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Sample records for soil-water systems surfactants

  1. Sorption of nonionic organic compounds in soil-water systems containing a micelle-forming surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.; Inskeep, W.P.; Boyd, S.A. |

    1994-12-31

    The solubility enhancement of nonionic organic compounds (NOCs) by surfactants may represent an important tool in chemical and biological remediation of contaminated soils. In aqueous systems, the presence of dissolved surfactant emulsions or micelles may enhance the solubility of NOCs by acting as a hydrophobic partitioning phase for the NOCs. However, most environmental remediation efforts involve soil-water or sediment-water systems, where surfactant molecules may also interact with the solid phase. An understanding of the effect of surfactants on the sorption and distribution of NOCs in soil or sediment environments will provide an essential basis for utilizing surfactants in environmental remediation. In this study, the authors examined the effect of a micelle-forming surfactant (Triton X-100) on the sorption of 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5,5{prime}-PCB, 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (p,p{prime}-DDT) and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB). A conceptual model, which accurately describes the functional dependence of K* on Triton X-100 concentration, was developed based on the partition coefficients of these NOCs by soil, soil-surfactant, surfactant monomer and surfactant micelle phases. This model can be further modified to provide quantitative prediction of K* of a given NOC at different surfactant concentrations.

  2. Atrazine and Diuron partitioning within a soil-water-surfactant system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Keller, A.

    2006-12-01

    The interaction between pesticide and soil and water is even more complex in the presence of surfactants. In this study, batch equilibrium was employed to study the sorption of surfactants and the partitioning behaviors of Atrazine and Diuron within a soil-water-surfactant system. Five soils and four surfactants (nonionic Triton- 100, cationic Benzalkonium Chloride (BC), anionic Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS), and anionic Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)) were used. All surfactant sorption isotherms exhibited an initial linear increase at low surfactant concentrations but reached an asymptotic value as the surfactant concentrations increased. Among the surfactants, BC had the highest sorption onto all soils, followed by Triton-100 and then by LAS and SDS, implying that the nature of the charge significantly influences surfactant sorption. Sorption of either Triton-100 or BC was highly correlated with soil Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) while that of LAS and SDS was complicated by the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in the aqueous phase and the CEC sites. Both LAS and SDS formed complexes with Ca2+ and Mg2+, resulting in a significant decrease in the detergency of the surfactants. At high surfactant concentrations and with micelles present in the aqueous phase, the micelles formed a more competitive partitioning site for the pesticides, resulting in less pesticide sorbed to the soil. At low Triton-100 and BC concentration, the sorption of the surfactants first resulted in less Atrazine sorption but more Diuron sorption, implying competition between the surfactants and Atrazine, which serves as an indirect evidence that there is a different sorption mechanism for Atrazine. Atrazine is a weak base and it protonates and becomes positively charged near particle surfaces where the pH is much lower than in the bulk solution. The protonated Atrazine may then be held on the CEC sites via electrostatic attraction. Triton-100, LAS and SDS sorbed on the soil showed similar

  3. Sorption/desorption behavior of oxytetracycline and sulfachloropyridazine in the soil water surfactant system.

    PubMed

    ElSayed, Eman M; Prasher, Shiv O

    2014-03-01

    Sorption/desorption of antibiotics, oxytetracycline (OTC), and sulfachloropyridazine (SCP) was investigated in the presence of a nonionic surfactant Brij35. Batch sorption experiments indicated that Freundlich equation fits sorption isotherms well for OTC. The sorption coefficients, KF, values were computed as 23.55 mL g(−1) in the absence of Brij35 and 25.46 mL g(−1) in the presence of Brij35 in the monomer form (below critical micelle concentration CMC, of 74 mg L(−1)). However, the KF values reduced to 12.76 mL g(−1) in the presence of Brij35 at 2.5 g L(−1). Therefore, irrigation with surfactant-rich water may increase the leaching potential of OTC. In the case of SCP, the KF value, in the absence of Brij35, was 19.95 mL g(−1). As a result of increasing the concentration of Brij35 to 0.25 g L(−1) (about 2.5 CMC), KF values first increased and reached a maximum value of 95.49 mL g(−1) and then reduced to 66.06 mL g(−1), at surfactant concentration of 5 g L(−1). Unlike OTC, the presence of surfactant in irrigation water is likely to decrease SCP leaching. In the case of OTC, hysteresis was found at Brij35 concentrations below CMC. However, OTC desorbed readily from soil (no hysteresis) at Brij35 concentrations above CMC. In the case of SCP, no hysteresis was found in the presence of the surfactant, both below and above CMC. Further, the obtained values of the efficiency coefficient (E), reveals that Brij35 had the potential to release more OTC from the soil (E > 1) as compared to SCP (E < 1). From these results, it can be concluded that regular use of manure on agricultural soils, especially in regions where poor quality irrigation water is used, can increase OTC contamination of water resources. PMID:24234758

  4. Predicting surfactant modified soil/water distribution coefficients using micellar HPLC

    PubMed

    Paterson; Chowdhry; Leharne

    1999-01-01

    Soil water/distribution coefficients (Kd) have been measured for the partitioning of naphthalene, phenanthrene and pyrene between aqueous surfactant solutions and a clean soil. The surfactants used are ABA block copolymers constructed from ethylene oxide (the monomer used to synthesise the hydrophilic A blocks) and propylene oxide (used for the manufacture of the hydrophobic B block). Three of these surfactants comprising the same size propylene oxide block but different ethylene oxide/propylene oxide ratios were investigated. Increasing amounts of surfactant in the system result in a progressive decrease in the Kd values signifying an increasing tendency for the hydrophobic solutes to be dispersed in aqueous solution due to the action of the surfactant. More significantly for equal surfactant doses the most hydrophobic surfactant possessing the lowest ethylene oxide/propylene oxide ratio reduces Kd by the greatest amount whereas the most hydrophilic surfactant reduces Kd the least. Finally micellar HPLC using the above surfactants and hydrophobic solutes was undertaken. Interpolated capacity factors evaluated for particular surfactant doses correlated well with Kd values calculated for the same surfactant doses. The relationship between Kd and capacity was found to be log-linear and the correlation line could be fitted to the data obtained for all three surfactants. It is therefore concluded that micellar HPLC may be used for preliminary evaluations of the effectiveness of particular surfactants proposed for contaminated soils restoration schemes. PMID:10901653

  5. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  6. Comparison of natural (olive mill wastewater) and synthetic surfactant for soil water repellency mitigation in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantis, Vasileios; Pagorogon, Lorvi; Gazani, Eleutheria; Gkiougkis, Ioannis; Pliakas, Fotios

    2010-05-01

    This study explores, for the first time, the potential effectiveness of olive mill wastewater (OMW) as an alternative to industrial surfactants in decreasing soil water repellency. The OMW was characterized by high concentrations of short-chain fatty acids, mainly butyric, propionic and acetic, which contributed approximately to 1/3 of the organic load. It was applied diluted (1:1 with freshwater) in an agricultural field in NE Greece affected by water repellency, at a rate of ~ 4.3 L/m2. For comparison, a commercial soil surfactant was used according to the instructions of the manufacturer (0.8 mL/m2). The use of commercial surfactant was very efficient in decreasing water repellency immediately after application. The number of wettable samples (WDPT < 5 s) increased to ~ 50% (compared to 13% for the control soil) seven (7) days after treatment application. Diluted olive mill wastewater (50%) did not show any improvement in soil wettability immediately after application, but gradually was comparable effective to the surfactant treatment. The number of wettable samples showed a continuous increase from 13 to 25 and 54% after 7, 22 and 37 days from OMW application. In conclusion, OMW was found to be effective in decreasing soil water repellency. This suggests the potential of OMW as a natural surfactant. Its longer-term effects, however, have yet to be established. It is demonstrated that the short-chain fatty acids present in OMW play a critical role towards its surface-active properties. Keywords: Olive mill wastewater; short-chain fatty acids; biosurfactant; natural surfactant; water repellency mitigation.

  7. Effects of polyethoxylate lauryl ether (Brij 35) addition on phenanthrene biodegradation in a soil/water system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-T; Hung, Chun-H; Chou, Hsi-L

    2014-01-01

    Non-ionic surfactants usually are often selected for use in surfactant flushing technology, which is a process that can be used as part of PAH-contaminated soil bioremediation. Phenanthrene (PHE) biodegradation in the presence of polyethoxylate lauryl ether (Brij 35) was studied in two soil/water systems. The natural soil organic matter content (SOM) and the present of Brij 35, both above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and below the CMC, changed the rate of PHE biodegradation in the presence of Brij 35. PHE biodegradation is different in the two different soil/water systems: PHE > PHE-Brij 35-Micelle > PHE-Brij 35-Monomer in the clay/water system; PHE-Brij 35-Micelle > PHE-Brij 35-Monomer > PHE in the natural soil/water system. Among the free-living species associated with PHE-Brij 35 biodegradation, Brevundimonas diminuta, Caulobacter spp., Mycoplana bullata, Acidovorax spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa accounted for 90.72% to 99.90% of the bacteria present. Specific hydrolytic enzymes, including esterases, glycosol-hydrolases and phosphatases, are expressed during PHE biodegradation. The information presented here will help the engineering design of more effective PAH bioremediation systems that use Brij 35 series flushing technology. In particular, micelles of Brij 35 can be used to accelerate the rate of remediation of PAH-contaminated soil in natural soil/water systems. PMID:25320854

  8. Hydrologic modeling of soil water storage in landfill cover systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, F.J.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy of modeling soil water storage by two hydrologic models, CREAMS and HELP, was tested by comparing simulation results with field measurements of soil moisture in eight experimental landfill cover systems having a range of well-defined soil profiles and vegetative covers. Regression analysis showed that CREAMS generally represented soil moisture more accurately than HELP simulations. Soil profiles that more closely resembled natural agricultural soils were more accurately modeled than highly artificial layered soil profiles. Precautions for determining parameter values for model input and for interpreting simulation results are discussed.

  9. Modifying soil water status and improving stand establishment in a water repellent soil using surfactant coated seed.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostka, Stanley; Lampe, Mark; van Mondfrans, Jan; Madsen, Matthew; McMillan, Mica

    2015-04-01

    Surfactant seed coating (SSC) is a technology being developed cooperatively by scientists at the USDA, Agricultural Research Service and Aquatrols to improve stand establishment in water repellent soils, particularly under arid conditions. Early SSC studies have demonstrated that surfactant coatings can dramatically increase soil water content, turfgrass density, cover, and biomass for Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue and perennial ryegrass sown in water repellent soils under greenhouse conditions. However, in these studies, surfactant loads were excessive (≥ 40 wt% of seed mass). The objective of the current study was to ascertain if a lower surfactant treatment level (10 wt%) would improve emergence and stand establishment in a severely water repellent sandy soil under field conditions. Research was conducted on a golf course near Utrecht, NL. At the time of planting water drop penetration time (WDPT) of the soil was approximately 300 s, indicating severe water repellency. Chewings fescue (Festuca rubra subsp. commutata) seed was treated with ASET-4001 surfactant at a loading rate of 10 wt% using two different proprietary coating procedures (US Patent Application 20100267554). The two different ASET-4001 coatings were compared against untreated seed in a randomized complete block design with four replicates. In order to maximize abiotic stresses, the only applied water came from rainfall. Assessments of stand establishment were made every 7-14 days for three months using a subjective visual assessment of percent grass cover and sward quality based on a 1-10 scale (where 10 is best). At six months post-sowing, 20 mm x 300 mm soil cores were randomly removed from each plot and soil wetting front depth measured. Improved emergence of the surfactant coated seeds over the untreated seeds began to appear 7 days after sowing. However, there were no differences between the two SSC treatments. Establishment was influenced by weather conditions. From mid-June to early

  10. SOIL WATER USE AND GRAIN YIELD OF THREE DRYLAND CROPS UNDER DIFFERING TILLAGE SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Combining the use of drought-adapted and early maturing crops with reduced tillage practices in dryland cropping systems can increase soil water storage, water-use efficiency and crop yields. The objective of this study was to evaluate soil water use by cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), grain sorghum [So...

  11. Clouding behaviour in surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Partha; Padhan, Susanta K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, Bijay K

    2011-02-17

    A study on the phenomenon of clouding and the applications of cloud point technology has been thoroughly discussed. The phase behaviour of clouding and various methods adopted for the determination of cloud point of various surfactant systems have been elucidated. The systems containing anionic, cationic, nonionic surfactants as well as microemulsions have been reviewed with respect to their clouding phenomena and the effects of structural variation in the surfactant systems have been incorporated. Additives of various natures control the clouding of surfactants. Electrolytes, nonelectrolytes, organic substances as well as ionic surfactants, when present in the surfactant solutions, play a major role in the clouding phenomena. The review includes the morphological study of clouds and their applications in the extraction of trace inorganic, organic materials as well as pesticides and protein substrates from different sources. PMID:21296314

  12. Soil water availability as controlling factor for actual evapotranspiration in urban soil-vegetation-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Simon; Reisdorff, Christoph; Gröngröft, Alexander; Jensen, Kai; Eschenbach, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The City of Hamburg is characterized by a large number of greens, parks and roadside trees: 600.000 trees cover about 14% of the city area, and moreover, 245.000 roadside trees can be found here. Urban vegetation is generally known to positively contribute to the urban micro-climate via cooling by evapotranspiration (ET). The water for ET is predominantly stored in the urban soils. Hence, the actual evapotranspiration (ETa) is - beside atmospheric drivers - determined by soil water availability at the soil surface and in the rooting zones of the respective vegetation. The overall aim of this study is to characterize soil water availability as a regulative factor for ETa in urban soil-vegetation systems. The specific questions addressed are: i) What is the spatio-temporal variation in soil water availability at the study sites? ii) Which soil depths are predominantly used for water uptake by the vegetation forms investigated? and iii) Which are the threshold values of soil water tension and soil water content (Θ), respectively, that limit ETa under dry conditions on both grass-dominated and tree-dominated sites? Three study areas were established in the urban region of Hamburg, Germany. We selected areas featuring both single tree stands and grass-dominated sites, both representing typical vegetation forms in Hamburg. The areas are characterized by relatively dry soil conditions. However, they differ in regard to soil water availability. At each area we selected one site dominated by Common Oak (Quercus ruber L.) with ages from 40 to 120 years, and paired each oak tree site with a neighboring grass-dominated site. All field measurements were performed during the years 2013 and 2014. At each site, we continuously measured soil water tension and Θ up to 160 cm depth, and xylem sap flux of each of three oak trees per site in a 15 min-resolution. Furthermore, we measured soil hydraulic properties as pF-curve, saturated and unsaturated conductivity at all sites

  13. Mechanism for the primary transformation of acetaminophen in a soil/water system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chuanzhou; Lan, Zhonghui; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Yingbao

    2016-07-01

    The transformation of acetaminophen (APAP) in a soil/water system was systematically investigated by a combination of kinetic studies and a quantitative analysis of the reaction intermediates. Biotransformation was the predominant pathway for the elimination of APAP, whereas hydrolysis or other chemical transformation, and adsorption processes made almost no contribution to the transformation under a dark incubation. Bacillus aryabhattai strain 1-Sj-5-2-5-M, Klebsiella pneumoniae strain S001, and Bacillus subtilis strain HJ5 were the main bacteria identified in the biotransformation of APAP. The soil-to-water ratio and soil preincubation were able to alter the transformation kinetic pattern. Light irradiation promoted the overall transformation kinetics through enhanced biotransformation and extra photosensitized chemical reactions. The transformation pathways were strongly dependent on the initial concentration of APAP. The main primary transformation products were APAP oligomers and p-aminophenol, with the initial addition of 26.5 and 530 μM APAP, respectively. APAP oligomers accounted for more than 95% of transformed APAP, indicating that almost no bound residues were generated through the transformation of APAP in the soil/water system. The potential environmental risks of APAP could increase following the transformation of APAP in the soil/water system because of the higher toxicity of the transformation intermediates. PMID:27107139

  14. Observing soil water dynamics under two field conditions by a novel sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, W.; Sun, Y.; Schulze Lammers, P.; Schumann, H.; Berg, A.; Shi, C.; Wang, C.

    2011-10-01

    SummarySufficiently available soil water is a basic requirement in agricultural production. Monitoring soil water dynamics (SWD) in the root zone is an optimal approach for managing a crop's growth. This study presents a novel sensor system that simultaneously measures volumetric soil water content (VSWC), apparent electrical conductivity (EC a) and soil temperature at two different soil depths (shallow: 16 cm; deep: 36 cm). For testing its feasibility in the field, two prototypes were installed, one in bare soil and the other in a sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L.) field in the summer of 2010. Following a sequence of rainfall events randomly distributed over the experimental period, we observed distinct responses from the sensors at each monitored depth in both field conditions. In addition to the multi-parameter measurements, the novel sensor design includes a series of technical advantages such as solar-powered operation, wireless communication, and being relatively easy to install/remove. Thus, the developed wireless sensor system is promising for networked applications in precision farming.

  15. A new TDR multiplexing system for reliable electrical conductivity and soil water content measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihermueller, Lutz; Huisman, Sander; Hermes, Normen; Pickel, Stefanie; Vereecken, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is a standard method to estimate soil water content and bulk soil electrical conductivity. In many applications, several TDR probes are installed in soil columns or field setups, and they are measured using a multiplexing system. It has been reported that commercially available multiplexers share a common ground, which might lead to inaccurate TDR measurements when probes are installed close together or at sites with high electromagnetic noise. Therefore, a new eight-channel differential multiplexer (50C81-SDM) was developed that allows communication with standard TDR equipment. The 50C81-SDM multiplexer was tested using measurement in electrolyte solutions and a sand tank. In contrast to multiplexers with a common ground, they showed no interference of closely spaced TDR probes. Measurements at a test site also showed the applicability of the 50C81-SDM multiplexer in an environment contaminated with high electromagnetic noise.

  16. APPLICATIONS OF AGRICULTURAL SYSTEM MODELS IN ASSESSING AND MANAGING CONTAMINATION OF THE SOIL-WATER-ATMOSPHERE CONTINUUM IN AGRICULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last three decades, there has been a growing public concern about the adverse effects of modern agriculture on environmental quality and soil-water resources. In the mid-1980's, the USDA, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) identified the need for models of whole agricultural systems that wi...

  17. Application of Agricultural System Models in Assessing and Managing Contamination of Soil-Water-Atmosphere Continuum in Agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the last three decades, there has been a growing public concern about the adverse effects of modern agriculture on environmental quality and soil-water resources. In the mid-1980s, the USDA, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) identified the need for models of whole agricultural systems th...

  18. Biodegradation of organic chemicals in soil/water microcosms system: Model development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, L.; Tindall, J.A.; Friedel, M.J.; Zhang, W.

    2007-01-01

    The chemical interactions of hydrophobic organic contaminants with soils and sediments may result in strong binding and slow subsequent release rates that significantly affect remediation rates and endpoints. In order to illustrate the recalcitrance of chemical to degradation on sites, a sorption mechanism of intraparticle sequestration was postulated to operate on chemical remediation sites. Pseudo-first order sequestration kinetics is used in the study with the hypothesis that sequestration is an irreversibly surface-mediated process. A mathematical model based on mass balance equations was developed to describe the fate of chemical degradation in soil/water microcosm systems. In the model, diffusion was represented by Fick's second law, local sorption-desorption by a linear isotherm, irreversible sequestration by a pseudo-first order kinetics and biodegradation by Monod kinetics. Solutions were obtained to provide estimates of chemical concentrations. The mathematical model was applied to a benzene biodegradation batch test and simulated model responses correlated well compared to measurements of biodegradation of benzene in the batch soil/water microcosm system. A sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the effects of several parameters on model behavior. Overall chemical removal rate decreased and sequestration increased quickly with an increase in the sorption partition coefficient. When soil particle radius, a, was greater than 1 mm, an increase in radius produced a significant decrease in overall chemical removal rate as well as an increase in sequestration. However, when soil particle radius was less than 0.1 mm, an increase in radius resulted in small changes in the removal rate and sequestration. As pseudo-first order sequestration rate increased, both chemical removal rate and sequestration increased slightly. Model simulation results showed that desorption resistance played an important role in the bioavailability of organic chemicals in porous

  19. Spatial and Temporal Control of Surfactant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent progress on approaches leading to spatial and temporal control of surfactant systems. The approaches revolve around the use of redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants. Perspectives are presented on experiments that have realized approaches for active control of interfacial properties of aqueous surfactant systems, reversible control of microstructures and nanostructures formed within bulk solutions, and in situ manipulation of the interactions of surfactants with polymers, DNA and proteins. A particular focus of this review is devoted to studies of amphiphiles that contain the redox-active group ferrocene – reversible control of the oxidation state of ferrocene leads to changes in the charge/hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles, resulting in substantial changes in their self-assembly. Light-sensitive surfactants containing azobenzene, which undergo changes in shape/polarity upon illumination with light, are a second focus of this review. Examples of both redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants that lead to large (> 20mN/m) and spatially localized (~mm) changes in surface tensions on a time scale of seconds are presented. Systems that permit reversible transformations of bulk solution nanostructures – such as micelle-to-vesicle transitions or monomer-to-micelle transitions – are also described. The broad potential utility of these emerging classes of amphiphiles are illustrated by the ability to drive changes in functional properties of surfactant systems, such as rheological properties and reversible solubilization of oils, as well as the ability to control interactions of surfactants with biomolecules to modulate their transport into cells. PMID:19665723

  20. Fate and transport of the β-adrenergic agonist ractopamine hydrochloride in soil-water systems.

    PubMed

    Hakk, Heldur; Shelver, Weilin L; Casey, Francis X M

    2016-07-01

    The feed additive ractopamine hydrochloride was fortified at four concentrations into batch vials containing soils that differed in both biological activity and organic matter (OM). Sampling of the liquid layer for 14days demonstrated that ractopamine rapidly dissipated from the liquid layer. Less than 20% of the fortified dose remained in the liquid layer after 4hr, and recoveries of dosed ractopamine ranged from 8 to 18% in the liquid layer at 336hr. Sorption to soil was the major fate for ractopamine in soil:water systems, i.e., 42%-51% of the dose at 14days. The major portion of the sorbed fraction was comprised of non-extractables; a smaller fraction of the sorbed dose was extracted into water and acetone, portions which would be potentially mobile in the environment. Partitioning coefficients for all soils suggested strong sorption of ractopamine to soil which is governed by hydrophobic interactions and cation exchange complexes within the soil OM. Ractopamine degradation was observed, but to mostly non-polar compounds which had a higher potential than ractopamine to sorb to soil. The formation of volatiles was also suggested. Therefore, despite rapid and extensive soil sorption, these studies indicated a portion of ractopamine, present in manures used to fertilize soils, may be mobile in the environment via water-borne events. PMID:27372117

  1. Soil particle-size dependent partitioning behavior of pesticides within water-soil-cationic surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Keller, Arturo A

    2008-08-01

    Cationic surfactants have been proposed for enhanced sorption zones to contain hydrophobic organic compound (HOC) contamination. Benzalkonium chloride (BC), a cationic surfactant, was selected to study the particle-size dependent sorption behavior of the surfactant and its role in the immobilization of two hydrophobic pesticides (atrazine and diuron) within soil-water-surfactant systems for this application. Five different soils were considered in this study. Our results showed significant particle-size dependent behavior for surfactant sorption and pesticide immobilization in the presence of the sorbed cationic surfactant. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the bulk soils and their size fractions (clay, silt, and sand fractions) determined BC sorption capacity. In the absence of BC the sand fractions were the least effective sorbent for the pesticides compared with silts and clays. However, at relatively low BC mass sorbed (<10,000mg/kg) to any of the soil fractions, well below sorption saturation, the sand fractions became more effective sorbents for either pesticide than the clay and silt fractions. The pesticide partitioning coefficient onto sorbed BC (K(ss)) was not constant. Particle CEC, availability of CEC sites for sorption of the cationic surfactant, and the amount of the BC sorbed determined the phase of K(ss). The maximum K(ss) occurred before BC saturation sorption capacity was reached and at different % CEC occupancy for the different size fractions. For the clay fractions, the maximum K(ss) occurred at lower % CEC occupancy ( approximately 30-40%) than for the silt and sand fractions. The maximal K(ss) for the sand fractions occurred at the highest % CEC occupancy among all fractions ( approximately 50-60%). These findings suggest that for an in situ surfactant-enhanced sorption zone it may be better to operate well below the saturation sorption of the cationic surfactant. This would enhance sorption of the HOCs onto the immobile fractions (silt

  2. AUTOMATED SYSTEM FOR COLLECTING MULTIPLE, SEQUENTIAL SAMPLES FROM SOIL WATER SAMPLERS UNDER CONTINUOUS VACUUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manually collecting a series of sequential, discrete water samples from soil water percolation samplers, or similar devices, that withdraw water from unsaturated porous media under continuous vacuum is a logistical challenge, though the resulting collection can provide valuable information on the dy...

  3. Simulation of large-scale soil water systems using groundwater data and satellite based soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreye, Phillip; Meon, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Complex concepts for the physically correct depiction of dominant processes in the hydrosphere are increasingly at the forefront of hydrological modelling. Many scientific issues in hydrological modelling demand for additional system variables besides a simulation of runoff only, such as groundwater recharge or soil moisture conditions. Models that include soil water simulations are either very simplified or require a high number of parameters. Against this backdrop there is a heightened demand of observations to be used to calibrate the model. A reasonable integration of groundwater data or remote sensing data in calibration procedures as well as the identifiability of physically plausible sets of parameters is subject to research in the field of hydrology. Since this data is often combined with conceptual models, the given interfaces are not suitable for such demands. Furthermore, the application of automated optimisation procedures is generally associated with conceptual models, whose (fast) computing times allow many iterations of the optimisation in an acceptable time frame. One of the main aims of this study is to reduce the discrepancy between scientific and practical applications in the field of hydrological modelling. Therefore, the soil model DYVESOM (DYnamic VEgetation SOil Model) was developed as one of the primary components of the hydrological modelling system PANTA RHEI. DYVESOMs structure provides the required interfaces for the calibrations made at runoff, satellite based soil moisture and groundwater level. The model considers spatial and temporal differentiated feedback of the development of the vegetation on the soil system. In addition, small scale heterogeneities of soil properties (subgrid-variability) are parameterized by variation of van Genuchten parameters depending on distribution functions. Different sets of parameters are operated simultaneously while interacting with each other. The developed soil model is innovative regarding concept

  4. Crop systems and plant roots can modify the soil water holding capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doussan, Claude; Cousin, Isabelle; Berard, Annette; Chabbi, Abad; Legendre, Laurent; Czarnes, Sonia; Toussaint, Bruce; Ruy, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    At the interface between atmosphere and deep sub-soil, the root zone plays a major role in regulating the flow of water between major compartments: groundwater / surface / atmosphere (drainage, runoff, evapotranspiration). This role of soil as regulator/control of water fluxes, but also as a supporting medium to plant growth, is strongly dependent on the hydric properties of the soil. In turn, the plant roots growing in the soil can change its structure; both in the plow layer and in the deeper horizons and, therefore, could change the soil properties, particularly hydric properties. Such root-related alteration of soil properties can be linked to direct effect of roots such as soil perforation during growth, aggregation of soil particles or indirect effects such as the release of exudates by roots that could modify the properties of water or of soil particles. On an another hand, the rhizosphere, the zone around roots influenced by the activity of root and associated microorganisms, could have a high influence on hydric properties, particularly the water retention. To test if crops and plant roots rhizosphere may have a significant effect on water retention, we conducted various experiment from laboratory to field scales. In the lab, we tested different soil and species for rhizospheric effect on soil water retention. Variation in available water content (AWC) between bulk and rhizospheric soil varied from non-significant to a significant increase (to about 16% increase) depending on plant species and soil type. In the field, the alteration of water retention by root systems was tested in different pedological settings for a Maize crop inoculated or not with the bacteria Azospirillum spp., known to alter root structure, growth and morphology. Again, a range of variation in AWC was evidenced, with significant increase (~30%) in some soil types, but more linked to innoculated/non-innoculated plants rather than to a difference between rhizospheric and bulk soil

  5. Trace element biogeochemistry in the soil-water-plant system of a temperate agricultural soil amended with different biochars.

    PubMed

    Kloss, Stefanie; Zehetner, Franz; Buecker, Jannis; Oburger, Eva; Wenzel, Walter W; Enders, Akio; Lehmann, Johannes; Soja, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    Various biochar (BC) types have been investigated as soil amendment; however, information on their effects on trace element (TE) biogeochemistry in the soil-water-plant system is still scarce. In the present study, we determined aqua-regia (AR) and water-extractable TEs of four BC types (woodchips (WC), wheat straw (WS), vineyard pruning (VP), pyrolyzed at 525 °C, of which VP was also pyrolyzed at 400 °C) and studied their effects on TE concentrations in leachates and mustard (Sinapis alba L.) tissue in a greenhouse pot experiment. We used an acidic, sandy agricultural soil and a BC application rate of 3% (w/w). Our results show that contents and extractability of TEs in the BCs and effectuated changes of TE biogeochemistry in the soil-water-plant system strongly varied among the different BC types. High AR-digestable Cu was found in VP and high B contents in WC. WS had the highest impact on TEs in leachates showing increased concentrations of As, Cd, Mo, and Se, whereas WC application resulted in enhanced leaching of B. All BC types increased Mo and decreased Cu concentrations in the plant tissue; however, they showed diverging effects on Cu in the leachates with decreased concentrations for WC and WS, but increased concentrations for both VPs. Our results demonstrate that BCs may release TEs into the soil-water-plant system. A BC-induced liming effect in acidic soils may lead to decreased plant uptake of cationic TEs, including Pb and Cd, but may enhance the mobility of anionic TEs like Mo and As. We also found that BCs with high salt contents (e.g., straw-based BCs) may lead to increased mobility of both anionic and cationic TEs in the short term. PMID:25315931

  6. Assessing HYDRUS-2D model to estimate soil water contents and olive tree transpiration fluxes under different water distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autovino, Dario; Negm, Amro; Rallo, Giovanni; Provenzano, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    In Mediterranean countries characterized by limited water resources for agricultural and societal sectors, irrigation management plays a major role to improve water use efficiency at farm scale, mainly where irrigation systems are correctly designed to guarantee a suitable application efficiency and the uniform water distribution throughout the field. In the last two decades, physically-based agro-hydrological models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system. Mechanistic models like HYDRUS 2D/3D (Šimunek et al., 2011) have been proposed to simulate all the components of water balance, including actual crop transpiration fluxes estimated according to a soil potential-dependent sink term. Even though the suitability of these models to simulate the temporal dynamics of soil and crop water status has been reported in the literature for different horticultural crops, a few researches have been considering arboreal crops where the higher gradients of root water uptake are the combination between the localized irrigation supply and the three dimensional root system distribution. The main objective of the paper was to assess the performance of HYDRUS-2D model to evaluate soil water contents and transpiration fluxes of an olive orchard irrigated with two different water distribution systems. Experiments were carried out in Castelvetrano (Sicily) during irrigation seasons 2011 and 2012, in a commercial farm specialized in the production of table olives (Olea europaea L., var. Nocellara del Belice), representing the typical variety of the surrounding area. During the first season, irrigation water was provided by a single lateral placed along the plant row with four emitters per plant (ordinary irrigation), whereas during the second season a grid of emitters laid on the soil was installed in order to irrigate the whole soil surface around the selected trees. The model performance was assessed based on the

  7. Spatial variability in the soil water content of a Mediterranean agroforestry system with high soil heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Antonio Jaime; Llorens, Pilar; Aranda, Xavier; Savé, Robert; Biel, Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Variability of soil water content is known to increase with the size of spatial domain in which measurements are taken. At field scale, heterogeneity in soil, vegetation, topography, water input volume and management affects, among other factors, hydrologic plot behaviour under different mean soil water contents. The present work studies how the spatial variability of soil water content (SWC) is affected by soil type (texture, percentage of stones and the combination of them) in a timber-orientated plantation of cherry tree (Prunus avium) under Mediterranean climatic conditions. The experimental design is a randomized block one with 3 blocks * 4 treatments, based on two factors: irrigation (6 plots irrigated versus 6 plots not irrigated) and soil management (6 plots tillaged versus 6 plots not tillaged). SWC is continuously measured at 25, 50 and 100 cm depth with FDR sensors, located at two positions in each treatment: under tree influence and 2.5 m apart. This study presents the results of the monitoring during 2012 of the 24 sensors located at the 25 cm depth. In each of the measurement point, texture and percentage of stones were measured. Sandy-loam, sandy-clay-loam and loam textures were found together with a percentage of stones ranging from 20 to 70 %. The results indicated that the relationship between the daily mean SWC and its standard deviation, a common procedure used to study spatial variability, changed with texture, percentage of stones and the estimation of field capacity from the combination of both. Temporal stability analysis of SWC showed a clear pattern related to field capacity, with the measurement points of the sandy-loam texture and the high percentage of stones showing the maximun negative diference with the global mean. The high range in the mean relative difference observed (± 75 %), could indicate that the studied plot may be considered as a good field-laboratory to extrapolate results at higher spatial scales. Furthermore, the

  8. Modeling coupled sorption and transformation of 17β-estradiol-17-sulfate in soil-water systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xuelian; Shrestha, Suman L.; Casey, Francis X. M.; Hakk, Heldur; Fan, Zhaosheng

    2014-11-01

    Animal manure is the primary source of exogenous free estrogens in the environment, which are known endocrine-disrupting chemicals to disorder the reproduction system of organisms. Conjugated estrogens can act as precursors to free estrogens, which may increase the total estrogenicity in the environment. In this study, a comprehensive model was used to simultaneously simulate the coupled sorption and transformation of a sulfate estrogen conjugate, 17β-estradiol-17-sulfate (E2-17S), in various soil-water systems (non-sterile/sterile; topsoil/subsoil). The simulated processes included multiple transformation pathways (i.e. hydroxylation, hydrolysis, and oxidation) and mass transfer between the aqueous, reversibly sorbed, and irreversibly sorbed phases of all soils for E2-17S and its metabolites. The conceptual model was conceived based on a series of linear sorption and first-order transformation expressions. The model was inversely solved using finite difference to estimate process parameters. A global optimization method was applied for the inverse analysis along with variable model restrictions to estimate 36 parameters. The model provided a satisfactory simultaneous fit (R2adj = 0.93 and d = 0.87) of all the experimental data and reliable parameter estimates. This modeling study improved the understanding on fate and transport of estrogen conjugates under various soil-water conditions.

  9. Profiling soil water content sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A waveguide-on-access-tube (WOAT) sensor system based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) principles was developed to sense soil water content and bulk electrical conductivity in 20-cm (8 inch) deep layers from the soil surface to depths of 3 m (10 ft) (patent No. 13/404,491 pending). A Cooperative R...

  10. The effects of rainfall partitioning and evapotranspiration on the temporal and spatial variation of soil water content in a Mediterranean agroforestry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biel, C.; Molina, A.; Aranda, X.; Llorens, P.; Savé, R.

    2012-04-01

    Tree plantation for wood production has been proposed to mitigate CO2-related climate change. Although these agroforestry systems can contribute to maintain the agriculture in some areas placed between rainfed crops and secondary forests, water scarcity in Mediterranean climate could restrict its growth, and their presence will affect the water balance. Tree plantations management (species, plant density, irrigation, etc), hence, can be used to affect the water balance, resulting in water availability improvement and buffering of the water cycle. Soil water content and meteorological data are widely used in agroforestry systems as indicators of vegetation water use, and consequently to define water management. However, the available information of ecohydrological processes in this kind of ecosystem is scarce. The present work studies how the temporal and spatial variation of soil water content is affected by transpiration and interception loss fluxes in a Mediterranean rainfed plantation of cherry tree (Prunus avium) located in Caldes de Montbui (Northeast of Spain). From May till December 2011, rainfall partitioning, canopy transpiration, soil water content and meteorological parameters were continuously recorded. Rainfall partitioning was measured in 6 trees, with 6 automatic rain recorders for throughfall and 1 automatic rain recorder for stemflow per tree. Transpiration was monitored in 12 nearby trees by means of heat pulse sap flow sensors. Soil water content was also measured at three different depths under selected trees and at two depths between rows without tree cover influence. This work presents the relationships between rainfall partitioning, transpiration and soil water content evolution under the tree canopy. The effect of tree cover on the soil water content dynamics is also analyzed.

  11. The AgroEcoSystem (AgES) response-function model simulates layered soil water dynamics in semi-arid Colorado: sensitivity and calibration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation of vertical soil hydrology is a critical component of simulating even more complex soil water dynamics in space and time, including land-atmosphere and subsurface interactions. The AgroEcoSystem (AgES) model is defined here as a single land unit implementation of the full AgES-W (Watershe...

  12. Irrigation management using an expert system, soil water potentials, and vegetative indices for spatial applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems are irrigation systems that are capable of applying different water depths both in the direction of travel and along the length of the irrigation system. However, when compared to traditional irrigation systems, VRI systems require a higher level of management...

  13. Assessment of structural model and parameter uncertainty with a multi-model system for soil water balance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalik, Thomas; Multsch, Sebastian; Frede, Hans-Georg; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    Water for agriculture is strongly limited in arid and semi-arid regions and often of low quality in terms of salinity. The application of saline waters for irrigation increases the salt load in the rooting zone and has to be managed by leaching to maintain a healthy soil, i.e. to wash out salts by additional irrigation. Dynamic simulation models are helpful tools to calculate the root zone water fluxes and soil salinity content in order to investigate best management practices. However, there is little information on structural and parameter uncertainty for simulations regarding the water and salt balance of saline irrigation. Hence, we established a multi-model system with four different models (AquaCrop, RZWQM, SWAP, Hydrus1D/UNSATCHEM) to analyze the structural and parameter uncertainty by using the Global Likelihood and Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) method. Hydrus1D/UNSATCHEM and SWAP were set up with multiple sets of different implemented functions (e.g. matric and osmotic stress for root water uptake) which results in a broad range of different model structures. The simulations were evaluated against soil water and salinity content observations. The posterior distribution of the GLUE analysis gives behavioral parameters sets and reveals uncertainty intervals for parameter uncertainty. Throughout all of the model sets, most parameters accounting for the soil water balance show a low uncertainty, only one or two out of five to six parameters in each model set displays a high uncertainty (e.g. pore-size distribution index in SWAP and Hydrus1D/UNSATCHEM). The differences between the models and model setups reveal the structural uncertainty. The highest structural uncertainty is observed for deep percolation fluxes between the model sets of Hydrus1D/UNSATCHEM (~200 mm) and RZWQM (~500 mm) that are more than twice as high for the latter. The model sets show a high variation in uncertainty intervals for deep percolation as well, with an interquartile range (IQR) of

  14. Removal of 2-ClBP from soil-water system using activated carbon supported nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yu, Tian; Han, Xiaolin; Ying, Weichi

    2016-09-01

    We explored the feasibility and removal mechanism of removing 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-ClBP) from soil-water system using granular activated carbon (GAC) impregnated with nanoscale zerovalent iron (reactive activated carbon or RAC). The RAC samples were successfully synthesized by the liquid precipitation method. The mesoporous GAC based RAC with low iron content (1.32%) exhibited higher 2-ClBP removal efficiency (54.6%) in the water phase. The result of Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model implied that the different molecular structures between 2-ClBP and trichloroethylene (TCE) resulted in more difference in dechlorination reaction rates on RAC than adsorption capacities. Compared to removing 2-ClBP in the water phase, RAC removed the 2-ClBP more slowly in the soil phase due to the significant external mass transfer resistance. However, in the soil phase, a better removal capacity of RAC was observed than its base GAC because the chemical dechlorination played a more important role in total removal process for 2-ClBP. This important result verified the effectiveness of RAC for removing 2-ClBP in the soil phase. Although reducing the total RAC removal rate of 2-ClBP, soil organic matter (SOM), especially the soft carbon, also served as an electron transfer medium to promote the dechlorination of 2-ClBP in the long term. PMID:27593281

  15. Crop diversification, tillage, and management system influences on spring wheat yield and soil water use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Depleted soil quality, decreased water availability, and increased weed competition constrain spring wheat production in the northern Great Plains. Integrated crop management systems are necessary for improved crop productivity. We conducted a field experiment from 2004-2010 comparing productivity...

  16. Surfactant oil recovery systems and recovery of oil therewith

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J. E.; Pardue, J. E.

    1985-12-31

    In accordance with the present invention, oil is recovered from a subsurface earth formation by injecting into the subsurface formation an aqueous surfactant system containing a polyvalent metal carboxylate, as a surfactant, a cosurfactant and an electrolyte in concentrations and proportions to form multiphase system with the reservoir oil, thereafter, injecting into the earth formation a drive fluid to drive the multiphase system through the reservoir and displace a significant amount of the reservoir oil and withdrawing the thus displaced oil from the subsurface earth formation. A novel aqueous surfactant system, adapted to thus recover oil from a subsurface formation, comprises a polyvalent metal carboxylate, such as calcium isosteareate, as a surfactant, and an alcohol having at least five carbon atoms, as a cosurfactant, and an electrolyte, such as sodium chloride, in proportions which form a multiphase system with the reservoir oil.

  17. Structure and Conformational Dynamics of DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant and DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant/DNA Systems

    PubMed Central

    Pietralik, Zuzanna; Krzysztoń, Rafał; Kida, Wojciech; Andrzejewska, Weronika; Kozak, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Amphiphilic dicationic surfactants, known as gemini surfactants, are currently studied for gene delivery purposes. The gemini surfactant molecule is composed of two hydrophilic “head” groups attached to hydrophobic chains and connected via molecular linker between them. The influence of different concentrations of 1,5-bis (1-imidazolilo-3- decyloxymethyl) pentane chloride (gemini surfactant) on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayers with and without the presence of DNA was investigated using Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation and differential scanning calorimetry. With increasing concentration of surfactant in DMPC/DNA systems, a disappearance of pretransition and a decrease in the main phase transition enthalpy and temperature were observed. The increasing intensity of diffraction peaks as a function of surfactant concentration also clearly shows the ability of the surfactant to promote the organisation of lipid bilayers in the multilayer lamellar phase. PMID:23571492

  18. Sequential effects of irradiation on the pulmonary surfactant system. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, D.L.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Penney, D.P.; Siemann, D.W.; Rubin, P.

    1982-05-01

    This study examines the effect of irradiation on lung surfactant synthesis and secretion in mice. Animals were irradiated with 650, 1300, or 1950 rad and morphological and biochemical indices of surfactant system function were followed for 18 weeks. No changes were seen at 650 rad; the results at 1300 and 1950 rad were virtually identical. Increased amounts of alveolar surfactant phospholipid were measureable by 24 hours. This persisted for four weeks and returned to normal by 18 weeks. Tissue surfactant phospholipid was initially reduced, returned to normal by four weeks and was increased at 18 weeks. At 18 weeks there was increased incorporation of surfactant precursor and increased production of alveolar surfactant. These biochemical changes were reflected in morphologic alterations showing release of lamellar body contents into alveoli in the first week and an increase in lamellar bodies in type II pneumocytes by 18 weeks. Elevated tissue protein levels and morphologic evidence of increased collagen formation were also found at 18 weeks. These findings indicate effects of irradiation on the pulmonary surfactant system and have important implications for the pathogenesis and potential therapy of radiation pneumonitis.

  19. New serine-derived gemini surfactants as gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Cruz, A Rita; Silva, Sandra G; do Vale, M Luísa; Marques, Eduardo F; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Jurado, Amália S

    2015-01-01

    Gemini surfactants have been extensively used for in vitro gene delivery. Amino acid-derived gemini surfactants combine the special aggregation properties characteristic of the gemini surfactants with high biocompatibility and biodegradability. In this work, novel serine-derived gemini surfactants, differing in alkyl chain lengths and in the linker group bridging the spacer to the headgroups (amine, amide and ester), were evaluated for their ability to mediate gene delivery either per se or in combination with helper lipids. Gemini surfactant-based DNA complexes were characterized in terms of hydrodynamic diameter, surface charge, stability in aqueous buffer and ability to protect DNA. Efficient formulations, able to transfect up to 50% of the cells without causing toxicity, were found at very low surfactant/DNA charge ratios (1/1-2/1). The most efficient complexes presented sizes suitable for intravenous administration and negative surface charge, a feature known to preclude potentially adverse interactions with serum components. This work brings forward a new family of gemini surfactants with great potential as gene delivery systems. PMID:25513958

  20. Effects of surfactant addition on the biomineralization and microbial toxicity of phenanthrene.

    PubMed

    Bramwell, D P; Laha, S

    2000-01-01

    Surfactants are known to increase the apparent aqueous solubility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and may thereby enhance their bioavailability. In this study the effects of four surfactants on the mineralization of phenanthrene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in liquid culture and in soil-water suspensions was studied in batch reactors over a 15-week study period. In the absence of surfactant, liquid cultures mineralized approximately 50% of the phenanthrene added within seven weeks following a one-week lag period and an initial mineralization rate of 0.04 mg/d. Mineralization in soil-water suspensions proceeded without any measurable lag period. The initial mineralization rate was lower (0.006 mg/d), but mineralization continued to >70% over the fifteen week period. In general, the addition of very low concentrations of surfactant (<0.001%) to liquid cultures did not impact mineralization significantly. At higher surfactant concentrations (>CMC) all surfactants were seen to be inhibitory. In soil-water systems, the rate of phenanthrene mineralization was decreased even at surfactant doses that did not produce significant solubilization. In summary, none of the surfactants enhanced the mineralization of phenanthrene by P. aeruginosa in liquid culture or in soil-water suspensions. In order to rank surfactant toxicity, microbial toxicity tests were performed measuring the light output of bioluminescent bacteria as affected by the presence of surfactants. Additional toxicity testing indicated that the presence of solubilized phenanthrene increased the toxicity of the surfactant by a 100-fold suggesting that the toxicity of solubilized substrate needs also to be considered in the application of surfactant-amended remediation. PMID:11432584

  1. The soil-water flow system beneath a cotton field in arid north-west China, serviced by mulched drip irrigation using brackish water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xianwen; Jin, Menggui; Huang, Jinou; Yuan, Jingjing

    2015-02-01

    A field experiment was carried out in southern Xinjiang, China, to reveal soil-water flow pattern beneath a combined plastic-mulch (film) and drip-irrigation system using brackish water. The soil-water flow system (SWFS) was characterized from soil surface to the water table based on observed spatio-temporal distribution of total soil-water potential, water content and electric conductivity. Root suction provided a strong inner sink. The results indicated that SWFS determined the soil salinity and moisture distribution. Drip-irrigation events could leach excess salts from the root zone and provide soil conditions with a tolerable salinity level that supports the growth of cotton. High-salinity strips were formed along the wetting front and at the bare soil surface. Hydrogeology conditions, irrigation regime, climate, plant growth and use of mulch would affect potential sources and sinks, boundary conditions and the size of the SWFS. At depth 0-60 cm, the soil salinity at the end of the irrigation season was 1.9 times that at the beginning. Beneath the mulch cover, the soil-water content in the `wide rows' zone (55 cm between the two rows with no drip line) was higher than that in the `narrow rows' zone (15 cm between the two rows with a drip line) due to the strong root-water uptake. The downward water flow below the divergent curved surface of zero flux before irrigation, and the water-table fluctuation with irrigation events, indicated that excessive irrigation occurred.

  2. Increasing Efficiency of Water Use in Agriculture through Management of Soil Water Repellency to Optimize Soil and Water Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Demie; Kostka, Stan; McMillan, Mica; Gadd, Nick

    2010-05-01

    Water's ability to infiltrate and disperse in soils, and soil's ability to receive, transport, retain, filter and release water are important factors in the efficient use of water in agriculture. Deteriorating soil conditions, including development of soil water repellency, negatively impact hydrological processes and, consequently, the efficiency of rainfall and irrigation. Soil water repellency is increasingly being identified in diverse soils and cropping systems. Recently research has been conducted on the use of novel soil surfactants (co-formulations of alkyl polyglycoside and block copolymer surfactants) to avoid or overcome soil water repellency and enhance water distribution in soils. Results indicate that this is an effective and affordable approach to maintaining or restoring soil and water productivity in irrigated cropping systems. Results from studies conducted in Australia and the United States to determine how this technology modifies soil hydrological behavior and crop yields will be presented. A range of soils and various crops, including potatoes, corn, apples and grapes, were included. Several rates were compared to controls for effect on soil moisture levels, soil water distribution, and crop yield. An economic analysis was also conducted in some trials. Treatments improved rootzone water status, significantly increased crop yield and quality, and in some cases allowed significant reductions in water requirements. Where assessed, a positive economic return was generated. This technology holds promise as a strategy for increasing efficiency of water use in agriculture.

  3. Origin of the difference in the distribution behavior of tellurium and selenium in a soil water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Teppei; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2008-03-01

    The distribution behavior of tellurium (Te) between soil and water in a synthetic soil-water system was studied coupled with the speciation of Te both in soil and water phases by using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and a high-performance liquid chromatography connected to an ICP-MS (HPLC-ICP-MS), respectively. The results were compared with a similar data set for Se, which was simultaneously obtained in this study. The oxidation states and host phases of Te and Se in the soil samples were given by XAFS, while the oxidation states in water were given by HPLC-ICP-MS. It was found that both Te and Se in soil are mainly associated with Fe(III) hydroxides under oxic conditions. From the EXAFS analyses, the outer-sphere complex is important for the Se(VI) sorbed on Fe(III) hydroxides in soils, while Se(IV), Te(IV), and Te(VI) form inner-sphere complexes. Under reducing condition, it was found that Te(0) and Se(0) species were formed and that Se was more readily reduced to Se(0) than Te, as is predicted from their Eh-pH diagrams. The reduction process from hexavalent to zerovalent species was different between Se and Te, that is, the direct reduction from Se(VI) to Se(0) was observed for Se, while Te was reduced stepwise from Te(VI) to Te(0) via Te(IV). In terms of the distribution between soil and water, Se distribution to water was much higher than that of Te under wide redox conditions. For Se, selenate is the predominant species in water even under reducing condition due to the much higher solubility of Se(VI) than Se(IV). Furthermore, a much smaller distribution of Te in water was primarily due to the larger affinities of Te(IV) and Te(VI) to Fe(III) hydroxides than Se(VI), which originates from the formation of the inner-sphere complexes of Te(IV) and Te(VI) to Fe(III) hydroxides.

  4. Tuning of depletion interaction in nanoparticle-surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, D. Aswal, V. K.

    2014-04-24

    The interaction of anionic silica nanoparticles (Ludox LS30) and non-ionic surfactants decaethylene glycol monododecylether (C12E10) without and with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous electrolyte solution has been studied by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The measurements have been carried out for fixed concentrations of nanoparticle (1 wt%), surfactants (1 wt%) and electrolyte (0.1 M NaCl). Each of these nanoparticlesurfactant systems has been examined for different contrast conditions where individual components (nanoparticle or surfactant) are made visible. It is observed that the nanoparticle-C12E10 system leads to the depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles. The system however behaves very differently on addition of SDS where depletion interaction gets suppressed and aggregation of nanoparticles can be prevented. We show that C12E10 and SDS form mixed micelles and the charge on these micelles plays important role in tuning the depletion interaction.

  5. Solution rheology of polyelectrolytes and polyelectrolyte-surfactant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucktaveesak, Nopparat

    The fundamental understanding of polyelectrolytes in aqueous solutions is an important branch of polymer research. In this work, the rheological properties of polyelectrolytes and polyelectrolyte/surfactant systems are studied. Various synthetic poly electrolytes are chosen with varied hydrophobicity. We discuss the effects of adding various surfactants to aqueous solutions of poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)- b-polyethylene oxide)-g-poly(acrylic acid) (PEO-PPO-PAA) in the first chapter. Thermogelation in aqueous solutions of PEO-PPO-PAA is due to micellization caused by aggregation of poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) blocks resulting from temperature-induced dehydration of PPO. When nonionic surfactants with hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) parameter exceeding 11 or Cn alkylsulfates; n-octyl (C8), n-decyl (C 10) and n-dodecyl (C12) sulfates are added, the gelation threshold temperature (Tgel) of 1.0wt% PEO-PPO-PAA in aqueous solutions increases. In contrast, when nonionic surfactants with HLB below 11 are added, the gelation temperature decreases. On the other hand, alkylsulfates with n = 16 or 18 and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) do not affect the Tgel. The results imply that both hydrophobicity and tail length of the added surfactant play important roles in the interaction of PEO-PPO-PAA micelles and the surfactant. In the second chapter, the solution behavior of alternating copolymers of maleic acid and hydrophobic monomer is studied. The alternating structure of monomers with two-carboxylic groups and hydrophobic monomers make these copolymers unique. Under appropriate conditions, these carboxylic groups dissociate leaving charges on the chain. The potentiometric titrations of copolymer solutions with added CaCl2 reveal two distinct dissociation processes corresponding to the dissociation of the two adjacent carboxylic acids. The viscosity data as a function of polymer concentration of poly(isobutylene-alt-sodium maleate), poly

  6. Solubilization and biodegradation of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil/aqueous systems with nonionic surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.A.; Laha, S.; Liu, Zhongbao; Luthy, R.G.

    1992-05-01

    Nonionic surfactants may strongly interact with hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), soil, and microorganisms in soil/aqueous systems. These interactions affect the potential for surfactant-facilitated HOC transport in soil and groundwater systems, and the feasibility of engineered surfactant cleanup of contaminated sites (McCarthy and Wober, 1991). At sufficiently high bulk liquid concentrations at 25 C, most nonionic surfactants form regular micelles in single-phase solutions, whereas certain surfactants, such as C{sub 12}E{sub 4}, may form bilayer lamellae or other types of aggregates in more complex two-phase solutions. The critical concentrations for the onset of micelle and aggregate formation are termed the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), respectively. Important changes occur in surfactant sorption, surfactant solubilization of HOCs, and microbial mineralization of HOCs in the presence of nonionic surfactants at or near these critical surfactant concentrations.

  7. Solubilization and biodegradation of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil/aqueous systems with nonionic surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.A.; Laha, S.; Liu, Zhongbao; Luthy, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    Nonionic surfactants may strongly interact with hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), soil, and microorganisms in soil/aqueous systems. These interactions affect the potential for surfactant-facilitated HOC transport in soil and groundwater systems, and the feasibility of engineered surfactant cleanup of contaminated sites (McCarthy and Wober, 1991). At sufficiently high bulk liquid concentrations at 25 C, most nonionic surfactants form regular micelles in single-phase solutions, whereas certain surfactants, such as C{sub 12}E{sub 4}, may form bilayer lamellae or other types of aggregates in more complex two-phase solutions. The critical concentrations for the onset of micelle and aggregate formation are termed the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), respectively. Important changes occur in surfactant sorption, surfactant solubilization of HOCs, and microbial mineralization of HOCs in the presence of nonionic surfactants at or near these critical surfactant concentrations.

  8. Phase behavior and oil recovery investigations using mixed and alkaline-enhanced surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; French, T.R.; Noll, L.A.; Munden, S.A.

    1992-03-01

    The results of an evaluation of different mixed surfactant and alkaline-enhanced surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several mixed surfactant systems have been studies to evaluate their oil recovery potential as well as improved adaptability to different ranges of salinity, divalent ion concentrations, and temperature. Several combinations of screening methods were used to help identify potential chemical formulations and determine conditions where particular chemical systems can be applied. The effects of different parameters on the behavior of the overall surfactant system were also studied. Several commercially available surfactants were tested as primary components in the mixtures used in the study. These surfactants were formulated with different secondary as well as tertiary components, including ethoxylated and non-ethoxylated sulfonates and sulfates. Improved salinity and hardness tolerance was achieved for some of these chemical systems. The salinity tolerance of these systems were found to be dependent on the molecular weight, surfactant type, and concentration of the surfactant components.

  9. Automated soil water balance sensing: From layers to control volumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous sensing of soil water status has been possible in some ways since the advent of chart recorders, but the widespread adoption of soil water sensing systems did not occur until relatively inexpensive dataloggers became available in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Early systems relied on pre...

  10. Viscosity of the oil-in-water Pickering emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer and nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Tushar; Kumar, G. Suresh; Chon, Bo Hyun; Sangwai, Jitendra S.

    2014-11-01

    Information on the viscosity of Pickering emulsion is required for their successful application in upstream oil and gas industry to understand their stability at extreme environment. In this work, a novel formulation of oil-in-water (o/w) Pickering emulsion stabilized using nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer (polyacrylamide) system as formulated in our earlier work (Sharma et al., Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 2014) is investigated for rheological stability at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions using a controlled-strain rheometer. The nanoparticle (SiO2 and clay) concentration is varied from 1.0 to 5.0 wt%. The results are compared with the rheological behavior of simple o/w emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system. Both the emulsions exhibit non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior. A positive shift in this behavior is observed for surfactant-polymer stabilized emulsion at high pressure conditions. Yield stress is observed to increase with pressure for surfactant-polymer emulsion. In addition, increase in temperature has an adverse effect on the viscosity of emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system. In case of nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer stabilized o/w emulsion system, the viscosity and yield stress are predominantly constant for varying pressure and temperature conditions. The viscosity data for both o/w emulsion systems are fitted by the Herschel-Bulkley model and found to be satisfactory. In general, the study indicates that the Pickering emulsion stabilized by nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer system shows improved and stable rheological properties as compared to conventional emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system indicating their successful application for HPHT environment in upstream oil and gas industry.

  11. Interfacial action of natural surfactants in oil/water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, K.; Onishi, M.

    1981-09-01

    This paper concerns the tendency of a few natural surfactants at the oil/water interface to induce spontaneous emulsification. N-paraffin (n-dodecane), liquid triglycerides (oleic safflower oil and corn oil), and liquid fatty acids (oleic acid and linoleic acid) were used as the oil phase and distilled water was used as the water phase. Natural surfactants such as cholesterol, lecithin, and oleic acid were applied to the systems as the oil-soluble additives. Lecithin was the most strongly effective in reducing the interfacial tension of the oil/water systems, and cholesterol was effective at the second strength. The oil/water interface of the systems containing the oil-soluble additives changed in various ways as observed by microscopy and the unaided eye. The most remarkable change was found in the system of glycerides containing cholesterol in contact with water, in which crystals of cholesterol were formed at the interface. 13 references.

  12. Polymer-surfactant systems in bulk and at fluid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Eduardo; Llamas, Sara; Maestro, Armando; Fernández-Peña, Laura; Akanno, Andrew; Miller, Reinhard; Ortega, Francisco; Rubio, Ramón G

    2016-07-01

    The interest of polymer-surfactant systems has undergone a spectacular development in the last thirty years due to their complex behavior and their importance in different industrial sectors. The importance can be mainly associated with the rich phase behavior of these mixtures that confers a wide range of physico-chemical properties to the complexes formed by polymers and surfactants, both in bulk and at the interfaces. This latter aspect is especially relevant because of the use of their mixture for the stabilization of dispersed systems such as foams and emulsions, with an increasing interest in several fields such as cosmetic, food science or fabrication of controlled drug delivery structures. This review presents a comprehensive analysis of different aspects related to the phase behavior of these mixtures and their intriguing behavior after adsorption at the liquid/air interface. A discussion of some physical properties of the bulk is also included. The discussion clearly points out that much more work is needed for obtaining the necessary insights for designing polymer-surfactant mixtures for specific applications. PMID:26608684

  13. Screening of mixed surfactant systems: Phase behavior studies and CT imaging of surfactant-enhanced oil recovery experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Lorenz, P.B.; Cook, I.M.; Scott, L.J.

    1993-11-01

    A systematic chemical screening study was conducted on selected anionic-nonionic and nonionic-nonionic systems. The objective of the study was to evaluate and determine combinations of these surfactants that would exhibit favorable phase behavior and solubilization capacity. The effects of different parameters including (a) salinity, (b) temperature, (c) alkane carbon number, (c) hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of nonionic component, and (d) type of surfactant on the behavior of the overall chemical system were evaluated. The current work was conducted using a series of ethoxylated nonionic surfactants in combinations of several anionic systems with various hydrocarbons. Efforts to correlate the behavior of these mixed systems led to the development of several models for the chemical systems tested. The models were used to compare the different systems and provided some guidelines for formulating them to account for variations in salinity, oil hydrocarbon number, and temperature. The models were also evaluated to determine conformance with the results from experimental measurements. The models provided good agreement with experimental results. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. CT-monitored corefloods were conducted to examine the effect of changing surfactant slug size injection on oil bank formation and propagation. Reducing surfactant slug size resulted in lower total oil production. Oil recovery results, however, did not correlate with slug size for the low-concentration, alkaline, mixed surfactant system used in these tests. The CT measurements showed that polymer mobility control and core features also affected the overall oil recovery results.

  14. Development of the pulmonary surfactant system in two oviparous vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S D; Orgeig, S; Lopatko, O V; Daniels, C B

    2000-02-01

    In birds and oviparous reptiles, hatching is often a lengthy and exhausting process, which commences with pipping followed by lung clearance and pulmonary ventilation. We examined the composition of pulmonary surfactant in the developing lungs of the chicken, Gallus gallus, and of the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps. Lung tissue was collected from chicken embryos at days 14, 16, 18 (prepipped), and 20 (postpipped) of incubation and from 1 day and 3 wk posthatch and adult animals. In chickens, surfactant protein A mRNA was detected using Northern blot analysis in lung tissue at all stages sampled, appearing relatively earlier in development compared with placental mammals. Chickens were lavaged at days 16, 18, and 20 of incubation and 1 day posthatch, whereas bearded dragons were lavaged at day 55, days 57-60 (postpipped), and days 58-61 (posthatched). In both species, total phospholipid (PL) from the lavage increased throughout incubation. Disaturated PL (DSP) was not measurable before 16 days of incubation in the chick embryo nor before 55 days in bearded dragons. However, the percentage of DSP/PL increased markedly throughout late development in both species. Because cholesterol (Chol) remained unchanged, the Chol/PL and Chol/DSP ratios decreased in both species. Thus the Chol and PL components are differentially regulated. The lizard surfactant system develops and matures over a relatively shorter time than that of birds and mammals. This probably reflects the highly precocial nature of hatchling reptiles. PMID:10666151

  15. Monitoring near surface soil water and associated dynamics of infiltration and evaporation fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-situ monitoring of soil water has the advantage of integrating the precipitation, evaporation history, and gradual changes in hydraulic properties on the aggregate response of the system, which is manifested as soil water storage. Near-surface soil water and temperature dynamics were monitored th...

  16. [The ocular surfactant system and its relevance in the dry eye].

    PubMed

    Schicht, M; Posa, A; Paulsen, F; Bräuer, L

    2010-11-01

    The amphiphilic surfactant proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) are tightly bound to phospholipids. These proteins play important roles in maintaining the surface tension-lowering properties of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) are hydrophilic and are thought to have a role in recycling surfactant and, especially, in improving host defense in the lung. Moreover, SP-A supports the hydrophobic surfactant proteins B and during surfactant subtype assembly and inhibits the secretion of lamellar bodies into the alveolar space. During recent years surfactant proteins have also been detected at locations outside the lung such as the lacrimal apparatus. In this review, the latest information regarding SP function and regulation in the human lacrimal system, the tear film and the ocular surface is summarised with regard to dry eye, rheological and antimicrobial properties of the tear film, tear outflow, certain disease states and possible therapeutic perspectives. PMID:21077020

  17. Determination of the critical micelle concentration in simulations of surfactant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Andrew P.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative methods for determining the critical micelle concentration (cmc) are investigated using canonical and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a lattice surfactant model. A common measure of the cmc is the "free" (unassociated) surfactant concentration in the presence of micellar aggregates. Many prior simulations of micellizing systems have observed a decrease in the free surfactant concentration with overall surfactant loading for both ionic and nonionic surfactants, contrary to theoretical expectations from mass-action models of aggregation. In the present study, we investigate a simple lattice nonionic surfactant model in implicit solvent, for which highly reproducible simulations are possible in both the canonical (NVT) and grand canonical (μVT) ensembles. We confirm the previously observed decrease of free surfactant concentration at higher overall loadings and propose an algorithm for the precise calculation of the excluded volume and effective concentration of unassociated surfactant molecules in the accessible volume of the solution. We find that the cmc can be obtained by correcting the free surfactant concentration for volume exclusion effects resulting from the presence of micellar aggregates. We also develop an improved method for determination of the cmc based on the maximum in curvature for the osmotic pressure curve determined from μVT simulations. Excellent agreement in cmc and other micellar properties between NVT and μVT simulations of different system sizes is observed. The methodological developments in this work are broadly applicable to simulations of aggregating systems using any type of surfactant model (atomistic/coarse grained) or solvent description (explicit/implicit).

  18. The surfactant system protects both fetus and newborn.

    PubMed

    Hallman, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant complex and its individual components decrease surface tension, silence inflammatory responses, bind and destroy air-borne microbes, facilitate phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages and bind endogenous and exogenous molecules. Surfactant components generally decrease harmful inflammatory responses. New exogenous surfactants and new indications for surfactant therapy remain to be studied. At term the pool of human surfactant from developing airways extends to the amniotic cavity and to the gastrointestinal tract. Preterm labor-inducing inflammatory ligands (interleukin-1 or lipopolysaccharide) cause a robust induction of surfactant complex and lower the risk of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The effect of antenatal glucocorticoid therapy is complementary. According to transgenic experiments or genetic evidence in humans, surfactant proteins A, D or C (SP-A, SP-D, SP-C), expressed in fetal tissue, influence the onset of term or preterm labor. After birth, the surface tension-reducing and the inflammation-silencing effects of exogenous and endogenous surfactant are complementary. Surfactant proteins influence the genetic predisposition of RDS, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and airway infections in early infancy. Moderate to severe BPD has a strong genetic predisposition. Deleterious mutations of SP-B, ABCA3 or SP-C cause congenital interstitial lung disease that mimics the phenotype of established severe BPD. I propose that lung surfactant protects both the fetus and the newborn. Surfactant ameliorates inflammatory responses that are harmful to the mother, fetus and infant. In chorioamnionitis, inflammatory ligands are carried from the fetal membranes to the alveolar space via amniotic fluid and developing airways. They induce surfactant synthesis and secretion. Surfactant ameliorates severe inflammatory responses in fetal compartments and promotes spontaneous preterm birth. PMID:23736009

  19. Crop Residue and Soil Water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop yield is greatly influenced by the amount of water that moves from the soil, through the plant, and out into the atmosphere. Winter wheat yield responds linearly to available soil water content at planting (bu/a = 5.56 + 5.34*inches). Therefore, storing precipitation in the soil during non-crop...

  20. Soil carbonates and soil water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of soil carbonates occurring as solidified masses or dispersed particles can alter soil water dynamics from what would be expected based on non-carbonate soil properties. Carbonate minerals in the soil can be derived from high carbonate parent material, additions in the form of carbonat...

  1. Wormlike micelles in mixed surfactant systems: effect of cosolvents.

    PubMed

    Varade, Dharmesh; Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos; Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Aramaki, Kenji

    2007-09-01

    We have studied the structure and rheological behavior of viscoelastic wormlike micellar solutions in the mixed nonionic surfactants poly(oxyethylene) cholesteryl ether (ChEO15)-trioxyethylene monododecyl ether (C12EO3) and anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-C12EO3 using a series of glycerol/water and formamide/water mixed solvents. The obtained results are compared with those reported in pure water for the corresponding mixed surfactant systems. The zero-shear viscosity first sharply increases with C12EO3 addition and then decreases; i.e., there is a viscosity maximum. The intensity (viscosity) and position (C12EO3 fraction) of this maximum shift to lower values upon an increase in the ratio of glycerol in the glycerol/water mixed solvent, while the position of the maximum changes in an opposite way with increasing formamide. In the case of the SDS/C12EO3 system, zero-shear viscosity shows a decrease with an increase of temperature, but for the ChEO15/C12EO3 system, again, the zero-shear viscosity shows a maximum if plotted as a function of temperature, its position depending on the C12EO3 mixing fraction. In the studied nonionic systems, worm micelles seem to exist at low temperatures (down to 0 degrees C) and high glycerol concentrations (up to 50 wt %), which is interesting from the viewpoint of applications such as drag reduction fluids. Rheology results are supported by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements on nonionic systems, which indicate micellar elongation upon addition of glycerol or increasing temperature and shortening upon addition of formamide. The results can be interpreted in terms of changes in the surface curvature of aggregates and lyophobicity. PMID:17696527

  2. Surfactant effects on alpha-factors in aeration systems.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Diego; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2006-04-01

    Aeration in wastewater treatment processes accounts for the largest fraction of plant energy costs. Aeration systems function by shearing the surface (surface aerators) or releasing bubbles at the bottom of the tank (coarse- or fine-bubble aerators). Surfactant accumulation on gas-liquid interfaces reduces mass transfer rates, and this reduction in general is larger for fine-bubble aerators. This study evaluates mass transfer effects on the characterization and specification of aeration systems in clean and process water conditions. Tests at different interfacial turbulence regimes show higher gas transfer depression for lower turbulence regimes. Contamination effects can be offset at the expense of operating efficiency, which is characteristic of surface aerators and coarse-bubble diffusers. Results describe the variability of alpha-factors measured at small scale, due to uncontrolled energy density. Results are also reported in dimensionless empirical correlations describing mass transfer as a function of physiochemical and geometrical characteristics of the aeration process. PMID:16549087

  3. Lithographic performance and dissolution behavior of novolac resins for various developer surfactant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Gary E.; Loftus, James E.

    1992-06-01

    The use of surfactants in today's society ranges over a wide variety of technologies, from soaps and detergents to house paints and electronic materials. In the semiconductor industry, surfactants are commonly used as coating additives in photoresists, as additives in wet chemical etchants, as additives in developer solutions, and in other areas where surface activity is desirable. In most applications, the mechanisms of surfactant chemistry are well established, yet there has been only a limited amount of published literature pertaining to characterizing the behavior of surfactants in developer systems for photoresists. This project explores the application of surfactants in an aqueous tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH) based developer for two optical resists, one incorporating a 2,1,4- diazonaphthoquinone (DNQ) sensitizer, while the other incorporates a 2,1,5-DNQ sensitizer. In addition, each optical resist is based on different positive novolac resins with distinct structural properties. This feature aids in illustrating the improtance of matching the developer surfactant with the photoresist resin structure. Four distinct non-ionic surfactants with well published physical and chemical properties are examined. Properties of the surfactants explored include differences in structure, surfactant concentration, various degrees of hydrophilic versus lipophilic content (known as the HLB, or hydrophilic - lipophilic balance), and the differences in reported critical micelle concentration (CMC). Previous research investigated the performance characteristics of the 2,1,5-DNQ for these four surfactants. This investigation is an extension of the previous project by next considering a significantly different photoresist. A discussion of potential mechanisms of the solubilization and wetting effects is utilized to promote an understanding of surfactant effects in resist/developer systems. Also, because of the extensive characterization involved in screening surfactants, a

  4. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  5. PHASE BEHAVIOR OF WATER/PERCHLOROETHYLENE/ANIONIC SURFACTANT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Winsor Type I (o/w), Type II (w/o), and Type III (middle phase) microemulsions have been generated for water and perchloroethylene (PCE) in combination with anionic surfactants and the appropriate electrolyte concentration. The surfactant formulation was a combination of sodium d...

  6. Evolution, Development, and Function of the Pulmonary Surfactant System in Normal and Perturbed Environments.

    PubMed

    Orgeig, Sandra; Morrison, Janna L; Daniels, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant lipids and proteins form a surface active film at the air-liquid interface of internal gas exchange organs, including swim bladders and lungs. The system is uniquely positioned to meet both the physical challenges associated with a dynamically changing internal air-liquid interface, and the environmental challenges associated with the foreign pathogens and particles to which the internal surface is exposed. Lungs range from simple, transparent, bag-like units to complex, multilobed, compartmentalized structures. Despite this anatomical variability, the surfactant system is remarkably conserved. Here, we discuss the evolutionary origin of the surfactant system, which likely predates lungs. We describe the evolution of surfactant structure and function in invertebrates and vertebrates. We focus on changes in lipid and protein composition and surfactant function from its antiadhesive and innate immune to its alveolar stability and structural integrity functions. We discuss the biochemical, hormonal, autonomic, and mechanical factors that regulate normal surfactant secretion in mature animals. We present an analysis of the ontogeny of surfactant development among the vertebrates and the contribution of different regulatory mechanisms that control this development. We also discuss environmental (oxygen), hormonal and biochemical (glucocorticoids and glucose) and pollutant (maternal smoking, alcohol, and common "recreational" drugs) effects that impact surfactant development. On the adult surfactant system, we focus on environmental variables including temperature, pressure, and hypoxia that have shaped its evolution and we discuss the resultant biochemical, biophysical, and cellular adaptations. Finally, we discuss the effect of major modern gaseous and particulate pollutants on the lung and surfactant system. PMID:26756637

  7. Integrating soil water and tracer balances, numerical modelling and GIS tools to estimate regional groundwater recharge: Application to the Alcadozo Aquifer System (SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Hornero, Jorge; Manzano, Marisol; Ortega, Lucía; Custodio, Emilio

    2016-10-15

    Groundwater recharge is one of the key variables for aquifer management and also one of the most difficult to be evaluated with acceptable accuracy. This is especially relevant in semiarid areas, where the processes involved in recharge are widely variable. Uncertainty should be estimated to know how reliable recharge estimations are. Groundwater recharge has been calculated in the Alcadozo Aquifer System, under steady state conditions, at regional (aquifer) and sub-regional (spring catchment) scales applying different methods. The regional distribution of long-term average recharge values has been estimated with the chloride mass balance method using data from four rain stations and 40 groundwater samples covering almost the whole aquifer surface. A remarkable spatial variability has been found. Average annual recharge rates ranges from 20 to 243mmyear(-1) across the aquifer, with an estimated coefficient of variation between 0.16 and 0.38. The average recharge/precipitation ratio decreases from 34% in the NW to 6% in the SE, following the topographic slope. At spring-catchment scale, recharge has been estimated by modelling the soil water balance with the code Visual Balan 2.0. The results, calibrated with discharge data of the two main springs Liétor and Ayna, are 35.5 and 50mmyear(-1) respectively, with estimated coefficients of variation of 0.49 and 0.36. A sensitivity analysis showed that soil parameters influence the most the uncertainty of recharge estimations. Recharge values estimated with both methods and at two temporal and spatial scales are consistent, considering the regional variability obtained with the chloride method and the respective confidence intervals. Evaluating the uncertainties of each method eased to compare their relative results and to check their agreement, which provided confidence to the values obtained. Thus, the use of independent methods together with their uncertainties is strongly recommended to constrain the magnitude and to

  8. Turbulent Drag Reduction with Surfactant Additives — Basic Research and Application to an Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Li, F. C.; Yu, B.; Wei, J. J.

    It is well known that a small amount of chemicals such as water-soluble polymers or surfactants dramatically suppresses turbulence when they are added to liquid flow at large Reynolds number. In the last two decades, the application of surfactants to heat transportation systems such as district heating and cooling systems has attracted much interest among researchers. It has been revealed that 70% of the pumping power used to drive hot water in primary pipelines or district heating systems was saved by adding only a few hundred ppm of surfactant into the circulating water. The technological achievement requires a new design strategy for pipeline networks and heat exchangers to handle the drag reducing liquid flow. In the case of a Newtonian fluid such as water or air, the knowledge for designing fluid systems has been accumulated and the accuracy of numerical prediction is sufficient. On the other hand, the design system for surfactant solutions is not mature because drag-reducing flow phenomena are much more complicated than for Newtonian flow, for example, the friction factor for a surfactant solution depends not only on Reynolds number but also pipe diameter. In order to provide a design strategy for heat transportation systems using surfactant additives, we are now carrying out both experimental and numerical studies for surfactant solutions. In this lecture, experimental and numerical studies on the turbulence structure in drag reducing flow will be introduced. The result of an application study relating to the air conditioning system will be also shown.

  9. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  10. Response of graywater recycling systems based on hydroponic plant growth to three classes of surfactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, J. L.; Levine, L. H.; Yorio, N. C.; Hummerick, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    Anionic (sodium laureth sulfate, SLES), amphoteric (cocamidopropyl betaine, CAPB) and nonionic (alcohol polyethoxylate, AE) surfactants were added to separate nutrient film technique (NFT) hydroponic systems containing dwarf wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. USU Apogee) in a series of 21 day trials. Surfactant was added either in a (1). temporally dynamic mode (1-3 g surfactant m(-2) growing area d(-1)) as effected by automatic addition of a 300 ppm surfactant solution to meet plant water demand, or (2). continuous mode (2 g surfactant m(-2) growing area d(-1)) as effected by slow addition (10 mLh(-1)) of a 2000 ppm surfactant solution beginning at 4d after planting. SLES showed rapid primary degradation in both experiments, with no accumulation 24 h after initial addition. CAPB and AE were degraded less rapidly, with 30-50% remaining 24 h after initial addition, but CAPB and AE levels were below detection limit for the remainder of the study. No reductions in vegetative growth of wheat were observed in response to SLES, but biomass was reduced 20-25% with CAPB and AE. Microbial communities associated with both the plant roots and wetted hardware surfaces actively degraded the surfactants, as determined by monitoring surfactant levels following pulse additions at day 20 (with plants) and day 21 (after plant removal). In order to test whether the biofilm communities could ameliorate phytotoxicity by providing a microbial community acclimated for CAPB and AE decay, the continuous exposure systems were planted with wheat seeds after crop removal at day 21. Acclimation resulted in faster primary degradation (>90% within 24h) and reduced phytotoxicity. Overall, the studies indicate that relatively small areas (3-5m(2)) of hydroponic plant systems can process per capita production of mixed surfactants (5-10 g x person(-1)d(-1)) with minimal effects on plant growth.

  11. Response of graywater recycling systems based on hydroponic plant growth to three classes of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Garland, J L; Levine, L H; Yorio, N C; Hummerick, M E

    2004-04-01

    Anionic (sodium laureth sulfate, SLES), amphoteric (cocamidopropyl betaine, CAPB) and nonionic (alcohol polyethoxylate, AE) surfactants were added to separate nutrient film technique (NFT) hydroponic systems containing dwarf wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. USU Apogee) in a series of 21 day trials. Surfactant was added either in a (1). temporally dynamic mode (1-3 g surfactant m(-2) growing area d(-1)) as effected by automatic addition of a 300 ppm surfactant solution to meet plant water demand, or (2). continuous mode (2 g surfactant m(-2) growing area d(-1)) as effected by slow addition (10 mLh(-1)) of a 2000 ppm surfactant solution beginning at 4d after planting. SLES showed rapid primary degradation in both experiments, with no accumulation 24 h after initial addition. CAPB and AE were degraded less rapidly, with 30-50% remaining 24 h after initial addition, but CAPB and AE levels were below detection limit for the remainder of the study. No reductions in vegetative growth of wheat were observed in response to SLES, but biomass was reduced 20-25% with CAPB and AE. Microbial communities associated with both the plant roots and wetted hardware surfaces actively degraded the surfactants, as determined by monitoring surfactant levels following pulse additions at day 20 (with plants) and day 21 (after plant removal). In order to test whether the biofilm communities could ameliorate phytotoxicity by providing a microbial community acclimated for CAPB and AE decay, the continuous exposure systems were planted with wheat seeds after crop removal at day 21. Acclimation resulted in faster primary degradation (>90% within 24h) and reduced phytotoxicity. Overall, the studies indicate that relatively small areas (3-5m(2)) of hydroponic plant systems can process per capita production of mixed surfactants (5-10 g x person(-1)d(-1)) with minimal effects on plant growth. PMID:15087176

  12. Microemulsion to liquid crystal transition in two anionic surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, J.L.; Miller, C.A.

    1988-08-01

    The phase behavior of two anionic surfactant systems, one containing a commercial alpha olefin sulfonate (AOS) and the other containing pure sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), was determined in the region where a transition from microemulsion to liquid-crystalline phases occurred with decreasing alcohol content and temperature. A general and rather complex pattern of phase behavior was seen that included a four-phase coexistence region of brine, microemulsion, lamellar liquid crystal, and oil, and two three-phase regions containing both microemulsion and liquid crystal. In much of the four-phase region, complete separation of the phases did not occur even after equilibration for 1 year or more at constant temperature. Instead, oil and brine were observed to coexist with stable birefringent dispersions that (for some compositions at least) apparently contained three phases: microemulsion, liquid crystal, and oil. Solubilization of brine was uniformly low in the phases making up the dispersions. The dispersions in the SDS system exhibited non-Newtonian behavior with apparent viscosities in the range of 50 to 100 mPa . s (50 to 100 cp) at a shear rate of 10 seconds/sup -1/. Microemulsion viscosities in the same system were about an order of magnitude lower. No plugging or other adverse behavior was seen when such dispersions flowed at a velocity of 10/sup -5/ m/s (3 ft/D) through a model porous medium having pore sizes comparable with those in reservoirs. In preliminary experiments, selected dispersions appeared to be capable of displacing oil from the same model porous medium.

  13. Design and field tests of a directly coupled waveguide-on-access-tube soil water sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sensor systems capable of monitoring soil water content can provide a useful tool for irrigation control. Current systems are limited by installation depth, labor, accuracy, and cost. Time domain reflectometry (TDR) is an approach for monitoring soil water content that relates the travel time of an ...

  14. Biodegradation of naphthalene in aqueous nonionic surfactant systems.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z; Jacobson, A M; Luthy, R G

    1995-01-01

    The principal objective of this study was to quantify the bioavailability of micelle-solubilized naphthalene to naphthalene-degrading microorganisms comprising a mixed population isolated from contaminated waste and soils. Two nonionic surfactants were used, an alkylethoxylate, Brij 30 (C12E4), and an alkylphenol ethoxylate, Triton X-100 (C8PE9.5). Batch experiments were used to evaluate the effects of aqueous, micellized nonionic surfactants on the microbial mineralization of naphthalene and salicylic acid, an intermediate compound formed in the pathway of microbial degradation of naphthalene. The extent of solubilization and biodegradation under aerobic conditions was monitored by radiotracer and spectrophotometric techniques. Experimental results showed that surfactant concentrations above the critical micelle concentration were not toxic to the naphthalene-degrading bacteria and that the presence of surfactant micelles did not inhibit mineralization of naphthalene. Naphthalene solubilized by micelles of Brij 30 or Triton X-100 in liquid media was bioavailable and degradable by the mixed culture of bacteria. PMID:7887597

  15. Data assimilation with soil water content sensors and pedotransfer functions in soil water flow modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water flow models are based on a set of simplified assumptions about the mechanisms, processes, and parameters of water retention and flow. That causes errors in soil water flow model predictions. Soil water content monitoring data can be used to reduce the errors in models. Data assimilation (...

  16. Solubilization of naphthalene in the presence of plant-synthetic mixed surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Jagajjanani; Paria, Santanu

    2009-01-15

    Solubilization efficiencies of naphthalene by micellar solution of a plant-based surfactant extracted from fruit of Sapindus mukorossi (reetha) and the synthetic surfactants like nonionic (Triton X-100 or TX-100), cationic (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or CTAB), and anionic (sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate or SDBS; dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate or AOT; sodium octanesulfonate or SOS) in their single and as well as binary mixed (plant-synthetic) systems were measured and compared. The solubilization efficiency of single surfactants shows that reetha is less effective than TX-100, similar to SDBS, and more than AOT and SOS. The mixed surfactant systems show negative deviation in molar solubilization ratio (MSR) from ideality. The ascending order of percent change in MSR (Delta(MSR)) is TX-100-reetha < CTAB-reetha < SDBS-reetha < AOT-reetha < SOS-reetha. The mixed micellar solution for a particular combination also shows that Delta(MSR) is more negative when the interaction parameter for the mixed micelle (beta) is more negative. The results of this study may be useful for the applications of natural or natural-synthetic mixed surfactants in surfactant-enhanced remediation or detergency. PMID:19099430

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Heterologous Production Systems for Recombinant Pulmonary Surfactant Protein D

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Daniela; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan; Twyman, Richard M.; Rasche, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Commercial surfactant products derived from animal lungs are used for the treatment of respiratory diseases in premature neonates. These products contain lipids and the hydrophobic surfactant proteins B and C, which help to lower the surface tension in the lungs. Surfactant products are less effective when pulmonary diseases involve inflammatory complications because two hydrophilic surfactant proteins (A and D) are lost during the extraction process, yet surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a component of the innate immune system that helps to reduce lung inflammation. The performance of surfactant products could, therefore, be improved by supplementing them with an additional source of SP-D. Recombinant SP-D (rSP-D) is produced in mammalian cells and bacteria (Escherichia coli), and also experimentally in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mammalian cells produce full-size SP-D, but the yields are low and the cost of production is high. In contrast, bacteria produce a truncated form of SP-D, which is active in vitro and in vivo, and higher yields can be achieved at a lower cost. We compare the efficiency of production of rSP-D in terms of the total yields achieved in each system and the amount of SP-D needed to meet the global demand for the treatment of pulmonary diseases, using respiratory distress syndrome as a case study. PMID:25538707

  18. Evaluation of antitubercular drug-loaded surfactants as inhalable drug-delivery systems for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chimote, G; Banerjee, R

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is associated with a year-long chemotherapy, poor alveolar drug levels, drug-related systemic toxicity, and patient noncompliance. In this study, exogenous pulmonary surfactant is proposed as a drug carrier for antitubercular drugs. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the major lung-surfactant lipid, has been combined with antitubercular drugs isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RFM), and ethambutol (ETH) in 1:1 ratio by weight, in which drugs had a ratio of 1:2:3 by weight. At 37 degrees C, the formulation had better surfactant function with quicker reduction of surface tension on adsorption (32.71 +/- 0.65 mN/m) than DPPC liposomes (44.67 +/- 0.57 mN/m) and maintained 100% airway patency in a capillary surfactometer. Drug-loaded surfactant liposomes were about 2 microm and had entrapment efficiency of 30.04% +/- 2.05%, 18.85% +/- 2.92%, and 61.47% +/- 3.32% for INH, RFM, and ETH, respectively. Sustained release of the drugs from surfactants was observed over 24 h. In vitro alveolar deposition efficiency using the twin impinger showed 12.06% +/- 1.87% of INH, 43.30% +/- 0.87% of RFM, and 22.07% +/- 2.02% of ETH deposited in the alveolar chamber upon nebulization for a minute using a jet nebulizer. The formulation was biocompatible and stable with physicochemical properties being retained even after storage for a month at 4 degrees C. Antitubercular drug-loaded surfactants developed could serve dual purposes of alveolar stabilization due to surfactant action and better reach of these drugs to the alveoli due to antiatelectatic effect of the surfactant. PMID:18431766

  19. Conservation laws for a class of soil water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaşar, Emrullah

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we consider a class of nonlinear partial differential equations which model soil water infiltration, redistribution and extraction in a bedded soil profile irrigated by a line source drip irrigation system. By using the nonlocal conservation theorem method and the partial Lagrangian approach, conservation laws are presented. It is observed that both approaches lead to the nontrivial and infinite conservation laws.

  20. Quantifying crop water stress factors from soil water measurements in a limited irrigation experiment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying crop water stress factors from soil water measurements in a limited irrigation experiment. A correct simulation of crop responses to water stress is essential for a system model. In this study, we investigated three methods of quantifying water deficit stresses based on soil water meas...

  1. EVALUATION OF A TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY SLED FOR MAPPING SOIL WATER CONTENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rapid method for mapping soil water content would be valuable for agricultural and scientific applications such as precision irrigation. A sled type measurement device with a time domain reflectometer and global positioning system was evaluated for measuring soil water content following tillage. T...

  2. EVALUATION OF SOIL WATER RETENTION MODELS BASED ON BASIC SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Algorithms to model soil water retention are needed to study the response of vegetation and hydrologic systems to climate change. he objective of this study was to evaluate some soil water retention models to identify minimum input data requirements. ix models that function with ...

  3. Crop water stress indices correlated with soil water storage: Implications for variable rate irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water sensing methods are now coming to be used for irrigation scheduling of whole fields. However, newly introduced variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems require information about soil water content in many areas of a field, each called an irrigation management zone. Commonly available soil w...

  4. Soil water sensors for irrigation management-What works, what doesn't, and why

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation scheduling can be greatly improved if accurate soil water content data are available. There are a plethora of available soil water sensing systems, but those that are practical for irrigation scheduling are divided into two major types: the frequency domain (capacitance) sensors and the t...

  5. Autonomic control of the pulmonary surfactant system and lung compliance in the lizard.

    PubMed

    Wood, P G; Andrew, L K; Daniels, C B; Orgeig, S; Roberts, C T

    1997-01-01

    An increase in body temperature in the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps, is accompanied by an increase in the amount of pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of proteins and lipids, with the latter consisting predominantly of phospholipid and cholesterol. This increase may result from a temperature-induced change in autonomic input to the lungs, as perfusing the isolated lungs of P. vitticeps with either acetylcholine or adrenaline increases surfactant phospholipid release. However, whether acetylcholine acts via intrapulmonary sympathetic ganglia or directly on alveolar Type II cells is unknown. Moreover, the relative importance of circulating catecholamines and pulmonary sympathetic nerves on the control of the surfactant system is also obscure. Here, we describe the mechanism of the modulation of the surfactant system and the effect of this modulation on lung compliance. The role of acetylcholine was determined by perfusing isolated lungs with acetylcholine, acetylcholine and the ganglionic antagonist hexamethonium, or acetylcholine, hexamethonium, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Perfusing with acetylcholine significantly increased phospholipid release but did not affect cholesterol release. While histological examination of the lung revealed the presence of a large autonomic ganglion at the apex, blocking sympathetic ganglia with hexamethonium did not prevent the acetylcholine-mediated increase in phospholipid. However, the increase was inhibited by blocking muscarinic receptors with atropine, which indicates that acetylcholine acts on muscarinic receptors to stimulate phospholipid release. By increasing pulmonary smooth muscle tone, acetylcholine decreased opening pressure and increased static inflation pressures. Plasma levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline increased with increasing temperature and were accompanied by a greater surfactant content in the lungs. While surfactant content was also higher in animals that exercised, plasma levels of adrenaline

  6. Identification of phases of various oil, surfactant/ co-surfactants and water system by ternary phase diagram.

    PubMed

    Syed, Haroon K; Peh, Kok K

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to select appropriate surfactants or blends of surfactants and oil to study the ternary phase diagram behavior and identify various phases obtained from the oil and surfactant/surfactant mixture combinations of different HLB. The phases include conventional emulsion, gel/viscous and transparent/translucent microemulsion. Pseudoternary phase diagrams of water, oil and S/Smix of various HLB values range of 9.65-15 were constructed by using water titration method at room temperature. Visual analysis, conductivity and dye dilution test (methylene blue) were performed after each addition and mixing of water, to identify phases as microemulsion, o/w or w/o emulsion (turbid/milky) and transparent gel/turbid viscous. High gel or viscous area was obtained with Tween 80 and surfactant mixture of Tween 80 and Span 80 with all oils. The results indicated that non-ionic surfactants and PG of different HLB values exhibited different pseudoternary phase diagram characteristics but no microemulsions originated from mineral and olive oils. The w/o emulsion occupied a large area in the ternary phase triangle when HLB value of the surfactant/Smix decreased. The o/w emulsion area was large with increasing HLB value of surfactant/Smix. PMID:25272651

  7. Lamellar miscibility gap in a binary catanionic surfactant-water system.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bruno F B; Marques, Eduardo F; Olsson, Ulf

    2007-12-01

    The coexistence of two lamellar liquid-crystalline phases in equilibrium for binary surfactant-water systems is a rare and still puzzling phenomenon. In the few binary systems where it has been demonstrated experimentally, the surfactant is invariably ionic and the miscibility gap is thought to stem from a subtle balance between attractive and repulsive interbilayer forces. In this paper, we report for the first time a miscibility gap for a catanionic lamellar phase formed by the surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium octylsulfonate (TASo) in water. Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering, polarizing light microscopy, and 2H NMR unequivocally show the coexistence of a dilute (or swollen) lamellar phase, Lalpha', and a concentrated (or collapsed) lamellar phase, Lalpha' '. Furthermore, linear swelling is observed for each of the phases, with the immiscibility region occurring for 15-54 wt % surfactant. In the dilute region, the swollen lamellar phase is in equilibrium with an isotropic micellar region. Vesicles can be observed in this two-phase region as a dispersion of Lalpha' in the solution phase. A theoretical cell model based on combined DLVO and short-range repulsive potentials is presented in order to provide physical insight into the miscibility gap. The surfactant TASo is net uncharged, but it undergoes partial dissociation owing to the higher aqueous solubility of the short octylsulfonate chain. Thus, a residual positive charge in the bilayer is originated and, consequently, an electrostatic repulsive force, whose magnitude is dependent on surfactant concentration. For physically reasonable values of the solubility of the octyl chain, assumed to be constant with surfactant volume fraction, a fairly good agreement is observed between the experimental miscibility gap and the theoretical one. PMID:17994726

  8. Self-assembled systems of water soluble metal 8-hydroxyquinolates with surfactants and conjugated polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Hugh D; Costa, Telma; Ramos, M Luisa; Valente, Artur J M; Stewart, Beverly; Justino, Licinia L G; Almeida, Aline I A; Catarina, Nathanny Lessa; Mallavia, Ricardo; Knaapila, Matti

    2016-06-22

    We have studied the interaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonate (8-HQS) with the metal ions Al(iii) and Zn(ii) in aqueous solution in the presence of tetraalkylammonium surfactants using UV/vis absorption, fluorescence, NMR spectroscopy and electrical conductivity measurements, complemented by DFT calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Under appropriate conditions, complexes between 8-HQS and metal ions form rapidly, and have similar electronic, spectroscopic and photophysical properties to the corresponding metal quinolates, such as Alq3. These interact with the cationic surfactants, leading to marked increases in fluorescence intensity. However, significant differences are seen in the behavior of the two metal ions. With aluminium, a stable [Al(8-QS)3](3-) anion is formed, and interacts, predominantly through electrostatic interactions, with the surfactant, without disrupting the metal ion coordination sphere. In contrast, with Zn(ii), there is a competition between the metal ion and surfactants in the interaction with 8-HQS, although the [Zn(8-QS)2(H2O)2](2-) species is stable at appropriate pH and surfactant concentration. The studies are extended to systems with the conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) poly-(9,9-bis(6-N,N,N-trimethylammonium)hexyl)-fluorene-phenylene bromide (HTMA-PFP), which has a similar alkylammonium chain to the surfactants. Mixing metal salt, 8-HQS and HTMA-PFP in the presence of a nonionic surfactant leads to the formation of a metal complex/CPE supramolecular assembly between the conjugated polyelectrolyte and the metal/8-HQS complex, as demonstrated by electronic energy transfer. The potential of these systems in sensing, light harvesting, and electron injection/transport layers in organic semiconductor devices is discussed. PMID:26817700

  9. The effect of alkaline additives on the performance of surfactant systems designed to recover light oils

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.; Evans, D.B.

    1991-02-01

    Surfactant flooding is flexible because of the ability to optimize formulations for a wide range of reservoir conditions and crude oil types. The objective for this work was to determine if the addition of alkaline additives will allow the design of surfactant formulations that are effective for the recovery of crude oil, while, at the same time, maintaining the surfactant concentration at a much lower level than has previously been used for micellar flooding. Specifically, the focus of the work was on light, midcontinent crudes that typically have very low acid contents. These oils are typical of much of the midcontinent resource. The positive effect of alkaline additives on the phase behavior of the surfactant formulations and acidic crude oils is well known. The extension to nonacidic and slightly acidic oils is not obvious. Three crude oils, a variety of commercial surfactants, and several alkaline additives were tested. The oils had acid numbers that ranged from 0.13, which is quite low, to less than 0.01 mg KOH/g of oil. Alkaline additives were found to be very effective in recovering Delaware-Childers (OK) oil at elevated temperatures, but much less effective at reservoir temperatures. Alkaline additives were very effective with Teapot Dome (WY) oil. With Teapot Dome oil, surfactant/alkali systems produced ultralow IFT values and recovered 60% of the residual oil that remained after waterflooding. The effect of alkaline additives on recovering Hepler (KS) oil was minimal. The results of this work indicate that alkaline additives do have merit for use in surfactant flooding of low acid crude oils; however, no universal statement about applicability can be made. Each oil behaves differently, with this treatment, and the effect of alkaline additives must be determined (at reservoir conditions) for each oil. 23 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Photocatalytic degradation of surfactants with immobilized TiO2: comparing two reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Lizama, C; Bravo, C; Caneo, C; Ollino, M

    2005-08-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of two industrial-grade surfactants, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and sodium dodecylbenzenesulphonate (SDDBS), were achieved using TiO2 immobilised on glass Raschig rings and inside a bent tube of glass, using two different photoreactors in recirculation batch mode with a black light fluorescent tube as irradiation source. The influence of parameters pH, recalculation flow, airflow and number of treatment units were determined. For comparison purposes, the energetic cost of treatment was determined for both reaction systems as the figure-of-merit EE/O, showing that titania supported on glass Raschig rings is a more efficient system than the inner coated spring with TiO2, but this condition is strongly dependent on the surfactant identity. The best conditions for surfactants elimination were used to carry out the treatment of solutions containing two commercial detergents, reaching an 80% of removal in 60 min of irradiation. PMID:16128389

  11. Hydrology: The diversified economics of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    Soil water that evaporates or is tapped by plants is largely separate from that which runs into streams and recharges groundwater. This finding has big implications for our understanding of water cycling. See Letter p.91

  12. Soil-, water-, and energy-conserving tillage - Southern Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.R.; Musick, J.T.; Unger, P.W.; Wiese, A.F.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes some conservation cropping systems that have been developed through research. The cropping systems were: dryland wheat-fallow with stubble mulch, dryland wheat-chemical fallow-sorghum, irrigated wheat-chemical fallow-sorghum, irrigated sorghum double-cropped after winter wheat, and irrigated annual sorghum. For these cropping systems, the affect of tillage method upon soil water storage, crop yield, and energy use is discussed. 15 refs.

  13. CO2-induced micelle to vesicle transition in zwitterionic-anionic surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yang, Yanjuan; Luo, Tian; Zhang, Jianling; Han, Buxing

    2014-02-28

    Study of micelle to vesicle transition (MVT) is of great importance from both theoretical and practical points of view. In this work, we studied the effect of compressed CO2 on the aggregation behavior of zwitterionic-anionic (DSB (dodecyl sulfonatebetaine)-AOT(sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate)) mixed surfactants in aqueous solution by means of direct observation, turbidity, steady-state fluorescence, fluorescence quantum yield, and entrapment quantity of vesicles. Interestingly, all the methods show that compressed CO2 can induce MVT in this zwitterionic-anionic surfactant system. The CO2-induced MVT is reversible and the degree of MVT can be easily tuned by controlling the operation pressure. Further studies show that the pH decrease and dissolution of gas molecules in the surfactant film co-contribute to the MVT, and a possible mechanism for the CO2-induced MVT was proposed based on the experimental results. PMID:24413812

  14. Investigation of surfactant mediated acid-base charging of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Matthew M; Berg, John C

    2012-12-21

    The current work examines the role of acid-base properties on particle charging in apolar media. Manipulating the polarity and magnitude of charge in such systems is of growing interest to a number of applications. A major hurdle to the implementation of this technology is that the mechanism(s) of particle charging remain a subject of debate. The authors previously conducted a study of the charging of a series of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems that contained the surfactant AOT. It was observed that there was a correlation between the particle electrophoretic mobility and the acid-base nature of the particle, as characterized by aqueous point of zero charge (PZC) or the isoelectric point (IEP). The current study investigates whether or not a similar correlation is observed with other surfactants, namely, the acidic Span 80 and the basic OLOA 11000. This is accomplished by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of a series of mineral oxides that are dispersed in Isopar-L containing various concentrations of either Span 80 or OLOA 11000. The mineral oxides used have PZC values that cover a wide range of pH, providing a systematic study of how particle and surfactant acid-base properties impact particle charge. It was found that the magnitude and polarity of particle surface charge varied linearly with the particle PZC for both surfactants used. In addition, the point at which the polarity of charge reversed for the basic surfactant OLOA 11000 was shifted to a pH of approximately 8.5, compared to the previous result of about 5 for AOT. This proves that both surfactant and particle acid-base properties are important, and provides support for the theory of acid-base charging in apolar media. PMID:23157688

  15. Factors Affecting the Design of Slow Release Formulations of Herbicides Based on Clay-Surfactant Systems. A Methodological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Galán-Jiménez, María del Carmen; Mishael, Yael-Golda; Nir, Shlomo; Morillo, Esmeralda; Undabeytia, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ), mesotrione (MS) and flurtamone (FL), whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i) neutral: two berols (B048, B266) and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202); (ii) cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15). Significant percent of active ingredient (a.i.) in the clay/surfactant/herbicide formulations could be achieved only when most of the surfactant was added as micelles. MZ and FL were well solubilized by berols, whereas MS by ET/15. Sorption of surfactants on the clay mineral sepiolite occurred mostly by sorption of micelles, and the loadings exceeded the CEC. Higher loadings were determined for B266 and ET/15. The sorption of surfactants was modeled by using the Langmuir-Scatchard equation which permitted the determination of binding coefficients that could be used for further predictions of the sorbed amounts of surfactants under a wide range of clay/surfactant ratios. A possibility was tested of designing clay-surfactant based formulations of certain herbicides by assuming the same ratio between herbicides and surfactants in the formulations as for herbicides incorporated in micelles in solution. Calculations indicated that satisfactory FL formulations could not be synthesized. The experimental fractions of herbicides in the formulations were in agreement with the predicted ones for MS and MZ. The validity of this approach was confirmed in in vitro release tests that showed a slowing down of the release of a.i. from the designed formulations relative to the technical products. Soil dissipation studies with MS formulations also showed improved bioactivity of the clay-surfactant formulation relative to the commercial one. This methodological approach can be extended to other clay-surfactant systems for encapsulation and

  16. Factors affecting the design of slow release formulations of herbicides based on clay-surfactant systems. A methodological approach.

    PubMed

    Galán-Jiménez, María Del Carmen; Mishael, Yael-Golda; Nir, Shlomo; Morillo, Esmeralda; Undabeytia, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ), mesotrione (MS) and flurtamone (FL), whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i) neutral: two berols (B048, B266) and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202); (ii) cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15). Significant percent of active ingredient (a.i.) in the clay/surfactant/herbicide formulations could be achieved only when most of the surfactant was added as micelles. MZ and FL were well solubilized by berols, whereas MS by ET/15. Sorption of surfactants on the clay mineral sepiolite occurred mostly by sorption of micelles, and the loadings exceeded the CEC. Higher loadings were determined for B266 and ET/15. The sorption of surfactants was modeled by using the Langmuir-Scatchard equation which permitted the determination of binding coefficients that could be used for further predictions of the sorbed amounts of surfactants under a wide range of clay/surfactant ratios. A possibility was tested of designing clay-surfactant based formulations of certain herbicides by assuming the same ratio between herbicides and surfactants in the formulations as for herbicides incorporated in micelles in solution. Calculations indicated that satisfactory FL formulations could not be synthesized. The experimental fractions of herbicides in the formulations were in agreement with the predicted ones for MS and MZ. The validity of this approach was confirmed in in vitro release tests that showed a slowing down of the release of a.i. from the designed formulations relative to the technical products. Soil dissipation studies with MS formulations also showed improved bioactivity of the clay-surfactant formulation relative to the commercial one. This methodological approach can be extended to other clay-surfactant systems for encapsulation and

  17. Simulations and field observations of root water uptake in plots with different soil water availability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Gaochao; Vanderborght, Jan; Couvreur, Valentin; Javaux, Mathieu; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Root water uptake is a main process in the hydrological cycle and vital for water management in agronomy. In most models of root water uptake, the spatial and temporal soil water status and plant root distributions are required for water flow simulations. However, dynamic root growth and root distributions are not easy and time consuming to measure by normal approaches. Furthermore, root water uptake cannot be measured directly in the field. Therefore, it is necessary to incorporate monitoring data of soil water content and potential and root distributions within a modeling framework to explore the interaction between soil water availability and root water uptake. But, most models are lacking a physically based concept to describe water uptake from soil profiles with vertical variations in soil water availability. In this contribution, we present an experimental setup in which root development, soil water content and soil water potential are monitored non-invasively in two field plots with different soil texture and for three treatments with different soil water availability: natural rain, sheltered and irrigated treatment. Root development is monitored using 7-m long horizontally installed minirhizotubes at six depths with three replicates per treatment. The monitoring data are interpreted using a model that is a one-dimensional upscaled version of root water uptake model that describes flow in the coupled soil-root architecture considering water potential gradients in the system and hydraulic conductances of the soil and root system (Couvreur et al., 2012). This model approach links the total root water uptake to an effective soil water potential in the root zone. The local root water uptake is a function of the difference between the local soil water potential and effective root zone water potential so that compensatory uptake in heterogeneous soil water potential profiles is simulated. The root system conductance is derived from inverse modelling using

  18. Characterization of Microemulsion Systems Formed by a Mixed 1,3-Dioxolane Ethoxylate / Octyl Glucoside Surfactant System

    SciTech Connect

    Alkhatib, Mayson H; Hayes, Douglas G; Urban, Volker S

    2009-01-01

    The phase behavior of microemulsion systems containing water (or 1.0 wt% NaCl{sub aq}), isooctane, and the binary surfactant system consisting of n-octyl-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside, C{sub 8}{beta}G{sub 1}, and the acid-cleavable alkyl ethoxylate, 4-CH{sub 3}O (CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub 7.2}, 2-(CH{sub 2}){sub 12}CH{sub 3}, 2-(CH{sub 2})CH{sub 3}, 1,3-dioxolane, or 'cyclic ketal' ('CK-2,13'), was determined. Large temperature-insensitive one, two, and three-phase microemulsion-phase regions were obtained when equal masses of the two surfactants were employed, suggesting that C{sub 8}{beta}G{sub 1} reduces the temperature sensitivity of CK-2,13's ethoxylate group. Addition of C{sub 8}{beta}G{sub 1} to CK-2,13 greatly improves the latter's low efficiency, evidenced by the formation of a three-phase microemulsion system for surfactant concentrations at low fractions of total surfactants for systems with equal mass ratios of water to oil and CK-2,13 to C{sub 8}{beta}G{sub 1}. Analysis of the phase diagrams also suggests that CK-2,13 and C{sub 8}{beta}G{sub 1} impart hydrophobic and hydrophilic character, respectively, to the surfactant mixture, and that addition of salt further increases the hydrophilicity of C{sub 8}{beta}G{sub 1}, presumably because of the salting-in of the latter. Analysis of small-angle neutron scattering data revealed that the mixed surfactant system formed spherical oil-in-water microemulsions, and that increasing the CK-2,13 fraction among the surfactants reduced the critical microemulsion concentration but slightly increased the nanodroplet size.

  19. Rheological Properties of Silica Nanoparticles in Brine and Brine-Surfactant Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pales, Ashley; Kinsey, Erin; Li, Chunyan; Mu, Linlin; Bai, Lingyun; Clifford, Heather; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Rheological Properties of Silica Nanoparticles in Brine and Brine-Surfactant Systems Ashley R. Pales, Erin Kinsey, Chunyan Li, Linlin Mu, Lingyun Bai, Heather Clifford, and Christophe J. G. Darnault Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Laboratory of Hydrogeoscience and Biological Engineering, L.G. Rich Environmental Laboratory, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA Nanofluids are suspensions of nanometer sized particles in any fluid base, where the nanoparticles effect the properties of the fluid base. Commonly, nanofluids are water based, however, other bases such as ethylene-glycol, glycerol, and propylene-glycol, have been researched to understand the rheological properties of the nanofluids. This work aims to understand the fundamental rheological properties of silica nanoparticles in brine based and brine-surfactant based nanofluids with temperature variations. This was done by using variable weight percent of silica nanoparticles from 0.001% to 0.1%. Five percent brine was used to create the brine based nanofluids; and 5% brine with 2CMC of Tween 20 nonionic surfactant (Sigma-Aldrich) was used to create the brine-surfactant nanofluid. Rheological behaviors, such as shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity, were compared between these nanofluids at 20C and at 60C across the varied nanoparticle wt%. The goal of this work is to provide a fundamental basis for future applied testing for enhanced oil recovery. It is hypothesized that the addition of surfactant will have a positive impact on nanofluid properties that will be useful for enhance oil recovery. Differences have been observed in preliminary data analysis of the rheological properties between these two nanofluids indicating that the surfactant is having the hypothesized effect.

  20. BEHAVIOR OF SURFACTANT MIXTURES AT SOLID/LIQUID AND OIL/LIQUID INTERFACES IN CHEMICAL FLOODING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. P. Somasundaran

    2002-09-30

    The aim of the project is to develop and evaluate efficient novel surfactant mixtures for enhanced oil recovery. Surfactant loss by adsorption or precipitation depends to a great extent on the type of surfactant complexes and aggregates formed. Such information as well as techniques to generate the information is lacking currently particularly for surfactant mixtures and surfactant/polymer systems. A novel analytical centrifuge application is explored during the last period to generate information on structures-performance relationship for different surfactant aggregates in solution and, in turn, at interfaces. To use analytical untracentrifuge for surfactant mixtures, information on partial specific volumes of single surfactants and their mixtures is required. Towards this purpose, surface tension and density measurements were performed to determine critical micellar concentrations (cmc), partial specific volumes of n-dodecyl-{beta}-Dmaltoside (DM), nonyl phenol ethoxylated decyl ether (NP-10) and their 1:1 mixtures at 25 C. Durchschlag's theoretical calculation method was adopted to calculate the partial specific volumes. Effects of temperature and mixing, as well as methods used for estimation on micellization and partial specific volumes were studied during the current period. Surface tension results revealed no interaction between the two surfactants in mixed micelles. Partial specific volume measurements also indicated no interaction in mixed micelles. Maximum adsorption density, area per molecule and free energy of micellization were also calculated. Partial specific volumes were estimated by two experimental methods: d{sub {rho}}/dc and V{sub {sigma}}. The difference between the results of using the two methods is within 0.5% deviation. It was found that the partial specific volume is concentration dependent and sensitive to changes in temperature. The information generated in this study will be used for the study of surfactant aggregate mass distribution

  1. Performance evaluation of TDT soil water content and watermark soil water potential sensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the performance of digitized Time Domain Transmissometry (TDT) soil water content sensors (Acclima, Inc., Meridian, ID) and resistance-based soil water potential sensors (Watermark 200, Irrometer Company, Inc., Riverside, CA) in two soils. The evaluation was performed by compar...

  2. Temporal stability of soil water content and soil water flux patterns across agricultural fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When an agricultural field is repeatedly surveyed for soil water content, sites often can be spotted where soil is consistently wetter or consistently dryer than average across the study area. Temporal stability presents significant interest for upscaling observed soil water content, improving soil ...

  3. COMBINED MICROBIAL SURFACTANT-POLYMER SYSTEM FOR IMPROVED OIL MOBILITY AND CONFORMANCE CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2004-08-01

    Many domestic oil fields are facing abandonment even though they still contain two-thirds of their original oil. A significant number of these fields can yield additional oil using advanced oil recovery (AOR) technologies. To maintain domestic oil production at current levels, AOR technologies are needed that are affordable and can be implemented by independent oil producers of the future. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) technologies have become established as cost-effective solutions for declining oil production. MEOR technologies are affordable for independent producers operating stripper wells and can be used to extend the life of marginal fields. The demonstrated versatility of microorganisms can be used to design advanced microbial systems to treat multiple production problems in complex, heterogeneous reservoirs. The proposed research presents the concept of a combined microbial surfactant-polymer system for advanced oil recovery. The surfactant-polymer system utilizes bacteria that are capable of both biosurfactant production and metabolically-controlled biopolymer production. This novel technology combines complementary mechanisms to extend the life of marginal fields and is applicable to a large number of domestic reservoirs. The research project described in this report is performed jointly by, Bio-Engineering Inc., a woman owned small business, Texas A&M University and Prairie View A&M University, a Historically Black College and University. This report describes the results of our laboratory work to grow microbial cultures and the work done on recovery experiments on core rocks. We have selected two bacterial strains capable of producing both surfactant and polymers. We have conducted laboratory experiments to determine under what conditions surfactants and polymers can be produced from one single strain. We have conduct recovery experiments to determine the performance of these strains under different conditions. Our results do not show a

  4. SWB-A modified Thornthwaite-Mather Soil-Water-Balance code for estimating groundwater recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westenbroek, S.M.; Kelson, V.A.; Dripps, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    A Soil-Water-Balance (SWB) computer code has been developed to calculate spatial and temporal variations in groundwater recharge. The SWB model calculates recharge by use of commonly available geographic information system (GIS) data layers in combination with tabular climatological data. The code is based on a modified Thornthwaite-Mather soil-water-balance approach, with components of the soil-water balance calculated at a daily timestep. Recharge calculations are made on a rectangular grid of computational elements that may be easily imported into a regional groundwater-flow model. Recharge estimates calculated by the code may be output as daily, monthly, or annual values.

  5. Polymers for use in controlled release systems: the effect of surfactants on their swelling properties.

    PubMed

    Vlachou, M; Hani, N; Efentakis, M; Tarantili, P A; Andreopoulos, A G

    2000-07-01

    The effect of an ampholytic surfactant on the swelling properties of polymeric materials was studied, using various swelling liquids. Tablets were prepared consisting of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, poly(oxyethylene) and sodium alginate. Tego betain was the non-ionic surfactant used as an additive in a series of samples made of the above polymers. Those tablets were immersed in distilled water, phosphate buffer and 0.1 N HCl, and their weight uptake was recorded as a function of time, in order to assess the swelling process. Measurements of the contact angle of the above systems were also carried out for estimating their wetting properties. The results of this study showed a selectivity among polymers, surfactant and surrounding liquid. Clearly, an enhancement of the swelling capacity of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose tablets due to the surfactant was recorded. An unclear effect was observed in the case of poly(oxyethylene), whereas for sodium alginate, the dominant factor is its water solubility that controls swelling behaviour. PMID:10972160

  6. Micro-pumping flow system for spectrophotometric determination of anionic surfactants in water.

    PubMed

    Lavorante, André F; Morales-Rubio, Angel; de la Guardia, Miguel; Reis, Boaventura F

    2005-03-01

    A novel procedure has been developed for spectrophotometric determination of anionic surfactants in water using a solenoid micro-pump as fluid-propulsion device. The proposed method is based on substitution of methyl orange (MO) by anionic surfactants in the formation of an ion-pair with the cetyl pyridine ion (CPC+) at pH 5.0. The flow network comprised four solenoid micro-pumps which, under microcomputer control, enabled sample and reagent introduction, and homogenisation in the reaction zone. The system is flexible and simple to operate and control, and sensitive and precise. The analytical plot for the anionic surfactant was linear between 1.43x10(-6) and 1.43x10(-5) mol L(-1) (0.5 to 5.0 mg L(-1); R=0.997, n=5). The relative standard deviation was 0.8% (n=11) for a sample containing 5.74x10(-6) mol L(-1) (2 mg L(-1)) surfactant. The limit of detection was 9.76x10(-8) mol L(-1) (0.034 mg L(-1)) and the sampling throughput was 60 determinations per hour. The results obtained for washing-water samples were comparable with those obtained by use of the reference method, and no significant differences at the 95% confidence level were observed. PMID:15761737

  7. Novel self-assembling system based on resorcinarene and cationic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Kashapov, Ruslan R; Pashirova, Tatiana N; Kharlamov, Sergey V; Ziganshina, Albina Yu; Ziltsova, Elena P; Lukashenko, Svetlana S; Zakharova, Lucia Ya; Habicher, Wolf D; Latypov, Shamil K; Konovalov, Alexander I

    2011-09-21

    Mixed association of calix[4]resorcinarene with ethyl sulfonate groups on the lower rim and dimethylaminomethyl groups on the upper rim (CR) and cationic surfactant 4-aza-1-hexadecyl-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octane bromide (DABCO-16) is studied by methods of tensiometry, conductometry, potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy at fixed CR concentration and varied surfactant concentration. Beyond ca. 0.4 mM of DABCO-16, mixed aggregates enriched by CR are proved to be formed due to electrostatic forces, while beyond ca. 5 mM, aggregates enriched by surfactant occur due to the hydrophobic effect. Spectrophotometry monitoring of the solubilization of a hydrophobic dye, Orange OT, demonstrated that only the second type of mixed aggregate enriched by DABCO-16 is capable of binding the organic probe, while the mixed system where the surfactant is a minor component shows no binding capacity towards Orange OT. This finding can be used for the design of nanocontainers with controllable binding/release properties. PMID:21822509

  8. Physicochemical characterization and cytotoxic studies of nonionic surfactant vesicles using sucrose esters as oral delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Karina; Morilla, María José; Romero, Eder; Chávez, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Several nanotechnological solutions for mucosal immunization have been proposed, such as nanoparticles, liposomes, solid lipidic particles, micelles, and surfactant vesicles. In recent years, surfactant vesicles have gained increasing scientific attention as an alternative potential drug delivery system to the conventional liposome. This type of vesicle known as niosomes or nonionic surfactant vesicles (NSVs) has a structure and properties similar to those of liposomes. Both of them can transport hydrophilic drugs by encapsulation in the aqueous inner pool or hydrophobic drugs by intercalation into hydrophobic domains. The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize vesicles formed by sucrose esters as protective systems of bioactive molecules for oral administration. Vesicles were prepared using two commercial products formed by mixtures of mono and diesters S-570 and S-770, respectively. Determined parameters were size and zeta potential; the stability of formulations was tested in presence of increasing concentrations of a surfactant, and at several pH values observed in the gastrointestinal tract. Solubilization experiences showed an initial decrease in size for vesicles of both ester mixtures, samples showed detergent resistance at higher Triton X-100 concentrations. Vesicles showed stability at pH 5-7.4 up to 90 min; however, both formulations showed colloidal instability at pH=2, which corresponds to the isoelectric point of these vesicles. To evaluate the cytotoxicity of both vesicle formulations and separately each pure ester, Caco-2 cells were used. Cytotoxic evaluation indicated that both types of vesicles and free sucrose distearate were safe for Caco-2 viability; however, free sucrose monostearate was toxic for the cells. As a conclusion of these preliminary studies, it can be stated that vesicles formed with mixtures of sucrose esters showed a size in the range of 200 nm maintaining their size when exposed to the action of a surfactant, but

  9. Electrostatic interactions and aqueous two-phase separation modes of aqueous mixed oppositely charged surfactants system.

    PubMed

    Hao, Li-Sheng; Gui, Yuan-Xiang; Chen, Yan-Mei; He, Shao-Qing; Nan, Yan-Qing; You, Yi-Lan

    2012-08-30

    Electrostatic interactions play an important role in setting the aqueous two-phase separation behaviors of mixtures of oppositely charged surfactants. The aqueous mixture of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecylsulfonate (AS) is actually a five-component system, comprised of CTAB, AS, complex salt (cetyltrimethylammonium dodecylsulfonate, abbreviated as CTA(+)AS(-)), NaBr, and water. In the three-dimensional pyramid phase diagram, the aqueous two-phase region with excess AS or with excess CTAB extends successively from the region very near to the NaBr-H2O line through the CTAB-AS-H2O conventional mixing plane to the CTA(+)AS(-)-AS-H2O side plane or to the CTA(+)AS(-)-CTAB-H2O side plane, respectively. Large or small molar ratios between the counterions and their corresponding surfactant ions for oppositely charged surfactants located in the NaBr side or the CTA(+)AS(-) side of the pyramid imply strong or weak electrostatic screening. Electrostatic screening of counterions alters the electrostatic attractions between the oppositely charged head groups or the electrostatic repulsions between the like-charged head groups in excess, and the electrostatic free energy of aggregation thus affects the aqueous two-phase separation modes. Composition analysis, rheological property investigation, and TEM images suggest that there are two kinds of aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs). On the basis of these experimental results and Kaler's cell model, two kinds of phase separation modes were proposed. Experimental results also indicate that all of the top phases are surfactant-rich, and all of the bottom phases are surfactant-poor; the density difference between the top phase and the bottom phase in one ATPS is very small; the interfacial tension (σ) of the ATPS is ultralow. PMID:22856887

  10. Experimental and theoretical approach to cationic drug-anionic gemini surfactant systems in aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Noori, Sahar; Naqvi, Andleeb Z; Ansari, Wajid H; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-03-01

    Herein the results of surface tension measurements on the mixed systems of an amphiphilic drug amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT) and three anionic bisphosphodiester gemini surfactants having different hydrophobic tails (8, 10, and 12 carbon) are presented. The experimental and ideal critical micelle concentration (cmc and cmcid) values suggest synergism in mixed systems of AMT and 8-2-8/10-2-10 and attractive interaction in AMT-12-2-12 systems. Other parameters evaluated from the data also suggest mixed micellization among the components with almost 50% contribution of surfactants (micellar mole fraction, X1(m), close to 0.5). The X1 values evaluated from Rubingh's model (X1(m)) and Motomura's model (X1(M)) as well as X1(id) values increase with increasing content of surfactants in solution. Adsorption behavior too indicates that the mixed monolayers experience attractive interaction (β(σ)) which vary in the order: AMT-12-2-12systems of AMT-10-2-10 are the most stable one. Probably the difference in length of hydrophobic parts of AMT and gemini is most compatible in this system. PMID:24333555

  11. Postfire restoration of soil hydrology and wildland vegetation using surfactant seed coating technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    n semi-arid environments, soil water repellency can contribute to reseeding failure by reducing soil moisture availability and site stability. Non-ionic soil surfactants (wetting agents) have been shown to be effective in ameliorating soil water repellency; however, their application in wildland eco...

  12. BEHAVIOR OF SURFACTANT MIXTURES AT SOLID/LIQUID AND OIL/LIQUID INTERFACES IN CHEMICAL FLOODING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. P. Somasundaran

    2003-03-31

    The aim of the project is to develop a knowledge base to help with the design of enhanced process for mobilizing and extracting untrapped oil. We emphasize on evaluating novel surfactant mixtures and on obtaining optimum combinations of the surfactants in chemical flooding EOR process. An understanding of the micellar shape and size is crucial since these physical properties directly determine the crude oil removal efficiency. Analytical ultracentrifugation experiments were used to test the multi-micelle model proposed earlier and formulate the relationships between mixed micelle formation and the surfactant structure. Information on partial specific volume of surfactants and their mixtures is required to treat analytical ultracentrifuge data. In the last report, it was noted that the partial specific volumes of the sugar-based surfactants obtained experimentally did not agree with those from theoretical calculations. A scrutiny of partial specific volumes of the four sugar-based surfactants revealed that conformational changes upon micelle formation are responsible for the large deviation. From sedimentation equilibrium experiments, two types of micelles were identified for the nonionic polyethylene surfactant and its mixtures with the sugar-based surfactant, dodecyl maltoside. The average aggregation numbers of n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltoside and nonyl phenol ethoxylated decyl ether agreed with those reported in literature using other techniques. Our study displayed, for the first time, that small micelles might coexist with large micelles at high concentrations due to unique structures of the surfactant although classical thermodynamic theory supports only one type of micelle. Initial dynamic light scattering results support the results for the same mixed surfactant system from analytical ultracentrifuge equilibrium technique. The implication of this finding lies in the fact that efficiency of oil recovery will be improved due to the large micellar size, its

  13. COMBINED MICROBIAL SURFACTANT-POLYMER SYSTEM FOR IMPROVED OIL MOBILITY AND CONFORMANCE CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2005-08-01

    Many domestic oil fields are facing abandonment even though they still contain two-thirds of their original oil. A significant number of these fields can yield additional oil using advanced oil recovery (AOR) technologies. To maintain domestic oil production at current levels, AOR technologies are needed that are affordable and can be implemented by the independent oil producers of the future. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) technologies have become established as cost-effective solutions for declining oil production. MEOR technologies are affordable for independent producers operating stripper wells and can be used to extend the life of marginal fields. The demonstrated versatility of microorganisms can be used to design advanced microbial systems to treat multiple production problems in complex, heterogeneous reservoirs. The proposed research presents the concept of a combined microbial surfactant-polymer system for advanced oil recovery. The surfactant-polymer system utilizes bacteria that are capable of both biosurfactant production and metabolically-controlled biopolymer production. This novel technology combines complementary mechanisms to extend the life of marginal fields and is applicable to a large number of domestic reservoirs. The research project described in this report was performed by Bio-Engineering Inc., a woman owned small business, Texas A&M University and Prairie View A&M University, a Historically Black College and University. This report describes the results of our laboratory work to grow microbial cultures, the work done on recovery experiments on core rocks, and computer simulations. We have selected two bacterial strains capable of producing both surfactant and polymers. We have conducted laboratory experiments to determine under what conditions surfactants and polymers can be produced from one single strain. We have conduct recovery experiments to determine the performance of these strains under different conditions. Our results

  14. Temperature dependence of soil water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, S.C.H. )

    1992-12-01

    To understand the process of coupled heat and water transport, the relationship between temperature and soil water potential must be known. Two clays, Avonlea bentonite and Lake Agassiz clay, are being considered as the clay-based sealing materials for the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Avonlea bentonite is distinguished from Lake Agassiz clay by its high sealing potential in water. A series of experiments was performed in which the two clays were mixed with equal amounts of sand and were compacted to a dry density of 1.67 Mg/m[sup 3] under various moisture contents and temperatures. A psychrometer was placed within the compacted clay-sand to measure the soil water potential based on the electromotive force measured by the psychrometer. The results indicate that the soil water potential at a particular temperature is higher for both clay-sand mixtures than predicted by the change in the surface tension of water; this effect is much more prominent in the Avonlea bentonite and at low moisture contents. The paper presents empirical equations relating the soil water potential with the moisture content and temperature of the two clay-sand mixtures. 24 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Soil water monitoring equipment for irrigation scheduling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equipment for monitoring soil water content and sometimes bulk electrical conductivity can be used for scheduling irrigations if the accuracy of the equipment is sufficient to avoid damanging plants and wasting water and fertilizer. Irrigation scheduling is the process of deciding when to irrigate a...

  16. Soil water evaporation and crop residues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues have value when left in the field and also when removed from the field and sold as a commodity. Reducing soil water evaporation (E) is one of the benefits of leaving crop residues in place. E was measured beneath a corn canopy at the soil suface with nearly full coverage by corn stover...

  17. Intrusion of Soil Water through Pipe Cracks

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a series of experiments conducted at U.S. EPA’s Test and Evaluation Facility in 2013-2014 to study the intrusion of contaminated soil water into a pipe crack during simulated backflow events. A test rig was used consisting of a 3’ x 3’ x 3’ acrylic soil bo...

  18. Superamphiphilic nanocontainers based on the resorcinarene - Cationic surfactant system: Synergetic self-assembling behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynanova, Gulnara A.; Bekmukhametova, Alina M.; Kashapov, Ruslan R.; Ziganshina, Albina Yu.; Zakharova, Lucia Ya.

    2016-05-01

    Self-organization in the mixed system based on water-soluble aminomethylated calix[4]arene with sulfonatoethyl groups at the lower rim and classical cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide has been studied by the methods of tensiometry, conductometry, spectrophotometry, dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering. The values of the critical association concentration, the size and zeta potential values, and the solubilization capacity of mixed aggregates toward the hydrophobic probe (Sudan I) were determined.

  19. Cationic surfactants for control of fresh- and saltwater mollusks in nuclear cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.M.; Mallen, E.; Lehmann, F.

    1991-11-01

    One result of the release of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Generic Letter 89-13, Service Water Problems Affecting Safety-Related Equipment, was the heightened awareness of the nuclear industry to the problems of macrofouling in heat exchange systems. The principal mollusk species that contribute to freshwater macrofouling problems are Asiatic Clam (southern United States) and Zebra Mussel (Great Lakes). The predominant saltwater fouling mollusks are the Blue Mussel (Pacific, northern Atlantic), Ribbed Mussel (southern Atlantic, Gulf Coast), and American Oyster (Atlantic, Gulf Coast). The nuclear community's awareness of macrofouling problems and the ineffectiveness of intermittent chlorination programs have led to the development of several chemical control technologies for eliminating macrofouling organism infestation. One technology that has proven effective for the control of macrofouling organisms is the periodic addition of a combination of two cationic charged surfactants, specifically, alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (QUAT) and dodecyl guanidine hydrochloride (DGH). Experience with the cationic surfactants at several nuclear power plants is reported.

  20. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1984-12-11

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with either a petroleum sulfonate or an alkaryl sulfonate. A surfactant system containing the above surfactant useful in enhanced oil recovery processes is also provided.

  1. Soil water sensing for water balance, ET and WUE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil water balance can be solved for evapotranspiration (ET) using data from either weighing lysimetry or soil water sensing and measurement. Weighing lysimeters are expensive and, although accurate, are difficult to manage and afford little replication. Direct soil water measurement by coring i...

  2. Soil water sensing for water balance, ET, and WUE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soil water balance can be solved for evapotranspiration (ET) using data from either weighing lysimetry or soil water sensing and measurement. Weighing lysimeters are expensive and, although accurate, are difficult to manage and afford little replication. Direct soil water measurement by coring i...

  3. Curing kinetics and morphology of a nanovesicular epoxy/stearyl-block-poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Bogaerts, K; Lavrenova, A; Spoelstra, A B; Boyard, N; Goderis, B

    2015-08-21

    Brittle epoxy based thermosets can be made tougher by introducing structural inhomogeneities at the micro- or nanoscale. In that respect, nano vesicles and worm-like micelles from self-assembling blockcopolymers have been shown to be very effective. This paper describes the curing kinetics and morphology of an epoxy composed of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) and 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA), modified by 20% of the surfactant stearyl-block-poly(ethylene oxide). Time resolved, synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering demonstrates that at any time during the epoxy curing process, the surfactant predominantly adopts a bilayer vesicular nano-morphology. Transmission electron microscopy on fully cured systems reveals the coexistence of spherical and worm-like micelles. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments prove that the presence of surfactant reduces the epoxy curing rate but that ultimately full curing is accomplished. The material glass transition temperature falls below that of the pure resin due to plasticization. It is suggested that favorable secondary interactions between the PEO segments and the epoxy resin are responsible for the observed phenomena. PMID:26144526

  4. Constrained sessile drop as a new configuration to measure low surface tension in lung surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Laura M Y; Lu, James J; Chan, Yawen W; Ng, Amy; Zhang, Ling; Hoorfar, Mina; Policova, Zdenka; Grundke, Karina; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2004-08-01

    Existing methodology for surface tension measurements based on drop shapes suffers from the shortcoming that it is not capable to function at very low surface tension if the liquid dispersion is opaque, such as therapeutic lung surfactants at clinically relevant concentrations. The novel configuration proposed here removes the two big restrictions, i.e., the film leakage problem that is encountered with such methods as the pulsating bubble surfactometer as well as the pendant drop arrangement, and the problem of the opaqueness of the liquid, as in the original captive bubble arrangement. A sharp knife edge is the key design feature in the constrained sessile drop that avoids film leakage at low surface tension. The use of the constrained sessile drop configuration in conjunction with axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure surface tension allows complete automation of the setup. Dynamic studies with lung surfactant can be performed readily by changing the volume of a sessile drop, and thus the surface area, by means of a motor-driven syringe. To illustrate the validity of using this configuration, experiments were performed using an exogenous lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) at 5.0 mg/ml. A comparison of results obtained for BLES at low concentration between the constrained sessile drop and captive bubble arrangement shows excellent agreement between the two approaches. When the surface area of the BLES film (0.5 mg/ml) was compressed by about the same amount in both systems, the minimum surface tensions attained were identical within the 95% confidence limits. PMID:15064296

  5. The solubilization of fatty acids in systems based on block copolymers and nonionic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirgorodskaya, A. B.; Yatskevich, E. I.; Zakharova, L. Ya.

    2010-12-01

    The solubilizing action of micellar, microemulsion, and polymer-colloid systems formed on the basis of biologically compatible amphiphilic polymers and nonionic surfactants on capric, lauric, palmitic, and stearic acids was characterized quantitatively. Systems based on micelle forming oxyethyl compounds increased the solubility of fatty acids by more than an order of magnitude. Acid molecules incorporated into micelles increased their size and caused structural changes. Solubilization was accompanied by complete or partial destruction of intrinsic acid associates and an increase in their p K a by 1.5-2 units compared with water.

  6. Surfactant-Wrapped Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes in Aquatic Systems: Surfactant Displacement in the Presence of Humic Acid.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaojun; Bouchard, Dermont C

    2016-09-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) facilitates multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) debundling and enhances nanotube stability in the aqueous environment by adsorbing on the nanotube surfaces, thereby increasing repulsive electrostatic forces and steric effects. The resulting SDS-wrapped MWCNTs are utilized in industrial applications and have been widely employed in environmental studies. In the present study, MWCNTs adsorbed SDS during ultrasonication to form stable MWCNTs suspensions. Desorption of SDS from MWCNTs surfaces was then investigated as a function of Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) and background electrolyte concentrations. Due to hydrophobic effects and π-π interactions, MWCNTs exhibit higher affinity for SRHA than SDS. In the presence of SRHA, SDS adsorbed on MWCNTs was displaced. Cations (Na(+), Ca(2+)) decreased SDS desorption from MWCNTs due to charge screening effects. Interestingly, the presence of the divalent calcium cation facilitated multilayered SRHA adsorption on MWCNTs through bridging effects, while monovalent sodium reduced SRHA adsorption. Results of the present study suggest that properties of MWCNTs wrapped with commercial surfactants will be altered when these materials are released to surface waters and the surfactant coating will be displaced by natural organic matter (NOM). Changes on their surfaces will significantly affect MWCNTs fate in aquatic environments. PMID:27500910

  7. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system of nifedipine: impact of hydrophilic-lipophilic balance and molecular structure of mixed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Weerapol, Yotsanan; Limmatvapirat, Sontaya; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Sriamornsak, Pornsak

    2014-04-01

    A simple but novel mixed surfactant system was designed to fabricate a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) based on hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) value. The impacts of HLB and molecular structure of surfactants on the formation of SNEDDS were investigated. After screening various oils and surfactants, nifedipine (NDP)-loaded liquid SNEDDS was formulated with Imwitor(®) 742 as oil and Tween(®)/Span(®) or Cremophor(®)/Span(®) as mixed surfactant. Droplet size of the emulsions obtained after dispersing SNEDDS containing Tween(®)/Span(®) in aqueous medium was independent of the HLB of a mixed surfactant. The use of the Cremophor(®)/Span(®) blend gave nanosized emulsion at higher HLB. The structure of the surfactant was found to influence the emulsion droplet size. Solid SNEDDS was then prepared by adsorbing NDP-loaded liquid SNEDDS comprising Cremophor(®) RH40/Span(®) 80 onto Aerosil(®) 200 or Aerosil(®) R972 as inert solid carrier. Solid SNEDDS formulations using higher amounts (30-50% w/w) of Aerosil(®) 200 exhibited good flow properties with smooth surface and preserved the self-emulsifying properties of liquid SNEDDS. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction studies of solid SNEDDS revealed the transformation of the crystalline structure of NDP due to its molecular dispersion state. In vitro dissolution study demonstrated higher dissolution of NDP from solid SNEDDS compared with NDP powder. PMID:24452500

  8. Encapsulation of functional lipophilic components in surfactant-based colloidal delivery systems: vitamin E, vitamin D, and lemon oil.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Khalid; Fang, Yuan; McClements, David Julian

    2012-09-15

    The fabrication and stability of surfactant-based colloidal delivery systems (microemulsions and emulsions) suitable for encapsulation of lipophilic active agents (vitamins and flavours) was investigated. An emulsion titration method was used to study the influence of surfactant type (Tween 20, 60 and 80) and oil type (Vitamin E, vitamin D(3) and lemon oil) on the incorporation of lipophilic components into surfactant micelles. Oil-in-water emulsions were formed and then different amounts were titrated into surfactant micelle solutions. The influence of surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR) and oil type on the formation of colloidal dispersions was examined using dynamic light scattering and turbidity measurements. SOR, oil type, and surfactant type had a pronounced influence on the nature of the colloidal dispersions formed. Microemulsions could not be formed using vitamin D or E in 1% Tween solutions, due to the relatively large size of the lipophilic molecules relative to the hydrophobic interior of the surfactant micelles. On the other hand, microemulsions could be formed from lemon oil at relatively high SORs. There was not a major impact of non-ionic surfactant type (Tween 20, 60 or 80) on the formation and properties of the colloidal dispersions. However, Tween 20 micelles did appear to be able to solubilise less lemon oil than Tween 60 or 80 micelles, presumably due to their smaller dimensions. This study provides useful information for the rational design of food grade colloidal delivery systems for encapsulating flavour oils, oil-soluble vitamins, and other functional lipids for application in foods and beverages. PMID:23107734

  9. Surfactant-based drug delivery systems for treating drug-resistant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Murthy, R S R; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Among all cancers, lung cancer is the major cause of deaths. Lung cancer can be categorized into two classes for prognostic and treatment purposes: small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Both categories of cancer are resistant to certain drugs. Various mechanisms behind drug resistance are over-expression of superficial membrane proteins [glycoprotein (P-gp)], lung resistance-associated proteins, aberration of the intracellular enzyme system, enhancement of the cell repair system and deregulation of cell apoptosis. Structure-performance relationships and chemical compatibility are consequently major fundamentals in surfactant-based formulations, with the intention that a great deal investigation is committed to this region. With the purpose to understand the potential of P-gp in transportation of anti-tumor drugs to cancer cells with much effectiveness and specificity, several surfactant-based delivery systems have been developed which may include microspheres, nanosized drug carriers (nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, stealth liposomes, nanogels, polymer-drug conjugates), novel powders, hydrogels and mixed micellar systems intended for systemic and/or localized delivery. PMID:25013959

  10. Nano-droplet systems by surfactant self-assembly and applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Abreu, Carlos; Vila, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Liquid systems containing droplets with size in the nanoscale range are attractive from both scientific and technological points of view as they have many current and potential applications in several industries and products. The formation and stabilization of nano-droplet systems are mostly based on the self-assembly of surfactant (amphiphilic) molecules at interfaces, driven by the solvophobic effect. Surfactants are involved in both top-bottom (high energy) and bottom- up (low energy) methods. Several devices have also been developed to aid in liquid fragmentation down to the nanometer scale. Nano-droplet systems can be both thermodynamically stable (microemulsions) or metastable (nanoemulsions), and appropriate formulation is a key for optimum product design in terms of droplet size, maximum solubilization, colloidal stability, and optical and rheological properties, among others. Such characteristics are determined by molecular packing, interfacial curvature, droplet-droplet interactions, film elasticity and nature of the dispersed and continuous phase. These properties can be engineered by proper understanding of the molecular structure and phase behavior of the multicomponent systems involved and by a range of experimental characterization techniques. Nano-droplet systems can help to solve specific issues in pharmaceutical products such as processing, limitations in drug solubility or stability, control on drug release, drug targeting and absorption; there are many examples to prove that. However, several practical aspects should be considered for preclinical and clinical tests and product development. PMID:24444153

  11. Size influences the effect of hydrophobic nanoparticles on lung surfactant model systems.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula V; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Koshkina, Olga; Maskos, Michael; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar lung surfactant (LS) is a complex lipid protein mixture that forms an interfacial monolayer reducing the surface tension to near zero values and thus preventing the lungs from collapse. Due to the expanding field of nanotechnology and the corresponding unavoidable exposure of human beings from the air, it is crucial to study the potential effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on the structural organization of the lung surfactant system. In the present study, we investigated both, the domain structure in pure DPPC monolayers as well as in lung surfactant model systems. In the pure lipid system we found that two different sized hydrophobic polymeric nanoparticles with diameter of ~12 nm and ~136 nm have contrasting effect on the functional and structural behavior. The small nanoparticles inserted into fluid domains at the LE-LC phase transition are not visibly disturbing the phase transition but disrupting the domain morphology of the LE phase. The large nanoparticles led to an expanded isotherm and to a significant decrease in the line tension and thus to a drastic disruption of the domain structures at a much lower number of nanoparticles with respect to the lipid. The surface activity of the model LS films again showed drastic variations due to presence of different sized NPs illustrated by the film balance isotherms and the atomic force microscopy. AFM revealed laterally profuse multilayer protrusion formation on compression but only in the presence of 136 nm sized nanoparticles. Moreover we investigated the vesicle insertion process into a preformed monolayer. A severe inhibition was observed only in the presence of ~136 nm NPs compared to minor effects in the presence of ~12 nm NPs. Our study clearly shows that the size of the nanoparticles made of the same material determines the interaction with biological membranes. PMID:24411261

  12. Application of rye green manure in wheat rotation system alters soil water content and chemical characteristics under dryland condition in Maragheh.

    PubMed

    Mosavi, S B; Jafarzadeh, A A; Nishabouri, M R; Ostan, Sh; Feiziasl, V

    2009-01-15

    This study was carried out with or without rye green manure along with 4 nitrogen fertilization treatments (0, 26, 103 and 337 (kg N ha(-1)) in 3 rotation system (green manure-wheat). Results showed that, although treatment effects on dryland wheat grain yield was not significant, but maximum grain yield (2484 kg ha(-1)) was obtained from application of rye green manure along with 26 kg N ha(-1); which is 22% more than check (without rye green manure) treatment. Green manure application with or without nitrogen increased EC (dS m(-1)), but decreased OC, P (av.), Cu (av.), Mn (av.), Zn (av.) and sand in the soil. In contrast to green manure, application of nitrogen along with green manure increased saturation and clay. In the stage of stem appearance, soil moisture content decreased 8% in green-manure application but with nitrogen application the moisture increased 6% compared with check in 0-20 cm depth. It can be concluded that, green manure application is useful along with nitrogen fertilizer application in long term. This treatment could increase soil moisture content, which leads to higher wheat grain yield in dryland areas. In addition, green manure application could change some soil characteristics such as soil TNV%, which decreases availability of some essential nutrients for dryland wheat. PMID:19579941

  13. The soil water balance in a mosaic of clumped vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzolla, Teresa; Manfreda, Salvatore; Caylor, Kelly; Gioia, Andrea; Iacobellis, Vito

    2014-05-01

    The spatio-temporal distribution of soil moisture influences the plant growth and the distribution of terrestrial vegetation. This effect is more evident in arid and semiarid ecosystems where the interaction between individuals and the water limited conditions play a fundamental role, providing environmental conditions which drive a variety of non-linear ecohydrological response functions (such as transpiration, photosynthesis, leakage). In this context, modeling vegetation patterns at multiple spatial aggregation scales is important to understand how different vegetation structures can modify the soil water distribution and the exchanged fluxes between soil and atmosphere. In the present paper, the effect of different spatial vegetation patterns, under different climatic scenarios, is investigated in a patchy vegetation mosaic generated by a random process of individual tree canopies and their accompanying root system. Vegetation pattern are generated using the mathematical framework proposed by Caylor et al. (2006) characterized by a three dimensional stochastic vegetation structure, based on the density, dispersion, size distribution, and allometry of individuals within a landscape. A Poisson distribution is applied to generate different distribution of individuals paying particular attention on the role of clumping on water distribution dynamics. The soil water balance is evaluated using the analytical expression proposed by Laio et al. (2001) to explore the influence of climate and vegetation patterns on soil water balance steady-state components (such as the average rates of evaporation, the root water uptake and leakage) and on the stress-weighted plant water uptake. Results of numerical simulations show that clumping may be beneficial for water use efficiency at the landscape scale. References Caylor, Kelly K., P. D'Odorico and I. Rodriguez Iturbe: On the ecohydrology of structurally heterogeneous semiarid landscape. Water Resour. Res., 28, W07424, 2006

  14. The soil-water system as basis for a climate proof and healthy urban environment: opportunities identified in a Dutch case-study.

    PubMed

    Claessens, Jacqueline; Schram-Bijkerk, Dieneke; Dirven-van Breemen, Liesbet; Otte, Piet; van Wijnen, Harm

    2014-07-01

    One of the effects of climate change expected to take place in urban areas in the Netherlands is an increase in periods of extreme heat and drought. How the soil can contribute to making cities more climate proof is often neglected. Unsealed soil and green spaces increase water storage capacity and can consequently prevent flooding. The planning of public or private green spaces can have a cooling effect and, in general, have a positive effect on how people perceive their health. This paper reviews existing guidelines from Dutch policy documents regarding unsealed soil and green spaces in the Netherlands; do they support climate adaptation policies? Scientific literature was used to quantify the positive effects of green spaces on water storage capacity, cooling and public health. Finally we present a case study of a model town where different policy areas are linked together. Maps were made to provide insight into the ratio of unsealed soil and the number of green spaces in relation to existing guidelines using Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Maps marking the age and social-economic status of the population were also made. The benefits of green spaces are difficult to express in averages because they depend on many different factors such as soil properties, type of green spaces, population characteristics and spatial planning. Moreover, it is not possible to provide quantifications of the benefits of green spaces because of a lack of scientific evidence at the moment. Based on the maps, however, policy assessments can be made, for example, in which site a neighborhood will most benefit from investment in parks and public gardens. Neighborhoods where people have a low social-economic status have for example fewer green spaces than others. This offers opportunities for efficient adaptation policies linking goals of several policy fields. PMID:24656988

  15. Stochastic Modeling of Soil Water and Plant Water Stress Using Cumulant Expansion Theory and Its Application to Climate Change Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Lee, A.; Keem, M.; Shin, H.

    2009-12-01

    For better understanding of soil water and plant water stress dynamics, a stochastic soil water and plant water stress model will be proposed and applied to climate change impact assessment. The proposed model is derived by using cumulant expansion theory from a stochastic differential equation with stochastic rainfall forcings. This model has the advantage of providing the probabilistic solution in the form of a probability distribution function, from which the ensemble average behavior of the system can be obtained easily. Also, since this model uses only the statistics of rainfall time series, the effect of different climate conditions on the soil water and plant water stress dynamics can be incorporated effectively. The simulation result of soil water confirms that the proposed model can reproduce the observation properly and shows that the soil water behaves with consistent cycle based on the precipitation pattern. In order to understand the impact of climate change on soil water and plant water stress behaviors, the RCM data developed by Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA RCM) and the third GCM by Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis(CGCM3) are used with two time periods of 2051~2060 and 2091~2100. With all the simulation results, it can be conclude that the simulation results will be different with what climate change scenario is selected since different climate change model predicts different soil water and plant water stress behaviors. This analysis can be expected as a starting point for better understanding of the effect of soil water on ecosystem dynamics such as climate-soil-vegetation interaction. Figure 1. The evolution of the soil water PDF. The soil water PDFs have two different patterns according to wet season from June to September and dry season from October to May. From such result, it can be inferred that the mechanisms which influence the soil water behavior are different in wet and dry seasons. That is to say, in wet

  16. Photochemical control of molecular assembly formation in a catanionic surfactant system.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Atsutoshi; Tsuchiya, Koji; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2011-03-01

    Photochemical control of vesicle disintegration and reformation in aqueous solution was examined using a mixture of 4-butylazobenzene-4'-(oxyethyl)trimethylammonium bromide (AZTMA) as the photoresponsive cationic surfactant and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) as the anionic surfactant. Spontaneous vesicle formation was found in a wide-ranging composition of the trans-AZTMA/SDBS system. AZTMA molecules constituting vesicles underwent reversible trans-cis photoisomerization when irradiated with ultraviolet and visible light. Transmission electron microscopy observations using the freeze-fracture technique (FF-TEM) showed that UV light irradiation caused the vesicles to disintegrate into coarse aggregates and visible light irradiation stimulated the reformation of vesicles (normal control). A detailed investigation of the phase state and the effects of UV and visible light irradiation on the AZTMA/SDBS system with the use of electroconductivity, dynamic/static light scattering, and surface tension measurements and FF-TEM observations revealed that in the AZTMA-rich composition (AZTMA/SDBS 9:1) a micellar solution before light irradiation became a vesicular solution after UV light irradiation and visible light irradiation allowed the return to a micellar solution (reverse control). Thus, we could photochemically control the disintegration (normal control) and reformation (reverse control) of vesicles in the same system. PMID:21244081

  17. Phase equilibria in four-component system consisting of water, a nonionic surfactant mixture, and oleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Matveenko, V.N.; Drovetskii, B.Yu.; Kirasanov, E.A.

    1994-05-01

    The phase diagram of the system consisting of water, Tween 20, Span 80, and oleic acid has been obtained; the coexisting phases have been identified; and the character of the equilibrium of microemulsion, liquid crystal, and molecular solution has been described. In the water-Tween 20-oleic acid system, the ratio of the water volume to the surfactant volume is identical in all of the coexisting phases; this proves the existence of a corresponding field variable in a system with a nonionic surfactant.

  18. Rooting Dynamics and Soil Water Variation of Native Shrubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizito, A.; Dragila, M. I.; Sene, M.; Dick, R.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding the relationships that exist in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum in semi-arid areas presents particular challenges, requiring accurate quantification of soil water with depth, a highly variable and limiting parameter in these vulnerable ecosystems. Two sites in the Peanut Basin of Senegal were selected to study rooting patterns of native shrubs and the corresponding variation of water distribution within the soil profile in both the dry and wet season. During dry periods or dry spells in the wet season, soil moisture content (θ v) surrounding the shrub's shallow roots is substantially moister than the adjacent soil matrix. It is therefore hypothesized, that nearing a condition of water stress, shrubs may participate in redistribution of soil water, effectively changing their own environment and enhancing their survival as well as that of neighboring annual crops. A possible region of water redistribution is interpreted to be between 15-75 cm depth, with the upper 0-15 cm remaining typically dry (θ v < 1 m3m-3) and forming a self mulching mechanism protecting lower horizons from the intense evaporation, and the lower 75 to 105 cm depth acting as a "moist reservoir" (θ v ˜ 6 m3m-3). We investigated shrub root depths, distribution, size, density and gravimetric soil water variation at 15 cm depth increments to 110 cm, and at 10 cm lateral spread increments to 200 cm from each shrub trunk. Shrubs exhibited a complex heterogeneous rooting system with approximately 50% of the root biomass occurring in the upper 30 cm and 95% in the upper 110 cm. Root study and soil moisture results are used to select optimal sensor placement in relation to shrub root depth and lateral spread extent. Monitoring is continuing for soil water and tension variation with sensors concentrated between 15 and 75 cm. Accurate quantitative data on the vertical and horizontal distribution of roots permits us to estimate how shrubs may alter water use by annual crops and modify

  19. Measurement of the matric potential of soil water in the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Whalley, W R; Ober, E S; Jenkins, M

    2013-10-01

    The availability of soil water, and the ability of plants to extract it, are important variables in plant research. The matric potential has been a useful way to describe water status in a soil-plant system. In soil it is the potential that is derived from the surface tension of water menisci between soil particles. The magnitude of matric potential depends on the soil water content, the size of the soil pores, the surface properties of the soil particles, and the surface tension of the soil water. Of all the measures of soil water, matric potential is perhaps the most useful for plant scientists. In this review, the relationship between matric potential and soil water content is explored. It is shown that for any given soil type, this relationship is not unique and therefore both soil water content and matric potential need to be measured for the soil water status to be fully described. However, in comparison with water content, approaches for measuring matric potential have received less attention until recently. In this review, a critique of current methods to measure matric potential is presented, together with their limitations as well as underexploited opportunities. The relative merits of both direct and indirect methods to measure matric potential are discussed. The different approaches needed in wet and dry soil are outlined. In the final part of the paper, the emerging technologies are discussed in so far as our current imagination allows. The review draws upon current developments in the field of civil engineering where the measurement of matric potential is also important. The approaches made by civil engineers have been more imaginative than those of plant and soil scientists. PMID:23526772

  20. Effect of ionic surfactants on the phase behavior and structure of sucrose ester/water/oil systems.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Carlos; Acharya, Durga P; Hinata, Shigeki; Ishitobi, Masahiko; Kunieda, Hironobu

    2003-06-15

    The phase behavior and structure of sucrose ester/water/oil systems in the presence of long-chain cosurfactant (monolaurin) and small amounts of ionic surfactants was investigated by phase study and small angle X-ray scattering. In a water/sucrose ester/monolaurin/decane system at 27 degrees C, instead of a three-phase microemulsion, lamellar liquid crystals are formed in the dilute region. Unlike other systems in the presence of alcohol as cosurfactant, the HLB composition does not change with dilution, since monolaurin adsorbs almost completely in the interface. The addition of small amounts of ionic surfactant, regardless of the counterion, increases the solubilization of water in W/O microemulsions. The solubilization on oil in O/W microemulsions is not much affected, but structuring is induced and a viscous isotropic phase is formed. At high ionic surfactant concentrations, the single-phase microemulsion disappears and liquid crystals are favored. PMID:16256631

  1. Surfactant and process for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, P. R.

    1985-03-12

    A novel surfactant is formed by reacting maleic anhydride with a polynuclear aromatic compound having a molecular weight of at least 155. A novel surfactant system useful in enhanced oil recovery containing the above surfactant is also provided. In addition, an improved process for the enhanced recovery of oil is provided utilizing the novel surfactant system.

  2. Decadal Potential Predictability of Soil Water, Vegetation, and Wildfire Frequency over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikamoto, Y.; Timmermann, A.; Stevenson, S. L.; Di Nezio, P. N.; Langford, S.

    2014-12-01

    The potential decadal predictability of land hydrological and biogeochemical variables in North America is examined using a 900-year-long pre-industrial control simulation, conducted with the NCAR Community EarthSystem Model (CESM). The leading modes of simulated North American precipitation and soil water storage are characterized by qualitatively similar meridional seesaw patterns associated with the downstream activity of the westerly jet. Whereas the corresponding precipitation variability can be described as a white noise stochastic process, power spectra of vertically integrated soil water exhibit significant redness on timescales of years to decades since the predictability of soil water storage arises mostly from the integration of precipitation variability. As a result, our ensemble hindcasts conducted with the CESM for various initial conditions are skillful with lead times of up to several years due to the long-term memory of damped persistence. Our control simulation further suggests that decadal variations in soil water storage also affect vegetation and wildfire occurrences. Our results demonstrate that skillful decadal predictions of soil water storage, carbon stock, and fire frequency are feasible with proper initialization of soil conditions. Although the potential predictability in our idealized modeling framework would overestimate the real predictability of the coupled climate-land-vegetation system, the decadal climate prediction may become beneficial for water resource management, forestry, and agriculture.

  3. Ecohydrologic Implications and Management of Post-fire Soil Water Repellency in Burned Pinon-Juniper Woodlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Matthew; Zvirzdin, Daniel; Fernelius, Kaitlynn; McMillan, Mica; Kostka, Stanley

    2014-05-01

    Erosion and weed dominance often limit the recovery of piñon-juniper woodlands of western North America after high intensity wildfires. Soil water repellency (SWR) is one factor that may promote overland flow and impede seedling establishment. In spite of these effects, the influence of post-fire SWR on site recovery is poorly understood. Our presentation summarizes data collected within studies on burned piñon-juniper woodlands that provide new insight on: 1) the spatial distribution and severity of SWR, 2) influence of SWR on soil hydrology, nitrogen cycling, and site revegetation, and 3) the suitability of soil surfactants as a post-fire restoration tool. We demonstrate how patterns of SWR are highly correlated to pre-fire woodland canopy structure. At sites where SWR is present, infiltration, soil water content, and plant establishment is significantly less than at non-hydrophobic sites. We show how newly developed soil surfactants can significantly improve ecohydrologic properties required for plant growth by overcoming SWR; thus, increasing the amount and duration of available water for seed germination and plant growth. However, the application of soil surfactants in wildfire-affected ecosystems has been limited due to logistical and economic constraints associated with the standard practice of using large quantities of irrigation water as the surfactant carrier. We have developed a potential solution to this problem by using seed coating technology to use the seed as the carrier for the delivery of soil surfactant. Through this approach, precipitation leaches the surfactant from the seed into the soil where it absorbs onto the soil particles and ameliorates water repellency within the seeds microsite. We present findings from laboratory and field evaluations of surfactant seed coatings, which provide evidence that it may be plausible for the technology to improve post-fire seeding efforts by restoring soil hydrologic function and increasing seedling

  4. Effect of Different Surfactants on the Interfacial Behavior of the n-Hexane-Water System in the Presence of Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Nihar Ranjan; Rangera, Naveen; Singh, Jayant K

    2016-07-28

    This paper presents the effect of negatively charged silica nanoparticles (NPs) on the interfacial tension of the n-hexane-water system at variable concentrations of four different surfactants, viz., an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), a cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and two nonionic surfactants, Tween 20 and Triton X-100 (TX-100). The presence of negatively charged silica nanoparticles is found to have a different effect depending on the type of surfactant. In the case of ionic surfactants, SDS and CTAB, silica NPs reduce the interfacial tension of the system. On the contrary, for nonionic surfactants, Tween 20 and TX-100, silica NPs increase the interfacial tension. The increasing/decreasing nature of the interfacial tension in the presence of NPs is well supported by the calculated surface excess concentrations. The diffusion kinetic control (DKC) and statistical rate theory (SRT) models are used to understand the behavior of dynamic interfacial tension of the surfactant-NP-oil-water system. The DKC model is found to describe the studied surfactant-NP-oil-water systems more aptly. PMID:27367433

  5. Impact of soil water property parameterization on atmospheric boundary layer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenca, Richard H.; Ek, Michael; Mahrt, Larry

    1996-03-01

    Both the form of functional relationships applied for soil water properties and the natural field-scale variability of such properties can significantly impact simulation of the soil-plant-atmosphere system on a diurnal timescale. Various input parameters for soil water properties including effective saturation, residual water content, anerobiosis point, field capacity, and permanent wilting point are incorporated into functions describing soil water retention, hydraulic conductivity, diffusivity, sorptivity, and the plant sink function. The perception of the meaning of these values and their variation within a natural environment often differs from the perspective of the soil physicist, plant physiologist, and atmospheric scientist. This article investigates the sensitivity of energy balance and boundary layer simulation to different soil water property functions using the Oregon State University coupled atmosphere-plant-soil (CAPS) simulation model under bare soil conditions. The soil parameterizations tested in the CAPS model include those of Clapp and Hornberger [1978], van Genuchten [1980], and Cosby et al. [1984] using initial atmospheric conditions from June 16, 1986 in Hydrologic Atmospheric Pilot Experiment-Modélisation du Bilan Hydrique (HAPEX-MOBILHY). For the bare soil case these results demonstrate unexpected model sensitivity to soil water property parameterization in partitioning all components of the diurnal energy balance and corresponding boundary layer development.

  6. Approaches and challenges of soil water monitoring in an irrigated vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolz, Reinhard; Loiskandl, Willibald

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of water content is an approved method to quantify certain components of the soil water balance, for example as basis for hydrological studies and soil water management. Temporal soil water data also allow controlling water status by means of demand-oriented irrigation. Regarding spatial variability of water content due to soil characteristics, plant water uptake and other non-uniformities, it is a great challenge to select a location that is most likely representing soil water status of a larger area (e.g. an irrigated field). Although such an approach might not satisfy the requirements of precision farming - which becomes more and more related to industrial agriculture - it can help improving water use efficiency of small-scale farming. In this regard, specific conditions can be found in typical vineyards in the eastern part of Austria, where grapes are grown for high quality wine production. Generally, the local dry-subhumid climate supports grape development. However, irrigation is temporarily essential in order to guarantee stable yields and high quality. As the local winegrowers traditionally control irrigation based on their experience, there is a potential to improve irrigation management by means of soil water data. In order to gain experience with regard to irrigation management, soil water status was determined in a small vineyard in Austria (47°48'16'' N, 17°01'57'' E, 118 m elevation). The vineyard was equipped with a subsurface drip irrigation system and access tubes for measuring water content in soil profiles. The latter was measured using a portable device as well as permanently installed multi-sensor capacitance probes. Soil samples were taken at chosen dates and gravimetrically analyzed in the laboratory. Water content data were analyzed using simple statistical procedures and the temporal stability concept. Soil water content was interpreted considering different environmental conditions, including rainfall and irrigation periods

  7. Theoretical and Simulations-Based Modeling of Micellization in Linear and Branched Surfactant Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendenhall, Jonathan D.

    Surfactants are chemically-heterogeneous molecules possessing hydrophilic (head) and hydrophobic (tail) moieties. This dual nature of surfactants leads to interesting phase behavior in aqueous solution as a function of surfactant concentration, including: (i) formation of surfactant monolayers at surfaces and interfaces, and (ii) self-assembly into finite aggregates (micelles) in the bulk solution beyond the critical micelle concentration (cmc). This concentration-dependent phase behavior induces changes in solution properties. For example, the surface activity of surfactants can decrease the surface tension, and self-assembly in bulk solution can lead to changes in viscosity, equivalent conductivity, solubilization capacity, and other bulk properties. These effects make surfactants quite attractive and unique for use in product formulations, where they are utilized as detergents, dispersants, emulsifiers, solubilizers, surface and interfacial tension modifiers, and in other contexts. The specific chemical structure of the surfactant head and tail is essential in determining the overall performance properties of a surfactant in aqueous media. The surfactant tail drives the self-assembly process through the hydrophobic effect, while the surfactant head imparts a certain extent of solubility to the surfactant in aqueous solution through preferential interactions with the hydrogen-bonding network of water. The interplay between these two effects gives rise to the particular phase diagram of a surfactant, including the specific cmc at which micelles begin to form. In addition to serving as a quantitative indicator of micelle formation, the cmc represents a limit to surface monolayer formation, and hence to surface and interfacial tension reduction, because surfactant adsorption at interfaces remains approximately constant beyond the cmc. In addition, the cmc represents the onset of changes in bulk solution properties. This Thesis is concerned with the prediction of cmc

  8. Pulmonary Surfactant Model Systems Catch the Specific Interaction of an Amphiphilic Peptide with Anionic Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Hiromichi; Lee, Sannamu; Shibata, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Interfacial behavior was studied in pulmonary surfactant model systems containing an amphiphilic α-helical peptide (Hel 13-5), which consists of 13 hydrophobic and five hydrophilic amino acid residues. Fully saturated phospholipids of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) were utilized to understand specific interactions between anionic DPPG and cationic Hel 13-5 for pulmonary functions. Surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms of DPPG/Hel 13-5 and DPPC/DPPG (4:1, mol/mol)/Hel 13-5 preparations were measured to obtain basic information on the phase behavior under compression and expansion processes. The interaction leads to a variation in squeeze-out surface pressures against a mole fraction of Hel 13-5, where Hel 13-5 is eliminated from the surface on compression. The phase behavior was visualized by means of Brewster angle microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. At low surface pressures, the formation of differently ordered domains in size and shape is induced by electrostatic interactions. The domains independently grow upon compression to high surface pressures, especially in the DPPG/Hel 13-5 system. Under the further compression process, protrusion masses are formed in AFM images in the vicinity of squeeze-out pressures. The protrusion masses, which are attributed to the squeezed-out Hel 13-5, grow larger in lateral size with increasing DPPG content in phospholipid compositions. During subsequent expansion up to 35 mN m−1, the protrusions retain their height and lateral diameter for the DPPG/Hel 13-5 system, whereas the protrusions become smaller for the DPPC/Hel 13-5 and DPPC/DPPG/Hel 13-5 systems due to a reentrance of the ejected Hel 13-5 into the surface. In this work we detected for the first time, to our knowledge, a remarkably large hysteresis loop for cyclic ΔV-A isotherms of the binary DPPG/Hel 13-5 preparation. This exciting phenomenon

  9. Langmuir-Blodgett films of a pyrrole and ferrocene mixed surfactant system

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.; Rahman, A.K.M.; Clough, S.; Tripathy, S.; Hale, P.D.; Inagaki, T.; Skotheim, T.A.; Okamoto, Y. . Dept. of Chemistry; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-01-01

    The Langmuir-Blodgett technique was used to study the molecular organization of a mixed 3-hexadecyl pyrrole (3HDP) and ferrocene-derivatized pyrrole (Fc-Py) surfactant system. It has been determined that stable monolayer films of the mixed system could be formed at the air-water interface. The growth and assembly process led to polypyrrole 2-D lattices with heretofore unsurpassed order. In fact, the process of template polymerization, it appears, leads to a new crystal phase for the polypyrrole component of the thin film structure. Various monolayer and multilayer films were prepared on platinum coated substrates for surface spectroscopic characterization. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) studies revealed that highly ordered multilayer structures are being formed. Electrochemical studies have been initiated to determine the feasibility of these films in molecular electronic device applications. 13 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Surfactant mixing rules applied to surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses surfactant mixing rules which have been used to describe crude oil/alkali/surfactant phase behavior, using David Lloydminster crude oil and the surfactant Neodol 25-3S. It was found that at a fixed salinity and alkali concentration, a specific mole fraction of synthetic surfactant to petroleum soap was required to produce optimal phase behavior as the water-to-oil ratio varied. This methodology is useful in understanding the relationship between the variables of water-to-oil ratio and synthetic surfactant concentration in phase behavior systems that produce a petroleum soap.

  11. Descriptive and sensitivity analyses of WATBALI: A dynamic soil water model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildreth, W. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A soil water computer model that uses the IBM Continuous System Modeling Program III to solve the dynamic equations representing the soil, plant, and atmospheric physical or physiological processes considered is presented and discussed. Using values describing the soil-plant-atmosphere characteristics, the model predicts evaporation, transpiration, drainage, and soil water profile changes from an initial soil water profile and daily meteorological data. The model characteristics and simulations that were performed to determine the nature of the response to controlled variations in the input are described the results of the simulations are included and a change that makes the response of the model more closely represent the observed characteristics of evapotranspiration and profile changes for dry soil conditions is examined.

  12. Dryland crop sequence and tillage influences on soil water storage: First 15 years

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management practices and cropping systems have greatly changed over the past half century. In the northern Great Plains, soil water storage during the non-crop period of annual cropping systems helps to stabilize crop yields. Our objectives were to determine the influences of six crop sequences an...

  13. Soil water response to slope aspect and grazing in silvopasture during drought

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Silvopasture is receiving increasing attention as a robust management system for production of forage for livestock grazing on the diverse landscapes of the Appalachian region. Little knowledge about soil water response to slope aspect and grazing pressure in silvopasture systems of the Region is a...

  14. Microwave remote sensing of soil water content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cihlar, J.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1975-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing of soils to determine water content was considered. A layered water balance model was developed for determining soil water content in the upper zone (top 30 cm), while soil moisture at greater depths and near the surface during the diurnal cycle was studied using experimental measurements. Soil temperature was investigated by means of a simulation model. Based on both models, moisture and temperature profiles of a hypothetical soil were generated and used to compute microwave soil parameters for a clear summer day. The results suggest that, (1) soil moisture in the upper zone can be predicted on a daily basis for 1 cm depth increments, (2) soil temperature presents no problem if surface temperature can be measured with infrared radiometers, and (3) the microwave response of a bare soil is determined primarily by the moisture at and near the surface. An algorithm is proposed for monitoring large areas which combines the water balance and microwave methods.

  15. Semiempirical model of soil water hysteresis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In order to represent hysteretic soil water retention curves accurately using as few measurements as possible, a new semiempirical model has been developed. It has two postulates related to physical characteristics of the medium, and two parameters, each with a definite physical interpretation, whose values are determined empirically for a given porous medium. Tests of the model show that it provides high-quality optimized fits to measured water content vs. matric pressure wetting curves for a wide variety of media. A practical use of this model is to provide a complete simulated main wetting curve for a medium where only a main drying curve and two points on the wetting curve have been measured. -from Author

  16. Decadal predictability of soil water, vegetation, and wildfire frequency over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikamoto, Yoshimitsu; Timmermann, Axel; Stevenson, Samantha; DiNezio, Pedro; Langford, Sally

    2015-10-01

    The potential decadal predictability of land hydrological and biogeochemical variables in North America is examined using a 900-year-long pre-industrial control simulation, conducted with the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) version 1.0.3. The leading modes of simulated North American precipitation and soil water storage are characterized essentially by qualitatively similar meridional seesaw patterns associated with the activity of the westerly jet. Whereas the corresponding precipitation variability can be described as a white noise stochastic process, power spectra of vertically integrated soil water exhibit significant redness on timescales of years to decades, since the predictability of soil water storage arises mostly from the integration of precipitation variability. As a result, damped persistence hindcasts following a 1st order Markov process are skillful with lead times of up to several years. This potential multi-year skill estimate is consistent with ensemble hindcasts conducted with the CESM for various initial conditions. Our control simulation further suggests that decadal variations in soil water storage also affect vegetation and wildfire occurrences. The long-term potential predictability of soil water variations in combination with the slow regrowth of vegetation after major disruptions leads to enhanced predictability on decadal timescales for vegetation, terrestrial carbon stock, and fire frequency, in particular in the Southern United States (US)/Mexico region. By contrast, the prediction skill of fire frequency in the Northern US is limited to 1 year. Our results demonstrate that skillful decadal predictions of soil water storage, carbon stock, and fire frequency are feasible with proper initialization of soil conditions. Although the potential predictability in our idealized modeling framework would overestimate the real predictability of the coupled climate-land-vegetation system, the decadal climate prediction may become

  17. Influence of sediment on the fate and toxicity of a polyethoxylated tallowamine surfactant system (MON 0818) in aquatic microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, N.; Besser, J.M.; Buckler, D.R.; Honegger, J.L.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Johnson, B.T.; Kurtzweil, M.L.; MacGregor, J.; McKee, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fate and toxicity of a polyethoxylated tallowamine (POEA) surfactant system, MON 0818, was evaluated in water-sediment microcosms during a 4-d laboratory study. A surfactant solution of 8 mg l-1 nominal concentration was added to each of nine 72-l aquaria with or without a 3-cm layer of one of two natural sediments (total organic carbon (TOC) 1.5% or 3.0%). Control well water was added to each of nine additional 72-l aquaria with or without sediment. Water samples were collected from the microcosms after 2, 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h of aging to conduct 48-h toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and to determine surfactant concentrations. Elevated mortality of D. magna (43-83%) was observed in overlying water sampled from water-only microcosms throughout the 96-h aging period, whereas elevated mortality (23-97%) was only observed in overlying water sampled from water-sediment microcosms during the first 24 h of aging. Measured concentrations of MON 0818 in water-only microcosms remained relatively constant (4-6 mg l-1) during the 96-h period, whereas the concentrations in overlying water from microcosms containing either of the two types of sediment dissipated rapidly, with half-lives of 13 h in the 3.0% TOC sediment and 18 h in the 1.5% TOC sediment. Both toxicity and the concentration of MON 0818 in overlying water decreased more rapidly in microcosms containing sediment with the higher percent TOC and clay and with a higher microbial biomass. Mortality of D. magna was significantly correlated with surfactant concentrations in the overlying water. These results indicate that the toxicity of the POEA surfactant in water rapidly declines in the presence of sediment due to a reduction in the surfactant concentration in the overlying water above the sediment.

  18. Sensible heat observations reveal soil-water evaporation dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is important at scales ranging from microbial ecology to large-scale climate. Yet, routine measurments are unable to capture rapidly shifting near-surface soil heat and water processes involved in soil-water evaporation. The objective of this study was to determine the depth a...

  19. Comparison of corn transpiration, eddy covariance, and soil water loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem flow gages are used to estimate plant transpiration, but only a few studies compare transpiration with other measures of soil water loss. The purpose of this study was to compare transpiration from stem flow measurements with soil water changes estimated by daily neutron probe readings. Monitor...

  20. Soil Water and Shallow Groundwater Relations in an Agricultural Hillslope

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shallow water tables contribute to soil water variations under rolling topography, and soil properties contribute to shallow water table fluctutations. Preferential flow through large soil pores can cause a rise in the water table with little increase in soil water except near the soil surface. Late...

  1. Soil Water Trends During the 2005 - 2006 Drought in Oklahoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water depletion is an early consequence of a meteorological drought, with the latter defined as a precipitation deficit lasting a few months to several years. Soil water in the upper soil profile (approximately first meter) is limited and highly variable because of its rapid response to precipi...

  2. Remote sensing of soil water content at large scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water content at the near surface is a critical parameter for understanding land surface atmosphere interactions, influencing surface energy balances. Using microwave radiometry, an accurate global map of surface soil water content can be generated on a near daily basis. The accuracy of the p...

  3. Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe Soil Water Measurements over Complex Terrain in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreugdenhil, Mariette; Weltin, Georg; Kheng Heng, Lee; Wahbi, Ammar; Oismueller, Markus; Dercon, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    The importance of surface soil water (rooting zone) has become evident with climate change affecting rainfall patterns and crop production. The use of Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe (CRNP) for measuring surface soil water has become increasingly popular. The advantage of CRNP is that it is a non-invasive technique for measuring soil water content at an area-wide scale, in contrast to more conventional, techniques which measure mainly at field scale (point level). The CRNP integrates over a circular area of ca. 600 meters in diameter, to a depth of 70 cm, giving an average value for soil water content. Cosmic radiation interacting with the Earth's atmosphere continuously generates neutrons. At Earth's surface, these neutrons interact with surface water, and are slowed down. At sub-micrometer geometrics, these neutrons affect semiconductor devices, so they can be counted, slow and fast ones separately. From the difference in numbers between fast and slow neutrons, soil water content is calculated. As first in Austria, a CRNP (CRS 1000/B model) consisting of two neutron counters (one tuned for slow, the other one for fast neutrons), data logger and an Iridium modem, has been installed at Petzenkirchen research station of the Doctoral Programme for Water Resource Systems (TU Vienna) at 48.14 latitude and 15.17 longitude, 100 km west of Vienna, in late autumn 2013. The research station is located in an undulating agricultural landscape, characterized by heavy Cambisols and Planosols, and winter wheat and barley as main crops in winter, and maize and sunflower in summer. In addition, an in-situ soil moisture network consisting of 32 stations of Time Domain Transmissivity (TDT) sensors measuring soil water at 4 depths (0.05, 0.10,0.20 and 0.50 m) over an area of 64 ha has been established. This TDT network is currently being used to validate the use of the innovative CRNP technique. First results will be shown at the EGU 2014.

  4. Assessment of the soil water content temporal variations in an agricultural area of Galicia (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas-Valero, Roger Manuel; Miras-Avalos, Jose Manuel; Paz-González, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    The direct and continuous assessment of the temporal variation on soil water content is of paramount importance for agricultural practices and, in particular, for the management of water resources. Soil water content is affected by many factors such as topography, particle size, clay and organic matter contents, and tillage systems. There are several techniques to measure or estimate soil water content. Among them, Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) stands out. It is based on measuring the dielectrical constant of the soil environment. This technique allows to describe water dynamics in time and space, to determine the main patterns of soil moisture, the water uptake by roots, the evapotranspiration and the drainage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the daily variation of soil water content in the root-influenced zone in plots devoted to maize and grassland as a function of the soil water volumetric content. The studied site is located in an experimental field of the Centre for Agricultural Research (CIAM) in Mabegondo located in the province of A Coruña, Spain (43°14'N, 8°15'W; 91 masl). The study was carried out from June 2008 to September 2009 in a field devoted to maize (Zea mays, L.) and another field devoted to grassland. The soil of these sites is silt-clay textured. Long-term mean annual temperature and rainfall figures are 13.3 °C and 1288 mm, respectively. During the study period, maize crop was subjected to conventional agricultural practices. A weekly evaluation of the phenological stage of the crop was performed. An EnviroSCAN FDR equipment, comprising six capacitance sensors, was installed in the studied sites following the manufacturer's recommendations, thus assuring a proper contact between the probe and the soil. Soil water content in the root-influenced zone (40 cm depth in grassland and 60 cm depth in maize were considered) was hourly monitored in 20 cm ranges (0-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and 40-60 cm) using FDR. Evaluations were

  5. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  6. Diseases of pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  7. HYDRAULIC REDISTRIBUTION OF SOIL WATER BY ROOTS IN FORESTS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    One aspect of structural complexity of forest canopies is the root system structure belowground, which influences patterns of soil water utilization by trees. Deeply rooted trees and other plants can hydraulically lift water via their roots from several m below the soil surface ...

  8. Monitoring near surface soil water and associated dynamics of infiltration and evaporation fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-situ monitoring of soil water has the advantage of integrating the precipitation and evaporation history and gradual changes in hydraulic properties on the aggregate response of the soil-plant-atmosphere system. A paired field study in Bushland, Texas, and Tribune, Kansas, evaluated infiltration ...

  9. Thermo-responsive properties driven by hydrogen bonding in aqueous cationic gemini surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xi-Lian; Han, Chuan-Hong; Geng, Pei-Pei; Chen, Xiao-Xiao; Guo, Yan; Liu, Jie; Sun, De-Zhi; Zhang, Jun-Hong; Yu, Meng-Jiao

    2016-02-01

    A series of unexpected thermo-responsive phenomena were discovered in an aqueous solution of the cationic gemini surfactant, 2-hydroxypropyl-1,3-bis(alkyldimethylammonium chloride) (n-3(OH)-n(2Cl), n = 14, 16), in the presence of an inorganic salt. The viscosity change trend for the 14-3(OH)-14(2Cl) system was investigated in the 20-40 °C temperature range. As the temperature increased, the viscosity of the solution first decreased to a minimum point corresponding to 27 °C, and then increased until a maximum was reached, after which the viscosity decreased again. In the 16-3(OH)-16(2Cl) system, the gelling temperature (T(gel)) and viscosity changes upon heating were similar to those in the 14-3(OH)-14(2Cl) system above 27 °C. The reversible conversion of elastic hydrogel to wormlike micelles in the aqueous solution of the 16-3(OH)-16(2Cl) system in the presence of an inorganic salt was observed at relatively low temperatures. Various techniques were used to study and verify the phase-transition processes in these systems, including rheological measurements, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), electric conductivity, and differential scanning calorimetry. The abovementioned phenomena were explained by the formation and destruction of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, and the transition mechanisms of the aggregates were analyzed accordingly. PMID:26659081

  10. Factors influencing the mechanism of surfactant catalyzed reaction of vitamin C-ferric chloride hexahydrate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrukh, Muhammad Akhyar; Kauser, Robina; Adnan, Rohana

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of vitamin C by ferric chloride hexahydrate has been investigated in the aqueous ethanol solution of basic surfactant viz. octadecylamine (ODA) under pseudo-first order conditions. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant was determined by surface tension measurement. The effect of pH (2.5-4.5) and temperature (15-35°C) in the presence and absence of surfactant were investigated. Activation parameters, Δ E a, Δ H #, Δ S #, Δ G ≠, for the reaction were calculated by using Arrhenius and Eyring plot. Surface excess concentration (Γmax), minimum area per surfactant molecule ( A min), average area occupied by each molecule of surfactant ( a), surface pressure at the CMC (Πmax), Gibb's energy of micellization (Δ G M°), Gibb's energy of adsorption (Δ G ad°), were calculated. It was found that the reaction in the presence of surfactant showed faster oxidation rate than the aqueous ethanol solution. Reaction mechanism has been deduced in the presence and absence of surfactant.

  11. A minimalist probabilistic description of root zone soil water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.

    2001-01-01

    The probabilistic response of depth-integrated soil water to given climatic forcing can be described readily using an existing supply-demand-storage model. An apparently complex interaction of numerous soil, climate, and plant controls can be reduced to a relatively simple expression for the equilibrium probability density function of soil water as a function of only two dimensionless parameters. These are the index of dryness (ratio of mean potential evaporation to mean precipitation) and a dimensionless storage capacity (active root zone soil water capacity divided by mean storm depth). The first parameter is mainly controlled by climate, with surface albedo playing a subsidiary role in determining net radiation. The second is a composite of soil (through moisture retention characteristics), vegetation (through rooting characteristics), and climate (mean storm depth). This minimalist analysis captures many essential features of a more general probabilistic analysis, but with a considerable reduction in complexity and consequent elucidation of the critical controls on soil water variability. In particular, it is shown that (1) the dependence of mean soil water on the index of dryness approaches a step function in the limit of large soil water capacity; (2) soil water variance is usually maximized when the index of dryness equals 1, and the width of the peak varies inversely with dimensionless storage capacity; (3) soil water has a uniform probability density function when the index of dryness is 1 and the dimensionless storage capacity is large; and (4) the soil water probability density function is bimodal if and only if the index of dryness is <1, but this bimodality is pronounced only for artificially small values of the dimensionless storage capacity.

  12. Fractal behavior of soil water storage at multiple depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenjun; Lin, Mi; Biswas, Asim; Si, Bing C.; Chau, Henry W.; Cresswell, Hamish P.

    2016-08-01

    Spatiotemporal behavior of soil water is essential to understand the science of hydrodynamics. Data intensive measurement of surface soil water using remote sensing has established that the spatial variability of soil water can be described using the principle of self-similarity (scaling properties) or fractal theory. This information can be used in determining land management practices provided the surface scaling properties are kept at deep layers. The current study examined the scaling properties of sub-surface soil water and their relationship to surface soil water, thereby serving as supporting information for plant root and vadose zone models. Soil water storage (SWS) down to 1.4 m depth at seven equal intervals was measured along a transect of 576 m for 5 years in Saskatchewan. The surface SWS showed multifractal nature only during the wet period (from snowmelt until mid- to late June) indicating the need for multiple scaling indices in transferring soil water variability information over multiple scales. However, with increasing depth, the SWS became monofractal in nature indicating the need for a single scaling index to upscale/downscale soil water variability information. In contrast, all soil layers during the dry period (from late June to the end of the growing season in early November) were monofractal in nature, probably resulting from the high evapotranspirative demand of the growing vegetation that surpassed other effects. This strong similarity between the scaling properties at the surface layer and deep layers provides the possibility of inferring about the whole profile soil water dynamics using the scaling properties of the easy-to-measure surface SWS data.

  13. Alcohol--Induced Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Complex Coacervate Systems: Characterization and Applications in Enzyme and Protein Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejati Moshtaghin, Mahboubeh

    The focus of this thesis is to achieve a better understanding of the newly discovered surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervate (SPCC) systems induced by fluoroalcohol/acid as well as short chain aliphatic alcohol; and to elucidate their applications in extraction and enrichment of proteins and enzyme. We have discovered that fluoroalcohols and --acids induce complex coacervation and phase separation in the aqueous mixtures of oppositely charged anionic polyelectrolytes; specifically, sodium salts of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid and cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) over a broad range of concentrations of mole fractions of the oppositely charged amphiphiles. Accordingly, these new classes of coacervators will significantly broaden the scope and facilitate engineering of new coacervate phases. Toward these goals, we have inspected the formation of surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervates in the presence of fluoroalcohols namely hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and Trifluoroethanol (TFE). Furthermore, the extent of coacervation as a function of concentrations the system components, and charge ratios of the oppositely charged amphiphiles has been investigated. Polyelectrolytes are considered to be milder reagents, as compared to surfactants, regarding proteins denaturation. This highlights the importance of a detailed investigation of the efficiency of our coacervate systems for extraction and preconcentration of proteins and enzymes, especially, when the biological activity of the extracted proteins needs to be maintained based on the objectives mentioned above, the results of the investigations have been organized in four chapters. In Chapter II, the phase behavior of the FA-SPCC will be investigated. The objective is to examine the phase behavior and phase properties with respect to the extent of coacervation in different solution conditions. In particular, the effects of different solution variables such as concentration

  14. Experimental study of surfactant transfer in fluid systems in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarev, K. G.; Levtov, V. L.; Romanov, V. V.; Shmyrov, A. V.; Viviani, A.

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents the results of the space experiment studying the process of surfactant dissolution from a binary fluid drop in microgravity conditions. The experiment was performed during the flight of the space satellite "Foton M-3" in September 2007. Investigation of the surfactant diffusion was made using a new original setup based on the interferometric method. The experimental cuvette represented a thin Hele-Shaw cell filled with water, which surrounded a drop in the form of a short liquid cylinder with a free lateral surface. The drop consisted of a binary mixture, in which one of the components was the surfactant easily dissolved in water. The use of interferometry made it possible to visualize and investigate evolution of the surfactant distributions and the flow structures in the drop and the surrounding liquid. The characteristic stages of the dissolution process were identified, and the rate of the concentration front propagation was defined. It was shown that in microgravity conditions the process of surfactant diffusion through the interface did not initiate an intensive solutal Marangoni convection as contrasted to the case of terrestrial simulation. The observed phenomenon has its origins in the long-lived fields of surfactant concentration formed near the interface due to the absence of the gravitational mechanisms of motion and large characteristic time of admixture diffusion which is hundreds of times longer than the time of thermal diffusion.

  15. Reversible shear-induced crystallization above equilibrium freezing temperature in a lyotropic surfactant system

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Vikram; Krishnaswamy, Rema; Pal, Antara; Raghunathan, V. A.; Impéror-Clerc, Marianne; Pansu, Brigitte; Sood, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a unique shear-induced crystallization phenomenon above the equilibrium freezing temperature in weakly swollen isotropic and lamellar mesophases with bilayers formed in a cationic-anionic mixed surfactant system. Synchrotron rheological X-ray diffraction study reveals the crystallization transition to be reversible under shear (i.e., on stopping the shear, the nonequilibrium crystalline phase melts back to the equilibrium mesophase). This is different from the shear-driven crystallization below , which is irreversible. Rheological optical observations show that the growth of the crystalline phase occurs through a preordering of the phase to an phase induced by shear flow, before the nucleation of the phase. Shear diagram of the phase constructed in the parameter space of shear rate vs. temperature exhibits and transitions above the equilibrium crystallization temperature , in addition to the irreversible shear-driven nucleation of in the phase below . In addition to revealing a unique class of nonequilibrium phase transition, the present study urges a unique approach toward understanding shear-induced phenomena in concentrated mesophases of mixed amphiphilic systems. PMID:23986497

  16. Thermodynamic parameters and counterion binding to the micelle in binary anionic surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Maneedaeng, Atthaphon; Haller, Kenneth J; Grady, Brian P; Flood, Adrian E

    2011-04-15

    Competitive counterion binding of sodium and calcium to micelles, and mixed micellization have been investigated in the systems sodium dodecylsulfate (NaDS)/sodium decylsulfate (NaDeS) and NaDS/sodium 4-octylbenzenesulfonate (NaOBS) in order to accurately model the activity of the relevant species in solution. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) and equilibrium micelle compositions of mixtures of these anionic surfactants, which is necessary for determining fractional counterion binding measurements, is thermodynamically modeled by regular solution theory. The mixed micelle is ideal (the regular solution parameter β(M)=0) for the NaDS/NaOBS system, while the mixed micelle for NaDS/NaDeS has β(M)=-1.05 indicating a slight synergistic interaction. Counterion binding of sodium to the micelle is influenced by the calcium ion concentration, and vice versa. However, the total degree of counterion binding is essentially constant at approximately 0.65 charge negation at the micelle's surface. The counterion binding coefficients can be quantitatively modeled using a simple equilibrium model relating concentrations of bound and unbound counterions. PMID:21292278

  17. Mapping crop evapotranspiration by integrating vegetation indices into a soil water balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, Simona; Vanella, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    The approach combines the basal crop coefficient (Kcb) derived from vegetation indices (VIs) with the daily soil water balance, as proposed in the FAO-56 paper, to estimate daily crop evapotranspiration (ETc) rates of orange trees. The reliability of the approach to detect water stress was also assessed. VIs were simultaneously retrieved from WorldView-2 imagery and hyper-spectral data collected in the field for comparison. ETc estimated were analysed at the light of independent measurements of the same fluxes by an eddy covariance (EC) system located in the study area. The soil water depletion in the root zone of the crop simulated by the model was also validated by using an in situ soil water monitoring. Average overestimate of daily ETc of 6% was obtained from the proposed approach with respect to EC measurements, evidencing a quite satisfactory agreement between data. The model also detected several periods of light stress for the crop under study, corresponding to an increase of the root zone water deficit matching quite well the in situ soil water monitoring. The overall outcomes of this study showed that the FAO-56 approach with remote sensing-derived basal crop coefficient can have the potential to be applied for estimating crop water requirements and enhancing water management strategies in agricultural contexts.

  18. Physicochemical characterization of novel aqueous two-phase system: gemini surfactant 12-2-12/NaBr/H2O.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ling; He, Zimeng; Zhu, Yunfeng; Shang, Yazhuo; Liu, Honglai

    2015-04-01

    A novel aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) only containing Gemini surfactant ethanediyl-1,2-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) and an inorganic salt sodium bromide was designed, and the physicochemical properties of the ATPS were investigated systematically. The results have shown that the coexisting two phases, one surfactant-rich and the other salt-rich, are stable and the phase behavior, volume ratio, and extraction efficiency of ATPS are strongly influenced by contents of surfactant and salt. The novel ATPS here investigated have potential application in partitioning and analysis of biomaterials. Compared with other complicated surfactant-based ATPS, the surfactant concentration for the formation of ATPS is much lower, which implies that the studied system is potentially more economical for purification and separation of biomaterials. Meanwhile, the surfactant can be recycled by altering salt concentration in ATPS. Lyotropic liquid crystal was found in the bottom phase besides micelles under different conditions. The salting-out effect may be the driving force of ATPS formation for the studied "living polymer"/salt system. However, the coexistence of micelles with different microstructures is the necessary condition of phase separation. The current studies not only present a new ATPS for partitioning and analysis of biomaterials but also have a great significance on rational use of Gemini surfactants. PMID:25649445

  19. Quantifying nonisothermal subsurface soil water evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deol, Pukhraj; Heitman, Josh; Amoozegar, Aziz; Ren, Tusheng; Horton, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Accurate quantification of energy and mass transfer during soil water evaporation is critical for improving understanding of the hydrologic cycle and for many environmental, agricultural, and engineering applications. Drying of soil under radiation boundary conditions results in formation of a dry surface layer (DSL), which is accompanied by a shift in the position of the latent heat sink from the surface to the subsurface. Detailed investigation of evaporative dynamics within this active near-surface zone has mostly been limited to modeling, with few measurements available to test models. Soil column studies were conducted to quantify nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles using a sensible heat balance (SHB) approach. Eleven-needle heat pulse probes were used to measure soil temperature and thermal property distributions at the millimeter scale in the near-surface soil. Depth-integrated SHB evaporation rates were compared with mass balance evaporation estimates under controlled laboratory conditions. The results show that the SHB method effectively measured total subsurface evaporation rates with only 0.01-0.03 mm h-1difference from mass balance estimates. The SHB approach also quantified millimeter-scale nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles over a drying event, which has not been previously possible. Thickness of the DSL was also examined using measured soil thermal conductivity distributions near the drying surface. Estimates of the DSL thickness were consistent with observed evaporation profile distributions from SHB. Estimated thickness of the DSL was further used to compute diffusive vapor flux. The diffusive vapor flux also closely matched both mass balance evaporation rates and subsurface evaporation rates estimated from SHB.

  20. Unique Phase Behaviors in the Gemini Surfactant/EAN Binary System: The Role of the Hydroxyl Group.

    PubMed

    Li, Qintang; Wang, Xudong; Yue, Xiu; Chen, Xiao

    2015-12-22

    The hydroxyl group in the spacer of a cationic Gemini surfactant (12-3OH-12) caused dramatic changes of the phase behaviors in a protic ionic liquid (EAN). Here, the effects of the hydroxyl group on micellization and lyotropic liquid crystal formation were investigated through the surface tension, small-angle X-ray scattering, polarized optical microscopy, and rheological measurements. With the hydroxyl group in the spacer, the critical micellization concentration of 12-3OH-12 was found to be lower than that of the homologue without hydroxyl (12-3-12) and the 12-3OH-12 molecules packed more densely at the air/EAN interface. It was then interesting to observe a coexistence of two separated phases at wide concentration and temperature ranges in this 12-3OH-12/EAN system. Such a micellar phase separation was rarely observed in the ionic surfactant binary system. With the increase of surfactant concentration, the reverse hexagonal and bicontinuous cubic phases appeared in sequence, whereas only a reverse hexagonal phase was found in 12-3-12/EAN system. But, the hexagonal phases formed with 12-3OH-12 exhibited lower viscoelasticity and thermostability than those observed in 12-3-12/EAN system. Such unique changes in phase behaviors of 12-3OH-12 were ascribed to their enhanced solvophilic interactions of 12-3OH-12 and relatively weak solvophobic interactions in EAN. PMID:26634877

  1. Spontaneous formation of intermediate phases and dynamics of interfacial tension in water-nonionic surfactant-octane systems

    SciTech Connect

    Svitova, T.F.; Smirnova, Yu.P.; Pisarev, S.A.

    1994-05-01

    The kinetics of the spontaneous formation of intermediate phases in aqueous solutions of ethoxylated iso-nonylphenols (iso-C{sub 9}PhEO{sub n}, where n = 5-10)-octane systems was studied at 25{degree}C. The maximum rate of the formation of intermediate phases at this temperature was observed when the number of ethoxy-groups n was 6. The dynamic interfacial tension at the boundary between the aqueous solutions of the surfactants and octane were measured using drop volume and spinning drop methods. The rate of the interfacials tension decrease was maximum and the equilibrium interfacial tension was minimum also at n = 6. A correlation between the dynamics of interfacial processes and the equilibrium phase state of the water-nonionic surfactant-hydrocarbon systems was found for the first time.

  2. Enhanced solubilization and desorption of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) from soil by oil-swollen micelles formed with a nonionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guanyu; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Wong, Jonathan W C

    2012-11-01

    The effect of oil-swollen micelles formed with nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), cosurfactant 1-pentanol, and linseed oil on the solubilization and desorption of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) including DDT and γ-HCH from both loam soil and clay soil were investigated. Results showed that the solubilizing capacities of oil-swollen micelles were dependent on the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of Tween 80. Once the concentrations of oil-swollen micelles exceeded the CMC of Tween 80, the oil-swollen micelles exhibited much higher solubilizing capacity than empty Tween 80 micelles for the two OCPs. Desorption tests revealed that oil-swollen micelles could successfully enhance desorption of OCPs from both loam soil and clay soil. However, compared with the efficiencies achieved by empty Tween 80 micelles, oil-swollen micelles exhibited their superiority to desorb OCPs only in loam soil-water system while was less effective in clay soil-water system. Distribution of Tween 80, 1-pentanol and linseed oil in soil-water system revealed that the difference in the sorption behavior of linseed oil onto the two soils is responsible for the different effects of oil-swollen micelles on the desorption of OCPs in loam soil and clay soil systems. Therefore, oil-swollen micelles formed with nonionic surfactant Tween 80 are better candidates over empty micelle counterparts to desorb OCPs from soil with relatively lower sorption capacity for oil fraction, which may consequently enhance the availability of OCPs in soil environment during remediation processes of contaminated soil. PMID:22998366

  3. Fluctuations of lamellar structure prior to a lamellar-->gyroid transition in a nonionic surfactant system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Masayuki; Kawaguchi, Ayako; Saeki, Akira; Nakaya, Kaori; Kato, Tadashi; Ito, Kazuki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki

    2000-11-01

    Fluctuations of lamellar structure prior to a lamellar-->gyroid transition in a nonionic surfactant-water system has been investigated by means of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and differential scanning calorimeter measurements. For large ΔT (ΔT=T-TLG, where T is the temperature and TLG the lamellar-->gyroid transition temperature) in the lamellar phase, the SAXS profiles can be described by a Caillé correlation function for undulating lamellar structure. Approaching the temperature to the TLG, an excess diffuse scattering grows at the lower Q (Q is the magnitude of scattering vector) side of the first lamellar peak. Highly oriented lamellar samples revealed that the excess diffuse scattering arises from in-plane density fluctuations. We attribute this diffuse scattering to the perforation fluctuation layer (PFL) structure and we show that the PFL is an equilibrium structure. At TLG, the PFL transformed to the gyroid phase through a transient ordered structure having a rhombohedral symmetry.

  4. Molecular recognition and controlled release in drug delivery systems based on nanostructured lipid surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angius, R.; Murgia, S.; Berti, D.; Baglioni, P.; Monduzzi, M.

    2006-08-01

    Several monoolein/water (MO/W) based liquid crystalline (LC) nanostructured mesophases have been revisited in view of the new trends of modern drug delivery formulations. The shape and amphiphilic character of the investigated lipid molecules address the preferential polar-apolar interfacial curvature and the delicate interplay of different intermolecular forces that drive self-assembly and thermodynamic stability of the nanostructures. Here some preliminary results related to the release of the antiviral drug 1-amine-adamantane hydrochloride, solubilized in the aqueous domain of bicontinuous cubic and reverse hexagonal LC phases, suggest these MO based LC phases as possible nano-depot systems for long term controlled release. Drug release was followed by conductivity measurements during a period of ten days. An effective and targeted drug delivery often requires a specific molecular recognition. With this aim, the possibility to entrap suitable molecules such as lauroylcholine (LCh, a cationic surfactant having a peptide-like polar head that can 'recognize' membrane proteins) and adenosine monophosphate disodium salt (NaAMP, an electrolyte that can 'recognize' purine receptors) has been tested. The addition of LCh to MO/W cubic gyroid (CG) LC phase causes a cubic-lamellar phase transition. The addition of NaAMP still allows the formation of the CG nanostructure. In the presence of both NaAMP and LCh again a CG LC phase forms. The bicontinuous CG LC phases have been characterized by NMR and SAXS.

  5. Parameter selection and testing the soil water model SOIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGechan, M. B.; Graham, R.; Vinten, A. J. A.; Douglas, J. T.; Hooda, P. S.

    1997-08-01

    The soil water and heat simulation model SOIL was tested for its suitability to study the processes of transport of water in soil. Required parameters, particularly soil hydraulic parameters, were determined by field and laboratory tests for some common soil types and for soils subjected to contrasting treatments of long-term grassland and tilled land under cereal crops. Outputs from simulations were shown to be in reasonable agreement with independently measured field drain outflows and soil water content histories.

  6. Influence of surfactants on unsaturated water flow and solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagunduz, Ahmet; Young, Michael H.; Pennell, Kurt D.

    2015-04-01

    Surfactants can reduce soil water retention by changing the surface tension of water and the contact angle between the liquid and solid phases. As a result, water flow and solute transport in unsaturated soil may be altered in the presence of surfactants. In this study, the effects of a representative nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, on coupled water flow and nonreactive solute transport during unsaturated flow conditions were evaluated. Batch reactor experiments were conducted to measure the surfactant sorption characteristics, while unsaturated transport experiments were performed in columns packed with 40-270 mesh Ottawa sand at five initial water contents. Following the introduction of surfactant solution, the rate of water percolation through the sand increased; however, this period of rapid water drainage was followed by decreased water percolation due to the reduction in soil water content and the corresponding decrease in unsaturated hydraulic conductivity behind the surfactant front. The observed changes in water percolation occurred sequentially, and resulted in faster nonreactive solute transport than was observed in the absence of surfactant. A one-dimensional mathematical model accurately described coupled water flow, surfactant, and solute transport under most experimental conditions. Differences between model predictions and experimental data were observed in the column study performed at the lowest water content (0.115 cm3/cm3), which was attributed to surfactant adsorption at the air-water interface. These findings demonstrate the potential influence of surfactants additives on unsaturated water flow and solute transport in soils, and demonstrate a methodology to couple these processes in a predictive modeling tool.

  7. Spatial variability of arsenic and chromium in the soil water at a former wood preserving site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Luisa; Peiffer, Stefan; Durner, Wolfgang

    2006-05-01

    Contamination of industrial sites by wood preservatives such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA) may pose a serious threat to groundwater quality. The objective of this study was to characterise the spatial variability of As and Cr concentrations in the solid phase and in the soil water at a former wood impregnation plant and to reveal the fundamental transport processes. The soil was sampled down to a depth of 2 m. The soil water was extracted in situ from the vadose zone over a period of 10 months at depths of 1 and 1.5 m, using large horizontally installed suction tubes. Groundwater was sampled from a depth of 4.5 m. Results showed that arsenic and chromium had accumulated in the upper region of the profile and exhibited a high spatial variability (As: 21-621 mg kg - 1 ; Cr: 74-2872 mg kg - 1 ). Concentrations in the soil water were high (mean As 167 μg L - 1 ; Cr: 62 μg L - 1 ) and also showed a distinct spatial variability, covering concentration ranges up to three orders of magnitude. The variability was caused by the severe water-repellency of the surface soil, induced by the concurrent application of creosote wood preservatives, which leads to strong preferential flow as evident from a dye experiment. In contrast to soil water concentrations, only low As concentrations (< 12 μg L - 1 ) were detected in the groundwater. High Cr concentrations in the groundwater (approx. 300 μg L - 1 ), however, illustrated the pronounced mobility of chromium. Our study shows that at sites with a heterogeneous flow system in the vadose zone a disparity between flux-averaged and volume-averaged concentrations may occur, and sampling of soil water might not be adequate for assessing groundwater concentrations. In these cases long-term monitoring of the groundwater appears to be the best strategy for a groundwater risk assessment.

  8. Soil-water fluxes modelling in a green roof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamera, Carlotta; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Becciu, Gianfranco; Rosso, Renzo

    2014-05-01

    Green roofs differ from a natural environment as they are on top of a building and are not connected to the natural ground; therefore it is critical that soils can drain and retain water simultaneously and that they work even in very shallow systems. The soil or growing medium used for green roofs is specifically engineered to provide the vegetation with nutrients, discharging any excess water into the drainage layer, and releasing stored water back into the substrate. In this way, medium depth and porosity plays an important role in stormwater retention and plant growth in a green roof. Due to the lack of a good understanding about the hydraulic efficiency of each green roof's layer in rainwater management, a detailed analysis of the hydrological dynamics, connected with the green roof technical design is essential in order to obtain a full characterization of the hydrologic behavior of a green roof system and its effects on the urban water cycle components. The purpose of this research is analyzing the soil-water dynamics through the different components of a green roof and modeling these processes though a detailed but clear subsurface hydrology module, based on green roof vertical soil water movement reproduction, in relation to climate forcing, basic technology components and geometric characteristics of green roof systems (thickness of the stratigraphy, soil layers and materials, vegetation typology and density). A multi-layer bucket model has been applied to examine the hydrological response of the green roof system under a temperate maritime climate, by varying the physical and geometric parameters that characterize the different components of the vegetated cover. Following a stage of validation and calibration, results confirm the suitability of the model to describe the hydrologic response of the green roof during the observed rainfall events: the discharge hydrograph profile, volume and timing, predicted by the model, matched experimental measurements

  9. Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R. S. Bowman; E. J. Sullivan

    2004-03-11

    This report summarizes work of this project from October 2003 through March 2004. The major focus of the research was to further investigate BTEX removal from produced water, to quantify metal ion removal from produced water, and to evaluate a lab-scale vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) for BTEX destruction in off-gases produced during SMZ regeneration. Batch equilibrium sorption studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of semi-volatile organic compounds commonly found in produced water on the sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) onto surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) and to examine selected metal ion sorption onto SMZ. The sorption of polar semi-volatile organic compounds and metals commonly found in produced water onto SMZ was also investigated. Batch experiments were performed in a synthetic saline solution that mimicked water from a produced water collection facility in Wyoming. Results indicated that increasing concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds increased BTEX sorption. The sorption of phenol compounds could be described by linear isotherms, but the linear partitioning coefficients decreased with increasing pH, especially above the pKa's of the compounds. Linear correlations relating partitioning coefficients of phenol compounds with their respective solubilities and octanol-water partitioning coefficients were developed for data collected at pH 7.2. The sorption of chromate, selenate, and barium in synthetic produced water were also described by Langmuir isotherms. Experiments conducted with a lab-scale vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) packed with foam indicated that this system could achieve high BTEX removal efficiencies once the nutrient delivery system was optimized. The xylene isomers and benzene were found to require the greatest biofilter bed depth for removal. This result suggested that these VOCs would ultimately control the size of the biofilter required for the produced water application. The biofilter recovered

  10. Multi-lamellar vesicle formation in a long-chain nonionic surfactant: C16E4/D2O system.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Luigi; Mortensen, Kell; Rossi, Cesare Oliviero; Olsson, Ulf; Ranieri, Giuseppe A

    2011-10-01

    The temperature dependent rheological and structural behavior of a long-chain C(16)E(4) (tetraethylene glycol monohexadecyl ether) surfactant in D(2)O has been studied within the regime of low shear range. In the absence of shear flow, the system forms a lamellar liquid crystalline phase at relatively high temperatures. The present paper reports on the shear-induced multi-lamellar vesicle (MLV) formation in C(16)E(4)/D(2)O at 40 wt.% of surfactant in the temperature range of 40-55 °C. The transition from planar lamellar structure to multi-lamellar vesicles has been investigated by time-resolved experiments combining rheology and nuclear magnetic resonance (rheo-NMR), rheo small-angle neutron scattering (rheo-SANS) and rheometry. The typical transient viscosity behavior of MLV formation has been discovered at low shear rate value of 0.5s(-1). PMID:21767850

  11. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured propertiesmore » is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.« less

  12. The importance of experimental design on measurement of dynamic interfacial tension and interfacial rheology in diffusion-limited surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reichert, Matthew D.; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Brooks, Carlton F.; Grillet, Anne M.; Mondy, Lisa A.; Anna, Shelley L.; Walker, Lynn M.

    2014-09-24

    Pendant bubble and drop devices are invaluable tools in understanding surfactant behavior at fluid–fluid interfaces. The simple instrumentation and analysis are used widely to determine adsorption isotherms, transport parameters, and interfacial rheology. However, much of the analysis performed is developed for planar interfaces. Moreover, the application of a planar analysis to drops and bubbles (curved interfaces) can lead to erroneous and unphysical results. We revisit this analysis for a well-studied surfactant system at air–water interfaces over a wide range of curvatures as applied to both expansion/contraction experiments and interfacial elasticity measurements. The impact of curvature and transport on measured properties is quantified and compared to other scaling relationships in the literature. Our results provide tools to design interfacial experiments for accurate determination of isotherm, transport and elastic properties.

  13. Controlled fabrication of SrMoO{sub 4} hierarchical nanosheets in a surfactant-assisted nonaqueous system

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Shuijin; Peng, Xiaomin; Li, Xiuping; Liang, Zhihong; Yang, Yi; Cheng, Baochang; Xiao, Yanhe; Zhou, Lang

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} An imitated nonaqueous microemulsion system was developed. {yields} Various hierarchical architectures of SrMoO{sub 4} nanosheets were fabricated. {yields} The solvent, surfactant, reaction temperature and reaction time were important. {yields} The products emit a strong blue (474 nm) and weak green (573 nm) luminescence. -- Abstract: Various hierarchical architectures of SrMoO{sub 4} nanosheets (thickness of 8-9 nm) have been successfully prepared in nonaqueous system by a surfactant-assisted solvothermal method. X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to study the crystal structure and morphologies of the products. Experiments showed that the solvent, surfactant, reaction temperature and reaction time were crucial for the oriented aggregation of the SrMoO{sub 4} nanosheets. Morphological control of these parameters resulted in platelet, column, interlaced multilayer and nest of nanosheets. A possible growth mechanism for these hierarchical architectures has also been proposed according to the morphological evolution with the reaction time. The optical properties of the products were also examined by means of photoluminescence and excitation spectroscopy. Photoluminescence studies revealed that these SrMoO{sub 4} nanocrystals exhibited a greatly strong blue emission under 325-nm excitation with different intensities but centered at the same position of 474 nm.

  14. Oligosaccharide-based Surfactant/Citric Acid Buffer System Stabilizes Lactate Dehydrogenase during Freeze-drying and Storage without the Addition of Natural Sugar.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shigesaburo; Kawai, Ryuichiro; Koga, Maito; Asakura, Kouichi; Takahashi, Isao; Osanai, Shuichi

    2016-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the maintenance effects of oligosaccharide-based surfactants on the enzymatic activity of a model protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), during freeze-drying and room temperature storage using the citric acid buffer system. Oligosaccharide-based surfactants, which exhibit a high glass transition temperature (Tg), promoted the eminent retention of enzymatic activity during these protocols, whereas monosaccharide-based surfactants with a low Tg displayed poor performance at high concentration, albeit much better than that of Tween 80 at middle concentration. The increase in the alkyl chain length did not exert positive effects as observed for the maintenance effect during freeze-thawing, but an amphiphilic nature and a glass forming ability were crucial for the effective stabilization at a low excipient concentration during freeze-drying. Even a low oligosaccharide-based surfactant content (0.1 mg mL(-1)) could maintain LDH activity during freeze-drying, but a high surfactant content (1.0 mg mL(-1)) was required to prevent buffer precipitation and retain high LDH activity on storage. Regarding storage, glass formation restricted molecular mobility in the lyophilized matrix, and LDH activity was effectively retained. The present results describe a strategy based on the glass-forming ability of surfactant-type excipients that affords a natural sugar-free formulation or an alternative use for polysorbate-type surfactants. PMID:27181251

  15. Mixed surfactant based (SNEDDS) self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system presenting efavirenz for enhancement of oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Prakash C; Sahoo, Sunit K; Sahu, Alakh N

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) based on non-ionic surfactant mixtures to improve the oral bioavailability of efavirenz (EFZ) categorized as a class II according to the BCS, for HIV- therapy. The result of solubility studies of EFZ in various excipients utilized for construction of the pseudo ternary phase diagram containing surfactant mixtures. Surfactants in 1:1 combination are used with different co-surfactants in different ratio to delineate the area of monophasic region of the pseudo ternary phase diagram. Different accelerated physical stability studies and self-emulsification assessment were performed on the formulations. The formulations clearing the above studies are considered for percentage transmittance and turbidity analysis. The globule size distributions of post diluted SNEDDS having percentage transmittance above 90 were estimated. The TEM analysis of two optimized post diluted SNEDDS formulations further confirm the size in nanometric range (below 50nm). FT-IR studies showed the retention of the characteristic peaks of EFZ in the preconcentrate. The in vitro dissolution profile of SNEDDS established advantages of SNEDDS over plain drug as more than 80% drug was released within 30min in case of optimized SNEDDS while it was approximately 18.3% in the case of plain drug powder. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated after performing the in vivo studies of best optimized formulation in rats. The Pharmacokinetic data reveal a 2.63 fold increase in AUC(0-∞) in comparison to plain EFZ suspension. The designed delivery system showed the faith in generating an effective formulation of EFZ for HIV treatment. PMID:27133038

  16. Effects of Temperature on the Emulsification in Surfactant-Water-Oil Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yin-Quan; Zou, Xian-Wu; Xiong, Ping-Fan

    The effect of temperature on the emulsification has been investigated by discontinuous molecular dynamic simulation. When a large oil drop is put in water, on one hand the mixing entropy makes it divide into small oil drops; on the other hand the interactions among particles drives the small oil drops fowards aggregation. The evolution of the mean size of oil drops obeys the exponential delay law. There exist an active temperature, at which, the addition of surfactants has obvious effect on the emulsification. The surfactants with low HLB value (e.g. H1T3) make the dispersity of emulsion decrease, and the surfactants with high HLB value (e.g. H2T2 and H3T1) make a contribution to increase the dispersity of emulsion.

  17. Using Ethanol to Investigate Dynamic Soil Water Repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James E.; Beatty, Sarah M.

    2016-04-01

    Large gaps remain in our fundamental understanding of the behaviour of water in dynamically repellent soils. By investigating these systems using other miscible fluids that minimize or eliminate repellency, e.g. ethanol, we seek to better understand and quantify soil water repellency. The advantages of the enhanced wettability of water repellent soils to other miscible fluids, however, come with complications including shifts in effective pore water pressures induced through variable interfacial tensions as well as differences in fluid mobility due to variable fluid viscosities and densities. With these considerations in mind, we compare and contrast the observed behaviours of fluid infiltration and retention in dynamically hydrophobic soils and hydrophilic soils. We conducted field and laboratory studies using tension disc infiltrometers along with water and ethanol solutions to investigate dynamic repellency in post-wildfire soils from Northern Ontario, Canada. Tension infiltrometers maintain a constant negative liquid pressure at the surface which proved to be useful for isolating wettable behaviours sensitive to dynamic changes in wettability. We present the data and system conceptualised and explained through contact angle dynamics and variable fractional wettability of the soil. The limitations of extending hydrophilic concepts and hydraulic functions to hydrophobic soils are discussed along with persistent challenges to advance our ability to simulate and predict system behaviours in naturally occurring water repellent soils.

  18. Mitigation of soil water repellency improves rootzone water status and yield in precision irrigated apples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostka, S.; Gadd, N.; Bell, D.

    2009-04-01

    Water repellent soils are documented to impact a range of hydrological properties, yet studies evaluating the consequences of soil water repellency (SWR) and its mitigation on crop yield and quality are conspicuously absent. With global concerns on drought and water availability and the projected impacts of climate change, development of novel strategies to optimize efficient rootzone delivery of water are required. Co-formulations of alkyl polyglycoside (APG) and ethylene oxide-propylene oxide (EO/PO) block copolymer surfactants have been shown to improve wetting synergistically. The objectives of this study were to determine if this surfactant technology: 1) increased soil water content and wetting front depth in mini-sprinkler irrigated, water repellent, Goulburn Valley clay loam soils and 2) assess the consequence of SWR mitigation on yield of Malus domestica Borkh. Three trials were conducted in the apple varieties 'Pink Lady' (2006/07 and 2007/08) and 'Gala' (2007/08) growing on Goulburn Valley clay loam soils in Victoria, AU. The test design was a randomized complete block with treatments replicated 5-6 times. Plot size varied by location. SWR was mitigated by applying surfactant at initial rates of 0, 5, or 10 L ha-1 in the spring, then at 0, 2.5, or 5 L ha-1 monthly for up to four months and compared to an untreated control. Treatments were applied to tree lines using a hand held small plot sprayer (118 liters of spray solution ha-1) followed by irrigation within 1-3 days of treatment applications. At each location, plots were irrigated by mini sprinklers and received the same irrigation volumes and management practices. Soil volumetric water content (VWC) was monitored at depths of 0-10 and 10-20 cm using a Theta probe (Delta-T Devices, Cambridge, UK). At harvest, fruit number and weights were measured and used for crop yield estimations. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance with mean values summarized and separated using Least Significant Test

  19. Partitioning behavior of an acid-cleavable, 1,3-dioxolane alkyl ethoxylate, surfactant in single and binary surfactant mixtures for 2- and 3-phase microemulsion systems according to ethoxylate head group size

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Del Rio, Javier A; Hayes, Douglas G; Urban, Volker S

    2010-01-01

    Partition coefficients for a pH-degradable 1,3-dioxolane alkyl ethoxylate surfactant, 4-CH{sub 3}O (CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O){sub 5.6}-CH{sub 2}, 2,2-(CH{sub 2}){sub 12}CH{sub 3}, 2-(CH{sub 2}) CH{sub 3}, 1,3-dioxolane or ''cyclic ketal'' surfactant, CK-2,13-E{sub 5.6,ave}, between isooctane- and water-rich phases of 2- and 3-phase microemulsion systems (K{sub n}) were determined as functions of the ethoxylate size, n, and temperature for the neat surfactant and its binary surfactant mixtures, to understand the partitioning of alkyl ethoxylates possessing a broad distribution of ethoxylate size and to determine conditions required for formation of 3-phase microemulsion systems at an optimal temperature where phase separation occurs rapidly, important for protein purification via proteins selective partitioning to the middle phase, driven by affinity to the second surfactant of the binary mixture. A semi-empirical thermodynamic mathematical model described the partitioning data well, provided optimal temperature values consistent with phase diagrams and theory, and demonstrated that the tail region of CK-2,13-E{sub 5.6,ave} is more polar than the hydrophobes of fatty alcohol ethoxylates. The addition of Aerosol-OT (AOT) removed the temperature sensitivity of CK-2,13-E{sub 5.6,ave}s partitioning, producing 3-phase microemulsion systems between 20 C and 40 C. Analysis of the bottom phases of the 2- and 3-phase microemulsion systems formed by CK-2,13-E{sub 5.6,ave} via small-angle neutron scattering demonstrated the presence of spherical, monodisperse oil-in-water microemulsions.

  20. COMPARISON AND EVALUATION OF FIELD METHODS (DIRECT AND INDIRECT) TO ESTIMATE SOIL WATER FLUXES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of soil water fluxes is critical for evaluating efficiency and environmental effects of soil and crop management. Indirect methods commonly used to estimate soil water fluxes estimates are currently based on (a) soil water balance, (b) soil water potential measurements with the Darcy-Bucki...

  1. Soil water evaporation measurement of lysimeter based on fiber Bragg grating sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Kejun; Liu, Jun; Miao, Liping; Bai, Li; Zhong, Wenting

    2013-10-01

    A lysimeter weighing system based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for measuring the soil water evaporation was presented in this paper. By the use of three mechanical levers and balance weight, the weight loaded on the FBG sensor was reduced K times (here, K was the ratio of levers). So the amount of water change in the soil container of tons can be weighted. A two-hole cantilever was selected as the elastomer structure of FBG weighing sensor, and an optimum design was carried on using the finite element method to meet the small-scaled design requirements. Using the matching fiber Bragg grating demodulation method based on LabVIEW, the demodulation system was easy to be implemented. Then the FBG center wavelength drift was converted into a time interval, and the weight can be obtained automatically through measuring the interval by computer. Preliminary experiment showed that this weighing system has the ability of measuring soil water evaporation accurately.

  2. Model development for prediction of soil water dynamics in plant production.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhengfeng; Jin, Huixia; Zhang, Kefeng

    2015-09-01

    Optimizing water use in agriculture and medicinal plants is crucially important worldwide. Soil sensor-controlled irrigation systems are increasingly becoming available. However it is questionable whether irrigation scheduling based on soil measurements in the top soil could make best use of water for deep-rooted crops. In this study a mechanistic model was employed to investigate water extraction by a deep-rooted cabbage crop from the soil profile throughout crop growth. The model accounts all key processes governing water dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. Results show that the subsoil provides a significant proportion of the seasonal transpiration, about a third of water transpired over the whole growing season. This suggests that soil water in the entire root zone should be taken into consideration in irrigation scheduling, and for sensor-controlled irrigation systems sensors in the subsoil are essential for detecting soil water status for deep-rooted crops. PMID:26525032

  3. Estimating soil water retention using soil component additivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiliger, A.; Ermolaeva, O.; Semenov, V.

    2009-04-01

    Soil water retention is a major soil hydraulic property that governs soil functioning in ecosystems and greatly affects soil management. Data on soil water retention are used in research and applications in hydrology, agronomy, meteorology, ecology, environmental protection, and many other soil-related fields. Soil organic matter content and composition affect both soil structure and adsorption properties; therefore water retention may be affected by changes in soil organic matter that occur because of both climate change and modifications of management practices. Thus, effects of organic matter on soil water retention should be understood and quantified. Measurement of soil water retention is relatively time-consuming, and become impractical when soil hydrologic estimates are needed for large areas. One approach to soil water retention estimation from readily available data is based on the hypothesis that soil water retention may be estimated as an additive function obtained by summing up water retention of pore subspaces associated with soil textural and/or structural components and organic matter. The additivity model and was tested with 550 soil samples from the international database UNSODA and 2667 soil samples from the European database HYPRES containing all textural soil classes after USDA soil texture classification. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) of the volumetric water content estimates for UNSODA vary from 0.021 m3m-3 for coarse sandy loam to 0.075 m3m-3 for sandy clay. Obtained RMSEs are at the lower end of the RMSE range for regression-based water retention estimates found in literature. Including retention estimates of organic matter significantly improved RMSEs. The attained accuracy warrants testing the 'additivity' model with additional soil data and improving this model to accommodate various types of soil structure. Keywords: soil water retention, soil components, additive model, soil texture, organic matter.

  4. Kinetics of re-equilibrium of oppositely charged hydrogel-surfactant system and its application in controlled release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Sande, Sv Arne

    2013-06-01

    We report a study of re-equilibrium kinetics of an oppositely charged hydrogel-surfactant system (cationically modified hydroxyethyl cellulose (cat-HEC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) and an application of the formulation for delivery of a water-insoluble molecule. Hydrogels have been applied for long-term delivery of water-soluble drugs due to their controlled-release property. However, the release mechanism of drugs solubilized by surfactants has not been clear. In the present study, SDS was used to solubilize a hydrophobic model drug, and thereafter, by electrostatic interaction between cat-HEC and SDS, the solubilized model drug was loaded into two types of cat-HEC hydrogels with different charge density. We found that the charge density of the polymers had a crucial effect on the loading capacity, without affecting the re-equilibrium kinetics. By an elaborate design of the experiments, the release profiles were fitted with one-dimensional Fickian law where we found the diffusivity of the drug to be constant and comparable to free micelles over a wide region of surfactant concentrations. The observed long-term controlled diffusion is discussed from a thermodynamic point of view. PMID:23679106

  5. BEHAVIOR OF SURFACTANT MIXTURE AT SOLID/LIQUID AND OIL/LIQUID INTERFACE IN CHEMICAL FLOODING SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. P. Somasundaran

    2002-03-01

    The aim of the project is to develop and evaluate efficient novel surfactant mixtures for enhanced oil recovery. Preliminary ultra-filtration tests suggest that two kinds of micelles may exist in binary surfactant mixtures at different concentrations. Due to the important role played in interfacial processes by micelles as determined by their structures, focus of the current work is on the delineation of the relationship between such aggregate structures and chemical compositions of the surfactants. A novel analytical centrifuge application is explored to generate information on structures of different surfactants aggregates. In this report, optical systems, typical output of the analytical ultracentrifuge results and four basic experiments are discussed. Initial sedimentation velocity investigations were conducted using nonyl phenol ethoxylated decyl ether (NP-10) to choose the best analytical protocol, calculate the partial specific volume and obtain information on sedimentation coefficient, aggregation mass of micelles. The partial specific volume was calculated to be 0.920. Four softwares: Optima{trademark} XL-A/XL-I data analysis software, DCDT+, Svedberg and SEDFIT, were compared for the analysis of sedimentation velocity experimental data. The sedimentation coefficient and aggregation number of NP-10 micelles obtained using the first three softwares at 25 C are 209, 127, and 111, respectively. The last one is closest to the result from Light Scattering. The reason for the differences in numbers obtained using the three softwares is discussed. Based on these tests, Svedberg and SEDFIT analysis are chosen for further studies. This approach using the analytical ultracentrifugation offers an unprecedented opportunity now to obtain important information on mixed micelles and their role in interfacial processes.

  6. Inverse modeling of GPR signal for estimating soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambot, S.; van den Bosch, I.; Slob, E. C.; Stockbroeckx, B.; Scheers, B.; Vanclooster, M.

    2003-04-01

    For a large variety of environmental and agricultural applications, the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) for identifying soil water content is a matter of concern. However, the current state of technology still needs improvements and new developments. Research has focused on the development of an integrated inverse modeling approach including GPR design, GPR signal forward modeling, and GPR signal inversion to estimate simultaneously the depth dependent dielectric constant and electrical conductivity of the shallow subsurface. We propose to use as radar system a stepped frequency continuous wave radar with an ultrawide band dielectric filled TEM horn antenna used in monostatic mode. This configuration is appropriate for real time mapping and allows for a more realistic forward modeling of the radar-antenna-soil system. Forward modeling was based on the exact solution of Maxwell's equations and inversion was formulated by the classical least square problem. Given the inherent complex topography of the objective functions to optimize in electromagnetic inversion problems, we used for the inversion the recently developed global multilevel coordinate search algorithm that we combine sequentially with the local Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. We applied the method in laboratory conditions on tank filled with sand subject to different water content levels considering a homogeneous water profile. The inverse estimation of the soil dielectric constant was remarkably well in accordance with each water content level and the corresponding theoretical values of the dielectric constant for the sand. Comparison of GPR measurements with estimations from time domain reflectometry (TDR) were also well in close agreement.

  7. Polymer/surfactant transport in micellar flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, C.S.; Kellerhals, G.E.

    1981-10-01

    For the surfactant formulations used (particular surfactant concentration, surfactant type, cosolvent type, cosolvent concentration, etc.), the results show that surfactant systems containing polymer as a mobility control agent may exhibit adverse polymer transport behavior during flow through porous media. Polymer generally lagged behind the surfactant even though the two species were injected simultaneously in the surfactant slug. This poor polymer transport definitely could have a detrimental effect on the efficiency of a micellar flooding process in the field. Phase studies show that when some surfactant systems containing xanthan gum are mixed with crude oil at various salinities, a polymer-rich, gel-like phase forms. The polymer lag phenomenon in core tests can be related to phase separation due to divalent cations generated in situ as a result of ion exchange with the clays and the surfactant. 18 refs.

  8. Plant Response to Differential Soil Water Content and Salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A. B.; Dara, A.; Kamai, T.; Ngo, A.; Walker, R.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Root-zone soil water content is extremely dynamic, governed by complex and coupled processes such as root uptake, irrigation, evaporation, and leaching. Root uptake of water and nutrients is influenced by these conditions and the processes involved. Plant roots are living and functioning in a dynamic environment that is subjected to extreme changes over relatively short time and small distances. In order to better manage our agricultural resources and cope with increasing constraints of water limitation, environmental concerns and climate change, it is vital to understand plants responses to these changes in their environment. We grew chick pea (Cicer arietinum) plants, in boxes of 30 x 25 x 1 cm dimensions filled with fine sand. Layers of coarse sand (1.5 cm thick) were embedded in the fine-sand media to divide the root growth environment into sections that were hydraulically disconnected from each other. This way, each section could be independently treated with differential levels of water and salinity. The root growth and distribution in the soil was monitored on daily bases using neutron radiography. Daily water uptake was measured by weighing the containers. Changes of soil water content in each section of the containers were calculated from the neutron radiographs. Plants that part of their root system was stressed with drought or salinity showed no change in their daily water uptake rate. The roots in the stressed sections stayed turgid during the stress period and looked healthy in the neutron images. However the uptake rate was severely affected when the soil in the non-stressed section started to dry. The plants were then fully irrigated with water and the water uptake rate recovered to its initial rate shortly after irrigation. The neutron radiographs clearly illustrated the shrinkage and recovery of the roots under stress and the subsequent relief. This cycle was repeated a few times and the same trend could be reproduced. Our results show that plants

  9. Re-entrant phase behavior of a concentrated anionic surfactant system with strongly binding counterions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sajal Kumar; Rathee, Vikram; Krishnaswamy, Rema; Raghunathan, V A; Sood, A K

    2009-08-01

    The phase behavior of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the presence of the strongly binding counterion p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) has been examined using small-angle X-ray diffraction and polarizing microscopy. A hexagonal-to-lamellar transition on varying the PTHC to SDS molar ratio (alpha) occurs through a nematic phase of rodlike micelles (Nc) --> isotropic (I) --> nematic of disklike micelles (N(D)) at a fixed surfactant concentration (phi). The lamellar phase is found to coexist with an isotropic phase (I') over a large region of the phase diagram. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of the phase behavior at phi = 0.4 confirm the transition from N(C) to N(D) on varying alpha. The viscoelastic and flow behaviors of the different phases were examined. A decrease in the steady shear viscosity across the different phases with increasing alpha suggests a decrease in the aspect ratio of the micellar aggregates. From the transient shear stress response of the N() and N(D) nematic phases in step shear experiments, they were characterized to be tumbling and flow aligning, respectively. Our studies reveal that by tuning the morphology of the surfactant micelles strongly binding counterions modify the phase behavior and rheological properties of concentrated surfactant solutions. PMID:19301881

  10. The structure and morphology of gold nanoparticles produced in cationic gemini surfactant systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawska, Magdalena; Wiatr, Michalina; Nowakowski, Paweł; Szutkowski, Kosma; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2013-12-01

    Potential applications of gold nanoparticles (GNP) are strictly connected with their size and shape. The influence of different dicationic (gemini) surfactants, alkyloxymethylimidazolium derivatives derivatives, on the structure and morphology of GNP was studied. The synthesis of nanoparticles was performed in the presence of various gemini surfactants—dodecyloxymethylimidazolium nitrate (IMI_NO3_C4_C12), propionate (IMI_PROP_C4_C12) and 3,3'-[1,9-(2,8-dioxanonane)]bis-(1-nonyloxymethylimidazolium) chloride (IMI_Cl_oxyC7_C9), used as stabilizers and templates for obtaining different size and shape of gold nanoparticles. The samples obtained were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation (SAXS), UV-vis spectroscopy and NMR PFG spectroscopy. For the obtained solutions of nanoparticles the plasmon resonance was observed at the wavelengths corresponding to the presence of gold nanoparticles of sizes ranging from 5-100 nm, with a significant shift towards higher wavelength for the samples prepared with addition of dicationic surfactants. TEM images evidence the presence of gold nanoparticles with tetrahedral and spherical morphology in solutions prepared with the surfactants IMI_PROP_C4_C12, IMI_NO3_C4_C12, and those of spherical morphology, but strongly aggregated, in the solution with the cationic surfactant IMI_Cl_oxyC7_C9.

  11. Effect of cationic surfactant on transport of surface-active and non-surface-active model drugs and emulsion stability in triphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, N; Burgess, D J

    2000-01-01

    A study was carried out to determine the effect of excess surfactant on transport kinetics in emulsions, using surface-active (phenobarbital, barbital) and non-surface-active (phenylazoaniline, benzocaine) model drugs (pH 7.0). Mineral oil was chosen as the oil phase, and the ionic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was chosen as the emulsifier. The effect of nonionic surfactant Brij 97 on transport kinetics of these model drugs were determined by authors elsewhere. Model drug transport in the triphasic systems was investigated using side-by-side diffusion cells mounted with hydrophilic dialysis membranes (molecular weight cutoffs 1 kD and 50 kD) and a novel bulk equilibrium reverse dialysis bag technique. Emulsion stability was determined by droplet size analysis as a function of time, temperature, and the presence of model drugs using photon correlation spectroscopy. Mineral oil/water partition coefficients and aqueous solubilities were determined in the presence of surfactant. The droplet size of the CTAB-stabilized emulsion system is bigger than that of the Brij 97-stabilized system because of the relatively less dense interfacial packing of the cationic surfactant. CTAB forms a complex with the model drugs because of ionic interaction between CTAB and the aromatic and azo groups of the model drugs. This complexation is expected to increase emulsion stability and affect model drug transport kinetics. The transport rates of model drugs in emulsions increased with increases in CTAB micellar concentrations up to 0.5% w/v and then decreased at higher surfactant concentrations. Total transport rates of phenobarbital and barbital were faster than those of phenylazoaniline and benzocaine. Excess surfactant affected the transport rates of the model drugs in the emulsions depending on drug surface activity and lipophilicity. The transport profiles of the model drugs appeared to be governed by model drug oil/water partition coefficient values and by

  12. Soil Water Balance and Recharge Monitoring at the Hanford Site - FY09 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Waichler, Scott R.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2009-09-28

    Recharge provides the primary driving force for transporting contaminants from the vadose zone to underlying aquifer systems. Quantification of recharge rates is important for assessing contaminant transport and fate and for evaluating remediation alternatives. This report describes the status of soil water balance and recharge monitoring performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Hanford Site for Fiscal Year 2009. Previously reported data for Fiscal Years 2004 - 2008 are updated with data collected in Fiscal Year 2009 and summarized.

  13. Ternary system based on fluorophore-surfactant assemblies--Cu²⁺ for highly sensitive and selective detection of arginine in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jianhua; Ding, Liping; Hu, Wenting; Chen, Xiangli; Chen, Xiao; Fang, Yu

    2014-12-23

    A new cationic dansyl derivative-based (DIlSD) fluorescence probe was designed and synthesized. Its combination with anionic surfactant SDS assemblies shows enhanced fluorescence intensity and blue-shifted maximum wavelength. Its fluorescence can be slightly quenched by Cu(2+); however, the fluorescence quenching efficiency by Cu(2+) is highly increased upon titration of arginine (Arg). As a result, the ternary system containing the cationic fluorophore, anionic surfactant, and Cu(2+) functions as a highly sensitive and selective sensor to Arg. The optimized sensor system displays a detection limit of 170 nM, representing the highest sensitivity to Arg in total aqueous solution by a fluorescent sensor. Control experiments reveal that the imidazolium groups in the fluorophore, the anionic surfactant, and Cu(2+) all play important roles in the process of sensing Arg. The electrostatic interaction between the cationic fluorophore and anionic surfactants facilitates the binding of imidazolium rings with Cu(2+), the surfactant surface-anchored Cu(2+) is responsible for further binding of Arg, and the electrostatic interaction between anionic surfactants and positively charged amino acids accounts for the selective responses to Arg. PMID:25453500

  14. Preparation and tumor cell model based biobehavioral evaluation of the nanocarrier system using partially reduced graphene oxide functionalized by surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yimin; Liu, Kunping; Luo, Zewei; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, surfactant-functionalized nanomaterials are tending toward development of novel tumor-targeted drug carriers to overcome multidrug resistance in cancer therapy. Now, investigating the biocompatibility and uptake mechanism of specific drug delivery systems is a growing trend, but usually a troublesome issue, in simple pharmaceutical research. Methods We first reported the partially reduced graphene oxide modified with poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) as a nanocarrier system. Then, the nanocarrier was characterized by atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscope, ultraviolet–visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-Ray powder diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Epirubicin (EPI) was attached to PSSG via π–π stacking, hydrogen bonding, and physical absorption to form conjugates of PSSG–EPI. The adsorption and desorption profiles, cytotoxicity coupled with drug accumulation, and uptake of PSSG and PSSG–EPI were evaluated. Finally, the subcellular behaviors, distribution, and biological fate of the drug delivery system were explored by confocal laser scanning microscope using direct fluorescence colocalization imaging and transmission electron microscopy. Results The partially reduced graphene oxide sheets functionalized by surfactant exhibit good dispersibility. Moreover, due to much less carboxyl groups retained on the edge of PSSG sheets, the nanocarriers exhibit biocompatibility in vitro. The obtained PSSG shows a high drug-loading capacity of 2.22 mg/mg. The complexes of PSSG–EPI can be transferred to lysosomes in 2 hours through endocytosis, then the drug is released in the cytoplasm in 8 hours, and ultimately EPI is delivered into cell nucleus to exhibit medicinal effects in 1 day. Conclusion The comprehensive exploration of the biological uptake mechanism of functional graphene-mediated tumor cell targeting model provides a typical

  15. Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; R. S. Bowman; E. J. Sullivan

    2005-03-11

    This report summarizes work performed on this project from October 2004 through March 2005. In previous work, a surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) was shown to be an effective system for removing BTEX contaminants from produced water. Additional work on this project demonstrated that a compost-based biofilter could biodegrade the BTEX contaminants found in the SMZ regeneration waste gas stream. However, it was also determined that the BTEX concentrations in the waste gas stream varied significantly during the regeneration period and the initial BTEX concentrations were too high for the biofilter to handle effectively. A series of experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of using a passive adsorption column placed upstream of the biofilter to attenuate the peak gas-phase VOC concentrations delivered to the biofilter during the SMZ regeneration process. In preparation for the field test of the SMZ/VPB treatment system in New Mexico, a pilot-scale SMZ system was also designed and constructed during this reporting period. Finally, a cost and feasibility analysis was also completed. To investigate the merits of the passive buffering system during SMZ regeneration, two adsorbents, SMZ and granular activated carbon (GAC) were investigated in flow-through laboratory-scale columns to determine their capacity to handle steady and unsteady VOC feed conditions. When subjected to a toluene-contaminated air stream, the column containing SMZ reduced the peak inlet 1000 ppmv toluene concentration to 630 ppmv at a 10 second contact time. This level of buffering was insufficient to ensure complete removal in the downstream biofilter and the contact time was longer than desired. For this reason, using SMZ as a passive buffering system for the gas phase contaminants was not pursued further. In contrast to the SMZ results, GAC was found to be an effective adsorbent to handle the peak contaminant concentrations that occur early during the SMZ regeneration process. At a one

  16. Ecohydrology of dry regions: storage versus pulse soil water dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lauenroth, William K.; Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Bradford, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Although arid and semiarid regions are defined by low precipitation, the seasonal timing of temperature and precipitation can influence net primary production and plant functional type composition. The importance of precipitation seasonality is evident in semiarid areas of the western U.S., which comprise the Intermountain (IM) zone, a region that receives important winter precipitation and is dominated by woody plants and the Great Plains (GP), a region that receives primarily summer precipitation and is dominated by perennial grasses. Although these general relationships are well recognized, specific differences in water cycling between these regions have not been well characterized. We used a daily time step soil water simulation model and twenty sites from each region to analyze differences in soil water dynamics and ecosystem water balance. IM soil water patterns are characterized by storage of water during fall, winter, and spring resulting in relatively reliable available water during spring and early summer, particularly in deep soil layers. By contrast, GP soil water patterns are driven by pulse precipitation events during the warm season, resulting in fluctuating water availability in all soil layers. These contrasting patterns of soil water—storage versus pulse dynamics—explain important differences between the two regions. Notably, the storage dynamics of the IN sites increases water availability in deep soil layers, favoring the deeper rooted woody plants in that region, whereas the pulse dynamics of the Great Plains sites provide water primarily in surface layers, favoring the shallow-rooted grasses in that region. In addition, because water received when plants are either not active or only partially so is more vulnerable to evaporation and sublimation than water delivered during the growing season, IM ecosystems use a smaller fraction of precipitation for transpiration (47%) than GP ecosystems (49%). Recognizing the pulse-storage dichotomy in

  17. Effect of nonionic surfactant on transport of surface-active and non-surface-active model drugs and emulsion stability in triphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, N; Burgess, D J

    2000-01-01

    The effect of surfactant concentration on transport kinetics in emulsions using surface-active (phenobarbital, barbital) and non- surface-active (phenylazoaniline, benzocaine) model drugs is determined. Mineral oil was chosen as the oil phase and the nonionic surfactant polyoxyethylene-10-oleyl-ether (Brij 97) was chosen as the emulsifier. Model drug transport in the triphasic systems was investigated using side-by-side diffusion cells mounted with hydrophilic dialysis membranes (molecular weight cutoffs 1 kd and 50 kd) and a novel bulk equilibrium reverse dialysis bag technique. Emulsion stability was determined by droplet size analysis as a function of time, temperature, and the presence of model drugs, using photon correlation spectroscopy. Mineral oil/water (O/W) partition coefficients and aqueous solubilities were determined in the presence of surfactant. The transport rates of model drugs in emulsions increased with an increase in Brij 97 micellar concentrations up to 1.0% wt/vol and then decreased at higher surfactant concentrations. The transport profiles of the model drugs appeared to be governed by model drug O/W partition coefficient values and by micellar shape changes at higher surfactant concentrations. Total transport rates of phenobarbital and barbital were faster than those of phenylazoaniline and benzocaine. Excess surfactant affected the transport rates of the model drugs in the emulsions depending on drug surface activity and lipophilicity. PMID:11741246

  18. NMR investigation of the short-chain ionic surfactant-water systems.

    PubMed

    Popova, M V; Tchernyshev, Y S; Michel, D

    2004-02-01

    The structure and dynamics of surfactant molecules [CH3(CH2)7COOK] in heavy water solutions were investigated by 1H and 2H NMR. A double-exponential attenuation of the spin-echo amplitude in a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill experiment was found. We expect correspondence to both bounded and monomeric states. At high concentrations in the NMR self-diffusion measurements also a double-exponential decay of the spin-echo signal versus the square of the dc magnetic gradient was observed. The slow component of the diffusion process is caused by micellar aggregates, while the fast component is the result of the self-diffusion of the monomers through the micelles. The self-diffusion studies indicate that the form of micelles changes with increasing total surfactant concentration. The critical temperature range for self-association is reflected in the 1H transverse relaxation. PMID:15773085

  19. Drag reduction by coupled systems: microbubble injection with homogeneous polymer and surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, A. A.; Deutsch, S.; Brungart, T. A.; Petrie, H. L.; Fenstermacker, M.

    The influence of homogeneous surfactant and homogeneous polymer solutions on the performance of microbubble skin friction reduction was investigated on an axisymmetric body. Carbon dioxide was injected into water, homogeneous surfactant (Aerosol OT) solutions, and homogeneous dilute polymer (Polyethylene oxide) solutions. Integrated skin friction measurements were obtained at two freestream velocities as a function of gas injection rate and polyethylene-oxide concentration. A moderate (50%) decrease in surface tension had little to no effect on the drag reducing characteristics of microbubble injection. At similar gas injection rates, microbubble injection exhibited more drag reduction in the polymer solutions than obtained with microbubble injection into water. However, the increased drag reduction obtained with polymer additives was no more than a multiplicative factor related to the baseline levels of drag reduction achieved by the individual methods, and suggests the mechanism for microbubble skin friction reduction acts independently of the polymer drag reduction.

  20. Heteroepitaxial formation of aligned mesostructured silica films with large structural periodicities from mixed surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Saeko; Kanno, Yosuke; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Kuroda, Kazuyuki; Miyata, Hirokatsu

    2013-06-11

    Liquid-crystal phases consisting of cylindrical micelles of amphiphilic block copolymers and silica precursors are epitaxially built up on aligned surface micelles formed by an alkyl-PEO surfactant, Brij56, irrespective of the large difference in the intrinsic structural periodicities resulting in the formation of fully aligned mesostructured silica films with large lattice constants. Brij56 works as an alignment controlling agent on rubbing-treated polyimide through selective adsorption from a precursor solution containing the two surfactants, a block copolymer and Brij56, through strong hydrophobic interactions to form an anisotropic surface micelle structure. Aligned mesostructured silica layers with larger periodicities, which dominantly consist of block copolymers, form on these aligned surface micelles by gradually changing the vertical periodicity keeping the lateral intermicelle distance constant. This can be regarded as a kind of heteroepitaxy because the lattice constant at the surface is different from that of the bulk of the film. On the basis of this new concept, highly aligned mesostructured silica films with structural periodicities as large as 10 nm are successfully formed, which has never been achieved when the block copolymers are used alone as the structure-directing agent. The periodicity of the aligned films can precisely be controlled by an appropriate choice of block copolymers and the mixing ratio of the two surfactants, which increases the opportunity for applications of these films with highly anisotropic mesoscale structure. PMID:23721098

  1. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS USING A SURFACTANT MODIFIED ZEOLITE/VAPOR PHASE BIOREATOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LYNN E. KATZ; KERRY A. KINNEY; R.S. BOWMAN; E.J. SULLIVAN

    2003-10-01

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some of them must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. An efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed to remove these constituents. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. Our previous DOE research work (DE-AC26-99BC15221) demonstrated that SMZ could successfully remove BTEX compounds from the produced water. In addition, SMZ could be regenerated through a simple air sparging process. The primary goal of this project is to develop a robust SMZ/VPB treatment system to efficiently remove the organic constituents from produced water in a cost-effective manner. This report summarizes work of this project from March 2003 through September 2003. We have continued our investigation of SMZ regeneration from our previous DOE project. Ten saturation/stripping cycles have been completed for SMZ columns saturated with BTEX compounds. The results suggest that BTEX sorption capacity is not lost after ten saturation/regeneration cycles. The composition of produced water from a site operated by Crystal Solutions Ltd. in Wyoming has been characterized and was used to identify key semi-volatile components. Isotherms with selected semi-volatile components have been initiated and preliminary results have been obtained. The experimental vapor phase bioreactors for this project have been designed and

  2. Treatment of Produced Water Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn E. Katz; Kerry A. Kinney; Robert S. Bowman; Enid J. Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine B. Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig R. Altare

    2006-01-31

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced waters typically contain a high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component as well as chemicals added during the oil-production process. It has been estimated that a total of 14 billion barrels of produced water were generated in 2002 from onshore operations (Veil, 2004). Although much of this produced water is disposed via reinjection, environmental and cost considerations can make surface discharge of this water a more practical means of disposal. In addition, reinjection is not always a feasible option because of geographic, economic, or regulatory considerations. In these situations, it may be desirable, and often necessary from a regulatory viewpoint, to treat produced water before discharge. It may also be feasible to treat waters that slightly exceed regulatory limits for re-use in arid or drought-prone areas, rather than losing them to reinjection. A previous project conducted under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99BC15221 demonstrated that surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) represents a potential treatment technology for produced water containing BTEX. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that: (1) sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) to SMZ follows linear isotherms in which sorption increases with increasing solute hydrophobicity; (2) the presence of high salt concentrations substantially increases the capacity of the SMZ for BTEX; (3) competitive sorption among the BTEX compounds is negligible; and, (4) complete recovery of the SMZ sorption capacity for BTEX can be achieved by air sparging the SMZ. This report summarizes research for a follow on project to optimize the regeneration process for multiple sorption/regeneration cycles, and to develop and incorporate a vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) system for treatment of the off-gas generated during

  3. Dynamic aspects of soil water availability for isohydric plants: Focus on root hydraulic resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couvreur, V.; Vanderborght, J.; Draye, X.; Javaux, M.

    2014-11-01

    Soil water availability for plant transpiration is a key concept in agronomy. The objective of this study is to revisit this concept and discuss how it may be affected by processes locally influencing root hydraulic properties. A physical limitation to soil water availability in terms of maximal flow rate available to plant leaves (Qavail) is defined. It is expressed for isohydric plants, in terms of plant-centered variables and properties (the equivalent soil water potential sensed by the plant, ψs eq; the root system equivalent conductance, Krs; and a threshold leaf water potential, ψleaf lim). The resulting limitation to plant transpiration is compared to commonly used empirical stress functions. Similarities suggest that the slope of empirical functions might correspond to the ratio of Krs to the plant potential transpiration rate. The sensitivity of Qavail to local changes of root hydraulic conductances in response to soil matric potential is investigated using model simulations. A decrease of radial conductances when the soil dries induces earlier water stress, but allows maintaining higher night plant water potentials and higher Qavail during the last week of a simulated 1 month drought. In opposition, an increase of radial conductances during soil drying provokes an increase of hydraulic redistribution and Qavail at short term. This study offers a first insight on the effect of dynamic local root hydraulic properties on soil water availability. By better understanding complex interactions between hydraulic processes involved in soil-plant hydrodynamics, better prospects on how root hydraulic traits mitigate plant water stress might be achieved.

  4. Assessment of capacity sensors for monitoring soil water content in ecological orchards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrícia Prazeres Marques, Karina; Horcajo, Daniel; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor

    2014-05-01

    Water is an important element for soil tillage and crop development. Its proper management is essential for the development of plants, by preventing excess or shortage in water application. Soil water content is affected by the soil-water-plant system and its monitoring is a required within a sustainable agriculture framework respectful with the natural environment. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of capacitive sensors in monitoring soil moisture from organic orchards. An experimental text was carried out at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the Agricultural Engineering School in the Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain). Soil samples were collected within the 0-20 cm depth layers from the university organic orchard. The samples were air dried and subsequently sieved in a 2 mm mesh sieve, removing roots and coarse fractions and keeping the fine soil. The amount of fine soil was calculated from the soil density and the soil samples were compacted to obtain the relative volume that corresponded to their density. The measurements were carried out in dry and in saturated soil and, also in samples where soil was stirring with: 150 cm³, 300 cm³ and 450 cm³ of water. A 1890 ml container was used to hold the fine soil and the soil moisture sensor ECH2O, type 10 HS (Decagon Devices, Inc.) was placed horizontally at 5 cm depth. Soil water readings were recorded on a datalogger Em5b from the same manufacturer. The results showed that the capacitive sensor has a linear response to soil moisture content. Its value was overestimated in comparison to the volumetric values and the largest errors (about 8%) were observed in the soils with high moisture contents. Overall, these results point out that the ECH2O sensor, model 10 HS, could determine with sufficient accuracy the volumetric soil water content from organic orchards although it could be further improved by "in situ" calibration.

  5. Monitoring of soil water content and quality inside and outside the water curtain cultivation facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, K.; Kim, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Water curtain cultivation system is an energy saving technique for winter season by splashing groundwater on the inner roof of green house. Artificial groundwater recharge application to the water curtain cultivation facilities was adopted and tested to use groundwater sustainably in a rural region of Korea. The groundwater level in the test site shows natural trend corresponding rainfall pattern except during mid-November to early April when groundwater levels decline sharply due to groundwater abstraction for water curtain cultivation. Groundwater levels are also affected by surface water such as stream, small dams in the stream and agricultural ditches. Infiltration data were collected from lysimeter installation and monitoring inside and outside water cultivation facility and compared with each other. The infiltration data were well correlated with rainfall outside the facility, but the data in the facility showed very different from the other. The missing infiltration data were attributed to groundwater level rise and level sensor location below water table. Soil water contents in the unsaturated zone indicated rainfall infiltration propagation at depth and with time outside the facility. According to rainfall amount and water condition at the initial stage of a rainfall event, the variation of soil water content was shown differently. Soil water contents and electrical conductivities were closely correlated with each other, and they reflected rainfall infiltration through the soil and water quality changes. The monitoring results are useful to reveal the hydrological processes from the infiltration to groundwater recharge, and water management planning in the water cultivation areas.

  6. Assessing soil water storage distribution under sprinkler irrigation by coupling 3D simulations and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Uday; Shabeeb, Ahmed; dragonetti, giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    This work analyzed the variability of sprinkler irrigation application over a bare soil, both in terms of water application efficiency and uniformity, by integrating and comparing the information on the irrigation depth data (ID), as measured by catch cans, soil water storage in the upper root zone, as measured by TDR probes, and a 3D simulations of water flow in soils. Three irrigation tests were performed at three different pressures (2, 3 and 4 bar). A lateral water redistribution was observed and simulated after each irrigation event by comparing spatial distributions of site-specific water application efficiency (AEs), as well as ratios of site-specific actual water storage increase (SWEs) and irrigation depth (IDs) to the water content before irrigation. Because of soil water redistribution processes, distribution uniformity based on soil storages was systematically higher than the catch can uniformity. The obvious consequence of lateral water redistribution processes was that the soil smoothing action on non-uniformity observed at the surface increased both with depth and over time. At a given depth the uniformity of soil water storages always attained the same value, whatever the pressure considered and the catch can-based uniformity coefficient. It was concluded that, for the case of random distribution of ID, the uniformity of water storages is driven by the soil behavior rather than by the irrigation system.

  7. Simulating sunflower canopy temperatures to infer root-zone soil water potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Idso, S. B.

    1983-01-01

    A soil-plant-atmosphere model for sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), together with clear sky weather data for several days, is used to study the relationship between canopy temperature and root-zone soil water potential. Considering the empirical dependence of stomatal resistance on insolation, air temperature and leaf water potential, a continuity equation for water flux in the soil-plant-atmosphere system is solved for the leaf water potential. The transpirational flux is calculated using Monteith's combination equation, while the canopy temperature is calculated from the energy balance equation. The simulation shows that, at high soil water potentials, canopy temperature is determined primarily by air and dew point temperatures. These results agree with an empirically derived linear regression equation relating canopy-air temperature differential to air vapor pressure deficit. The model predictions of leaf water potential are also in agreement with observations, indicating that measurements of canopy temperature together with a knowledge of air and dew point temperatures can provide a reliable estimate of the root-zone soil water potential.

  8. Assessment of a calibration procedure to estimate soil water content with Sentek Diviner 2000 capacitance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallo, G.; Giordano, G.; Provenzano, G.

    2012-04-01

    In irrigated systems, soil water content is a major factor determining plant growth. Irrigation scheduling criteria are often related to measurements of soil water content or matric potential. Strategies to manage irrigation can be used to optimize irrigation water use or to maximize crop yield and/or quality, in order to increase the net return for the farmer. Of course, whatever criterion is adopted to schedule irrigation and in particular when crop water stress conditions are considered, the accurate monitoring of the water content in the soil profile, could allow to verify the exact irrigation timing, defined according to the crop response to water stress. Currently many methods are available for determining soil water content on a volume basis (m3m-3) or a tension basis (MPa), as described by Robinson (2008). Recently, distributed fiber optic temperature measurement, has been assessed as a new technique for indirect and precise estimation of soil water contents. Over the past decade Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) probes, allowing to measure the apparent dielectric constant of the soil (K), indirectly related to the volumetric water content (θv), have been improved, due to the good potentiality of capacitance based sensors to in situ measurements of soil water content. However, due to the high variability of K with soil minerals and dry plants tissues, it necessary to proceed to a specific calibration of the sensor for each soil (Baumhardt et al., 2000), even to take into account the effect of soil temperature, bulk density and water salinity (Al Ain et al., 2009). . According to Paltineanu and Starr (1997), the precision of the calibration equation, obtained with in situ measurements, mainly depends on the errors related to the sampling of the soil volume investigated by the sensor, that must be done accurately. For swelling/shrinking soils, the changes of soil bulk volume with water content cause modifications in the geometry of some if not all the

  9. Soil water sensor response to bulk electrical conductivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water monitoring using electromagnetic (EM) sensors can facilitate observations of water content at high temporal and spatial resolutions. These sensors measure soil dielectric permittivity (Ka) which is largely a function of volumetric water content. However, bulk electrical conductivity BEC c...

  10. Effect of corn or soybean row position on soil water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop plants can funnel water to the soil and increase water content more in the row relative to the interrow. Because the row intercepts more soil water after rains and higher root density, the soil may also dry out more between rains than does soil in the interrow. The purpose of this study was to ...

  11. Direct and surrogate measures of soil water content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An expert group from five nations and three continents did comparative trials of soil water sensing methods under laboratory and field conditions at the behest of the joint division of the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), resulting i...

  12. Measurement of soil water content with dielectric dispersion frequency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) is an inexpensive and attractive methodology for repeated measurements of soil water content (SWC). Although there are some known measurement limitations for dry soil and sand, a fixed-frequency method is commonly employed using commercially available FDR probes....

  13. Principles of water capture, evaporation, and soil water retention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Successful dryland crop production in semiarid environments is dependent upon efficient storage of precipitation and use of stored soil water supplies. The objectives of this presentation are to: 1. Summarize information regarding the effects of time of year; environmental parameters; residue orient...

  14. STABLE ISOTOPES AS INDICATORS OF SOIL WATER DYNAMICS IN WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream water quality and quantity depend on discharge rates of water and nutrients from soils. However, soil-water storage is very dynamic and strongly influenced by plants. We analyzed stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen to quantify spatial and temporal changes in evaporati...

  15. Using soil water sensors to improve irrigation management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irrigation water management has to do with the appropriate application of water to soils, in terms of amounts, rates, and timing to satisfy crop water demands while protecting the soil and water resources from degradation. In this regard, sensors can be used to monitor the soil water status; and som...

  16. Quantification of soil water evaporation using TDR-microlysimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is conventionally measured using microlysimeters by evaluating the daily change in mass. Daily removal is laborious and replacement immediately after irrigation events is impractical because of field wetness which leads to delays and an underestimation of evaporation. Irrigati...

  17. Electrical resistance sensors for soil water tension estimates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter, in a book to be published by the International Atomic Energy Agency/FAO Joint Division, provides detailed information on how to sense soil water tension with electrical resistance sensors. It provides insight into problems commonly encountered in using these sensors. Guidance on data r...

  18. An overview of soil water sensing technologies and problems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An expert group from five nations and three continents did comparative trials of soil water sensing methods under laboratory and field conditions for the International Atomic Energy Agency. Important conclusions of the expert group include: 1) The field-calibrated neutron moisture meter (NMM) remain...

  19. A review on temporal stability of soil water contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal stability of soil water content (TS SWC) has been observed across a wide range of soil types, landscapes, climates and scales. A better understanding of TS SWC controls and their interactions needs to be developed. The objective of this work is to develop a comprehensive inventory of publis...

  20. Augmenting soil water storage using uncharred switchgrass and pyrolyzed biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar is an amendment that can augment soil water storage; however, its projected cost per ton could be financially limiting at field application scales. It may be more monetarily convenient if an alternate amendment were available that could deliver similar soil enhancements. We compared two swi...

  1. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  2. Intrinsic parameters for structural variation of reverse micelles in nonionic surfactant (glycerol alpha-monolaurate)/oil systems: a SAXS study.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Sato, Takaaki; Aramaki, Kenji

    2009-06-01

    Using Small-Angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we have studied self-assembled structures of glycerol alpha-monolaurate (C(12)G(1)) in different nonpolar solvents, such as cyclohexane, n-octane, n-decane, n-tetradecane, and n-hexadecane, as a function of composition, temperature, and added polar additives. The dilute mixtures of C(12)G(1) with the aforementioned oils are essentially a solid dispersion at lower temperatures without forming any liquid crystalline phases, which are transformed into isotropic reverse micellar solutions upon heating. The generalized indirect Fourier transformation (GIFT) analysis of the SAXS data has drawn a clear picture of the structural variations of the reverse micellar aggregates in the isotropic solution phase. A notable effect on the micellar growth emerges when cyclohexane is replaced with the linear-chain hydrocarbon oils; a gradual increase of the carbon number of the hydrocarbon skeleton from octane to hexadecane, ellipsoidal prolate-like micelles are eventually transformed to long rod-like ones. Far more pronounced structural enhancement could be achieved by increasing the hydrophilicity of the surfactant, as short-rod micelles observed in the C(12)G(1)/decane system are replaced with long cylindrical ones when a more hydrophilic diglycerol monolaurate (C(12)G(2)) is used. This fact also supports a scenario that regulates the ability to form elongated to reverse structures. Lowering the temperature and increasing the surfactant concentration similarly lead to micellar growth while the cross-sectional structure remains essentially unchanged. In contrast, polar additive-induced growth is accompanied by the rapid swelling of the micellar core. Our data demonstrate that optimization of the oil properties and/or other outer conditions provide possible routes to flexibly controlling the size, shape, and internal structure of the reverse micelles despite lower universality for a shorter hydrophilic chain surfactant. PMID:19458827

  3. Interactions of surfactants with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Heerklotz, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Surfactants are surface-active, amphiphilic compounds that are water-soluble in the micro- to millimolar range, and self-assemble to form micelles or other aggregates above a critical concentration. This definition comprises synthetic detergents as well as amphiphilic peptides and lipopeptides, bile salts and many other compounds. This paper reviews the biophysics of the interactions of surfactants with membranes of insoluble, naturally occurring lipids. It discusses structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of membrane-water partitioning, changes in membrane properties induced by surfactants, membrane solubilisation to micelles and other phases formed by lipid-surfactant systems. Each section defines and derives key parameters, mentions experimental methods for their measurement and compiles and discusses published data. Additionally, a brief overview is given of surfactant-like effects in biological systems, technical applications of surfactants that involve membrane interactions, and surfactant-based protocols to study biological membranes. PMID:19079805

  4. Molecular Aggregates in Stable Aqueous Three-Phase Surfactant Systems and Their use in Producing CdS Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Renhao; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Dong; Hao, Jingcheng

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous three-phase surfactant systems (A3PS) are important, multicomponent, stable three-phase equilibria with coexisting forms in a common colloid solution, but have been largely ignored regarding further characterization and application. Mixing simple, commercially available, single-tailed anionic/nonionic or anionic/cationic surfactants in water can spontaneously produce stable A3PS with coexisting multiscale self-assembled structures including discs, lamellas, micelles and vesicles. As with conventional aqueous two-phase systems (A2PS), A3PS can be applied in partition and extraction processes. Here, the A3PS was also used as a mild media for one-step synthesis of multiscale CdS nanowires. Particularly, the A3PS does not change and simultaneously separates the CdS nanowires with the comparable size in one phase, which provides a facile strategy for collection of monodisperse nanomaterials. We expect that this present work can expand recognition of A3PS for use in theoretical and applied studies. PMID:23588712

  5. Structural aspects in self-assembled systems of polyoxyethylene surfactants, as studied by the spin probe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldararu, Horia

    1998-12-01

    Typical examples of structural characterization of self-assembled systems by the spin probes technique, selected from our representative results accumulated in the last years of systematic studies, are presented. The choice of the examples has aimed at emphasizing the potentiality of this technique in the study of self-assembled systems, in general, and of those of PEO surfactants, in particular. By using specific ESR parameters (the nitrogen hyperfine splitting (hfs), aN, the rotational correlation time, τc, the order parameter, S) of a variety of properly chosen nitroxides, problems such hydration degree and profile of the PEO chains, ordering and order profile along these chains, their penetrability by the oil solvent, role of the terminal OH in the micellization, as well as differences in these quantities vs . the nature of the aggregate (micelle, reverse micelle, lamellar phase, etc.), nature of the surfactants (conventional or triblock copolymer), solubilizates (water in reverse micelles or various alcohols in micelles) and temperature have been discussed.

  6. Modulating self-assembly behavior of a salt-free peptide amphiphile (PA) and zwitterionic surfactant mixed system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Sun, Jichao; Xin, Xia; Xu, Wenlong; Shen, Jinglin; Song, Zhaohua; Yuan, Shiling

    2016-04-01

    A salt-free surfactant system formed by a peptide amphiphile with short headgroup (PA,C16-GK-3) and a zwitterionic surfactant (dodecyldimethylamine oxide, C12DMAO) in water has been systematically investigated. The microstructures and properties of C16-GK-3/C12DMAO mixed system were characterized using a combination of microscopic, scattering and spectroscopic techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD) and rheological measurements. Rich phase transitions have been observed by adjusting the concentration of C16-GK-3. Investigation of the hydrogels of C16-GK-3/C12DMAO with TEM, SEM and AFM showed that all of these hydrogels form nanobelts. The nanobelt formation is performed in a hierarchical manner: β-sheet peptides and C12DMAO first interact each other to form small aggregates, which then arrange themselves to form one dimensional (1D) left-handed ribbons. The ribbons further aggregated into flat and rigid nanobelts. We proposed a mechanism to interpret the self-assembly process according to the specific peptide structure as well as multiple equilibria between the hydrogen bonding interactions between the headgroups of C16-GK-3, between C12DMAO molecules and the headgroups of C16-GK-3, chirality of the amino acid residues and hydrophobic interactions of the alkyl chains. PMID:26773608

  7. The relationship between sap flow and commercial soil water sensor readings in irrigated potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many irrigation scheduling methods utilized in commercial production settings rely on soil water sensors that are normally purchased as off-the-shelf technology or through contracted services that install and monitor readings throughout the season. These systems often assume a direct relationship be...

  8. Effect of the soil water content on Jatropha seedlings in a tropical climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Vázquez, A.; Hernández-Salinas, G.; Ávila-Reséndiz, C.; Valdés-Rodríguez, O. A.; Gallardo-López, F.; García-Pérez, E.; Ruiz-Rosado, O.

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate growth, chlorophyll content, and photosynthesis in Jatropha at different levels of soil moisture. Plants were cultivated in containers and the treatments of the soil water content evaluated were: 0% (without watering), 20, 40, 60, and 80% soil water content. Plant height was statistically similar for all treatments, but the number of leaves differed significantly. Total dry matter and chlorophyll at 40, 60, and 80% soil water content were statistically similar, but different from 0 and 20% soil water content. Leaf area at 40, 60, and 80% soil water content was statistically different from 0 and 20% soil water content. The photosynthetic rate, transpiration and stomatal conductance at 60 and 80% soil water content were statistically similar but different from 0 and 20% soil water content. Water stress affected growth, chlorophyll content, photosynthetic rate, transpiration, and stomatal conductance.

  9. Resonance Rayleigh scattering method for the determination of cationic surfactants with chromium(VI)-iodide system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaopu; Shi, Yan; Liu, Zhongfang; Luo, Hongqun; Kong, Ling

    2006-05-01

    A method for detecting and identifying cationic surfactant in some chemical samples for daily use that include Head & Shoulder Ampoule and Slek Shower Lotion has been developed. In an acid medium, chromium(VI) oxidizes I(-) to produce I(2), I(2) binds excess of I(-) to form I(3)(-), and I(3)(-) can further react with a cationic surfactant (CS) (such as cetyldimethyl benzylammonium chloride (CDBAC), Zephiramine (Zeph), cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB), tetradecyl pyridinium bromide (TPB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)) to form ion-association complexes [CS][I(3)]. This results in a significant enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and appearance of new RRS spectra. The RRS spectral characteristics of the ion-association complexes, the influencing factors and the optimum conditions of the reactions have been investigated. The intensities of RRS are directly proportional to the concentration of CS. CS in samples are collected using a treated anion exchange column and subsequently complexed by I(3)(-); then the RRS intensities of CS complex are determined at 495 nm. The reactions have high sensitivities, and their detection limits are 7.05 - 9.62 ng/mL for different CS. The effects of foreign substances are investigated and the results show that the method has good selectivity. PMID:16770060

  10. Light-responsive multillamellar vesicles in coumaric acid/alkyldimethylamine oxide binary systems: Effects of surfactant and hydrotrope structures.

    PubMed

    Jia, Kangle; Hu, Junwen; Dong, Jinfeng; Li, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    Herein, we report a series of novel light-responsive multilamellar vesicles based on the surfactant/hydrotrope binary systems. The phase behaviors of alkyldimethylamine oxide (CmDMAO, m=10, 12, 14) and trans-coumaric acid (trans-CA) isomerides, including trans-ortho-coumaric acid (trans-OCA), trans-meta-coumaric acid (trans-MCA) and trans-para-coumaric acid (trans-PCA), show that the multilamellar vesicle (MLV) formation region is commonly presented in the trans-CA/CmDMAO systems except trans-PCA/C12DMAO. Moreover, the molecular structures of CmDMAO and trans-CA affect the multilamellar vesicle formation region significantly. Generally speaking, the bigger the m, the larger the MLV region. Various techniques such as rheology, polarized optical microscopy (POM), (1)H NMR, (2)H NMR, cryogen transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy (FF-TEM) are used to characterize the aggregate structures. The multilamellar vesicles can transform into a homogeneous and transparent micelle phase or a two-phase system in the trans-OCA/CmDMAO binary systems under UV light irradiation, which depends on the chain length of CmDMAO and the molar ratio of [trans-OCA]/[CmDMAO]. Specifically, the light-stimuli response of multilamellar vesicles in the trans-OCA/C12DMAO system is representatively studied in detail. UV-vis spectra and (1)H NMR measurements illustrate that the light-induced trans-OCA to cis-OCA isomerization is essential during the transitions and the light-induced two-phase formation is attributed to the enrichment of surfactants, because the trans-cis isomerization can not only strengthen the hydrophilicity of cis-OCA but also increase the steric hindrance between cis-OCA and C12DMAO, and thereby altering the morphology of aggregate and the rheological response of bulk phase significantly. PMID:27262081