydraulic diameter of 87.5 mm for the straight channel (Dho/Dhi = 1.0); the rib height-to-hydraulic diameter is 0.114; the rib pitch-to-height ratio equals 10. On the contrary to public opinion that the friction factor depends on the portion of the ribbed area, the total friction factor in the two opposite ribbed walls are lower than in the one-sided ribbed wall in the divergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 1.33 because the total pressure, summing positive dynamic and negative static pressures, is acted. The results show that the two opposite ribbed divergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 1.33 provides the best heat transfer enhancement and the two opposite ribbed convergent channel of Dho/Dhi = 0.75 provides the worst friction factor enhancement, and the ribbed divergent channels are generally recommended.

  8. Factors and perceptions that influence women's decisions to have a single embryo transferred.

    PubMed

    de Lacey, S; Davies, M; Homan, G; Briggs, N; Norman, R J

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that inhibit or promote the adoption of single embryo transfer (SET). A cohort of 163 women patients receiving IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment, comprising 87 women choosing SET and 63 women choosing double embryo transfer (DET), were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. The data were compared using logistic regression analysis. Confidence in the chance of pregnancy with SET, younger age and first treatment were predictive of a decision for SET. Preference for a healthy and singleton pregnancy was predictive but perceptions of the incidence or risk of multiple gestation were not. Factors such as a sense of time urgency and past experience of treatment were significant and predictive of diminished choice of SET. The clinic doctor was an important influencing factor. The results of this study confirm that improved pregnancy rates in SET coupled with an official clinic policy to promote SET in younger, first cycle patients influenced many women to choose SET. However, repeated treatment, advancing age and urgency to become pregnant are factors that moderate a woman's choice for SET. PMID:18028744

  9. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance Determined by Resistance-Transfer Factors1

    PubMed Central

    Unowsky, Joel; Rachmeler, Martin

    1966-01-01

    Unowsky, Joel (Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, Ill.), and Martin Rachmeler. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance determined by resistance-transfer factors. J. Bacteriol. 92:358–365. 1966.—This study was concerned with the mechanism of expression of drug resistance carried by resistance-transfer (R) factors of two types: fi− (negative fertility inhibition) and fi+ (positive fertility inhibition). The levels of drug resistance determined by R factors used in this study were similar to those reported by other investigators. A new finding was that Escherichia coli carrying the fi− episome was resistant to 150 to 200 μg/ml of streptomycin. The growth kinetics of R factor-containing cells were similar in the presence or absence of streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline, but a period of adaptation was necessary before cells began exponential growth in the presence of tetracycline. By use of radioactive antibiotics, it was shown that cells containing the fi− episome were impermeable to tetracycline and streptomycin, whereas cells containing the fi+ episome were impermeable only to chloramphenicol. Cell-free extracts from fi+ and fi− cells were sensitive to the antibiotics tested in the polyuridylic acid-stimulated incorporation of phenylalanine into protein. PMID:16562121

  10. 100% Classification Accuracy Considered Harmful: The Normalized Information Transfer Factor Explains the Accuracy Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Valverde-Albacete, Francisco J.; Peláez-Moreno, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The most widely spread measure of performance, accuracy, suffers from a paradox: predictive models with a given level of accuracy may have greater predictive power than models with higher accuracy. Despite optimizing classification error rate, high accuracy models may fail to capture crucial information transfer in the classification task. We present evidence of this behavior by means of a combinatorial analysis where every possible contingency matrix of 2, 3 and 4 classes classifiers are depicted on the entropy triangle, a more reliable information-theoretic tool for classification assessment. Motivated by this, we develop from first principles a measure of classification performance that takes into consideration the information learned by classifiers. We are then able to obtain the entropy-modulated accuracy (EMA), a pessimistic estimate of the expected accuracy with the influence of the input distribution factored out, and the normalized information transfer factor (NIT), a measure of how efficient is the transmission of information from the input to the output set of classes. The EMA is a more natural measure of classification performance than accuracy when the heuristic to maximize is the transfer of information through the classifier instead of classification error count. The NIT factor measures the effectiveness of the learning process in classifiers and also makes it harder for them to “cheat” using techniques like specialization, while also promoting the interpretability of results. Their use is demonstrated in a mind reading task competition that aims at decoding the identity of a video stimulus based on magnetoencephalography recordings. We show how the EMA and the NIT factor reject rankings based in accuracy, choosing more meaningful and interpretable classifiers. PMID:24427282

  11. 100% classification accuracy considered harmful: the normalized information transfer factor explains the accuracy paradox.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Albacete, Francisco J; Peláez-Moreno, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The most widely spread measure of performance, accuracy, suffers from a paradox: predictive models with a given level of accuracy may have greater predictive power than models with higher accuracy. Despite optimizing classification error rate, high accuracy models may fail to capture crucial information transfer in the classification task. We present evidence of this behavior by means of a combinatorial analysis where every possible contingency matrix of 2, 3 and 4 classes classifiers are depicted on the entropy triangle, a more reliable information-theoretic tool for classification assessment. Motivated by this, we develop from first principles a measure of classification performance that takes into consideration the information learned by classifiers. We are then able to obtain the entropy-modulated accuracy (EMA), a pessimistic estimate of the expected accuracy with the influence of the input distribution factored out, and the normalized information transfer factor (NIT), a measure of how efficient is the transmission of information from the input to the output set of classes. The EMA is a more natural measure of classification performance than accuracy when the heuristic to maximize is the transfer of information through the classifier instead of classification error count. The NIT factor measures the effectiveness of the learning process in classifiers and also makes it harder for them to "cheat" using techniques like specialization, while also promoting the interpretability of results. Their use is demonstrated in a mind reading task competition that aims at decoding the identity of a video stimulus based on magnetoencephalography recordings. We show how the EMA and the NIT factor reject rankings based in accuracy, choosing more meaningful and interpretable classifiers. PMID:24427282

  12. Neutron spectroscopic factors of Ar34 and Ar46 from (p,d) transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jenny; Tsang, M. B.; Bazin, D.; Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Lynch, W. G.; Rogers, A. M.; Sanetullaev, A.; Sun, Z. Y.; Youngs, M.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Famiano, M.; Hudan, S.; Shapira, D.; O'Malley, P.; Peters, W. A.; Chae, K. Y.; Schmitt, K.

    2011-01-01

    Single-neutron-transfer measurements using (p,d) reactions have been performed at 33 MeV per nucleon with proton-rich Ar34 and neutron-rich Ar46 beams in inverse kinematics. The extracted spectroscopic factors are compared to the large-basis shell-model calculations. Relatively weak quenching of the spectroscopic factors is observed between Ar34 and Ar46. The experimental results suggest that neutron correlations have a weak dependence on the asymmetry of the nucleus over this isotopic region. The present results are consistent with the systematics established from extensive studies of spectroscopic factors and dispersive optical-model analyses of Ca40-49 isotopes. They are, however, inconsistent with the trends obtained in knockout-reaction measurements.

  13. Extracellular Vesicles from Trypanosoma brucei Mediate Virulence Factor Transfer and Cause Host Anemia.

    PubMed

    Szempruch, Anthony J; Sykes, Steven E; Kieft, Rudo; Dennison, Lauren; Becker, Allison C; Gartrell, Anzio; Martin, William J; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Almeida, Igor C; Hajduk, Stephen L; Harrington, John M

    2016-01-14

    Intercellular communication between parasites and with host cells provides mechanisms for parasite development, immune evasion, and disease pathology. Bloodstream African trypanosomes produce membranous nanotubes that originate from the flagellar membrane and disassociate into free extracellular vesicles (EVs). Trypanosome EVs contain several flagellar proteins that contribute to virulence, and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense EVs contain the serum resistance-associated protein (SRA) necessary for human infectivity. T. b. rhodesiense EVs transfer SRA to non-human infectious trypanosomes, allowing evasion of human innate immunity. Trypanosome EVs can also fuse with mammalian erythrocytes, resulting in rapid erythrocyte clearance and anemia. These data indicate that trypanosome EVs are organelles mediating non-hereditary virulence factor transfer and causing host erythrocyte remodeling, inducing anemia. PMID:26771494

  14. [Viral transfer of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in gene therapy].

    PubMed

    Wędrowska, Ewelina; Wandtke, Tomasz; Dyczek, Andrzej; Woźniak, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively induces carcinoma cell death through the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Preclinical trials of gene therapy have been conducted using viral transfer of the TRAIL transgene into prostate, bladder, breast, kidney, liver, non-small cell lung cancer and also glioblastoma cells. Experiments in vitro demonstrated the extensive apoptosis of target cells as well as frequent disease regression or remission. TRAIL transfer did not show any side effects, opposite to chemotherapy. Encouraging results of TRAIL-related gene therapy were observed in rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes. Adenoviral vectors (AdV) encoding TRAIL are the most promising tool in anti-tumor therapy. They have undergone numerous modifications by increasing transfection efficiency and transgene expression in target cells. However, only one clinical phase I trial has been performed. AdV encoding the TRAIL transgene caused local inflammation and apoptosis in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27259213

  15. Transfer of R factors to and between genetically marked sublines of Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, L D

    1979-05-01

    Plasmids R1822 and pRD1 of the P-1 incompatibility group, for which Rhizobium japonicum had not previously been shown to serve as host, were introduced into a strain of R. japonicum. Acquisition of R68 and R68.45 plasmids by this Rhizobium was equivocal. Transfer of R1822 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and of pRD1 from Escherichia coli to R. japonicum was unambiguous, because the exconjugants subsequently cotransferred the three R-factor resistance determinants (kanamycin, tetracycline, and penicillin) between genetically marked sublines of strain I-110. Under optimal conditions the transfer of R1822 and pRD1 occurred at frequencies of approximately 10(-3) in plate matings of strains bearing as many as five dissimilar genetic markers. In matings with R1822 on membrane filters, recombinants were formed at incidences as high as 4%. PMID:114109

  16. Strategic factors in the development of the National Technology Transfer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Root, Jonathan F.; Stone, Barbara A.

    1993-01-01

    Broad consensus among industry and government leaders has developed over the last decade on the importance of applying the U.S. leadership in research and development (R&D) to strengthen competitiveness in the global marketplace, and thus enhance national prosperity. This consensus has emerged against the backdrop of increasing economic competition, and the dramatic reduction of military threats to national security with the end of the Cold War. This paper reviews the key factors and considerations that shaped - and continue to influence - the development of the Regional Technoloty Transfer Centers (RTTC) and the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC). Also, the future role of the national network in support of emerging technology policy initiatives will be explored.

  17. Growth factor enhanced retroviral gene transfer to the adult central nervous system.

    PubMed

    King, L A; Mitrophanous, K A; Clark, L A; Kim, V N; Rohll, J B; Kingsman, A J; Colello, R J

    2000-07-01

    The use of viral vectors for gene delivery into mammalian cells provides a new approach in the treatment of many human diseases. The first viral vector approved for human clinical trials was murine leukemia virus (MLV), which remains the most commonly used vector in clinical trials to date. However, the application of MLV vectors is limited since MLV requires cells to be actively dividing in order for transduction and therefore gene delivery to occur. This limitation precludes the use of MLV for delivering genes to the adult CNS, where very little cell division is occurring. However, we speculated that this inherent limitation of ML V may be overcome by utilizing the known mitogenic effect of growth factors on cells of the CNS. Specifically, an in vivo application of growth factor to the adult brain, if able to induce cell division, could enhance MLV-based gene transfer to the adult brain. We now show that an exogenous application of basic fibroblast growth factor induces cell division in vivo. Under these conditions, where cells of the adult brain are stimulated to divide, MLV-based gene transfer is significantly enhanced. This novel approach precludes any vector modifications and provides a simple and effective way of delivering genes to cells of the adult brain utilizing MLV-based retroviral vectors. PMID:10918476

  18. Single-Phase, Turbulent Heat-Transfer Friction-Factor Data Base Flow Enhanced Tb

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    Heat-exchanger designers need to know what type of performance improvement can be obtained before they will consider enhanced tubes. In particular, they need access to the heat-transfer coefficients and friction-factor values of enhanced tube types that are commercially available. To compile these data from the numerous publications and reports in the open literature is a formidable task that can discourage the designer from using them. A computer program that contains a comprehensive data base withmore » a search feature would be a handy tool for the designer to obtain an estimate of the performance improvement that can be obtained with a particular enhanced tube geometry. In addition, it would be a valuable tool for researchers who are developing and/or validating new prediction methods. This computer program can be used to obtain friction-factor and/or heat-transfer data for a broad range of internally enhanced tube geometries with forced-convective turbulent flow. The program has search features; that is the user can select data for tubes with a particular enhancement geometry range or data obtained from a particular source or publication. The friction factor data base contains nearly 5,000 points and the heat-transfer data base contains more than 4,700 points. About 360 different tube geometries are included from the 36 different sources. Data for tubes with similar geometries and the same and/or different types can be easily extracted with the sort feature of this data base and compared. Users of the program are heat-exchanger designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  19. Interhospital transfer: an independent risk factor for mortality in the surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Katherine R; Kelz, Rachel R; Mills, Angela M; Reinke, Caroline E; Robertson, Mathew P; Sims, Carrie A; Pascual, Jose L; Reilly, Patrick M; Holena, Daniel N

    2013-09-01

    Interhospital transfer (IHT) is associated with mortality in medical and mixed intensive care units (ICUs), but few studies have examined this relationship in a surgical ICU (SICU) setting. We hypothesized that IHT is associated with increased mortality in SICU patients relative to ICU patients admitted within the hospital. We reviewed SICU and transfer center databases from a tertiary academic center over a 2-year period. Inclusion criteria included age 18 years or older and SICU admission 24 hours or greater. Demographic data, admission service, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores were captured. The primary end point was ICU mortality. Univariate logistic regression was used to test the association between variables and mortality. Factors found to be associated with mortality at P < 0.1 were entered into a multivariable model. Of 4542 admissions, 416 arrived by IHT. Compared with the non-IHT group, the IHT group was older (age 58.3 years [interquartile range, 47.8 to 70.6] vs. 57.8 years [interquartile range, 44.1 to 68.8] years, P = 0.036), sicker (APACHE II score 16.5 [interquartile range, 12 to 23] vs. 14 [interquartile range, 10 to 20], P < 0.001), and more likely to be white (82% [n = 341] vs. 69% [n = 2865], P < 0.001). Mortality rates in IHT patients were highest on the emergency surgery (18%), transplant surgery (16%), and gastrointestinal surgery (8%) services. After adjusting for age and APACHE II score, IHT remained a risk factor for ICU mortality (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 2.45; P = 0.032) in SICU patients. Interhospital transfer is an independent risk factor for mortality in the SICU population; this risk is unevenly distributed through service lines. Further efforts to determine the cause of this association are warranted. PMID:24069990

  20. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I.; Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H.

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  1. Selection of terrestrial transfer factors for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Y.C.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter value for a radioecological assessment model is not a single value but a distribution of values about a central value. The sources that contribute to the variability of transfer factors to predict foodchain transport of radionuclides are enumerated. Knowledge of these sources, judgement in interpreting the available data, consideration of collateral information, and established criteria that specify the desired level of conservatism in the resulting predictions are essential elements when selecting appropriate parameter values for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides. 39 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  2. Measurement of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan Miller

    2009-06-01

    The E02-013 collaboration's precision measurement of the electric form factor of the neutron at high momentum took place in Hall A of Jefferson Laboratory [1]. Four kinematic points spread in Q2 from 1.2 to 3.5 (GeV/c)2 reach the region of momentum transfer where there is little ambiguity that the form factors are dominated by the valence quarks. The electric form factor provides important constraints on the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of the nucleon and therefore to understand the currently unknown quark angular orbital moments. The talk presented newly obtained results for GnE including at Q2 of 2.5 (GeV/c)2. These measurements provide access to twice the range of momentum transfer for complete iso-spin decomposition of the nucleon form factors. The form factors of the u and d quarks were also presented. The measurement used a double polarization asymmetry method [2][3] with He polarized up to 55% (provided by a novel hybrid alkali optical pumping scheme utilizing a Rb & K mixture) and the highly polarized (85%) electron beam at CEBAF. A specially constructed detector package consisting of an electron spectrometer, named Big-Bite, with a solid angle of 95 msr and a large neutron detector were used to detect the particles in the reaction {sup 3}H{rvec e}({rvec e},e',h). The experimental apparatus provided more than 100 times better Figure-of-Merit than other GnE experiments utilizing polarized targets; for more information see [4].

  3. Examining the Factor Structure and Predictive Ability of the German-Version of the Learning Transfer Systems Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Reid; Kauffeld, Simone; Holton, Elwood F., III

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine the construct and predictive ability of a German version of the Learning Transfer Systems Inventory (GLTSI), an instrument designed to assess a constellation of 16 factors known to influence the transfer of training in work settings. Design/methodology/approach: The survey data for this study was…

  4. Studies on soil to grass transfer factor (Fv) and grass to milk transfer coefficient (Fm) for cesium in Kaiga region.

    PubMed

    Karunakara, N; Ujwal, P; Yashodhara, I; Rao, Chetan; Sudeep Kumara, K; Dileep, B N; Ravi, P M

    2013-10-01

    Detailed studies were carried out to establish site-specific soil to grass transfer factors (Fv) and grass to cow milk transfer coefficients (Fm) for radioactive cesium ((137)Cs) and stable cesium (Cs) for Kaiga region, where a nuclear power station has been in operation for more than 10 years. The study included adopted cows, cows of local farmers, and cows from the dairy farm. A grass field was developed specifically for the study and 2 local breed cows were adopted and allowed to graze in this grass field. The soil and grass samples were collected regularly from this field and analyzed for the concentrations of (137)Cs and stable Cs to evaluate the soil to grass Fv values. The milk samples from the adopted cows were analyzed for the (137)Cs and stable Cs concentrations to evaluate Fm values. For comparison, studies were also carried out in dominant grazing areas in different villages around the nuclear power plant and the cows of local farmers which graze in these areas were identified and milk samples were collected and analyzed regularly. The geometric mean values of Fv were found to be 1.1 × 10(-1) and 1.8 × 10(-1) for (137)Cs and stable Cs, respectively. The Fm of (137)Cs had geometric mean values of 1.9 × 10(-2) d L(-1) and 4.6 × 10(-2) d L(-1), respectively, for adopted Cows 1 and 2; 1.7 × 10(-2) d L(-1) for the cows of local farmers, and 4.0 × 10(-3) d L(-1) for the dairy farm cows. The geometric mean values of Fm for stable Cs were similar to those of (137)Cs. The Fm value for the dairy farm cows was an order of magnitude lower than those for local breed cows. The Fm values observed for the local breed cows were also an order of magnitude higher when compared to the many values reported in the literature and in the IAEA publication. Possible reasons for this higher Fm values were identified. The correlation between Fv and Fm values for (137)Cs and stable Cs and their dependence on the potassium content ((40)K and stable K) in

  5. Neutron spectroscopic factors of 55Ni hole-states from (p,d) transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanetullaev, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Lynch, W. G.; Lee, Jenny; Bazin, D.; Chan, K. P.; Coupland, D.; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Sun, Z. Y.; Youngs, M.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Famiano, M.; Hudan, S.; Shapira, D.; Peters, W. A.; Barbieri, C.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Horoi, M.; Otsuka, T.; Suzuki, T.; Utsuno, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Spectroscopic information has been extracted on the hole-states of 55Ni, the least known of the quartet of nuclei (55Ni, 57Ni, 55Co and 57Cu), one nucleon away from 56Ni, the N=Z=28 double magic nucleus. Using the H1(Ni56,d)Ni55 transfer reaction in inverse kinematics, neutron spectroscopic factors, spins and parities have been extracted for the f7/2, p3/2 and the s1/2 hole-states of 55Ni. These new data provide a benchmark for large basis calculations that include nucleonic orbits in both the sd and pf shells. State of the art calculations have been performed to describe the excitation energies and spectroscopic factors of the s1/2 hole-state below Fermi energy.

  6. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore » the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  7. Aggregated Transfer Factors For Small Mammals Collected From the Exposed Sediments Of A 137 Cs Contaminated Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, Michael H.; Jannika, G. Timothy; Wike, Lynn D

    2005-10-04

    {sup 137}Cs transfer factors were computed for small mammals collected from the dried sediment areas of a partially drained, contaminated reservoir. Soil {sup 137}Cs concentrations were heterogeneous on small and large spatial scales, with a geometric mean of 253.1 Bq/kg dry weight. About 50% of the variance in cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus tissue {sup 137}Cs levels was explained by variation in soil {sup 137}Cs levels. Soil to animal transfer factors (whole body dry weight) averaged 6.0 for cotton rats and 1.2 for cotton mice Peromyscus gossypinus. These values are similar to {sup 137}Cs transfer factors for herbivorous, homeothermic animals from other contaminated ecosystems. Site-specific transfer factors can significantly affect the estimation of dose. In the RESRAD-BIOTA dose model, the default transfer factor for {sup 137}Cs in terrestrial animals is 110 resulting in an estimate of radiation dose to terrestrial biota that is 16 times more than the dose calculated with the actual measured transfer factor.

  8. Statistical iterative reconstruction using fast optimization transfer algorithm with successively increasing factor in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Statistical iterative reconstruction exhibits particularly promising since it provides the flexibility of accurate physical noise modeling and geometric system description in transmission tomography system. However, to solve the objective function is computationally intensive compared to analytical reconstruction methods due to multiple iterations needed for convergence and each iteration involving forward/back-projections by using a complex geometric system model. Optimization transfer (OT) is a general algorithm converting a high dimensional optimization to a parallel 1-D update. OT-based algorithm provides a monotonic convergence and a parallel computing framework but slower convergence rate especially around the global optimal. Based on an indirect estimation on the spectrum of the OT convergence rate matrix, we proposed a successively increasing factor- scaled optimization transfer (OT) algorithm to seek an optimal step size for a faster rate. Compared to a representative OT based method such as separable parabolic surrogate with pre-computed curvature (PC-SPS), our algorithm provides comparable image quality (IQ) with fewer iterations. Each iteration retains a similar computational cost to PC-SPS. The initial experiment with a simulated Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) system shows that a total 40% computing time is saved by the proposed algorithm. In general, the successively increasing factor-scaled OT exhibits a tremendous potential to be a iterative method with a parallel computation, a monotonic and global convergence with fast rate.

  9. Transfer of Cadmium from Soil to Vegetable in the Pearl River Delta area, South China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huihua; Chen, Junjian; Zhu, Li; Yang, Guoyi; Li, Dingqiang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regional Cadmium (Cd) concentration levels in soils and in leaf vegetables across the Pearl River Delta (PRD) area; and reveal the transfer characteristics of Cadmium (Cd) from soils to leaf vegetable species on a regional scale. 170 paired vegetables and corresponding surface soil samples in the study area were collected for calculating the transfer factors of Cadmium (Cd) from soils to vegetables. This investigation revealed that in the study area Cd concentration in soils was lower (mean value 0.158 mg kg−1) compared with other countries or regions. The Cd-contaminated areas are mainly located in west areas of the Pearl River Delta. Cd concentrations in all vegetables were lower than the national standard of Safe vegetables (0.2 mg kg−1). 88% of vegetable samples met the standard of No-Polluted vegetables (0.05 mg kg−1). The Cd concentration in vegetables was mainly influenced by the interactions of total Cd concentration in soils, soil pH and vegetable species. The fit lines of soil-to-plant transfer factors and total Cd concentration in soils for various vegetable species were best described by the exponential equation (), and these fit lines can be divided into two parts, including the sharply decrease part with a large error range, and the slowly decrease part with a low error range, according to the gradual increasing of total Cd concentrations in soils. PMID:25247431

  10. Foliar transfer into the biosphere: review of translocation factors to cereal grains.

    PubMed

    Colle, C; Madoz-Escande, C; Leclerc, E

    2009-09-01

    A review of the published literature about foliar transfer radionuclides to cereal grains was carried out with a special interest for translocation factors. Translocation describes the distribution of radionuclides within the plant after foliar deposition and radionuclide absorption onto the surface of leaves. It mainly depends on elements and the plant growth stage. The collected data were derived from both in-field and greenhouse experiments. They were analysed in order to select those coming from a contamination simulating a sprinkling irrigation or a rain. The data set contains 307 values. For each radionuclide the translocation factor values were sorted according to 5 characteristic stages of the cereal vegetative cycle: leaf development-tillering, stem elongation, earing-flowering, grain growth and ripening. Wheat, barley and rye have been treated together, independently of rice. For mobile elements such as cesium, the translocation factor is maximum when the contamination occurred at the earing-flowering stage. For less mobile elements such as strontium this maximum occurred for a foliar contamination at the grain growth stage. This review enabled us to propose the most probable value as well as the range of variation of translocation factors for some radionuclides according to the cereal vegetative cycle. Moreover, from these results, a radionuclide classification is proposed according to three mobility groups. PMID:19019504

  11. Transfer factors as immunotherapy and supplement of chemotherapy in experimental pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    FABRE, R A; PÉREZ, T M; AGUILAR, L D; RANGEL, M J; ESTRADA-GARCÌA, I; HERNÁNDEZ-PANDO, R; ESTRADA PARRA, S

    2004-01-01

    Problems of logistics, compliance and drug resistance point to an urgent need for immunotherapeutic strategies capable of shortening the current six month antibiotic regimens used to treat tuberculosis. One potential immunotherapeutic agent is transfer factors. Transfer factors (TF) are low molecular weight dialysable products from immune cells which transmit the ability to express delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and cell mediated immunity from sensitized donors to nonimmune recipients. In this study we determined the efficiency of TF as immunotherapy to treat experimental tuberculosis. When BALB/c mice are infected via the trachea with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv there is an initial phase of partial resistance dominated by Th-1 type cytokines plus tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), followed by a phase of progressive disease characterized by increasing expression of IL-4, diminished expression of TNFα and iNOS, and low DTH. Animals in this late progressive phase of the disease (day 60) were treated with different doses of TF (one injection per week) obtained from spleen cells when the peak of immune protection in this animal model is reached (day 21), or with different doses of TF from peripheral leucocytes of PPD + healthy subjects. We show here that the treatment with murine or human TF restored the expression of Th-1 cytokines, TNFα and iNOS provoking inhibition of bacterial proliferation and significant increase of DTH and survival. This beneficial effect was dose dependent. Interestingly, murine TF in combination with conventional chemotherapy had a synergistic effect producing significant faster elimination of lung bacteria loads than chemotherapy alone. PMID:15086383

  12. Improved Induction of Immune Tolerance to Factor IX by Hepatic AAV-8 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Mario; Nayak, Sushrusha; Hoffman, Brad E.; Terhorst, Cox; Cao, Ou

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Gene therapy for hemophilia B has been shown to result in long-term expression and immune tolerance to factor IX (F.IX) after in vivo transduction of hepatocytes with adeno-associated viral (AAV-2) vectors in experimental animals. An optimized protocol was effective in several strains of mice with a factor 9 gene deletion (F9−/−). However, immune responses against F.IX were repeatedly observed in C3H/HeJ F9−/− mice. We sought to establish a gene transfer protocol that results in sustained expression without a requirement for additional manipulation of the immune system. Compared with AAV-2, AAV-8 was more efficient in transgene expression and induction of tolerance to F.IX in three different strains of wild-type mice. At equal vector doses, AAV-8 induced transgene product-specific regulatory CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells at significantly higher frequency. Moreover, sustained correction of hemophilia B in C3H/HeJ F9−/− mice without antibody formation was documented in all animals treated with ≥4 × 1011 vector genomes (VG)/kg and in 80% of mice treated with 8 × 1010 VG/kg. Therefore, it is possible to develop a gene transfer protocol that reliably induces tolerance to F.IX largely independent of genetic factors. A comparison with other studies suggests that additional parameters besides plateau levels of F.IX expression contributed to the improved success rate of tolerance induction. PMID:19309290

  13. Chemical elements in pearl oysters (Paxyodon ponderosus), phytoplankton and estuarine sediments from eastern Amazon (Northern Brazil): Bioaccumulation factors and trophic transfer factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhena, Maria P. S. P.; Costa, Marcondes L.; Berrêdo, José F.; Paiva, Rosildo S.; Souza, Crisvaldo C. S.

    2016-04-01

    The current study was conducted near Barcarena County, which is a mid-sized urban center where aluminum ore processing industries (bauxite) and Vila do Conde cargo terminal are located. It aims to discuss the bioaccumulation factors as well as factors related to the trophic transfer of chemical elements in water, oyster, phytoplankton and bottom sediments from an estuary in the Brazilian Northern coast. The bioaccumulation factor (BAF), trophic transfer factor (TTF) and biota-sediment-water were used to correlate the contents of chemical elements found in organisms. The sediment, surface water, phytoplankton and pearl oysters chemical composition was analyzed by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Pearl oysters showed K, Ca, Mg, P, Mn, Fe, Zn, Al, Ba and Pb accumulation, which concentration increase is associated with their diet (phytoplankton). Al concentrations are 14 times higher in pearl oysters (Paxyodon ponderosus), assuming that they are associated with wastewater emissions and with industrialization processes in the area. BAF and BSAF values are 1000 times higher than the metal concentrations in water and bioavailable fraction concentrations. The oyster-phytoplankton trophic transfer factor indicates that P, Ba, Ca, Na, Cd and Zn showed the largest transfers (from 5 to 19). These trophic transfers may be sufficient to cause significant ecotoxicological effects on the region biota.

  14. Single-Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Onar, Omer C; Miller, John M; Tang, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance. To understand the power flow through the system this paper presents a novel approach to the system model and the impact of different control parameters on the load power. The implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation is also discussed.

  15. Lifetime and g-factor measurements of excited states using Coulomb excitation and alpha transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Z. E.; Torres, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution the challenges in the use of a setup to simultaneously measure lifetimes and g-factor values will be presented. The simultaneous use of the transient field technique and the Doppler Shift Attenuation Method, to measure magnetic moments and lifetimes respectively, allows to obtain a complete characterization of the currents of nucleons and the deformation in excited states close to the ground state. The technique is at the moment limited to Coulomb excitation and alpha-transfer reactions, what opens an interesting perspective to consider this type of experiments with radioactive beams. The use of deep-inelastic and fusion-evaporation reactions will be discussed. An example of a setup that makes use of a beam of 106Cd to study excited states of 110Sn and the beam nuclei itself will be presented.

  16. Biota-sediment accumulation and trophic transfer factors for extremely hydrophobic polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Maruya, K.A.; Lee, R.F.

    1998-12-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in fish, invertebrates, and sediment from a contaminated tidal creek system in coastal Georgia (USA) were traced to Aroclor 1268, a mixture of hepta through decachlorinated homologs used at a former chlor/alkali plant adjacent to the study site. The base 10 logarithm of the octanol/water partition coefficient (K{sub ow}) for the 15 most abundant Aroclor 1268 components in these samples ranged from 6.7 to >9. The composite mean biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) for these congeners was 3.1, 0.81, and 0.28 for yearling striped mullet, spotted sea trout, and grass shrimp, respectively, species representing three trophic levels of the local food web. Individual congener BSAFs were negatively correlated with log K{sub ow} for all three species. The composite mean trophic transfer factor (TTF{sub lip}), defined as the ratio of lipid-normalized PCB concentrations in fish to grass shrimp, was higher for mullet (12) than for sea trout (2.9). Individual TTF{sub lip} values were two to three times higher for Cl{sub 7} and Cl{sub 8} homologs that were substituted at all four ortho positions, suggesting a difference in PCB retention based on chlorine substitution patterns. The relative magnitude of BSAFs and TTF{sub lip} values indicated that sediment-ingesting forage species like mullet efficiently accumulate PCBs and are an important link in the food web transfer of sediment-ingesting forage in this system. The negative linear relationships between BSAF and log K{sub ow} established in this study are among the first to be reported in the field for extremely hydrophobic PCBs.

  17. Local convective heat transfer coefficient and friction factor of CuO/water nanofluid in a microchannel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabi, A. R.; Zarrinabadi, S.; Peyghambarzadeh, S. M.; Hashemabadi, S. H.; Salimi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Forced convective heat transfer in a microchannel heat sink (MCHS) using CuO/water nanofluids with 0.1 and 0.2 vol% as coolant was investigated. The experiments were focused on the heat transfer enhancement in the channel entrance region at Re < 1800. Hydraulic performance of the MCHS was also estimated by measuring friction factor and pressure drop. Results showed that higher convective heat transfer coefficient was obtained at the microchannel entrance. Maximum enhancement of the average heat transfer coefficient compared with deionized water was about 40 % for 0.2 vol% nanofluid at Re = 1150. Enhancement of the convective heat transfer coefficient of nanofluid decreased with further increasing of Reynolds number.

  18. Modification of an impulse-factoring orbital transfer technique to account for orbit determination and maneuver execution errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kibler, J. F.; Green, R. N.; Young, G. R.; Kelly, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    A method has previously been developed to satisfy terminal rendezvous and intermediate timing constraints for planetary missions involving orbital operations. The method uses impulse factoring in which a two-impulse transfer is divided into three or four impulses which add one or two intermediate orbits. The periods of the intermediate orbits and the number of revolutions in each orbit are varied to satisfy timing constraints. Techniques are developed to retarget the orbital transfer in the presence of orbit-determination and maneuver-execution errors. Sample results indicate that the nominal transfer can be retargeted with little change in either the magnitude (Delta V) or location of the individual impulses. Additonally, the total Delta V required for the retargeted transfer is little different from that required for the nominal transfer. A digital computer program developed to implement the techniques is described.

  19. Direct transfer of transforming growth factor beta 1 gene into arteries stimulates fibrocellular hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Nabel, E G; Shum, L; Pompili, V J; Yang, Z Y; San, H; Shu, H B; Liptay, S; Gold, L; Gordon, D; Derynck, R

    1993-01-01

    The arterial wall responds to thrombosis or mechanical injury through the induction of specific gene products that increase cellular proliferation and connective tissue formation. These changes result in intimal hyperplasia that is observed in restenosis and the early phases of atherosclerosis. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) is a secreted multi-functional protein that plays an important role in embryonal development and in repair following tissue injury. However, the function of TGF-beta 1 in vascular cell growth in vivo has not been defined. In this report, we have evaluated the role of TGF-beta 1 in the pathophysiology of intimal and medial hyperplasia by gene transfer of an expression plasmid encoding active TGF-beta 1 into porcine arteries. Expression of TGF-beta 1 in normal arteries resulted in substantial extracellular matrix production accompanied by intimal and medial hyperplasia. Increased procollagen, collagen, and proteoglycan synthesis in the neointima was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry relative to control transfected arteries. Expression of TGF-beta 1 induced a distinctly different program of gene expression and biologic response from the platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF B) gene: procollagen synthesis induced by TGF-beta 1 was greater, and cellular proliferation was less prominent. These findings show that TGF-beta 1 differentially modulates extracellular matrix production and cellular proliferation in the arterial wall in vivo and could play a reparative role in the response to arterial injury. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8248168

  20. Transference factors as a tool for the estimation of arsenic milk concentration.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Carrera, Alejo; Alvarez-Gonçalvez, Cristina V; Fernández-Cirelli, Alicia

    2016-08-01

    The Chaco Pampean Plain of central Argentina represents one of the largest regions with high levels of arsenic (As) in groundwater. The aim of this study was the assessment of a biotransference factor (BTF) as a tool for the estimation of As concentration in cow's milk from As drinking water concentration. Total As content in livestock drinking water, soil, forage, and milk was determined in farms located in an area of high As groundwater, in order to analyze the relation between As uptake and its transfer to milk. The concentrations of As in milk ranged from 0.5 to 8.0 μg/L. From the results obtained, drinking water may be considered the main source of exposure to As, and the biotransference factor for milk ranges from 1.5 × 10(-5) to 4.3 × 10(-4). Therefore, BTF provides a simple tool for the estimation of arsenic levels in milk through the As livestock drinking water content. PMID:27155835

  1. Polarization Factors and Spin-Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunneling Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slonczewski, John

    2004-03-01

    Recent advances in fabrication of magnetic tunnel junctions having small RA enhance the prospect of 2-terminal memory elements using spin transfer for writing and TMR for reading. Using Bardeen theory, I find a sufficient condition for the existence of the tunnel-effective polarization factors which I-V experiments support. The mere presence of an ideal crystalline slab within the barrier suffices, regardless of electron structure and atomic disorder within the magnets and interface regions. I find the moment-coplanar torque density L_R=(h/4π e)P_LJ_0sin θ acting on a right magnet with applied voltage V. Here, P_L(V) and P_R(V) are the polarization factors of the left and right magnets, and J_0(V) is the mean current density in the conventional expression J=J_0(1+P_LP_Rs θ ). This connection between LR and J may aid laboratory exploration of junction technology for current-driven switching by study of J(V,θ ) prior to the difficult fabrication of pillars having submicron dimensions.

  2. The effect of long-term wastewater irrigation on accumulation and transfer of heavy metals in Cupressus sempervirens leaves and adjacent soils.

    PubMed

    Farahat, Emad; Linderholm, Hans W

    2015-04-15

    Wastewater reuse for agriculture is an important management strategy in areas with limited freshwater resources, yielding potential economic and environmental benefits. Here the effects of long-term irrigation with wastewater on the nutrient contents of green and senesced leaves of Cupressus sempervirens L. were assessed for three planted forests in Egypt. Stoichiometric ratios, transfer factors for nutrients from soil to plant and enrichment factors in contaminated soils were estimated and compared to a ground water irrigated control site. Under wastewater irrigation, C. sempervirens transferred most of the estimated nutrients, particularly heavy metals, from green to senesced leaves. This could be a self-protecting mechanism under continuous wastewater irrigation. The accumulation of four metals (Zn, Mn, Cu and Cd) with transfer factors>1 for wastewater-irrigated trees, indicated the ability for metal accumulation of C. sempervirens. Stoichiometric ratios decreased under wastewater irrigation compared to the control site and global trends, which suggests nutrient disorders in these plants. The values of enrichment factors in the wastewater-irrigated soils showed remarkable availability and distribution of metals. Decreased resorption of metals by senesced leaves of C. sempervirens will add considerable amount of these metals to the soils, which will likely have adverse affects on the desert ecosystem components. PMID:25613764

  3. Plasmid Transfer of Plasminogen K1-5 Reduces Subcutaneous Hepatoma Growth by Affecting Inflammatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Lea A.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Raskopf, Esther

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that plasminogen K1-5 (PlgK1-5) directly affects tumour cells and inflammation. Therefore, we analysed if PlgK1-5 has immediate effects on hepatoma cells and inflammatory factors in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, effects of plasmid encoding PlgK1-5 (pK1-5) on Hepa129, Hepa1-6, and HuH7 cell viability, apoptosis, and proliferation as well as VEGF and TNF-alpha expression and STAT3-phosphorylation were investigated. In vivo, tumour growth, proliferation, vessel density, and effects on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) expression were examined following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, pK1-5 halved cell viability; cell death was increased by up to 15% compared to the corresponding controls. Proliferation was not affected. VEGF, TNF-alpha, and STAT3-phosphorylation were affected following treatment with pK1-5. In vivo, ten days after treatment initiation, pK1-5 reduced subcutaneous tumour growth by 32% and mitosis by up to 77% compared to the controls. Vessel density was reduced by 50%. TNF-alpha levels in tumour and liver tissue were increased, whereas VEGF levels in tumours and livers were reduced after pK1-5 treatment. Taken together, plasmid gene transfer of PlgK1-5 inhibits hepatoma (cell) growth not only by reducing vessel density but also by inducing apoptosis, inhibiting proliferation, and triggering inflammation. PMID:24895598

  4. Bacterial α2-macroglobulins: colonization factors acquired by horizontal gene transfer from the metazoan genome?

    PubMed Central

    Budd, Aidan; Blandin, Stephanie; Levashina, Elena A; Gibson, Toby J

    2004-01-01

    Background Invasive bacteria are known to have captured and adapted eukaryotic host genes. They also readily acquire colonizing genes from other bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Closely related species such as Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter hepaticus, which exploit different host tissues, share almost none of their colonization genes. The protease inhibitor α2-macroglobulin provides a major metazoan defense against invasive bacteria, trapping attacking proteases required by parasites for successful invasion. Results Database searches with metazoan α2-macroglobulin sequences revealed homologous sequences in bacterial proteomes. The bacterial α2-macroglobulin phylogenetic distribution is patchy and violates the vertical descent model. Bacterial α2-macroglobulin genes are found in diverse clades, including purple bacteria (proteobacteria), fusobacteria, spirochetes, bacteroidetes, deinococcids, cyanobacteria, planctomycetes and thermotogae. Most bacterial species with bacterial α2-macroglobulin genes exploit higher eukaryotes (multicellular plants and animals) as hosts. Both pathogenically invasive and saprophytically colonizing species possess bacterial α2-macroglobulins, indicating that bacterial α2-macroglobulin is a colonization rather than a virulence factor. Conclusions Metazoan α2-macroglobulins inhibit proteases of pathogens. The bacterial homologs may function in reverse to block host antimicrobial defenses. α2-macroglobulin was probably acquired one or more times from metazoan hosts and has then spread widely through other colonizing bacterial species by more than 10 independent horizontal gene transfers. yfhM-like bacterial α2-macroglobulin genes are often found tightly linked with pbpC, encoding an atypical peptidoglycan transglycosylase, PBP1C, that does not function in vegetative peptidoglycan synthesis. We suggest that YfhM and PBP1C are coupled together as a periplasmic defense and repair system. Bacterial α2-macroglobulins might

  5. Factors Influencing Lava-Substrate Heat Transfer and Implications for Thermomechanical Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagents, S. A.; Greeley, R.; Lenat, J. F. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    We develop numerical simulations of basaltic lava flowing laminarly over a basalt substrate in order to examine the details of the lava dynamics and thermal boundary layers and to understand the implications for substrate heating. As the initial stage of a larger study of thermomechanical erosion in different planetary environments, we aim to understand why erosion occurs on Earth, why erosion features are not ubiquitous given the high temperatures involved, and whether it is a plausible mechanism for the formation of planetary channels such as lunar sinuous rilles and Venusian canali. Here we confine our attention to terrestrial lavas with well-known properties and eruption parameters. With relatively simple computational fluid dynamic simulations, most closely representing tube-fed hawaiian basalts (for which erosion has been documented), we demonstrate the importance of incorporating several key factors in models of lava flow/ substrate heat transfer, which have commonly been neglected in previous treatments. By addressing the interaction of the flow dynamics and heat transfer in the lava, our work suggests that the development of a temperature gradient in the base of the lava, even for undeveloped flow, has a significant influence on substrate temperature. The sensitivity of the lava-substrate interface temperature to the thermophysical properties of the lava and substrate suggests that a delicate balance is required for partial melting to occur. Thus, it might take weeks of continuous flow to initiate partial melting of the substrate at distances of several kilometers from the vent. These durations exceed the periods of stability typical of lava flowing in tubes; pauses, blockages, surges, and break-outs frequently disrupt the flow. However, natural irregularities in the flow dynamics or substrate topography might help to initiate and maintain substrate melting on shorter timescales by disturbing the intimately coupled dynamic and thermal boundary layers

  6. Plasmid Specificity of The Origin of Transfer of Sex Factor F

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Peter; Willetts, Neil

    1974-01-01

    The ability of F-like plasmids to promote transfer from the F origin of transfer was determined. Chromosome transfer was measured from plasmid derivatives of RecA− Hfr deletion strains which had lost all the F transfer genes but which in some cases retained, and in others had also lost, the origin sequence. ColV2 and ColVBtrp could initiate transfer from the F origin, but R100-1, R1-19, and R538-1 drd could not. These results can be correlated with the plasmid specificity of the traI components of the different plasmid transfer systems, supporting the hypothesis that the origin of transfer is the site of action of the traI product. Most F-like plasmids, including R1-19 and R538-1 drd, could transfer ColE1, consistent with previous findings that the (plasmid-specific) traI product is not necessary for ColE1 transfer by Flac; ColE1 transfer may be initiated by a ColE1-or host-determined product. R100-1 and R136fin− could not transfer ColE1 efficiently, apparently because of differences residing in their pilus-forming genes. PMID:4608577

  7. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Power transfer capability of wireless power transfer systems is highly dependent on the magnetic design of the primary and secondary inductors and is measured quantitatively by the coupling factor. The inductors are designed by placing the coil over a ferrite base to increase the coupling factor and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance, and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending on the placement of ferrite. Also, the addition of ferrite increases the self-inductance of the coils, and there is a probability for an overall decrease in the coupling factor. Correct placement of ferrite, on the other hand, can increase the coupling factor relatively higher than the base ferrite as it is closer to the other inductor. Ferrite being a heavy compound of iron increases the inductor weight significantly and needs to be added judiciously. Four zones have been identified in the paper, which shows different sensitivity to addition of ferrite in terms of the two inductances and coupling factor. Simulation and measurement results are presented for different air gaps between the coils and at different gap distances between the ferrite base and added ferrite. This paper is beneficial in improving the coupling factor while adding minimum weight to wireless power transfer system.

  8. Visualization of two transfer RNAs trapped in transit during elongation factor G-mediated translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ramrath, David J. F.; Lancaster, Laura; Sprink, Thiemo; Mielke, Thorsten; Loerke, Justus; Noller, Harry F.; Spahn, Christian M. T.

    2013-01-01

    During protein synthesis, coupled translocation of messenger RNAs (mRNA) and transfer RNAs (tRNA) through the ribosome takes place following formation of each peptide bond. The reaction is facilitated by large-scale conformational changes within the ribosomal complex and catalyzed by elongtion factor G (EF-G). Previous structural analysis of the interaction of EF-G with the ribosome used either model complexes containing no tRNA or only a single tRNA, or complexes where EF-G was directly bound to ribosomes in the posttranslocational state. Here, we present a multiparticle cryo-EM reconstruction of a translocation intermediate containing two tRNAs trapped in transit, bound in chimeric intrasubunit ap/P and pe/E hybrid states. The downstream ap/P-tRNA is contacted by domain IV of EF-G and P-site elements within the 30S subunit body, whereas the upstream pe/E-tRNA maintains tight interactions with P-site elements of the swiveled 30S head. Remarkably, a tight compaction of the tRNA pair can be seen in this state. The translocational intermediate presented here represents a previously missing link in understanding the mechanism of translocation, revealing that the ribosome uses two distinct molecular ratchets, involving both intra- and intersubunit rotational movements, to drive the synchronous movement of tRNAs and mRNA. PMID:24324168

  9. Transfer factor, lung volumes, resistance and ventilation distribution in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Verbanck, Sylvia; Van Muylem, Alain; Schuermans, Daniel; Bautmans, Ivan; Thompson, Bruce; Vincken, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of chronic lung disease requires reference values of lung function indices, including putative markers of small airway function, spanning a wide age range.We measured spirometry, transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO), static lung volume, resistance and ventilation distribution in a healthy population, studying at least 20 subjects per sex and per decade between the ages of 20 and 80 years.With respect to the Global Lung Function Initiative reference data, our subjects had average z-scores for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC of -0.12, 0.04 and -0.32, respectively. Reference equations were obtained which could account for a potential dependence of index variability on age and height. This was done for (but not limited to) indices that are pertinent to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease studies: forced expired volume in 6 s, forced expiratory flow, TLCO, specific airway conductance, residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC), and ventilation heterogeneity in acinar and conductive lung zones.Deterioration in acinar ventilation heterogeneity and lung clearance index with age were more marked beyond 60 years, and conductive ventilation heterogeneity showed the greatest increase in variability with age. The most clinically relevant deviation from published reference values concerned RV/TLC values, which were considerably smaller than American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society-endorsed reference values. PMID:26585426

  10. Intercellular transfer of tissue factor via the uptake of tumor-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luize G; Leal, Ana Carolina; Vargas, Gabriele; Porto-Carreiro, Isabel; Monteiro, Robson Q

    2013-10-01

    Coagulation proteins play a critical role in numerous aspects of tumor biology. Cancer cells express tissue factor (TF), the protein that initiates blood clotting, which frequently correlates with processes related to cell aggressiveness, including primary tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. It has been demonstrated that TF gets incorporated into tumor-derived microvesicles (MVs), a process that has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Here, we describe the exchange of TF-bearing MVs between breast cancer cell lines with different aggressiveness potential. The highly invasive and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells displayed higher surface levels of functional TF compared with the less aggressive MCF-7 cells. MVs derived from MDA-MB-231 cells were enriched in TF and accelerated plasma coagulation, but MCF-7 cell-derived MVs expressed very low levels of TF. Incubating MCF-7 cells with MDA-MB-231 MVs significantly increased the TF activity. This phenomenon was not observed upon pretreatment of MVs with anti-TF or annexin-V, which blocks phosphatidylserine sites on the surface of MVs. Our data indicated that TF-bearing MVs can be transferred between different populations of cancer cells and may therefore contribute to the propagation of a TF-related aggressive phenotype among heterogeneous subsets of cells in a tumor. PMID:23993901

  11. Gene Transfer of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Prevents Neurodegeneration Triggered by FXN Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Katsu-Jiménez, Yurika; Loría, Frida; Corona, Juan Carlos; Díaz-Nido, Javier

    2016-05-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is a predominantly neurodegenerative disease caused by recessive mutations that produce a deficiency of frataxin (FXN). Here, we have used a herpesviral amplicon vector carrying a gene encoding for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to drive its overexpression in neuronal cells and test for its effect on FXN-deficient neurons both in culture and in the mouse cerebellum in vivo. Gene transfer of BDNF to primary cultures of mouse neurons prevents the apoptosis which is triggered by the knockdown of FXN gene expression. This neuroprotective effect of BDNF is also observed in vivo in a viral vector-based knockdown mouse cerebellar model. The injection of a lentiviral vector carrying a minigene encoding for a FXN-specific short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) into the mouse cerebellar cortex triggers a FXN deficit which is accompanied by significant apoptosis of granule neurons as well as loss of calbindin in Purkinje cells. These pathological changes are accompanied by a loss of motor coordination of mice as assayed by the rota-rod test. Coinjection of a herpesviral vector encoding for BDNF efficiently prevents both the development of cerebellar neuropathology and the ataxic phenotype. These data demonstrate the potential therapeutic usefulness of neurotrophins like BDNF to protect FXN-deficient neurons from degeneration. PMID:26849417

  12. Free functional muscle transfer failure and thrombophilic gene mutations as a potential risk factor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vekris, Marios D; Ovrenovits, Maria; Dova, Lefkothea; Beris, Alexandros E; Soucacos, Panayiotis N; Kolaitis, Nikolaos; Vartholomatos, George

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of microsurgery popularized the free functioning muscle transfers as secondary procedures to reanimate paralyzed extremities after severance of the brachial plexus, especially when the surgeon deals with late cases. Studies considering transplantation, describe thrombophilic factors as a cause of severe complications after transplantation, such as acute or early rejection episodes, delayed graft function, or chronic graft dysfunction. It is the first time that thrombophilia associated with free muscle-graft rejection is reported. A young man who had two free functional muscle transfers for brachial plexus reconstruction in the same forearm within an interval of 6 months. The free functional muscle transfer was failed in both cases because of vein thrombosis and subsequent arterial clot. The possibility of thrombophilia was investigated and during the genetic investigation it was discovered that he was heterozygous for the mutations of factor V, G1691A-Leiden, A4070G and homozygous for the MTHFR C677T mutation. PMID:17295258

  13. Perceptions of a Learning Organization and Factors within the Work Environment That Influence Transfer of Training in Law Enforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter-Johnson, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine law enforcement officers' perception of factors within the workplace that influence transfer of training and their perception of the organization being a learning organization. The study actually had three parts. First, it intended to investigate the perception of law enforcement officers regarding…

  14. Learning What Matters: Exploring the Factors Affecting Learning Transfers in Child Welfare Competencies and Career Interest in Child Welfare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Aries Meng-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of the factors impacting MSW students' interests and motivation to learn child welfare competencies, and how they affect learning transfer of the subject is important for the development of a knowledgeable, competent, and committed workforce that serves children and families in the United States. Practitioners need to attain…

  15. Aqueous Al2O3 nanofluids: the important factors impacting convective heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jianguo; Ding, Yulong; Ma, Caiyun

    2014-12-01

    A high accuracy, counter flow double pipe heat exchanger system is designed for the measurement of convective heat transfer coefficients with different nanofluids. Both positive and negative enhancement of convective heat transfer of alumina nanofluids are found in the experiments. A modified equation was proposed to explain above phenomena through the physic properties of nanofluids such as thermal conductivity, special heat capacity and viscosity.

  16. External and Institutional Factors Affecting Community College Student-Transfer Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Debra L.

    A study was conducted to identify the environmental conditions and relationships between external and institutional conditions that have a significant effect upon student transfer activity. A sample of 78 colleges in 15 states were selected from institutions participating in a national transfer project; 42% were located in Texas or California. The…

  17. Predisposition Factors of Career and Technical Education Transfer Students: A Hermeneutic Phenomenology Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hioki, Warren; Lester, Derek; Martinez, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Six college students, who were career and technical education (CTE) transfer students in the state of Nevada, were interviewed Spring Semester of 2009. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenology framework as the method to identify those predisposition variables that heavily influenced the students in their decision to transfer to a senior…

  18. Assessing Dynamic Spectral Causality by Lagged Adaptive Directed Transfer Function and Instantaneous Effect Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan

    2014-01-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The non-zero covariance of the model’s residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the “causal ordering” is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In the present study, we firstly investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in

  19. "A Hand Hold for a Little Bit": Factors Facilitating the Success of Community College Transfer Students to a Large Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K.; Wilson, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    To understand factors affecting the academic and social integration of community college transfer students, we interviewed 19 students who transferred to one state's large Research-Extensive university. We inquired about the transfer process, efforts of the university to orient and assist them, and perceptions of the university versus the…

  20. The Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio mu(p) G**p(E)/G**p(M) at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ron; J. Glister; B. Lee; K. Allada; W. Armstrong; J. Arrington; A. Beck; F. Benmokhtar; B.L. Berman; W. Boeglin; E. Brash; A. Camsonne; J. Calarco; J. P. Chen; Seonho Choi; E. Chudakov; L. Coman; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; J. Dumas; C. Dutta; R. Feuerbach; A. Freyberger; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; R. Gilman; O. Hansen; D. W. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; C.E. Hyde; H. Ibrahim; Y. Ilieva; C. W. de Jager; X. Jiang; M. K. Jones; A. Kelleher; E. Khrosinkova; E. Kuchina; G. Kumbartzki; J. J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; P. Markowitz; S. May-Tal Beck; E. McCullough; D. Meekins; M. Meziane; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; B.E. Norum; Y. Oh; M. Olson; M. Paolone; K. Paschke; C. F. Perdrisat; E. Piasetzky; M. Potokar; R. Pomatsalyuk; I. Pomerantz; A. Puckett; V. Punjabi; X. Qian; Y. Qiang; R. Ransome; M. Reyhan; J. Roche; Y. Rousseau; A. Saha; A.J. Sarty; B. Sawatzky; E. Schulte; M. Shabestari; A. Shahinyan; R. Shneor; S. ˇ Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; J. Song; R. Sparks; R. Subedi; S. Strauch; G. M. Urciuoli; K. Wang; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Yan; H. Yao; X. Zhan; X. Zhu

    2007-11-01

    High precision measurements of the proton elastic form factor ratio have been made at four-momentum transfers, Q^2, between 0.2 and 0.5 GeV^2. The new data, while consistent with previous results, clearly show a ratio less than unity and significant differences from the central values of several recent phenomenological fits. By combining the new form-factor ratio data with an existing cross-section measurement, one finds that in this Q^2 range the deviation from unity is primarily due to GEp being smaller than the dipole parameterization.

  1. Influence of chemical and biological factors on trophic transfer of persistent organic pollutants in the northwater polynya marine food web.

    PubMed

    Fisk, A T; Hobson, K A; Norstrom, R J

    2001-02-15

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and stable isotopes of nitrogen (delta 15N) were measured in zooplankton (6 species), a benthic invertebrate (Anonyx nugax), Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), seabirds (6 species), and ringed seals (Phoca hispida) collected in 1998 in the Northwater Polynya to examine effects of biological and chemical factors on trophic transfer of POPs in an Arctic marine food web. Strong positive relationships were found between recalcitrant POP concentrations (lipid corrected) and trophic level based on stable isotopes of nitrogen, providing clear evidence of POP biomagnification in Arctic marine food webs. Food web magnification factors (FWMFs), derived from the slope of the POP--trophic level relationship, provided an overall magnification factor for the food web but over and underestimated biomagnification factors (BMFs) based on predator--prey concentrations in poikilotherms (fish) and homeotherms (seabirds and mammals), respectively. Greater biomagnification in homeotherms was attributed to their greater energy requirement and subsequent feeding rates. Within the homeotherms, seabirds had greater BMFs than ringed seals, consistent with greater energy demands in birds. Scavenging from marine mammal carcasses and accumulation in more contaminated winter habitats were considered important variables in seabird BMFs. Metabolic differences between species resulted in lower than expected BMFs, which would not be recognized in whole food web trophic level--POP relationships. The use of sigma POP groups, such as sigma PCB, is problematic because FWMFs and BMFs varied considerably between individual POPs. FWMFs of recalcitrant POPs had a strong positive relationship with log octanol--water partition coefficient (Kow). Results of this study show the utility of using delta 15N to characterize trophic level and trophic transfer of POPs but highlight the effects of species and chemical differences on trophic transfer of POPs that can be overlooked when

  2. Transfer Rates of Texas Hispanic Community College Students to 4-Year Institutions: Selected Institutional Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klement, Emily Conrady

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this non-experimental, quantitative study was to determine how well selected institutional characteristics explain the variance in Hispanic community college students' transfer rates to 4-year institutions. Due to the rapidly growing Texas Hispanic population, understanding challenges to their educational attainment has become…

  3. EXPERIMENTAL METHODOLOGIES AND PRELIMINARY TRANSFER FACTOR DATA FOR ESTIMATION OF DERMAL EXPOSURES TO PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental efforts and experimental data are described that focused on quantifying the transfer of particles on a mass basis from indoor surfaces to human skin. Methods were developed that utilized a common fluorescein-tagged Arizona Test Dust (ATD) as a possible surrogate ...

  4. Factors Affecting Persistence of Undergraduate Students in a Fisheries and Wildlife Program: Transfer Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Bjorn H. K.; Millenbah, Kelly F.; Montgomery, Robert A.; Schneider, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Transfer students are of recognized importance to postsecondary education and every year feed thousands of students into natural resources programs across America. This influx of students can have a sustaining effect on many academic programs, including fisheries and wildlife programs, which are suffering from a nation-wide decrease in interest…

  5. Learning Factors Transfer Analysis: Using Learning Curve Analysis to Automatically Generate Domain Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, Philip I. Jr.; Cen, Hao; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to create a quantitative model of an educational content domain of related practice item-types using learning curves. By using a pairwise test to search for the relationships between learning curves for these item-types, we show how the test results in a set of pairwise transfer relationships that can be…

  6. Evaluating recipient and embryo factors that affect pregnancy rates of embryo transfer in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Spell, A R; Beal, W E; Corah, L R; Lamb, G C

    2001-07-15

    The objectives of this experiment were to determine the effects of corpus luteum characteristics, progesterone concentration, donor-recipient synchrony, embryo quality, type, and developmental stage on pregnancy rates after embryo transfer. We synchronized 763 potential recipients for estrus using one of two synchronization protocols: two doses of PGF2alpha (25 mg i.m.) given 11 d apart (Location 1); and, a single norgestomet implant for 7 d with one dose of PGF2alpha (25 mg i.m.) 24 h before implant removal (Location 2). At embryo transfer, ovaries were examined by rectal palpation and ultrasonography. Of the 526 recipients presented for embryo transfer, 122 received a fresh embryo and 326 received a frozen embryo. Pregnancy rates were greater (P < 0.05) with fresh embryos (83%) than frozen-thawed embryos (69%). Pregnancy rates were not affected by embryo grade, embryo stage, donor-recipient synchrony, or the palpated integrity of the CL. Corpus luteum diameter and luteal tissue volume increased as days post-estrus for the recipients increased. However, pregnancy rates did not differ among recipients receiving embryos 6.5 to 8.5 days after estrus (P > 0.1). There was a significant, positive simple correlation between CL diameter or luteal tissue volume and plasma progesterone concentration (r = 0.15, P < 0.01 and r = 0.18, P < 0.01, respectively). There were no significant differences in mean CL diameter, luteal volume or plasma progesterone concentration among recipients that did or did not become pregnant after embryo transfer. We conclude that suitability of a potential embryo transfer recipient is determined by observed estrus and a palpable corpus luteum, regardless of size or quality. PMID:11480620

  7. Characteristics of heavy metal transfer and their influencing factors in different soil-crop systems of the industrialization region, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyan; Yuan, Xuyin; Li, Tianyuan; Hu, Sun; Ji, Junfeng; Wang, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Soil heavy metals and their bioaccumulation in agricultural products have attracted widespread concerns, yet the transfer and accumulation characteristics of heavy metals in different soil-crop systems was rarely investigated. Soil and crop samples were collected from the typical agricultural areas in the Yangtze River Delta region, China. The concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd and Hg in the soils, roots and grains of rice (Oryza Sativa L.), wheat (Triticum L.) and canola (Brassica napus L.) were determined in this study. Transfer ability of heavy metals in soil-rice system was stronger than those in soil-wheat and soil-canola systems. The wheat showed a strong capacity to transfer Zn, Cu and Cd from root to the grain while canola presented a restricting effect to the intake of Cu and Cd. Soil pH and total organic matter were major factors influencing metal transfer from soil to rice, whereas soil Al2O3 contents presented a negative effect on heavy metal mobility in wheat and canola cultivation systems. The concentration of Zn and Cd in crop grains could well predicted according to the stepwise multiple linear regression models, which could help to quantitatively evaluate the ecologic risk of heavy metal accumulation in crops in the study area. PMID:26771531

  8. Transfer of radiocesium to four cruciferous vegetables as influenced by organic amendment under different field conditions in Fukushima Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Aung, Han Phyo; Djedidi, Salem; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Sohzoh; Bellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko Dorothea

    2015-02-01

    Soil-to-plant transfer of radiocesium ((137)Cs) in four cruciferous vegetables as influenced by cattle manure-based compost amendment was investigated. Komatsuna, mustard, radish and turnip were cultivated in three different (137)Cs-contaminated fields at Nihonmatsu City in Fukushima Prefecture from June to August 2012. Results revealed that organic compost amendments stimulated plant biomass production and tended to induce higher (137)Cs concentration in the cruciferous vegetables in most cases. Among the studied sites, Takanishi soil possessing low exchangeable potassium (0.10 cmolc kg(-1)) was associated with an increased concentration of (137)Cs in plants. Radiocesium transfer factor (TF) values of the vegetables ranged from 0.025 to 0.119. The increase in (137)Cs TFs was dependent on larger plant biomass production, high organic matter content, and high sand content in the studied soils. Average (137)Cs TF values for all study sites and compost treatments were higher in Komatsuna (0.072) and radish (0.059), which exhibited a higher biomass production compared to mustard and turnip. The transferability of (137)Cs to vegetables from soils was in the order Komatsuna > radish > mustard > turnip. The highest (137)Cs TF value (0.071) of all vegetables was recorded for a field where the soil had high organic matter content and a high clay proportion of 470 g kg(-1) consisting of Al-vermiculite clay mineral. PMID:25483355

  9. CFD analysis of heat transfer and friction factor charaterstics in a circular tube fitted with horizontal baffles twisted tape inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Bakar Mohamad, Abu

    2013-12-01

    Swirl/vortex flow generator is an important form of passive augmentation techniques. Twisted-tape is one of the most important members of this form which is used extensively in different type heat exchangers. This paper reports the effect of twisted tape inserts on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics in circular tube under constant heat flux and laminar flow conditions using CFD simulation. Plain twisted tape inserts with twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91) and baffled twisted tape inserts with twist ratio (y = 2.93) have been used for the simulation using Fluent version 6.3.26. The results obtained by simulation matched with the literature correlations for plain tube with the discrepancy of less than ± 8% for Nusselt number and ± 6.25% for friction factor. The results have also revealed that the heat transfer in term of the Nusselt number enhanced with increases of Reynolds number, decreases of twist ratio and baffle insert. Among the various twist ratios, the twisted tape with twist ratio of y=2.93 and baffle is offered a maximum heat transfer enhancement.

  10. Transfer factor of 131I from the fallout to human thyroid dose equivalent after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Beno, M; Mikulecký, M; Hrabina, J

    1992-01-01

    A similar pattern of variation with time in observed maxima of daily dose equivalent rates in human thyroids (TD - microSv.d-1) and of daily fallout radioactivities (FR - kBq.m-2) has been found after the Chernobyl accident. An estimate of the time-lag between the maxima in TD lines and the preceding FR peaks was made of about seven days for adult and nine days for juveniles. Applying this time-lag it was possible to estimate transfer factors from the fallout to thyroid dose equivalent: the highest estimated values were 221 microSv/kBq.m-2 for adult and 641 microSv/kBq.m-2 for juvenile thyroids. These values differ from those published by UNSCEAR (United Nations 1988), which have been calculated for various regions of Czechoslovakia, from ingestion and inhalation intake estimates. A broad variation of transfer factor values could be expected to result from such transfer calculations using ingestion and inhalation estimates. The findings also support the concept of a need for prolonged iodine prophylaxy after emissions of radioiodine into the environment. PMID:1609058

  11. Modulation Transfer Function Measurement of Infrared Focal-Plane Arrays with Small Fill Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Barrière, Florence; Druart, Guillaume; Guérineau, Nicolas; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Mugnier, Laurent; Gravrand, Olivier; Baier, Nicolas; Lhermet, Nicolas; Destefanis, Gérard; Derelle, Sophie

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes an original method to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) of an infrared focal-plane array (IRFPA), based on a diffraction grating called a continuously self-imaging grating (CSIG). We give a general methodology to design the test bench, and we describe the data processing approach which has been developed to extract relevant information about the size of the photodiodes and filtering effects. The MTF measurement capability of this method is illustrated with a cooled IRFPA.

  12. Identification and quantification of factors affecting neonatal immunological transfer in dairy calves in the UK.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, J A; Grove-White, D H; Royal, M D; Smith, R F

    2015-06-13

    The object of the study was to quantify the prevalence of failure of passive transfer in UK dairy farms and to identify variables that had a significant impact on the rate of immunological transfer. In a six-month study of 444 calvings from seven UK dairy farms, 26 per cent of calves failed to receive adequate immunoglobulin transfer as judged by a plasma total protein (pTP) concentration less than 5.6 g/dl. Colostrum immunoglobulin concentration, indirectly measured using Brix refractometry, showed wide variations with samples ranging from 10.3 to 34.7 Brix units. Thirty-seven per cent of samples were below the suggested cut-off Brix score for colostrum quality of 22 per cent. Potential associations between covariates and plasma protein concentration were investigated using multiple linear regression models. The covariate with the greatest impact on the pTP concentration was the farm on which the calf was born (P<0.05). A significant but small association was demonstrated between colostrum immunoglobulin concentration and calf pTP concentration (P<0.01). Multiple linear regression models suggested that the time of colostrum collection after calving, parity of the dam, and the individual farm were associated with the Brix measurements (P<0.05). This study suggested that veterinary review of colostrum protocols on farm with emphasis on prompt collection and dosing after calving remains a simple and effective measure to improve passive transfer and thus calf health on UK dairy farms. PMID:25861824

  13. Summarizing lecture: factors influencing enzymatic H-transfers, analysis of nuclear tunnelling isotope effects and thermodynamic versus specific effects

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R.A

    2006-01-01

    In the articles in this Discussion, a wide variety of topics are treated, including reorganization energy, initially introduced for electron transfers (‘environmentally assisted tunnelling’), nuclear tunnelling, H/D and C12/C13 kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), the effect of changes of distal and nearby amino acid residues using site-directed mutagenesis, and dynamics versus statistical effects. A coordinate-free form of semi-classical theory is used to examine topics on data such as tunnelling versus ‘over-the-barrier’ paths and temperature and pressure effects on KIEs. The multidimensional semi-classical theory includes classically allowed and classically forbidden transitions. More generally, we address the question of relating kinetic to thermodynamic factors, as in the electron transfer field, so learning about specific versus thermodynamic effects in enzyme catalysis and KIEs. PMID:16873131

  14. The Use of Iteration Factors Method in the Solution of Multilevel Radiative Transfer Problems in Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmanovska-Barandovska, O.

    2012-12-01

    The NLTE problem of formation of spectral lines is one of the most difficult ones to deal with; due to the important role of scattering processes it is nonlocal and for the multilevel case it is additionally nonlinear. Therefore, the problem requires simultaneous solution of radiative transfer (RT) and statistical equilibrium (SE) equations which can be achieved through iterative procedure. There is still a great need of efficient numerical methods for a solution of NLTE radiative transfer problems as they are a necessary step of stellar atmospheres modelling and other important astrophysical problems. In the thesis we develop fast and accurate numerical method that uses iteration factors. The method is based on the use of quasi-invariant functions - iteration factors, in a simple iterative procedure. Defined as ratios of the moments (integrals of angles and frequencies) of radiation field intensities, the factors are calculated on the beginning of each iterative step from the current solution and then used to obtain its correction. In the thesis we extend iteration factors method developed for a solution of linear problems - monochromatic problem and two-level atom line transfer problems to the solution of a more generalized multilevel problem of spectral line formation with complete redistribution and no background continuum. The additional difficulty arises from the non linear coupling of atomic level populations and the radiation filed intensities in the corresponding spectral lines. In the thesis we suggest and describe in details four iterative procedures that use two families of iteration factors defined for a constant property medium and two different approaches for a simultaneous solution of nonlinear RT and SE equations: (1) linearization of the equations with respect to all relevant variables and (2) modification of the SE equations in order to make them linear. In both approaches the substitution of the linearized SE equations in the moments of RT

  15. [Vascular endothelium as a factor in information transfer between the cardiovascular and immune systems].

    PubMed

    Stvrtinová, V; Ferencík, M; Hulín, I; Jahnová, E

    1998-01-01

    In health, the vascular endothelium forms a multifunctional interface between the circulating blood and various tissues and organs of the body. It constitutes a selectively permeable barrier for macromolecules, as well as a nonthrombogenic and nonadhesive container that actively maintains the fluidity of blood. It is a metabolically active endocrine organ, serving as the source of multiple factors and mediators that are critical for normal homeostasis. These include vasodilators (nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor), vasoconstrictors (endothelin-1, thromboxane A2, prostaglandin H2 and components of the renin angiotensin system), various pro- and antithrombotic factors (e.g. tissue factor, platelet activating factor--PAF, von Willebrand factor), fibrinolytic activators and inhibitors (e.g. tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1), potent arachidonate metabolites (prostanoids), leukocyte adhesion molecules (e.g. E-selectin, P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1--ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1--VCAM-1), and multiple cytokines with activities of growth stimulators and inhibitors, transforming growth factors, proinflammatory and antiinflammatory mediators, tumour necrosis factors and chemotactic factors (chemokines). Besides these essential activities controlling the cardiovascular system, the endothelial cells represent an important part of the immune system as well. They have a pivotal role in the initiation and development of defensive and damaging inflammatory responses. Therefore endothelium can be considered as being the central equipment for the mutual exchange of life important information between the cardiovascular and immune systems. This in turn is leading to rapid advances in understanding the pathogenesis of some of the most serious and most common diseases, including inflammation, atherosclerosis and hypertension. (Tab. 7, Ref. 89.) PMID:9588073

  16. Measurements of the elastic electromagnetic form factor ratio {mu}pGEp/GMp via polarization transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier Gayou; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Andrei Afanasev; Arunava Saha; Brendan Fox; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; C. Chang; Cathleen Jones; Charles Glashausser; Charles Perdrisat; D. Crovelli; Daniel Simon; David Meekins; Demetrius Margaziotis; Dipangkar Dutta; Edgar Kooijman; Elaine Schulte; Edward Brash; Edward Kinney; Eugene Chudakov; Feng Xiong; Franco Garibaldi; Garth Huber; Gerfried Kumbartzki; Guido Urciuoli; Haiyan Gao; Jordan Hovdebo; James Kelly; Javier Gomez; Jens-Ole Hansen; Jian-Ping Chen; John Calarco; John LeRose; Joseph Mitchell; Juncai Gao; Konrad Aniol; Kamal Benslama; Kathy McCormick; Cornelis De Jager; Cornelis de Jager; Kevin Fissum; Krishni Wijesooriya; Louis Bimbot; Ludyvine Morand; Luminita Todor; Moskov Amarian; Marat Rvachev; Mark Jones; Martin Epstein; Meihua Liang; Michael Kuss; Nilanga Liyanage; Adam Sarty; Paul Ulmer; Pete Markowitz; Peter Bosted; R. Holt; Riad Suleiman; Richard Lindgren; Rikki Roche; Robert Michaels; Roman Pomatsalyuk; Ronald Gilman; Ronald Ransome; Stephen Becher; Scott Dumalski; Salvatore Frullani; Seonho Choi; Sergey Malov; Sonja Dieterich; Steffen Strauch; Steve Churchwell; Ting Chang; Viktor Gorbenko; Vina Punjabi; Wang Xu; Xiangdong Ji; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Zhengwei Chai

    2001-09-01

    We present measurements of the ratio of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors, {mu}pGEp/GMp. The Jefferson Lab Hall A Focal Plane Polarimeter was used to determine the longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization in ep elastic scattering; the ratio of these polarization components is proportional to the ratio of the two form factors. These data reproduce the observation of Jones et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1398 (2000)], that the form factor ratio decreases significantly from unity above Q2 = 1 GeV2.

  17. Impact of plant and environmental factors on ALS-resistant gene transfer rate from ClearfieldTM rice to red rice biotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pollen-mediated transfer of ALS-resistant gene from ClearfieldTM (CL) rice to red rice can affect the population dynamics and long-term management of red rice. To mitigate gene flow, it is important to understand the plant and environmental factors which affect gene transfer rate. This experiment ai...

  18. Transfer of tumour necrosis factor-α via colostrum to foals.

    PubMed

    Secor, E J; Matychak, M B; Felippe, M J B

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether TNF-α is transferred to equine neonates via colostrum and the relationship between TNF-α and IgG concentrations in the equine neonate. Colostrum, presuckle and postsuckle foal serum samples were collected from healthy mares and their foals. Equine TNF-α ELISA and IgG SRID kits were used to determine the concentrations of TNF-α and IgG, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using the Spearman rank correlation. TNF-α concentrations in all presuckle foal serum were below the limit of detection in 15/16 foals and increased in postsuckle foal serum to a mean concentration of 7.7 x 10(4) pg/ml. TNF-α concentrations in postsuckle foal serum and colostrum showed significant correlation (rho=0.668; P=0.005). However, TNF-α and IgG concentrations in colostrum or postsuckle foal serum did not correlate (rho<-0.016; P>0.05). Ratios of TNF-α/IgG in colostrum or postsuckle foal serum showed significant correlation (rho=0.750; P=0.0008). These results indicate that TNF-α is transferred to the foal via colostrum absorption and may play a role in early immunity. PMID:22027187

  19. Biotic interactions modify the transfer of cesium-137 in a soil-earthworm-plant-snail food web.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Clémentine; Scheifler, Renaud; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Hubert, Philippe; Coeurdassier, Michaël; de Vaufleury, Annette; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2008-08-01

    The present study investigated the possible influence of the earthworm Aporrectodea tuberculata on the transfer of cesium-137 ((137)Cs) from a contaminated (130 Bq/kg) deciduous forest soil to the lettuce Lactuca sativa and to the snail Cantareus aspersus (formerly Helix aspersa) in two laboratory experiments. In the first experiment, the International Organization for Standardization 15952 test was used to expose snails for five weeks to contaminated soil with or without earthworms. In these conditions, the presence of earthworms caused a two- to threefold increase in (137)Cs concentrations in snails. Transfer was low in earthworms as well as in snails, with transfer factors (TFs) lower than 3.7 x 10(-2). Activity concentrations were higher in earthworms (2.8- 4.8 Bq/kg dry mass) than in snails (<1.5 Bq/kg). In the second experiment, microcosms were used to determine the contribution of soil and lettuce in the accumulation of (137)Cs in snails. Results suggest that the contribution of lettuce and soil is 80 and 20%, respectively. Microcosms also were used to study the influence of earthworms on (137)Cs accumulation in snail tissues in the most ecologically relevant treatment (soil-earthworm-plant-snail food web). In this case, soil-to-plant transfer was high, with a TF of 0.8, and was not significantly modified by earthworms. Conversely, soil-to-snail transfer was lower (TF, approximately 0.1) but was significantly increased in presence of earthworms. Dose rates were determined in the microcosm study with the EDEN (elementary dose evaluation for natural environment) model. Dose rates were lower than 5.5 x 10(-4) mGy/d, far from values considered to have effects on terrestrial organisms (1 mGy/d). PMID:18266477

  20. Transfer characteristics of cobalt from soil to crops in the suburban areas of Fujian Province, southeast China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Zheng, Haifeng; Chen, Yanhui; Wang, Guo; Fenghua, Ding

    2010-11-01

    The bioavailability of cobalt and its transfer from soil to vegetables and rice were investigated. Among 312 soils collected from vegetable and paddy fields in the suburban areas of some major cities of Fujian Province, southeast China, total soil Co ranged from 3.5 to 21.7 mg kg(-1), indicating a slight accumulation compared with the background value of the province. DTPA extracted 0.1-8.5% of soil total Co. Total and DTPA-extractable Co correlated with soil pH, CEC, free Fe, total Mn, clay and silt content more significantly in paddy soils than in the soils from vegetable fields. The average Co concentrations in the edible parts of vegetables and rice were 15.4 microg kg(-1) and 15.5 microg kg(-1), respectively. The transfer factor (the ratio of plant Co to soil DTPA-extractable Co, TF(DTPA)) ranged from 0.003 to 0.126 with a median of 0.049. The TF(DTPA) decreased in the order of leafy vegetables > fruit vegetables > root vegetables > rice. The TF(DTPA) of all crops decreased with increasing DTPA-extractable Co. Increase in pH, CEC, organic matter, clay, silt, free iron and total Mn limited the soil-to-plant transfer of Co to varying degrees. The transfer of Co from the soils to the edible parts of the crops was lower than that of Zn, Cu and Cd, but higher than that of Pb in the same areas. The concentrations of Co in rice and vegetables in the study areas were considered to be safe for the local residents because of the slight anthropogenic input and the low transfer potential to the edible parts of Co from the soils. PMID:20615604

  1. Transfer students in STEM majors at a Midwestern University: Academic and social involvement factors that influence student success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Carlos

    There is soon-to-be a shortage of qualified U.S. workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As a result, many science-related jobs are being filled by technically-skilled foreign workers. If the U.S wants to maintain its global economic leadership, then it must ensure a continuous growth of highly-trained individuals in STEM disciplines. Therefore, American institutions of higher education, including community colleges, must identify potential factors that contribute to the lack of interest in STEM majors, as well as the low rate of success of students who enter STEM majors but struggle to finish their degrees. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions of community college transfer students who are pursuing bachelor degrees in STEM majors at Iowa State University (ISU). What were their transfer experiences and what influenced their academic success in STEM. Participants were encouraged to share their transfer experiences while at the community college as well as their experiences on the ISU campus. They were also asked about their level of academic involvement, their relationships with faculty, and their participation in peer group activities prior to and after transferring. The research design included both quantitative and qualitative components, which provided an in-depth look at the experiences of STEM non-engineering and engineering students. Quantitative data include students' background characteristics, demographic information, and college activities at the community college and ISU. Qualitative data were used to illuminate students' overall transfer experience and their successful journey in STEM fields. The combination of quantitative and qualitative methods allowed a better understanding of the strategies students put into practice once they transfer from a community college to a four-year institution in pursuit of a STEM bachelor's degree. The results of this study suggest that there is an association among the

  2. SiC MOSFET Based Single Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Onar, Omer C; Tang, Lixin; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Campbell, Steven L; Miller , John M.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges the utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance due to variable parameters such as battery state-of-charge, coupling factor, and coil misalignment. This paper presents the implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation. The proposed SiC MOSFET based single phase active front end rectifier with PFC resulted in >97% efficiency at 137mm air-gap and >95% efficiency at 160mm air-gap.

  3. Factors enhancing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene transfer in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egnin, M.; Mora, A.; Prakash, C. S.; Mortley, D. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Parameters enhancing Agrobacterium-mediated transfer of foreign genes to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cells were investigated. An intron-containing beta-glucuronidase uidA (gusA) gene under the transcriptional control of CaMV 35S promoter served as a reporter. Transformation frequency was evaluated by scoring the number of sectors expressing GUS activity on leaf and epicotyl explants. The 'Valencia Select' market type cv. New Mexico was more amenable to Agrobacterium transformation than the 'runner' market type cultivars tested (Florunner, Georgia Runner, Sunrunner, or South Runner). The disarmed Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA101 was superior in facilitating the transfer of uidA gene to peanut cells compared to the disarmed strain C58. Rinsing of explants in half-strength Murashige-Skoog (MS) media prior to infection by Agrobacterium significantly increased the transformation efficiency. The use of cocultivation media containing high auxin [1.0 or 2.5 mg/l (4.53 micromolar or 11.31 micromolar) 2,4-D] and low cytokinin [0.25 or 0.5 mg/l (1.0 micromolar or 2.0 micromolar) BA] promoted higher transformation than either hormone-free or thidiazuron-containing medium. The polarity of the epicotyl during cocultivation was important; explants incubated in an inverted (vertically) manner followed by a vertically upright position resulted in improved transformation and shoot regeneration frequencies. Preculture of explants in MS basal medium or with 2.5 mg thidiazuron per l prior to infection drastically decreased the number of transformed zones. The optimized protocol was used to obtain transient transformation frequencies ranging from 12% to 36% for leaf explants, 15% to 42% for epicotyls. Initial evidence of transformation was obtained by polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by Southern analysis of regenerated plants.

  4. JLab Measurement of the He4 Charge Form Factor at Large Momentum Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camsonne, A.; Katramatou, A. T.; Olson, M.; Sparveris, N.; Acha, A.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B. D.; Arrington, J.; Baldwin, A.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Craver, B.; Decowski, P.; Dutta, C.; Folts, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilman, R.; Gomez, J.; Hahn, B.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Kelleher, A.; Khrosinkova, E.; Kievsky, A.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; Lee, B.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R. A.; Lott, G.; Lu, H.; Marcucci, L. E.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; Meekins, D.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Norum, B.; Petratos, G. G.; Puckett, A.; Qian, X.; Rondon, O.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Segal, J.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R. R.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, B. B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhang, W.-M.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    The charge form factor of He4 has been extracted in the range 29 fm-2≤Q2≤77 fm-2 from elastic electron scattering, detecting He4 recoil nuclei and electrons in coincidence with the high resolution spectrometers of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. The measurements have uncovered a second diffraction minimum for the form factor, which was predicted in the Q2 range of this experiment. The data are in qualitative agreement with theoretical calculations based on realistic interactions and accurate methods to solve the few-body problem.

  5. A Semi-Empirical Method to Estimate the Response Factors for VOCs in Proton-Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Leithead, A.; De Gouw, J. A.; Warneke, C.; Graus, M.; Veres, P. R.; Murphy, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds are essential in sustaining atmospheric chemical processes which lie at the heart of most atmospheric environmental issues. Recent advances in VOC measurement technologies have allowed rapid detection of the primary VOCs and their oxidation products. Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS) has been widely used to determine air concentrations of many hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons rapidly. The recent advance in PTRMS with time-of-flight mass (TOF) detection, allows hundreds of VOC compounds to be detected simultaneously and rapidly. Converting these detected signals into air concentrations is a challenge. This is usually accomplished with calibrations using a limited number of target compounds at known concentrations. However, for the hundreds of masses in the PTR mass spectrum particularly from TOF detectors, conversion to air concentration is not always practical nor possible if their compound identities are not known. Here, we have developed a new method to estimate the response factors for VOCs to convert the measured ion signals into air concentrations. This method is based on semi-empirical calculations of the rate constants for the proton transfer reactions between the hydronium ion and target hydrocarbons using polarizabilities and permanent dipole moments, and extrapolation to unknown hydrocarbons. The method is further validated with calibration results for selected hydrocarbons. Using these response factors, conversion to air concentrations for many signals in a PTR MS of unknown chemical structures can be accomplished.

  6. Factors influencing ALS-resistant gene transfer from CL (tm) rice to red rice.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) is hard to control due to its genetic similarity to cultivated rice. Herbicide-resistant Clearfield ™ (CL) rice now offers an excellent option for red rice control. However, sustainability of CL technology at the producers’ level will be dictated by various factors. Promi...

  7. Satisfaction Levels and Factors Influencing Satisfaction With Use of a Social App for Neonatal and Pediatric Patient Transfer Information Systems: A Questionnaire Study Among Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Iee; Kim, Sun Jun; Cho, Soo Chul; Kim, Il Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment of neonatal and pediatric patients is limited to certain medical institutions depending on treatment difficulty. Effective patient transfers are necessary in situations where there are limited medical resources. In South Korea, the government has made a considerable effort to establish patient transfer systems using various means, such as websites, telephone, and so forth. However, in reality, the effort has not yet been effective. Objective In this study, we ran a patient transfer information system using a social app for effective patient transfer. We analyzed the results, satisfaction levels, and the factors influencing satisfaction. Methods Naver Band is a social app and mobile community application which in Korea is more popular than Facebook. It facilitates group communication. Using Naver Band, two systems were created: one by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the other by the Department of Pediatrics at Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital, South Korea. The information necessary for patient transfers was provided to participating obstetricians (n=51) and pediatricians (n=90). We conducted a survey to evaluate the systems and reviewed the results retrospectively. Results The number of patients transferred was reported to increase by 65% (26/40) obstetricians and 40% (23/57) pediatricians. The time taken for transfers was reported to decrease by 72% (29/40) obstetricians and 59% (34/57) pediatricians. Satisfaction was indicated by 83% (33/40) obstetricians and 89% (51/57) pediatricians. Regarding factors influencing satisfaction, the obstetricians reported communication with doctors in charge (P=.03) and time reduction during transfers (P=.02), whereas the pediatricians indicated review of the diagnosis and treatment of transferred patients (P=.01) and the time reduction during transfers (P=.007). Conclusions The users were highly satisfied and different users indicated different factors of satisfaction. This finding

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor: subcellular compartmentalization and interneuronal transfer as visualized with anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, C; Cao, Y H; Pettersson, R F; Olson, L

    1991-01-01

    The recent cloning of a second member of the nerve growth factor family, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), has prompted investigation into the cells that express this factor's mRNA and protein. In the present study, antibodies raised against unique peptide sequences within the porcine BDNF protein detect BDNF-like immunoreactivity in neurons in rat hippocampal and cortical areas consistent with the distribution of BDNF mRNA as detected with in situ hybridization. Within these neurons, BDNF-like immunoreactivity was observed in the cytoplasm, dendrites, and nuclei. In addition, BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in the cytoplasm of cholinergic neurons that do not express detectable levels of BDNF mRNA. Thus, anti-peptide antibodies can be used to detect this neurotrophic factor protein in cytoplasmic sites of synthesis and in areas of probable action. We propose that one form of the BDNF protein enters the nucleus and may directly influence transcription, while another fraction of the protein is transported out of the synthesizing cell and can be detected, after retrograde axonal transport, in cytoplasmic granules in the perikarya of cholinergic neurons. These basal forebrain cholinergic neurons project to regions enriched in BDNF-synthesizing cells and are known to be responsive to BDNF in vitro. Our data provide information regarding the cellular distribution of BDNF protein in vivo and suggest a dendro-axonic interneuronal transfer of BDNF as well as an additional, intracellular signaling pathway not previously thought to occur in postmitotic neurons in brain. Images PMID:1946410

  9. Factors affecting stepladder stability during a lateral weight transfer: a study in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bing-Shiang; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2005-09-01

    A fall from a stepladder is often initiated by a loss of lateral stability. An inverted pendulum model of the human, validated by experiment, was used to determine the feasible range of whole-body center of mass (COM) states for which weight can be transferred laterally on a ladder tread without a ladder rail losing contact with the ground ("no lift-off" stability region). The results show that the size of the feasible no lift-off region was inversely proportional to the height of the tread above the ground, the distance of the stance foot from the ipsilateral rail, and lateral ground inclination angle. For given initial COM kinematics on a tread height equal to 40% human body height, a stance-foot location equal to one-eighth tread width and a 3.5 degrees ground inclination had approximately equivalent effects on the no lift-off region size. Ladder stability was three times more sensitive to tread height than to foot location. Laterally-exerted impulsive hand-tool forces should generally be limited to 8% body weight. These findings can lead to improved ladder designs and safety instructions for stepladder users. PMID:15970205

  10. Characterization of human dialyzable transfer factor from normal and chronic lymphoid leukemia sources.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Marescot, M R; Lesourd, B; Doumercq, S; Moulias, R

    1976-01-01

    Dialysates of lymphomonocytes can be roughly quantified through the use of optical density and measurements of RNA and protein contents. Dialysates of normal lymphocytes (N-TFd) contain about 224 +/- 67 mug of RNA-like material per 10(8) cells, 75 to 90% of which is eluted in fractions II and III on Biogel P10 chromatography. In contrast, dialysates of lymphocytes from patients suffering chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL-TFd) contain approximately 12 times less RNA-like material (about 27 +/- 11 mug per 10(8) lymphocytes) and have a different characteristic chromatographic pattern. Bioassays with crude dialysates confirm (a) that N-TFd increases 3H-thymidine incorporation by nonsenstitized lymphocytes "in vitro" in the presence of PPD, and (b) that inbred Lewis rats develop positive skin tests (systemic transfer) after receiving injections of N-TFd or of fractions II and III from Biogel fractionation of N-TFd. Neither test gives positive results when CLL-TFd is used. PMID:817750

  11. Transference and "the Rebbe" idiographic and nomothetic factors in the psychoanalysis of Lubavitch Chassidim.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Martin A; Kaplan, Ricki S

    2013-12-01

    The Lubavitch Chassidim are one of several ultra-orthodox groups within Judaism. Their central focus is on their leader or Rebbe, who is seen as not only the possessor of all wisdom but also having supernatural powers. In working therapeutically with Lubavitch, one needs to distinguish if the beliefs of the individual are unique to them or reflect the belief system of the community. If the former, then it obviously needs to be analyzed. If the latter, then it is seen as an identification with the group and reflective of the need for group cohesion and often a regulator of self-esteem. The following article demonstrates these factors. PMID:23824957

  12. Scattering cross-section emission factors for visibility and radiative transfer applications: military vehicles traveling on unpaved roads.

    PubMed

    Moosmüller, Hans; Varma, Ravi; Arnott, W Patrick; Kuhns, Hampden D; Etyemezian, Vicken; Gillies, John A

    2005-11-01

    Emission factors for particulate matter (PM) are generally reported as mass emission factors (PM mass emitted per time or activity) as appropriate for air quality standards based on mass concentration. However, for visibility and radiative transfer applications, scattering, absorption, and extinction coefficients are the parameters of interest, with visibility standards based on extinction coefficients. These coefficients (dimension of inverse distance) equal cross-section concentrations, and, therefore, cross-section emission factors are appropriate. Scattering cross-section emission factors were determined for dust entrainment by nine vehicles, ranging from light passenger vehicles to heavy military vehicles, traveling on an unpaved road. Each vehicle made multiple passes at multiple speeds while scattering and absorption coefficients, wind velocity and dust plume profiles, and additional parameters were measured downwind of the road. Light absorption of the entrained PM was negligible, and the light extinction was primarily caused by scattering. The resulting scattering cross-section emission factors per vehicle kilometer traveled (vkt) range from 12.5 m2/vkt for a slow (16 km/ hr), light (1176 kg) vehicle to 3724 m2/vkt for a fast (64 km/hr), heavy (17,727 kg) vehicle and generally increase with vehicle speed and mass. The increase is approximately linear with speed, yielding emission factors per vkt and speed ranging from 4.2 m2/(vkt km/hr) to 53 m2/(vkt km/hr). These emission factors depend approximately linearly on vehicle mass within the groups of light (vehicle mass < or =3100 kg) and heavy (vehicle mass >8000 kg) vehicles yielding emission factors per vkt, speed, and mass of 0.0056 m2/(vkt km/hr kg) and 0.0024 m2/(vkt km/hr kg), respectively. Comparison of the scattering cross-section and PM mass emission factors yields average mass scattering efficiencies of 1.5 m2/g for the light vehicles and of 0.8 m2/g for the heavy vehicles indicating that the heavy

  13. Physiological mechanisms, behavioral and psychological factors influencing the transfer of milk from mothers to their young.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Wibke; Woodside, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care".Producing milk to support the growth of their young is a central element of maternal care in mammals. In spite of the facts that ecological constraints influence nursing frequency, length of time until weaning and the composition of milk, there is considerable similarity in the anatomy and physiology of milk production and delivery across mammalian species. Here we provide an overview of cross species variation in nursing patterns and milk composition as well as the mechanisms underlying mammary gland development, milk production and letdown. Not all women breastfeed their infants, thus in later sections we review studies of factors that facilitate or impede the initiation and duration of breastfeeding. The results of these investigations suggest that the decisions to initiate and maintain breastfeeding are influenced by an array of personal, social and biological factors. Finally, studies comparing the development of breastfed and formula fed infants as well as those investigating associations between breastfeeding, maternal health and mother/infant interaction are reviewed. Leading health agencies including the World Health Organization and CDC advocate breastfeeding for at least the first 6months postpartum. To achieve these rates will require not only institutional support but also a focus on individual mother/infant dyads and their experience. PMID:26232032

  14. Two protocols to treat thin endometrium with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor during frozen embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhang, Qiong; Hao, Jie; Xu, Dabao; Li, Yanping

    2015-04-01

    The efficacy of two granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) protocols for thin endometrium were investigated. Eighty-two patients were diagnosed with thin endometrium (<7 mm). Thirty patients with previously cancelled embryo transfers received intrauterine G-CSF in subsequent frozen embryo transfer (FET) cycles. Patients were divided into the G-CSF only and G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroups. Compared with previous cycles, endometrial thickness increased from 5.7 ± 0.7 mm to 8.1 ± 2.1 mm after G-CSF treatment (P < 0.001). Endometrial thickness increases were not significantly different between the two subgroups. The G-CSF with endometrial scratch subgroup established nominally higher though non-significant clinical pregnancy and live birth rates than the G-CSF only subgroup (53.8 % versus 42.9% and 38.5% versus 28.6%, respectively). Fifty-two patients underwent FET despite edometrial thickness less than 7 mm, and were included as controls. Significantly higher embryo implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were observed in the G-CSF group compared with the control group (31.5% versus 13.9%; P < 0.01; 48.1% versus 25.0%; P = 0.038, respectively). Endometrial scracth did not impair G-CSF treatment for thin endometrium and favoured pregnancy and live birth rates. For patients with thin endometrium, embryo transfer cancellation and G-CSF treatment in subsequent FET cycles is beneficial. PMID:25682303

  15. Trichostatin A specifically improves the aberrant expression of transcription factor genes in embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kimiko; Oikawa, Mami; Kamimura, Satoshi; Ogonuki, Narumi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Although mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established in various species, the low developmental efficiency has hampered its practical applications. Treatment of SCNT-derived embryos with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can improve their development, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. To address this question, we analysed gene expression profiles of SCNT-derived 2-cell mouse embryos treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a potent HDAC inhibitor that is best used for mouse cloning. Unexpectedly, TSA had no effect on the numbers of aberrantly expressed genes or the overall gene expression pattern in the embryos. However, in-depth investigation by gene ontology and functional analyses revealed that TSA treatment specifically improved the expression of a small subset of genes encoding transcription factors and their regulatory factors, suggesting their positive involvement in de novo RNA synthesis. Indeed, introduction of one of such transcription factors, Spi-C, into the embryos at least partially mimicked the TSA-induced improvement in embryonic development by activating gene networks associated with transcriptional regulation. Thus, the effects of TSA treatment on embryonic gene expression did not seem to be stochastic, but more specific than expected, targeting genes that direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the 2-cell stage. PMID:25974394

  16. Trichostatin A specifically improves the aberrant expression of transcription factor genes in embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Oikawa, Mami; Kamimura, Satoshi; Ogonuki, Narumi; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nakano, Toru; Abe, Kuniya; Ogura, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Although mammalian cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been established in various species, the low developmental efficiency has hampered its practical applications. Treatment of SCNT-derived embryos with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can improve their development, but the underlying mechanism is still unclear. To address this question, we analysed gene expression profiles of SCNT-derived 2-cell mouse embryos treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a potent HDAC inhibitor that is best used for mouse cloning. Unexpectedly, TSA had no effect on the numbers of aberrantly expressed genes or the overall gene expression pattern in the embryos. However, in-depth investigation by gene ontology and functional analyses revealed that TSA treatment specifically improved the expression of a small subset of genes encoding transcription factors and their regulatory factors, suggesting their positive involvement in de novo RNA synthesis. Indeed, introduction of one of such transcription factors, Spi-C, into the embryos at least partially mimicked the TSA-induced improvement in embryonic development by activating gene networks associated with transcriptional regulation. Thus, the effects of TSA treatment on embryonic gene expression did not seem to be stochastic, but more specific than expected, targeting genes that direct development and trigger zygotic genome activation at the 2-cell stage. PMID:25974394

  17. JLab Measurement of the 4He Charge Form Factor at Large Momentum Transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Camsonne, Alexandre; Katramatou, A. T.; Olson, M.; Sparveris, Nikolaos; Acha, Armando; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Bryon; Arrington, John; Baldwin, Alan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Decowski, Piotr; Dutta, Chiranjib; Folts, Edward; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilman, Ronald; Gomez, Javier; Hahn, Brian; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jian; Iodice, Mauro; Kelleher, Aidan; Khrosinkova, Elena; Kievsky, A.; Kuchina, Elena; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Lee, Byungwuek; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Lott, Gordon; Lu, H.; Marcucci, Laura; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Norum, Blaine; Petratos, Gerassimos; Puckett, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segal, John; Hashemi, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Suleiman, Riad; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Viviani, Michele; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhang, W. -M.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2014-04-01

    The charge form factor of 4He has been extracted in the range 29 fm-2 <= Q2 <= 77 fm-2 from elastic electron scattering, detecting 4He nuclei and electrons in coincidence with the High Resolution Spectrometers of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. The results are in qualitative agreement with realistic meson-nucleon theoretical calculations. The data have uncovered a second diffraction minimum, which was predicted in the Q2 range of this experiment, and rule out conclusively long-standing predictions of dimensional scaling of high-energy amplitudes using quark counting.

  18. Intramyocardial transfer of hepatocyte growth factor as an adjunct to CABG: phase I clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kim, J S; Hwang, H Y; Cho, K R; Park, E-A; Lee, W; Paeng, J C; Lee, D S; Kim, H-K; Sohn, D-W; Kim, K-B

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this phase I clinical trial was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and potential efficacy of VM202, naked DNA expressing two isoforms of hepatocyte growth factor, as an adjunct therapy to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). Nine patients were assigned to receive increasing doses (0.5 to 2.0 mg) of VM202 injected into the right coronary artery (RCA) territory following completion of CABG for the left coronary artery territory. Patients were evaluated for safety and tolerability, and changes in myocardial functions were monitored via echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and myocardial single photon emission computed tomography throughout 6-month follow-up period. No serious complication related to VM202 was observed throughout the 6-month follow-up period. Global myocardial functions (wall motion score index, P=0.0084; stress perfusion, P=0.0002) improved during the follow-up period. In the RCA region, there was an increase in the stress perfusion (baseline vs 3-month, P=0.024; baseline vs 6-month, P=0.024) and also in the wall thickness of the diastolic and systolic phases. Intramyocardial injection of VM202 can be safely used in IHD patients with the tolerable dose of 2.0 mg. In addition, VM202 might appear to have improved regional myocardial perfusion and wall thickness in the injected region. PMID:23151518

  19. Human transfer factor in vitro. II. Augmentation of the secretion of leucocyte migration inhibitory factor (LIF) by leucocyte dialysate and by its components L-serine and glycine.

    PubMed Central

    Ashorn, R G; Räsänen, L; Marnela, K M; Krohn, K J

    1979-01-01

    The effect of human transfer factor (TF) or its components L-serine and/or glycine in tuberculin (PPD), or leucoagglutinin (LA) induced leucocyte migration inhibitory factor (LIF) secretion was studied. Augmentation of LIF secretion was seen with low concentration ( = 0.078 g/l) of TF when lymphocytes were cultured in minimum essential medium for suspension cultures (MEM-S), a culture medium lacking L-serine and glycine. High concentrations (0.3125-5.0 g/l dry weight) of TF were inhibitory in MEM-S. In RPMI 1640, a culture medium containing L-serine and glycine, TF was either inhibitory or had no effect. The combination of L-serine and glycine, at concentrations equivalent or lower than the optimum of TF, had an augmenting effect on LIF secretion identical to that of TF, but no inhibition at higher concentrations was seen. The results indicate that human TF contains components which have suppressive or augmenting effects on LIF secretion in vitro. The augmenting effect may be mainly due to L-serine and glycine and thus not related to TF's activity in vivo. PMID:385187

  20. Development of a general equation to determine the transfer factor feed-to-meat for radiocesium on the basis of the body mass of domestic animals

    SciTech Connect

    Nalezinski, S.; Ruehm, W.; Wirth, E.

    1996-05-01

    Transfer factors from feed to meat (5{sub {integral}}), taken from literature for monogastric animals and ruminants have been correlated to their corresponding animal body mass (m{sub b}). Taking all data into account, a close relationship between both transfer factor and body mass becomes evident, yielding a regression function of (T{sub {integral}} = 8.0 x m{sub b}{sup {minus}0.91}) (r = -0.97). For monogastric animals (including poultry), the corresponding relationships are T{sub {integral}} = 1.9 x m{sub b}{sup {minus}0.72} (r = 0.78). The equations offer the opportunity to estimate the transfer factor for individual animals more precisely taking individual body masses into account. They are of interest for animals, on which no or only poor data concerning radiocesium transfer factors are available. The determination of radiocesium transfer factors are reduced to a simple weighing process. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Structural and Formulation Factors Influencing Pyridinium Lipid-based Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lin; Lu, Yan; Miller, Duane D.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2009-01-01

    A series of pyridinium lipids containing a heterocyclic ring and a nitrogen atom were synthesized to determine the structure-activity relationship for gene delivery. Pyrylium chloroaluminate was synthesized by monoacylation of mesityl oxide and converted into pyrylium hexafluorophosphate, which was used as the key intermediate for reaction with different primary amines, to yield hydroxyethylpyridinium hexafluorophosphate and aminoethylpyridinium hexafluorophosphate. Acylation of these pyridinium salts with different types of fatty acid chlorides afforded the final pyridinium lipids, which were mixed with a co-lipid, such as L-alpha-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and cholesterol (Chol) to prepare cationic liposomes by sonication. These liposomes were mixed with plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (pCMS-EGFP) or luciferase (pDNA3-Luc) and transfected into Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Several factors including hydrophobic anchor chain length, anchor chain type, configuration of double bond, linker type, co-lipid type, cationic lipid: co-lipid molar ratio, charge ratio (N/P), and cell type had significant influence on transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity. Pyridinium lipids with amide linker showed significantly higher transfection efficiency compared to their ester counterparts. Liposomes prepared at 1:1 molar ratio of pyridinium lipid and co-lipid showed higher transfection efficiency when either DOPE or cholesterol was used as a co-lipid to prepare cationic liposomes for complex formation with plasmid DNA at 3:1(+/−) charge ratio. Pyridinium liposomes based on hydrophobic anchor chain length of 16 showed higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity. The pyridinium lipid with trans-configuration of the double bond in fatty acid chain showed higher transfection efficiency than its counterpart with cis-configuration at the same fatty acid chain length. In the presence of serum, C16:0 and Lipofectamine significantly

  2. A Member of the Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Transcription Termination Factor Family Is Required for Maturation of Chloroplast Transfer RNAIle(GAU).

    PubMed

    Romani, Isidora; Manavski, Nikolay; Morosetti, Arianna; Tadini, Luca; Maier, Swetlana; Kühn, Kristina; Ruwe, Hannes; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Wanner, Gerhard; Leister, Dario; Kleine, Tatjana

    2015-09-01

    Plastid gene expression is crucial for organelle function, but the factors that control it are still largely unclear. Members of the so-called mitochondrial transcription termination factor (mTERF) family are found in metazoans and plants and regulate organellar gene expression at different levels. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mTERF6 is localized in chloroplasts and mitochondria, and its knockout perturbs plastid development and results in seedling lethality. In the leaky mterf6-1 mutant, a defect in photosynthesis is associated with reduced levels of photosystem subunits, although corresponding messenger RNA levels are unaffected, whereas translational capacity and maturation of chloroplast ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are perturbed in mterf6-1 mutants. Bacterial one-hybrid screening, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments reveal a specific interaction between mTERF6 and an RNA sequence in the chloroplast isoleucine transfer RNA gene (trnI.2) located in the rRNA operon. In vitro, recombinant mTERF6 bound to its plastid DNA target site can terminate transcription. At present, it is unclear whether disturbed rRNA maturation is a primary or secondary defect. However, it is clear that mTERF6 is required for the maturation of trnI.2. This points to an additional function of mTERFs. PMID:26152711

  3. A potential screening factor for accumulation of cholesteyl ester transfer protein deficiency in East Asia: Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Shinji

    2014-04-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP)-deficiency manifests a unique plasma lipoprotein profile without other apparent symptoms. It is highly common in East Asia while rather rare anywhere else. A potential environmental screening factor(s) may therefore contribute to this eccentric distribution, such as its selective advantage against a regional illness, most likely an infectious disease, in relation to plasma lipoproteins. Blood flukes use the host plasma lipoproteins as nutrient sources through the lipoprotein receptor-like systems. Its Asian-specific species, Schistosoma (S) japonicum, which has been endemic in East Asia, takes up cholesteryl ester (CE) from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) for the embryonation of their eggs to miracidia, a critical step of the hepatic pathogenesis of this parasite, but poorly from HDL of CETP-deficiency. CD36-related protein (CD36RP) was cloned from the adults and the eggs of S. japonicum, with 1880-bp encoding 506 amino-acid residues exhibiting the CD36 domains and two transmembrane regions. Its extracellular domain selectively bound human HDL but neither LDL nor CETP-deficiency HDL, and the antibody against the extracellular domain suppressed the selective HDL-CE uptake and embryonation of the eggs. When infected with S. japonicum, wild-type mice developed less hepatic granulomatosis than CETP-transgenic mice by the ectopic egg embryonation. CD36RP is thus a candidate receptor of S. japonicum to facilitate uptake of HDL-CE necessary for egg embryonation. Abnormal HDL caused by CETP-deficiency retards this process and thereby protects the patients from development of hepatic lesions. S. japonicum infection is a potential screening factor for high prevalence of CETP deficiency in East Asia. PMID:24388961

  4. Plasmid-based transient human stromal cell-derived factor-1 gene transfer improves cardiac function in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, S; Miller, T J; Pastore, J M; Kiedrowski, M; Aras, R; Penn, M S

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that transient stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1) improved cardiac function when delivered via cell therapy in ischemic cardiomyopathy at a time remote from acute myocardial infarction (MI) rats. We hypothesized that non-viral gene transfer of naked plasmid DNA-expressing hSDF-1 could similarly improve cardiac function. To optimize plasmid delivery, we tested SDF-1 and luciferase plasmids driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter with (pCMVe) or without (pCMV) translational enhancers or α myosin heavy chain (pMHC) promoter in a rodent model of heart failure. In vivo expression of pCMVe was 10-fold greater than pCMV and pMHC expression and continued over 30 days. We directly injected rat hearts with SDF-1 plasmid 1 month after MI and assessed heart function. At 4 weeks after plasmid injection, we observed a 35.97 and 32.65% decline in fractional shortening (FS) in control (saline) animals and pMHC-hSDF1 animals, respectively, which was sustained to 8 weeks. In contrast, we observed a significant 24.97% increase in animals injected with the pCMVe-hSDF1 vector. Immunohistochemistry of cardiac tissue revealed a significant increase in vessel density in the hSDF-1-treated animals compared with control animals. Increasing SDF-1 expression promoted angiogenesis and improved cardiac function in rats with ischemic heart failure along with evidence of scar remodeling with a trend toward decreased myocardial fibrosis. These data demonstrate that stand-alone non-viral hSDF-1 gene transfer is a strategy for improving cardiac function in ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21472007

  5. Inadequate passive immune transfer in puppies: definition, risk factors and prevention in a large multi-breed kennel.

    PubMed

    Mila, H; Feugier, A; Grellet, A; Anne, J; Gonnier, M; Martin, M; Rossig, L; Chastant-Maillard, S

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of neonatal mortality is high in the canine species and far from well-studied. In most domestic neonates, an appropriate colostrum intake is a key element of the control of neonatal mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of passive immune transfer on puppy mortality, assessed through serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration at 2 days of age. Factors impacting passive immune transfer and the value of an oral immunoglobulin supplementation to prevent it were also analyzed. A total of 149 puppies from 34 litters (12 breeds) within one breeding kennel were included. Blood samples were collected at 2 days of age and colostrum was collected from their dams 1 day after whelping to assay IgG concentration. Puppies were weighed at birth and at 2 days of age for calculation of growth rate. Mortality was recorded until 3 weeks of age. Seventy randomly assigned puppies were orally supplemented with hyper-immunized adult plasma twice within the first 8h of life. IgG concentration at 2 days of age was significantly correlated with weight gain during the first 2 days of life. The multivariable model with litter as a random effect demonstrated that neonatal mortality was not influenced by breed size, sex, supplementation, litter size, nor colostrum IgG concentration, but by puppy IgG concentration at 2 days of age. According to the ROC curve, the minimal IgG concentration at and below which puppies were at higher risk of death was determined at 230 mg/dl. Puppy IgG concentration was significantly associated with growth rate, but not with breed size, sex, supplementation, litter size or colostrum IgG concentration in a multivariable model with litter as a random effect. This study demonstrates that neonatal mortality in puppies is related to the quality of passive immune transfer. The oral supplementation with hyper-immunized canine plasma neither decreased risk of mortality, nor improved serum IgG concentration at 2 days of age in puppies

  6. Charge form factor of the neutron at low momentum transfer from the 2H-->(e-->,e'n)1H reaction.

    PubMed

    Geis, E; Kohl, M; Ziskin, V; Akdogan, T; Arenhövel, H; Alarcon, R; Bertozzi, W; Booth, E; Botto, T; Calarco, J; Clasie, B; Crawford, C B; DeGrush, A; Donnelly, T W; Dow, K; Farkhondeh, M; Fatemi, R; Filoti, O; Franklin, W; Gao, H; Gilad, S; Hasell, D; Karpius, P; Kolster, H; Lee, T; Maschinot, A; Matthews, J; McIlhany, K; Meitanis, N; Milner, R G; Rapaport, J; Redwine, R P; Seely, J; Shinozaki, A; Sirca, S; Sindile, A; Six, E; Smith, T; Steadman, M; Tonguc, B; Tschalaer, C; Tsentalovich, E; Turchinetz, W; Xiao, Y; Xu, W; Zhang, C; Zhou, Z; Zwart, T

    2008-07-25

    We report new measurements of the neutron charge form factor at low momentum transfer using quasielastic electrodisintegration of the deuteron. Longitudinally polarized electrons at an energy of 850 MeV were scattered from an isotopically pure, highly polarized deuterium gas target. The scattered electrons and coincident neutrons were measured by the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST) detector. The neutron form factor ratio GEn/GMn was extracted from the beam-target vector asymmetry AedV at four-momentum transfers Q2=0.14, 0.20, 0.29, and 0.42 (GeV/c)2. PMID:18764321

  7. Transfer factor of the radionuclides in food crops from high-background radiation area of south west India.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, G; Thanka Kumaran, J Thampi; Gnana Raj, G Allen; Maniyan, C G

    2012-04-01

    It is necessary to obtain the transfer factor (TF) of long-lived radionuclides because soil type and vegetation can affect TF. We studied the food crops commonly consumed by the general public of Kanyakumari district of south India. The main focus was on rice, fruits, vegetables and tapioca because the consumption of these is high. The soil to rice TF for the radionuclides, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (238)U and (40) K are 8.8×10(-2), 14.2×10(-2), 5.8×10(-2) and 6.3×10(-2), respectively. The TF of tapioca for (226)Ra, (232)Th, (238)U and (40) K are 6.2×10(-2) , 11×10(-2), 1.9×10(-2) and 8.9×10(-2), respectively. For fruits and vegetables, the TFs are low. In the majority of the crops the non-edible parts accumulate more radionuclides than the edible parts. PMID:21680604

  8. BASELINE PARAMETER UPDATE FOR HUMAN HEALTH INPUT AND TRANSFER FACTORS FOR RADIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, T; Patricia Lee, P

    2007-01-31

    The purpose of this report is to update parameters utilized in Human Health Exposure calculations and Bioaccumulation Transfer Factors utilized at SRS for Performance Assessment modeling. The reason for the update is to utilize more recent information issued, validate information currently used and correct minor inconsistencies between modeling efforts performed in SRS contiguous areas of the heavy industrialized central site usage areas called the General Separations Area (GSA). SRS parameters utilized were compared to a number of other DOE facilities and generic national/global references to establish relevance of the parameters selected and/or verify the regional differences of the southeast USA. The parameters selected were specifically chosen to be expected values along with identifying a range for these values versus the overly conservative specification of parameters for estimating an annual dose to the maximum exposed individual (MEI). The end uses are to establish a standardized source for these parameters that is up to date with existing data and maintain it via review of any future issued national references to evaluate the need for changes as new information is released. These reviews are to be added to this document by revision.

  9. Development of a Cell-Based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Reporter for Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, R H; Steenblock, E R; Camarero, J A

    2007-03-22

    We report the construction of a cell-based fluorescent reporter for anthrax lethal factor (LF) protease activity using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This was accomplished by engineering an Escherichia coli cell line to express a genetically encoded FRET reporter and LF protease. Both proteins were encoded in two different expression plasmids under the control of different tightly controlled inducible promoters. The FRET-based reporter was designed to contain a LF recognition sequence flanked by the FRET pair formed by CyPet and YPet fluorescent proteins. The length of the linker between both fluorescent proteins was optimized using a flexible peptide linker containing several Gly-Gly-Ser repeats. Our results indicate that this FRET-based LF reporter was readily expressed in E. coli cells showing high levels of FRET in vivo in the absence of LF. The FRET signal, however, decreased 5 times after inducing LF expression in the same cell. These results suggest that this cell-based LF FRET reporter may be used to screen genetically encoded libraries in vivo against LF.

  10. Soil to rice transfer factors for (226)Ra, (228)Ra, (210)Pb, (40)K and (137)Cs: a study on rice grown in India.

    PubMed

    Karunakara, N; Rao, Chetan; Ujwal, P; Yashodhara, I; Kumara, Sudeep; Ravi, P M

    2013-04-01

    India is the second largest producer of rice (Oryza sativa L.) in the world and rice is an essential component of the diet for a majority of the population in India. However, detailed studies aimed at the evaluation of radionuclide transfer factors (F(v)) for the rice grown in India are almost non-existent. This paper presents the soil to rice transfer factors for natural ((226)Ra, (228)Ra, (40)K, and (210)Pb) and artificial ((137)Cs) radionuclides for rice grown in natural field conditions on the West Coast of India. A rice field was developed very close to the Kaiga nuclear power plant and the water required for this field was drawn from the cooling water discharge canal of the power plant. For a comparative study of the radionuclide transfer factors, rice samples were also collected from the rice fields of nearby villages. The study showed that the (226)Ra and (228)Ra activity concentrations were below detection levels in different organs of the rice plant. The soil to un-hulled rice grain (40)K transfer factor varied in the range of 6.5 × 10(-1) to 2.9 with a mean of 0.15 × 10(1), and of (210)Pb varied in the range of <1.2 × 10(-2) to 8.1 × 10(-1) with a mean of 1.4 × 10(-1), and of (137)Cs varied in the range of 6.6 × 10(-2) to 3.4 × 10(-1) with a mean of 2.1 × 10(-1). The mean values of un-hulled grain to white rice processing retention factors (F(r)) were 0.12 for (40)K, 0.03 for (210)Pb, and 0.14 for (137)Cs. Using these processing retention factors, the soil to white rice transfer factors were estimated and these were found to have mean values of 1.8 × 10(-1), 4.2 × 10(-3), and 3.0 × 10(-2) for (40)K, (210)Pb, and (137)Cs, respectively. The study has shown that the transfer of (40)K was higher for above the ground organs than for the root, but (210)Pb and (137)Cs were retained in the root and their transfer to above the ground organs of the rice plant is significantly lower. PMID:23266913

  11. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer and Friction Factor Characteristics in a Circular Tube Fitted with V-Cut Twisted Tape Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Sami D.; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H.; Takriff, Mohd S.; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2013-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of a circular fitted with V-cut twisted tape (VCT) insert with twist ratio (y = 2.93) and different cut depths (w = 0.5, 1, and 1.5 cm) were studied for laminar flow using CFD package (FLUENT-6.3.26). The data obtained from plain tube were verified with the literature correlation to ensure the validation of simulation results. Classical twisted tape (CTT) with different twist ratios (y = 2.93, 3.91, 4.89) were also studied for comparison. The results show that the enhancement of heat transfer rate induced by the classical and V-cut twisted tape inserts increases with the Reynolds number and decreases with twist ratio. The results also revealed that the V-cut twisted tape with twist ratio y = 2.93 and cut depth w = 0.5 cm offered higher heat transfer rate with significant increases in friction factor than other tapes. In addition the results of V-cut twist tape compared with experimental and simulated data of right-left helical tape inserts (RLT), it is found that the V-cut twist tape offered better thermal contact between the surface and the fluid which ultimately leads to a high heat transfer coefficient. Consequently, 107% of maximum heat transfer was obtained by using this configuration. PMID:24078795

  12. An Exploratory Examination of Organizational Factors Leading to Transfer of Hispanic Students: A Case Study. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laden, Berta Vigil

    Hispanics are the fastest growing ethnic group nationally, yet they continue to be undereducated and underemployed. This paper discusses one community college's success in preparing and transfering Hispanic students to 4-year institutions. The study examined a San Francisco Bay Area high transfer community college, which was experiencing an…

  13. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  14. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.R. Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA ); Darlington, G. ); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  15. 137Cs Inter-Plant Concentration Ratios Provide a Predictive Tool for Coral Atolls with Distinct Benefits Over Transfer Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Bogen, K; Corado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2007-07-17

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR), [Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in coral atoll tree food-crops/Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume], can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict {sup 137}Cs concentration in tree food-crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact tree roots naturally integrate 137Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of {sup 137}Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in {sup 137}Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSD's of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD = 1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10 to 20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples.

  16. Lung Transfer Factor in Middle Aged Asymptomatic Male Smokers of a City from West India: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Gadhavi, Bhakti P.; Mehta, Hemant B.; Shah, Chinmay J.; Gokhale, Pradnya A.; Makwana, Amit H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Smoking is an increasingly popular indulgence in India. Assessment by routine spirometry falls short of direct functional parameter like Diffusion Lung Capacity (DLC), also known as lung transfer factor (LTF). Aim To measure LTF amongst middle aged male smokers and to study various correlates for it. Materials and Methods Total of 45 asymptomatic male current smokers were enrolled for this cross-sectional study conducted at pulmonary function testing lab of Physiology Department of our college. Smoking history was evaluated and smoking index was defined by product of number smoked per day and years smoked. We used instrument Ultima PFX of Medgraphic Company. After pre syringe calibration LTF was measured by Methane mixture using protocols of ATS. Parameters measured were Dlco-uncorrected, corrected and normalized to VA (alveolar volume). Results were compared for statistical significance and significance was set as p <0.05. Results In case group of 45(25 bidi and 20 cigarette smokers) mean age was 30 years, mean duration was 8 years, mean smoking index was 60. We found small insignificant decline in actual LTF values than predicted which was not significantly different between bidi and cigarette smokers. Duration, age and intensity of smoking were negatively and significantly correlated with LTF value while anthropometric parameters were not. Conclusion Smoking adversely affects LTF in young asymptomatic current male smoker that further declines with severity of smoking and with duration regardless of type of smoking. With years to come, these alterations can largely be prevented by smoking cessation, at least theoretically. PMID:27134864

  17. (137)Cs inter-plant concentration ratios provide a predictive tool for coral atolls with distinct benefits over transfer factors.

    PubMed

    Robison, William L; Hamilton, Terry F; Bogen, Kenneth T; Conrado, Cynthia L; Kehl, Steven R

    2008-01-01

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR) [Bqg(-1)(137)Cs in coral atoll tree food crops/Bqg(-1)(137)Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume] can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict (137)Cs concentration in tree food crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact that tree roots naturally integrate (137)Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of (137)Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in (137)Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log-normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD)=1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSDs of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD=1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10-20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples. PMID:17904254

  18. Soil-to-Crop Transfer Factors of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides and Stable Elements for Long-Term Dose Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, S.; Tagami, K.

    2007-07-01

    A soil-to-crop transfer factor, TF, is a key parameter that directly affects the internal dose assessment for the ingestion pathway, however, obtaining TFs of various long-lived radionuclides occurred during operation of nuclear power plants is difficult because most of them could not be found in natural environments. In this study, therefore, we collected crops and their associated soils throughout Japan and measured more than 50 elements to obtain TFs under equilibrium conditions. The TFs were calculated for 42 elements (Li, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, Sn, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tl, Pb, Th and U) from their concentrations in both crop and soil samples. The TF is defined as the concentration of an isotope in a crop (in Bq/kg or mg/kg dry weight) divided by the concentration of the isotope in soil (in Bq.kg or mg/kg dry weight). Probability distributions of TFs for 62 upland field crops were usually log-normal type so that geometric means (GMs) were calculated. The values for the elements of interest from the viewpoint of long-term dose assessment were 2.5E-02 for Se, 7.9E-02 for Sr, 3.1E-03 for Cs, 4.2E-04 for Th and 4.6E-04 for U. Leafy vegetable showed the highest TFs for all the elements among the crop groups. It was clear that these data were usually within the 95% confidence limits of TFs compiled by IAEA in Technical Report Series 364. (authors)

  19. Molecular Cloning of a Xylosyltransferase That Transfers the Second Xylose to O-Glucosylated Epidermal Growth Factor Repeats of Notch*

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Maya K.; Buettner, Falk F. R.; Ashikov, Angel; Krylov, Vadim B.; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Nifantiev, Nikolay E.; Haltiwanger, Robert S.; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Bakker, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular domain of Notch contains epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeats that are extensively modified with different O-linked glycans. O-Fucosylation is essential for receptor function, and elongation with N-acetylglucosamine, catalyzed by members of the Fringe family, modulates Notch activity. Only recently, genes encoding enzymes involved in the O-glucosylation pathway have been cloned. In the Drosophila mutant rumi, characterized by a mutation in the protein O-glucosyltransferase, Notch signaling is impaired in a temperature-dependent manner, and a mouse knock-out leads to embryonic lethality. We have previously identified two human genes, GXYLT1 and GXYLT2, encoding glucoside xylosyltransferases responsible for the transfer of xylose to O-linked glucose. The identity of the enzyme further elongating the glycan to generate the final trisaccharide xylose-xylose-glucose, however, remained unknown. Here, we describe that the human gene C3ORF21 encodes a UDP-xylose:α-xyloside α1,3-xylosyltransferase, acting on xylose-α1,3-glucoseβ1-containing acceptor structures. We have, therefore, renamed it XXYLT1 (xyloside xylosyltransferase 1). XXYLT1 cannot act on a synthetic acceptor containing an α-linked xylose alone, but requires the presence of the underlying glucose. Activity on Notch EGF repeats was proven by in vitro xylosylation of a mouse Notch1 fragment recombinantly produced in Sf9 insect cells, a bacterially expressed EGF repeat from mouse Notch2 modified in vitro by Rumi and Gxylt2 and in vivo by co-expression of the enzyme with the Notch1 fragment. The enzyme was shown to be a typical type II membrane-bound glycosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:22117070

  20. Transfer factor of (90)Sr and (137)Cs to lettuce and winter wheat at different growth stage applications.

    PubMed

    Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Safia, Bassam; Ghani, Basem Abdul

    2015-12-01

    The effect of clay soil contamination time on the transfer factors (Fvs) of (137)Cs and (90)Sr was investigated in four different growth stages of winter wheat and lettuce crops. The experiment was performed in an open field using lysimeters. The Fvs were the ratio of the activity concentrations of the radionuclides in crops to those in soil, both as dry weight (Bq kg(-1)). Significant difference of log-Fvs was evaluated using one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Basically, Fvs of (90)Sr were higher than those of (137)Cs, despite of the application stage or crop' variety. Higher Fvs for both radionuclides were observed for lettuce in comparison to winter wheat. Fvs of (90)Sr showed comparable trends for both crops with enhanced Fvs obtained when contamination occurred in early stages, i.e. 1.20 for lettuce and 0.88 and 0.02 for winter wheat, straw and grains, respectively. Despite the fluctuation noted in the pattern of Fvs for (137)Cs, soil contaminated at the second stage gave the highest Fvs for lettuce and grains, with geometric means of 0.21 and 0.01, respectively. However, wheat-straw showed remarkable increase in Fv for the latest contamination (ripening stage), about 0.06. It could be concluded that soil contamination at early growth stages would represent high radiological risk for the scenarios studied with an exception to (137)Cs in winter wheat-straw which reflected greater hazard at the latest application. PMID:26318772

  1. Robotic technology evolution and transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.

    1992-01-01

    A report concerning technology transfer in the area of robotics is presented in vugraph form. The following topics are discussed: definition of technology innovation and tech-transfer; concepts relevant for understanding tech-transfer; models advanced to portray tech-transfer process; factors identified as promoting tech-transfer; factors identified as impeding tech-transfer; what important roles do individuals fulfill in tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; robotic technology evolution; robotic technology transferred; and recommendations for successful robotics tech-transfer.

  2. Trace element mobility and transfer to vegetation within the Ethiopian Rift Valley lake areas.

    PubMed

    Kassaye, Yetneberk A; Skipperud, Lindis; Meland, Sondre; Dadebo, Elias; Einset, John; Salbu, Brit

    2012-10-26

    To evaluate critical trace element loads in native vegetation and calculate soil-to-plant transfer factors (TFs), 11 trace elements (Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Cd, Pb and Mn) have been determined in leaves of 9 taxonomically verified naturally growing terrestrial plant species as well as in soil samples collected around 3 Ethiopian Rift Valley lakes (Koka, Ziway and Awassa). The Cr concentration in leaves of all the plant species was higher than the "normal" range, with the highest level (8.4 mg per kg dw) being observed in Acacia tortilis from the Lake Koka area. Caper species (Capparis fascicularis) and Ethiopian dogstooth grass (Cynodon aethiopicus) from Koka also contained exceptionally high levels of Cd (1 mg per kg dw) and Mo (32.8 mg per kg dw), respectively. Pb, As and Cu concentrations were low in the plant leaves from all sites. The low Cu level in important fodder plant species (Cynodon aethiopicus, Acacia tortilis and Opuntia ficus-indicus) implies potential deficiency in grazing and browsing animals. Compared to the Canadian environmental quality guideline and maximum allowable concentration in agricultural soils, the total soil trace element concentrations at the studied sites are safe for agricultural crop production. Enrichment factor was high for Zn in soils around Lakes Ziway and Awassa, resulting in moderate to high transfer of Zn to the studied plants. A six step sequential extraction procedure on the soils revealed a relatively high mobility of Cd, Se and Mn. Strong association of most trace elements with the redox sensitive fraction and mineral lattice was also confirmed by partial redundancy analysis. TF (mg per kg dw plants/mg per kg dw soil) values based on the total (TF(total)) and mobile fractions (TF(mobile)) of soil trace element concentrations varied widely among elements and plant species, with the averaged TF(total) and TF(mobile) values ranging from 0.01-2 and 1-60, respectively. Considering the mobile fraction in soils should

  3. Soil arsenic availability and the transfer of soil arsenic to crops in suburban areas in Fujian Province, southeast China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui-Qing; Gao, Shu-Fang; Wang, Wei-Ling; Staunton, S; Wang, Guo

    2006-09-15

    The bioavailability, soil-to-plant transfer and associated health risks of arsenic in soils collected from paddy rice fields and vegetable fields in suburban areas of some major cities of Fujian Province were investigated. The total soil concentrations of arsenic ranged from 1.29 to 25.28 mg kg(-)(1) with a mean of 6.09 mg kg(-)(1). Available (NaH(2)PO(4)-extractable) arsenic content accounted for 0.7-38.2% of total soil arsenic and was significantly correlated with total soil arsenic content. For the vegetable soils, the available fraction (ratio of available As to total As) of arsenic decreased with decreasing silt (particle size 0.02-0.002 mm) and free iron (DCB extractable) contents and with increasing soil pH and organic matter content. The available fraction of arsenic in the paddy rice soils increased with increasing free iron and organic matter contents and decreasing soil pH and silt content. The correlation of NaH(2)PO(4)-extractable arsenic with the arsenic concentration of the vegetables was much better than that of total As. The transfer factor based on the soil available arsenic (TF(avail)) was chosen to compare the accumulation ability of the various crops. The TF(avail) values of rice grains (air-dried weight basis) ranged between 0.068 and 0.44 and were higher than those of the vegetables, ranging from 0.001 to 0.12. The accumulation ability of the crops decreased in the order of rice>radish>water spinach>celery>onion>taro>leaf mustard>fragrant-flowered garlic>pakchoi>Chinese cabbage>lettuce>garlic>cowpea>cauliflower>bottle gourd>towel gourd>eggplant. Daily consumption of rice and other As-rich vegetables could result in an excessive intake of arsenic, based on the provisional tolerable intake for adults for arsenic recommended by WHO. PMID:16624379

  4. Estimate Radiological Dose for Animals

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-12-18

    Estimate Radiological dose for animals in ecological environment using open literature values for parameters such as body weight, plant and soil ingestion rate, rad. halflife, absorbed energy, biological halflife, gamma energy per decay, soil-to-plant transfer factor, ...etc

  5. A compilation of radionuclide transfer factors for the plant, meat, milk, and aquatic food pathways and the suggested default values for the RESRAD code

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.Y.; Biwer, B.M.; Yu, C.

    1993-08-01

    The ongoing development and revision of the RESRAD computer code at Argonne National Laboratory requires update of radionuclide transfer factors for the plant, meat, milk, and aquatic food pathways. Default values for these transfer factors used in published radiological assessment reports are compiled and compared with values used in RESRAD. The differences among the reported default values used in different radiological assessment codes and reports are also discussed. In data comparisons, values used in more recent reports are given more weight because more recent experimental work tends to be conducted under better-defined laboratory or field conditions. A new default value is suggested for RESRAD if one of the following conditions is met: (1) values used in recent reports are an order of magnitude higher or lower than the default value currently used in RESRAD, or (2) the same default value is used in several recent radiological assessment reports.

  6. Measurements of the proton elastic-form-factor ratio mu pG p E/G p M at low momentum transfer.

    PubMed

    Ron, G; Glister, J; Lee, B; Allada, K; Armstrong, W; Arrington, J; Beck, A; Benmokhtar, F; Berman, B L; Boeglin, W; Brash, E; Camsonne, A; Calarco, J; Chen, J P; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E; Coman, L; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; Dumas, J; Dutta, C; Feuerbach, R; Freyberger, A; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilman, R; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Hyde, C E; Ibrahim, H; Ilieva, Y; de Jager, C W; Jiang, X; Jones, M K; Kang, H; Kelleher, A; Khrosinkova, E; Kuchina, E; Kumbartzki, G; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Markowitz, P; May-Tal Beck, S; McCullough, E; Meekins, D; Meziane, M; Meziani, Z-E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Norum, B E; Oh, Y; Olson, M; Paolone, M; Paschke, K; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Pomatsalyuk, R; Pomerantz, I; Puckett, A; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Ransome, R; Reyhan, M; Roche, J; Rousseau, Y; Saha, A; Sarty, A J; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shabestari, M; Shahinyan, A; Shneor, R; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Song, J; Sparks, R; Subedi, R; Strauch, S; Urciuoli, G M; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Zhan, X; Zhu, X

    2007-11-16

    High-precision measurements of the proton elastic form-factor ratio, mu pG p E/G p M, have been made at four-momentum transfer, Q2, values between 0.2 and 0.5 GeV2. The new data, while consistent with previous results, clearly show a ratio less than unity and significant differences from the central values of several recent phenomenological fits. By combining the new form-factor ratio data with an existing cross-section measurement, one finds that in this Q2 range the deviation from unity is primarily due to G p E being smaller than expected. PMID:18233135

  7. Effect of nuclear factor κB inhibition on serotype 9 adeno-associated viral (AAV9) minidystrophin gene transfer to the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Reay, Daniel P; Niizawa, Gabriela A; Watchko, Jon F; Daood, Molly; Reay, Ja'Nean C; Raggi, Eugene; Clemens, Paula R

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy studies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have focused on viral vector-mediated gene transfer to provide therapeutic protein expression or treatment with drugs to limit dystrophic changes in muscle. The pathological activation of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway has emerged as an important cause of dystrophic muscle changes in muscular dystrophy. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB may inhibit gene transfer by promoting inflammation in response to the transgene or vector. Therefore, we hypothesized that inhibition of pathological NF-κB activation in muscle would complement the therapeutic benefits of dystrophin gene transfer in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Systemic gene transfer using serotype 9 adeno-associated viral (AAV9) vectors is promising for treatment of preclinical models of DMD because of vector tropism to cardiac and skeletal muscle. In quadriceps of C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J (mdx) mice, the addition of octalysine (8K)-NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO)-binding domain (8K-NBD) peptide treatment to AAV9 minidystrophin gene delivery resulted in increased levels of recombinant dystrophin expression suggesting that 8K-NBD treatment promoted an environment in muscle tissue conducive to higher levels of expression. Indices of necrosis and regeneration were diminished with AAV9 gene delivery alone and to a greater degree with the addition of 8K-NBD treatment. In diaphragm muscle, high-level transgene expression was achieved with AAV9 minidystoophin gene delivery alone; therefore, improvements in histological and physiological indices were comparable in the two treatment groups. The data support benefit from 8K-NBD treatment to complement gene transfer therapy for DMD in muscle tissue that receives incomplete levels of transduction by gene transfer, which may be highly significant for clinical applications of muscle gene delivery. PMID:22231732

  8. Assessing Student Expertise in Introductory Physics with Isomorphic Problems. II. Effect of Some Potential Factors on Problem Solving and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandralekha; Singh

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the use of isomorphic problem pairs (IPPs) to assess introductory physics students' ability to solve and successfully transfer problem-solving knowledge from one context to another in mechanics. We call the paired problems "isomorphic" because they require the same physics principle to solve them. We analyze written…

  9. Hispanic Student Success: Factors Influencing the Persistence and Transfer Decisions of Latino Community College Students Enrolled in Developmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Gloria; Nora, Amaury

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a set of theoretically-derived predictor variables on the persistence and transfer of Hispanic community college students. Early models of student persistence have been validated primarily among 4-year college students. While the constructs have been well-established, the relationships of those relevant factors…

  10. Examining Factors Affecting Beginning Teachers' Transfer of Learning of ICT-Enhanced Learning Activities in Their Teaching Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agyei, Douglas D.; Voogt, Joke

    2014-01-01

    This study examined 100 beginning teachers' transfer of learning when utilising Information Communication Technology-enhanced activity-based learning activities. The beginning teachers had participated in a professional development program that was characterised by "learning technology by collaborative design" in their final year of…

  11. A Comparison of Factors Related to University Students' Learning: College-Transfer and Direct-Entry from High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acai, Anita; Newton, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Articulation agreements between colleges and universities, whereby students with two-year college diplomas can receive advancement toward a four-year university degree, are provincially mandated in some Canadian provinces and highly encouraged in others. In this study, we compared learning in college transfer and direct-entry from high school…

  12. Theories Supporting Transfer of Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamnill, Siriporn; McLean, Gary N.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews theories about factors affecting the transfer of training, including theories on motivation (expectancy, equity, goal setting), training transfer design (identical elements, principle, near and far), and transfer climate (organizational). (Contains 36 references.) (SK)

  13. Chorioretinitis with a combined defect in T and B lymphocytes and granulocytes. A new syndrome successfully treated with dialyzable leukocyte extracts (transfer factor).

    PubMed

    Kyong, C U; Wilson, G B; Fudenberg, H H; Goust, J M; Richardson, P; Echerd, J

    1980-06-01

    A patient with immune deficiency, recurrent pyogenic infections and active chorioretinitis is described; in addition to agammaglobulinemia, both quantitative and qualitative T-cell deficiencies were documented. Furthermore, the patient's granulocytes (polymorphonuclear leukocytes), although normal in their bactericidal capacity for Staphylococcus, responded poorly to both leukocyte migration inhibition factor and neutrophil immobilizing factor obtained from normal cells. The immunologic features of this patient appear to comprise a new syndrome. Remarkable diminution of the ocular lesions and increased visual acuity occurred within two months after the initiation of therapy with dialyzable leukocyte extracts (transfer factor). Concurrent testing of the patient's cell-mediated immunity showed increased numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and improved T-cell function following dialyzable leukocyte extract [DLE] therapy. The dramatic clinical results indicate that similar therapy may prove to be beneficial in other patients with chorioretinitis and T-cell deficiency. PMID:6992573

  14. Measurements of heat transfer coefficients and friction factors in rib-roughened channels simulating leading-edge cavities of a modern turbine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Taslim, M.E.; Li, T.; Spring, S.D.

    1997-07-01

    Leading edge cooling cavities in modern gas turbine blades play an important role in maintaining the leading edge temperature at levels consistent with air foil design life. These cavities often have a complex cross-sectional shape to be compatible with the external contour of the blade at the leading edge. A survey of many existing geometries shows that, for analytical as well as experimental analyses, such cavities can be simplified in shape by a four-sided polygon with one curved side similar to the leading edge curvature, a rectangle with one semicircular side (often the smaller side) or a trapezoid, the smaller base of which is replaced by a semicircle. Furthermore, to enhance the heat transfer coefficient in these cavities, they are mostly roughened on three sides with ribs of different geometries. Experimental data on friction factors and heat transfer coefficients in such cavities are rare if not nonexistent. A liquid crystal technique was used in this experimental investigation to measure heat transfer coefficients in six test sections representing the leading-edge cooling cavities. Both straight and tapered ribs were configured on the two opposite sidewalls in a staggered arrangement with angles of attack to the mainstream flow, {alpha}, of 60 and 90 deg. The ribs on the curved surface were of constant cross section with an angle of attack 90 deg to the flow. Heat transfer measurements were performed on the straight sidewalls, as well as on the round surface adjacent to the blade leading edge. Effects such as rib angle of attack to the mainstream flow and constant versus tapered rib cross-sectional areas were also investigated. Nusselt numbers, friction factors, and thermal performances are reported for nine rib geometries in six test sections.

  15. Technology Transfer Issues and a New Technology Transfer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2009-01-01

    The following are major issues that should be considered for efficient and effective technology transfer: conceptions of technology, technological activity and transfer, communication channels, factors affecting transfer, and models of transfer. In particular, a well-developed model of technology transfer could be used as a framework for…

  16. Exploring the Contextual Factors Related to Transfer of Learning in a High School Implementation of the eMINTS Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Lorie F.

    2011-01-01

    Truly impacting teacher practices is a challenge for educational professional development (PD) providers. Typically, little attention is paid to the factors within the environment to which the educators return and how those factors will impact participants' ability to integrate what they have learned into their teaching practices. Even for…

  17. Experimental determination of average turbulent heat transfer and friction factor in stator internal rib-roughened cooling channels.

    PubMed

    Battisti, L; Baggio, P

    2001-05-01

    In gas turbine cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to the hot stream are based on the increase of the inner heat transfer areas and on the promotion of the turbulence of the cooling flow. This is currently obtained by casting periodic ribs on one or more sides of the serpentine passages into the core of the blade. Fluid dynamic and thermal behaviour of the cooling flow have been extensively investigated by means of experimental facilities and many papers dealing with this subject have appeared in the latest years. The evaluation of the average value of the heat transfer coefficient most of the time is inferred from local measurements obtained by various experimental techniques. Moreover the great majority of these studies are not concerned with the overall average heat transfer coefficient for the combined ribs and region between them, but do focus just on one of them. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the average Nusselt number inside a straight ribbed duct. Series of measurements have been performed in steady state eliminating the error sources inherently connected with transient methods. A low speed wind tunnel, operating in steady state flow, has been built to simulate the actual flow condition occurring in a rectilinear blade cooling channel. A straight square channel with 20 transverse ribs on two sides has been tested for Re of about 3 x 10(4), 4.5 x 10(4) and 6 x 10(4). The ribbed wall test section is electrically heated and the heat removed by a stationary flow of known thermal and fluid dynamic characteristics. PMID:11460662

  18. Factors Determining the Efficiency of Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Data Analysis with Over 200,000 Reconstructed Embryos.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianbin; Dou, Hongwei; Xiang, Xi; Li, Lin; Li, Yong; Lin, Lin; Pang, Xinzhi; Zhang, Yijie; Chen, Yu; Luan, Jing; Xu, Ying; Yang, Zhenzhen; Yang, Wenxian; Liu, Huan; Li, Feida; Wang, Hui; Yang, Huanming; Bolund, Lars; Vajta, Gabor; Du, Yutao

    2015-12-01

    Data analysis in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research is usually limited to several hundreds or thousands of reconstructed embryos. Here, we report mass results obtained with an established and consistent porcine SCNT system (handmade cloning [HMC]). During the experimental period, 228,230 reconstructed embryos and 82,969 blastocysts were produced. After being transferred into 656 recipients, 1070 piglets were obtained. First, the effects of different types of donor cells, including fetal fibroblasts (FFs), adult fibroblasts (AFs), adult preadipocytes (APs), and adult blood mesenchymal (BM) cells, were investigated on the further in vitro and in vivo development. Compared to adult donor cells (AFs, APs, BM cells, respectively), FF cells resulted in a lower blastocyst/reconstructed embryo rate (30.38% vs. 37.94%, 34.65%, and 34.87%, respectively), but a higher overall efficiency on the number of piglets born alive per total blastocysts transferred (1.50% vs. 0.86%, 1.03%, and 0.91%, respectively) and a lower rate of developmental abnormalities (10.87% vs. 56.57%, 24.39%, and 51.85%, respectively). Second, recloning was performed with cloned adult fibroblasts (CAFs) and cloned fetal fibroblasts (CFFs). When CAFs were used as the nuclear donor, fewer developmental abnormalities and higher overall efficiency were observed compared to AFs (56.57% vs. 28.13% and 0.86% vs. 1.59%, respectively). However, CFFs had an opposite effect on these parameters when compared with CAFs (94.12% vs. 10.87% and 0.31% vs. 1.50%, respectively). Third, effects of genetic modification on the efficiency of SCNT were investigated with transgenic fetal fibroblasts (TFFs) and gene knockout fetal fibroblasts (KOFFs). Genetic modification of FFs increased developmental abnormalities (38.96% and 25.24% vs. 10.87% for KOFFs, TFFs, and FFs, respectively). KOFFs resulted in lower overall efficiency compared to TFFs and FFs (0.68% vs. 1.62% and 1.50%, respectively). In conclusion, this is the

  19. Factors affecting the chemical exchange saturation transfer of Creatine as assessed by 11.7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeyoshi; Mori, Yuki; Tanki, Nobuyoshi; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Murase, Kenya

    2015-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a new contrast enhancement approach for imaging exogenous or endogenous substances such as creatine (Cr), amide protons, and glutamate in the human body. An increase in field strength is beneficial for CEST imaging because of the increased chemical shift and longer longitudinal relaxation time (T1). In high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), establishing and evaluating the CEST effect is important for optimizing the magnetization transfer (MT) saturation radio frequency (RF) pulses. In this study, the CEST effect on Cr was evaluated at different concentrations in pH phantoms by appropriately selecting MT saturation RF pulses using 11.7 T MRI. The results showed that the CEST efficiency increased gradually with increasing applied saturation RF pulse power and that it was affected by the number of saturation RF pulses and their bandwidths. However, spillover effects were observed with higher saturation RF pulse powers. In conclusion, we successfully performed in vitro Cr CEST imaging under optimized conditions of MT saturation RF pulses. PMID:25477238

  20. Transfer of Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on transfer of training and human resources. "The Effect of Organizational Support, Management Support, and Peer Support on Transfer of Training" (Susan E. Cromwell, Judith A. Kolb) reports on a longitudinal study of work environment factors that affect transfer of training in a university supervisory skills…

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-1 prevents miR-122 production in neighbouring cells to curtail its intercellular transfer to ensure proliferation of human hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sudarshana; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N.

    2014-01-01

    miRNAs are 20–22 nt long post-transcriptional regulators in metazoan cells that repress protein expression from their target mRNAs. These tiny regulatory RNAs follow tissue and cell-type specific expression pattern, aberrations of which are associated with various diseases. miR-122 is a liver-specific anti-proliferative miRNA that, we found, can be transferred via exosomes between human hepatoma cells, Huh7 and HepG2, grown in co-culture. Exosomal miR-122, expressed and released by Huh7 cells and taken by miR-122 deficient HepG2 cells, was found to be effective in repression of target mRNAs and to reduce growth and proliferation of recipient HepG2 cells. Interestingly, in a reciprocal process, HepG2 secretes Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1) that decreases miR-122 expression in Huh7 cells. Our observations suggest existence of a reciprocal interaction between two different hepatic cells with distinct miR-122 expression profiles. This interaction is mediated via intercellular exosome-mediated miR-122 transfer and countered by a reciprocal IGF1-dependent anti-miR-122 signal. According to our data, human hepatoma cells use IGF1 to prevent intercellular exosomal transfer of miR-122 to ensure its own proliferation by preventing expression of growth retarding miR-122 in neighbouring cells. PMID:24813441

  2. Evolution of a Sigma Factor: An All-In-One of Gene Duplication, Horizontal Gene Transfer, Purifying Selection, and Promoter Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    López-Leal, Gamaliel; Cevallos, Miguel A.; Castillo-Ramírez, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Sigma factors are an essential part of bacterial gene regulation and have been extensively studied as far as their molecular mechanisms and protein structure are concerned. However, their molecular evolution, especially for the alternative sigma factors, is poorly understood. Here, we analyze the evolutionary forces that have shaped the rpoH sigma factors within the alphaproteobacteria. We found that an ancient duplication gave rise to two major groups of rpoH sigma factors and that after this event horizontal gene transfer (HGT) occurred in rpoH1 group. We also noted that purifying selection has differentially affected distinct parts of the gene; singularly, the gene segment that encodes the region 4.2, which interacts with the −35 motif of the RpoH-dependent genes, has been under relaxed purifying selection. Furthermore, these two major groups are clearly differentiated from one another regarding their promoter selectivity, as rpoH1 is under the transcriptional control of σ70 and σ32, whereas rpoH2 is under the transcriptional control of σ24. Our results suggest a scenario in which HGT, gene loss, variable purifying selection and clear promoter specialization occurred after the ancestral duplication event. More generally, our study offers insights into the molecular evolution of alternative sigma factors and highlights the importance of analyzing not only the coding regions but also the promoter regions. PMID:27199915

  3. Quantifying data retention of perpendicular spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory chips using an effective thermal stability factor method

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Luc Jan, Guenole; Le, Son; Wang, Po-Kang

    2015-04-20

    The thermal stability of perpendicular Spin-Transfer-Torque Magnetic Random Access Memory (STT-MRAM) devices is investigated at chip level. Experimental data are analyzed in the framework of the Néel-Brown model including distributions of the thermal stability factor Δ. We show that in the low error rate regime important for applications, the effect of distributions of Δ can be described by a single quantity, the effective thermal stability factor Δ{sub eff}, which encompasses both the median and the standard deviation of the distributions. Data retention of memory chips can be assessed accurately by measuring Δ{sub eff} as a function of device diameter and temperature. We apply this method to show that 54 nm devices based on our perpendicular STT-MRAM design meet our 10 year data retention target up to 120 °C.

  4. Iron deficiency leads to inhibition of oxygen transfer and enhanced formation of virulence factors in cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jin; Sabra, Wael; Zeng, An-Ping

    2003-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was recently found to exhibit two remarkable physiological responses to oxidative stress: (1) a strong reduction in the efficiency of oxygen transfer from the gas phase into the liquid phase, thus causing oxygen limitation in the culture and (2) formation of a clear polysaccharide capsule on the cell surface. In this work, it has been shown that the iron concentration in the culture plays a crucial role in evoking these phenomena. The physiological responses of two P. aeruginosa PAO1 isolates (NCCB 2452 and ATCC 15692) were examined in growth media with varied iron concentrations. In a computer-controlled bioreactor cultivation system for controlled dissolved oxygen tension (pO2), a strong correlation between the exhaustion of iron and the onset of oxygen limitation was observed. The oxygen transfer rate of the culture, characterized by the volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient, kLa, significantly decreased under iron-limited conditions. The formation of alginate and capsule was more strongly affected by iron concentration than by oxygen concentration. The reduction of the oxygen transfer rate and the subsequent oxygen limitation triggered by iron deficiency may represent a new and efficient way for P. aeruginosa PAO1 to adapt to growth conditions of iron limitation. Furthermore, the secretion of proteins into the culture medium was strongly enhanced by iron limitation. The formation of the virulence factor elastase and the iron chelators pyoverdine and pyochelin also significantly increased under iron-limited conditions. These results have implications for lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients by P. aeruginosa in view of the prevalence of iron limitation at the site of infection and the respiratory failure leading to death. PMID:12949186

  5. A Measurement of the neutron electric form factor at very large momentum transfer using polaried electrions scattering from a polarized helium-3 target

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, Aidan

    2010-02-01

    Knowledge of the electric and magnetic elastic form factors of the nucleon is essential for an understanding of nucleon structure. Of the form factors, the electric form factor of the neutron has been measured over the smallest range in Q2 and with the lowest precision. Jefferson Lab experiment 02-013 used a novel new polarized 3 He target to nearly double the range of momentum transfer in which the neutron form factor has been studied and to measure it with much higher precision. Polarized electrons were scattered off this target, and both the scattered electron and neutron were detected. Gn E was measured to be 0.0242 ± 0.0020(stat) ± 0.0061(sys) and 0.0247 ± 0.0029(stat) ± 0.0031(sys) at Q2 = 1.7 and 2.5 GeV2 , respectively.

  6. Factors Determining the Risk of Inadvertent Retroviral Transduction of Male Germ Cells After In Utero Gene Transfer in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Park, Paul J.; Colletti, Evan; Ozturk, Ferhat; Wood, Josh A.; Tellez, Joe; Almeida-Porada, Graça

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The possibility of permanent genetic changes to the germline is central to the bioethics of in utero gene therapy (IUGT) because of the concern of inadvertent potentially deleterious alterations to the gene pool. Despite presumed protection of the male germline due to early germ cell (GC) compartmentalization, we reported that GCs within the developing ovine testes are transduced at low levels after retrovirus-mediated IUGT, thus underscoring the need for a thorough understanding of GC development in clinically predictive models to determine the optimal time to perform IUGT and avoid germline modification. In the present studies, we used the fetal sheep model to analyze GCs for phenotype, location, proliferation, and incidence of transduction after IUGT at various fetal ages to learn when during development the nascent germline is likely to be at greatest risk of retrovirus-mediated alteration. Our studies show that although GCs were transduced at all injection ages, the levels of transduction varied by nearly 700-fold as a function of the age at transfer. After remaining largely quiescent as they migrated to/settled within nascent sex cords, GCs began active cycling before cord closure was complete, suggesting this is likely the point at which they would be most susceptible to retroviral transduction. Furthermore, we observed that compartmentalization of GCs continued into early postnatal life, suggesting the male germline may be vulnerable to low-level inadvertent retroviral vector modification throughout fetal life, but that this risk can be minimized by performing IUGT later in gestation. PMID:19301473

  7. Factors determining the risk of inadvertent retroviral transduction of male germ cells after in utero gene transfer in sheep.

    PubMed

    Park, Paul J; Colletti, Evan; Ozturk, Ferhat; Wood, Josh A; Tellez, Joe; Almeida-Porada, Graça; Porada, Christopher

    2009-03-01

    The possibility of permanent genetic changes to the germline is central to the bioethics of in utero gene therapy (IUGT) because of the concern of inadvertent potentially deleterious alterations to the gene pool. Despite presumed protection of the male germline due to early germ cell (GC) compartmentalization, we reported that GCs within the developing ovine testes are transduced at low levels after retrovirus-mediated IUGT, thus underscoring the need for a thorough understanding of GC development in clinically predictive models to determine the optimal time to perform IUGT and avoid germline modification. In the present studies, we used the fetal sheep model to analyze GCs for phenotype, location, proliferation, and incidence of transduction after IUGT at various fetal ages to learn when during development the nascent germline is likely to be at greatest risk of retrovirus-mediated alteration. Our studies show that although GCs were transduced at all injection ages, the levels of transduction varied by nearly 700-fold as a function of the age at transfer. After remaining largely quiescent as they migrated to/settled within nascent sex cords, GCs began active cycling before cord closure was complete, suggesting this is likely the point at which they would be most susceptible to retroviral transduction.Furthermore, we observed that compartmentalization of GCs continued into early postnatal life, suggesting the male germline may be vulnerable to low-level inadvertent retroviral vector modification throughout fetal life, but that this risk can be minimized by performing IUGT later in gestation. PMID:19301473

  8. Geometric radiation exchange factors for axial radiative transfer in an LWR core filled with absorbing-emitting gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S.H.; Cho, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    A reactor core filled with an emitting-absorbing mixture (like steam, hydrogen gas and fission gases) is considered. Analysis is provided to evaluate axial radiative heat exchange of a rod bundle with a nonuniform axial temperature distribution. The necessary radiation exchange shape factors (geometric mean absorptance, emittance and transmittance) between segments of the complex rod bundle arrangement are presented. They are applicable to arbitrary sizes of segments, well suited for numerical computations.

  9. The delay in transfer between the emergency department and the critical care unit for patients with an acute cardiac event--in hospital factors.

    PubMed

    Grech, C; Pannell, D; Smith-Sparrow, T

    2001-11-01

    The Lyell McEwin Health Service (LMHS) is a major public hospital located in the northern suburbs of Adelaide, a region where the death rate from ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is higher than the expected death rate in the population. A retrospective case note study conducted at this hospital investigated the duration that patients with unstable angina pectoris (UA) or acute myocardial infarction (AMI) spent in the emergency department (ED) before admission to the critical care unit (CCU) and the factors that contributed to delays of greater than 70 minutes. All patients admitted to the LMHS over an 18 month period with a discharge diagnosis related group (DRG) for AMI and UA were included in the study. A total of 667 case notes were examined; 403 of these cases met the inclusion criteria for the study. The mean duration between arrival in the ED and subsequent admission to the CCU was found to be 161 minutes. DRG was a major factor in the length of time spent in the ED. The mean duration for patients with AMI was 124 minutes, whilst for UA the duration was 190 minutes (difference = 66 minutes, p<0.001). Other factors that were significant were gender (females = mean duration 29 minutes > males, p=0.015), and mode of transport to the ED (arrival by ambulance mean duration 30 minutes < private transport, Recommendations arising from this study included that a system be established to enable the rapid assessment of all patients suspected of suffering AMI and UA, inclusive of their expeditious transfer to the CCU. In addition, a staff development programme was proposed to ensure medical and nursing staff became aware of a bias in this hospital toward transferring male patients in a shorter timeframe than females with the same DRG. PMID:11806510

  10. Friction factors and heat transfer coefficients in turbulated cooling passages of different aspect ratios. I - Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslim, M. E.; Spring, S. D.

    1987-06-01

    In advanced turbine airfoil cooling designs where multiple-pass cooling circuits are used, a range of cooling passage aspect ratios (height/width) are encountered. The objective of this experimental investigation was to determine the effect that increasing aspect ratios have on friction factors and Nusselt numbers in internal cooling passages with rib-roughened (turbulated) surfaces. Aspect ratios ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 were tested over a Reynolds number range of 30,000 to 190,000. Each aspect ratio was tested at three different turbulator-height/hydraulic-diameter ratios and at a constant turbulator-height/pitch ratio of 0.10.

  11. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skin by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-11-01

    Gene therapy using wound healing-associated growth factor gene has received much attention as a new strategy for improving the outcome of tissue transplantation. We delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF) to rat free skin grafts by the use of laser-induced stress waves (LISWs); autografting was performed with the grafts. Systematic analysis was conducted to evaluate the adhesion properties of the grafted tissue; angiogenesis, cell proliferation, and reepithelialization were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and reperfusion was measured by laser Doppler imaging as a function of time after grafting. Both the level of angiogenesis on day 3 after grafting and the increased ratio of blood flow on day 4 to that on day 3 were significantly higher than those in five control groups: grafting with hHGF gene injection alone, grafting with control plasmid vector injection alone, grafting with LISW application alone, grafting with LISW application after control plasmid vector injection, and normal grafting. Reepithelialization was almost completed on day 7 even at the center of the graft with LISW application after hHGF gene injection, while it was not for the grafts of the five control groups. These findings demonstrate the validity of our LISW-based HGF gene transfection to accelerate the adhesion of grafted skins.

  12. Factors Influencing Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Gene Transfer to Human Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells: Comparison with Adenovirus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, S.; Bartlett, J. S.; McCarty, D.; Xiao, X.; Samulski, R. J.; Boucher, R. C.

    1998-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors appear promising for use in gene therapy in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, yet many features of AAV-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelial cells are not well understood. We compared the transduction efficiencies of AAV vectors and adenovirus (Ad) vectors in immortalized cell lines from CF patients and in nasal epithelial primary cultures from normal humans and CF patients. Similar dose-dependent relationships between the vector multiplicities of infection and the efficiencies of lacZ gene transfer were observed. However, levels of transduction for both Ad and recombinant AAV (rAAV) were significantly lower in the airway epithelial cell than in the control cell lines HeLa and HEK 293. Transduction efficiencies differed among cultured epithelial cell types, with poorly differentiated cells transducing more efficiently than well-differentiated cells. A time-dependent increase in gene expression was observed after infection for both vectors. For Ad, but not for AAV, this increase was dependent on prolonged incubation of cells with the vector. Furthermore, for rAAV (but not for rAd), the delay in maximal transduction could be abrogated by wild-type Ad helper infection. Thus, although helper virus is not required for maximal transduction, it increases the kinetics by which this is achieved. Expression of Ad E4 open reading frame 6 or addition of either hydroxyurea or camptothecin resulted in increased AAV transduction, as previously demonstrated for nonairway cells (albeit to lower final levels), suggesting that second-strand synthesis may not be the sole cause of inefficient transduction. Finally, the efficiency of AAV-mediated ex vivo gene transfer to lung cells was similar to that previously described for Ad vectors in that transduction was limited to regions of epithelial injury and preferentially targeted basal-like cells. These studies address the primary factors influencing rAAV infection of human airway cells and should

  13. Factors influencing adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer to human cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells: comparison with adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, S; Bartlett, J S; McCarty, D; Xiao, X; Samulski, R J; Boucher, R C

    1998-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors appear promising for use in gene therapy in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, yet many features of AAV-mediated gene transfer to airway epithelial cells are not well understood. We compared the transduction efficiencies of AAV vectors and adenovirus (Ad) vectors in immortalized cell lines from CF patients and in nasal epithelial primary cultures from normal humans and CF patients. Similar dose-dependent relationships between the vector multiplicities of infection and the efficiencies of lacZ gene transfer were observed. However, levels of transduction for both Ad and recombinant AAV (rAAV) were significantly lower in the airway epithelial cell than in the control cell lines HeLa and HEK 293. Transduction efficiencies differed among cultured epithelial cell types, with poorly differentiated cells transducing more efficiently than well-differentiated cells. A time-dependent increase in gene expression was observed after infection for both vectors. For Ad, but not for AAV, this increase was dependent on prolonged incubation of cells with the vector. Furthermore, for rAAV (but not for rAd), the delay in maximal transduction could be abrogated by wild-type Ad helper infection. Thus, although helper virus is not required for maximal transduction, it increases the kinetics by which this is achieved. Expression of Ad E4 open reading frame 6 or addition of either hydroxyurea or camptothecin resulted in increased AAV transduction, as previously demonstrated for nonairway cells (albeit to lower final levels), suggesting that second-strand synthesis may not be the sole cause of inefficient transduction. Finally, the efficiency of AAV-mediated ex vivo gene transfer to lung cells was similar to that previously described for Ad vectors in that transduction was limited to regions of epithelial injury and preferentially targeted basal-like cells. These studies address the primary factors influencing rAAV infection of human airway cells and should

  14. Improved measurement of labile proton concentration-weighted chemical exchange rate (kws) with experimental factor-compensated and T1-normalized quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Renhua; Liu, Charng-Ming; Liu, Philip K; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2012-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI enables measurement of dilute CEST agents and microenvironment properties such as pH and temperature, holding great promise for in vivo applications. However, because of confounding concomitant RF irradiation and relaxation effects, the CEST-weighted MRI contrast may not fully characterize the underlying CEST phenomenon. We postulated that the accuracy of quantitative CEST MRI could be improved if the experimental factors (labeling efficiency and RF spillover effect) were estimated and taken into account. Specifically, the experimental factor was evaluated as a function of exchange rate and CEST agent concentration ratio, which remained relatively constant for intermediate RF irradiation power levels. Hence, the experimental factors can be calculated based on the reasonably estimated exchange rate and labile proton concentration ratio, which significantly improved quantification. The simulation was confirmed with Creatine phantoms of serially varied concentration titrated to the same pH, whose reverse exchange rate (kws) was found to be linearly correlated with the concentration. In summary, the proposed solution provides simplified yet reasonably accurate quantification of the underlying CEST system, which may help guide the ongoing development of quantitative CEST MRI. PMID:22649044

  15. [Therapeutic angiogenesis using genetic transfection. An in vitro quantitative and functional study after gene code transfer for vascular endothelial growth factor].

    PubMed

    Zaric, V; Weltin, D; Stephan, D

    2000-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene transfer is a new therapeutic approach in clinical situations where insufficient angiogenesis may impair processes that require vessel formation, such as myocardial ischemia or peripheral vascular disease. The feasibility of this strategy was addressed in vitro by (i) optimisation of DNA transfection into cultured cells using a cationic liposome, (ii) study of the transgene production and it's angiogenic properties. An expression plasmid encoding VEGF165 was used to transfect endothelial cells (EAhy-926) in vitro. Different amounts of the cationic liposome were complexed to the plasmid DNA in order to achieve increasing ratios (1/1, 2/1, 3/1, 4/1, 5/1). Maximal gene expression was obtained when the cationic liposome was mixed to plasmid DNA in a 3/1 ratio. Using this optimised liposome/plasmid DNA formulation, VEGF expression measured by ELISA, reached a maximum of 60 ng/mL 24 hours after gene transfer then rapidly decreased. Conditioned media from transfected cells (CMVEGF) significantly increased the proliferation rate of endothelial cells. The maximal mitogenic effect was observed when the cell media was supplemented with 25% of CMVEGF, corresponding to 10 ng/mL of recombinant VEGF. Addition of the VEGF165 peptide into the cell media showed a similar mitogenic effect. The angiogenic property of the transgene was assessed by the demonstration of its ability to stimulate capillary tubes formation in a tridimensional biologic gel. PMID:10989743

  16. The Time-Dependent Transfer Factor of Radiocesium from Soil to Game Animals in Japan after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Keiko; Howard, Brenda J; Uchida, Shigeo

    2016-09-01

    Since the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident, monitoring of tissues from hunted game animals ensures compliance with the standard food limits for radionuclides in Japan. We quantified the transfer of (137)Cs from contaminated land to game animals using the Aggregated transfer factor (Tag = activity concentration in meat [Bq kg(-1) fw]/amount in soil [Bq m(-2)]) of (137)Cs for Asian black bear, wild boar, sika deer, green pheasant, copper pheasant and wild duck, collected between 2011 and 2015. Open data sources were used from Fukushima, Miyagi, Ibaraki, Tochigi, and Gunma prefectures. Our initially compiled data showed that the maximum reported (137)Cs activity concentration in wild boar after the Fukushima Dai-ichi accident were lower than those reported after the Chernobyl accident. The geometric mean Tag values (m(2)kg(-1) fw) of (137)Cs in 2015 for Asian black bear, wild boar, sika deer and copper pheasant were similar (1.9-5.1) × 10(-3) while those for green pheasant and wild duck were about 1 order of magnitude lower at (1.0-2.2) × 10(-4). Effective half-lives were 1.2-6.9 y except for sika deer and copper pheasant where no decreases were found. In contrast to the Chernobyl accident, no seasonal change occurred in the meat (137)Cs activity concentrations of the wild animals during the study period. PMID:27513196

  17. Determination of nicotine in tobacco with second-order spectra data of charge-transfer complex in ethanol-water binary solvents processed by parallel factor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shuqin; Liao, Lifu; Xiao, Xilin; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Du, Nan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2010-05-01

    A new spectrophotometric method for the determination of nicotine in mixtures without pre-separation has been proposed. Nicotine could react with 2,4-dinitrophenol through a charge-transfer reaction to form a colored complex. The second-order data from the visible absorption spectra of the complex in a series of ethanol-water binary solvents with various water volume fractions could be expressed as the combination of two bilinear data matrices. With the bilinear model, the second-order spectra data of mixtures containing nicotine and other interferents could be analysed by using second-order calibration algorithms, and the determination of nicotine in the mixtures could be achieved. The algorithm used here was parallel factor analysis. The method has been successfully used to determine nicotine in tobacco samples with satisfactory results.

  18. Protein Replacement Therapy and Gene Transfer in Canine Models of Hemophilia A, Hemophilia B, von Willebrand Disease, and Factor VII Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Timothy C.; Dillow, Aaron M.; Franck, Helen W.G.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Raymer, Robin A.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Arruda, Valder R.; High, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Dogs with hemophilia A, hemophilia B, von Willebrand disease (VWD), and factor VII deficiency faithfully recapitulate the severe bleeding phenotype that occurs in humans with these disorders. The first rational approach to diagnosing these bleeding disorders became possible with the development of reliable assays in the 1940s through research that used these dogs. For the next 60 years, treatment consisted of replacement of the associated missing or dysfunctional protein, first with plasma-derived products and subsequently with recombinant products. Research has consistently shown that replacement products that are safe and efficacious in these dogs prove to be safe and efficacious in humans. But these highly effective products require repeated administration and are limited in supply and expensive; in addition, plasma-derived products have transmitted bloodborne pathogens. Recombinant proteins have all but eliminated inadvertent transmission of bloodborne pathogens, but the other limitations persist. Thus, gene therapy is an attractive alternative strategy in these monogenic disorders and has been actively pursued since the early 1990s. To date, several modalities of gene transfer in canine hemophilia have proven to be safe, produced easily detectable levels of transgene products in plasma that have persisted for years in association with reduced bleeding, and correctly predicted the vector dose required in a human hemophilia B liver-based trial. Very recently, however, researchers have identified an immune response to adeno-associated viral gene transfer vector capsid proteins in a human liver-based trial that was not present in preclinical testing in rodents, dogs, or nonhuman primates. This article provides a review of the strengths and limitations of canine hemophilia, VWD, and factor VII deficiency models and of their historical and current role in the development of improved therapy for humans with these inherited bleeding disorders. PMID:19293459

  19. Accelerated adhesion of grafted skins by laser-induced stress wave-based gene transfer of hepatocyte growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    In our previous study, we delivered plasmid DNA coding for human hepatocyto growth factor (hHGF) to rat skin grafts based on laser-induced stress wave (LISW), by which production of CD31-positive cells in the grafted skins was found to be enhanced, suggesting improved angiogenesis. In this study, we validated the efficacy of this method to accelerate adhesion of grafted skins; reperfusion and reepithelialization in the grafted skins were examined. As a graft, dorsal skin of a rat was exsected and its subcutaneous fat was removed. Plasmid DNA expression vector for hHGF was injected into the graft; on its back surface a laser target with a transparent sheet for plasma confinement was placed, and irradiated with three nanosecond laser pulses at a laser fluence of 1.2 J/cm2 (532 nm; spot diameter, 3 mm) to generate LISWs. After the application of LISWs, the graft was transplanted onto its donor site. We evaluated blood flow by laser Doppler imaging and analyzed reepithelialization based on immunohistochemistry as a function of postgrafting time. It was found that both reperfusion and reepithelialization were significantly enhanced for the grafts with gene transfection than for normal grafts; reepithelialization was completed within 7 days after transplantation with the transfected grafts. These findings demonstrate that adhesion of grafted skins can be accelerated by delivering HGF gene to the grafts based on LISWs.

  20. Non-viral liposome-mediated transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor across the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ying; Wen, Chun-yan; Li, Song-tao; Xia, Zong-xin

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the repair of central nervous system injury, but cannot directly traverse the blood-brain barrier. Liposomes are a new type of non-viral vector, able to carry macromolecules across the blood-brain barrier and into the brain. Here, we investigate whether BDNF could be transported across the blood-brain barrier by tail-vein injection of liposomes conjugated to transferrin (Tf) and polyethylene glycol (PEG), and carrying BDNF modified with cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMV) or glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter (pGFAP) (Tf-pCMV-BDNF-PEG and Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG, respectively). Both liposomes were able to traverse the blood-brain barrier, and BDNF was mainly expressed in the cerebral cortex. BDNF expression in the cerebral cortex was higher in the Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG group than in the Tf-pCMV-BDNF-PEG group. This study demonstrates the successful construction of a non-virus targeted liposome, Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG, which crosses the blood-brain barrier and is distributed in the cerebral cortex. Our work provides an experimental basis for BDNF-related targeted drug delivery in the brain. PMID:27212923

  1. Increased encapsulated cell biodelivery of nerve growth factor in the brain by transposon-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Fjord-Larsen, L; Kusk, P; Emerich, D F; Thanos, C; Torp, M; Bintz, B; Tornøe, J; Johnsen, A H; Wahlberg, L U

    2012-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as it has positive effects on the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons whose degeneration correlates with the cognitive decline in AD. We have previously described an encapsulated cell biodelivery device, NsG0202, capable of local delivery of NGF by a genetically modified human cell line, NGC-0295. The NsG0202 devices have shown promising safety and therapeutic results in a small phase 1b clinical study. However, results also show that the NGF dose could advantageously be increased. We have used the sleeping beauty transposon expression technology to establish a new clinical grade cell line, NGC0211, with at least 10 times higher NGF production than that of NGC-0295. To test whether encapsulation of this cell line provides a relevant dose escalation step in delivering NGF for treatment of the cognitive decline in AD patients, we have validated the bioactivity of devices with NGC0211 and NGC-0295 cells in normal rat striatum as well as in the quinolinic acid striatal lesion model. These preclinical animal studies show that implantation of devices with NGC0211 cells lead to significantly higher NGF output, which in both cases correlate with highly improved potency. PMID:22113314

  2. A gene transfer comparative study of HSA-conjugated antiangiogenic factors in a transgenic mouse model of metastatic ocular cancer.

    PubMed

    Frau, E; Magnon, C; Opolon, P; Connault, E; Opolon, D; Beermann, F; Beerman, F; Abitbol, M; Perricaudet, M; Bouquet, C

    2007-03-01

    Different antiangiogenic and antimetastatic recombinant adenoviruses were tested in a transgenic mouse model of metastatic ocular cancer (TRP1/SV40 Tag transgenic mice), which is a highly aggressive tumor, developed from the pigmented epithelium of the retina. These vectors, encoding amino-terminal fragments of urokinase plasminogen activator (ATF), angiostatin Kringles (K1-3), endostatin (ES) and canstatin (Can) coupled to human serum albumin (HSA) were injected to assess their metastatic and antiangiogenic activities in our model. Compared to AdCO1 control group, AdATF-HSA did not significantly reduce metastatic growth. In contrast, mice treated with AdK1-3-HSA, AdES-HSA and AdCan-HSA displayed significantly smaller metastases (1.19+/-1.19, 0.87+/-1.5, 0.43+/-0.56 vs controls 4.04+/-5.12 mm3). Moreover, a stronger inhibition of metastatic growth was obtained with AdCan-HSA than with AdK1-3-HSA (P=0.04). Median survival was improved by 4 weeks. A close correlation was observed between the effects of these viruses on metastatic growth and their capacity to inhibit tumor angiogenesis. Our study indicates that systemic antiangiogenic factors production by recombinant adenoviruses, particularly Can, might represent an effective way of delaying metastatic growth via inhibition of angiogenesis. PMID:17082795

  3. Enhancement of innate immune system in monocot rice by transferring the dicotyledonous elongation factor Tu receptor EFR.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fen; Wang, Huiqin; Wang, Shanzhi; Jiang, Wendi; Shan, Changlin; Li, Bin; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Shiyong; Sun, Wenxian

    2015-07-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) receptor (EFR) in cruciferous plants specifically recognizes the N-terminal acetylated elf18 region of bacterial EF-Tu and thereby activates plant immunity. It has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis EFR confers broad-spectrum bacterial resistance in the EFR transgenic solanaceous plants. Here, the transgenic rice plants (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cv. Zhonghua 17) and cell cultures with constitutive expression of AtEFR were developed to investigate whether AtEFR senses EF-Tu and thus enhances bacterial resistance in the monocot plants. We demonstrated that the Xanthomonas oryzae-derived elf18 peptide induced oxidative burst and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in the AtEFR transgenic rice cells and plants, respectively. Pathogenesis-related genes, such as OsPBZ1, were upregulated dramatically in transgenic rice plant and cell lines in response to elf18 stimulation. Importantly, pretreatment with elf18 triggered strong resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae in the transgenic plants, which was largely dependent on the AtEFR expression level. These plants also exhibited enhanced resistance to rice bacterial brown stripe, but not to rice fungal blast. Collectively, the results indicate that the rice plants with heterologous expression of AtEFR recognize bacterial EF-Tu and exhibit enhanced broad-spectrum bacterial disease resistance and that pattern recognition receptor-mediated immunity may be manipulated across the two plant classes, dicots and monocots. PMID:25358295

  4. Non-viral liposome-mediated transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ying; Wen, Chun-Yan; Li, Song-Tao; Xia, Zong-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the repair of central nervous system injury, but cannot directly traverse the blood-brain barrier. Liposomes are a new type of non-viral vector, able to carry macromolecules across the blood-brain barrier and into the brain. Here, we investigate whether BDNF could be transported across the blood-brain barrier by tail-vein injection of liposomes conjugated to transferrin (Tf) and polyethylene glycol (PEG), and carrying BDNF modified with cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMV) or glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter (pGFAP) (Tf-pCMV-BDNF-PEG and Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG, respectively). Both liposomes were able to traverse the blood-brain barrier, and BDNF was mainly expressed in the cerebral cortex. BDNF expression in the cerebral cortex was higher in the Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG group than in the Tf-pCMV-BDNF-PEG group. This study demonstrates the successful construction of a non-virus targeted liposome, Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG, which crosses the blood-brain barrier and is distributed in the cerebral cortex. Our work provides an experimental basis for BDNF-related targeted drug delivery in the brain. PMID:27212923

  5. Neonatal transfer of membrane-bound stem cell factor improves survival and heart function in aged mice after myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhuo; Lee, Chyan-Jang; Mejia-Guerrero, Salvador; Zhang, Yuemei; Higuchi, Koji; Li, Ren-Ke; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2012-12-01

    Stem cell mobilization to injured tissue contributes to neovascularization, resulting in regeneration after myocardial infarction (MI). We previously showed that direct cardiac injection of a recombinant lentivirus (LV) that engineers expression of membrane-bound stem cell factor (mSCF) improves outcomes immediately after MI. In this study, we evaluated the effect of neonatal LV/mSCF transduction on MI outcomes in aged mice. We constructed a recombinant LV harboring an α-myosin heavy chain promoter that drives mSCF expression and injected it into the temporal vein of neonatal mice. One year later, sustained expression of mSCF in the adult mouse hearts was detected by genomic and quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. To evaluate the contribution of neonatal LV/mSCF delivery to recovery from MI, we induced an MI in adult LV/mSCF-transduced, LV only-transduced, and nontransduced control mice. Strikingly, LV/mSCF transduction reduced infarct scar size, enhanced angiogenesis, improved ventricular function, and significantly increased survival of the mice. Regional overexpression of CD11b, a marker of monocytes and proangiogenic cells, was observed on monocytes isolated from the infarcted hearts of LV/mSCF-transduced mice. Our data suggest a model of neonatal gene delivery that leads to sustained mSCF expression during adulthood to aid recovery from MI and prevent heart failure. PMID:22998370

  6. Risks associated with the transfer of toxic organo-metallic mercury from soils into the terrestrial feed chain.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Bruno; Rodrigues, S M; Coelho, C; Cruz, N; Duarte, A C; Römkens, P F A M; Pereira, E

    2013-09-01

    Although the transfer of organo-metallic mercury (OrgHg) in aquatic food webs has long been studied, it has only been recently recognized that there is also accumulation in terrestrial systems. There is still however little information about the exposure of grazing animals to OrgHg from soils and feed as well as on risks of exposure to animal and humans. In this study we collected 78 soil samples and 40 plant samples (Lolium perenne and Brassica juncea) from agricultural fields near a contaminated industrial area and evaluated the soil-to-plant transfer of Hg as well as subsequent trophic transfer. Inorganic Hg (IHg) concentrations ranged from 0.080 to 210mgkg(-1) d.w. in soils, from 0.010 to 84mgkg(-1) d.w. in roots and from 0.020 to 6.9mgkg(-1) d.w. in shoots. OrgHg concentrations in soils varied between 0.20 and 130μgkg(-1) d.w. representing on average 0.13% of the total Hg (THg). In root and shoot samples OrgHg comprised on average 0.58% (roots) and 0.66% (shoots) of THg. Average bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for OrgHg in relation to soil concentrations were 3.3 (for roots) and 1.5 (for shoots). The daily intake (DI) of THg in 33 sampling sites exceeded the acceptable daily intake (ADI) of THg of both cows (ADI=1.4mgd(-1)) and sheep (ADI=0.28mgd(-1)), in view of food safety associated with THg in animal kidneys. Estimated DI of OrgHg for grazing animals were up to 220μgd(-1) (for cows) and up to 33μgd(-1) (for sheep). This study suggested that solely monitoring the levels of THg in soils and feed may not allow to adequately taking into account accumulation of OrgHg in feed crops and properly address risks associated with OrgHg exposure for animals and humans. Hence, the inclusion of limits for OrgHg in feed quality and food safety legislation is advised. PMID:23917441

  7. Production of transgenic goats expressing human coagulation factor IX in the mammary glands after nuclear transfer using transfected fetal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Amiri Yekta, Amir; Dalman, Azam; Eftekhari-Yazdi, Poopak; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Shahverdi, Abdol Hossein; Fakheri, Rahman; Vazirinasab, Hamed; Daneshzadeh, Mohammad Taghi; Vojgani, Mahdi; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Fatemi, Nayeralsadat; Vahabi, Zeinab; Mirshahvaladi, Shahab; Ataei, Fariba; Bahraminejad, Elmira; Masoudi, Najmehsadat; Rezazadeh Valojerdi, Mojtaba; Gourabi, Hamid

    2013-02-01

    There are growing numbers of recombinant proteins that have been expressed in milk. Thus one can consider the placement of any gene of interest under the control of the regulatory elements of a milk protein gene in a dairy farm animal. Among the transgene introducing techniques, only nuclear transfer (NT) allows 100 % efficiency and bypasses the mosaicism associated with counterpart techniques. In this study, in an attempt to produce a transgenic goat carrying the human coagulation factor IX (hFIX) transgene, goat fetal fibroblasts were electroporated with a linearized marker-free construct in which the transgene was juxtaposed to β-casein promoter designed to secret the recombinant protein in goat milk. Two different lines of transfected cells were used as donors for NT to enucleated oocytes. Two transgenic goats were liveborn. DNA sequencing of the corresponding transgene locus confirmed authenticity of the cloning procedure and the complementary experiments on the whey demonstrated expression of human factor IX in the milk of transgenic goats. In conclusion, our study has provided the groundwork for a prosperous and promising approach for large-scale production and therapeutic application of hFIX expressed in transgenic goats. PMID:22869287

  8. Sites Involved in Intra- and Interdomain Allostery Associated with the Activation of Factor VIIa Pinpointed by Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange and Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongjian; Olsen, Ole H.; Persson, Egon; Rand, Kasper D.

    2014-01-01

    Factor VIIa (FVIIa) is a trypsin-like protease that plays an important role in initiating blood coagulation. Very limited structural information is available for the free, inactive form of FVIIa that circulates in the blood prior to vascular injury and the molecular details of its activity enhancement remain elusive. Here we have applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry coupled to electron transfer dissociation to pinpoint individual residues in the heavy chain of FVIIa whose conformation and/or local interaction pattern changes when the enzyme transitions to the active form, as induced either by its cofactor tissue factor or a covalent active site inhibitor. Identified regulatory residues are situated at key sites across one continuous surface of the protease domain spanning the TF-binding helix across the activation pocket to the calcium binding site and are embedded in elements of secondary structure and at the base of flexible loops. Thus these residues are optimally positioned to mediate crosstalk between functional sites in FVIIa, particularly the cofactor binding site and the active site. Our results unambiguously show that the conformational allosteric activation signal extends to the EGF1 domain in the light chain of FVIIa, underscoring a remarkable intra- and interdomain allosteric regulation of this trypsin-like protease. PMID:25344622

  9. Pregnancy rates and corpus luteum-related factors affecting pregnancy establishment in bovine recipients synchronized for fixed-time embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, L G B; Torres, C A A; Souza, E D; Monteiro, P L J; Arashiro, E K N; Camargo, L S A; Fernandes, C A C; Viana, J H M

    2009-10-15

    The objective was to investigate the influence of corpora lutea physical and functional characteristics on pregnancy rates in bovine recipients synchronized for fixed-time embryo transfer (FTET). Crossbred (Bos taurus taurus x Bos taurus indicus) nonlactating cows and heifers (n=259) were treated with the following protocol: 2mg estradiol benzoate (EB) plus an intravaginal progesterone device (CIDR 1.9g progesterone; Day 0); 400 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG; Day 5); prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) and CIDR withdrawal (Day 8); and 1mg EB (Day 9). Ovarian ultrasonography and blood sample collections were performed on Day 17. Of the 259 cattle initially treated, 197 (76.1%) were suitable recipients; they received a single, fresh, quality grade 1 or 2 in vivo-derived (n=90) or in vitro-produced (n=87) embryo on Day 17. Pregnancy rates (23 d after embryo transfer) were higher for in vivo-derived embryos than for in vitro-produced embryos (58.8% vs. 31.0%, respectively; P<0.001). Mean (+/-SD) plasma progesterone (P(4)) concentration was higher in cattle that became pregnant than that in nonpregnant cattle (5.2+/-5.0 vs. 3.8+/-2.4 ng/mL; P=0.02). Mean pixel values (71.8+/-1.3 vs. 71.2+/-1.1) and pixel heterogeneity (14.8+/-0.3 vs. 14.5+/-0.5) were similar between pregnant and nonpregnant recipients (P>0.10). No significant relationship was detected between pregnancy outcome and plasma P(4), corpus luteum area, or corpus luteum echotexture. Embryo type, however, affected the odds of pregnancy. In conclusion, corpus luteum-related traits were poor predictors of pregnancy in recipients. The type of embryo, however, was a major factor affecting pregnancy outcome. PMID:19709722

  10. Transfer factors and effective half-lives of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in different environmental sample types obtained from Northern Finland: case Fukushima accident.

    PubMed

    Koivurova, Matias; Leppänen, Ari-Pekka; Kallio, Antti

    2015-08-01

    The Fukushima NPP accident caused a small but detectable cesium fallout in northern Finland, of the order of 1 Bq/m(2). This fallout transferred further to soil, water, flora and fauna. By using modern HPGe detector systems traces of (134)Cs from the Fukushima fallout were observed in various samples of biota. In northern Finland different types of environmental samples such as reindeer meat, berries, fish, lichens and wolf were collected during 2011-2013. The observed (134)Cs concentrations varied from 0.1 Bq/kg to a few Bq/kg. By using the known (134)Cs/(137)Cs ratio observed in Fukushima fallout the increase of the Fukushima accident to the (137)Cs concentrations was found to vary from 0.06 % to 6.9 % depending on the sample type. The aggregated transfer factors (Tag) and effective half-lives (Teff) for (134)Cs and (137)Cs were also determined and then compared with known values found from earlier studies which are calculated based on the fallout from the Chernobyl accident. Generally, the Tag and Teff values determined in this study were found to agree with the values found in the earlier studies. The Teff values were sample-type specific and were found to vary from 0.91 to 2.1 years for (134)Cs and the estimates for (137)Cs ranged between 1.6 and 19 years. Interestingly, the ground lichens had the longest Teff whereas the beard lichen had the shortest. In fauna, highest Tag values were determined for wolf meat ranging between 1.0 and 2.2 m(2)/kg. In flora, the highest Tag values were determined for beard lichens, ranging from 1.9 m(2)/kg to 3.5 m(2)/kg. PMID:25935505

  11. Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) based label-free aptasensor for platelet-derived growth factor-BB and its logic gate application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangfeng; Zhu, Yanhong; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2015-01-15

    Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) is often overexpressed in human malignant tumors as an indicator for tumor angiogenesis. Here by the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between DNA-Ag fluorescent nanoclusters (NCs) and G-quadruplex/hemin complexes, we present a sensitive label-free fluorescent sensor for PDGF-BB. In the presence of PDGF-BB, the specific conjugation with its aptamer induced the conformational change of the duplex-like DNA sequence, releasing the G-quadruplex sequence part. Then in the presence of hemin and K(+), the horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme (HRP-DNAzyme) was formed. With the electron transfer between the DNA-Ag NCs to the hemin Fe (III) center of HRP-DNAzyme, the PET occurred with a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of the DNA-Ag NCs. The detection performance such as selectivity, linear dynamic range, sensitivity, and the quenching capability of HRP-DNAzyme were estimated. The detection range for PDGF-BB is from 5×10(-13) to 1×10(-8) M and the detection limit is 1×10(-13) M. The experimental results confirmed that the novel fluorescent aptasensor possessed a good sensitivity and high selectivity for PDGF-BB. In addition, the developed probe is nontoxic, label-free only involving one-step hybridization without sophisticated fabrication process. Furthermore, based on this quenching mode occurred by PDGF-BB and hemin, using PDGF-BB and hemin as inputs and the fluorescence signal as an output, a logic gate has been fabricated. PMID:25150781

  12. MR Assessment of Myocardial Perfusion, Viability, and Function after Intramyocardial Transfer of VM202, a New Plasmid Human Hepatocyte Growth Factor in Ischemic Swine Myocardium1

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Maythem; Martin, Alastair; Ursell, Phillip; Do, Loi; Bucknor, Matt; Higgins, Charles B.; Saloner, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: VM202, a newly constructed plasmid human hepatocyte growth factor, was transferred intramyocardially after infarction for the purpose of evaluating this strategy as a therapeutic approach for protection from left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Materials and Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved this study. Pigs underwent coronary artery occlusion and reperfusion and served as either control (n = 8) or VM202-treated (n = 8) animals. VM202 was transferred intramyocardially into four infarcted and four periinfarcted sites. Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (cine, perfusion, delayed enhancement) was performed in acute (3 days) and chronic (50 days ± 3 [standard error of the mean]) infarction. Histopathologic findings were used to characterize and quantify neovascularization. The t test was utilized to compare treated and control groups and to assess changes over time. Results: In acute infarction, MR imaging estimates of function, perfusion, and viability showed no difference between the groups. In chronic infarction, however, VM202 increased maximum signal intensity and upslope at first-pass perfusion imaging and reduced infarct size at perfusion and delayed-enhancement imaging. These changes were associated with a decrease in end-diastolic (2.15 mL/kg ± 0.12 to 1.73 mL/kg ± 0.10, P < .01) and end-systolic (1.33 mL/kg ± 0.07 to 0.92 mL/kg ± 0.08, P < .001) volumes and an increase in ejection fraction (38.2% ± 1.3 to 47.0% ± 1.8, P < .001). In contrast, LV function deteriorated further in control animals. Compared with control animals, VM202-treated animals revealed peninsulas and/or islands of viable myocardium in infarcted and periinfarcted regions and greater number of capillaries (218 per square millimeter ± 19 vs 119 per square millimeter ± 17, P < .05) and arterioles (21 per square millimeter ± 4 vs 3 per square millimeter ± 1, P < .001). Conclusion: Intramyocardial transfer of VM202 improved myocardial

  13. Motivational Influences on Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Kevin J.; Bergin, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Both transfer and motivation are important constructs accompanied by extensive bodies of literature. However, there is a lack of integration of the 2 constructs. This article analyzes the potential indirect influence of motivational factors on transfer by reviewing studies that examine the influence of motivation on cognitive processes related to…

  14. Transfer factors to Whitetail deer: comparison of stomach-content, plant-sample and soil-sample concentrations as the denominator.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, S C

    2013-12-01

    A recent study measured transfer factors for 49 elements in hunter-killed Whitetail deer (Odocoileus virginianus), using concentrations in the stomach content as the substrate/denominator to compute muscle/vegetation concentration ratios (CR(m-stomach)) and daily fractional transfer factors (Ff). Using the stomach content ensured an accurate representation of what the deer ate, except that it was limited in time to the vegetation selected by the animal just before it was killed. Here, two alternatives are considered, one where the feed is represented by samples of 21 different vegetation types that deer may have eaten in the area (CR(m-plant)), and the other is using soil concentration in the region as the denominator (CR(m-soil)). The latter is the formulation used in the ERICA tool, and other sources, for risk assessment to non-human biota. Across elements, (log) concentrations in all the media were highly correlated. The stomach contents had consistently higher ash and rare earth element concentrations than the sampled (and washed) vegetation and this was attributed to soil or dust ingestion. This lends credence to the use of soil-based CRm-soil values, despite (or more accurately because of) the inclusive yet gross simplicity of the approach. However, it was clear that variation of CR(m-soil) values was larger than for CR(m-stomach) or CR(m-plant), even if soil load on vegetation was included in the latter values. It was also noted that the variation in CR(m-soil) computed from the product of CR(m-plant) and CR(plant-soil) (where CR(plant-soil) is the plant/soil concentration ratio) was somewhat larger than the variation inherent in CR(m-soil) data. Thus it is reasonable to estimate CR(m-soil) from CR(m-plant) and CR(plant-soil) if observed CR(m-soil) values are not available, but this introduces further uncertainty. PMID:23287432

  15. Thallium at the interface of soil and green cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.): soil-plant transfer and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanlong; Xiao, Tangfu; Zhou, Guangzhu; Ning, Zengping

    2013-04-15

    Thallium (Tl) is a non-essential and toxic trace metal found in many plants, but it can accumulate at particularly high concentration in green cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.). The aim of this study is to explore the transfer and accumulation of Tl at the interface of rhizospheric soil and green cabbage from a long-term Tl contaminated site in southwestern Guizhou Province, China. Influencing factors such as Tl distribution in various soil fractions and physical-chemical characteristics of rhizospheric soil were also investigated. Our results demonstrated that green cabbage had high accumulation of Tl, with most bioconcentration factor (BF) values exceeding 1, and up to a maximum level of 11. The enrichment of Tl in the green cabbage tissues followed a descending order, i.e. old leaves>fresh leaves>stems≈roots. The stems functioned as a channel for Tl transportation to the leaves, where most of the Tl (greater than 80%) was found to accumulate. In the rhizospheric soils, 62-95% of Tl existed in the residual fraction, while lower concentrations of Tl (on average, 1.7% of total T1 in rhizospheric soil) were found in the water and acid soluble fractions. The major fraction of labile Tl was located in the reducible fraction (9%). Our results also suggested that the uptake and enrichment of Tl in green cabbage were affected by Tl concentrations, soil water content, soil pH, soil organic material (SOM) and cation exchange capacity (CEC) in rhizospheric soil. PMID:23474259

  16. Proton elastic form factor ratios to Q{sup 2}=3.5 GeV{sup 2} by polarization transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, V.; Perdrisat, C.F.; Gerstner, G.; Pentchev, L.; Rutledge, G.; Strauch, S.; Wijesooriya, K.; Aniol, K.A.; Epstein, M.B.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Baker, F.T.; Templon, J.A.; Berthot, J.; Bertin, P.Y.; Besson, A.; Fonvieille, H.; Jaminion, S.; Laveissiere, G.

    2005-05-01

    The ratio of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp}, was obtained by measuring P{sub t} and P{sub l}, the transverse and longitudinal recoil proton polarization components, respectively, for the elastic e{sup {yields}}p{yields}ep{sup {yields}}reaction in the four-momentum transfer squared range of 0.5 to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}. In the single-photon exchange approximation, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp} is directly proportional to P{sub t}/P{sub l}. The simultaneous measurement of P{sub t} and P{sub l} in a polarimeter reduces systematic uncertainties. The results for G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp} show a systematic decrease with increasing Q{sup 2}, indicating for the first time a definite difference in the distribution of charge and magnetization in the proton. The data have been reanalyzed and their systematic uncertainties have become significantly smaller than those reported previously.

  17. Variability of 137Cs and 40K soil-to-fruit transfer factor in tropical lemon trees during the fruit development period.

    PubMed

    Velasco, H; Cid, A S; Anjos, R M; Zamboni, C B; Rizzotto, M; Valladares, D L; Juri Ayub, J

    2012-02-01

    In this investigation we evaluate the soil uptake of (137)Cs and (40)K by tropical plants and their consequent translocation to fruits, by calculating the soil-to-fruit transfer factors defined as F(v) = [concentration of radionuclide in fruit (Bq kg(-1) dry mass)/concentration of radionuclide in soil (Bq kg(-1) dry mass in upper 20 cm)]. In order to obtain F(v) values, the accumulation of these radionuclides in fruits of lemon trees (Citrus limon B.) during the fruit growth was measured. A mathematical model was calibrated from the experimental data allowing simulating the incorporation process of these radionuclides by fruits. Although the fruit incorporates a lot more potassium than cesium, both radionuclides present similar absorption patterns during the entire growth period. F(v) ranged from 0.54 to 1.02 for (40)K and from 0.02 to 0.06 for (137)Cs. Maximum F(v) values are reached at the initial time of fruit growth and decrease as the fruit develops, being lowest at the maturation period. As a result of applying the model a decreasing exponential function is derived for F(v) as time increases. The agreement between the theoretical approach and the experimental values is satisfactory. PMID:22115437

  18. The structure of a ring-opened proliferating cell nuclear antigen–replication factor C complex revealed by fluorescence energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhihao; Yoder, Bonita L.; Burgers, Peter M. J.; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous proteins that function in DNA metabolic pathways are known to interact with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The important function of PCNA in stimulating various cellular activities requires its topological linkage with DNA. Loading of the circular PCNA onto duplex DNA requires the activity of a clamp-loader [replication factor C (RFC)] complex and the energy derived from ATP hydrolysis. The mechanistic and structural details regarding PCNA loading by the RFC complex are still developing. In particular, the positive identification of a long-hypothesized structure of an open clamp–RFC complex as an intermediate in loading has remained elusive. In this study, we capture an open yeast PCNA clamp in a complex with RFC through fluorescence energy transfer experiments. We also follow the topological transitions of PCNA in the various steps of the clamp-loading pathway through both steady-state and stopped-flow fluorescence studies. We find that ATP effectively drives the clamp-loading process to completion with the formation of the closed PCNA bound to DNA, whereas ATPγS cannot. The information derived from this work complements that obtained from previous structural and mechanistic studies and provides a more complete picture of a eukaryotic clamp-loading pathway using yeast as a paradigm. PMID:16476998

  19. Interferon-alpha and transfer factor in the treatment of multiple sclerosis: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. AUSTIMS Research Group.

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The role of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and transfer factor (TF) in the treatment of multiple sclerosis was investigated in a prospective, multi-centric, three year, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. One hundred and eighty two patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis were randomised into three treatment groups whose compositions were found to be similar for demographic and prognostic variables including HLA status. Subcutaneous injections of IFN-alpha (3 x 10(6) units), TF (0.5 units) manufactured from leucocytes of cohabiting donors, or placebo were given twice weekly for two months, once weekly for 10 months then fortnightly for 24 months. One hundred and fifty three patients completed the injection regimen. There was no significant difference in the progression of disability for multiple sclerosis patients in either the IFN-alpha or TF-treated groups compared with the placebo group. Similarly, change in visual evoked responses (VER), and in number of oligoclonal bands (OCB) and the level of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) over the trial period did not differ significantly between the three groups. However, the IFN-alpha-treated group had significantly more reported adverse drug reactions and patient withdrawals than either of the other two groups. PMID:2659737

  20. Proton elastic form factor ratios to Q{sup 2} = 3.5 GeV{sup 2} by polarization transfer

    SciTech Connect

    V. Punjabi; C.F. Perdrisat; et al

    2005-01-01

    The ratio of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors, G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}}, was obtained by measuring P{sub t} and P{sub {ell}}, the transverse and longitudinal recoil proton polarization components, respectively, for the elastic {rvec e}p {yields} e{rvec p} reaction in the four-momentum transfer squared range of 0.5 to 3.5 GeV{sup 2}. In the single-photon exchange approximation, the ratio G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} is directly proportional to the ratio P{sub t}/P{sub {ell}}. The simultaneous measurement of P{sub t} and P{sub {ell}} in a polarimeter reduces systematic uncertainties. The results for the ratio G{sub E{sub p}}/G{sub M{sub p}} show a systematic decrease with increasing Q{sup 2}, indicating for the first time a definite difference in the distribution of charge and magnetization in the proton. The data have been re-analyzed and systematic uncertainties have become significantly smaller than previously published results.

  1. Exosomes mediate intercellular transfer of pro-fibrogenic connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) between hepatic stellate cells, the principal fibrotic cells in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Alyssa; Chen, Ruju; Chen, Li; Kemper, Sherri; Hattori, Takako; Takigawa, Masaharu; Brigstock, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibrogenic pathways in the liver are principally regulated by hepatic stellate cells (HSC) which produce and respond to fibrotic mediators such as connective tissue growth factor (CCN2). The aim of this study was to determine whether CCN2 is shuttled between HSC in membraneous nanovesicles, or “exosomes”. Methods Exosomes were incubated with HSC after isolation from conditioned medium of control or CCN2-GFP-transfected primary mouse HSC or human LX-2 HSC. Some exosomes were flourescently stained with PKH26. HSC co-culture experiments were performed in the presence of GW4869 exosome inhibitor. CCN2 or CCN2-GFP were evaluated by qRT-PCR or Western blot. Results HSC-derived exosomes contained CCN2 or CCN2 mRNA, each of which increased in concentration during HSC activation or after transfection of HSC with CCN2-GFP. Exosomes, stained with either PKH26 or purified from CCN2-GFP-transfected cells, were taken up by activated or quiescent HSC resulting in CCN2-GFP delivery, as shown by their direct addition to recipient cells or by the GW4869-dependency of donor HSC. Conclusions CCN2 is packaged into secreted nano-sized exosomes which mediate its intercellular transfer between HSC. Exosomal CCN2 may amplify or fine-tune fibrogenic signaling and may, in conjunction with other exosome constituents, have utility as a noninvasive biomarker to assess hepatic fibrosis. PMID:24882759

  2. Commitment to Transfer. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arthur M.

    The proportion of community college students transferring to a four-year institution dropped considerably during the 1970's and early 1980's, a situation leading to accusations that the colleges do not prepare their students sufficiently well for transfer. However, several other factors have an influence on transfer rates. The fact that most…

  3. Astrophysical SE2 factor of the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction through the 12C(11B, 7Li)16O transfer reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, B.; Du, X. C.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Y. J.; Pang, D. Y.; Su, J.; Yan, S. Q.; Fan, Q. W.; Gan, L.; Han, Z. Y.; Li, E. T.; Li, X. Y.; Lian, G.; Liu, J. C.; Pei, C. J.; Qiao, L. H.; Shen, Y. P.; Su, Y.; Wang, Y. B.; Zeng, S.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, W. P.

    2016-02-01

    The 12C(α, γ)16O reaction plays a key role in the evolution of stars with masses of M > 0.55 M⊙. At the Gamow peak (Ec.m. = 300 ke V, T9 = 0.2), the cross section of the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction is so small (about 10-17 barn) that the direct measurement in ground laboratory is not feasible with the existing technology. Up to now, the cross sections at lower energies can only be extrapolated from the data at higher energies. However, two subthreshold resonances, locating at Ex = 7.117 MeV and Ex = 6.917 MeV, make this extrapolation more complicated. In this work the 6.917 MeV subthreshold resonance in the 12C(α, γ)16O reaction was investigated via the 12C(11B, 7Li)16O reaction. The experiment was performed using the Q3D magnetic spectrograph at HI-13 tandem accelerator. We measured the angular distribution of the 12C(11B, 7Li)16O transfer reaction leading to the 6.917 MeV state. Based on DWBA analysis, we derived the square of ANC of the 6.917 MeV level in 16O to be (2.45± 0.28) ×1010 fm-1, with which the reduced-α width can be computed. Finally, we calculated the astrophysical SE2 factor of the 6.917 MeV resonance to be 67.6 ± 7.7 ke V b.

  4. Cigarette smoke extract alters the cell cycle via the phospholipid transfer protein/transforming growth factor-β1/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xue-Min; Li, You-Lun; Chen, Hong; Guo, Shu-Liang; Shui, Li-Li; Chen, Ya-Juan

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) on cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced alteration of the cell cycle and the possible mechanism. Male Wistar rats and the rat alveolar epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN) were exposed to normal air or different concentrations of CSE. Then PLTP siRNA was transfected into cells and an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was administered prior to CSE exposure. Histological changes and cell cycle stage were recorded, as were the expression levels of PLTP, TGF-β1, CyclinD1 and CDK4. Resulting morphological changes included diffuse interstitial substance incrassation and elevated alveolar rupturing. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase in the number of cells in the G1 phase in a time- and dose-related manner. Both PLTP and TGF-β1 were up-regulated at protein and mRNA levels, whereas CyclinD1 and CDK4 expression was down-regulated after CSE exposure. Furthermore, PLTP siRNA significantly suppressed CSE-induced TGF-β1 expression, resulting in up-regulation of CyclinD1 and CDK4, but the TGF-β1 inhibitor was not able to abrogate CSE-induced PLTP over-expression. In conclusion, PLTP may operate upstream of the TGF-β1/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway and may mediate the CSE-induced G1 arrest in RLE-6TN cells. Our work provides some new insight into the relation between PLTP and cell cycle progression. PMID:27260126

  5. Transfer Students from California Community Colleges: A Narrative Approach to Understanding the Social Capital and Institutional Factors That Lead to a Timely Transfer to a Public, Four-Year University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermoso, Katrina Virata

    2013-01-01

    The unique experiences of community college transfer students have not been explored at public, four-year universities. Most of the research on the experiences of community college students is based on quantitative research methods, which fail to provide a comprehensive understanding of the nature of students' lived experiences. This qualitative…

  6. Pragmatic Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasper, Gabriele

    1992-01-01

    Attempting to clarify the concept of pragmatic transfer, this article proposes as a basic distinction Leech/Thomas' dichotomy of sociopragmatics versus pragmalinguistics, presenting evidence for transfer at both levels. Issues discussed include pragmatic universals in speech act realization, conditions for pragmatic transfer, communicative…

  7. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for a successful technology transfer program and what such a program would look like are discussed. In particular, the issues associated with technology transfer in general, and within the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) environment specifically are addressed. The section on background sets the stage, identifies the barriers to successful technology transfer, and suggests actions to address the barriers either generally or specifically. The section on technology transfer presents a process with its supporting management plan that is required to ensure a smooth transfer process. Viewgraphs are also included.

  8. Vibrational mode and collision energy effects on reaction of H{sub 2}CO{sup +} with C{sub 2}H{sub 2}: Charge state competition and the role of Franck-Condon factors in endoergic charge transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jianbo; Van Devener, Brian; Anderson, Scott L.

    2005-11-22

    The effects of collision energy (E{sub col}) and six different H{sub 2}CO{sup +} vibrational states on the title reaction have been studied over the center-of-mass E{sub col} range from 0.1 to 2.6 eV, including measurements of product ion recoil velocity distributions. Ab initio and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations were used to examine the properties of complexes and transition states that might be important in mediating the reaction. Reaction is largely direct, despite the presence of multiple deep wells on the potential surface. Five product channels are observed, with a total reaction cross section at the collision limit. The competition among the major H{sub 2}{sup +} transfer, hydrogen transfer, and proton transfer channels is strongly affected by E{sub col} and H{sub 2}CO{sup +} vibrational excitation, providing insight into the factors that control competition and charge state 'unmixing' during product separation. One of the more interesting results is that endoergic charge transfer appears to be controlled by Franck-Condon factors, implying that it occurs at large inter-reactant separations, contrary to the expectation that endoergic reactions should require intimate collisions to drive the necessary energy conversion.

  9. Retrospective determination of 137Cs specific activity distribution in spruce bark and bark aggregated transfer factor in forests on the scale of the Czech Republic ten years after the Chernobyl accident.

    PubMed

    Suchara, I; Rulík, P; Hůlka, J; Pilátová, H

    2011-04-15

    The (137)Cs specific activities (mean 32Bq kg(-1)) were determined in spruce bark samples that had been collected at 192 sampling plots throughout the Czech Republic in 1995, and were related to the sampling year. The (137)Cs specific activities in spruce bark correlated significantly with the (137)Cs depositions in areas affected by different precipitation sums operating at the time of the Chernobyl fallout in 1986. The ratio of the (137)Cs specific activities in bark and of the (137)Cs deposition levels yielded bark aggregated transfer factor T(ag) about 10.5×10(-3)m(-2)kg(-1). Taking into account the residual specific activities of (137)Cs in bark 20Bq kg(-1) and the available pre-Chernobyl data on the (137)Cs deposition loads on the soil surface in the Czech Republic, the real aggregated transfer factor after and before the Chernobyl fallout proved to be T*(ag)=3.3×10(-3)m(-2)kg(-1) and T**(ag)=4.0×10(-3)m(-2)kg(-1), respectively. The aggregated transfer factors T*(ag) for (137)Cs and spruce bark did not differ significantly in areas unequally affected by the (137)Cs fallout in the Czech Republic in 1986, and the figures for these aggregated transfer factors were very similar to the mean bark T(ag) values published from the extensively affected areas near Chernobyl. The magnitude of the (137)Cs aggregated transfer factors for spruce bark for the pre-Chernobyl and post-Chernobyl period in the Czech Republic was also very similar. The variability in spruce bark acidity caused by the operation of local anthropogenic air pollution sources did not significantly influence the accumulation and retention of (137)Cs in spruce bark. Increasing elevation of the bark sampling plots had a significant effect on raising the remaining (137)Cs specific activities in bark in areas affected by precipitation at the time when the plumes crossed, because the sums of this precipitation increased with elevation (covariable). PMID:21377193

  10. Applicability of moisture transfer parameters estimated by correlation between Biot number and lag factor (Bi-G correlation) for convective drying of eggplant slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianxi; Hou, Hongying; Chen, Junruo

    2013-11-01

    Accurate values of the moisture transfer parameters are necessary to study heat and mass transfer, particularly for the efficient design of both process and equipment. However, these parameters obtained from empirical equations or analytical solutions of Fick’s second diffusion law are generally different from each other. In order to make simulation more accurate and closer to the fact, it is necessary to perform theoretical analysis and test of available empirical equations in literatures. In this work, such efforts were made: firstly, moisture transfer parameters were evaluated by Bi-G correlation; then, the obtained parameters were substituted to Fick’s second law of diffusion model, and the model was numerically calculated with convective boundary condition. The results show that although the exponential equation fits the experimental data well, the data predicted from Fick’s second law deviate far from the experimental data. This implicates that Bi-G correlation need be further improved to obtain better accurate moisture transfer parameters.

  11. SOLID-LIQUID PHASE TRANSFER CATALYZED SYNTHESIS OF CINNAMYL ACETATE-KINETICS AND ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE REACTION IN A BATCH REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of solid-liquid phase transfer catalysis has an advantage of carrying out reaction between two immiscible substrates, one in solid phase and the other in liquid phase, with high selectivity and at relatively low temperatures. In this study we investigated the synthesis ci...

  12. Factors That Control the Reactivity of Cobalt(III)-Nitrosyl Complexes in Nitric Oxide Transfer and Dioxygenation Reactions: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Investigation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Lee, Yong-Min; Hu, Lianrui; Chen, Jianwei; Park, Young Jun; Yao, Jiannian; Chen, Hui; Karlin, Kenneth D; Nam, Wonwoo

    2016-06-22

    Metal-nitrosyl complexes are key intermediates involved in many biological and physiological processes of nitric oxide (NO) activation by metalloproteins. In this study, we report the reactivities of mononuclear cobalt(III)-nitrosyl complexes bearing N-tetramethylated cyclam (TMC) ligands, [(14-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) and [(12-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+), in NO-transfer and dioxygenation reactions. The Co(III)-nitrosyl complex bearing 14-TMC ligand, [(14-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+), transfers the bound nitrosyl ligand to [(12-TMC)Co(II)](2+) via a dissociative pathway, {[(14-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) → {(14-TMC)Co···NO}(2+)}, thus affording [(12-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) and [(14-TMC)Co(II)](2+) as products. The dissociation of NO from the [(14-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) complex prior to NO-transfer is supported experimentally and theoretically. In contrast, the reverse reaction, which is the NO-transfer from [(12-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) to [(14-TMC)Co(II)](2+), does not occur. In addition to the NO-transfer reaction, dioxygenation of [(14-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) by O2 produces [(14-TMC)Co(II)(NO3)](+), which possesses an O,O-chelated nitrato ligand and where, based on an experiment using (18)O-labeled O2, two of the three O-atoms in the [(14-TMC)Co(II)(NO3)](+) product derive from O2. The dioxygenation reaction is proposed to occur via a dissociative pathway, as proposed in the NO-transfer reaction, and via the formation of a Co(II)-peroxynitrite intermediate, based on the observation of phenol ring nitration. In contrast, [(12-TMC)Co(III)(NO)](2+) does not react with O2. Thus, the present results demonstrate unambiguously that the NO-transfer/dioxygenation reactivity of the cobalt(III)-nitrosyl complexes bearing TMC ligands is significantly influenced by the ring size of the TMC ligands and/or the spin state of the cobalt ion. PMID:27221953

  13. The human element in technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A transfer model composed of three roles and their linkages was considered. This model and a growing body of experience was analyzed to provide guidance in the human elements of technology transfer. For example, criteria for selection of technology transfer agents was described, and some needed working climate factors were known. These concepts were successfully applied to transfer activities.

  14. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, Frank E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: international comparison of R&D expenditures in 1989; NASA Technology Transfer Program; NASA Technology Utilization Program thrusts for FY 1992 and FY 1993; National Technology Transfer Network; and NTTC roles.

  15. Additive Manufacturing/Diagnostics via the High Frequency Induction Heating of Metal Powders: The Determination of the Power Transfer Factor for Fine Metallic Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Caravias, George; Holcomb, Matthew

    2015-03-11

    Grid Logic Inc. is developing a method for sintering and melting fine metallic powders for additive manufacturing using spatially-compact, high-frequency magnetic fields called Micro-Induction Sintering (MIS). One of the challenges in advancing MIS technology for additive manufacturing is in understanding the power transfer to the particles in a powder bed. This knowledge is important to achieving efficient power transfer, control, and selective particle heating during the MIS process needed for commercialization of the technology. The project s work provided a rigorous physics-based model for induction heating of fine spherical particles as a function of frequency and particle size. This simulation improved upon Grid Logic s earlier models and provides guidance that will make the MIS technology more effective. The project model will be incorporated into Grid Logic s power control circuit of the MIS 3D printer product and its diagnostics technology to optimize the sintering process for part quality and energy efficiency.

  16. Prevalence and factors associated with false positive suspicion of acute aortic syndrome: experience in a patient population transferred to a specialized aortic treatment center

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Chad E.; Aggarwal, Bhuvnesh; Schoenhagen, Paul; Kralovic, Damon M.; Kormos, Kristopher; Holloway, David

    2013-01-01

    Study objective Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a medical emergency that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment at specialized centers. We sought to determine the frequency and etiology of false positive activation of a regional AAS network in a patient population emergently transferred for suspected AAS. Methods We evaluated 150 consecutive patients transferred from community emergency departments directly to our Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (CICU) with a diagnosis of suspected AAS between March, 2010 and August, 2011. A final diagnosis of confirmed acute Type A, acute Type B dissection, and false positive suspicion of dissection was made in 63 (42%), 70 (46.7%) and 17 (11.3%) patients respectively. Results Of the 17 false positive transfers, ten (58.8%) were suspected Type A dissection and seven (41.2%) were suspected Type B dissection. The initial hospital diagnosis in 15 (88.2%) patients was made by a computed tomography (CT) scan and 10 (66.6%) of these patients required repeat imaging with an ECG-synchronized CT to definitively rule out AAS. Five (29.4%) patients had prior history of open or endovascular aortic repair. Overall in-hospital mortality was 9.3%. Conclusions The diagnosis of AAS is confirmed in most patients emergently transferred for suspected AAS. False positive activation in this setting is driven primarily by uncertainty secondary to motion-artifact of the ascending aorta and the presence of complex anatomy following prior aortic intervention. Network-wide standardization of imaging strategies, and improved sharing of imaging may further improve triage of this complex patient population. PMID:24400203

  17. Factors Affecting The Experimental Line Spread Function (Lsf) Measurement And Modulation Transfer Function (Mtf) Calculation Including Deviation In Characteristic Curve Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahle, Marcia E.; Haus, Arthur G.

    1980-08-01

    The major potential errors in the slit method measurement of the line spread function (LSF) and the modu-lation transfer function (MTF) of radiographic screen-film systems are reviewed. These errors are compared with the potential error introduced in the LSF due to an erroneous representation of the characteristic curve (sensitometric data). If a deviation in the sensitometric data results in a lower average gradient of the characteristic curve, the MTF will show higher resolution capabilities.

  18. Pure transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-03-01

    Spectral purity can now be transferred from one laser to another with a very different wavelength at an order of magnitude better than previously achievable. Yann Le Coq spoke to Nature Photonics about the new development.

  19. Comparison of Passively Transferred Antibodies in Bighorn and Domestic Lambs Reveals One Factor in Differential Susceptibility of These Species to Mannheimia haemolytica-Induced Pneumonia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mannheimia haemolytica consistently causes fatal bronchopneumonia in bighorn sheep (BHS; Ovis canadensis) under natural and experimental conditions. Leukotoxin is the primary virulence factor of this organism. BHS are more susceptible to developing fatal pneumonia than the related species Ovis aries...

  20. Optimality and Conductivity for Water Flow: From Landscapes, to Unsaturated Soils, to Plant Leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-02-23

    Optimality principles have been widely used in many areas. Based on an optimality principle that any flow field will tend toward a minimum in the energy dissipation rate, this work shows that there exists a unified form of conductivity relationship for three different flow systems: landscapes, unsaturated soils and plant leaves. The conductivity, the ratio of water flux to energy gradient, is a power function of water flux although the power value is system dependent. This relationship indicates that to minimize energy dissipation rate for a whole system, water flow has a small resistance (or a large conductivity) at a location of large water flux. Empirical evidence supports validity of the relationship for landscape and unsaturated soils (under gravity dominated conditions). Numerical simulation results also show that the relationship can capture the key features of hydraulic structure for a plant leaf, although more studies are needed to further confirm its validity. Especially, it is of interest that according to this relationship, hydraulic conductivity for gravity-dominated unsaturated flow, unlike that defined in the classic theories, depends on not only capillary pressure (or saturation), but also the water flux. Use of the optimality principle allows for determining useful results that are applicable to a broad range of areas involving highly non-linear processes and may not be possible to obtain from classic theories describing water flow processes.

  1. Accumulation of heavy metals from contaminated soil to plants and evaluation of soil remediation by vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Malandrino, Mery; Abollino, Ornella; Buoso, Sandro; Giacomino, Agnese; La Gioia, Carmela; Mentasti, Edoardo

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the distribution of 15 metal ions, namely Al, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sc, Ti, V, Y, Zn and Zr, in the soil of a contaminated site in Piedmont (Italy). This area was found to be heavily contaminated with Cu, Cr and Ni. The availability of these metal ions was studied using Tessier's sequential extraction procedure: the fraction of mobile species, which potentially is the most harmful for the environment, was much higher than that normally present in unpolluted soils. This soil was hence used to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with vermiculite to reduce the availability of the pollutants to two plants, Lactuca sativa and Spinacia oleracea, by pot experiments. The results indicated that the addition of vermiculite significantly reduces the uptake of metal pollutants by plants, confirming the possibility of using this clay in amendment treatments of metal-contaminated soils. The effect of plant growth on metal fractionation in soils was investigated. Finally, the sum of the metal percentages extracted into the first two fractions of Tessier's protocol was found to be suitable in predicting the phytoavailability of most of the pollutants present in the investigated soil. PMID:21055788

  2. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  3. Bioaccumulation and food-chain analysis for evaluating ecological risks in terrestrial and wetland habitats: Availability-transfer factors (ATFs) in soil {r_arrow} soil macroinvertebrate {r_arrow} amphibian food chains

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, G.; Bollman, M.; Callahan, C.; Gillette, C.; Nebeker, A.; Wilborn, D.

    1998-12-31

    As part of the ecological risk assessment process for terrestrial and wetland habitats, the evaluation of bioaccumulative chemicals of concern (BCCs) is frequently pursued through food-chain analysis with a subsequent comparison of daily doses to benchmark toxicity reference values, when available. Food-chain analysis has frequently been applied to the analysis of exposure to BCCs identified as chemicals of potential ecological concern (COPECs) in the ecological risk assessment process. Here, designed studies focused on wetland food-chains such as hydric soil {r_arrow} soil macroinvertebrate {r_arrow} amphibian and terrestrial food-chains such as soil {r_arrow} plant {r_arrow} small mammal illustrate an approach for the derivation and validation of trophic transfer factors for metals considered as COPECs such as cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc. The results clearly indicate that the transfer of chemicals between trophic levels is critical in the bioaccumulation process in wetland and terrestrial food-chains and is influenced by numerous interacting abiotic and biotic factors, including physicochemical properties of soil, and the role, if any, that the metal has in the receptor as a required trace element.

  4. Experimental studies on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid in a circular pipe under laminar flow with wire coil inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekar, M.; Suresh, S.; Chandra Bose, A.

    2010-02-15

    In this paper, fully developed laminar flow convective heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nanofluid flowing through a uniformly heated horizontal tube with and without wire coil inserts is presented. For this purpose, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles of 43 nm size were synthesized, characterized and dispersed in distilled water to form stable suspension containing 0.1% volume concentration of nanoparticles. The Nusselt number in the fully developed region were measured and found to increase by 12.24% at Re = 2275 for plain tube with nanofluid compared to distilled water. Two wire coil inserts made of stainless steel with pitch ratios 2 and 3 were used which increased the Nusselt numbers by 15.91% and 21.53% respectively at Re = 2275 with nanofluid compared to distilled water. The better heat transfer performance of nanofluid with wire coil insert is attributed to the effects of dispersion or back-mixing which flattens the temperature distribution and make the temperature gradient between the fluid and wall steeper. The measured pressure loss with the use of nanofluids is almost equal to that of the distilled water. The empirical correlations developed for Nusselt number and friction factor in terms of Reynolds/Peclet number, pitch ratio and volume concentration fits with the experimental data within {+-}15%. (author)

  5. [Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latker, Norman J.

    Some authorities on technolgoy transfer feel that industry is not fully capitalizing on the inventive output of universities and nonprofit organizations. From the point of view of the government, the stakes are high. The magnitude of federal support of research and development in these organizations demands evidence of useful results if it is to…

  6. Exploring Differential Effects of Supervisor Support on Transfer of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijman, Derk-Jan J. M.; Nijhof, Wim J.; Wognum, A. A. M.; Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide further insight into the relationship between supervisor support and transfer of training, by taking into account the effects of other transfer-influencing factors in a systemic approach of the transfer process. Design/methodology/approach: A review of studies on factors affecting transfer of…

  7. Community Colleges and the Transfer Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Mary E.

    This paper examines how the traditional transfer role of the community college has become less significant as a vocational and community-based role has assumed importance. The paper describes factors contributing to the transfer function's decline and illustrates various attitudes surrounding the issue. The history of transfer education is…

  8. Training Transfer: An Integrative Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lisa A.; Hutchins, Holly M.

    2007-01-01

    Given the proliferation of training transfer studies in various disciplines, we provide an integrative and analytical review of factors impacting transfer of training. Relevant empirical research for transfer across the management, human resource development (HRD), training, adult learning, performance improvement, and psychology literatures is…

  9. HRD Effectiveness and Transfer of Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on human resource development (HRD) effectiveness and transfer of learning. "Factors Affecting Transfer of Training in Thailand" (Siriporn Yamnill, Gary N. McLean) discusses how the Learning Transfer System Inventory was validated in Thailand by administering it to 1,029 employers and analyzing…

  10. Experimental Approaches to Studying Biological Electron Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview on biological electron-transfer reactions, summarizing what is known about how distance, spatial organization, medium, and other factors affect electron transfer. Experimental approaches, including studies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions (electrostatic effects and precursor complexes), are considered. (JN)

  11. Transfer functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taback, I.

    1979-01-01

    The vulnerability of electronic equipment to carbon fibers is studied. The effectiveness of interfaces, such as filters, doors, window screens, and cabinets, which affect the concentration, exposure, or deposition of carbon fibers on both (internal and external) sides of the interface is examined. The transfer function of multilayer aluminum mesh, wet and dry, polyurethane foam, and window screen are determined as a function of air velocity. FIlters installed in typical traffic control boxes and air conditioners are also considered.

  12. Analysis of transfer genes and gene products within the traB-traC region of the Escherichia coli fertility factor, F

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.; Wu, J.H.; Kathir, P.; Hamilton, C.M.; Ippen-Ihler, K.

    1987-09-01

    A series of plasmids that carry overlapping segments of F DNA encoding the genes in the traB-traC interval was constructed, and a restriction enzyme map of the region was derived. Plasmids carrying deletions that had been introduced at an HpaI sites within this interval were also isolated. The ability of these plasmids to complement transfer of F lac plasmids carrying mutations in traB, traV, traW, and traC was analyzed. The protein products of the plasmids were labeled in UV-irradiated cells and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. These analyses showed that the product of traV is a polypeptide that migrates with an apparent molecular weight of 21,000. It was not detected when (/sup 35/S)methionine was used to label plasmid products, but was readily detected in /sup 14/C-amino acid labeling experiments. A 21,500-dalton product appeared to stem from the region assigned to traP. A 9000-dalton product was found to stem from a locus, named traR, that is located between traV and traC. No traW activity could be detected from the region of tra DNA examined. The authors data also indicated that traC is located in a more promoter-proximal position than suggested on earlier maps. The plasmids constructed are expected to be useful in studies designed to identify the specific functions of the traB, -P, -V, -R, and -C products.

  13. Transfer of three transcription factors via a lentiviral vector ameliorates spatial learning and memory impairment in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin; Yan, Qing; Wang, Songtao; Wang, Cunzu; Zhao, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible and progressive neurodegenerative disorder with observable memory impairment. The present study was performed to evaluate the beneficial effects of lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of a combination of three transcription regulators, ABN (Ascl1, Brn2 and Ngn2), on learning and memory loss in a mouse model of AD. The AD model was established by injecting Aβ1-42 bilaterally into the mouse hippocampus. Lentiviral ABN was delivered bilaterally into the hippocampus of mice. Animals injected with LV-ABN showed significantly improved spatial learning and memory in the water maze test. Additionally, antibody array analysis indicated that intrahippocampal LV-ABN delivery significantly altered the expression levels of some proteins that were identified as inflammatory factors or neuroprotective and growth factors. In conclusion, our data suggest that LV-ABN delivery can ameliorate spatial learning and memory impairment in an AD mouse model, and the beneficial effect of ABN gene treatment could be linked to inhibition of the neuroinflammatory response and enhancement of neuroprotection and neurogenesis. Thus, these findings indicate that lentiviral ABN gene delivery has potential therapeutic applications for AD. PMID:27102892

  14. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  15. Transfer of elements relevant to nuclear fuel cycle from soil to boreal plants and animals in experimental meso- and microcosms.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Tiina S; Kasurinen, Anne; Häikiö, Elina; Tervahauta, Arja; Makkonen, Sari; Holopainen, Toini; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Uranium (U), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), thorium (Th) and zinc (Zn) occur naturally in soil but their radioactive isotopes can also be released into the environment during the nuclear fuel cycle. The transfer of these elements was studied in three different trophic levels in experimental mesocosms containing downy birch (Betula pubescens), narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) and Scandinavian small-reed (Calamagrostis purpurea ssp. Phragmitoides) as producers, snails (Arianta arbostorum) as herbivores, and earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) as decomposers. To determine more precisely whether the element uptake of snails is mainly via their food (birch leaves) or both via soil and food, a separate microcosm experiment was also performed. The element uptake of snails did not generally depend on the presence of soil, indicating that the main uptake route was food, except for U, where soil contact was important for uptake when soil U concentration was high. Transfer of elements from soil to plants was not linear, i.e. it was not correctly described by constant concentration ratios (CR) commonly applied in radioecological modeling. Similar nonlinear transfer was found for the invertebrate animals included in this study: elements other than U were taken up more efficiently when element concentration in soil or food was low. PMID:26363398

  16. A survey of attitudes and factors associated with successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) knowledge transfer in an older population most likely to witness cardiac arrest: design and methodology

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, Christian; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Brehaut, Jamie C; Osmond, Martin; Charette, Manya L; Wells, George A; Stiell, Ian G

    2008-01-01

    Background Overall survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest rarely exceed 5%. While bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival for cardiac arrest victims by up to four times, bystander CPR rates remain low in Canada (15%). Most cardiac arrest victims are men in their sixties, they usually collapse in their own home (85%) and the event is witnessed 50% of the time. These statistics would appear to support a strategy of targeted CPR training for an older population that is most likely to witness a cardiac arrest event. However, interest in CPR training appears to decrease with advancing age. Behaviour surrounding CPR training and performance has never been studied using well validated behavioural theories. Methods/Design The overall goal of this study is to conduct a survey to better understand the behavioural factors influencing CPR training and performance in men and women 55 years of age and older. The study will proceed in three phases. In phase one, semi-structured qualitative interviews will be conducted and recorded to identify common categories and themes regarding seeking CPR training and providing CPR to a cardiac arrest victim. The themes identified in the first phase will be used in phase two to develop, pilot-test, and refine a survey instrument based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour. In the third phase of the project, the final survey will be administered to a sample of the study population over the telephone. Analyses will include measures of sampling bias, reliability of the measures, construct validity, as well as multiple regression analyses to identify constructs and beliefs most salient to seniors' decisions about whether to attend CPR classes or perform CPR on a cardiac arrest victim. Discussion The results of this survey will provide valuable insight into factors influencing the interest in CPR training and performance among a targeted group of individuals most susceptible to witnessing a victim in cardiac

  17. Adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor in critical limb ischemia: safety results from a phase I trial.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Emile R; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Olin, Jeffrey W; Trachtenberg, Jeffrey D; Rasmussen, Henrik; Pak, Raphael; Crystal, Ronald G

    2003-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is typified by rest pain and/or tissue necrosis secondary to advanced peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and is characterized by diminution in limb perfusion at rest. We tested the safety of an angiogenic strategy with CI-1023 (Ad(GV)VEGF121.10), a replication-deficient adenovirus encoding human vascular endothelial growth factor isoform 121 in patients with CLI as part of a phase I trial. Fifteen subjects >35 years of age with CLI and angiographic disease involving the infra-inguinal vessels underwent intramuscular injection of CI-1023 (4 x 10(8) to 4 x 10(10) particle units, n = 13) or placebo (n = 2). All of the patients tolerated the injection well and there were no serious complications related to the procedure. Transient edema was noted in one patient. A total of 79 adverse events were reported over the course of one year. One death (day 136) and one malignancy (day 332) occurred in the CI-1023 group. CI-1023 appears to be well tolerated and safe for single-dose administration in patients with critical limb ischemia due to PAD. Further studies are needed to determine the efficacy of this form of therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:12866606

  18. Nonadiabatic anharmonic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, P P

    2013-03-28

    The effect of an inner sphere, local mode vibration on an electron transfer is modeled using the nonadiabatic transition probability (rate) expression together with both the anharmonic Morse and the harmonic oscillator potential. For an anharmonic inner sphere mode, a variational analysis uses harmonic oscillator basis functions to overcome the difficulties evaluating Morse-model Franck-Condon overlap factors. Individual matrix elements are computed with the use of new, fast, robust, and flexible recurrence relations. The analysis therefore readily addresses changes in frequency and/or displacement of oscillator minimums in the different electron transfer states. Direct summation of the individual Boltzmann weighted Franck-Condon contributions avoids the limitations inherent in the use of the familiar high-temperature, gaussian form of the rate constant. The effect of harmonic versus anharmonic inner sphere modes on the electron transfer is readily seen, especially in the exoergic, inverted region. The behavior of the transition probability can also be displayed as a surface for all temperatures and values of the driving force/exoergicity Δ = -ΔG. The temperature insensitivity of the transfer rate is clearly seen when the exoergicity equals the collective reorganization energy (Δ = Λ(s)) along a maximum ln (w) vs. Δ ridge of the surface. The surface also reveals additional regions for Δ where ln (w) appears to be insensitive to temperature, or effectively activationless, for some kinds of inner sphere contributions. PMID:23556710

  19. Nonadiabatic anharmonic electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, P. P.

    2013-03-28

    The effect of an inner sphere, local mode vibration on an electron transfer is modeled using the nonadiabatic transition probability (rate) expression together with both the anharmonic Morse and the harmonic oscillator potential. For an anharmonic inner sphere mode, a variational analysis uses harmonic oscillator basis functions to overcome the difficulties evaluating Morse-model Franck-Condon overlap factors. Individual matrix elements are computed with the use of new, fast, robust, and flexible recurrence relations. The analysis therefore readily addresses changes in frequency and/or displacement of oscillator minimums in the different electron transfer states. Direct summation of the individual Boltzmann weighted Franck-Condon contributions avoids the limitations inherent in the use of the familiar high-temperature, Gaussian form of the rate constant. The effect of harmonic versus anharmonic inner sphere modes on the electron transfer is readily seen, especially in the exoergic, inverted region. The behavior of the transition probability can also be displayed as a surface for all temperatures and values of the driving force/exoergicity {Delta}=-{Delta}G. The temperature insensitivity of the transfer rate is clearly seen when the exoergicity equals the collective reorganization energy ({Delta}={Lambda}{sub s}) along a maximum ln (w) vs. {Delta} ridge of the surface. The surface also reveals additional regions for {Delta} where ln (w) appears to be insensitive to temperature, or effectively activationless, for some kinds of inner sphere contributions.

  20. Adenoviral-Mediated Glial Cell Line–Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Transfer Has a Protective Effect on Sciatic Nerve Following Constriction-Induced Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chou, An-Kuo; Yang, Ming-Chang; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Tai, Ming-Hong; Kwan, Aij-Li; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain due to peripheral nerve injury may be associated with abnormal central nerve activity. Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can help attenuate neuropathic pain in different animal models of nerve injury. However, whether GDNF can ameliorate neuropathic pain in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in constriction-induced peripheral nerve injury remains unknown. We investigated the therapeutic effects of adenoviral-mediated GDNF on neuropathic pain behaviors, microglial activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and programmed cell death in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) nerve injury animal model. In this study, neuropathic pain was produced by CCI on the ipsilateral SCDH. Mechanical allodynia was examined with von Frey filaments and thermal sensitivity was tested using a plantar test apparatus post-operatively. Target proteins GDNF-1, GDNFRa-1, MMP2, MMP9, p38, phospho-p38, ED1, IL6, IL1β, AIF, caspase-9, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, PARP, cleaved PARP, SPECTRIN, cleaved SPECTRIN, Beclin-1, PKCσ, PKCγ, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS were detected. Microglial activity was measured by observing changes in immunoreactivity with OX-42. NeuN and TUNEL staining were used to reveal whether apoptosis was attenuated by GDNF. Results showed that administrating GDNF began to attenuate both allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7. CCI-rats were found to have lower GDNF and GDNFRa-1 expression compared to controls, and GDNF re-activated their expression. Also, GDNF significantly down-regulated CCI-induced protein expression except for MMP2, eNOS and nNOS, indicating that the protective action of GDNF might be associated with anti-inflammation and prohibition of microglia activation. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that GDNF reduced CCI-induced neuronal apoptosis. In sum, GDNF enhanced the neurotrophic effect by inhibiting microglia activation and cytokine production via p38 and PKC signaling. GDNF could be a good

  1. The transfer of analytical procedures.

    PubMed

    Ermer, J; Limberger, M; Lis, K; Wätzig, H

    2013-11-01

    Analytical method transfers are certainly among the most discussed topics in the GMP regulated sector. However, they are surprisingly little regulated in detail. General information is provided by USP, WHO, and ISPE in particular. Most recently, the EU emphasized the importance of analytical transfer by including it in their draft of the revised GMP Guideline. In this article, an overview and comparison of these guidelines is provided. The key to success for method transfers is the excellent communication between sending and receiving unit. In order to facilitate this communication, procedures, flow charts and checklists for responsibilities, success factors, transfer categories, the transfer plan and report, strategies in case of failed transfers, tables with acceptance limits are provided here, together with a comprehensive glossary. Potential pitfalls are described such that they can be avoided. In order to assure an efficient and sustainable transfer of analytical procedures, a practically relevant and scientifically sound evaluation with corresponding acceptance criteria is crucial. Various strategies and statistical tools such as significance tests, absolute acceptance criteria, and equivalence tests are thoroughly descibed and compared in detail giving examples. Significance tests should be avoided. The success criterion is not statistical significance, but rather analytical relevance. Depending on a risk assessment of the analytical procedure in question, statistical equivalence tests are recommended, because they include both, a practically relevant acceptance limit and a direct control of the statistical risks. However, for lower risk procedures, a simple comparison of the transfer performance parameters to absolute limits is also regarded as sufficient. PMID:23978903

  2. Factors affecting production of transgenic rats by ICSI-mediated DNA transfer: effects of sonication and freeze-thawing of spermatozoa, rat strains for sperm and oocyte donors, and different constructs of exogenous DNA.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Masumi; Kato, Megumi; Ishikawa, Ayako; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Yagi, Takeshi; Hochi, Shinichi

    2005-04-01

    Factors affecting the efficiency of producing transgenic rats by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)-mediated DNA transfer were investigated. Epididymal spermatozoa from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were sonicated and/or frozen-thawed for cutting the tail and membrane disruption. The sperm heads were exposed for 1 min to different concentrations (0.02-2.5 microg/ml) of 3.0 kb enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) DNA solution, and then microinjected into the denuded F1 hybrid (Donryu x LEW) rat oocytes. The optimal concentration of EGFP DNA solution was 0.1 microg/ml, as determined by the in vitro developmental competence into morulae/blastocysts of the ICSI oocytes and the EGFP expression of the resultant embryos. The efficiency of producing transgenic rat offspring (per transferred zygote) was 2.8%, 1.6%, and 3.3% in the oocytes injected with sonicated, frozen-thawed, and sonicated + frozen-thawed sperm heads, respectively. The founder transgenic rats carrying the EGFP gene transmitted their transgenes to their progeny according to the Mendelian fashion, suggesting the stable incorporation of the transgenes into the rat genomes. Four rat strains (F344, LEW, Donryu, and SD) were compared for their suitability as sperm/oocyte donors for the production of transgenic rats by ICSI with sonicated, frozen-thawed and solution of EGFP DNA-exposed sperm heads. The efficiency of producing transgenic rats in the SD strain (8.2%) was higher than that in the LEW strain (0.9%), while those in the F344 and Donryu strains (4.3%-4.4%) were intermediate. One plasmid DNA (Fyn, 5.0 kb) and two BAC DNA (BAC/Fyn, 208 kb; Svet1/IRES-Cre, 186 kb) were successfully introduced into the SD rat genomes via ICSI, with the producing efficiencies of 2.8%, 0.9%, and 2.4%, respectively. PMID:15685640

  3. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, Kimberly R.

    1995-01-01

    The development and application of new technologies in the United States has always been important to the economic well being of the country. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been an important source of these new technologies for almost four decades. Recently, increasing global competition has emphasized the importance of fully utilizing federally funded technologies. Today NASA must meet its mission goals while at the same time, conduct research and development that contributes to securing US economic growth. NASA technologies must be quickly and effectively transferred into commercial products. In order to accomplish this task, NASA has formulated a new way of doing business with the private sector. Emphasis is placed on forming mutually beneficial partnerships between NASA and US industry. New standards have been set in response to the process that increase effectiveness, efficiency, and timely customer response. This summer I have identified potential markets for two NASA inventions: including the Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Characterization of Flaws in Metallic Tubing and the Radiographic Moire. I have also worked to establish a cooperative program with TAG, private industry, and a university known as the TAG/Industry/Academia Program.

  4. Transferability of tubifex limiting factor models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Terrell, James W.; Milhous, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    Dense populations of T. tubifex are generally associated with habitats dominated by fine sediments and enriched organic material (e.g. Krueger, 2002). Management of whirling disease positive systems is entering a new phase where channel modifications are being implemented to reduce or isolate this type of habitat. These management actions have the potential to cause new areas of sediment deposition. Descriptions of sediment characteristics associated with high numbers of T. tubifex can help engineers design channel modifications that minimize situations where altered velocity distributions inadvertently create optimum worm habitat. Ongoing studies in two Colorado Rivers with very different flow regimes and watershed characteristics provide preliminary evidence that a median sediment particle diameter greater than 1.4mm in conjunction with at least 30% (dry weight) of sediment with a diameter less than 0.3mm limits T. tubifex densities to approximately less than 10% of maximum densities.

  5. Microparticle Fluorimetry and Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folan, Lorcan Michael

    1987-12-01

    The primary aims of this dissertation were to develop an aerosol particle fluorimeter, utilize the instrument to investigate electronic energy transfer in individual microparticles (liquid droplets approximately 10 microns in radius) and develop an electromagnetic model to explain the observed energy transfer. A spectrometer for measuring the fluorescence emission fron a single trapped aerosol particle is described. This device consists of a particle generator, an electrodynamic levitator, and excitation source and detection optics and electronics. Provision is made to cool the sample chamber and fluorescence emission spectra can be obtained in real time. The fluorimeter was used to investigate energy transfer between donor-acceptor pairs of laser dyes. Energy transfer between the dyes was found to be enhanced in the levitated particles over the same material in bulk solution by more than a factor of 100. The concentration dependence of the particle energy transfer and characteristic features identified in the emission spectra indicate that the natural electromagnetic resonances of the particle mediate the energy transfer. A model calculation supports the experimental conclusions and yields good qualitative agreement with the observed energy transfer magnitude and concentration dependence.

  6. The Technology Transfer Process: Concepts, Framework and Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, James A.

    This paper discusses the conceptual framework and methodology of the technology transfer process and develops a model of the transfer mechanism. This model is then transformed into a predictive model of technology transfer incorporating nine factors that contribute to the movement of knowledge from source to user. Each of these factors is examined…

  7. Factors affecting 137Cs bio- availability under the application of different fertilizing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorkova, M. V.; Belova, N. I.

    2012-04-01

    Although it has been 25 years since the Chernobyl accident, it was generally found that radiocaesium remained bio-availability in some regions. Plant uptake of 137Cs is depended from quantity of exchangeable radionuclide and strongly influenced by soil properties. The addition of fertilizers to soil induces chemical and biological changes that influence the distribution of free ions the different phases (soil and soil solution). In this study we try to estimate influence of different soil conditions affecting the 137Cs bio-availability under the application of manure and inorganic fertilizers. Our research carried out in 2001-2008 years on contaminated after Chernobyl accident sod-podzolic soil during of prolonged field experiment. The experimental site was located in south-west of Bryansk region, Russia. Contamination density by 137Cs in the sampling point was equal to 475±30 kBq/m2. The sequence of crops in rotation was: 1) potato; 2) oats 3) lupine 4) winter rye. Three fertilizing systems were compared: organic - 80 tons per hectare of cow manure; inorganic fertilizing system - different rates of NPK (low, temperate and high) and mixed - 40 tons per hectare of cow manure + NPK. Main soil properties and chemical form of 137Cs and K (potassium) were detected. Radiocaesium activity was determined in soil and plant samples by gamma spectrometry, using a high purity Ge detectors. Overall efficiency was known to an accuracy of about 10-12%. Obtained results shows, that various fertilizing systems influence soil properties, chemical forms of 137Cs and K in soil and radionuclide soil-to-plant transfer in different ways. The highest reduction of exchangeable 137Cs in soil was found in case with application of organic fertilizers and also - temperate NPK rates. Part of exchangeable 137Cs is equal 6.8% (from total activity) in case of manure, 7.8% in case of inorganic fertilizers with control value - 10.2%. Caesium mobility in soil is affected by such soil properties as

  8. Trends in Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starnick, Jurgen

    1988-01-01

    Various forms of technology transfer in Europe and North America are discussed including research contracts, cooperative research centers, and personnel transfer. Examples of approaches to technology transfer are given and the establishment of personnel transfer is discussed. Preconditions for successful technology transfer in the future are…

  9. To transfer or not to transfer? Kinematics and laterality quotient predict interlimb transfer of motor learning.

    PubMed

    Lefumat, Hannah Z; Vercher, Jean-Louis; Miall, R Chris; Cole, Jonathan; Buloup, Frank; Bringoux, Lionel; Bourdin, Christophe; Sarlegna, Fabrice R

    2015-11-01

    Humans can remarkably adapt their motor behavior to novel environmental conditions, yet it remains unclear which factors enable us to transfer what we have learned with one limb to the other. Here we tested the hypothesis that interlimb transfer of sensorimotor adaptation is determined by environmental conditions but also by individual characteristics. We specifically examined the adaptation of unconstrained reaching movements to a novel Coriolis, velocity-dependent force field. Right-handed subjects sat at the center of a rotating platform and performed forward reaching movements with the upper limb toward flashed visual targets in prerotation, per-rotation (i.e., adaptation), and postrotation tests. Here only the dominant arm was used during adaptation and interlimb transfer was assessed by comparing performance of the nondominant arm before and after dominant-arm adaptation. Vision and no-vision conditions did not significantly influence interlimb transfer of trajectory adaptation, which on average was significant but limited. We uncovered a substantial heterogeneity of interlimb transfer across subjects and found that interlimb transfer can be qualitatively and quantitatively predicted for each healthy young individual. A classifier showed that in our study, interlimb transfer could be predicted based on the subject's task performance, most notably motor variability during learning, and his or her laterality quotient. Positive correlations suggested that variability of motor performance and lateralization of arm movement control facilitate interlimb transfer. We further show that these individual characteristics can predict the presence and the magnitude of interlimb transfer of left-handers. Overall, this study suggests that individual characteristics shape the way the nervous system can generalize motor learning. PMID:26334018

  10. Fundamentals of phosphate transfer.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Anthony J; Nome, Faruk

    2015-07-21

    Historically, the chemistry of phosphate transfer-a class of reactions fundamental to the chemistry of Life-has been discussed almost exclusively in terms of the nucleophile and the leaving group. Reactivity always depends significantly on both factors; but recent results for reactions of phosphate triesters have shown that it can also depend strongly on the nature of the nonleaving or "spectator" groups. The extreme stabilities of fully ionised mono- and dialkyl phosphate esters can be seen as extensions of the same effect, with one or two triester OR groups replaced by O(-). Our chosen lead reaction is hydrolysis-phosphate transfer to water: because water is the medium in which biological chemistry takes place; because the half-life of a system in water is an accepted basic index of stability; and because the typical mechanisms of hydrolysis, with solvent H2O providing specific molecules to act as nucleophiles and as general acids or bases, are models for reactions involving better nucleophiles and stronger general species catalysts. Not least those available in enzyme active sites. Alkyl monoester dianions compete with alkyl diester monoanions for the slowest estimated rates of spontaneous hydrolysis. High stability at physiological pH is a vital factor in the biological roles of organic phosphates, but a significant limitation for experimental investigations. Almost all kinetic measurements of phosphate transfer reactions involving mono- and diesters have been followed by UV-visible spectroscopy using activated systems, conveniently compounds with good leaving groups. (A "good leaving group" OR* is electron-withdrawing, and can be displaced to generate an anion R*O(-) in water near pH 7.) Reactivities at normal temperatures of P-O-alkyl derivatives-better models for typical biological substrates-have typically had to be estimated: by extended extrapolation from linear free energy relationships, or from rate measurements at high temperatures. Calculation is free

  11. Food chain transfer and potential renal toxicity of mercury to small mammals at a contaminated terrestrial field site.

    PubMed

    Talmage, S S; Walton, B T

    1993-12-01

    Mercury concentrations were determined in surface soil and biota at a contaminated terrestrial field site and were used to calculate transfer coefficients of mercury through various compartments of the ecosystem based on trophic relationships. Mercury concentrations in all compartments (soil, vegetation, invertebrates, and small mammals) were higher than mercury concentrations in corresponding samples at local reference sites. Nonetheless, mercury concentrations in biota did not exceed concentrations in the contaminated surface soil, which averaged 269 μg g(-1). Plant tissue concentrations of mercury were low (0.01 to 2.0 μg g(-1)) and yielded soil to plant transfer coefficients ranging from 3.7×10(-5) for seeds to 7.0×10(-3) for grass blades. Mercury concentrations in invertebrates ranged from 0.79 for harvestmen (Phalangida) to 15.5 μg g(-1) for undepurated earthworms (Oligochaeta). Mean food chain transfer coefficients for invertebrates were 0.88 for herbivores/omnivores and 2.35 for carnivores. Mean mercury concentrations in target tissue (kidney) were 1.16±1.16 μg g(-1) for the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), a granivore, and 38.8±24.6 μg g(-1) for the shorttail shrew (Blarina brevicauda), an insectivore. Transfer coefficients for diet to kidney were 0.75 and 4.40 for P. leucopus and B. brevicauda, respectively. A comparison of kidney mercury residues measured in this study with values from controlled laboratory feeding studies from the literature indicate that B. brevicauda but not P. leucopus may be ingesting mercury at levels that are nephrotoxic. PMID:24201735

  12. Applying Transfer in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminski, Karen; Foley, Jeffrey M.; Kaiser, Leann M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the chapters in this issue, the authors have cited various definitions for learning transfer. For educators, in its simplest form, transfer of learning occurs when students put to practical use the knowledge and skills they gained in the classroom (near transfer). Chapter 1 defines near transfer and then goes into detail on the levels…

  13. Radiation View Factor With Shadowing

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-24

    FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors as input data to finite element heat transfer analysis codes.

  14. Risk-based analytical method transfer: application to large multi-product transfers.

    PubMed

    Raska, Christina S; Bennett, Tony S; Goodberlet, Scott A

    2010-07-15

    As pharmaceutical companies adapt their business models, a new approach to analytical method transfer is needed to efficiently handle transfers of multiple products, associated with situations such as site consolidations/closures. Using the principles of risk management, a risk-based method transfer approach is described, which defines appropriate transfer activities based on a risk assessment of the methods and experience of the receiving unit. A key step in the process is detailed knowledge transfer from the transferring unit to the receiving unit. The amount of transfer testing required can be streamlined or eliminated on the basis of a number of factors, including method capability, receiving unit familiarity, and method past performance. PMID:20557030

  15. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  16. In the Trainer's Voice: A Study of Training Transfer Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Holly M.

    2009-01-01

    Data were gathered from members of a large professional training organization regarding their practices for supporting training transfer. Transfer factor categories grounded in the literature were used to code the data using content analysis procedures. Commensurate with the transfer literature, results suggest that trainers reported strategies…

  17. Strategies for Helping Students Transfer Credits. DETC Occasional Paper 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fares, Ali

    This booklet is a guide to the process of transferring college credits from one institution of higher education to another. First, it identifies the factors that affect college transfer, including college and/or state policies on transfer of credits, college residency requirements, comparability of courses, grade received in a course, and…

  18. Probability of Detection Demonstration Transferability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.

    2008-01-01

    The ongoing Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Propellant Tank Penetrant Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Probability of Detection (POD) Assessment (NESC activity) has surfaced several issues associated with liquid penetrant POD demonstration testing. This presentation lists factors that may influence the transferability of POD demonstration tests. Initial testing will address the liquid penetrant inspection technique. Some of the factors to be considered in this task are crack aspect ratio, the extent of the crack opening, the material and the distance between the inspection surface and the inspector's eye.

  19. Second Chances: Investigating Athletes' Experiences of Talent Transfer.

    PubMed

    MacNamara, Áine; Collins, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Talent transfer initiatives seek to transfer talented, mature individuals from one sport to another. Unfortunately talent transfer initiatives seem to lack an evidence-based direction and a rigorous exploration of the mechanisms underpinning the approach. The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify the factors which successfully transferring athletes cite as facilitative of talent transfer. In contrast to the anthropometric and performance variables that underpin current talent transfer initiatives, participants identified a range of psycho-behavioral and environmental factors as key to successful transfer. We argue that further research into the mechanisms of talent transfer is needed in order to provide a strong evidence base for the methodologies employed in these initiatives. PMID:26600303

  20. Second Chances: Investigating Athletes’ Experiences of Talent Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Talent transfer initiatives seek to transfer talented, mature individuals from one sport to another. Unfortunately talent transfer initiatives seem to lack an evidence-based direction and a rigorous exploration of the mechanisms underpinning the approach. The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify the factors which successfully transferring athletes cite as facilitative of talent transfer. In contrast to the anthropometric and performance variables that underpin current talent transfer initiatives, participants identified a range of psycho-behavioral and environmental factors as key to successful transfer. We argue that further research into the mechanisms of talent transfer is needed in order to provide a strong evidence base for the methodologies employed in these initiatives. PMID:26600303

  1. Reverse Transfer in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    This article considers national Australian data on reverse transfer--the transfer of students from bachelor programs or higher to sub baccalaureate programs, institutions and sectors. It finds that previous studies have overstated the prevalence and perhaps also the significance of reverse transfer. The data are not good, but the best conclusion…

  2. Transfer of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on transfer of learning. In "Learning Transfer in a Social Service Agency: Test of an Expectancy Model of Motivation" (Reid A. Bates) structural equation modeling is used to test the validity of a valence-instrumentality-expectancy approach to motivation to transfer learning. "The Relationship between…

  3. Transfer of Learning Transformed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Instruction is motivated by the assumption that students can transfer their learning, or apply what they have learned in school to another setting. A common problem arises when the expected transfer does not take place, what has been referred to as the inert knowledge problem. More than an academic inconvenience, the failure to transfer is a major…

  4. Transfer Index: One Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinselman, James L.

    A transfer index of the proportion of students in California's community colleges transferring to the University of California (UC) and the California State University (CSU) system for fall 1982, 1983, and 1984 is presented in this report. Introductory material provides one definition of an appropriate index of transfer rates, i.e., the ratio of…

  5. Operationalizing the Transfer Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Philip

    In statistical terms, transfer rates require two components: a numerator that represents community college students who transfer and a denominator that approximates the pool of potential transfer students. The California Task Force adopted a set of criteria to judge the appropriateness of prospective pairs of numerators and denominators. Its form…

  6. Electron Transfer versus Proton Transfer in Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions of Polyprotonated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardena, Harsha P.; He, Min; Chrisman, Paul A.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Hogan, Jason M.; Hodges, Brittany D. M.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    The ion/ion reactions of several dozen reagent anions with triply protonated cations of the model peptide KGAILKGAILR have been examined to evaluate predictions of a Landau–Zener-based model for the likelihood for electron transfer. Evidence for electron transfer was provided by the appearance of fragment ions unique to electron transfer or electron capture dissociation. Proton transfer and electron transfer are competitive processes for any combination of anionic and cationic reactants. For reagent anions in reactions with protonated peptides, proton transfer is usually significantly more exothermic than electron transfer. If charge transfer occurs at relatively long distances, electron transfer should, therefore, be favored on kinetic grounds because the reactant and product channels cross at greater distances, provided conditions are favorable for electron transfer at the crossing point. The results are consistent with a model based on Landau–Zener theory that indicates both thermodynamic and geometric criteria apply for electron transfer involving polyatomic anions. Both the model and the data suggest that electron affinities associated with the anionic reagents greater than about 60–70 kcal/mol minimize the likelihood that electron transfer will be observed. Provided the electron affinity is not too high, the Franck–Condon factors associated with the anion and its corresponding neutral must not be too low. When one or the other of these criteria is not met, proton transfer tends to occur essentially exclusively. Experiments involving ion/ion attachment products also suggest that a significant barrier exists to the isomerization between chemical complexes that, if formed, lead to either proton transfer or electron transfer. PMID:16144411

  7. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  8. Heat transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  9. Quenching fundamentals: Heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, D.S.; Totten, G.E.; Webster, G.M.

    1996-12-31

    Quenching is essentially a heat transfer problem. It is necessary to quench parts fast enough that adequate mechanical and corrosion properties are achieved, but not so fast that detrimental distortion and residual stresses are formed. In addition, non-uniform heat transfer across the surface of a part will produce thermal gradients which will also create distortion or residual stresses. In this paper, the role of agitation will be discussed in terms of the heat transfer coefficient. A brief review of the published heat transfer literature will be discussed in terms of the fluid flow on heat transfer coefficient, with implications on quenching.

  10. Quality factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.

    1986-01-01

    The quality factor, Q, is a dimensionless modifier used in converting absorbed dose, expressed in rads (or grays), to dose equivalent, expressed in rems (or seiverts). The dose equivalent is used in radiation protection to account for the biological effectiveness of different kinds of radiation. The quality factor is related to both the linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE). The RBE's obtained from biological experiments depend in a complex way on the observed biological effect, the specific test organism, and the experimental conditions. Judgement is involved, therefore, in the choice of the quality factor. Questions regarding the adequacy of current Q values for neutrons were raised first in a 1980 statement by the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) and later in a 1985 statement by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In 1980, the NCRP alerted the technical community to possible future increases between a factor of three and ten in the Q for neutrons, and in 1985, the ICRP suggested an increase by a factor of two in Q for neutrons. Both the ICRP and NRCP are now recommending essentially the same guidance with regard to Q for neutrons: an increase by a factor of two. The Q for neutrons is based on a large, albeit unfocused, body of experimental data. In spite of the lack of focus, the data supporting a change in the neutron quality factor are substantial. However, the proposed doubling of Q for neutrons is clouded by other issues regarding its application. 33 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Quantification of soil-to-plant transport of recombinant nucleopolyhedrovirus: effects of soil type and moisture, air currents, and precipitation.

    PubMed

    Fuxa, J R; Richter, A R

    2001-11-01

    Significantly more occlusion bodies (OB) of DuPont viral construct HzSNPV-LqhIT2, expressing a scorpion toxin, were transported by artificial rainfall to cotton plants from sandy soil (70:15:15 sand-silt-clay) than from silt (15:70:15) and significantly more from silt than from clay (15:15:70). The amounts transported by 5 versus 50 mm of precipitation were the same, and transport was zero when there was no precipitation. In treatments that included precipitation, the mean number of viable OB transported to entire, 25- to 35-cm-tall cotton plants ranged from 56 (clay soil, 5 mm of rain) to 226 (sandy soil, 50 mm of rain) OB/plant. In a second experiment, viral transport increased with increasing wind velocity (0, 16, and 31 km/h) and was greater in dry (-1.0 bar of matric potential) than in moist (-0.5 bar) soil. Wind transport was greater for virus in a clay soil than in silt or sand. Only 3.3 x 10(-7) (clay soil, 5 mm rain) to 1.3 x 10(-6) (sandy soil, 50 mm rain) of the OB in surrounding soil in experiment 1 or 1.1 x 10(-7) (-0.5 bar sandy soil, 16-km/h wind) to 1.3 x 10(-6) (-1.0 bar clay soil, 31-km/h wind) in experiment 2 were transported by rainfall or wind to cotton plants. This reduces the risk of environmental release of a recombinant nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV), because only a very small proportion of recombinant virus in the soil reservoir is transported to vegetation, where it can be ingested by and replicate in new host insects. PMID:11679341

  12. Wireless energy transfer between anisotropic metamaterials shells

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-06-15

    The behavior of strongly coupled Radial Photonic Crystals shells is investigated as a potential alternative to transfer electromagnetic energy wirelessly. These sub-wavelength resonant microstructures, which are based on anisotropic metamaterials, can produce efficient coupling phenomena due to their high quality factor. A configuration of selected constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) is analyzed in terms of its resonant characteristics. The coupling to loss ratio between two coupled resonators is calculated as a function of distance, the maximum (in excess of 300) is obtained when the shells are separated by three times their radius. Under practical conditions an 83% of maximum power transfer has been also estimated. -- Highlights: •Anisotropic metamaterial shells exhibit high quality factors and sub-wavelength size. •Exchange of electromagnetic energy between shells with high efficiency is analyzed. •Strong coupling is supported with high wireless transfer efficiency. •End-to-end energy transfer efficiencies higher than 83% can be predicted.

  13. Proton transfer in organic scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Dipankar

    This dissertation focuses on the fundamental understanding of the proton transfer process and translating the knowledge into design/development of new organic materials for efficient non-aqueous proton transport. For example, what controls the shuttling of a proton between two basic sites? a) Distance between two groups? or b) the basicity? c) What is the impact of protonation on molecular conformation when the basic sites are attached to rigid scaffolds? For this purpose, we developed several tunable proton sponges and studied proton transfer in these scaffolds theoretically as well as experimentally. Next we moved our attention to understand long-range proton conduction or proton transport. We introduced liquid crystalline (LC) proton conductor based on triphenylene molecule and established that activation energy barrier for proton transport is lower in the LC phase compared to the crystalline phase. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of several critical factors: the choice of the proton transferring groups, mobility of the charge carriers, intrinsic vs. extrinsic charge carrier concentrations and the molecular architectures on long-range proton transport. The outcome of this research will lead to a deeper understanding of non-aqueous proton transfer process and aid the design of next generation proton exchange membrane (PEM) for fuel cell.

  14. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

  15. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  16. Calculating proper transfer prices

    SciTech Connect

    Dorkey, F.C. ); Jarrell, G.A. )

    1991-01-01

    This article deals with developing a proper transfer pricing method. Decentralization is as American as baseball. While managers laud the widespread benefits of both decentralization and baseball, they often greet the term transfer price policy with a yawn. Since transfer prices are as critical to the success of decentralized firms as good pitchers are to baseball teams, this is quite a mistake on the part of our managers. A transfer price is the price charged to one division for a product or service that another division produced or provided. In many, perhaps most, decentralized organizations, the transfer pricing policies actually used are grossly inefficient and sacrifice the potential advantages of decentralization. Experience shows that far too many companies have transfer pricing policies that cost them significantly in foregone growth and profits.

  17. Biomechanics of Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Andrew; Tueting, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    The transfer of tendons in the upper extremity is a powerful technique to restore function to a partially paralyzed hand. The biomechanical principles of muscle tension and tendon excursion dictate motor function both in the native as well as transferred states. Appropriately tensioning transferred tendons to maximize the function of the associated muscle remains an area of focused research. Newer methods of tendon coaptation have proven similar in strength to the standard Pulvertaft weave, affording more options to the surgeon. PMID:27387073

  18. Wireless Power Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-22

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the

  19. Wireless Power Transfer

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-11-19

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the

  20. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  1. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are used commonly for the correction of soft tissue imbalances and instabilities. The complete transfer and the split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon are well-accepted methods for the treatment of idiopathic equinovarus deformity in children and adults. Throughout the literature, complete and split transfer have been shown to yield significant improvements in ankle and foot range of motion and muscle function. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend one procedure over the other, although the split procedure has been advocated for consistently achieving inversion to eversion muscle balance without overcorrection. PMID:26590723

  2. Bacterial transfer RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNA is an essential adapter molecule that is found across all three domains of life. The primary role of transfer RNA resides in its critical involvement in the accurate translation of messenger RNA codons during protein synthesis and, therefore, ultimately in the determination of cellular gene expression. This review aims to bring together the results of intensive investigations into the synthesis, maturation, modification, aminoacylation, editing and recycling of bacterial transfer RNAs. Codon recognition at the ribosome as well as the ever-increasing number of alternative roles for transfer RNA outside of translation will be discussed in the specific context of bacterial cells. PMID:25796611

  3. Exploring the transferability of safety performance functions.

    PubMed

    Farid, Ahmed; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Lee, Jaeyoung; Eluru, Naveen; Wang, Jung-Han

    2016-09-01

    Safety performance functions (SPFs), by predicting the number of crashes on roadway facilities, have been a vital tool in the highway safety area. The SPFs are typically applied for identifying hot spots in network screening and evaluating the effectiveness of road safety countermeasures. The Highway Safety Manual (HSM) provides a series of SPFs for several crash types by various roadway facilities. The SPFs, provided in the HSM, were developed using data from multiple states. In regions without local jurisdiction based SPFs it is common practice to adopt national SPFs for crash prediction. There has been little research to examine the viability of such national level models for local jurisdictions. Towards understanding the influence of SPF transferability, we examine the rural divided multilane highway models from Florida, Ohio, and California. Traffic, roadway geometry and crash data from the three states are employed to estimate single-state SPFs, two-state SPFs and three-state SPFs. The SPFs are estimated using the negative binomial model formulation for several crash types and severities. To evaluate transferability of models, we estimate a transfer index that allows us to understand which models transfer adequately to other regions. The results indicate that models from Florida and California seem to be more transferable compared to models from Ohio. More importantly, we observe that the transfer index increases when we used pooled data (from two or three states). Finally, to assist in model transferability, we propose a Modified Empirical Bayes (MEB) measure that provides segment specific calibration factors for transferring SPFs to local jurisdictions. The proposed measure is shown to outperform the HSM calibration factor for transferring SPFs. PMID:27322637

  4. Technology Transfer and Technology Transfer Intermediaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Stephen M.; Flagg, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    A standard and comprehensive model is needed to evaluate and compare technology transfer systems and the stakeholders within these systems. The principle systems considered include federal laboratories, U.S. universities, the rehabilitation engineering research centers (RERCs), and large small business innovation research programs. An earlier…

  5. Evaluating knowledge transfer practices among construction organization in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Mohd Azian; Baharuddin, Mohd Nurfaisal; Bahardin, Nur Fadhilah; Yasin, Mohd Fadzil Mat; Nawi, Mohd Nasrun Mohd; Deraman, Rafikullah

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this paper is to identify a key dimension of knowledge transfer component to improve construction organization performance. It investigates the effectiveness of present knowledge transfer practices currently adopted by the Malaysian construction organizations and examines the relationship between knowledge transfer factors and organizational factors. A survey among 151 respondents including a different contractor registration grade was employed for the study. The survey shows that a seven-teen (17) factors known as creating shared awareness for information sharing, communication, personal skills,individual attitude,training, organizational culture, information technology,motivation, monitoring and supervision, service quality,information accessibility, information supply, socialization process,knowledge tools, coaching and monitoring, staff briefing and information sharing were identify as a key dimension for knowledge transfer success. This finding suggest that through improvement of each factor, the recognition of the whole strategic knowledge transfer process can be increase thus helping to strengthen the Malaysian construction organization for competitive advantages.

  6. The challenges of technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelwood, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of challenges of technology transfer are presented with emphasis placed on the position of industry seeking technology through the media of technology searches. Factors considered are: (1) not-invented-here syndrome; (2) penetration of technological literature; (3) gap between origin and industry use; (4) large aerospace manufacturer vs. the small manufacturer; (5) link between the technology disseminator and the potential user; (6) feasibility of substitutions in terms of production costs; and (7) role of patents. It is shown that industry, government agencies, and others having technology to disseminate or use, must mutually understand the technology tools and translate to one another's capabilities, in order to profit from this national resource.

  7. The electronic couplings in electron transfer and excitation energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2009-04-21

    The transport of charge via electrons and the transport of excitation energy via excitons are two processes of fundamental importance in diverse areas of research. Characterization of electron transfer (ET) and excitation energy transfer (EET) rates are essential for a full understanding of, for instance, biological systems (such as respiration and photosynthesis) and opto-electronic devices (which interconvert electric and light energy). In this Account, we examine one of the parameters, the electronic coupling factor, for which reliable values are critical in determining transfer rates. Although ET and EET are different processes, many strategies for calculating the couplings share common themes. We emphasize the similarities in basic assumptions between the computational methods for the ET and EET couplings, examine the differences, and summarize the properties, advantages, and limits of the different computational methods. The electronic coupling factor is an off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix element between the initial and final diabatic states in the transport processes. ET coupling is essentially the interaction of the two molecular orbitals (MOs) where the electron occupancy is changed. Singlet excitation energy transfer (SEET), however, contains a Frster dipole-dipole coupling as its most important constituent. Triplet excitation energy transfer (TEET) involves an exchange of two electrons of different spin and energy; thus, it is like an overlap interaction of two pairs of MOs. Strategies for calculating ET and EET couplings can be classified as (1) energy-gap-based approaches, (2) direct calculation of the off-diagonal matrix elements, or (3) use of an additional operator to describe the extent of charge or excitation localization and to calculate the coupling value. Some of the difficulties in calculating the couplings were recently resolved. Methods were developed to remove the nondynamical correlation problem from the highly precise coupled cluster

  8. Transfer of Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of three papers presented at a symposium on transfer of training moderated by Gene Roth at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Validation of a Transfer Climate Instrument" (Reid A. Bates et al.) reports a study that attempted to validate Rouiller and Goldstein's (1993) eight-factor…

  9. Student Equity: Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdsall, Les

    Focusing on the transfer function at Diablo Valley College (DVC), in California, this report offers 1991 and 1992 transfer data drawn from reports issued by the University of California (UC), the California State University (CSU), and the Los Angeles-based Center for the Study of Community Colleges (CSCC). Following introductory materials, the UC…

  10. Multicomponent mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.; Krishna, R.

    1993-01-01

    This is an important book on multicomponent mass transfer, meant for readers already acquainted with the theory of mass transfer and the fundamentals of transport phenomena. Part 1, entitled Molecular Diffusion, contains the following chapters: Preliminary Concepts; The Maxwell-Stefan Relations; Fick's Law; Estimation of Diffusion Coefficients; Solution of multicomponent Diffusion Problems: The Linearized Theory; and Solution of Multicomponent Diffusion Problems: Effective Diffusivity Methods. Part 2, entitled Interphase Transfer, contains the following chapters: Mass-Transfer Coefficients; Film Theory; Unsteady-State Mass-Transfer Models; Mass Transfer in Turbulent Flow; and Simultaneous Mass and Energy Transfer. Part 3, entitled Design, contains the following chapters: Multicomponent Distillation: Mass-Transfer Models; Multicomponent Distillation: Efficiency Models; Multicomponent Distillation: A Nonequilibrium Stage Model; and Condensation of Vapor Mixtures. Appendices are provided on matrix algebra, equation-solving and estimation of a thermodynamic derivative matrix. A computer diskette is provided with the book; the examples in Chapters 1--13 are solvable using this diskette and the commercial package Mathcad which the user must obtain. A separate software package, Chemsep, is needed for some of the exercises in Chapter 14.

  11. Automatic microbial transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.; Mills, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Device can transfer metabolites or inhibitory agents to broth cultures of bacteria, in various stages of growth, for study. It also has application in transfer of other micro-organisms, such as yeasts, and could be useful in clinical and research laboratories. Device has been used for wide variety of purposes in experimental situations.

  12. Transfer involving deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.O.; Guidry, M.W.; Canto, L.F.

    1985-03-01

    Results are reviewed of 1- and 2-neutron transfer reactions at near-barrier energies for deformed nuclei. Rotational angular momentum and excitation patterns are examined. A strong tendency to populating high spin states within a few MeV of the yrast line is noted, and it is interpreted as preferential transfer to rotation-aligned states. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  13. Transfer Student Characteristics Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Sharon Paterson; Belcheir, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and define profiles of transfer students and assess if there are different levels of student success (as measured by first semester GPA, retention, and graduation) associated with of those profiles. Using cluster analysis, four transfer student types were identified and labeled as follows: Old Hand at…

  14. [Transference, taboo and truth].

    PubMed

    Bloom, H

    1989-05-01

    The author re-examines the development of the concept of transference in Freud's work. He gives special attention to Totem and Taboo published in 1912-13. He notes that Freud's totally unsupported hypotheses within this model become illuminating and intelligible if "totem" is translated as "psychoanalyst" and "taboo" as "transference (neurosis)". PMID:2734458

  15. Transferring Education for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, Kunnathodi Abdul; Umer Farooque, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability stands for sustaining the past, meeting needs of the present without compromising the ability to meet future needs. It should meet the individual and social needs, present and future needs local and global needs. A sustainable education that meets this requirements surely be a transferable education; an education that transfers from…

  16. National Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Lee W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) are provided. The NTTC mission is to serve as a hub for the nationwide technology-transfer network to expedite the movement of federally developed technology into the stream of commerce. A description of the Center is provided.

  17. Tendon Transfers for Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that 65% to 75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery. The goals of surgery are to restore elbow extension, as well as hand pinch, grasp, and release. Patients who have defined goals, actively participate in therapy, and understand expected outcomes, appear to have the highest satisfaction following tendon transfer procedures. PMID:27387082

  18. Thermal radiation heat transfer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.; Howell, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of heat transfer by thermal radiation is presented, including the radiative behavior of materials, radiation between surfaces, and gas radiation. Among the topics considered are property prediction by electromagnetic theory, the observed properties of solid materials, radiation in the presence of other modes of energy transfer, the equations of transfer for an absorbing-emitting gas, and radiative transfer in scattering and absorbing media. Also considered are radiation exchange between black isothermal surfaces, radiation exchange in enclosures composed of diffuse gray surfaces and in enclosures having some specularly reflecting surfaces, and radiation exchange between nondiffuse nongray surfaces. The use of the Monte Carlo technique in solving radiant-exchange problems and problems of radiative transfer through absorbing-emitting media is explained.

  19. Examining Mental Health Differences between Transfer and Nontransfer University Students Seeking Counseling Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehr, Kristin E.; Daltry, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This article sought to examine the differences between transfer and nontransfer students on mental health factors, social involvement, and academic success. It was found that transfer students had significantly higher scores on several mental health factors as compared to nontransfer students. It was also found that transfer students were less…

  20. Transfer color to night vision images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shaoyuan; Jing, Zhongliang; Liu, Gang; Li, Zhenhua

    2005-08-01

    Natural color appearance is the key problem of color night vision field. In this paper, the color mood of daytime color image is transferred to the monochromic night vision image. This method gives the night image a natural color appearance. For each pixel in the night vision image, the best matching pixel in the color image is found based on texture similarity measure. Entropy, energy, contrast, homogeneity, and correlation features based on co-occurrence matrix are combined as texture similarity measure to find the corresponding pixels between the two images. We use a genetic algorithm (GA) to find the optimistic weighting factors assigned to the five different features. GA is also employed in searching the matching pixels to make the color transfer algorithm faster. When the best matching pixel in the color image is found, the chromaticity values are transferred to the corresponding pixel of the night vision image. The experiment results demonstrate the efficiency of this natural color transfer technique.

  1. Dexter energy transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Liu, Chaoren; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Virshup, Aaron M; Beratan, David N

    2016-07-19

    Energy transfer with an associated spin change of the donor and acceptor, Dexter energy transfer, is critically important in solar energy harvesting assemblies, damage protection schemes of photobiology, and organometallic opto-electronic materials. Dexter transfer between chemically linked donors and acceptors is bridge mediated, presenting an enticing analogy with bridge-mediated electron and hole transfer. However, Dexter coupling pathways must convey both an electron and a hole from donor to acceptor, and this adds considerable richness to the mediation process. We dissect the bridge-mediated Dexter coupling mechanisms and formulate a theory for triplet energy transfer coupling pathways. Virtual donor-acceptor charge-transfer exciton intermediates dominate at shorter distances or higher tunneling energy gaps, whereas virtual intermediates with an electron and a hole both on the bridge (virtual bridge excitons) dominate for longer distances or lower energy gaps. The effects of virtual bridge excitons were neglected in earlier treatments. The two-particle pathway framework developed here shows how Dexter energy-transfer rates depend on donor, bridge, and acceptor energetics, as well as on orbital symmetry and quantum interference among pathways. PMID:27382185

  2. Numerical Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Operator Perturbation: 1. Survey of operator perturbation methods W. Kalkofen; 2. Line formation in expanding atmospheres: multilevel calculations using approximate lambda operators W. R. Hamann; 3. Stellar atmospheres in non-LTE: model construction and line formation calculations using approximate lambda operators K. Werner; 4. Acceleration of convergence L. H. Auer; 5. Line formation in a time-dependent atmosphere W. Kalkofen; 6. Iterative solution of multilevel transfer problems Eugene H. Avrett and Rudolf Loeser; 7. An algorithm for the simultaneous solution of thousands of transfer equations under global constraints Lawrence S. Anderson; 8. Operator perturbation for differential equations W. Kalkofen; Part II. Polarised Radiation: 9. A gentle introduction to polarised radiative transfer David E. Rees; 10. Non-LTE polarised radiative transfer in special lines David E. Rees and Graham A. Murphy; 11. Transfer of polarised radiation using 4x4 matrices E. Landi Degli'Innocenti; 12. Radiative transfer in the presence of strong magnetic fields A. A. van Ballegooijen; 13. An integral operator technique of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry A. Peraiah; 14. Discrete ordinate matrix method M. Schmidt and R. Wehrse.

  3. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  4. Numerical Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1988-01-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Operator Perturbation: 1. Survey of operator perturbation methods W. Kalkofen; 2. Line formation in expanding atmospheres: multilevel calculations using approximate lambda operators W. R. Hamann; 3. Stellar atmospheres in non-LTE: model construction and line formation calculations using approximate lambda operators K. Werner; 4. Acceleration of convergence L. H. Auer; 5. Line formation in a time-dependent atmosphere W. Kalkofen; 6. Iterative solution of multilevel transfer problems Eugene H. Avrett and Rudolf Loeser; 7. An algorithm for the simultaneous solution of thousands of transfer equations under global constraints Lawrence S. Anderson; 8. Operator perturbation for differential equations W. Kalkofen; Part II. Polarised Radiation: 9. A gentle introduction to polarised radiative transfer David E. Rees; 10. Non-LTE polarised radiative transfer in special lines David E. Rees and Graham A. Murphy; 11. Transfer of polarised radiation using 4x4 matrices E. Landi Degli'Innocenti; 12. Radiative transfer in the presence of strong magnetic fields A. A. van Ballegooijen; 13. An integral operator technique of radiative transfer in spherical symmetry A. Peraiah; 14. Discrete ordinate matrix method M. Schmidt and R. Wehrse.

  5. Heat transfer in pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbach, T.

    1985-01-01

    The heat transfer from hot water to a cold copper pipe in laminar and turbulent flow condition is determined. The mean flow through velocity in the pipe, relative test length and initial temperature in the vessel were varied extensively during tests. Measurements confirm Nusselt's theory for large test lengths in laminar range. A new equation is derived for heat transfer for large starting lengths which agrees satisfactorily with measurements for large starting lengths. Test results are compared with the new Prandtl equation for heat transfer and correlated well. Test material for 200- and to 400-diameter test length is represented at four different vessel temperatures.

  6. Information transfer in the National Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alfred T.

    1988-01-01

    An informal overview is given of the work in progress and the planned work in the area of information transfer that specifically addresses human factors issues in National Airspace System (NAS). The issues of how weather information will be displayed on the flight deck, the development of appropriate decision making technology, and digital datalink transmission are also briefly discussed.

  7. Maximizing profits in international technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straube, W.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum profit can be introduced into international technology transfer by observing the following: (1) ethical and open dealing between the parties; (2) maximum knowledge of all facts concerning the technology, the use of the technology, the market, competition, prices, and alternatives; (3) ability to coordinate exports, service, support activities, licensing and cross licensing; and (4) knowledgeable people which put these factors together.

  8. Special Report on the Transfer Admission Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for College Admission Counseling, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each Spring, much media attention is focused on the college admission process for first-year students, with particular emphasis on acceptance rates and factors that colleges consider when choosing among applicants. However, less attention is focused on the transfer admission process, which affects approximately one-third of students beginning at…

  9. Predicting outcomes for youth transferred to adult court.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Carol A; Mulvey, Edward P; Loughran, Thomas A; Fagan, Jeffrey; Chassin, Laurie A; Piquero, Alex R; Losoya, Sandra H; Steinberg, Laurence; Cauffman, Elizabeth

    2010-12-01

    Extant research regarding juvenile transfer has focused primarily on the negative effects of current policies, with little consistent and rigorous work on the variation among the adolescents transferred to adult court and their later adjustment in the community. Using a sample of 193 transferred youth from Arizona, we consider how certain individual characteristics are related to four post-release outcomes (antisocial activity, re-arrest, re-institutionalization, and gainful activity). We find considerable variability in outcomes, with adjustment significantly and consistently related to certain legal and risk-need factors. These results indicate that some transferred youth may experience negative outcomes, and that refinements to transfer policy may benefit from consideration of these factors in determining which serious adolescent offenders are most appropriate for transfer. PMID:20204478

  10. Transferring learning from faculty development to the classroom.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kim Z

    2014-12-01

    This study’s purpose was to better understand the transfer of learning by uncovering how various factors supported the integration of health information technology knowledge and skills gleaned from the Health Resources and Services Administration–funded faculty development programs into nursing education curricula. Through interviews with 20 participants from four programs, this study confirmed the importance of findings related to faculty, program, and work environment characteristics for supporting successful transfer of learning and substantiates a variety of other transfer-of-learning research. New or seldom discussed supportive individual characteristics were found, including leadership abilities, lifelong learning, ability to recognize limitations, persistence, creativity, and risk taking. The importance of networking, diversity of perspectives, postconference support, and teams in program designs were found to positively influence transfer. The variety of supportive factors and barriers in the participants’ work environments strengthens the assertions that transfer may be context dependent. Findings provided insight for recommendations to improve learning transfer. PMID:25494191

  11. Liquefied Natural Gas Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Chicago Bridge & Iron Company's tanks and associated piping are parts of system for transferring liquefied natural gas from ship to shore and storing it. LNG is a "cryogenic" fluid meaning that it must be contained and transferred at very low temperatures, about 260 degrees below Fahrenheit. Before the LNG can be pumped from the ship to the storage tanks, the two foot diameter transfer pipes must be cooled in order to avoid difficulties associated with sharp differences of temperature between the supercold fluid and relatively warm pipes. Cooldown is accomplished by sending small steady flow of the cryogenic substance through the pipeline; the rate of flow must be precisely controlled or the transfer line will be subjected to undesirable thermal stress.

  12. Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perliski, Lori

    Because radiative transfer cuts across many scientific disciplines with applications including remote sensing, climate, atmospheric chemistry, and photobiology, there is a need for comprehensive books on this subject that can appeal to a wide readership. While Atmospheric Radiative Transfer takes strides toward filling this niche by addressing a broad range of topics, it is dry reading and suffers from lack of detail. The book was based on a graduate-level course taught at the University of Sciences and Technologies in Lille, France, and indeed, the text reads much like an expanded outline perhaps derived from lecture notes.Part one deals with general radiative transfer, and part two covers Earth's radiation budget, the climate system, and remote sensing techniques. The radiative transfer equation and solutions for absorbing and scattering atmospheres are discussed as are the details of absorption, such as energy levels, line strengths, line intensities, equivalent widths, and weak- and strong-line limits.

  13. Technology transfer methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labotz, Rich

    1991-01-01

    Information on technology transfer methodology is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include problems in economics, technology drivers, inhibitors to using improved technology in development, technology application opportunities, and co-sponsorship of technology.

  14. Technology transfer for adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  15. Principles of tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Coulet, B

    2016-04-01

    Tendon transfers are carried out to restore functional deficits by rerouting the remaining intact muscles. Transfers are highly attractive in the context of hand surgery because of the possibility of restoring the patient's ability to grip. In palsy cases, tendon transfers are only used when a neurological procedure is contraindicated or has failed. The strategy used to restore function follows a common set of principles, no matter the nature of the deficit. The first step is to clearly distinguish between deficient muscles and muscles that could be transferred. Next, the type of palsy will dictate the scope of the program and the complexity of the gripping movements that can be restored. Based on this reasoning, a surgical strategy that matches the means (transferable muscles) with the objectives (functions to restore) will be established and clearly explained to the patient. Every paralyzed hand can be described using three parameters. 1) Deficient segments: wrist, thumb and long fingers; 2) mechanical performance of muscles groups being revived: high energy-wrist extension and finger flexion that require strong transfers with long excursion; low energy-wrist flexion and finger extension movements that are less demanding mechanically, because they can be accomplished through gravity alone in some cases; 3) condition of the two primary motors in the hand: extrinsics (flexors and extensors) and intrinsics (facilitator). No matter the type of palsy, the transfer surgery follows the same technical principles: exposure, release, fixation, tensioning and rehabilitation. By performing an in-depth analysis of each case and by following strict technical principles, tendon transfer surgery leads to reproducible results; this allows the surgeon to establish clear objectives for the patient preoperatively. PMID:27117119

  16. Principles of Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Danielle; Hammert, Warren C

    2016-08-01

    Tendon transfers provide a substitute, either temporary or permanent, when function is lost due to neurologic injury in stroke, cerebral palsy or central nervous system lesions, peripheral nerve injuries, or injuries to the musculotendinous unit itself. This article reviews the basic principles of tendon transfer, which are important when planning surgery and essential for an optimal outcome. In addition, concepts for coapting the tendons during surgery and general principles to be followed during the rehabilitation process are discussed. PMID:27387072

  17. Adaptive transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper details the approach and methodology used to build adaptive transfer functions in a feed-forward Back-Propagation neural network, and provides insight into the structure dependent properties of using non-scaled analog inputs. The results of using adaptive transfer functions are shown to outperform conventional architectures in the implementation of a mechanical power transmission gearbox design expert system knowledge base. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Symbolic transfer entropy.

    PubMed

    Staniek, Matthäus; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2008-04-18

    We propose to estimate transfer entropy using a technique of symbolization. We demonstrate numerically that symbolic transfer entropy is a robust and computationally fast method to quantify the dominating direction of information flow between time series from structurally identical and nonidentical coupled systems. Analyzing multiday, multichannel electroencephalographic recordings from 15 epilepsy patients our approach allowed us to reliably identify the hemisphere containing the epileptic focus without observing actual seizure activity. PMID:18518155

  19. Symbolic Transfer Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniek, Matthäus; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2008-04-01

    We propose to estimate transfer entropy using a technique of symbolization. We demonstrate numerically that symbolic transfer entropy is a robust and computationally fast method to quantify the dominating direction of information flow between time series from structurally identical and nonidentical coupled systems. Analyzing multiday, multichannel electroencephalographic recordings from 15 epilepsy patients our approach allowed us to reliably identify the hemisphere containing the epileptic focus without observing actual seizure activity.

  20. Shielded cells transfer automation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J J

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

  1. [Quality of transfer. Biologist and clinician's point of view].

    PubMed

    Nogueira, D; Isnard, V; Fallet, C

    2010-04-01

    Embryonic transfer is one of the briefest procedures in the long-lasting chain of events occurring during an infertility treatment. Embryo transfer is, however, one of the most crucial steps in assisted reproductive technologies. The realization of this ultimate gesture involves the control of numerous parameters that exert an impact on its success. These various influential factors engage the multidisciplinary team: biologist, clinician... to permanently search for ways to optimize embryo transfer outcome. PMID:20728805

  2. The Improvement on the Xinjiekou Subway Transfer Channel of Nanjing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. D.; Zheng, C. J.

    The subway, which is an effective way to alleviate the traffic congestion, has gradually been constructed in many cities. With the completion of the construction, the transfer station will become the factor that affects the efficiency of the whole transport network. Based on investigation and analysis of the present situation of the passenger flow, the essay will make a prediction with the multiple linear regression and put forward two kinds of transfer channel improvement schemes for xinjiekou transfer station.

  3. Experimental research on heat transfer of pulsating heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Yan, Li

    2008-06-01

    Experimental research was conducted to understand heat transfer characteristic of pulsating heat pipe in this paper, and the PHP is made of high quality glass capillary tube. Under different fill ratio, heat transfer rate and many other influence factors, the flow patterns were observed in the start-up, transition and stable stage. The effects of heating position on heat transfer were discussed. The experimental results indicate that no annular flow appears in top heating condition. Under different fill ratios and heat transfer rate, the flow pattern in PHP is transferred from bulk flow to semi-annular flow and annular flow, and the performance of heat transfer is improved for down heating case. The experimental results indicate that the total heat resistant of PHP is increased with fill ratio, and heat transfer rate achieves optimum at filling rate 50%. But for pulsating heat pipe with changing diameters the thermal resistance is higher than that with uniform diameters.

  4. Controlled environment specimen transfer.

    PubMed

    Damsgaard, Christian D; Zandbergen, Henny; W Hansen, Thomas; Chorkendorff, Ib; B Wagner, Jakob

    2014-08-01

    Specimen transfer under controlled environment conditions, such as temperature, pressure, and gas composition, is necessary to conduct successive complementary in situ characterization of materials sensitive to ambient conditions. The in situ transfer concept is introduced by linking an environmental transmission electron microscope to an in situ X-ray diffractometer through a dedicated transmission electron microscope specimen transfer holder, capable of sealing the specimen in a gaseous environment at elevated temperatures. Two catalyst material systems have been investigated; Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for methanol synthesis and a Co/Al2O3 catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Both systems are sensitive to ambient atmosphere as they will oxidize after relatively short air exposure. The Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, was reduced in the in situ X-ray diffractometer set-up, and subsequently, successfully transferred in a reactive environment to the environmental transmission electron microscope where further analysis on the local scale were conducted. The Co/Al2O3 catalyst was reduced in the environmental microscope and successfully kept reduced outside the microscope in a reactive environment. The in situ transfer holder facilitates complimentary in situ experiments of the same specimen without changing the specimen state during transfer. PMID:24824787

  5. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    ScienceCinema

    Covey, Debra

    2012-08-29

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  6. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  7. Learning Transfer: The Views of Practitioners in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Paul; Darcy, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable expenditure on human resource development (HRD) has not necessarily resulted in a significant impact on organizational performance, and research suggests that the failure to transfer learning may be an important explanation. The search for factors affecting transfer has been extensive, as shown in Grossman and Salas's article in this…

  8. A Model of the Antecedents of Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed Turab, Ghaneemah; Casimir, Gian

    2015-01-01

    Many organizations have invested heavily in training. However, only a small percentage of what is learnt from training is applied or transferred to the workplace. This study examines factors that influence training transfer. A conceptual model based on the Theory of Reasoned Action is hypothesized and tested. The sample consisted of 123 full-time…

  9. High expression hampers horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, Chungoo; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), the movement of genetic material from one species to another, is a common phenomenon in prokaryotic evolution. Although the rate of HGT is known to vary among genes, our understanding of the cause of this variation, currently summarized by two rules, is far from complete. The first rule states that informational genes, which are involved in DNA replication, transcription, and translation, have lower transferabilities than operational genes. The second rule asserts that protein interactivity negatively impacts gene transferability. Here, we hypothesize that high expression hampers HGT, because the fitness cost of an HGT to the recipient, arising from the 1) energy expenditure in transcription and translation, 2) cytotoxic protein misfolding, 3) reduction in cellular translational efficiency, 4) detrimental protein misinteraction, and 5) disturbance of the optimal protein concentration or cell physiology, increases with the expression level of the transferred gene. To test this hypothesis, we examined laboratory and natural HGTs to Escherichia coli. We observed lower transferabilities of more highly expressed genes, even after controlling the confounding factors from the two established rules and the genic GC content. Furthermore, expression level predicts gene transferability better than all other factors examined. We also confirmed the significant negative impact of gene expression on the rate of HGTs to 127 of 133 genomes of eubacteria and archaebacteria. Together, these findings establish the gene expression level as a major determinant of horizontal gene transferability. They also suggest that most successful HGTs are initially slightly deleterious, fixed because of their negligibly low costs rather than high benefits to the recipient. PMID:22436996

  10. Achieving regionalization through rural interhospital transfer.

    PubMed

    Feazel, Leah; Schlichting, Adam B; Bell, Gregory R; Shane, Dan M; Ahmed, Azeemuddin; Faine, Brett; Nugent, Andrew; Mohr, Nicholas M

    2015-09-01

    Regionalization of emergency medical care aims to provide consistent and efficient high-quality care leading to optimal clinical outcomes by matching patient needs with appropriate resources at a network of hospitals. Regionalized care has been shown to improve outcomes in trauma, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiac arrest, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. In rural areas, effective regionalization often requires interhospital transfer. The decision to transfer is complex and includes such factors as capabilities of the presenting hospital; capacity at the receiving hospital; and financial, geographic, and patient-preference considerations. Although transfer to a comprehensive center has proven benefits for some conditions, the transfer process is not without risk. These risks include clinical deterioration, limited resource availability during transport, vehicular crashes, time delays for time-sensitive care, poor communication between providers, and neglect of patient preferences. This article reviews the transfer decision, financial implications, risks, and considerations for patients undergoing rural interhospital transfer. We identify several strategies that should be considered for development of the regionalized emergency health care system of the future and identify areas where further research is necessary. PMID:26087707

  11. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot has been constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors have been found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  12. A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    A reduced volumetric expansion factor plot was constructed for simple fluids which is suitable for engineering computations in heat transfer. Volumetric expansion factors were found useful in correlating heat transfer data over a wide range of operating conditions including liquids, gases and the near critical region.

  13. Heat transfer in energy problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushina, T.; Yang, W. J.

    Results of recent research are presented concerning heat transfer in energy problems, including high-temperature heat transfer, high-flux heat transfer, high-performance heat transfer, heat transfer in nonconventional energy (power and propulsion) systems, and novel heat transfer techniques. Topics discussed include studies of full-coverage film cooling, radiative properties of metals and alloys at high temperature, critical heat flux conditions in high-quality boiling systems, heat transfer characteristics of the evaporation of a liquid droplet on heated surfaces, high-performance surfaces for non-boiling heat transfer, and high performance heat transfer surfaces for boiling and condensation. Also examined are high flux heat transfer in gaseous solid suspension flow, nuclear process heat applications of high temperature heat exchange, heat transfer considerations in the use of new energy resources, and high performance mist-cooled condensers for geothermal binary cycle plants. No individual items are abstracted in this volume

  14. Transfer of nir calibration model for determining fiber content in flax; effects of transfer samples and standardization procedure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transfer of a calibration model for determining fiber content in flax stem was accomplished between two near-infrared spectrometers, which are the same brand but require a standardization. In this paper, three factors including: transfer sample set, spectral type, and standardization method wer...

  15. Tech transfer outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Liebetrau, S.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides an informal summary of the conference workshop sessions. Tech Transfer Outreach '' was originally designed as an opportunity for national laboratory communications and technology transfer staff to become better acquainted and to discuss matters of mutual interest. When DOE field office personnel asked if they could attend, and then when one of our keynote speakers became a participant in the discussions, the actual event grew in importance. The conference participants--the laboratories and DOE representatives from across the nation--worked to brainstorm ideas. Their objective: identify ways to cooperate for effective (and cost-effective) technology transfer outreach. Thus, this proceedings is truly a product of ten national laboratories and DOE, working together. It candidly presents the discussion of issues and the ideas generated by each working group. The issues and recommendations are a consensus of their views.

  16. Orbital Fluid Transfer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. S., (Nick); Ryder, Mel; Tyler, Tony R.

    1998-01-01

    An automated fluid and power interface system needs to be developed for future space missions which require on orbit consumable replenishment. Current method of fluid transfer require manned vehicles and extravehicular activity. Currently the US does not have an automated capability for consumable transfer on-orbit. This technology would benefit both Space Station and long duration satellites. In order to provide this technology the Automated Fluid Interface System (AFIS) was developed. The AFIS project was an advanced development program aimed at developing a prototype satellite servicer for future space operations. This mechanism could transfer propellants, cryogens, fluids, gasses, electrical power, and communications from a tanker unit to the orbiting satellite. The development of this unit was a cooperative effort between Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and Moog, Inc. in East Aurora, New York. An engineering model was built and underwent substantial development testing at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). While the AFIS is not suitable for spaceflight, testing and evaluation of the AFIS provided significant experience which would be beneficial in building a flight unit. The lessons learned from testing the AFIS provided the foundation for the next generation fluid transfer mechanism, the Orbital Fluid Transfer System (OFTS). The OFTS project was a study contract with MSFC and Moog, Inc. The OFTS was designed for the International Space Station (ISS), but its flexible design could used for long duration satellite missions and other applications. The OFTS was designed to be used after docking. The primary function was to transfer bipropellants and high pressure gases. The other items addressed by this task included propellant storage, hardware integration, safety and control system issues. A new concept for high pressure couplings was also developed. The results of the AFIS testing provided an excellent basis for the OFTS design. The OFTS

  17. Block Transfer Agreement Evaluation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastedo, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate for the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) the effectiveness of block transfer agreements (BTAs) in the BC Transfer System and recommend steps to be taken to improve their effectiveness. Findings of this study revealed that institutions want to expand block credit transfer;…

  18. Erotic transference in the male adolescent-female analyst dyad.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, S; Gabbard, G O

    1995-01-01

    Erotic transference involving female analysts and adult male patients has received increased attention in the past ten years. Absent from the literature, however, are any clinical reports concerning erotic transferences of adolescent male patients with female therapists. This paper presents a fragment of a treatment involving an adolescent male patient who developed an erotic transference. The vicissitudes of the transference, as well as his relationship to his mother and father, are discussed from the perspective of developmental conflicts and tasks of adolescence. The countertransference dimensions of this particular gender constellation are also examined from the standpoint of intrapsychic and cultural factors. PMID:7480402

  19. Heat transfer coefficients for drying in pulsating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, S.L.

    1998-05-01

    Pulsating flows generated by a Rijke type combustor are studied for drying of grains and food particles. It is assumed that the velocity fluctuations are the main factor in the enhancement of the drying process. The heat transfer coefficients for drying in vibrating beds are utilized to estimate the heat transfer coefficients of fixed beds in pulsating and permeating flows and are compared to the steady flow heat transfer coefficients obtained for solid porous bodies, after perturbing the main flow. The cases considered are compared to the convective heat transfer coefficients employed in non-pulsating drying.

  20. Making behavioral technology transferable

    PubMed Central

    Pennypacker, H. S.; Hench, Larry L.

    1997-01-01

    The paucity of transferred behavioral technologies is traced to the absence of strategies for developing technology that is transferable, as distinct from strategies for conducting research, whether basic or applied. In the field of engineering, the results of basic research are transformed to candidate technologies that meet standardized criteria with respect to three properties: quantification, repetition, and verification. The technology of vitrification and storage of nuclear waste is used to illustrate the application of these criteria. Examples from behavior analysis are provided, together with suggestions regarding changes in practice that will accelerate the development and application of behavioral technologies. PMID:22478284

  1. Technology transfer issue

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, C.

    1982-05-31

    Testimony by Lawrence J. Brady, Commerce Assistant Secretary for Trade Administration, at Congressional hearings on the national security issues of technology transfers to the Soviet Union identified steps the US needs to take to deal effectively with the problem. These steps include an understanding of how the Soviet Union has and will benefit militarily by acquiring Western technology and efforts to work with other countries, counterintelligence agencies, and industries to stem the flow of technological information. Brady outlined changes in technology development that complicate the enforcement of transfer rules, and emphasized the importance of a close relationship between the business community and the Commerce Department. (DCK)

  2. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James; Baccus, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    The Logistics Reduction (LR) project within the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is tasked with reducing logistical mass and repurposing logistical items. Multipurpose Cargo Transfer Bags (MCTB) have been designed such that they can serve the same purpose as a Cargo Transfer Bag, the suitcase-shaped common logistics carrying bag for Shuttle and the International Space Station. After use as a cargo carrier, a regular CTB becomes trash, whereas the MCTB can be unzipped, unsnapped, and unfolded to be reused. Reuse ideas that have been investigated include partitions, crew quarters, solar radiation storm shelters, acoustic blankets, and forward osmosis water processing.

  3. Departmental technology transfer update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Roger A.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is the following: to provide the perspective of the Department of Energy (DOE); emphasize new and emerging initiatives; and address unresolved issues that might impact successful program implementation. The approach is the following: to provide a brief overview of DOE, its R&D, and its technology transfer assets; to briefly describe the evolution of DOE's enhanced technology transfer program; to report on specific progress and achievements over the past year--as the spring board for our current and future plans; to present our near and longer term plans; and to survey the remaining issues and the resolution process.

  4. Transferring Technology to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenbarger, J. Ken

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology transfer processes in which JPL has been involved to assist in transferring the technology derived from aerospace research and development to industry. California Institute of Technology (CalTech), the organization that runs JPL, is the leading institute in patents for all U.S. universities. There are several mechanisms that are available to JPL to inform industry of these technological advances: (1) a dedicated organization at JPL, National Space Technology Applications (NSTA), (2) Tech Brief Magazine, (3) Spinoff magazine, and (4) JPL publications. There have also been many start-up organizations and businesses from CalTech.

  5. Heat transfer fluids containing nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Routbort, Jules; Routbort, A.J.; Yu, Wenhua; Timofeeva, Elena; Smith, David S.; France, David M.

    2016-05-17

    A nanofluid of a base heat transfer fluid and a plurality of ceramic nanoparticles suspended throughout the base heat transfer fluid applicable to commercial and industrial heat transfer applications. The nanofluid is stable, non-reactive and exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties relative to the base heat transfer fluid, with only minimal increases in pumping power required relative to the base heat transfer fluid. In a particular embodiment, the plurality of ceramic nanoparticles comprise silicon carbide and the base heat transfer fluid comprises water and water and ethylene glycol mixtures.

  6. Mass transfer in composite catalytic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Langhendries, G.; Claessens, R.; Baron, G.V.

    1996-12-31

    The partial oxidation of cyclohexane was studied in a composite polymer-zeolite catalytic membrane reactor. In a first step the equilibrium and mass transfer properties (swelling, diffusion and sorption) of dense composite membranes were examined. The swelling behavior of the crosslinked poly(dimethylsiloxane) network was determined for several solvents and related to the differences between the Hildebrand solubility parameters of solvent and polymer. Time lag experiments, which enable us to measure simultaneously diffusion and partition coefficients, were carried out on a dense poly(dimethylsiloxane) membrane. A mathematical model describing the mass transfer behavior of these catalytic membranes was derived and validated with experimental data. Mass transfer through composite catalytic membranes can be predicted using the properties of pure catalyst and polymer material, and a single tortuosity factor. 9 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Factors That Influence Teacher Attrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    External, employment, and personal factors which influence teacher decisions to stay, leave, or transfer from teaching assignments are discussed, with emphasis on special education teachers. Factors attributed to teacher attrition in urban and rural environments also are briefly reviewed, along with attrition of related services professionals.…

  8. Transfer of Word Meanings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Nancy E.; And Others

    Two studies investigated the degree to which the content of initial learning of a word facilitated transfer of the word meaning to other representations that were near or far, relative to the originally learned form of the word. Subjects in the first study were 40 undergraduate students, who were tested on a list of 13 uncommon words. Results…

  9. Solar Energy: Heat Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat transfer is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The…

  10. Glycolipid transfer proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rhoderick E.; Mattjus, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Glycolipid transfer proteins (GLTPs) are small (24 kD), soluble, ubiquitous proteins characterized by their ability to accelerate the intermembrane transfer of glycolipids in vitro. GLTP specificity encompasses both sphingoid- and glycerol-based glycolipids, but with a strict requirement that the initial sugar residue be beta-linked to the hydrophobic lipid backbone. The 3D protein structures of GLTP reveal liganded structures with unique lipid binding modes. The biochemical properties of GLTP action at the membrane surface have been studied rather comprehensively, but the biological role of GLTP remains enigmatic. What is clear is that GLTP differs distinctly from other known glycolipid-binding proteins, such as nonspecific lipid transfer proteins, lysosomal sphingolipid activator proteins, lectins, lung surfactant proteins as well as other lipid binding/transfer proteins. Based on the unique conformational architecture that targets GLTP to membranes and enables glycolipid binding, GLTP is now considered the prototypical and founding member of a new protein superfamily in eukaryotes. PMID:17320476

  11. Internal Transfer and Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager, Carolyn

    In 1989, a descriptive study was conducted of internal transfer and articulation within the context of two-year branch campuses of four-year institutions. Data were gathered from a survey sent to the chief executive officers (CEO's) of 408 campuses delivering two-year tracks within a four-year college or university. Study findings, based on…

  12. Information Transfer in 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hough, Roger W.

    Results of a recent study of potential demand for electronic information transfer services in 1970-1990 are presented. Projections are made for new services such as electronic mail, remote library browsing, checkless society transactions, video telephone and others, as well as conventional services such as telephone, telegraph and network program…

  13. Decal transfer microfabrication

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Childs, William Robert

    2004-10-19

    A method of making a microstructure includes forming a pattern in a surface of a silicon-containing elastomer, oxidizing the pattern, contacting the pattern with a substrate; and bonding the oxidized pattern and the substrate such that the pattern and the substrate are irreversibly attached. The silicon-containing elastomer may be removably attached to a transfer pad.

  14. Catalysis: Quantifying charge transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Trevor E.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2016-02-01

    Improving the design of catalytic materials for clean energy production requires a better understanding of their electronic properties, which remains experimentally challenging. Researchers now quantify the number of electrons transferred from metal nanoparticles to an oxide support as a function of particle size.

  15. NASP technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Charles

    1992-01-01

    It is the stated goal of this program, the National AeroSpace Plane (NASP) program, to develop and then demonstrate the technologies for single-stage-to-orbit flight and hypersonic cruise with airbreathing primary propulsion and horizontal takeoff and landing. This presentation is concerned with technology transfer in the context of the NASP program.

  16. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

  17. [Transference and group psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Bechelli, Luiz Paulo de C; Santos, Manoel Antônio Dos

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the concept of transference, focusing on its peculiarities in the group context. The nature of the therapeutic situation and the broad freedom given to patients in order to access the unconscious material at their own pace, within a safe environment and with as little censorship as can be managed, transference gradually takes place. Through displacement, the psychotherapist and group members are perceived not as they are, with their real attributes, but as one or more objects that arouse emotions coming from the infant world, more precisely from the collection of deep affective influences. One peculiarity of the group situation when compared to individual psychotherapy is that, in the former, multiple transferences coexist, which group members establish among themselves, enabling a wide range of possible feelings. Both treatment modes share the assumption that unresolved conflicts which stimulated patients to seek for help can be reduced or even abolished through the interpretation and working through of transference, which functions as a process of change throughout the psychotherapy. PMID:16532247

  18. Transfer function matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, H.

    1987-01-01

    Given a multivariable system, it is proved that the numerator matrix N(s) of the transfer function evaluated at any system pole either has unity rank or is a null matrix. It is also shown that N(s) evaluated at any transmission zero of the system has rank deficiency. Examples are given for illustration.

  19. Symbolic local information transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Haruna, T.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the permutation-information theoretic approach has been used in a broad range of research fields. In particular, in the study of high-dimensional dynamical systems, it has been shown that this approach can be effective in characterizing global properties, including the complexity of their spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we show that this approach can also be applied to reveal local spatiotemporal profiles of distributed computations existing at each spatiotemporal point in the system. J. T. Lizier et al. have recently introduced the concept of local information dynamics, which consists of information storage, transfer, and modification. This concept has been intensively studied with regard to cellular automata, and has provided quantitative evidence of several characteristic behaviors observed in the system. In this paper, by focusing on the local information transfer, we demonstrate that the application of the permutation-information theoretic approach, which introduces natural symbolization methods, makes the concept easily extendible to systems that have continuous states. We propose measures called symbolic local transfer entropies, and apply these measures to two test models, the coupled map lattice (CML) system and the Bak-Sneppen model (BS-model), to show their relevance to spatiotemporal systems that have continuous states. In the CML, we demonstrate that it can be successfully used as a spatiotemporal filter to stress a coherent structure buried in the system. In particular, we show that the approach can clearly stress out defect turbulences or Brownian motion of defects from the background, which gives quantitative evidence suggesting that these moving patterns are the information transfer substrate in the spatiotemporal system. We then show that these measures reveal qualitatively different properties from the conventional approach using the sliding window method, and are also robust against external noise. In the BS-model, we demonstrate that

  20. Three pro-nuclei (3PN) incidence factors and clinical outcomes: a retrospective study from the fresh embryo transfer of in vitro fertilization with donor sperm (IVF-D)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingzhao; Zhao, Wanqiu; Xue, Xia; Zhang, Silin; Shi, Wenhao; Shi, Juanzi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the main factors of 3PN incidence and determine whether the presence of 3PN could lead to a worse pregnancy outcome. Methods: This study included 508 IVF-D (in vitro fertilization with donor sperm) cycles from January 2013 to September 2014. The patients were divided into three groups as follows: group 1 included patients with no 3PN zygotes, group 2 included patients with 1%-25% 3PN zygotes and group 3 included patients with > 25% 3PN zygotes. Results: We observed that more retrieved oocytes and higher HCG day peak E2 value could result in 3PN incidence more easily. When the 3PN zygotes rate was > 25%, the percentages of normal fertilization (68.4% and 66.3% and 46.4%, P < 0.001), day 3 grade I+II embryos (41.2% and 38.6% and 25.8%, P < 0.001), day 3 grade I+II+III embryos (68.7% and 65.2% and 61.4%, P = 0.032) and implantation rates (52.1% and 50.8% and 45.4%, P = 0.026) were significantly lower than that in the other two groups respectively. The pregnancy rate was lower in 3PN > 25% group than that in the other two groups but there was no significant difference (65.2% and 66.7% and 55.6%, P = 0.266). The cleavage (98.3% and 97.2% and 98.2%, P = 0.063) and early abortion (7.1% and 8.0% and 8.6%, P = 0.930) rate were identical among three groups. Conclusions: More retrieved oocytes and higher HCG day peak E2 value could result in 3PN incidence more easily. Interestingly, normal fertilization rate, day-3 grade I+II embryos rate, day-3 grade I+II+III embryos rate and implantation rate were significantly lower in IVF-D cycles with a 3PN incidence of > 25%. The number of day-3 grade I+II embryos might be a key factor for pregnancy in IVF-D cycles with a 3PN incidence of > 25%. PMID:26550358

  1. The For-Profit Transfer Path: A Comparison of California Community College Transfer Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ommeren, Alice

    2011-01-01

    The results of this study determined that community college students who transfer to for-profit institutions are indeed different from students who follow traditional routes defined as public and non-profit institutions. This study compares the demographic characteristics, academic experiences, and socioeconomic factors of California community…

  2. Transfer Velocity Project: Key Findings on Student Transfer in California Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research and Planning Group for California Community Colleges (RP Group), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Which factors promote student transfer from California Community Colleges (CCC) to baccalaureate-granting institutions? How do community college practices support this transition? Which student behaviors and characteristics particularly facilitate their movement to four-year colleges and universities? The Research and Planning Group for California…

  3. Electron transfer kinetics in molecular photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimer, Todd Anthony

    1997-11-01

    Solar energy devices based on the sensitization of nanostructured titanium dioxide semiconductors have proven to be efficient converters of photons into electricity. However, many questions remain concerning the factors which govern conversion efficiency, stability, and photovoltage in these molecular level devices. The energetics and kinetics of electron transfer at the semiconductor/sensitizer interface play a critical role in solar cell photoelectrochemical properties. Through electrochemical and spectroscopic techniques the kinetics of the interfacial electron transfer processes have been measured. The kinetics are in general complex, and various models based on distributions of first order reaction rates or higher order reactions have been used to describe the experimental observations. The unique molecular nature of these devices allows the energy levels involved in electron transfer to be tuned through synthetic modification of the sensitizer. Systematic studies of chemically related sensitizers allow conclusions to be drawn about the factors which govern interfacial electron transfer processes and therefore determine the photoelectrochemical properties of the device. Hopefully, this thesis presents a foundation of knowledge which can successfully direct future development of sensitizers and semiconductors for efficient conversion of light to electricity.

  4. Technology transfer within the government

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Carissa Bryce

    1992-01-01

    The report of a workshop panel concerned with technology transfer within the government is presented. The suggested subtopics for the panel were as follows: (1) transfer from non-NASA U.S. government technology developers to NASA space missions/programs; and (2) transfer from NASA to other U.S. government civil space mission programs. Two presentations were made to the panel: Roles/Value of Early Strategic Planning Within the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) to Facilitate Later Technology Transfer To and From Industry; and NOAA Satellite Programs and Technology Requirements. The panel discussion addresses the following major issues: DOD/NASA cooperation; alternative mechanisms for interagency communication and interactions; current technology transfer relationships among federal research agencies, and strategies for improving this transfer; technology transfer mechanisms appropriate to intragovernment transfer; the importance of industry as a technology transfer conduit; and measures of merit.

  5. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiz G P; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo T

    2013-10-29

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate, which needs to be removed afterward. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied in this work, including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate's hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate current processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene. PMID:24127582

  6. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Luiz G. P.; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate, which needs to be removed afterward. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied in this work, including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate’s hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate current processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene. PMID:24127582

  7. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimenta, Luiz Gustavo; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo

    2014-03-01

    We explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate's hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate present processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications of CVD graphene can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene.

  8. Heat transfer behavior of molten nitrate salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Apurba K.; Clark, Michael M.; Teigen, Bard C.; Fiveland, Woodrow A.; Anderson, Mark H.

    2016-05-01

    The usage of molten nitrate salt as heat transfer fluid and thermal storage medium decouples the generation of electricity from the variable nature of the solar resource, allowing CSP plants to avoid curtailment and match production with demand. This however brings some unique challenges for the design of the molten salt central receiver (MSCR). An aspect critical to the use of molten nitrate (60wt%/40wt% - NaNO3/KNO3) salt as heat transfer fluid in the MSCR is to understand its heat transfer behavior. Alstom collaborated with the University of Wisconsin to conduct a series of experiments and experimentally determined the heat transfer coefficients of molten nitrate salt up to high Reynolds number (Re > 2.0E5) and heat flux (q″ > 1000 kW/m2), conditions heretofore not reported in the literature. A cartridge heater instrumented with thermocouples was installed inside a stainless steel pipe to form an annular test section. The test section was installed in the molten salt flow loop at the University of Wisconsin facility, and operated over a range of test conditions to determine heat transfer data that covered the expected operating regime of a practical molten salt receiver. Heat transfer data were compared to widely accepted correlations found in heat transfer literature, including that of Gnielinski. At lower Reynolds number conditions, the results from this work concurred with the molten salt heat transfer data reported in literature and followed the aforementioned correlations. However, in the region of interest for practical receiver design, the correlations did not accurately model the experimentally determined heat transfer data. Two major effects were observed: (i) all other factors remaining constant, the Nusselt numbers gradually plateaued at higher Reynolds number; and (ii) at higher Reynolds number a positive interaction of heat flux on Nusselt number was noted. These effects are definitely not modeled by the existing correlations. In this paper a new

  9. Cryogenic Fluid Transfer for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses current plans and issues for exploration that involve the use of cryogenic transfer. The benefits of cryogenic transfer to exploration missions are examined. The current state of the art of transfer technology is reviewed. Mission concepts of operation for exploration are presented, and used to qualitatively discuss the performance benefits of transfer. The paper looks at the challenges faced to implement a cryogenic transfer system and suggest approaches to address them with advanced development research. Transfer rates required for exploration are shown to have already been achieved in ground test. Cost effective approaches to the required on-orbit demonstration are suggested.

  10. Cryogenic Fluid Transfer for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses current plans and issues for exploration that involve the use of cryogenic transfer. The benefits of cryogenic transfer to exploration missions are examined. The current state of the art of transfer technology is reviewed. Mission concepts of operation for exploration are presented, and used to qualitatively discuss the performance benefits of transfer. The paper looks at the challenges faced to implement a cryogenic transfer system and suggest approaches to address them with advanced development research. Transfer rates required for exploration are shown to have already been achieved in ground test. Cost-effective approaches to the required on-orbit demonstration are suggested.

  11. Satellite system considerations for computer data transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. L.; Kaul, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    Communications satellites will play a key role in the transmission of computer generated data through nationwide networks. This paper examines critical aspects of satellite system design as they relate to the computer data transfer task. In addition, it discusses the factors influencing the choice of error control technique, modulation scheme, multiple-access mode, and satellite beam configuration based on an evaluation of system requirements for a broad range of application areas including telemetry, terminal dialog, and bulk data transmission.

  12. Swipe transfer assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, Robert M.; Mills, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The swipe transfer assembly is a mechanical assembly which is used in conjunction with glove boxes and other sealed containments. It is used to pass small samples into or out of glove boxes without an open breach of the containment, and includes a rotational cylinder inside a fixed cylinder, the inside cylinder being rotatable through an arc of approximately 240.degree. relative to the outer cylinder. An offset of 120.degree. from end to end allows only one port to be opened at a time. The assembly is made of stainless steel or aluminum and clear acrylic plastic to enable visual observation. The assembly allows transfer of swipes and smears from radiological and other specially controlled environments.

  13. CURRENT TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    DOEpatents

    Watt, D.A.

    1956-07-01

    A current transfer system is described for transferring current between a rotating member and a co-axial stationary member. The particular area of application for the invention is in connection with homopolar generators where a low voltage and high current are generated. The current tramsfer system of the invention comprises a rotor member and a co-axial stator member wherein one of the members is shaped to provide a circumferential surface concave in section and the other member is shaped to have a peripheral portion in close proximity to the surface, whereby a liquid metal can be stably supported between the two members when they are moving relative to one another to establish an electrical conducting path between the members.

  14. Technology transfer program: Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toyshov, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Most of NASA's technology transfer activities are in the area of land use (development, suitability, and planning); forestry (including wildlife and range and vegetation inventories) agriculture related activities; and water resources. The technology dissemination function is exercised through three regional applications centers which are involved in 91 applications projects within 22 states. In addition there are approximately eight application system verification transfer (ASVT) projects, 21 university applications branches, institutionalized liason activities with public interest groups, and user requirements activities. As the result of budget cuts, the ASVT and user requirements and awareness programs are to be phased out at the end of FY81. The university applications programs are to be phased down and terminated by 1985. NASA will continue to work with the user more in an R & D and an applications development capacity, and not in a national scale or administrative way.

  15. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  16. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics.

  17. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer.

    PubMed

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  18. Wireless power transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2016-02-23

    A system includes a first stage of an inductive power transfer system with an LCL load resonant converter with a switching section, an LCL tuning circuit, and a primary receiver pad. The IPT system includes a second stage with a secondary receiver pad, a secondary resonant circuit, a secondary rectification circuit, and a secondary decoupling converter. The secondary receiver pad connects to the secondary resonant circuit. The secondary resonant circuit connects to the secondary rectification circuit. The secondary rectification circuit connects to the secondary decoupling converter. The second stage connects to a load. The load includes an energy storage element. The second stage and load are located on a vehicle and the first stage is located at a fixed location. The primary receiver pad wirelessly transfers power to the secondary receiver pad across a gap when the vehicle positions the secondary receiver pad with respect to the primary receiver pad.

  19. Technology Transfer and Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Katherine; Chapman, Diane; Giffith, Melanie; Molnar, Darwin

    2001-01-01

    During concurrent sessions for Materials and Structures for High Performance and Emissions Reduction, the UEET Intellectual Property Officer and the Technology Commercialization Specialist will discuss the UEET Technology Transfer and Commercialization goals and efforts. This will include a review of the Technology Commercialization Plan for UEET and what UEET personnel are asked to do to further the goals of the Plan. The major goal of the Plan is to define methods for how UEET assets can best be infused into industry. The National Technology Transfer Center will conduct a summary of its efforts in assessing UEET technologies in the areas of materials and emissions reduction for commercial potential. NTTC is assisting us in completing an inventory and prioritization by commercialization potential. This will result in increased exposure of UEET capabilities to the private sector. The session will include audience solicitation of additional commercializable technologies.

  20. Training Transfer between CD-ROM Based Instruction and Traditional Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Gregory C.; Lim, Doo H.; Zulauf, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Many research studies on the effect of organizational factors on training transfer have been conducted, but few studies have considered the effect that different training delivery methods have on training transfer. This study sought to identify if there is any difference in the perceived transfer of training between traditional classroom…

  1. Do Institutional Characteristics Matter in Two- to Four-Year Transfer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Po

    This paper aims to estimate the effects of individual and institutional factors on college transfer. The author used logistic transgression to estimate the probability of transfer. The author assumes the probability of transfer from a two-year institution to a four-year institution is a function of student characteristics, type of institution in…

  2. Algebra Teachers' Utilization of Problems Requiring Transfer between Algebraic, Numeric, and Graphic Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Robert F.

    2005-01-01

    For students to develop an understanding of functions, they must have opportunities to solve problems that require them to transfer between algebraic, numeric, and graphic representations (transfer problems). Research has confirmed student difficulties with certain types of transfer problems and has suggested instructional factors as a possible…

  3. The Role of Teams, Culture, and Capacity in the Transfer of Organizational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Leyland M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Transferring organizational practices requires an understanding not only of what is being transferred but also of what is needed to ensure that the transfer is successful. In line with this thinking, the purpose of this study is to examine three factors that are crucial parts of this mechanism: use of teams, culture, and capacity.…

  4. A Tale of Two Terms: Exploring Differences between Spring and Fall Transfer Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlick, Renee A.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to explore what factors contribute to transfer student success and attempted to create a model using logistic regression to help predict likeliness of transfer student success. Using a sample that included all students who transferred to Colorado State University from a regionally accredited US institution between fall 2007 and…

  5. Goals, Family, and Community: What Drives Tribal College Transfer Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makomenaw, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This article examines success factors for American Indian tribal college students who transfer to 4-year predominantly White institutions. The study examined the experiences of 8 tribal college transfer students to Midwest universities. Using an indigenous methodology, 3 themes were found to help American Indian tribal college transfer students…

  6. One-way radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rodríguez, Pedro; Ilan, Boaz; Kim, Arnold D.

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the one-way radiative transfer equation (RTE) for modeling the transmission of a light beam incident normally on a slab composed of a uniform forward-peaked scattering medium. Unlike the RTE, which is formulated as a boundary value problem, the one-way RTE is formulated as an initial value problem. Consequently, the one-way RTE is much easier to solve. We discuss the relation of the one-way RTE to the Fokker-Planck, small-angle, and Fermi pencil beam approximations. Then, we validate the one-way RTE through systematic comparisons with RTE simulations for both the Henyey-Greenstein and screened Rutherford scattering phase functions over a broad range of albedo, anisotropy factor, optical thickness, and refractive index values. We find that the one-way RTE gives very good approximations for a broad range of optical property values for thin to moderately thick media that have moderately to sharply forward-peaked scattering. Specifically, we show that the error made by the one-way RTE decreases monotonically as the anisotropic factor increases and as the albedo increases. On the other hand, the error increases monotonically as the optical thickness increases and the refractive index mismatch at the boundary increases.

  7. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  8. Technology Transfer Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Since its inception, Goddard has pursued a commitment to technology transfer and commercialization. For every space technology developed, Goddard strives to identify secondary applications. Goddard then provides the technologies, as well as NASA expertise and facilities, to U.S. companies, universities, and government agencies. These efforts are based in Goddard's Technology Commercialization Office. This report presents new technologies, commercialization success stories, and other Technology Commercialization Office activities in 1999.

  9. Plastic container bagless transfer

    DOEpatents

    Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

    2003-11-18

    A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

  10. Technology transfer initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) technology transfer activities with the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the period of April 1993 through December 1993. Early in 1993, the MSFC/TUO and UAH conceived of the concept of developing stand-alone, integrated data packages on MSFC technology that would serve industrial needs previously determined to be critical. Furthermore, after reviewing over 500 problem statements received by MSFC, it became obvious that many of these requests could be satisfied by a standard type of response. As a result, UAH has developed two critical area response (CAR) packages: CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) replacements and modular manufacturing and simulation. Publicity included news releases, seminars, articles and conference papers. The Huntsville Chamber of Commerce established the Technology Transfer Subcommittee with the charge to identify approaches for the Chamber to assist its members, as well as non-members, access to the technologies at the federal laboratories in North Alabama. The Birmingham Chamber of Commerce has expressed interest in establishing a similar technology transfer program. This report concludes with a section containing a tabulation of the problem statements, including CAR packages, submitted to MSFC from January 1992 through December 1993.

  11. Imino Transfer Hydrogenation Reductions.

    PubMed

    Wills, Martin

    2016-04-01

    This review contains a summary of recent developments in the transfer hydrogenation of C=N bonds, with a particularly focus on reports from within the last 10 years and asymmetric transformations. However, earlier work in the area is also discussed in order to provide context for the more recent results described. I focus strongly on the Ru/TsDPEN class of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reactions originally reported by Noyori et al., together with examples of their applications, particularly to medically valuable target molecules. The recent developments in the area of highly active imine-reduction catalysts, notably those based on iridium, are also described in some detail. I discuss diastereoselective reduction methods as a route to the synthesis of chiral amines using transfer hydrogenation. The recent development of a methodology for positioning reduction complexes within chiral proteins, permitting the generation of asymmetric reduction products through a directed modification of the protein environment in a controlled manner, is also discussed. PMID:27573139

  12. The Orthogonal Transfer CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonry, J.; Burke, Barry E.; Schechter, Paul L.

    1997-10-01

    We have designed and built a new type of CCD that we call an orthogonal transfer CCD (OTCCD), which permits parallel clocking horizontally as well as vertically. The device has been used successfully to remove image motion caused by atmospheric turbulence at rates up to 100 Hz, and promises to be a better, cheaper way to carry out image motion correction for imaging than by using fast tip/tilt mirrors. We report on the device characteristics, and find that the large number of transfers needed to track image motion does not significantly degrade the image either because of charge transfer inefficiency or because of charge traps. For example, after 100 sec of tracking at 100 Hz approximately 3% of the charge would diffuse into a skirt around the point spread function. Four nights of data at the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT (MDM) 2.4-m telescope also indicate that the atmosphere is surprisingly benign, in terms of both the speed and coherence angle of image motion. Image motion compensation improved image sharpness by about 0.5'' in quadrature with no degradation over a field of at least 3 arcminutes. (SECTION: Astronomical Instrumentation)

  13. Model wall and recovery temperature effects on experimental heat transfer data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.; Stone, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    Basic analytical procedures are used to illustrate, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the relative impact upon heat transfer data analysis of certain factors which may affect the accuracy of experimental heat transfer data. Inaccurate knowledge of adiabatic wall conditions results in a corresponding inaccuracy in the measured heat transfer coefficient. The magnitude of the resulting error is extreme for data obtained at wall temperatures approaching the adiabatic condition. High model wall temperatures and wall temperature gradients affect the level and distribution of heat transfer to an experimental model. The significance of each of these factors is examined and its impact upon heat transfer data analysis is assessed.

  14. Review of Orbital Propellant Transfer Techniques and the Feasibility of a Thermal Bootstrap Propellant Transfer Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshikawa, H. H.; Madison, I. B.

    1971-01-01

    This study was performed in support of the NASA Task B-2 Study Plan for Space Basing. The nature of space-based operations implies that orbital transfer of propellant is a prime consideration. The intent of this report is (1) to report on the findings and recommendations of existing literature on space-based propellant transfer techniques, and (2) to determine possible alternatives to the recommended methods. The reviewed literature recommends, in general, the use of conventional liquid transfer techniques (i.e., pumping) in conjunction with an artificially induced gravitational field. An alternate concept that was studied, the Thermal Bootstrap Transfer Process, is based on the compression of a two-phase fluid with subsequent condensation to a liquid (vapor compression/condensation). This concept utilizes the intrinsic energy capacities of the tanks and propellant by exploiting temperature differentials and available energy differences. The results indicate the thermodynamic feasibility of the Thermal Bootstrap Transfer Process for a specific range of tank sizes, temperatures, fill-factors and receiver tank heat transfer coefficients.

  15. Effects of nonlocality on transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Luke

    Nuclear reactions play a key role in the study of nuclei away from stability. Single-nucleon transfer reactions involving deuterons provide an exceptional tool to study the single-particle structure of nuclei. Theoretically, these reactions are attractive as they can be cast into a three-body problem composed of a neutron, proton, and the target nucleus. Optical potentials are a common ingredient in reactions studies. Traditionally, nucleon-nucleus optical potentials are made local for convenience. The effects of nonlocal potentials have historically been included approximately by applying a correction factor to the solution of the corresponding equation for the local equivalent interaction. This is usually referred to as the Perey correction factor. In this thesis, we have systematically investigated the effects of nonlocality on (p,d) and (d,p) transfer reactions, and the validity of the Perey correction factor. We implemented a method to solve the single channel nonlocal equation for both bound and scattering states. We also developed an improved formalism for nonlocal interactions that includes deuteron breakup in transfer reactions. This new formalism, the nonlocal adiabatic distorted wave approximation, was used to study the effects of including nonlocality consistently in ( d,p) transfer reactions. For the (p,d) transfer reactions, we solved the nonlocal scattering and bound state equations using the Perey-Buck type interaction, and compared to local equivalent calculations. Using the distorted wave Born approximation we construct the T-matrix for (p,d) transfer on 17O, 41Ca, 49Ca, 127 Sn, 133Sn, and 209Pb at 20 and 50 MeV. Additionally we studied (p,d) reactions on 40Ca using the the nonlocal dispersive optical model. We have also included nonlocality consistently into the adiabatic distorted wave approximation and have investigated the effects of nonlocality on on (d,p) transfer reactions for deuterons impinged on 16O, 40Ca, 48Ca, 126Sn, 132Sn, 208Pb at 10

  16. Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio From Elastic e + p -> e + p Scattering at Momentum Transfer Q2 = 2.5, 5.2, 6.7 and 8.5 (GeV/c)2

    SciTech Connect

    Mkrtchyan, Arthur

    2012-05-31

    experiment show that GEp/GMp ratio continued to drop with Q2 and may cross 'zero' at Q2 > 10-15 (GeV/c)2. Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton form factor ratio GEp/GMp obtained from cross section and polarization measurements. It was assumed that the two photon exchange contribution might be responsible for difference of GEp/GMp ratio obtained by Rosenbluth separation method and recoil polarization technique. The kinematical dependence of polarization transfer observables in elastic electron-proton scattering at Q2 = 2.5 (GeV/c)2 have been used in search of effects of 2γ contribution. For a wide range of values of the virtual photon polarization Σ (Σ = 0.15, 0.63, and 0.77), the proton form factor ratio and longitudinal polarization transfer component were measured with statistical uncertainties of ±0.01 and ±0.005, respectively. Our data provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure.

  17. Analytic Couple Modeling Introducing Device Design Factor, Fin Factor, Thermal Diffusivity Factor, and Inductance Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A set of convenient thermoelectric device solutions have been derived in order to capture a number of factors which are previously only resolved with numerical techniques. The concise conversion efficiency equations derived from governing equations provide intuitive and straight-forward design guidelines. These guidelines allow for better device design without requiring detailed numerical modeling. The analytical modeling accounts for factors such as i) variable temperature boundary conditions, ii) lateral heat transfer, iii) temperature variable material properties, and iv) transient operation. New dimensionless parameters, similar to the figure of merit, are introduced including the device design factor, fin factor, thermal diffusivity factor, and inductance factor. These new device factors allow for the straight-forward description of phenomenon generally only captured with numerical work otherwise. As an example a device design factor of 0.38, which accounts for thermal resistance of the hot and cold shoes, can be used to calculate a conversion efficiency of 2.28 while the ideal conversion efficiency based on figure of merit alone would be 6.15. Likewise an ideal couple with efficiency of 6.15 will be reduced to 5.33 when lateral heat is accounted for with a fin factor of 1.0.

  18. Technology Transfer Network and Affiliations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Technology Transfer Partnership program sponsors a number of organizations around the country that are designed to assist U.S. businesses in accessing, utilizing, and commercializing NASA-funded research and technology. These organizations work closely with the Technology Transfer Offices, located at each of the 10 NASA field centers, providing a full range of technology transfer and commercialization services and assistance.

  19. Mass Transfer with Chemical Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoursey, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the organization of a graduate course dealing with mass transfer, particularly as it relates to chemical reactions. Discusses the course outline, including mathematics models of mass transfer, enhancement of mass transfer rates by homogeneous chemical reaction, and gas-liquid systems with chemical reaction. (TW)

  20. Teaching Mathematics Understandings for Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jennifer L.; Jones, Karrie A.; Vermette, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Promoting student understanding for transfer is an illusive hallmark of effective mathematics instruction. While much research has shown the necessity of promoting understanding for transfer, less attention has been paid to actual pedagogical strategies that can be used to promote transfer of mathematical ideas. Using Fogarty et al. (1992, "How to…

  1. Radiant heat transfer from storage casks to the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R W; Hovingh, J; Thomas, G R

    1999-05-10

    A spent fuel storage cask must efficiently transfer the heat released by the fuel assemblies through the cask walls to the environment. This heat must be transferred through passive means, limiting the energy transfer mechanisms from the cask to natural convection and radiation heat transfer.. Natural convection is essentially independent of the characteristics of the array of casks, provided there is space between casks to permit a convection loop. Radiation heat transfer, however, depends on the geometric arrangement of the array of casks because the peripheral casks will shadow the interior casks and restrict radiant heat transfer from all casks to the environment. The shadowing of one cask by its neighbors is determined by a view factor that represents the fraction of radiant energy that leaves the surface of a cask and reaches the environment. This paper addresses the evaluation of the view factor between a centrally located spent fuel storage cask and the environment. By combining analytic expressions for the view factor of (1) infinitely long cylinders and (2) finite cylinders with a length-to-diameter ratio of 2 to represent spent fuel storage casks, the view factor can be evaluated for any practical array of spent fuel storage casks.

  2. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  3. Material Balance Assessment for Double-Shell Tank Waste Pipeline Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.; Hartley, Stacey A.; Enderlin, Carl W.

    2001-03-12

    PNNL developed a material balance assessment methodology based on conservation of mass for detecting leaks and mis-routings in pipeline transfer of double-shell tank waste at Hanford. The main factors causing uncertainty in these transfers are variable property and tank conditions of density, existence of crust, and surface disturbance due to mixer pump operation during the waste transfer. The methodology was applied to three waste transfers from Tanks AN-105 and AZ-102.

  4. The role of the University Licensing Office in transferring intellectual property to industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Universities in the US have a significant impact on business through the transfer of technology. This transfer of technology takes various forms, including faculty communications, faculty consulting activities, and the direct transfer of technology through the licensing of patents, copyrights, and other intellectual property to industry. The topics discussed include the following: background of the MIT Technology Licensing Office (TLO), goals of the MIT TLO, MIT's technology transfer philosophy, and important factors for success in new company formation.

  5. Thermal Spin Transfer Torques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerrit

    2009-03-01

    The coupling between spin and charge in electronic transport is studied in the field of spintronics. Heat currents are coupled to both charge and spin currents as well [1]. This extension of spintronics to what may be called ``spin caloritronics'' recently enjoys renewed attention [2]. The spin-transfer torque associated with electric currents can excite magnetizations in nanostructures, switching magnetic configuration in spin valves and move domain walls in magnetic wires when exceeding critical values of the order of 10^7Acm-2 [3]. Also heat currents transfer spin angular momentum [4], either intrinsically or via the thermoelectric generation of particle spin currents. We predict that temperature differences of the order of 100 K over typical metallic nanostructures cause effects equivalent to the critical charge current densities. In this talk I will give a brief review of various aspects of spin caloritronics with emphasis on thermal spin transfer torques. This work has been carried out in collaboration with Moosa Hatami, Qinfang Zhang, Paul Kelly, Hans Joakim Skadsem, Arne Brataas and Sadamichi Maekawa. [4pt] [1] M. Johnson and R.H. Silsbee, Phys. Rev. B 35, 4959 (1987).[0pt] [2] International Workshop on Spin Caloritronics, Lorentz Center of Leiden University, 9-13 February 2009, http://www.lorentzcenter.nl/lc/web/2009/323/info.php3?wsid=323[0pt] [3] D. C. Ralph and M. D. Stiles, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 320, 1190 (2008).[0pt] [4] M. Hatami, G.E.W. Bauer, Q. Zhang, and P.J. Kelly, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 066603 (2007).

  6. Enabling cleanup technology transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Ditmars, J. D.

    2002-08-12

    Technology transfer in the environmental restoration, or cleanup, area has been challenging. While there is little doubt that innovative technologies are needed to reduce the times, risks, and costs associated with the cleanup of federal sites, particularly those of the Departments of Energy (DOE) and Defense, the use of such technologies in actual cleanups has been relatively limited. There are, of course, many reasons why technologies do not reach the implementation phase or do not get transferred from developing entities to the user community. For example, many past cleanup contracts provided few incentives for performance that would compel a contractor to seek improvement via technology applications. While performance-based contracts are becoming more common, they alone will not drive increased technology applications. This paper focuses on some applications of cleanup methodologies and technologies that have been successful and are illustrative of a more general principle. The principle is at once obvious and not widely practiced. It is that, with few exceptions, innovative cleanup technologies are rarely implemented successfully alone but rather are implemented in the context of enabling processes and methodologies. And, since cleanup is conducted in a regulatory environment, the stage is better set for technology transfer when the context includes substantive interactions with the relevant stakeholders. Examples of this principle are drawn from Argonne National Laboratory's experiences in Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Programs (ASAPs), Precise Excavation, and the DOE Technology Connection (TechCon) Program. The lessons learned may be applicable to the continuing challenges posed by the cleanup and long-term stewardship of radioactive contaminants and unexploded ordnance (UXO) at federal sites.

  7. Thermal flux transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freggens, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A thermal flux transfer system for use in maintaining the thrust chamber of an operative reaction motor at given temperatures is described. The system is characterized by an hermetically sealed chamber surrounding a thrust chamber to be cooled, with a plurality of parallel, longitudinally spaced, disk-shaped wick members formed of a metallic mesh and employed in delivering a working fluid, in its liquid state, radially toward the thrust chamber and delivering the working fluid, in its vapor state, away from the nozzle for effecting a cooling of the nozzle, in accordance with known principles of an operating heat pipe.

  8. Adaptive Transfer Function Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. |

    1993-06-01

    Real-time pattern classification and time-series forecasting applications continue to drive artificial neural network (ANN) technology. As ANNs increase in complexity, the throughput of digital computer simulations decreases. A novel ANN, the Adaptive Transfer Function Network (ATF-Net), directly addresses the issue of throughput. ATF-Nets are global mapping equations generated by the superposition of ensembles of neurodes having arbitrary continuous functions receiving encoded input data. ATF-Nets may be implemented on parallel digital computers. An example is presented which illustrates a four-fold increase in computational throughput.

  9. Adaptive Transfer Function Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, J.R. Portland State Univ., OR . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    Real-time pattern classification and time-series forecasting applications continue to drive artificial neural network (ANN) technology. As ANNs increase in complexity, the throughput of digital computer simulations decreases. A novel ANN, the Adaptive Transfer Function Network (ATF-Net), directly addresses the issue of throughput. ATF-Nets are global mapping equations generated by the superposition of ensembles of neurodes having arbitrary continuous functions receiving encoded input data. ATF-Nets may be implemented on parallel digital computers. An example is presented which illustrates a four-fold increase in computational throughput.

  10. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  11. ENERGY-TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    DOEpatents

    Thonemann, P.C.; Cowhig, W.T.; Davenport, P.A.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to the transfer of energy in a traveling electromagnetic wave to direct-current electrical energy in a gaseous medium. The traveling wave is generated by means of a radio-frequency oscillator connected across a capacitance-loaded helix wound around a sealed tube enclosing the gaseous medium. The traveling wave causes the electrons within the medium to drift towards one end of the tube. The direct current appearing across electrodes placed at each end of the tube is then used by some electrical means. (AEC)

  12. Lipid-transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiujuan

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) are basic proteins found in abundance in higher plants. LTPs play lots of roles in plants such as participation in cutin formation, embryogenesis, defense reactions against phytopathogens, symbiosis, and the adaptation of plants to various environmental conditions. In addition, LTPs from field mustard and Chinese daffodil exhibit antiproliferative activity against human cancer cells. LTPs from chili pepper and coffee manifest inhibitory activity against fungi pathogenic to humans such as Candida species. The intent of this article is to review LTPs in the plant kingdom. PMID:23193591

  13. Transferring heat during a bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiri, Samira; Bird, James

    2015-11-01

    When a hot liquid drop impacts a cold non-wetting surface, the temperature difference drives heat transfer. If the drop leaves the surface before reaching thermal equilibrium, the amount of heat transfer may depend on the contact time. Past studies exploring finite-time heat exchange with droplets focus on the Leidenfrost condition where heat transfer is regulated by a thin layer of vapor. Here, we present systematic experiments to measure the heat transferred by a bouncing droplet in non-Leidenfrost conditions. We propose a physical model of this heat transfer and compare our model to the experiments.

  14. Heat transfer in aeropropulsion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1985-07-01

    Aeropropulsion heat transfer is reviewed. A research methodology based on a growing synergism between computations and experiments is examined. The aeropropulsion heat transfer arena is identified as high Reynolds number forced convection in a highly disturbed environment subject to strong gradients, body forces, abrupt geometry changes and high three dimensionality - all in an unsteady flow field. Numerous examples based on heat transfer to the aircraft gas turbine blade are presented to illustrate the types of heat transfer problems which are generic to aeropropulsion systems. The research focus of the near future in aeropropulsion heat transfer is projected.

  15. Heat transfer in aeropropulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneau, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Aeropropulsion heat transfer is reviewed. A research methodology based on a growing synergism between computations and experiments is examined. The aeropropulsion heat transfer arena is identified as high Reynolds number forced convection in a highly disturbed environment subject to strong gradients, body forces, abrupt geometry changes and high three dimensionality - all in an unsteady flow field. Numerous examples based on heat transfer to the aircraft gas turbine blade are presented to illustrate the types of heat transfer problems which are generic to aeropropulsion systems. The research focus of the near future in aeropropulsion heat transfer is projected.

  16. Monitoring data transfer latency in CMS computing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacorsi, D.; Diotalevi, T.; Magini, N.; Sartirana, A.; Taze, M.; Wildish, T.

    2015-12-01

    During the first LHC run, the CMS experiment collected tens of Petabytes of collision and simulated data, which need to be distributed among dozens of computing centres with low latency in order to make efficient use of the resources. While the desired level of throughput has been successfully achieved, it is still common to observe transfer workflows that cannot reach full completion in a timely manner due to a small fraction of stuck files which require operator intervention. For this reason, in 2012 the CMS transfer management system, PhEDEx, was instrumented with a monitoring system to measure file transfer latencies, and to predict the completion time for the transfer of a data set. The operators can detect abnormal patterns in transfer latencies while the transfer is still in progress, and monitor the long-term performance of the transfer infrastructure to plan the data placement strategy. Based on the data collected for one year with the latency monitoring system, we present a study on the different factors that contribute to transfer completion time. As case studies, we analyze several typical CMS transfer workflows, such as distribution of collision event data from CERN or upload of simulated event data from the Tier-2 centres to the archival Tier-1 centres. For each workflow, we present the typical patterns of transfer latencies that have been identified with the latency monitor. We identify the areas in PhEDEx where a development effort can reduce the latency, and we show how we are able to detect stuck transfers which need operator intervention. We propose a set of metrics to alert about stuck subscriptions and prompt for manual intervention, with the aim of improving transfer completion times.

  17. A Probe into the Negative Writing Transfer of Chinese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Xiaojun; Niao, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Although Chinese college students have studied English for many years, they still have much difficulty in writing a good paper. There are many factors resulting in their inability to write well, such as students' lack of vocabulary, having a poor knowledge of grammar, language transfer, and so on. But, of these factors, the negative transfer of…

  18. Gene Transfer Strategies to Promote Chondrogenesis and Cartilage Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Gene transfer has been used experimentally to promote chondrogenesis and cartilage regeneration. While it is controversial to apply gene therapy for nonlethal conditions such as cartilage defect, there is a possibility that the transfer of therapeutic transgenes may dramatically increase the effectiveness of cell therapy and reduce the quantity of cells that are needed to regenerate cartilage. Single or combination of growth factors and transcription factors has been transferred to mesenchymal stem cells or articular chondrocytes using both nonviral and viral approaches. The current challenge for the clinical applications of genetically modified cells is ensuring the safety of gene therapy while guaranteeing effectiveness. Viral gene delivery methods have been mainstays currently with enhanced safety features being recently refined. On the other hand, efficiency has been greatly improved in nonviral delivery. This review summarizes the history and recent update on the gene transfer to enhance chondrogenesis from stem cells or articular chondrocytes. PMID:26414246

  19. Mesoscopic near-field radiative heat transfer at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, Ilari; Geng, Zhuoran; Chaudhuri, Saumyadip; Koppinen, Panu

    2015-03-01

    Near-field radiative heat transfer has mostly been discussed at room temperatures and/or macroscopic scale geometries. Here, we discuss our recent theoretical and experimental advances in understanding near-field transfer at ultra-low temperatures below 1K. As the thermal wavelengths increase with lowering temperature, we show that with sensitive tunnel junction bolometers it is possible to study near-field transfer up to distances ~ 10 μm currently, even though the power levels are low. In addition, these type of experiments correspond to the extreme near-field limit, as the near-field region starts at ~ mm distances at 0.1 K, and could have theoretical power enhancement factors of the order of 1010. Preliminary results on heat transfer between two parallel metallic wires are presented. We also comment on possible areas were such heat transfer might be relevant, such as densely packed arrays of low-temperature detectors.

  20. Auto-disable syringes for immunization: issues in technology transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J. S.; Milstien, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    WHO and its partners recommend the use of auto-disable syringes, "bundled" with the supply of vaccines when donor dollars are used, in all mass immunization campaigns, and also strongly advocate their use in routine immunization programmes. Because of the relatively high price of auto-disable syringes, WHO's Technical Network for Logistics in Health recommends that activities be initiated to encourage the transfer of production technology for these syringes as a means of promoting their use and enhancing access to the technology. The present article examines factors influencing technology transfer, including feasibility, corporate interest, cost, quality assurance, intellectual property considerations, and probable time frames for implementation. Technology transfer activities are likely to be complex and difficult, and may not result in lower prices for syringes. Guidelines are offered on technology transfer initiatives for auto-disable syringes to ensure the quality of the product, the reliability of the supply, and the feasibility of the technology transfer activity itself. PMID:10680248