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  1. Intellectual and Political Hygiene: The "Sokal Affair."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, Jennifer Daryl; Semati, M. Mehdi

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes coverage of the "Sokal Affair", in which physicist Alan Sokal submitted a fraudulent article and then criticized the journal for publishing it. Examines the four currents that overdetermined the Sokal Affair: antliberalism, anti-intellectualism, debates among the left about what constitutes a legitimate left, and the often-perceived…

  2. A Rhetorical Perspective on the Sokal Hoax: Genre, Style, and Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Secor, Marie; Walsh, Lynda

    2004-01-01

    In 1996, New York University professor of physics Alan Sokal wrote a parody of an academic article he titled "Transgressing the Boundaries: Toward a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity." This parody escaped detection by the editors and was published in the journal "Social Text." Sokal outed his own hoax in the academic magazine "Lingua…

  3. Fitness and Health. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Care Information Exchange, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Presents five articles on children's fitness and health: "Relaxation: Every Child's Right to Simply Be" (Patrice Thomas and Wendy Shepherd); "Infant Massage" (Carolyn Oleson); "Fitness and the Young Child" (James M. Poole); "Partners in Health: Helping Families Advocate for Their Children's Health Care" (Karen Sokal-Gutierrez); and "Preventing…

  4. Postmodernism, politics and religion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Philip

    2008-08-01

    Alan Sokal really likes footnotes, which may have made him uniquely qualified as a hoaxer of "science studies". The original hoax, a purposely and wonderfully nonsensical paper about the epistemology of quantum gravity, appeared in 1996 in the cultural-studies journal Social Text, with the enthusiastic endorsement of its editorship of eminent postmodernists. There were 107 footnotes.

  5. Soils regulate and mitigate climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background/Question/Methods: The interaction of soil science and ecology can be traced back to the origins of soil science as an independent discipline within the natural sciences. Vasili Dokuchaev, the founder of modern soil science, identified five soil forming factors: parent material, climate, o...

  6. Values Education in the Soviet State: The Lasting Contribution of V. A. Sukhomlinsky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cockerill, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Vasily Sukhomlinsky (1918-1970) was arguably the most influential Soviet educator of the post-war period. He was a practising teacher, and from 1947 to 1970 was principal of a school in the Ukrainian village of Pavlysh. One of Sukhomlinsky's primary concerns was to inculcate in his students the values of compassion and service, combined with…

  7. TEM verification of the <111>-type 4-arm multi-junction in [001]-Mo single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L

    2005-03-14

    To investigate and verify the formation of <111>-type 4-arm multi-junction by the dislocation reaction of 1/2[111] [b1] + 1/2[{bar 1}1{bar 1}] [b2] + 1/2[{bar 1}{bar 1}1] [b3] = 1/2[{bar 1}11] [b4], which has recently been discovered through computer simulations conducted by Vasily Bulatov and his colleagues.

  8. Clinical outcome of 27 imatinib mesylate-resistant chronic myelogenous leukemia patients harboring a T315I BCR-ABL mutation.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Franck E; Hayette, Sandrine; Corm, Selim; Bachy, Emmanuel; Bories, Dominique; Tulliez, Michel; Guilhot, François; Legros, Laurence; Maloisel, Frédéric; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Mahon, François-Xavier; Lê, Quoc-Hung; Michallet, Mauricette; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Preudhomme, Claude

    2007-09-01

    We analyzed 27 CML patients treated with imatinib (IM) who developed a BCR-ABLT315I mutation. These patients had poor prognostic features: High or intermediate Sokal index (82%), and lack of CCyR under IM (59%). At T315I discovery, patients were in advanced phase (59%), with clonal evolution (84%). Median time since diagnosis was 39 months, and progression occurred 13 months after IM initiation, regardless of disease phase. Overall survival since IM initiation was 42.5 months for chronic, and 17.5 months for advanced phases, and all patients progressed. This mutation seems related to or (partially?) responsible for progression and poor survival. PMID:17768119

  9. An Underdiscussed Aspect of Chomsky (1959)

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, Barry Eshkol

    2007-01-01

    Chomsky's (1959) review of Skinner's (1957) Verbal Behavior has been influential and attributed with a role in the cognitive revolution. However, while counter reviews from within behavior analysis have noted that Chomsky misunderstood the subject matter, certain aspects of his scholarship have been underdiscussed. This includes several instances where Chomsky misquotes Skinner or takes his quotes out of context. Similar to the findings of Sokal (1996a, 1996b), it is speculated that the problems with Chomsky were overlooked by cognitive psychologists because his general outlook was accepted. Implications for the editorial review process are discussed. PMID:22477378

  10. The Mishin Diaries, a new significant primary source of space history information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payson, Dmitry; Alifanov, Oleg; Moiseev, Ivan; Vick, Charles; Woods, David

    2016-06-01

    Vasily Mishin (1917-2001) was a prominent Russian engineer and scientist: one of the pioneers who made spaceflight a reality. In 2014 diaries that were maintained by Mishin from 1960 to 1974 (the Mishin Diaries) had been transcribed and published and can now serve as an extensive resource for first-hand historical information about that fascinating period of time. The original Diaries are now owned by the Perot Foundation and copies were generously provided by them to the Moscow Aviation Institute for this transcription project. The actual publication was made possible by Mishin's students, co-workers, family members as well as numerous spaceflight historians and enthusiasts.

  11. The EUTOS population-based registry: incidence and clinical characteristics of 2904 CML patients in 20 European Countries.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, V S; Baccarani, M; Hasford, J; Lindoerfer, D; Burgstaller, S; Sertic, D; Costeas, P; Mayer, J; Indrak, K; Everaus, H; Koskenvesa, P; Guilhot, J; Schubert-Fritschle, G; Castagnetti, F; Di Raimondo, F; Lejniece, S; Griskevicius, L; Thielen, N; Sacha, T; Hellmann, A; Turkina, A G; Zaritskey, A; Bogdanovic, A; Sninska, Z; Zupan, I; Steegmann, J-L; Simonsson, B; Clark, R E; Covelli, A; Guidi, G; Hehlmann, R

    2015-06-01

    This population-based registry was designed to provide robust and updated information on the characteristics and the epidemiology of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). All cases of newly diagnosed Philadelphia positive, BCR-ABL1+ CML that occurred in a sample of 92.5 million adults living in 20 European countries, were registered over a median period of 39 months. 94.3% of the 2904 CML patients were diagnosed in chronic phase (CP). Median age was 56 years. 55.5% of patients had comorbidities, mainly cardiovascular (41.9%). High-risk patients were 24.7% by Sokal, 10.8% by EURO, and 11.8% by EUTOS risk scores. The raw incidence increased with age from 0.39/100,000/year in people 20-29 years old to 1.52 in those >70 years old, and showed a maximum of 1.39 in Italy and a minimum of 0.69 in Poland (all countries together: 0.99). The proportion of Sokal and Euro score high-risk patients seen in many countries indicates that trial patients were not a positive selection. Thus from a clinical point of view the results of most trials can be generalized to most countries. The incidences observed among European countries did not differ substantially. The estimated number of new CML cases per year in Europe is about 6370. PMID:25783795

  12. 110th Anniversary of the Engelhardt Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedyev, Y.

    2012-09-01

    The Engelhardt Astronomical Observatory (EAO) was founded in September 21, 1901. The history of creation of the Engelhard Astronomical Observatory was begun in 1897 with transfer a complimentary to the Kazan University of the unique astronomical equipment of the private observatory in Dresden by known astronomer Vasily Pavlovichem Engelgardt. Having stopped astronomical activity owing to advanced years and illnesses Engelgardt has decided to offer all tools and library of the Astronomical observatory of the Kazan University. Vasily Pavlovich has put the first condition of the donation that his tools have been established as soon as possible and on them supervision are started. In 1898 the decree of Emperor had been allocated means and the ground for construction of the Astronomical observatory is allocated. There is the main historical telescope of the Engelhard Astronomical Observatory the 12-inch refractor which was constructed by English master Grubbom in 1875. The unique tool of the Engelhard Astronomical Observatory is unique in the world now a working telescope heliometer. It's one of the first heliometers, left workshops Repsolda. It has been made in 1874 and established in Engelgardt observatory in 1908 in especially for him the constructed round pavilion in diameter of 3.6 m. Today the Engelhard Astronomical Observatory is the only thing scientifically - educational and cultural - the cognitive astronomical center, located on territory from Moscow up to the most east border of Russia. Currently, the observatory is preparing to enter the protected UNESCO World Heritage List.

  13. Archeointensities in Greece during the Neolithic period: New insights into material selection and secular variation curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanjat, G.; Aidona, E.; Kondopoulou, D.; Camps, P.; Rathossi, C.; Poidras, T.

    2013-02-01

    Numerous archeomagnetic studies have provided high quality data for both the direction and the intensity of the geomagnetic field, essentially in Europe for the last 10 millennia. In particular, Greece supplies a lot of archeological materials due to its impressive cultural heritage and volcanic activity, so that numerous data have been obtained from burnt clays or historical lava flows. The most recent Greek secular variation curves are available for the last 8 millennia for the intensity and the last 6 millennia for the direction. Nevertheless, the coverage still presents several gaps for periods older than 2500 BC. In an effort to complete the Greek curve and extend it to older times, we present the archeointensity results from three Neolithic settlements in Northern Greece. The samples are of two different natures: burnt structures from Avgi (5250 ± 150 BC) and Vasili (4800 ± 200 BC), as well as ceramics from Dikili Tash (4830 ± 80 BC) and Vasili (4750 ± 250 BC). The samples have been subjected to standard rock magnetic analyses in order to estimate the thermal stability and the domain state of the magnetic carriers before archeointensity measurements. Surprisingly, very few ceramic samples provided reliable archeointensities whereas samples from burnt structures presented a very good success rate. Complementary studies showed that a detailed examination of the matrix color, following archeological information and classification standards can be a decisive test for pre-selection of sherds. In spite of these unsuccessful measurements from ceramics, we obtained an intensity value of 73.5 ± 1.1 μT for Dikili Tash, a higher value than the other data obtained in the same area, during the same period. However we do not have evidences for a technical artefact during the experiment. The burnt structures yielded two reliable archeointensities of 36.1 ± 1.8 μT and 46.6 ± 3.4 μT for Avgi and Vasili, respectively. Finally, we achieved a new archeomagnetic dating

  14. Updated thinking on positivity ratios.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, Barbara L

    2013-12-01

    This article presents my response to the article by Brown, Sokal, and Friedman (2013), which critically examined Losada's conceptual and mathematical work (as presented in Losada, 1999; Losada & Heaphy, 2004; and Fredrickson & Losada; 2005) and concluded that mathematical claims for a critical tipping point positivity ratio are unfounded. In the present article, I draw recent empirical evidence together to support the continued value of computing and seeking to elevate positivity ratios. I also underscore the necessity of modeling nonlinear effects of positivity ratios and, more generally, the value of systems science approaches within affective science and positive psychology. Even when scrubbed of Losada's now-questioned mathematical modeling, ample evidence continues to support the conclusion that, within bounds, higher positivity ratios are predictive of flourishing mental health and other beneficial outcomes. PMID:23855895

  15. [Achievement of deep molecular response in an elderly chronic myeloid leukemia patient intolerant to imatinib and nilotinib].

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, Miwa; Nagata, Akihisa; Sekiguchi, Naohiro; Noto, Satoshi; Takezako, Naoki

    2015-12-01

    A 90-year-old woman was diagnosed with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) of the high risk type (Sokal score 1.5), and was administered imatinib (400 mg/day). However, imatinib had to be switched to nilotinib because she suffered persistent vomiting and nausea. Although a cytogenetic response was achieved, the nilotinib administration also had to be stopped because the patient developed QTc prolongation and heart failure. After she had recovered from heart failure, the patient was given dasatinib (50 mg/day). No non-hematological adverse events occurred and she achieved a molecular response with administration of dasatinib. A molecular response can be achieved through appropriate supportive care and careful selection of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, with adjustments in the doses of these drugs administered to patients with the high-risk form of CML who are intolerant to imatinib. PMID:26725357

  16. A Grand Solar Plan: How Solar Power can Cut Greenhouse Gases and End U.S. Dependence on Foreign Oil (436th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis, Vasilis

    2008-04-21

    With oil now around $100 per barrel, solar power is no longer impractical, notes BNL's Vasilis Fthenakis, who, with two of his collaborators, authored "A Grand Solar Plan," the cover story of the January 2008 issue of Scientific American. As Dr. Fthenakis will detail in his special, open-to-the-public Earth Day lecture co-sponsored by the Brookhaven Lecture Committee and the Environment & Waste Management Services Division, the three solar experts propose covering thousands of square miles of the Southwest U.S. with photovoltaic arrays. These would convert sunlight into electricity, which would then be distributed across the U.S. -- ending foreign-oil dependence, reducing the trade deficit, cutting air pollution, and slowing global climate change. Given oil's record price, the time for solar power as an affordable and technically implementable solution is now -- if, according to Dr. Fthenakis, the U.S. makes the commitment and investment.

  17. The Dokuchaev hypothesis as a basis for predictive digital soil mapping (on the 125th anniversary of its publication)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florinsky, I. V.

    2012-04-01

    Predictive digital soil mapping is widely used in soil science. Its objective is the prediction of the spatial distribution of soil taxonomic units and quantitative soil properties via the analysis of spatially distributed quantitative characteristics of soil-forming factors. Western pedometrists stress the scientific priority and principal importance of Hans Jenny's book (1941) for the emergence and development of predictive soil mapping. In this paper, we demonstrate that Vasily Dokuchaev explicitly defined the central idea and statement of the problem of contemporary predictive soil mapping in the year 1886. Then, we reconstruct the history of the soil formation equation from 1899 to 1941. We argue that Jenny adopted the soil formation equation from Sergey Zakharov, who published it in a well-known fundamental textbook in 1927. It is encouraging that this issue was clarified in 2011, the anniversary year for publications of Dokuchaev and Jenny.

  18. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  19. Comittees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-10-01

    Fritz Caspers (CERN, Switzerland), Michel Chanel (CERN, Switzerland), Håkan Danared (MSL, Sweden), Bernhard Franzke (GSI, Germany), Manfred Grieser (MPI für Kernphysik, Germany), Dieter Habs (LMU München, Germany), Jeffrey Hangst (University of Aarhus, Denmark), Takeshi Katayama (RIKEN/Univ. Tokyo, Japan), H.-Jürgen Kluge (GSI, Germany), Shyh-Yuan Lee (Indiana University, USA), Rudolf Maier (FZ Jülich, Germany), John Marriner (FNAL, USA), Igor Meshkov (JINR, Russia), Dieter Möhl (CERN, Switzerland), Vasily Parkhomchuk (BINP, Russia), Robert Pollock (Indiana University), Dieter Prasuhn (FZ Jülich, Germany), Dag Reistad (TSL, Sweden), John Schiffer (ANL, USA), Andrew Sessler (LBNL, USA), Alexander Skrinsky (BINP, Russia), Markus Steck (GSI, Germany), Jie Wei (BNL, USA), Andreas Wolf (MPI für Kernphysik, Germany), Hongwei Zhao (IMP, People's Rep. of China).

  20. Pattern of chronic myeloid leukemia in the imatinib era in a Sub-Saharan African setting.

    PubMed

    Faye, Blaise Felix; Dieng, Nata; Seck, Moussa; Gadji, Macoura; Gueye, Youssou Bamar; Sy, Diariatou; Toure, Sokhna Aissatou; Sall, Abibatou; Toure, Awa Oumar; Dieye, Tandakha Ndiaye; Diop, Saliou

    2016-10-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is an orphan disease in Africa because of the inaccessibility to specific treatment and the high cost of diagnosis and monitoring patients. The aim of this study was to report CML treatment response in a developing country in the tyrosine kinase inhibitor era. We conducted a longitudinal study of our cohort of CML patients. Socio-demographic, diagnosis, therapeutic, and treatment response parameters were studied. Sokal score, disease phase at diagnosis, delay from diagnosis to treatment, and treatment response were analyzed for their impact on survival. Fifty-five patients with a diagnosis of CML and who received treatment with imatinib for a minimum of 3 months were included in this study. Median follow-up was 170 patient-years. The sex ratio (M/F) was 1.62 and median age at diagnosis was 42 years. At diagnosis, 85.5 % of the patients were in chronic phase (CP), 12.7 % in accelerated phase (AP), and 1.8 % in blast crisis (BC). Sokal risk score distribution was as follows: low risk 29.8 %, intermediate risk 38.3 %, and high risk 31.9 %. Median time from first symptoms to first medical visit was 6.2 months and median time from first medical visit to cytogenetic and or molecular confirmation was 12.4 months. Mean delay time from first medical visit to imatinib initiation was 12.5 months (95 % CI 6.3-18.7). The complete hematologic response (CHR) at 3 months, the major cytogenetic response (MCR) at 12 months, and the major molecular response (MMR) at 24 months were respectively 82.4, 75, and 25 %. The 2-year overall survival rate was 81 %. Advanced phase at the diagnosis, discontinuation of imatinib therapy over 15 % of the time, lack of CHR at 3 months, lack of MCR at 12 months, and progression of the disease during imatinib therapy were associated with a risk of death (p ≤ 0.05). Our data confirm the improved prognosis of CML treated with imatinib in the setting of a developing country. However, response rates

  1. CML treatment in Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Jootar, Saengsuree

    2012-04-01

    CML in Asia seems to affect the younger age group and more patients are in the high and intermediate Sokal risk group. Cytogenetic study and molecular testing are done mostly at diagnosis, but monitoring the response is limited due to the cost and accessibility. The treatment of chronic phase CML has changed dramatically within the last decade and imatinib has become the standard treatment for CP, CML. Since the cost of imatinib is quite high, most Asian patients cannot afford it. Patients in several countries get imatinib through Glivec International Patient Assistant Program. Patients who are intolerant or resistant to imatinib usually get the second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), either nilotinib or dasatinib. The National Health Insurance covers all or most of the cost of imatinib in South Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan. Both nilotinib and dasatinib are partially or fully covered by national insurance in Australia, Japan, Singapore and Taiwan as the second-line therapy. TKIs treatment remains out of reach for many Asian CML patients, especially those in the rural areas and those who are not eligible for patient access programs or covered by the national insurance. The cytogenetic response to imatinib in Asian CML patients varies considerably, from as low as 24% to as high as 96%. The Asia CML Study Alliance was briefly presented. PMID:22507785

  2. High-Dose Imatinib in Newly Diagnosed Chronic-Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: High Rates of Rapid Cytogenetic and Molecular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Jorge E.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Goldberg, Stuart L.; Powell, Bayard L.; Giles, Francis J.; Wetzler, Meir; Akard, Luke; Burke, John M.; Kerr, Robert; Saleh, Mansoor; Salvado, August; McDougall, Karen; Albitar, Maher; Radich, Jerald

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Long-term clinical outcome data have established imatinib 400 mg/d as standard front-line treatment for newly diagnosed patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Patients and Methods The Rationale and Insight for Gleevec High-Dose Therapy (RIGHT) trial is a multicenter study of imatinib 400 mg twice a day as initial therapy in 115 patients (70% Sokal low risk) with newly diagnosed CML in chronic phase who were observed for both molecular and cytogenetic responses for up to 18 months. Eighty-three patients (72%) completed the study, 10 patients (9%) discontinued the study because of adverse events, and six patients (5%) discontinued because of unsatisfactory therapeutic effect. Results Polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated rapid kinetics of major molecular response (MMR), with 48% of patients achieving MMR by 6 months, 54% by 12 months, and 63% by 18 months. Corresponding complete molecular response rates were 39%, 44%, and 55%, respectively. Median dose-intensity was 98%. Overall, 79% of patients who received at least 90% dose-intensity achieved MMR. The most frequent adverse events included myelosuppression, rash, fatigue, and musculoskeletal symptoms. Conclusion This study suggests that imatinib 400 mg twice a day results in more rapid reduction in tumor burden than imatinib 400 mg/d with minimal added toxicity. PMID:19720924

  3. The characterisation of Bordetella/Alcaligenes-like organisms and their effects on turkey poults and chicks.

    PubMed

    Varley, J

    1986-01-01

    Eight isolates of the Bordetella or Alcaligenes-like organisms associated with turkey rhino-tracheitis were examined. Five of these isolates had been recovered from the United Kingdom and three were foreign isolates. Four of the UK isolates came from flocks with mild respiratory disease. The fifth isolate came from birds with no respiratory signs and this appears to be the first report of the recovery of Bordetella/Alcaligenes from apparently normal turkeys. The field isolates and type strains Alcaligenes faecalis NCTC 415 and Bordetella bronchiseptica NCTC 452 were characterised by biochemical tests, but these did not include any electrophoresis or nucleic acid studies. Cluster analysis using the group average method and the similarly coefficient of Sokal and Sneath indicated that all the strains were distinct from Alcaligenes faecalis but were quite closely related to Bordetella bronchiseptica. Each field isolate was used to infect separate groups of day-old turkey poults and chicks, and each group contained birds which were experimentally infected and others which were in-contact. Observations were made over a 32-day period. In turkey poults, some of the isolates induced severe respiratory disease and mortality, and others very little or none. The UK isolates were less pathogenic than the foreign isolates. It was not possible to correlate the pathogenicity of the isolates for turkey poults with their biochemical characteristics. Chicks infected with two of the eight isolates showed slight respiratory signs, but there was no significant mortality. PMID:18766500

  4. Long-term benefits and risks of frontline nilotinib vs imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: 5-year update of the randomized ENESTnd trial.

    PubMed

    Hochhaus, A; Saglio, G; Hughes, T P; Larson, R A; Kim, D-W; Issaragrisil, S; le Coutre, P D; Etienne, G; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P E; Clark, R E; Flinn, I W; Nakamae, H; Donohue, B; Deng, W; Dalal, D; Menssen, H D; Kantarjian, H M

    2016-05-01

    In the phase 3 Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Trials-Newly Diagnosed Patients (ENESTnd) study, nilotinib resulted in earlier and higher response rates and a lower risk of progression to accelerated phase/blast crisis (AP/BC) than imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Here, patients' long-term outcomes in ENESTnd are evaluated after a minimum follow-up of 5 years. By 5 years, more than half of all patients in each nilotinib arm (300 mg twice daily, 54%; 400 mg twice daily, 52%) achieved a molecular response 4.5 (MR(4.5); BCR-ABL⩽0.0032% on the International Scale) compared with 31% of patients in the imatinib arm. A benefit of nilotinib was observed across all Sokal risk groups. Overall, safety results remained consistent with those from previous reports. Numerically more cardiovascular events (CVEs) occurred in patients receiving nilotinib vs imatinib, and elevations in blood cholesterol and glucose levels were also more frequent with nilotinib. In contrast to the high mortality rate associated with CML progression, few deaths in any arm were associated with CVEs, infections or pulmonary diseases. These long-term results support the positive benefit-risk profile of frontline nilotinib 300 mg twice daily in patients with CML-CP. PMID:26837842

  5. Long-term benefits and risks of frontline nilotinib vs imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase: 5-year update of the randomized ENESTnd trial

    PubMed Central

    Hochhaus, A; Saglio, G; Hughes, T P; Larson, R A; Kim, D-W; Issaragrisil, S; le Coutre, P D; Etienne, G; Dorlhiac-Llacer, P E; Clark, R E; Flinn, I W; Nakamae, H; Donohue, B; Deng, W; Dalal, D; Menssen, H D; Kantarjian, H M

    2016-01-01

    In the phase 3 Evaluating Nilotinib Efficacy and Safety in Clinical Trials–Newly Diagnosed Patients (ENESTnd) study, nilotinib resulted in earlier and higher response rates and a lower risk of progression to accelerated phase/blast crisis (AP/BC) than imatinib in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Here, patients' long-term outcomes in ENESTnd are evaluated after a minimum follow-up of 5 years. By 5 years, more than half of all patients in each nilotinib arm (300 mg twice daily, 54% 400 mg twice daily, 52%) achieved a molecular response 4.5 (MR4.5; BCR-ABL⩽0.0032% on the International Scale) compared with 31% of patients in the imatinib arm. A benefit of nilotinib was observed across all Sokal risk groups. Overall, safety results remained consistent with those from previous reports. Numerically more cardiovascular events (CVEs) occurred in patients receiving nilotinib vs imatinib, and elevations in blood cholesterol and glucose levels were also more frequent with nilotinib. In contrast to the high mortality rate associated with CML progression, few deaths in any arm were associated with CVEs, infections or pulmonary diseases. These long-term results support the positive benefit-risk profile of frontline nilotinib 300 mg twice daily in patients with CML-CP. PMID:26837842

  6. Graphical Representations for Ising and Potts Models in General External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioletti, Leandro; Vila, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This work is concerned with the theory of graphical representation for the Ising and Potts models over general lattices with non-translation invariant external field. We explicitly describe in terms of the random-cluster representation the distribution function and, consequently, the expected value of a single spin for the Ising and q-state Potts models with general external fields. We also consider the Gibbs states for the Edwards-Sokal representation of the Potts model with non-translation invariant magnetic field and prove a version of the FKG inequality for the so called general random-cluster model (GRC model) with free and wired boundary conditions in the non-translation invariant case. Adding the amenability hypothesis on the lattice, we obtain the uniqueness of the infinite connected component and the almost sure quasilocality of the Gibbs measures for the GRC model with such general magnetic fields. As a final application of the theory developed, we show the uniqueness of the Gibbs measures for the ferromagnetic Ising model with a positive power-law decay magnetic field with small enough power, as conjectured in Bissacot et al. (Commun Math Phys 337: 41-53, 2015).

  7. Impact of Imatinib Adherence on the Cytogenetic Response in Pediatric Chronic Myeloid Leukemia - Chronic Phase.

    PubMed

    Ganta, Ranga Raman; Nasaka, Srividya; Gundeti, Sadashivudu

    2016-09-01

    The authors aimed to study the impact of adherence to imatinib during initial 6 mo on the cytogenetic response in pediatric chronic myeloid leukemia - chronic phase (CML CP). The hospital records of pediatric CML patients (age ≤18 y) from 2009 through 2012, were analyzed retrospectively for the drug adherence and cytogenetic response (CyR) at 6 mo. Forty eight children were analyzed, with the median age of 13 y (range 5-18) and slight male preponderance (M:F- 1.18:1). Sokal scores were low, intermediate and high in 14 (29.3 %), 26 (54.1 %), 8 (16.6 %) children respectively. Only a little more than half of the children were adherent (58 %). At the end of 6 mo, complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) was achieved by 78.5 % of adherent children as compared to 5 % of non-adherent children. Majority (80 %) of the non-adherent children had only a partial cytogenetic response (PCyR). Therefore, it is concluded that most of the adherent children had optimal cytogenetic response at the end of 6 mo and majority of those in the non-adherent group did not attain it. PMID:26843266

  8. Plasmid and restriction endonuclease patterns in Pasteurella multocida isolated from a swine pyramid.

    PubMed

    Rúbies, Xavier; Casal, Jordi; Pijoan, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) and plasmid profile were used to study the epidemiology of Pasteurella multocida in a swine pyramid structure. The studied pyramid was comprised of a group of 12 swine farrow-to-finish farms related by unidirectional animal movement. P. multocida isolates were obtained from the lungs of 275 slaughtered pigs. Serotyping was performed by hyaluronidase sensitivity test and toxicity was investigated by the ELISA test. HpaII was used to cleave the P. multocida extracted DNA. REA patterns relationships were studied using the Sokal-Michener coefficients, and the dendrogram was built using the UPGMA system. The 218 P. multocida isolates obtained were distributed in 17 REA patterns. In 9 of the 12 farms studied only 2-3 REA patterns were detected, with one clearly predominant pattern. The 81 strains with plasmids were assigned to six plasmid profiles. REA and plasmid profiles proved to be good epidemiological tools for identifying different strains of P. multocida with the same phenotype. PMID:11731160

  9. Residual normal stem cells can be detected in newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia patients by a new flow cytometric approach and predict for optimal response to imatinib.

    PubMed

    Janssen, J J W M; Deenik, W; Smolders, K G M; van Kuijk, B J; Pouwels, W; Kelder, A; Cornelissen, J J; Schuurhuis, G J; Ossenkoppele, G J

    2012-05-01

    Insensitivity of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) hematopoietic stem cells to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) prevents eradication of the disease and may be involved in clinical resistance. For improved treatment results more knowledge about CML stem cells is needed. We here present a new flow cytometric approach enabling prospective discrimination of CML stem cells from their normal counterparts within single-patient samples. In 24 of 40 newly diagnosed CML patients residual normal CD34(+)CD38(-) stem cells could be identified by lower CD34 and CD45 expression, lower forward/sideward light scatter and by differences of lineage marker expression (CD7, CD11b and CD56) and of CD90. fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis on Fluorescence-activated cell sorting sorted cells proved that populations were BCR-ABL positive or negative and long-term liquid culture assays with subsequent colony forming unit assays and FISH analysis proved their stem cell character. Patients with residual non-leukemic stem cells had lower clinical risk scores (Sokal, Euro), lower hematological toxicity of imatinib (IM) and better molecular responses to IM than patients without. This new approach will expand our possibilities to separate CML and normal stem cells, present in a single bone marrow or peripheral blood sample, thereby offering opportunities to better identify new CML stem-cell-specific targets. Moreover, it may guide optimal clinical CML management. PMID:22157734

  10. Numerical taxonomy of Bacillus isolated from orally administered drugs.

    PubMed

    Gil, M C; de la Rosa, M C; Mosso, M A; García Arribas, M L

    1986-10-01

    Numerical taxonomy procedures were used to study 118 strains of Bacillus isolated from non-sterile drugs prepared for oral administration. Similarities between pairs of strains were calculated by the simple matching coefficient of Sokal and Michener (SSM). Each strain was tested for 60 unit characters and three clusters were defined. The strains in each cluster presented a similarity level of at least 60%. Cluster A comprised the strains identified as Bacillus cereus (SSM = 93.13%), cluster B contained three subgroups corresponding to the species B. pumilus, B. subtilis and B. licheniformis (SSM = 84.35%) and cluster C also included three subgroups that belonged to the species B. firmus, B. lentus and B. badius (SSM = 80.14%). The most discriminating tests were selected to differentiate the clusters from the subgroups. The feature with the highest discriminating power between clusters A and B was the lack of acid production from arabinose and mannitol. The Voges-Proskauer, methyl red tests and sensitivity to polymyxin B clearly distinguished cluster A from C. The Voges-Proskauer test and acid production from arabinose were the best to differentiate between B and C. Bacillus pumilus and B. subtilis differed in starch hydrolysis and B. licheniformis in growing anaerobically. To discriminate B. firmus from B. lentus the most important tests were the acid production from glucose and sucrose; intermediate strains were found. Bacillus badius was differentiated from B. firmus by 10 tests, and from B. lentus by the production of urease. PMID:3096933

  11. Romance of the three domains: how cladistics transformed the classification of cellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chi-Chun; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2013-09-01

    Cladistics is a biological philosophy that uses genealogical relationship among species and an inferred sequence of divergence as the basis of classification. This review critically surveys the chronological development of biological classification from Aristotle through our postgenomic era with a central focus on cladistics. In 1957, Julian Huxley coined cladogenesis to denote splitting from subspeciation. In 1960, the English translation of Willi Hennig's 1950 work, Systematic Phylogenetics, was published, which received strong opposition from pheneticists, such as numerical taxonomists Peter Sneath and Robert Sokal, and evolutionary taxonomist, Ernst Mayr, and sparked acrimonious debates in 1960-1980. In 1977-1990, Carl Woese pioneered in using small subunit rRNA gene sequences to delimitate the three domains of cellular life and established major prokaryotic phyla. Cladistics has since dominated taxonomy. Despite being compatible with modern microbiological observations, i.e. organisms with unusual phenotypes, restricted expression of characteristics and occasionally being uncultivable, increasing recognition of pervasiveness and abundance of horizontal gene transfer has challenged relevance and validity of cladistics. The mosaic nature of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes was also gradually discovered. In the mid-2000s, high-throughput and whole-genome sequencing became routine and complex geneologies of organisms have led to the proposal of a reticulated web of life. While genomics only indirectly leads to understanding of functional adaptations to ecological niches, computational modeling of entire organisms is underway and the gap between genomics and phenetics may soon be bridged. Controversies are not expected to settle as taxonomic classifications shall remain subjective to serve the human scientist, not the classified. PMID:23873078

  12. Cessation of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia following durable complete molecular response: a single center facing the dilemma.

    PubMed

    Iliakis, Theodoros; Papadopoulou, Vasiliki; Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis T; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Zervakis, Konstantinos; Giannakopoulou, Nefeli; Tilimidos, Gerassimos; Angelopoulou, Maria; Siakantaris, Marina P; Pangalis, Gerassimos; Mantzourani, Marina; Variami, Eleni; Viniou, Nora Athina

    2013-08-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), namely imatinib mesylate (IM) and recently approved second-generation TKIs dasatinib and nilotinib, are currently considered the treatment of choice for newly-diagnosed chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CP-CML). Although treatment with TKIs has not yet been proven curative, it certainly accomplishes a sustained control of the disease in the vast majority of patients. More than a decade after the successful launching of IM in first-line treatment of CP-CML and the subsequent introduction of second-generation TKIs in this setting, the question of the possibility of TKI cessation in a specific subset of patients has emerged. Side-effects of TKIs, along with some patients' wish to abandon the drugs and the rising financial burden upon healthcare systems, have led to the dilemma whether IM can be safely withdrawn after achieving deep molecular remissions and which patients are suitable for this discontinuation. We examined the data of our patients with CML in search of potential canditates for cessation of TKI therapy and identified their characteristics. We also performed a thorough review of the relevant literature. Eight out of fifty patients were discriminated on grounds of sustained complete molecular response (CMR) exceeding 12 months, most of them with a low or intermediate Sokal score at diagnosis. The median interval from IM initiation to CMR was almost 2 years and the median duration of detected CMR reached 6.5 years. Based on the promising results of prospective clinical trials reporting successful cessation of treatment with TKIs on selected subgroups of patients, we decided to proceed to interruption of therapy in the specific subset of our patients and closely monitor their response. PMID:23898127

  13. Dasatinib first-line: Multicentric Italian experience outside clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Stagno, Fabio; Luciano, Luigiana; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Annunziata, Mario; D'Adda, Mariella; Maggi, Alessandro; Sgherza, Nicola; Russo-Rossi, Antonella; Pregno, Patrizia; Castagnetti, Fausto; Iurlo, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Cedrone, Michele; Di Renzo, Nicola; Sorà, Federica; Rege-Cambrin, Giovanna; La Nasa, Giorgio; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Greco, Giovanna; Franceschini, Luca; Sica, Simona; Bocchia, Monica; Crugnola, Monica; Orlandi, Esther; Guarini, Attilio; Specchia, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Saglio, Giuseppe; Alimena, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib was approved for the treatment of chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients in first line therapy based on the demonstration of efficacy and safety reported in patients enrolled in clinical trials. We describe a multicentric Italian "real-life" experience of dasatinib used as frontline treatment outside clinical trials. One hundred and nine patients (median age 54 years) were treated from January 2012 to December 2013. Increased incidence of high risk patients were detected according to stratification (26% according to Sokal score, 19% according to Euro score and 16% according to EUTOS) when compared to company sponsored studies. Median time from diagnosis to start of dasatinib was 18 days. Ten patients received unscheduled starting dose (6 patients 50mg and 4 patients 80 mg QD), whereas 99 patients started with 100mg QD. At 3 months, 92% of patients achieved a BCR-ABL ratio less than 10%. At 6 months, the rate of CCyR was 91% and the rate of MR3 was 40%, with 8% of the patients reaching MR4.5. Ninety-three patients were evaluable at 12 months: the rate of MR3 was 62%, with MR4.5 being achieved by 19% of the patients. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 27 patients (24.7%) were receiving the drug at reduced dose. Two patients (1.8%) experienced a lymphoid blast crisis and the overall incidence of resistance was 8%. As regards safety, the major side effects recorded were thrombocytopenia, neutropenia and pleural effusions, which occurred in 22%, 10% and 8% of patients, respectively. Present results, achieved in a large cohort of patients treated outside clinical trials, further confirm the efficacy and safety of dasatinib as firstline treatment in CML. PMID:26643920

  14. Évolution de leucémies myéloïdes chroniques sous nilotinib après échec a l'imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Sawadogo, Salifo; Hien, Francis Michel; Ouédraogo, Macaire Sampawendé; Drabo, Youssouf Joseph

    2014-01-01

    C'est une étude observationnelle prospective ouverte: quatre leucémies myéloïdes chroniques résistant ou intolérant à l'Imatinib ont été traitées par le Nilotinib. Elles ont été incluses dans le programme GIPAP et suivies selon les recommandations de “European LeukemiaNet”. Trois ont un score de Sokal de haut risque et une de bas risque. Deux étaient hypertendues. Mises sous Nilotinib, il y a eu deux rémissions cytogénétiques complètes et deux échecs. Le traitement a été interrompu chez les deux rémissions complètes, l'un pour effet secondaire du Nilotinib et l'autre pour changement de pays. Les deux échecs sont dus à des résistances. Le Nilotinib réduisant la fréquence des mutations des leucémies myéloïdes chroniques à haut risque et risque intermédiaire, il serait judicieux d'utiliser ce produit en première intention dans ces cas - ci pour réduire la charge des examens complémentaires. Les pays à bas revenu confrontés à des problèmes de survie ont besoin de la solidarité mondiale pour prendre en charge les leucémies myéloïdes chroniques. PMID:25419280

  15. The applicability of certain Monte Carlo methods to the analysis of interacting polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Krapp, D.M. Jr.

    1998-05-01

    The authors consider polymers, modeled as self-avoiding walks with interactions on a hexagonal lattice, and examine the applicability of certain Monte Carlo methods for estimating their mean properties at equilibrium. Specifically, the authors use the pivoting algorithm of Madras and Sokal and Metroplis rejection to locate the phase transition, which is known to occur at {beta}{sub crit} {approx} 0.99, and to recalculate the known value of the critical exponent {nu} {approx} 0.58 of the system for {beta} = {beta}{sub crit}. Although the pivoting-Metropolis algorithm works well for short walks (N < 300), for larger N the Metropolis criterion combined with the self-avoidance constraint lead to an unacceptably small acceptance fraction. In addition, the algorithm becomes effectively non-ergodic, getting trapped in valleys whose centers are local energy minima in phase space, leading to convergence towards different values of {nu}. The authors use a variety of tools, e.g. entropy estimation and histograms, to improve the results for large N, but they are only of limited effectiveness. Their estimate of {beta}{sub crit} using smaller values of N is 1.01 {+-} 0.01, and the estimate for {nu} at this value of {beta} is 0.59 {+-} 0.005. They conclude that even a seemingly simple system and a Monte Carlo algorithm which satisfies, in principle, ergodicity and detailed balance conditions, can in practice fail to sample phase space accurately and thus not allow accurate estimations of thermal averages. This should serve as a warning to people who use Monte Carlo methods in complicated polymer folding calculations. The structure of the phase space combined with the algorithm itself can lead to surprising behavior, and simply increasing the number of samples in the calculation does not necessarily lead to more accurate results.

  16. Oral Histories in Meteoritics and Planetary Science - XX: Dale Cruikshank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek W. G.

    2013-04-01

    In this interview, Dale Cruikshank (Fig. 1) explains how as an undergraduate at Iowa State University he was a summer student at Yerkes Observatory where he assisted Gerard Kuiper in work on his Photographic Lunar Atlas. Upon completing his degree, Dale went to graduate school at the University of Arizona with Kuiper where he worked on the IR spectroscopy of the lunar surface. After an eventful 1968 trip to Moscow via Prague, during which the Soviets invaded Czechoslovakia, Dale assumed a postdoc position with Vasili Moroz at the Sternberg Astronomical Institute and more observational IR astronomy. Upon returning to the United States and after a year at Arizona, Dale assumed a position at the University of Hawai'i that he held for 17 years. During this period Dale worked with others on thermal infrared determinations of the albedos of small bodies beyond the asteroid Main Belt, leading to the recognition that low-albedo material is prevalent in the outer solar system that made the first report of complex organic solids on a planetary body (Saturn's satellite Iapetus). After moving to Ames Research Center, where he works currently, he continued this work and became involved in many outer solar system missions. Dale has served the community through his involvement in developing national policies for science-driven planetary exploration, being chair of the DPS 1990-1991 and secretary/treasurer for 1982-1985. He served as president of Commission 16 (Physics of Planets) of the IAU (2001-2003). He received the Kuiper prize in 2006.

  17. STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward Tsang Lu in white room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-84 Mission Specialist Edward T. Lu prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A with help from white room closeout crew members. The fourth Shuttle mission of 1997 will be the sixth docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir. The commander is Charles J. Precourt. The pilot is Eileen Marie Collins. The five mission specialists are C. Michael Foale, Carlos I. Noriega, Edward Tsang Lu, Jean-Francois Clervoy of the European Space Agency and Elena V. Kondakova of the Russian Space Agency. The planned nine-day mission will include the exchange of Foale for U.S. astronaut and Mir 23 crew member Jerry M. Linenger, who has been on Mir since Jan. 15. Linenger transferred to Mir during the last docking mission, STS-81; he will return to Earth on Atlantis. Foale is slated to remain on Mir for about four months until he is replaced in September by STS-86 Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. During the five days Atlantis is scheduled to be docked with the Mir, the STS-84 crew and the Mir 23 crew, including two Russian cosmonauts, Commander Vasily Tsibliev and Flight Engineer Alexander Lazutkin, will participate in joint experiments. The STS-84 mission also will involve the transfer of more than 7,300 pounds of water, logistics and science equipment to and from the Mir. Atlantis is carrying a nearly 300-pound oxygen generator to replace one of two Mir units which have experienced malfunctions. The oxygen it generates is used for breathing by the Mir crew.

  18. Age influences initial dose and compliance to imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia elderly patients but concomitant comorbidities appear to influence overall and event-free survival.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Luciano, Luigiana; Latagliata, Roberto; Castagnetti, Fausto; Ferrero, Dario; Cavazzini, Francesco; Trawinska, Malgorzata Monica; Annunziata, Mario; Stagno, Fabio; Tiribelli, Mario; Binotto, Gianni; Crisà, Elena; Musto, Pellegrino; Gozzini, Antonella; Cavalli, Laura; Montefusco, Enrico; Iurlo, Alessandra; Russo, Sabina; Cedrone, Michele; Rossi, Antonella Russo; Pregno, Patrizia; Endri, Mauro; Spadea, Antonio; Molica, Matteo; Giglio, Gianfranco; Celesti, Francesca; Sorà, Federica; Storti, Sergio; D'Addosio, Ada; Cambrin, Giovanna Rege; Isidori, Alessandro; Sica, Simona; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Speccha, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-10-01

    We applied Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) stratification on a large cohort of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) very elderly patients (>75 years) treated with imatinib, in order to observe the impact of concomitant diseases on both compliance and outcome. One hundred and eighty-one patients were recruited by 21 Italian centers. There were 95 males and 86 females, median age 78.6 years (range 75-93.6). According to Sokal score, 106 patients were classified as intermediate risk and 55 as high risk (not available in 20 patients). According to CCI stratification, 71 patients had score 0 and 110 a score ≥ 1. Imatinib standard dose was reduced at start of therapy (200-300 mg/day) in 68 patients independently from the evaluation of baseline comorbidities, but based only on physician judgement: 43.6% of these patients had score 0 compared to 34% of patients who had score ≥ 1. Significant differences were found in terms of subsequent dose reduction (39% of patients with score 0 compared to 53% of patients with score ≥ 1) and in terms of drug discontinuation due to toxicity (35% of patients with score 0 vs 65% of patients with score ≥ 1). We did not find significant differences as regards occurrence of hematologic side effects, probably as a consequence of the initial dose reduction: 39% of patients with score 0 experienced grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity (most commonly anemia) compared to 42% of patients with score ≥ 1. Independently from the initial dose, comorbidities again did not have an impact on development of grade 3/4 non-hematologic side effects (most commonly skin rash, muscle cramps and fluid retention): 62% of patients with score 0 compared to 52.5% of patients with score ≥ 1. Notwithstanding the reduced dose and the weight of comorbidities we did not find significant differences but only a trend in terms of efficacy: 66% of patients with score 0 achieved a CCyR compared to 54% of patients with score ≥ 1. Comorbidities appeared to have an impact on

  19. How much soil do young children ingest: an epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, E J; Barnes, R; Stanek, E J; Pastides, H; Gilbert, C E; Veneman, P; Wang, X R; Lasztity, A; Kostecki, P T

    1989-10-01

    Sixty-four children aged 1-4 years were evaluated for the extent to which they ingest soil. The study followed the soil tracer methodology of S. Binder, D. Sokal, and D. Maughan (1986, Arch. Environ. Health, 41, 341-345). However, the present study included a number of modifications from the Binder et al. study. The principal new features were (1) increasing the tracer elements from three to eight; (2) using a mass-balance approach so that the contribution of food and medicine ingestion would be considered; (3) extending the period of observation from 3 days to 8 days; and (4) validating the methodology by having adult volunteers ingest known amounts of soil in a mass-balance validation study. The principal findings reveal the following. (1) The adult study confirmed the validity of the tracer methodology to estimate soil ingestion. (2) Of the eight tracers employed in the adult study, only Al, Si, and Y provided sufficient recovery data that was directly acceptably stable and reliable. (3) If food ingestion determinations were taken into consideration, the median estimates of soil ingestion from the eight tracers ranged from a low of 9 mg/day (Y) to a high of 96 mg/day (V); the median values of Al, Si, and Y, the three most reliable tracers, ranged from 9 mg/day to 40 mg/day. (4) One child had soil ingestion values ranging from 5 to 8 g/day, depending on the tracer. (5) If food ingestion had not been considered, the estimates of soil ingestion would have increased about two- to sixfold, depending on the tracer with Ti and Y being most affected by food intake. (6) Since soil and dust samples did not significantly differ in their levels of tracer elements, no reliable differentiation between the contribution of ingestion of dust and soil could be made. (7) These findings are generally consistent with the previously reported findings of Binder et al. (1986) and P. Clausing, B. Brunekreff, and J.H. van Wijnen (1987, Int. Arch. Occup. Med., 59, 73) if these latter

  20. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, A. V.; Khodanovich, M. Y.; Yarnykh, V. L.

    2016-02-01

    The Second International Conference and Young Scientist School ''Magnetic resonance imaging in biomedical research'' was held on the campus of the National Research Tomsk State University (Tomsk, Russia) on September 7-9, 2015. The conference was focused on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications for biomedical research. The main goal was to bring together basic scientists, clinical researchers and developers of new MRI techniques to bridge the gap between clinical/research needs and advanced technological solutions. The conference fostered research and development in basic and clinical MR science and its application to health care. It also had an educational purpose to promote understanding of cutting-edge MR developments. The conference provided an opportunity for researchers and clinicians to present their recent theoretical developments, practical applications, and to discuss unsolved problems. The program of the conference was divided into three main topics. First day of the conference was devoted to educational lectures on the fundamentals of MRI physics and image acquisition/reconstruction techniques, including recent developments in quantitative MRI. The second day was focused on developments and applications of new contrast agents. Multinuclear and spectroscopic acquisitions as well as functional MRI were presented during the third day of the conference. We would like to highlight the main developments presented at the conference and introduce the prominent speakers. The keynote speaker of the conference Dr. Vasily Yarnykh (University of Washington, Seattle, USA) presented a recently developed MRI method, macromolecular proton fraction (MPF) mapping, as a unique tool for modifying image contrast and a unique tool for quantification of the myelin content in neural tissues. Professor Yury Pirogov (Lomonosov Moscow State University) described development of new fluorocarbon compounds and applications for biomedicine. Drs. Julia Velikina and Alexey

  1. Non-Invasive Assessment of Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias During Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Alterations Team is currently conducting studies to determine what alterations in hemodynamic regulation result from sixteen days of simulated microgravity exposure in normal human subjects. In this project we make additional measurements on these same study subjects in order to determine whether there is an increase in susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias resulting from simulated microgravity exposure. Numerous anecdotal and documented reports from the past 30 years suggest that the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias among astronauts is increased during space flight. For example, documented runs of ventricular tachycardia have been recorded from crew members of Skylab and Mir, there was much attention given by the lay press to Mir Commander Vasily Tslbliyev's complaints of heart rhythm irregularities in July of 1997, and cardiovascular mechanisms may have been causal in the recent death of an experimental primate shortly after return from space. In 1986, a Mir cosmonaut, Alexander Laveikin, was brought home and replaced with an alternate cosmonaut as a result of cardiac dysrhythmias that began during extravehicular activity. Furthermore, at a joint NASA/NSBRI workshop held in January 1998, cardiac arrhythmias were identified as the highest priority cardiovascular risk to a human Mars mission. Despite the evidence for the risk of a potentially lethal arrhythmia resulting from microgravity exposure, the effects of space flight and the associated physiologic stresses on cardiac conduction processes are not known, and an increase in cardiac susceptibility to arrhythmias has never been quantified. In this project, we are determining whether simulated space flight increases the risk of developing life-threatening heart rhythm disturbances such as sustained ventricular tachycardia (defined as ventricular tachycardia lasting at least 30 seconds or resulting in hemodynamic collapse) and ventricular fibrillation. We are obtaining measures of

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Smith, David R.

    2008-11-01

    coordinate transformations. If the coordinates they conjure up run backwards one gets negative refraction, if they exclude some region of space one makes anything inside invisible [4]. In physics, general relativity has honed the theoretical tools for understanding curved space and curved-coordinate transformations. In transformation optics, general relativity has become a theoretical tool for solving practical engineering problems [4]. What an unorthodox connection! This focus issue represents a snapshot of this rapidly developing research area. It is not restricted to optics or electromagnetism, though. Metamaterials for acoustics also exist and can be applied in ways similar to optical metamaterials. So transformation optics not only attracts an unusual mix of scientists, but also spans a range of applications in optics and beyond. Transformation optics has the potential to transform optics, for example by visualizing invisibility and making materials beyond materials—metamaterials. But before we transgress the boundaries to the hermeneutics of transformation optics [5], let the papers speak for themselves. References [1] Yao J, Liu Z, Liu Y, Wang Y, Sun C, Bartal G, Stacy A M and Zhang X 2008 Science 321 930 [2] Valentine J, Zhang S, Zentgraf T, Ulin-Avila E, Genov D A, Bartal G and Zhang X 2008 Nature 455 376 [3] Schurig D, Mock J J, Justice B J, Cummer S A, Pendry J B, Starr A F and Smith D R 2006 Science 314 977 [4] Leonhardt U and Philbin T G 2006 New J. Phys. 8 247 [5] Sokal A D 1996 Social Text 14(46/47) 217 Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics Contents Transformation optics for the full dielectric electromagnetic cloak and metal-dielectric planar hyperlens D P Gaillot, C Croënne, F Zhang and D Lippens Transmutation of singularities in optical instruments Tomáš Tyc and Ulf Leonhardt Electromagnetic cloaking with canonical spiral inclusions K Guven, E Saenz, R Gonzalo, E Ozbay and S Tretyakov Theory and potentials of multi-layered plasmonic covers for

  3. Renormalization group calculation of the universal critical exponents of a polymer molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belohorec, Peter

    , obtained as a fit to both the MC and exact data, allowed us to generate recursively all values of Rsbsp{N}{2}(w) and Asb2,sb{N}(w) for chains of length N = 2× 2sp{n} or N = 3× 2sp{n} and for any value of DJ parameter w using the inverse of the effective exponent transformation. This was used to evaluate the leading non-universal scaling amplitudes asb{R}(w),\\ asb{A}(w) and the non-universal correction to scaling amplitudes bsb{R}(w),\\ bsb{A}(w) as well as to compare our results to those of others. In the self-avoiding walk limit (w = 1) our generated data for Rsbsp{N}{2}(1) and Asb{2,N}(1) very well agree with the MC data of Li et al. (Li B., Madras N., and Sokal A. D. (1995). J. Stat. Phys. 80, 661). Also in the two-parameter model limit (w-> 0 and N->infty with z~ wNsp{1/2} = const.) our result for the expansion factor alphasbsp{R}{2}(z) agrees very well with the previous high precision estimate of des Cloizeaux et al. (des Cloizeaux J., Conte R. and Jannik G. (1985). Journal de Physique Lettres 46, L-595) in the range z≤ 1. The two-parameter result for the linear expansion factor alphasbsp{A}{3}(z) is new.

  4. Deep Ocean Tsunami Waves off the Sri Lankan Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    fully understand the dynamics. Examination of other MISR images of this area, taken under similar illumination conditions, has not uncovered any surface patterns resembling those seen here. This image is an example of how MISR's multi-angular capability provides unique information for understanding how tsunamis propagate. Another application of MISR data enabled scientists to measure the motion of breaking tsunami waves along the eastern shores of Andhra Pradesh, India. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees North and 82 degrees South latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 26720 and utilize data from within blocks 85 to 86 within World Reference System-2 path 142. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team. Text by Clare Averill (Raytheon ITSS/JPL); Michael Garay and David J. Diner (JPL, California Institute of Technology); and Vasily Titov (NOAA/Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory and University of Washington/Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Oceans).

  5. New method to determine initial surface water displacement at tsunami source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, Mikhail; Romanenko, Alexey; Tatarintsev, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    earthquake. However, today it is not yet possible. Ground-based sea radars. This is an effective tool for direct measurement of tsunami wave. At the same time, the wave is measured at a rather narrow area in front of the radar and does not include information about neighboring parts of the wave. Direct measurement of tsunami wave at deep water [2]. Today, this technology is certainly among the most useful and promising. The DART II® system consists of a seafloor bottom pressure recording (BPR) system, capable of detecting tsunamis as small as 1 cm, and a moored surface buoy for real-time communications. We focus our research on improving the later method, direct measurement of tsunami wave at deep water. We suggest the new way to analyze DART data, modifying the methodology originally proposed by V. Titov. Smaller system of unit sources [3] should be considered to approximate all typical shapes of initial disturbance by several suitable basis functions. To successfully implement it, performance of data analysis should be dramatically improved. This could be done by using a signal orthogonalization procedure for considered system of unit sources and calculation of Fourier coefficients of the measured time series with respect to orthogonal basis. The approach suggested was used as a part of computerized workstation for tsunami hazard monitoring [5-6]. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. URL: http://nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/honshu20110311/ National Data Buoy Center. URL: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/dart.shtml National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. URL: http://sift.pmel.noaa.gov/thredds/dodsC/uncompressed/ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. URL: http://nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/model.html Alexey Romanenko, Mikhail Lavrentiev-jr, Vasily Titov, "Modern Architecture for Tsunami Hazard Mitigation" // Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS-2012), ISBN 978-981-07-2049-0 Mikhail

  6. Electrochemical oxygen pumps. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J. D. Noble, J.

    2009-10-01

    All tasks of the Work Plan of ISTC Project 2277p have been completed, thus: (1) techniques of chemical synthesis were developed for more than ten recipes of electrolyte based on cerium oxide doped with 20 mole% of gadolinium (CeGd)O{sub 2}, doped by more than 10 oxide systems including 6 recipes in addition to the Work Plan; (2) electric conductivity and mechanical strength of CeGd specimens with additions of oxide systems were performed, two candidate materials for the electrolyte of electrochemical oxygen pump (pure CeGd and CeGd doped by 0.2 wt% of a transition metal) were chosen; (3) extended studies of mechanical strength of candidate material specimens were performed at room temperature and at 400, 600, 800 C; (4) fixtures for determination of mechanical strength of tubes by external pressure above 40 atmospheres at temperature up to 700 C were developed and fabricated; and (5) technology of slip casting of tubes from pure (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} and of (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} doped by 0.2 wt% of a transition metal, withstanding external pressure of minimum 40 atmospheres at temperature up to 700 C was developed, a batch of tubes was sent for testing to Argonne National Laboratory; (6) technology of making nanopowder from pure (Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} was developed based on chemical synthesis and laser ablation techniques, a batch of nanopowder with the weight 1 kg was sent for testing to Argonne National Laboratory; (7) a business plan for establishing a company for making powders of materials for electrochemical oxygen pump was developed; and (8) major results obtained within the Project were reported at international conferences and published in the Russian journal Electrochemistry. In accordance with the Work Plan a business trip of the following project participants was scheduled for April 22-29, 2006, to Tonawanda, NY, USA: Manager Victor Borisov; Leader of technology development Gennady Studenikin; Leader of business planning Elena Zadorozhnaya; Leader of production Vasily

  7. Interglacial-glacial cycles recorded in the deposit sequence at Kruzhyky on the Dniester River (East Carpathian Foreland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łanczont, Maria; Boguckyj, Aandrij; Mroczek, Przemysław; Zieliński, Paweł; Jacyszyn, Andrij; Pidek, Agnieszka I.; Urban, Danuta; Kulesza, Piotr; Hołub, Beata

    2010-01-01

    of sands with horizontal stratification and silts with horizontal or flaser lamination; single small-scale lithofacies of sands with trough cross-stratification occur in places; single gravel grains are numerous. Two deformation horizons are found: the higher one is characterized by the occurrence of folds and flexure deflections, and the lower one-involution structures and casts of ice wedges/fissures. This complex is probably the result of deposition on the distal part of flat, periodically inundated fluvioglacial fan connected with advancing ice sheet. 4. Ablation complex-sandy or sandy-silty diamicton occurring as isolated inserts, lenses or tongues. Its lower boundary is sharp, erosional and uneven (concave). This complex represents flows of supraglacial tills, which strongly deformed the deposits of the underlying complex 3. 5. Aeolian complex-silty (loess) and sandy-silty (Table 1) deposits with distinct traces of intensive, postsedimentary alterations of pedogenesis of different ages (Tables 1 and 2). It is composed of two soil units separated by thin, primary loess layer: a) older, well-developed paleosol with several pedofeatures very typical of the Sokal (Mazovian) soil; b) younger unit developed as pedocomplex consisting of two mature soils, the upper of which ("modern" neosol) is formed in the top of relict and exhumed paleosol. The described paleosols should be recognized as at least two soils of different ages and of interglacial rank, developed in periglacial loess-like deposits. The Kruzhyky profile is unique in the Dniester River valley. On account of its situation, it supplements the former information about the terrace 5 structure, which has been determined in detail in the Halyč site. And what is most important, it is the only site on the terrace 5 where glacial deposits were found. Lithofacial analysis carried out in the profile enables us to reconstruct the following events reflecting interglacial-glacial cycles: 1. The lowest, gravelly

  8. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Ulf; Smith, David R.

    2008-11-01

    coordinate transformations. If the coordinates they conjure up run backwards one gets negative refraction, if they exclude some region of space one makes anything inside invisible [4]. In physics, general relativity has honed the theoretical tools for understanding curved space and curved-coordinate transformations. In transformation optics, general relativity has become a theoretical tool for solving practical engineering problems [4]. What an unorthodox connection! This focus issue represents a snapshot of this rapidly developing research area. It is not restricted to optics or electromagnetism, though. Metamaterials for acoustics also exist and can be applied in ways similar to optical metamaterials. So transformation optics not only attracts an unusual mix of scientists, but also spans a range of applications in optics and beyond. Transformation optics has the potential to transform optics, for example by visualizing invisibility and making materials beyond materials—metamaterials. But before we transgress the boundaries to the hermeneutics of transformation optics [5], let the papers speak for themselves. References [1] Yao J, Liu Z, Liu Y, Wang Y, Sun C, Bartal G, Stacy A M and Zhang X 2008 Science 321 930 [2] Valentine J, Zhang S, Zentgraf T, Ulin-Avila E, Genov D A, Bartal G and Zhang X 2008 Nature 455 376 [3] Schurig D, Mock J J, Justice B J, Cummer S A, Pendry J B, Starr A F and Smith D R 2006 Science 314 977 [4] Leonhardt U and Philbin T G 2006 New J. Phys. 8 247 [5] Sokal A D 1996 Social Text 14(46/47) 217 Focus on Cloaking and Transformation Optics Contents Transformation optics for the full dielectric electromagnetic cloak and metal-dielectric planar hyperlens D P Gaillot, C Croënne, F Zhang and D Lippens Transmutation of singularities in optical instruments Tomáš Tyc and Ulf Leonhardt Electromagnetic cloaking with canonical spiral inclusions K Guven, E Saenz, R Gonzalo, E Ozbay and S Tretyakov Theory and potentials of multi-layered plasmonic covers for

  9. New method to determine initial surface water displacement at tsunami source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, Mikhail; Romanenko, Alexey; Tatarintsev, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    earthquake. However, today it is not yet possible. Ground-based sea radars. This is an effective tool for direct measurement of tsunami wave. At the same time, the wave is measured at a rather narrow area in front of the radar and does not include information about neighboring parts of the wave. Direct measurement of tsunami wave at deep water [2]. Today, this technology is certainly among the most useful and promising. The DART II® system consists of a seafloor bottom pressure recording (BPR) system, capable of detecting tsunamis as small as 1 cm, and a moored surface buoy for real-time communications. We focus our research on improving the later method, direct measurement of tsunami wave at deep water. We suggest the new way to analyze DART data, modifying the methodology originally proposed by V. Titov. Smaller system of unit sources [3] should be considered to approximate all typical shapes of initial disturbance by several suitable basis functions. To successfully implement it, performance of data analysis should be dramatically improved. This could be done by using a signal orthogonalization procedure for considered system of unit sources and calculation of Fourier coefficients of the measured time series with respect to orthogonal basis. The approach suggested was used as a part of computerized workstation for tsunami hazard monitoring [5-6]. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. URL: http://nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/honshu20110311/ National Data Buoy Center. URL: http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/dart.shtml National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. URL: http://sift.pmel.noaa.gov/thredds/dodsC/uncompressed/ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. URL: http://nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/model.html Alexey Romanenko, Mikhail Lavrentiev-jr, Vasily Titov, "Modern Architecture for Tsunami Hazard Mitigation" // Asia Oceania Geosciences Society (AOGS-2012), ISBN 978-981-07-2049-0 Mikhail

  10. PREFACE: Rusnanotech 2010 International Forum on Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazaryan, Konstantin

    2011-03-01

    Deputy Director, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Vladimir Kvardakov, Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of SciencesExecutive Director, Kurchatov Center of Synchrotron Radiation and Nanotechnology, RussiaProf Edward Son, Corresponding member of Russian Academy of SciencesScientific Deputy Director, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, RussiaProf Andrey GudkovSenior Vice President, Basic Science Chairman, Department of Cell Stress Biology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, USAProf Robert NemanichChair, Department of Physics, Arizona State University, USAProf Kandlikar SatishProfessor, Rochester Institute of Technology, USAProf Xiang ZhangUC Berkeley, Director of NSF Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC), USAProf Andrei ZvyaginProfessor, Macquarie University, AustraliaProf Sergey KalyuzhnyDirector of the Scientific and Technological Expertise Department, RUSNANO, RussiaKonstantin Kazaryan, PhDExpert of the Scientific and Technological Expertise Department, RUSNANO, Russia, Program Committee SecretarySimeon ZhavoronkovHead of Nanotechnology Programs Development Office, Rusnanotech Forum Fund for the Nanotechnology Development, Russia Editors of the proceedings: Section "Nanoelectronics" - Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Anatoly Dvurechenskii (Institute of Semiconductor Physics, RAS).Section "Nanophotonics" - Professor Vasily Klimov (Institute of Physics, RAS).Section "Nanodiagnostics" - Professor P Kashkarov (Russian Scientific Center, Kurchatov Institute).Section "Nanotechnology for power engineering" - Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Eduard Son (Joint Institute for High Temperatures, RAS).Section "Catalysis and chemical industry" - Member of Russian Academy of Sciences, Professor Valentin Parmon (Institute of Catalysis SB RAS).Section "Nanomaterials" - E Obraztsova, PhD (Institute of Physics, RAS), Marat Gallamov Ph

  11. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Diego Mansi Università Degli Studi di Milano Matteo Marescotti Università del Piemonte Orientale, Alessandria Alberto Mariotti Università di Milano-Bicocca Raffaele Marotta Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Napoli Alessio Marrani Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and LNF, Firenze Luca Martucci Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven David Mateos University of California, Santa Barbara Andrea Mauri Università di Milano Liuba Mazzanti Università di Milano-Bicocca Patrick Meessen Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Lotta Mether Helsinki Institute of Physics Rene Meyer Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Giuseppe Milanesi SISSA, Trieste Cesar Miquel-Espanya Universitat de Valencia and Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Valencia Alexander Monin Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow and Moscow State University (MSU) Samuel Monnier Université de Genève Sergio Montero Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Nicola Mori Università di Firenze Alexander Marcel Morisse University of California, Santa Cruz Sebastian Moster Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Adele Nasti Queen Mary, University of London Vasilis Niarchos École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Emil Nissimov Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia Francesco Nitti École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Eoin O'Colgain Imperial College, London Niels Obers Niels Bohr Institute, København Rodrigo Olea Università Degli Studi di Milano Marta Orselli Niels Bohr Institute, København Enrico PajerLudwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Eran PaltiOxford University Georgios PapathanasiouBrown University, Providence, RI Angel ParedesCentre de Physique Théorique, École Polytechnique, Palaiseau Jeong-Hyuck ParkMax-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Sara PasquettiUniversità di Parma Silvia PenatiUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Igor PesandoUniversità di Torino