Science.gov

Sample records for solar atmosphere implications

  1. Study of magnetic notions in the solar photosphere and their implications for heating the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Robert W.

    1995-01-01

    This progress report covers the first year of NASA Grant NAGw-2545, a study of magnetic structure in the solar photosphere and chromosphere. We have made significant progress in three areas: (1) analysis of vorticity in photospheric convection, which probably affects solar atmospheric heating through the stresses it imposes on photospheric magnetic fields; (2) modelling of the horizontal motions of magnetic footpoints in the solar photosphere using an assumed relation between brightness and vertical motion as well as continuity of flow; and (3) observations and analysis of infrared CO lines formed near the solar temperature minimum, whose structure and dynamics also yield important clues to the nature of heating of the upper atmosphere. Each of these areas are summarized in this report, with copies of those papers prepared or published this year included.

  2. The sensitivity of Titan's current atmosphere to variations in solar EUV flux and implications for the evolution of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, K.; Bell, J. M.; Waite, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    K. E. Mandt, J. Bell, J. H. Waite, Jr. Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX Stable isotope ratios are an important tool for tracing the evolution of an atmosphere. By carefully evaluating processes that fractionate the isotopes (e.g. escape and photochemistry), the inventory of a constituent can be tracked over geological time scales. For Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, the 14N/15N in N2 and the 12C/13C in CH4 can be used to constrain the initial size of the atmosphere and the amount of time that has passed since the current inventory of methane began outgassing into the atmosphere (see Lunine et al. [1999] and Mandt et al. [2009]). Because the processes that fractionate the isotopes are directly tied to the amount of solar EUV/UV energy deposited in the upper atmosphere, it is important to understand the sensitivity of the atmosphere to varying solar EUV flux. On short time scales, the EUV flux can vary by as much as a factor of two during the eleven-year solar cycle. On geologic time scales, the solar EUV flux is believed to have been about 2.5 times greater than the current flux about 2.5 billion years ago, and 6 times the current flux 3.5 billion years ago [Ribas et al. 2005]. Using a 1D version of the 3D Titan Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (T-GITM), we will explore the impact of the eleven-year solar cycle variations on Titan’s upper atmosphere, focusing on the key fractionating processes of photochemistry and escape. We will then discuss the implications of these results for modeling the evolution of the atmosphere over geological time scales. Lunine, J. I., Y. L. Yung and R. D. Lorenz, 1999. On the volatile inventory of Titan from isotopic abundances in nitrogen and methane. Planetary and Space Science, 47, 1291-1303. Mandt, K. E., J. H. Waite, Jr., B. A. Magee, J. Bell, J. Lunine, O. Mousis, D. Cordier, 2009, Isotopic evolution of Titan’s main atmospheric constituents, Planetary and Space Science, 57, 1917-1930. Ribas, I., E. F. Guinan

  3. Study of Magnetic Motions in the Solar Photosphere and their Implications for Heating the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    We continued our program of CO observations with the McMath-Pierce facility at Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory. Uitenbroek has developed a two-and three dimensional radiative transfer code that now includes chemical equilibrium calculations. This code allows us to compute a CO spectrum from for instance a snapshot of a solar granulation simulation (e.g. Stein & Nordlund 1989, Apj 342, L95) and compare these theoretical spectra with our spatially resolved CO spectroscopy. Van Ballegooijen and Uitenbroek have started calculations of two-dimensional fluxtube models that account consistently for hydrogen ionization in the calculation of the electron density. To this end we solve radiative transfer for hydrogen (bound-bound and bound-free transitions) in the two-dimensional models, including the effect of partial frequency redistribution (PRD) in the Lyman (alpha) and (beta) lines. From our internally consistent models we will calculate emergent spectra and the way these vary with location of some well-known spectral diagnostics and compare our results with observed line profiles. We can readily compare theoretical CO profiles from out models with our spatially resolved CO observations. Also we can compare with spatially resolved Ca II (ground based) and Mg II (we have observations done with the UVSP/SMM instrument), and Lyman (alpha) observations that should be available from SUMER/SOHO.

  4. Implications of solar irradiance variability upon long-term changes in the Earth's atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1992-01-01

    From 1979 through 1987, it is believed that variability in the incoming solar energy played a significant role in changing the Earth's climate. Using high-precision spacecraft radiometric measurements, the incoming total solar irradiance (total amount of solar power per unit area) and the Earth's mean, global atmospheric temperatures were found to vary in phase with each other. The observed irradiance and temperature changes appeared to be correlated with the 11-year cycle of solar magnetic activity. During the period from 1979 through 1985, both the irradiance and temperature decreased. From 1985 to 1987, they increased. The irradiance changed approximately 0.1 percent, while the temperature varied as much as 0.6 C. During the 1979-1987 period, the temperatures were forecasted to rise linearly because of the anthropogenic build-up of carbon dioxide and the hypothesized 'global warming', 'greenhouse effect', scenarios. Contrary to these scenarios, the temperatures were found to vary in a periodic manner in phase with the solar irradiance changes. The observed correlations between irradiance and temperature variabilily suggest that the mean, global temperature of the Earth may decline between 1990 and 1997 as solar magnetic activity decreases.

  5. Geology and photometric variation of solar system bodies with minor atmospheres: implications for solid exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yuka; Kimura, Jun; Dohm, James; Ohtake, Makiko

    2014-09-01

    A reasonable basis for future astronomical investigations of exoplanets lies in our best knowledge of the planets and satellites in the Solar System. Solar System bodies exhibit a wide variety of surface environments, even including potential habitable conditions beyond Earth, and it is essential to know how they can be characterized from outside the Solar System. In this study, we provide an overview of geological features of major Solar System solid bodies with minor atmospheres (i.e., the terrestrial Moon, Mercury, the Galilean moons, and Mars) that affect surface albedo at local to global scale, and we survey how they influence point-source photometry in the UV/visible/near IR (i.e., the reflection-dominant range). We simulate them based on recent mapping products and also compile observed light curves where available. We show a 5-50% peak-to-trough variation amplitude in one spin rotation associated with various geological processes including heterogeneous surface compositions due to igneous activities, interaction with surrounding energetic particles, and distribution of grained materials. Some indications of these processes are provided by the amplitude and wavelength dependence of variation in combinations of the time-averaged spectra. We also estimate the photometric precision needed to detect their spin rotation rates through periodogram analysis. Our survey illustrates realistic possibilities for inferring the detailed properties of solid exoplanets with future direct imaging observations. Key Words: Planetary environments-Planetary geology-Solar System-Extrasolar terrestrial planets. PMID:25238324

  6. Geology and Photometric Variation of Solar System Bodies with Minor Atmospheres: Implications for Solid Exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Jun; Dohm, James; Ohtake, Makiko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A reasonable basis for future astronomical investigations of exoplanets lies in our best knowledge of the planets and satellites in the Solar System. Solar System bodies exhibit a wide variety of surface environments, even including potential habitable conditions beyond Earth, and it is essential to know how they can be characterized from outside the Solar System. In this study, we provide an overview of geological features of major Solar System solid bodies with minor atmospheres (i.e., the terrestrial Moon, Mercury, the Galilean moons, and Mars) that affect surface albedo at local to global scale, and we survey how they influence point-source photometry in the UV/visible/near IR (i.e., the reflection-dominant range). We simulate them based on recent mapping products and also compile observed light curves where available. We show a 5–50% peak-to-trough variation amplitude in one spin rotation associated with various geological processes including heterogeneous surface compositions due to igneous activities, interaction with surrounding energetic particles, and distribution of grained materials. Some indications of these processes are provided by the amplitude and wavelength dependence of variation in combinations of the time-averaged spectra. We also estimate the photometric precision needed to detect their spin rotation rates through periodogram analysis. Our survey illustrates realistic possibilities for inferring the detailed properties of solid exoplanets with future direct imaging observations. Key Words: Planetary environments—Planetary geology—Solar System—Extrasolar terrestrial planets. Astrobiology 14, 753–768. PMID:25238324

  7. Solar ultraviolet transfer in the Martian atmosphere: biological and geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Córdoba-Jabonero, C.; Lara, L. M.; Mancho, A. M.; Márquez, A.; Rodrigo, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Martian environment has an exceedingly strong component of damaging solar far-ultraviolet radiation, including most of the UV-C range (190- 280 nm) because of the lack of an effective ozone shield. Two-stream radiative transfer modelling, including particulate aerosol content and surface albedo, indicates that the present abundance of SO 2 does not provide any surface protection of the UV radiation. However, larger abundances of sulfur dioxide (mixing ratio, q, comprised between 10 -5 and 10 -4) introduced in the present 6 mbar Martian atmosphere can partially protect the surface from the harmful solar UV radiation. Furthermore, Mie backscattering by dust and/or aerosols noticeably reduces the harmful solar UV radiation. Regardless of the ozone concentration, the required dust content for almost blocking this damaging radiation is such that the optical depth at 550 nm is τ=0.8-1.5 (for a given solar zenithal angle (SZA) of 38°), typical of a turbid atmosphere, and τ⩾1.6 more characteristic of dust storms. The required mass of SO 2 (i.e. 10 14- 10 15 gr) and/or ashes could have been easily provided by volcanic activity on Mars several times along the entire geologic history of the planet. In terms of DNA protection, volcanic ashes and SO 2 considerably reduced levels of UV radiation lead to a biological dose comparable to the existing on the present Earth, together with the possibility of a non-deterioration of the environment due to UV photo-oxidation. Therefore, preserving life forms on Mars surface at any past epoch cannot be completely ruled out.

  8. Generation of Electron Suprathermal Tails in the Upper Solar Atmosphere: Implications for Coronal Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Wong, Hung K.; Klimas, Alexander J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a mechanism for the generation of non-Maxwellian electron distribution function in the upper regions of the solar atmosphere in the presence of collisional damping. It is suggested that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating electromagnetic waves can carry a substantial electric field component parallel to the mean magnetic field that can be significantly larger than the Dreicer electric field. This long wavelength electric fluctuation is capable of generating high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves. The analysis has been performed using 1-1/2D Vlasov and PIC numerical simulations in which both electrons and ions are treated kinetically and self consistently. The simulation results indicate that high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves are generated. The high frequency electron plasma oscillation drives electron plasma turbulence, which subsequently is damped out by the background electrons. The turbulence damping results in electron acceleration and the generation of non-Maxwellian suprathermal tails on time scales short compared to collisional damping. Bulk heating also occurs if the fluctuating parallel electric field is strong enough. This study suggests that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating, electromagnetic waves can play a significant role in the acceleration and heating of the solar corona electrons and in the coupling of medium and small-scale phenomena.

  9. Magnetic reconnection resulting from flux emergence: implications for jet formation in the lower solar atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, J. Y.; Madjarska, M. S.; Doyle, J. G.; Lu, Q. M.; Vanninathan, K.; Huang, Z.

    2011-11-01

    Aims: We aim at investigating the formation of jet-like features in the lower solar atmosphere, e.g. chromosphere and transition region, as a result of magnetic reconnection. Methods: Magnetic reconnection as occurring at chromospheric and transition regions densities and triggered by magnetic flux emergence is studied using a 2.5D MHD code. The initial atmosphere is static and isothermal, with a temperature of 2 × 104 K. The initial magnetic field is uniform and vertical. Two physical environments with different magnetic field strength (25 G and 50 G) are presented. In each case, two sub-cases are discussed, where the environments have different initial mass density. Results: In the case where we have a weaker magnetic field (25 G) and higher plasma density (Ne = 2 × 1011 cm-3), valid for the typical quiet Sun chromosphere, a plasma jet would be observed with a temperature of 2-3 × 104 K and a velocity as high as 40 kms-1. The opposite case of a medium with a lower electron density (Ne = 2 × 1010 cm-3), i.e. more typical for the transition region, and a stronger magnetic field of 50 G, up-flows with line-of-sight velocities as high as ~90 kms-1 and temperatures of 6 × 105 K, i.e. upper transition region - low coronal temperatures, are produced. Only in the latter case, the low corona Fe ix 171 Å shows a response in the jet which is comparable to the O v increase. Conclusions: The results show that magnetic reconnection can be an efficient mechanism to drive plasma outflows in the chromosphere and transition region. The model can reproduce characteristics, such as temperature and velocity for a range of jet features like a fibril, a spicule, a hot X-ray jet or a transition region jet by changing either the magnetic field strength or the electron density, i.e. where in the atmosphere the reconnection occurs.

  10. Solar Atmosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutten, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    This contribution honoring Kees de Jager's 80th birthday is a review of "one-dimensional" solar atmosphere modeling that followed on the initial "Utrecht Reference Photosphere" of Heintze, Hubenet & de Jager (1964). My starting point is the Bilderberg conference, convened by de Jager in 1967 at the time when NLTE radiative transfer theory became mature. The resulting Bilderberg model was quickly superseded by the HSRA and later by the VAL-FAL sequence of increasingly sophisticated NLTE continuum-fitting models from Harvard. They became the "standard models" of solar atmosphere physics, but Holweger's relatively simple LTE line-fitting model still persists as a favorite of solar abundance determiners. After a brief model inventory I discuss subsequent work on the major modeling issues (coherency, NLTE, dynamics) listed as to-do items by de Jager in 1968. The present conclusion is that one-dimensional modeling recovers Schwarzschild's (1906) finding that the lower solar atmosphere is grosso modo in radiative equilibrium. This is a boon for applications regarding the solar atmosphere as one-dimensional stellar example - but the real sun, including all the intricate phenomena that now constitute the mainstay of solar physics, is vastly more interesting.

  11. VELOCITY-SHEAR-INDUCED MODE COUPLING IN THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE AND SOLAR WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR PLASMA HEATING AND MHD TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh. E-mail: ekaghash@aer.com

    2013-06-01

    We analytically consider how velocity shear in the corona and solar wind can cause an initial Alfven wave to drive up other propagating signals. The process is similar to the familiar coupling into other modes induced by non-WKB refraction in an inhomogeneous plasma, except here the refraction is a consequence of velocity shear. We limit our discussion to a low-beta plasma, and ignore couplings into signals resembling the slow mode. If the initial Alfven wave is propagating nearly parallel to the background magnetic field, then the induced signals are mainly a forward-going (i.e., propagating in the same sense as the original Alfven wave) fast mode, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; both signals are compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. For an initial Alfven wave propagating obliquely with respect to the magnetic field, the induced signals are mainly forward- and backward-going fast modes, and a driven signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave but polarized like the fast mode; these signals are all compressive and subject to damping by the Landau resonance. A backward-going Alfven wave, thought to be important in the development of MHD turbulence, is also produced, but it is very weak. However, we suggest that for oblique propagation of the initial Alfven wave the induced fast-polarized signal propagating like a forward-going Alfven wave may interact coherently with the initial Alfven wave and distort it at a strong-turbulence-like rate.

  12. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  13. Response of Earth's atmosphere to increases in solar flux and implications for loss of water from Venus.

    PubMed

    Kasting, J F; Pollack, J B; Ackerman, T P

    1984-01-01

    A one-dimensional radiative-convective model is used to compute temperature and water vapor profiles as functions of solar flux for an Earth-like atmosphere. The troposphere is assumed to be fully saturated, with a moist adiabatic lapse rate, and changes in cloudiness are neglected. Predicted surface temperatures increase monotonically from -1 to 111 degrees C as the solar flux is increased from 0.81 to 1.45 times its present value. Surface temperatures corresponding to high solar fluxes may be underestimated, however, owing to neglect of H2O continuum absorption outside of the 8- to 12-micrometers window region. These results imply that the surface temperature of a primitive water-rich Venus should have been at least 80-100 degrees C and may have been much higher. The existence of liquid water at the surface depends on poorly known aspects of H2O continuum absorption and on uncertainties concerning relative humidity and cloudiness. In any case, water vapor should have been a major atmospheric constituent at all altitudes, leading to the rapid hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen. The oxygen left behind by this process was presumably consumed by reactions with reduced minerals in the crust. Both the loss of oxygen and the presently observed enrichment of the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio are most easily explained if oceans of liquid water were initially present. PMID:11541985

  14. Atmospheric changes from solar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Aplin, K L; Scott, C J; Gray, S L

    2016-09-28

    This article reviews atmospheric changes associated with 44 solar eclipses, beginning with the first quantitative results available, from 1834 (earlier qualitative accounts also exist). Eclipse meteorology attracted relatively few publications until the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980, with the 11 August 1999 eclipse producing the most papers. Eclipses passing over populated areas such as Europe, China and India now regularly attract scientific attention, whereas atmospheric measurements of eclipses at remote locations remain rare. Many measurements and models have been used to exploit the uniquely predictable solar forcing provided by an eclipse. In this paper, we compile the available publications and review a subset of them chosen on the basis of importance and novelty. Beyond the obvious reduction in incoming solar radiation, atmospheric cooling from eclipses can induce dynamical changes. Observations and meteorological modelling provide evidence for the generation of a local eclipse circulation that may be the origin of the 'eclipse wind'. Gravity waves set up by the eclipse can, in principle, be detected as atmospheric pressure fluctuations, though theoretical predictions are limited, and many of the data are inconclusive. Eclipse events providing important early insights into the ionization of the upper atmosphere are also briefly reviewed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550760

  15. Mars' upper atmosphere and ionosphere at low, medium, and high solar activities: Implications for evolution of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2002-12-01

    Self-consistent models for 11 neutral and 18 ion species from 80 to 300 km on Mars have been developed by solving the continuity equations including ambipolar diffusion for ions. The models were calculated for the conditions of the HST, FUSE, and Mariner 6 and 7 observations of D, H2, and H, respectively, when the solar activity index was equal to 25, 61, and 88 at Mars orbit, respectively. Special care was taken to simulate the processes of H2 and HD dissociation in the reactions with CO2+, O+, CO+, N2+, N+, Ar+, and O(1D) and by photoelectrons. Thermal and nonthermal escape velocities were used as the upper boundary conditions for H2, H, HD, D, and He. The H2 and HD mixing ratios of 15 ppm and 11 ppb chosen to fit the FUSE and HST observations of H2 and D, respectively, result in (HD/H2)/(HDO/H2O) = 0.4. This value agrees with the depletion of D in H2 because of the smaller HDO photolysis cross section and the preferential condensation of HDO above the condensation level. Therefore the controversial problem of deuterium fractionation is solved throughout the atmosphere. The influx of cometary water was ~0.5 m planetwide in the last 3.8 billion years. It cannot affect the estimates of more than 30 m of water lost by sputtering and nonthermal and thermal escape and more than 1.3 km of water lost in the reaction with iron with subsequent hydrodynamic escape of H2. The calculated ion density profiles at various solar activity and the column reaction rates provide complete quantitative information for behavior of each ion, its formation, and its loss. The HCO+ ion is abundant in Mars' ionosphere because it is a final product of many reactions of other ions with H2 and does not react with neutral species.

  16. Oscillations of solar atmosphere neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Fogli, G. L.; Lisi, E.; Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P. D.

    2006-11-01

    The Sun is a source of high-energy neutrinos (E(greater-or-similar sign)10 GeV) produced by cosmic ray interactions in the solar atmosphere. We study the impact of three-flavor oscillations (in vacuum and in matter) on solar atmosphere neutrinos, and calculate their observable fluxes at Earth, as well as their event rates in a kilometer-scale detector in water or ice. We find that peculiar three-flavor oscillation effects in matter, which can occur in the energy range probed by solar atmosphere neutrinos, are significantly suppressed by averaging over the production region and over the neutrino and antineutrino components. In particular, we find that the relation between the neutrino fluxes at the Sun and at the Earth can be approximately expressed in terms of phase-averaged vacuum oscillations, dominated by a single mixing parameter (the angle {theta}{sub 23})

  17. Nonlinear waves in the solar atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ruderman, Michael S

    2006-02-15

    In this paper, we give a brief review of the contemporary theory of nonlinear waves in the solar atmosphere. The choice of topics reflects personal interests of the author. Historically the theory of nonlinear waves was first applied to the solar atmosphere to explain the chromospheric and coronal heating. It was assumed that the turbulent motion in the solar convective zone excites sound waves that propagate upwards. Due to nonlinearity these waves steepen and form shocks. The wave energy dissipates in these shocks thus heating the corona. We give a brief description of propagation and damping of nonlinear sound waves in the stratified solar atmosphere, and point out that, at present, the acoustic heating remains the most popular theory of heating the lower chromosphere. Then we extend the analysis to nonlinear slow magnetosonic waves in coronal plumes and loops, and discuss its implications for interpretation of observational results. The next topic of interest is the propagation of nonlinear waves in a magnetically structured atmosphere. Here, we restrict our analysis to slow sausage waves in magnetic tubes and discuss properties of solitary waves described by the Leibovich-Roberts equation. We conclude with the discussion of nonlinear theory of slow resonant layers, and its possible application to helioseismology. PMID:16414893

  18. Meteoroids in solar corona and planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Herve; Mann, Ingrid; Lemaire, Emeritus Joseph

    We simulate the meteoroid entry into the solar corona with a model similar to the one-dimensional ablation model developed by Campbell-Brown and Koschny (2004) for the Earth's atmosphere and by McAuliffe and Christou (2005) for the case of the atmosphere of Venus. We present the results of mass deposition profiles for a wide range of masses for objects falling into the Sun. Several representative chemical compositions of these objects are also considered in-cluding refractory and volatile materials. Our main focus is in the bigger objects (mass ¿ 1 Kg) for which most of the mass is deposited in the lower layers of the solar corona. The interaction of sungrazing comets with the solar corona is studied with a two-dimensional generalization of the model. The cumulative profile of mass deposition is calculated and we look for the actual effects on the coronal heavy ions composition. In particular we discuss possible implications for the FIP (First Ionization Potential) effect and for the formation of pick-up ions that are measured in the solar wind. We consider the similarities and differences of the entry process in the Solar corona and in planetary atmospheres and we shortly address the survival probability of molecular species.

  19. Solar Absorption in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical computations used to compute spectral absorption of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud absorption problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.

  20. Cross-Scale Coupling in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2011-01-01

    For understanding and eventually predicting solar activity, the fundamental question that Solar-C must answer is: How does energy transfer from the large-scales at which it is injected into the solar atmosphere to the small scales at which it is dissipated? We show that this question of cross-scale coupling is fundamental to all activity, ranging from the smallest nanoflares that are postulated to power coronal heating and solar wind acceleration, to the largest coronal mass ejections and eruptive flares. For the solar atmosphere, the most important process that actually dissipates the energy is believed to be magnetic reconnection. We present results on recent calculations of reconnection in a variety of solar contexts and focus on the coupling between kinetic and MHD scales during reconnection. We discuss the implications of our results for present data and for future observations from Solar-C.

  1. Solar Atmosphere Simulation - AGU Dec. 9, 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows a numerical simulation of a small area of the solar atmosphere at ~10,000K. Numerical models bridge the gap between IRIS observations and the physical mechanisms driving solar even...

  2. The Solar Spectrum: An Atmospheric Remote Sensing Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The solar spectrum not only contains information about the composition and structure of the sun, it also provides a bright and stable continuum source for earth remote sensing (atmosphere and surface). Many types of remote sensors use solar radiation. While high-resolution spaceborne sensors (e.g. ACE) can largely remove the effects of the solar spectrum by exo-atmospheric calibration, this isn't an option for sub-orbital sensors, such as the FTIR spectrometers used in the NDACC and TCCON networks. In this case the solar contribution must be explicitly included in the spectral analysis. In this talk the methods used to derive the solar spectrum are presented, and the underlying solar physics are discussed. Implication for remote sensing are described.

  3. Statistical analysis of solar EUV and X-ray flux enhancements induced by solar flares and its implication to upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Huijun; Liu, Libo; He, Han; Wan, Weixing

    2011-11-01

    The 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux data and 26-34 nm EUV flux data are used to statistically analyze the relationship between enhancement in X-ray flux and that in EUV flux during solar flares in 1996-2006. The EUV enhancement does not linearly increase with X-ray flux from C-class to X-class flares. Its uprising amplitude decreases with X-ray flux. The correlation coefficients between enhancements in EUV and X-ray flux for X, M and C-class flares are only 0.66, 0.58 and 0.54, respectively, which suggests that X-ray flux is not a good index for EUV flux during solar flares. Thus, for studying more accurately solar flare effect on the ionosphere/thermosphere system, one needs to use directly EUV flux measurements. One of important reasons for depressing relationship between X-ray and EUV is that the central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location can significantly affect EUV flux variation particularly for X-class flares: the larger value of CMD results in the smaller EUV enhancement. However, there are much smaller CMD effects on EUV enhancement for M and C-class flares. The solar disc images from SOHO/EIT are utilized to estimate the percentage contribution to total EUV enhancement from the flare region and from other region. The results show the larger percentage contribution from other region for the weaker flares, which would reduce the loss of EUV radiation due to limb location of flare and then weaken the CMD effect for weaker flares like M and C-class.

  4. Nucleosynthesis in the terrestrial and solar atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.; Zhou, R.; Zhan, S.

    1985-01-01

    Variations of Delta D, delta C-13, Delta C-14 and Delta O-18 with time were measured by a lot of experiments. Many abnormalities of isotope abundances in cosmic rays were found by balloons and satellites. It is suggested that these abnormalities are related to nuclearsynthesis in the terrestrial and solar atmospheres and are closely related to solar activities.

  5. Solar-terrestrial relationships in atmospheric electricity

    SciTech Connect

    Roble, R.G.

    1985-06-30

    There are many suggested solar-terrestrial relationships in global atmospheric electricity. Of the various relationships, the downward mapping of ionospheric and magnetospheric electric fields, associated with the solar wind/magnetosphere and the ionosphere wind dynamos, is best understood theoretically and appears to be supported by the few available data. The solar cycle variations of ionospheric potential and air-earth current appear to be related to variations in galactic cosmic rays and perhaps to their effect on the current output from thunderstorms. The solar flare and solar magnetic sector boundary variations are not well understood but may be related to Forbush decreases in cosmic ray flux and/or effects resulting from energetic particle precipitation. The available data on auroral effects on atmospheric electricity are confusing and not understood at all. There is a clear need for further research to better define the physical mechanisms responsible for all of these solar-terrestrial relationships. The observed solar-terrestrial variations and the need for current closure in the global circuit suggest that the function of the equalization layer in the ''classical picture'' of atmospheric electricity should be revised to be consistent with our current knowledge of upper-atmospheric electrical processes.

  6. Sub-photosphere to Solar Atmosphere Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komm, Rudolf; De Moortel, Ineke; Fan, Yuhong; Ilonidis, Stathis; Steiner, Oskar

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fields extend from the solar interior through the atmosphere. The formation and evolution of active regions can be studied by measuring subsurface flows with local helioseismology. The emergence of magnetic flux from the solar convection zone is associated with acoustic perturbation signatures. In near-surface layers, the average dynamics can be determined for emerging regions. MHD simulations of the emergence of a twisted flux tube show how magnetic twist and free energy are transported from the interior into the corona and the dynamic signatures associated with such transport in the photospheric and sub-photospheric layers. The subsurface twisted flux tube does not emerge into the corona as a whole in emerging active regions. Shear flows at the polarity inversion line and coherent vortical motions in the subsurface flux tubes are the major means by which twist is transported into the corona, leading to the formation of sigmoid-shaped coronal magnetic fields capable of driving solar eruptions. The transport of twist can be followed from the interior by using the kinetic helicity of subsurface flows as a proxy of magnetic helicity; this quantity holds great promise for improving the understanding of eruptive phenomena. Waves are not only vital for studying the link between the solar interior and the surface but for linking the photosphere with the corona as well. Acoustic waves that propagate from the surface into the magnetically structured, dynamic atmosphere undergo mode conversion and refraction. These effects enable atmospheric seismology to determine the topography of magnetic canopies in the solar atmosphere. Inclined magnetic fields lower the cut-off frequency so that low frequency waves can leak into the outer atmosphere. Recent high resolution, high cadence observations of waves and oscillations in the solar atmosphere, have lead to a renewed interest in the potential role of waves as a heating mechanism. In light of their potential contribution

  7. Early Earth: Atmosphere's solar shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Ramses

    2016-06-01

    Frequent storms on the young Sun would have ejected energetic particles and compressed Earth's magnetosphere. Simulations suggest that the particles penetrated the atmosphere and initiated reactions that warmed the planet and fertilized life.

  8. Infrared continuum observations of the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H.; Levan, P.; Lindsey, C.

    1979-01-01

    The far-infrared wavelengths (10 microns to 1 mm) were used to study the spatial and temporal structure of the solar atmosphere. Observational results were obtained on flares, faculae, sunspots, and on the center-to-limb intensity distribution, as well as on time variability within these regions. A program of precise monitoring of slow variations in the integrated solar luminosity was shown to be feasible, and initial steps to implement observations were completed.

  9. Photochemical Models for Mars' Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere at Low, Medium, and High Solar Activity: Implications for H2, D, and Evolution of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, V. A.

    2002-05-01

    Self-consistent models for 11 neutral and 18 ion species from 80 to 300 km on Mars have been developed by solving the continuity equations including ambipolar diffusion for ions. The models were calculated for the conditions of the HST, FUSE, and Mariner 6, 7 observations of D, H2, and H, respectively, when solar activity index was 25, 61, and 88 on Mars orbit, respectively. Special care was taken to simulate the processes of H2 and HD dissociation in the reactions with CO2+, O+, CO+, N2+, N+, Ar+, O(1D), and by photoelectrons. Thermal and nonthermal escape velocities were used as the upper boundary conditions for H2, H, HD, D, and He. The calculated ion density profiles at various solar activity and the column reaction rates provide complete quantitative information for behavior of each ion, its formation and loss. The HCO+ ion is abundant in Mars' ionosphere because it is a final product of many reactions of other ions with H2 and does not react with neutral species. The H2 and D mixing ratios of 15 ppm and 11 ppb chosen to fit the FUSE and HST observations of H2 and D, respectively, result in (HD/H2)/(HDO/H2O) = 0.41. This value agrees with the depletion of D in H2 because of the smaller HDO photolysis cross section, the preferential condensation of HDO above the hygropause, and the fractionation in chemical reactions that result in the formation of H2. Therefore the controversial problem of deuterium fractionation is solved throughout the atmosphere. Isotope fractionation factor for hydrogen escape is equal to 0.055, 0.082, and 0.167 for low, medium, and high solar activity, respectively, and the solar cycle mean value is 0.105. The polar caps shrink or dissappear at high obliquity, and water in the polar caps is in isotopic equilibrium with the atmospheric water. Using the water amount of 14 m in the polar caps, the fractionation factor, the present D/H ratio and that at the end of hydrodynamic escape (5.5 and 1.9 times the terrestrial ratio, respectively

  10. Vortex Identification in the Lower Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedun, V.; Giagkiozis, I.; Verth, G.; Scullion, E.

    2015-12-01

    Vortices in the solar atmosphere present an ideal driving mechanism for Alfvenic waves that can efficiently carry energy in the upper layers of the chromosphere and corona. However, the identification and classification of vortical motions from observations and numerical simulations is a challenging task. In this work we leverage a number of methods conventionally employed in turbulence to identify for the fist time in the solar atmosphere vortices, in an automated fashion. We also present a statistical analysis of the properties of the identified motions and relate this with theoretical results for such magnetic structures.

  11. Solar-terrestrial coupling through atmospheric electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roble, R. G.; Hays, P. B.

    1979-01-01

    There are a number of measurements of electrical variations that suggest a solar-terrestrial influence on the global atmospheric electrical circuit. The measurements show variations associated with solar flares, solar magnetic sector boundary crossings, geomagnetic activity, aurorae, differences between ground current and potential gradients at high and low latitudes, and solar cycle variations. The evidence for each variation is examined. Both the experimental evidence and the calculations made with a global model of atmospheric electricity indicate that there is solar-terrestrial coupling through atmospheric electricity which operates by altering the global electric current and field distribution. A global redistribution of currents and fields can be caused by large-scale changes in electrical conductivity, by alteration of the columnar resistance between thunderstorm cloud tops and the ionosphere, or by both. If the columnar resistance is altered above thunderstorms, more current will flow in the global circuit, changing the ionospheric potential and basic circuit variables such as current density and electric fields. The observed variations of currents and fields during solar-induced disturbances are generally less than 50% of mean values near the earth's surface.

  12. Venus Atmospheric Exploration by Solar Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; LaMarre, C.; Colozza, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Venus atmosphere is a favorable environment for flying powered aircraft. The atmospheric pressure makes flight much easier than on planets such as Mars. Above the clouds, solar energy is available in abundance on Venus, and the slow rotation of Venus allows a solar airplane to be designed for flight within continuous sunlight. The atmosphere between 50 km and 75 km on Venus is one of the most dynamic and interesting regions of the planet. The challenge for a Venus aircraft will be the fierce winds and caustic atmosphere. In order to remain on the sunlit side of Venus, an exploration aircraft will have to be capable of sustained flight at or above the wind speed. An aircraft would be a powerful tool for exploration. By learning how Venus can be so similar to Earth, and yet so different, we will learn to better understand the climate and geological history of the Earth.

  13. MAVEN observations of solar wind hydrogen deposition in the atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Lillis, R. J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Cravens, T. E.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Jakosky, B. M.; Luhmann, J. G.; McFadden, J. P.; Larson, D. E.; Harada, Y.; Ruhunusiri, S.

    2015-11-01

    Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission (MAVEN) observes a tenuous but ubiquitous flux of protons with the same energy as the solar wind in the Martian atmosphere. During high flux intervals, we observe a corresponding negative hydrogen population. The correlation between penetrating and solar wind fluxes, the constant energy, and the lack of a corresponding charged population at intermediate altitudes implicate products of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from charge exchange between the upstream solar wind and the exosphere. These atoms, previously observed in neutral form, penetrate the magnetosphere unaffected by electromagnetic fields (retaining the solar wind velocity), and some fraction reconvert to charged form through collisions with the atmosphere. MAVEN characterizes the energy and angular distributions of both penetrating and backscattered particles, potentially providing information about the solar wind, the hydrogen corona, and collisional interactions in the atmosphere. The accretion of solar wind hydrogen may provide an important source term to the Martian atmosphere over the planet's history.

  14. Atmospheric Solar Heating in Minor Absorption Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy driving atmospheric and oceanic circulations. Concerned with the huge computing time required for computing radiative transfer in weather and climate models, solar heating in minor absorption bands has often been neglected. The individual contributions of these minor bands to the atmospheric heating is small, but collectively they are not negligible. The solar heating in minor bands includes the absorption due to water vapor in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectral region from 14284/cm to 25000/cm, the ozone absorption and Rayleigh scattering in the near infrared, as well as the O2 and CO2 absorption in a number of weak bands. Detailed high spectral- and angular-resolution calculations show that the total effect of these minor absorption is to enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approximately 10%. Depending upon the strength of the absorption and the overlapping among gaseous absorption, different approaches are applied to parameterize these minor absorption. The parameterizations are accurate and require little extra time for computing radiative fluxes. They have been efficiently implemented in the various atmospheric models at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, including cloud ensemble, mesoscale, and climate models.

  15. The Solar Atmosphere and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothmer, Volker

    First ideas about possible physical influences of the Sun on Earth other than by electromagnetic (EM) radiation were scientifically discussed more seriously after Richard Carrington's famous observation of a spectacular white-light flare in 1859 and the subsequent conclusion that this flash of EM radiation was connected with the origin of strong perturbations of the Earth's outer magnetic field, commonly referred to as geomagnetic storms, which were recorded about 24 hours after the solar flare. Tentatively significant correlations of the number of geomagnetic storms and aurorae with the varying number of sunspots seen on the visible solar disk were found in the long-term with respect to the roughly 11-year periodicity of the solar activity cycle. Although theories of sporadic solar eruptions were postulated soon after the Carrington observations, the physical mechanism of the transfer of energy from the Sun to the Earth remained unknown. Early in the 20th century Chapman and Ferraro proposed the concept of huge clouds of charged particles emitted by the Sun as the triggers of geomagnetic storms. Based on the inference of the existence of a solar magnetic field, magnetized plasma clouds were subsequently introduced. Eugene Parker derived theoretical evidence for a continuous stream of ionized particles, the solar wind, leading to continuous convection of the Sun's magnetic field into interplanetary space. The existence of the solar wind was confirmed soon after the launch of the first satellites. Since then the Sun is known to be a permanent source of particles filling interplanetary space. However, it was still thought that the Sun's outer atmosphere, the solar corona, is a static rather than a dynamic object, undergoing only long-term structural changes in phase with the Sun's activity cycle. This view completely changed after space borne telescopes provided extended series of solar images in the EUV and soft X-ray range of the EM spectrum, invisible to ground

  16. Solar abundances and 3D model atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Hans-Günter; Caffau, Elisabetta; Steffen, Matthias; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Freytag, Bernd; Cayrel, Roger

    2010-03-01

    We present solar photospheric abundances for 12 elements from optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. The abundance analysis was conducted employing 3D hydrodynamical (CO5BOLD) as well as standard 1D hydrostatic model atmospheres. We compare our results to others with emphasis on discrepancies and still lingering problems, in particular exemplified by the pivotal abundance of oxygen. We argue that the thermal structure of the lower solar photosphere is very well represented by our 3D model. We obtain an excellent match of the observed center-to-limb variation of the line-blanketed continuum intensity, also at wavelengths shortward of the Balmer jump.

  17. On Wave Processes in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1998-01-01

    This grant was awarded by NASA/MSFC to The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) to investigate the physical processes responsible for heating and wind acceleration in the solar atmosphere, and to construct theoretical, self-consistent and time-dependent solar wind models based on the momentum deposition by finite amplitude and nonlinear Alfven waves. In summary, there are three main goals of the proposed research: (1) Calculate the wave energy spectra and wave energy fluxes carried by magnetic non- magnetic waves. (2) Find out which mechanism dominates in supplying the wave energy to different parts of the solar atmosphere. (3) Use the results obtained in (1) and (2) to construct theoretical, self-consistent and time- dependent models of the solar wind. We have completed the first goal by calculating the amount of non-radiative energy generated in the solar convection zone as acoustic waves and as magnetic tube waves. To calculate the amount of wave energy carried by acoustic waves, we have used the Lighthill-Stein theory for sound generation modified by Musielak, Rosner, Stein & Ulmschneider (1994). The acoustic wave energy fluxes for stars located in different regions of the Hertzsprung-Russell (H-R) diagram have also been computed. The wave energy fluxes carried by longitudinal and transverse waves along magnetic flux tubes have been calculated by using both analytical and numerical methods. Our analytical approach is based a theory developed by Musielak, Rosner & Ulmschnelder and Musielak, Rosner, Gall & Ulmschneider, which allows computing the wave energy fluxes for linear tube waves. A numerical approach has been developed by Huang, Musielak & Ulmschneider and Ulmschneider & Musielak to compute the energy fluxes for nonlinear tube waves. Both methods have been used to calculate the wave energy fluxes for stars located in different regions of the HR diagram (Musielak, Rosner & Ulmschneider 1998; Ulmschneider, Musielak & Fawzy 1998). Having obtained the

  18. Determining solar effects in Neptune's atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2016-01-01

    Long-duration observations of Neptune's brightness at two visible wavelengths provide a disk-averaged estimate of its atmospheric aerosol. Brightness variations were previously associated with the 11-year solar cycle, through solar-modulated mechanisms linked with either ultraviolet or galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on atmospheric particles. Here, we use a recently extended brightness data set (1972–2014), with physically realistic modelling to show, rather than alternatives, ultraviolet and GCR are likely to be modulating Neptune's atmosphere in combination. The importance of GCR is further supported by the response of Neptune's atmosphere to an intermittent 1.5- to 1.9-year periodicity, which occurred preferentially in GCR (not ultraviolet) during the mid-1980s. This periodicity was detected both at Earth, and in GCR measured by Voyager 2, then near Neptune. A similar coincident variability in Neptune's brightness suggests nucleation onto GCR ions. Both GCR and ultraviolet mechanisms may occur more rapidly than the subsequent atmospheric particle transport. PMID:27417301

  19. Determining solar effects in Neptune's atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Aplin, K L; Harrison, R G

    2016-01-01

    Long-duration observations of Neptune's brightness at two visible wavelengths provide a disk-averaged estimate of its atmospheric aerosol. Brightness variations were previously associated with the 11-year solar cycle, through solar-modulated mechanisms linked with either ultraviolet or galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on atmospheric particles. Here, we use a recently extended brightness data set (1972-2014), with physically realistic modelling to show, rather than alternatives, ultraviolet and GCR are likely to be modulating Neptune's atmosphere in combination. The importance of GCR is further supported by the response of Neptune's atmosphere to an intermittent 1.5- to 1.9-year periodicity, which occurred preferentially in GCR (not ultraviolet) during the mid-1980s. This periodicity was detected both at Earth, and in GCR measured by Voyager 2, then near Neptune. A similar coincident variability in Neptune's brightness suggests nucleation onto GCR ions. Both GCR and ultraviolet mechanisms may occur more rapidly than the subsequent atmospheric particle transport. PMID:27417301

  20. Determining solar effects in Neptune's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2016-07-01

    Long-duration observations of Neptune's brightness at two visible wavelengths provide a disk-averaged estimate of its atmospheric aerosol. Brightness variations were previously associated with the 11-year solar cycle, through solar-modulated mechanisms linked with either ultraviolet or galactic cosmic ray (GCR) effects on atmospheric particles. Here, we use a recently extended brightness data set (1972-2014), with physically realistic modelling to show, rather than alternatives, ultraviolet and GCR are likely to be modulating Neptune's atmosphere in combination. The importance of GCR is further supported by the response of Neptune's atmosphere to an intermittent 1.5- to 1.9-year periodicity, which occurred preferentially in GCR (not ultraviolet) during the mid-1980s. This periodicity was detected both at Earth, and in GCR measured by Voyager 2, then near Neptune. A similar coincident variability in Neptune's brightness suggests nucleation onto GCR ions. Both GCR and ultraviolet mechanisms may occur more rapidly than the subsequent atmospheric particle transport.

  1. Wave heating of the solar atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Arregui, Iñigo

    2015-05-28

    Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding of coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding of the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us to understand and quantify magnetic wave heating of the solar atmosphere. PMID:25897091

  2. Wave heating of the solar atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Arregui, Iñigo

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding of coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding of the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us to understand and quantify magnetic wave heating of the solar atmosphere. PMID:25897091

  3. Planetary atmospheric physics and solar physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An overview is presented on current and planned research activities in the major areas of solar physics, planetary atmospheres, and space astronomy. The approach to these unsolved problems involves experimental techniques, theoretical analysis, and the use of computers to analyze the data from space experiments. The point is made that the research program is characterized by each activity interacting with the other activities in the laboratory.

  4. Influence of solar activity on Jupiter's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    The influx of solar energy to different latitudes while Jupiter's orbital motion around the Sun varies significantly. This leads to a change in the optical and physical characteristics of its atmosphere. Analysis of the data for 1850-1991 on determination of the integral magnitude Mj Jupiter in the V filter, and a comparison with the changes of the Wolf numbers W, characterizing the variations of solar activity (SA) - showed that the change of Mj in maxima of the SA - has minima for odd, and maximums - for the even of SA cycles. That is, changing of the Jupiter brightness in visible light is much evident 22.3-year magnetic cycle, and not just about the 11.1-year cycle of solar activity. Analysis of the obtained in 1960-2015 data on the relative distribution of brightness along the central meridian of Jupiter, for which we calculated the ratio of the brightness Aj of northern to the southern part of the tropical and temperate latitudinal zones, allowed to approximate the change of Aj by sinusoid with a period of 11.91±0.07 earth years. Comparison of time variation of Aj from changes in the index of SA R, and the movement of the planet in its orbit - indicates the delay of response of the visible cloud layer in the atmosphere of the Sun's exposure mode for 6 years. This value coincides with the radiative relaxation of the hydrogen-helium atmosphere

  5. Solar wind effects on atmosphere evolution at Venus and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, Janet G.; Bauer, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    The weak intrinsic magnetism of Venus and Mars leaves these planets subject to some unique atmospheric loss processes. This paper reviews the ways in which material seems to be removed by the solar wind interaction, including atmospheric ion pickup by the solar wind, bulk removal and outflow of ionospheric plasma, and atmospheric sputtering by pickup ions. The factors in the planets' and sun's histories, such as planetary magnetism, solar luminosity, and past solar wind properties, that must ultimately be folded into considerations of the effects of the solar wind interaction on atmosphere evolution are discussed.

  6. Coronal propagation: Variations with solar longitude and latitude. [astronomical models of the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wibberenz, G.

    1976-01-01

    Observational results on the East-West effect are summarized and discussed in the context of existing models of coronal propagation. The variation of the number of events with solar longitude is shown to be surprisingly similar for particles covering a large interval of rigidities. Also, over large longitudinal distances, time delays to the event onset and maximum intensity are independent of energy and velocity. This has important implications and will require probably a transport process which is determined by fundamental properties of solar magnetic fields, e.g. reconnection processes between open and closed field configurations. The relative role of open and closed field configurations is extensively discussed. Some evidence is presented that the acceleration of protons to higher (approximately 10 MeV) energies is related with a shock wave traveling in the solar atmosphere. The importance of measurements performed from spacecraft out-of-the-ecliptic plane is stressed.

  7. Convection zone origins of solar atmospheric heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.; Mayr, Hans G.

    1986-01-01

    Spicules are examined as a means for supplying the corona with mass, energy, and magnetic field. It is suggested that spicules form from the supersonic upward expansion of material on nearly evacuated network flux tubes embedded within the sun's convection zone. This allows supersonic but subescape velocities to be attained by the material as it flows outward through the photosphere. Although supersonic, the kinetic energy (subescape) of the spicule material, as observed, is insufficient for coronal heating. It is suggested that, through buoyancy changes on evacuated flux tubes, the magnetic field first 'wicks' material flow into the solar atmosphere. Subsequently, the magnetic field energizes the gaseous material to form the conventional hot, dynamically expanding, solar corona. This occurs through momentum and energy transport by Alfven waves and associated Maxwell stresses concurrently flowing upward on these 'geysers' (spicules). The vertical momentum equation governing fluid flow is examined, and a particular equipartition solution is presented for the flow velocity along a simple field geometry.

  8. Atmospheric scattering corrections to solar radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Box, M. A.; Deepak, A.

    1979-01-01

    Whenever a solar radiometer is used to measure direct solar radiation, some diffuse sky radiation invariably enters the detector's field of view along with the direct beam. Therefore, the atmospheric optical depth obtained by the use of Bouguer's transmission law (also called Beer-Lambert's law), that is valid only for direct radiation, needs to be corrected by taking account of the scattered radiation. This paper discusses the correction factors needed to account for the diffuse (i,e., singly and multiply scattered) radiation and the algorithms developed for retrieving aerosol size distribution from such measurements. For a radiometer with a small field of view (half-cone angle of less than 5 deg) and relatively clear skies (optical depths less than 0.4), it is shown that the total diffuse contribution represents approximately 1% of the total intensity.

  9. Cloud geometry effects on atmospheric solar absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Q.; Cribb, M.C.; Barker, H.W.; Krueger, S.K.; Grossman, A.

    2000-04-15

    A 3D broadband solar radiative transfer scheme is formulated by integrating a Monte Carlo photon transport algorithm with the Fu-Liou radiation model. It is applied to fields of tropical mesoscale convective clouds and subtropical marine boundary layer clouds that were generated by a 2D cloud-resolving model. The effects of cloud geometry on the radiative energy budget are examined by comparing the full-resolution Monte Carlo results with those from the independent column approximation (ICA) that applies the plane-parallel radiation model to each column. For the tropical convective cloud system, it is found that cloud geometry effects always enhance atmospheric solar absorption regardless of solar zenith angle. In a large horizontal domain (512 km), differences in domain-averaged atmospheric absorption between the Monte Carlo and the ICA are less than 4 W m{sup {minus}2} in the daytime. However, for a smaller domain (e.g., 75 km) containing a cluster of deep convective towers, domain-averaged absorption can be enhanced by more than 20 W m{sup {minus}2}. For a subtropical marine boundary layer cloud system during the stratus-to-cumulus transition, calculations show that the ICA works very well for domain-averaged fluxes of the stratocumulus cloud fields even for a very small domain (4.8 km). For the trade cumulus cloud field, the effects of cloud sides and horizontal transport of photons become more significant. Calculations have also been made for both cloud systems including black carbon aerosol and a water vapor continuum. It is found that cloud geometry produces no discernible effects on the absorption enhancement due to the black carbon aerosol and water vapor continuum. The current study indicates that the atmospheric absorption enhancement due to cloud-related 3D photon transport is small. This enhancement could not explain the excess absorption suggested by recent studies.

  10. SOHO: Atomic physics and the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, T. A.

    1998-09-28

    Many aspects of the Sun's corona and wind are studied using data from the ultraviolet spectrum. Accurate atomic parameters are needed to interpret these data correctly, and a good understanding of the behaviors of atoms and ions in plasmas is essential to modeling the Sun's atmosphere. Here I present two examples of studies being carried out using the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) extreme ultraviolet spectrographs. The first of these is the study of flows in the Sun's chromosphere and corona. SOHO has provided new information concerning previous observations of the predominant down-flows in the Sun's lower atmosphere. Accurate measurements of Doppler line shifts have been extended to the corona. It has also been found that the Doppler shifts vary over different parts of the Sun. The second study discussed involves the use of SOHO data to measure elemental abundances in coronal structures know as streamers, giving more information on the 'FIP' effect--the observation that there is a relative deficit of elements with high first ionization potentials (FIPs) in the corona and solar wind.

  11. Ultraviolet Spectral Comparison of "Quiescent" M-dwarf Flares with Solar and "Active" M-dwarf Flares and the Implications for an Earth-like Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke Loyd, R. O.; France, Kevin; Youngblood, Allison

    2015-08-01

    All flares are not created equal. In particular, flares on low-mass stars are notable for their diversity, even between events on the same star. To better characterize these differences and the range of flare morphologies possible on low-mass stars, we analyzed a sample of such flares in detail using temporally resolved UV spectroscopy from the growing body of MUSCLES Treasury Survey data. Specifically, we used the data to analyze the response of several UV emission lines (e.g. C II, Si III, Si IV) and the UV continuum following each impulsive event. From this analysis, we present a qualitative picture of energy deposition and propagation in the stellar atmosphere during a few representative events. These data also permitted a spectral comparison with flares typical of the Sun, and we describe the most prominent differences that emerged from this comparison. Additionally, by including flares from all the observed MUSCLES stars, we create an energy-frequency plot for flares on “quiescent” M-dwarfs and compare it to that of the Sun and of well-studied “active” M-dwarfs such as AD Leo. Flares like those we detected and analyzed can strip some atmosphere from closely orbiting planets, adversely affecting the long-term habitability of planets that might have initially supported liquid surface water. To gauge the amplitude of this effect, we used the flare data to make an empirically driven estimate of how much mass each representative flare might remove from the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet.

  12. Solar and atmospheric forcing on mountain lakes.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Tomi P; Nevalainen, Liisa

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the influence of long-term external forcing on aquatic communities in Alpine lakes. Fossil microcrustacean (Cladocera) and macrobenthos (Chironomidae) community variability in four Austrian high-altitude lakes, determined as ultra-sensitive to climate change, were compared against records of air temperature, North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and solar forcing over the past ~400years. Summer temperature variability affected both aquatic invertebrate groups in all study sites. The influence of NAO and solar forcing on aquatic invertebrates was also significant in the lakes except in the less transparent lake known to have remained uniformly cold during the past centuries due to summertime snowmelt input. The results suggest that external forcing plays an important role in these pristine ecosystems through their impacts on limnology of the lakes. Not only does the air temperature variability influence the communities but also larger-scale external factors related to atmospheric circulation patterns and solar activity cause long-term changes in high-altitude aquatic ecosystems, through their connections to hydroclimatic conditions and light environment. These findings are important in the assessment of climate change impacts on aquatic ecosystems and in greater understanding of the consequences of external forcing on lake ontogeny. PMID:27220094

  13. Implications of solar wind measurements for solar models and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, Aldo; Scott, Pat; Villante, Francesco L.; Vincent, Aaron C.; Asplund, Martin; Basu, Sarbani; Grevesse, Nicolas; Peña-Garay, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    We critically examine recent claims of a high solar metallicity by von Steiger & Zurbuchen (2016, vSZ16) based on in situ measurements of the solar wind, rather than the standard spectroscopically-inferred abundances (Asplund et al. 2009, AGSS09). We test the claim by Vagnozzi et al. (2016) that a composition based on the solar wind enables one to construct a standard solar model in agreement with helioseismological observations and thus solve the decades-old solar modelling problem. We show that, although some helioseismological observables are improved compared to models computed with spectroscopic abundances, most are in fact worse. The high abundance of refractory elements leads to an overproduction of neutrinos, with a predicted 8B flux that is nearly twice its observed value, and 7Be and CNO fluxes that are experimentally ruled out at high confidence. A combined likelihood analysis shows that models using the vSZ16 abundances fare worse than AGSS09 despite a higher metallicity. We also present astrophysical and spectroscopic arguments showing the vSZ16 composition to be an implausible representation of the solar interior, identifying the first ionisation potential effect in the outer solar atmosphere and wind as the likely culprit.

  14. Implications of Extended Solar Minima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Davis, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of periodicity in the solar cycle, the historical record of sunspot number has been carefully examined, attempting to make predictions about the next cycle. Much emphasis has been on predicting the maximum amplitude and length of the next cycle. Because current space-based and suborbital instruments are designed to study active phenomena, there is considerable interest in estimating the length and depth of the current minimum. We have developed criteria for the definition of a minimum and applied it to the historical sunspot record starting in 1749. In doing so, we find that 1) the current minimum is not yet unusually long and 2) there is no obvious way of predicting when, using our definition, the current minimum may end. However, by grouping the data into 22- year cycles there is an interesting pattern of extended minima that recurs every fourth or fifth 22-year cycle. A preliminary comparison of this pattern with other records, suggests the possibility of a correlation between extended minima and lower levels of solar irradiance.

  15. Atmospheric planetary waves induced by solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivolutsky, A. A.

    1989-01-01

    It is known that there are variations in the atmospheric processes with a period close to that of the rotation of the Sun (27 days). The variations are discovered in tropospheric processes, rainfalls, geopotential and in stratosphere. The main theoretical problem is the identification of the physical process by which these heterogeneous solar and meteorological phenomena are connected. Ivanovsky and Krivolutsky proposed that the periodic heating of the ozone layer by the short wave radiation would be the reason of excitation the 27-day oscillations. It was also assumed that excitement takes place in condition of resonance with an excited mode corresponding to the conditions present in the stratospheric circulations. The possibility is discussed of the resonant excitation and presentation is made of the data analysis results which support this idea.

  16. Solar Wind Ablation of Terrestrial Planet Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas Earle; Fok, Mei-Ching H.; Delcourt, Dominique C.

    2009-01-01

    Internal plasma sources usually arise in planetary magnetospheres as a product of stellar ablation processes. With the ignition of a new star and the onset of its ultraviolet and stellar wind emissions, much of the volatiles in the stellar system undergo a phase transition from gas to plasma. Condensation and accretion into a disk is replaced by radiation and stellar wind ablation of volatile materials from the system- Planets or smaller bodies that harbor intrinsic magnetic fields develop an apparent shield against direct stellar wind impact, but UV radiation still ionizes their gas phases, and the resulting internal plasmas serve to conduct currents to and from the central body along reconnected magnetic field linkages. Photoionization and thermalization of electrons warms the ionospheric topside, enhancing Jeans' escape of super-thermal particles, with ambipolar diffusion and acceleration. Moreover, observations and simulations of auroral processes at Earth indicate that solar wind energy dissipation is concentrated by the geomagnetic field by a factor of 10-100, enhancing heavy species plasma and gas escape from gravity, and providing more current carrying capacity. Thus internal plasmas enable coupling with the plasma, neutral gas and by extension, the entire body. The stellar wind is locally loaded and slowed to develop the required power. The internal source plasma is accelerated and heated, inflating the magnetosphere as it seeks escape, and is ultimately blown away in the stellar wind. Bodies with little sensible atmosphere may still produce an exosphere of sputtered matter when exposed to direct solar wind impact. Bodies with a magnetosphere and internal sources of plasma interact more strongly with the stellar wind owing to the magnetic linkage between the two created by reconnection.

  17. Oscillatory phenomena in solar and stellar atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, David Shaun

    This thesis presents varying studies into the nature of intensity oscillations observed both on the Sun and two active cool stars. The first part concentrates on the detection of correlated oscillations occuring between differing heights in the solar atmosphere above quiet-Sun magnetic network bright points (NBPs), interpreted as signatures of energy propagation. This is achieved through correlating in time the wavelet power spectra of lightcurves from images obtained in several optical wavelengths. In four of the eleven NBPs studied, evidence is found for upwardly-propagating, low-frequency waves (1.4 mHz, 2.1 mHz) in the lower chromosphere, decreasing in oscillatory power with the onset, or increase in power, of higher-frequency waves (2.9 mHz, 4.0 mHz) within the upper chromosphere. Moving higher into the atmosphere two of the four cases of higher frequency waves also show a decrease in power. These observational detections are interpreted as transverse-mode magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves undergoing non-linear mode coupling to longitudinal-modes at double the frequency, which shock or otherwise dissipate in the high chromosphere. Evidence is also found for additional upward- and downward- directed waves within all the NBPs studied. The extension of wavelet power techniques into the analysis of phase difference and phase coherence is also presented, utilising UV intensities obtained from above a weak solar network element. The problems associated with the quantification of phase coherence values are outlined and a comparison of two differing methods is carried out. Changes observed in the evolution of phase difference between oscillations detected in the UV emission of the temperature minimum and low transition region are shown to be due to the alteration of the underlying magnetic topology, occuring when same polarity flux emerges nearby. The final part of this thesis concerns the differing situation of intensity variations during energetic flare phenomena on

  18. Little or no solar wind enters Venus' atmosphere at solar minimum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T L; Delva, M; Baumjohann, W; Auster, H-U; Carr, C; Russell, C T; Barabash, S; Balikhin, M; Kudela, K; Berghofer, G; Biernat, H K; Lammer, H; Lichtenegger, H; Magnes, W; Nakamura, R; Schwingenschuh, K; Volwerk, M; Vörös, Z; Zambelli, W; Fornacon, K-H; Glassmeier, K-H; Richter, I; Balogh, A; Schwarzl, H; Pope, S A; Shi, J K; Wang, C; Motschmann, U; Lebreton, J-P

    2007-11-29

    Venus has no significant internal magnetic field, which allows the solar wind to interact directly with its atmosphere. A field is induced in this interaction, which partially shields the atmosphere, but we have no knowledge of how effective that shield is at solar minimum. (Our current knowledge of the solar wind interaction with Venus is derived from measurements at solar maximum.) The bow shock is close to the planet, meaning that it is possible that some solar wind could be absorbed by the atmosphere and contribute to the evolution of the atmosphere. Here we report magnetic field measurements from the Venus Express spacecraft in the plasma environment surrounding Venus. The bow shock under low solar activity conditions seems to be in the position that would be expected from a complete deflection by a magnetized ionosphere. Therefore little solar wind enters the Venus ionosphere even at solar minimum. PMID:18046399

  19. A Stochastic Model of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yeming; Jefferies, John T.; Lindsey, Charles; Avrett, E. H.

    1997-07-01

    We present a model for the lower solar atmosphere based on continuum observations of the Sun spanning the 2-1200 μm wavelength range. We have shown that the data, in particular the center-to-limb brightness profiles at 50-350 μm, cannot be accounted for by any model which is plane-parallel and homogeneous in the height range in which this radiation is formed. We accordingly set out to develop a two-component model as the natural generalization. Making use of a theory for radiation transfer in a stochastic multi-component atmosphere, we find that one can indeed obtain an inhomogeneous model which satisfies center-to-limb data over the 2-1200 μm range. This composite model is made up of hot ``flux tubes'' randomly embedded in a cool medium, the flux tubes expanding to occupy an increasing proportion of the atmosphere as we move up in height. The cool ambient component shows a monotonic decrease in temperature in the range defined by the data. The temperature in the hot component is constant at about 6500 K up to about 400 km and increases monotonically above that height. The center-to-limb observations demand that the gas in the interiors of the flux tubes be recessed downward with respect to a hydrostatic equilibrium distribution of density. This appears to constitute a chromospheric Wilson depression consistent with a magnetic field of about 120 G in the flux-tube interior at a height of about 600 km. The new model is shown to be consistent with other spectral measurements independent of those used to define it. It gives a very good fit to the 0.5 μm continuum intensities across the disk, and provides an excellent accounting for the disk-center brightness temperature in the center of the 3-2 R14 CO line at 4.667 μm. A boundary temperature of less than about 3000 K in the cold component is suggested from the limb-darkening data available for this line. In an appendix we mention a procedure for an analogous study based on the intensities of multiplet lines

  20. The Role of Nitrogen in Titan’s Upper Atmospheric Hydrocarbon Chemistry Over the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luspay-Kuti, A.; Mandt, K. E.; Westlake, J. H.; Plessis, S.; Greathouse, T. K.

    2016-06-01

    Titan’s thermospheric photochemistry is primarily driven by solar radiation. Similarly to other planetary atmospheres, such as Mars’, Titan’s atmospheric structure is also directly affected by variations in the solar extreme-UV/UV output in response to the 11-year-long solar cycle. Here, we investigate the influence of nitrogen on the vertical production, loss, and abundance profiles of hydrocarbons as a function of the solar cycle. Our results show that changes in the atmospheric nitrogen atomic density (primarily in its ground state N(4S)) as a result of photon flux variations have important implications for the production of several minor hydrocarbons. The solar minimum enhancement of CH3, C2H6, and C3H8, despite the lower CH4 photodissociation rates compared with solar maximum conditions, is explained by the role of N(4S). N(4S) indirectly controls the altitude of termolecular versus bimolecular chemical regimes through its relationship with CH3. When in higher abundance during solar maximum at lower altitudes, N(4S) increases the importance of bimolecular CH3 + N(4S) reactions producing HCN and H2CN. The subsequent remarkable CH3 loss and decrease in the CH3 abundance at lower altitudes during solar maximum affects the overall hydrocarbon chemistry.

  1. Solar and thermal radiation in the Venus atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, V. I.; Ekonomov, A. P.; Moshkin, B. E.; Revercomb, H. E.; Sromovsky, L. A.; Schofield, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the solar and thermal radiation fields of Venus. Direct measurements and the results of numerical models based on direct measurements are presented. Radiation outside the atmosphere is considered with emphasis placed on global energy budget parameters, spectral and angular dependences, spatial distribution, and temporal variations of solar and thermal radiation. Radiation fluxes inside the atmosphere below 90 km are also considered with attention given to the solar flux at the surface, solar and thermal radiation fluxes from 100 km to the surface, and radiative heating and cooling below 100 km.

  2. Role of the Atmospheric Sciences for Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleissl, J. P.; Lave, M.; Urquhart, B. G.; Mathiesen, P. J.; Bosch, J. L.; Chow, C. W.; Luoma, J. K.; Jamaly, M.; Nottrott, A. A.; Wegener, J.

    2011-12-01

    Solar energy is the fastest growing renewable energy source. Public interest, practically unlimited solar resources, and dramatic cost reductions have fueled the hopes for grid parity of solar energy production and dramatic growth of the industry. However, the variability of the solar fuel presents perceived and real challenges that can increase grid-integration costs of solar energy. Variability in global irradiance at the surface is dominated by solar geometry and atmospheric transmissivity effects with clouds explaining the majority of the non-geometry variance. Atmospheric scientists can play a major role in quantifying resource variability and improving solar forecasting models. I will start by presenting the state of the solar energy industry. Various studies of scaling of solar variability in space and time will be reviewed. Solar forecasting tools such as satellites, sky imagery, and numerical weather prediction will be introduced and state-of-the-art applications in the solar forecasting industry will be reviewed. Directions for RD&D in the atmospheric sciences will be presented.

  3. Atmosphere, Ocean, Land, and Solar Irradiance Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James; Ahmad, Suraiya

    2003-01-01

    The report present the atmosphere, ocean color, land and solar irradiation data sets. The data presented: total ozone, aerosol, cloud optical and physical parameters, temperature and humidity profiles, radiances, rain fall, drop size distribution.

  4. Solar control of the upper atmosphere of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, James R.; Yung, Yuk L.; Allen, Mark

    1992-01-01

    If the upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Triton are controlled by precipitation of electrons from Neptune's magnetosphere as previously proposed, Triton could have the only ionosphere in the solar system not controlled by solar radiation. However, a new model of Triton's atmosphere, in which only solar radiation is present, predicts a large column of carbon atoms. With an assumed, but reasonable, rate of charge transfer between N2(+) and C, a peak C(+) abundance results that is close to the peak electron densities measured by Voyager in Triton's ionosphere. These results suggest that Triton's upper atmospheric chemistry may thus be solar-controlled. Measurement of key reaction rate constants, currently unknown or highly uncertain at Triton's low temperatures, would help to clarify the chemical and physical processes occurring in Triton's atmosphere.

  5. The Heating of the Solar Atmosphere: from the Bottom Up?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The heating of the solar atmosphere remains a mystery. Over the past several decades, scientists have examined the observational properties of structures in the solar atmosphere, notably their temperature, density, lifetime, and geometry, to determine the location, frequency, and duration of heating. In this talk, I will review these observational results, focusing on the wealth of information stored in the light curve of structures in different spectral lines or channels available in the Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, Hinode's X-ray Telescope and Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer, and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. I will discuss some recent results from combined data sets that support the heating of the solar atmosphere may be dominated by low, near-constant heating events.

  6. Basic Modeling of the Solar Atmosphere and Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avrett, Eugene H.; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the last three years we have continued the development of extensive computer programs for constructing realistic models of the solar atmosphere and for calculating detailed spectra to use in the interpretation of solar observations. This research involves two major interrelated efforts: work by Avrett and Loeser on the Pandora computer program for optically thick non-LTE modeling of the solar atmosphere including a wide range of physical processes, and work by Kurucz on the detailed high-resolution synthesis of the solar spectrum using data for over 58 million atomic and molecular lines. Our objective is to construct atmospheric models from which the calculated spectra agree as well as possible with high-and low-resolution observations over a wide wavelength range. Such modeling leads to an improved understanding of the physical processes responsible for the structure and behavior of the atmosphere.

  7. Possible relationships between solar activity and atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roosen, R. G.; Angione, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The large body of data on solar variations and atmospheric constituents collected between 1902 and 1953 by the Astrophysical Observatory of the Smithsonian Institution (APO) was examined. Short-term variations in amounts of atmospheric aerosols and water vapor due to seasonal changes, volcanic activity, air pollution, and frontal activity are discussed. Preliminary evidence indicates that increased solar activity is at times associated with a decrease in attenuation due to airborne particulates.

  8. Possible relationships between solar activity and atmospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roosen, R. G.; Angione, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The large body of data on solar variations and atmospheric constituents collected between 1902 and 1953 by the Astrophysical Observatory of the Smithsonian Institution (APO) is examined. Short term variations in amounts of atmospheric aerosols and water vapor due to seasonal changes, volcanic activity, air pollution, and frontal activity are discussed. Preliminary evidence indicates that increased solar activity is at times associated with a decrease in attenuation due to airborne particulates.

  9. Atmosphere of Venus: Implications of Venera 8 sunlight measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, A. A.; Hansen, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Venera 8 measurements of solar illumination within the atmosphere of Venus are quantitatively analyzed by using a multilayer model atmosphere. The analysis shows that there are at least three different scattering layers in the atmosphere of Venus and the total cloud optical thickness is about 10 or greater. However, because of the nature of the observations, it is not possible to determine the vertical distribution of absorbed solar energy, which would reveal the drive for the atmospheric dynamics and the strength of the greenhouse effect. Future spacecraft observations should be designed to (1) measure both upward and downward solar fluxes, (2) include measurements of the highest cloud layers, and (3) employ narrow-band and broad-band sensors.-

  10. Atmospheric corrosion model and monitor for low cost solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.; Mansfeld, F. B.; Jeanjaquet, S. L.; Kendig, M.

    1981-01-01

    An atmospheric corrosion model and corrosion monitoring system has been developed for low cost solar arrays (LSA). The corrosion model predicts that corrosion rate is the product of the surface condensation probability of water vapor and the diffusion controlled corrosion current. This corrosion model is verified by simultaneous monitoring of weather conditions and corrosion rates at the solar array test site at Mead, Nebraska.

  11. Solar activity influences on atmospheric electricity and on some structures in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, Reinhold

    1989-01-01

    Only processes in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere are reviewed. General aspects of global atmospheric electricity are summarized in Chapter 3 of NCR (1986); Volland (1984) has outlined the overall problems of atmospheric electrodynamics; and Roble and Hays (1982) published a summary of solar effects on the global circuit. The solar variability and its atmospheric effects (overview by Donelly et al, 1987) and the solar-planetary relationships (survey by James et al. 1983) are so extremely complex that only particular results and selected papers of direct relevance or historical importance are compiled herein.

  12. Physical mechanisms of solar activity effects in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebel, A.

    1989-01-01

    A great variety of physical mechanisms of possibly solar induced variations in the middle atmosphere has been discussed in the literature during the last decades. The views which have been put forward are often controversial in their physical consequences. The reason may be the complexity and non-linearity of the atmospheric response to comparatively weak forcing resulting from solar activity. Therefore this review focuses on aspects which seem to indicate nonlinear processes in the development of solar induced variations. Results from observations and numerical simulations are discussed.

  13. Origin and evolution of outer solar system atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1989-01-01

    The origin and evolution of the atmospheres of bodies in the outer solar system is studied on the basis of the abundances of key molecular species. Formation models in which significant infall of icy and rocky planetesimals accompanies planet formation is supported by the enrichment of methane and deuterated species from Jupiter and Neptune. The chemistry of the solar nebula and Titan are discussed. The prospects for obtaining information on the atmosphere of Triton from the Voyager 2 mission are considered. It is found that the mean density of the Pluto-Charon system implies an origin in the rather water-poor solar nebula.

  14. Waves in the atmosphere due to the solar terminator (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somsikov, V. M.

    1991-02-01

    A systematic review of theoretical and experimental research on the solar terminator (ST) over the last 20 years is presented. Existing models of the ST are examined along with various mechanisms for the formation of disturbances in the neutral atmosphere and ionospheric plasma. The wave structure of atmospheric density, pressure, and velocity associated with the ST in the neutral atmosphere is analyzed. Experimental results from the Soviet Terminator program are discussed.

  15. Solar Variability, Lunar Spectroscopy and Earth's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip G.

    Solar EUV radiation and its variability is of central importance to the earths upper atmosphere. Variability of the earths upper atmosphere is a major concern to NASAs satellite missions. This LARGE PROJECT (2 year) proposal asks for continued measurments of solar EUV variability using EUVE to observe solar light scattered from the moon. Existing EUVE data prove that we can enhance ourunderstanding of the physics of the upper atmosphere at a time when solar EUV measurements are scarce. Our aims include: (i) to understand the phase and polarization dependence of solar light scattered from the moon, (ii) to quantify variations in solar EUV irradiance, (iii) to calibrate these data with a rocket--launched EUV payload, and (iv) to use these data with simultaneous UV measurements from UARS as inputs to upper atmospheric models. Very short exposures (<30 min) are required. We request TYPE 2 observations twice a lunar month, and a variety of TYPE 1 observations to permit us to take the necessary steps towards converting lunar intensity data to absolute solar irradiances.

  16. Life of the Earth in the solar atmosphere (multimedia manual)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononovich, E. V.; Smirnova, O. B.; Matveychuk, T. V.; Jakunina, G. V.; Krasotkin, S. A.

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this manual is to illustrate the major physical processes occurring in the Sun - Earth system and ecology of the planet life. The material includes three individual parts: "The Earth", "The Sun" and "The solar-terrestrial connections". Sections do not require cross-references since each of them is self-complete. Inside the sections the material is located in sequences based on the principle: from simple to complex. The material is designed for students of the senior classes of high school and junior university level interested by the problem. The section "The Earth" is devoted to the description of the basic characteristics of the planet: internal structure, magnetic field, lithosphere and an atmosphere together with various occurring in them tectonic, hydro- and atmospheric processes. The top layers of an atmosphere, an ionosphere, a zone of polar lights, radiating belts, magnetosphere are also considered. The section "The Sun" includes the following subsections: the Sun as a star, internal structure of the Sun, Solar atmosphere, solar activity, cyclicity of the solar activity, helioseismology. In the section "The solar-terrestrial connections" the previous material is used to present the influence of the active solar processes on the most various aspects of a terrestrial life: ecological, biological, mental, social, economic and so forth. The problem of forecasting of the solar activity as the key parameter determining a condition of the so-called space weather is considered.

  17. Solar Atmospheric Magnetic Energy Coupling: Radiative Redistribution Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orange, N. Brice; Gendre, Bruce; Morris, David C.; Chesny, David

    2016-07-01

    Essential to many outstanding solar and stellar physics problems is elucidating the dynamic magnetic to radiative energy coupling of their atmospheres. Using three years of Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Heliosemic Magnetic Imager data of gross atmospheric feature classes, an investigation of magnetic and radiative energy redistribution is detailed. Self-consistent radiative to temperature distributions, that include magnetic weighting, of each feature class is revealed via utilizing the upper limit of thermodynamic atmospheric conditions provided by Active Region Cores (ARCs). Distinctly interesting is that our radiative energy distributions, though indicative to a linearly coupling with temperature, highlight the manifestation of diffuse ``unorganized" emission at upper transition region -- lower coronal regimes. Results we emphasize as correlating remarkably with emerging evidence for similar dependencies of magnetic energy redistribution efficiency with temperature, i.e., linearly with an embedded diffuse emitting region. We present evidence that our magnetic and radiative energy coupling descriptions are consistent with established universal scaling laws for large solar atmospheric temperature gradients and descriptions to the unresolved emission, as well as their insight to a potential origin of large variability in their previous reports. Finally, our work casts new light on the utility of narrowband observations as ad hoc tools for detailing solar atmospheric thermodynamic profiles, thus, presenting significant provisions to the field of solar and stellar physics, i.e., nature of coronae heating.

  18. Solar-wind tritium limit and nuclear processes in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, E. L.; Damico, J.; Defelice, J.

    1975-01-01

    Tritium in Surveyor 3 material is measured, and the resulting H-3/H-1 ratio for the solar wind is applied in a solar flare-solar wind relation to investigate the mixing requirements for the solar atmosphere. The flare-wind relation is derived. None of the tritium can be attributed to solar-wind implantation. The upper limit for the H-3/He ratio in the solar wind is 4 times 10 to the minus tenth power and corresponds to a H-3/H-1 limit of 2 times 10 to the minus eleventh power. This limit imposes a requirement on the mixing rate in the solar atmosphere if the H-3 production rate in solar-surface nuclear reactions is greater than 160/sq cm per sec.

  19. Solar energy and its interaction with Earth`s atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tulunay, Y. ||

    1993-12-31

    The Sun is responsible for many of the phenomena on Earth, including the maintenance of life. In addition, magnetic storms, capable of disrupting radio communication, and auroral displays are associated with solar events. Man-made electrical, satellite, and communication systems are affected strongly by the near-Earth space environments. The purpose of this paper is to review briefly the interaction of solar activity with the near-Earth environment. These processes can be studied by examing two sets of interactions. That is, the interaction of the solar electromagnetic output with the Earth`s neutral atmosphere, and the solar corpuscular output with the geomagnetic field. In order to understand the types of interactions one needs to know more details of the interacting components. Therefore, the near-Earth environments which comprise neutral atmospheric, ionospheric and magnetospheric regions will be discussed in relation to the direct and indirect influences of solar activity.

  20. Solar wind interaction with Venus and impact on its atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.; Wieser, G. S.; Luhmann, J.

    2014-04-01

    We present a review of the solar wind interaction with Venus and how the interaction affects the Venusian atmosphere. The Venus Express observations for more than 8 years (2005-present) and quantitatively new simulation codes substantially advanced physical understanding of the plasma processes in the near-Venus space since the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) mission (1978-1992). The near-Venus space can be divided into several plasma domains: the magnetotail with the plasmasheet, induced magnetosphere, and magnetosheath. The bow shock separates the undisturbed solar wind from the Venus-affected environment. We review the shapes and positions of the boundaries enveloping the main domains and discuss how they are formed by the current systems and pressure balance. In particular, we discuss the morphology and dynamics of the near-Venus magnetotail that was not accessible by PVO. Using the unique Venus Express measurements we discuss the ion acceleration processes and their links to the ionosphere. The focus is given to the Venus' atmosphere erosion associated with the solar wind interaction, both through the energy (ion acceleration) and momentum (atmospheric sputtering) transfer. We review the measurements of the escape rates, their variability with the upstream solar wind conditions and the solar cycle. We emphasize the measurements duirng extreme solar wind conditions as an analogue with nominal conditions for the young Sun. The modeling efforts in this area are also reviewed as they provide a quantitatively approach to understand the impact of the solar wind interaction on the atmospheric evolution. Finally, we compare Venus with other planets of the terrestrial planet group, the Earth and Mars. The Earth, a twin planet of the similar size, is magnetized. Mars, an unmagnetized planet like Venus, possesses by far weaker gravitation to hold its atmospheric gasses. This comparative magnetosphere approach based on the natural solar system laboratory of experiments gives

  1. Report of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Back, H.; Bahcall, J.N.; Bernabeu, J.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowles, T.; Calaprice, F.; Champagne, A.; Freedman, S.; Gai, M.; Galbiati, C.; Gallagher, H.; Gonzalez-Garcia, C.; Hahn, R.L.; Heeger, K.M.; Hime, A.; Jung, C.K.; Klein, J.R.; Koike, M.; Lanou, R.; Learned, J.G.; Lesko, K.T.; Losecco, J.; Maltoni, M.; Mann, A.; McKinsey, D.; Palomares-Ruiz, S.; Pena-Garay, C.; Petcov, S.T.; Piepke, A.; Pitt, M.; Raghavan, R.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Scholberg, K.; Sobel, H.W.; Takeuchi, T.; Vogelaar, R.; Wolfenstein, L.

    2004-10-22

    The highest priority of the Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiment Working Group is the development of a real-time, precision experiment that measures the pp solar neutrino flux. A measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux, in comparison with the existing precision measurements of the high energy {sup 8}B neutrino flux, will demonstrate the transition between vacuum and matter-dominated oscillations, thereby quantitatively testing a fundamental prediction of the standard scenario of neutrino flavor transformation. The initial solar neutrino beam is pure {nu}{sub e}, which also permits sensitive tests for sterile neutrinos. The pp experiment will also permit a significantly improved determination of {theta}{sub 12} and, together with other solar neutrino measurements, either a measurement of {theta}{sub 13} or a constraint a factor of two lower than existing bounds. In combination with the essential pre-requisite experiments that will measure the {sup 7}Be solar neutrino flux with a precision of 5%, a measurement of the pp solar neutrino flux will constitute a sensitive test for non-standard energy generation mechanisms within the Sun. The Standard Solar Model predicts that the pp and {sup 7}Be neutrinos together constitute more than 98% of the solar neutrino flux. The comparison of the solar luminosity measured via neutrinos to that measured via photons will test for any unknown energy generation mechanisms within the nearest star. A precise measurement of the pp neutrino flux (predicted to be 92% of the total flux) will also test stringently the theory of stellar evolution since the Standard Solar Model predicts the pp flux with a theoretical uncertainty of 1%. We also find that an atmospheric neutrino experiment capable of resolving the mass hierarchy is a high priority. Atmospheric neutrino experiments may be the only alternative to very long baseline accelerator experiments as a way of resolving this fundamental question. Such an experiment could be a very

  2. Distinguishing Solar Cycle Effects in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2008-12-01

    As solar radiation decreases with distance from the Sun, other sources of energy, such as ionization from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), assume a greater relative importance than at the terrestrial planets. Charged particle effects could therefore be more relevant to the formation of clouds and haze at the outer planets. The long-term solar modulation of Neptune's albedo is thought to be caused by either ion-induced nucleation of cloud-forming particles, or ultraviolet (UV) radiation effects on the colour of the clouds. On the basis of the 11 year solar cycle, the statistical evidence was slightly in favour of the UV mechanism, however distinguishing unambiguously between the two mechanisms will require more than the solar cycle variation alone. A 1.68 year quasi-periodicity, uniquely present at some times from heliospheric modulation of GCR, has previously been used to discriminate between solar UV and GCR effects in terrestrial data. The cosmic ray proton monitor data from both the Voyager spacecraft show this 1.68 year modulation during the 1980s when the spacecraft were close to the outer planets, indicating the possibility for applying a similar technique as far out as Neptune.

  3. Ions in the Terrestrial Atmosphere and Other Solar System Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. Giles; Tammet, Hannes

    Charged molecular clusters, traditionally called small ions, carry electric currents in atmospheres. Charged airborne particles, or aerosol ions, play an important role in generation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Growth of ions depends on the trace gas content, which is highly variable in the time and space. Even at sub-ppb concentrations, electrically active organic compounds (e.g. pyridine derivatives) can affect the ion composition and size. The size and mobility are closely related, although the form of the relationship varies depending on the critical diameter, which, at 273 K, is about 1.6 nm. For ions smaller than this the separation of quantum levels exceeds the average thermal energy, allowing use of a molecular aggregate model for the size-mobility relation. For larger ions the size-mobility relation approaches the Stokes-Cunningham-Millikan law. The lifetime of a cluster ion in the terrestrial lower atmosphere is about one minute, determined by the balance between ion production rate, ion-ion recombination, and ion-aerosol attachment.

  4. Ions in the Terrestrial Atmosphere and Other Solar System Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. Giles; Tammet, Hannes

    2008-06-01

    Charged molecular clusters, traditionally called small ions, carry electric currents in atmospheres. Charged airborne particles, or aerosol ions, play an important role in generation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Growth of ions depends on the trace gas content, which is highly variable in the time and space. Even at sub-ppb concentrations, electrically active organic compounds ( e.g. pyridine derivatives) can affect the ion composition and size. The size and mobility are closely related, although the form of the relationship varies depending on the critical diameter, which, at 273 K, is about 1.6 nm. For ions smaller than this the separation of quantum levels exceeds the average thermal energy, allowing use of a molecular aggregate model for the size-mobility relation. For larger ions the size-mobility relation approaches the Stokes-Cunningham-Millikan law. The lifetime of a cluster ion in the terrestrial lower atmosphere is about one minute, determined by the balance between ion production rate, ion-ion recombination, and ion-aerosol attachment.

  5. Propagation and generation of waves in solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, Swati

    The fact that the temperature increases with height in the solar atmosphere has been known for many years. To maintain this temperature increase, sources of heating must be present in the atmosphere. One of the most important, and still unsolved, problems in solar physics is to identify the basic physical processes that are responsible for this heating, and explain solar activities caused by the heating. It is also observationally well-established that the solar atmosphere shows a broad range of oscillations that are different in magnetic and non-magnetic regions of the atmosphere. The oscillations are driven by propagating waves, which cause the atmosphere to oscillate at its natural (cutoff) frequency. Since different waves have different cutoff frequencies, it is important to have a method that would allow determining such cutoffs for the solar atmosphere. In this PhD dissertation, the concept of cutoff frequency is extended to inhomogeneous atmospheres, and a general method to determine the cutoff frequency is presented. The method leads to new forms of wave equations obtained for all wave variables, and allows deriving the cutoff frequency without formally solving the wave equations. The main result is that the derived cutoff frequency is a local quantity and that its value at a given atmospheric height determines the frequency that waves must have in order to be propagating at this height. The developed method is general enough, so that it can be used to establish theoretical bases for studying the propagation and generation of different waves in the solar atmosphere. Acoustic waves play an important role in the heating of magnetic-free regions of the solar atmosphere. To determine the propagation conditions for these waves in the non-isothermal solar atmosphere, the method is used to obtain the resulting acoustic cutoff frequency. This new cutoff frequency is a local quantity and it generalizes Lamb's acoustic cutoff frequency that was obtained for an

  6. Waves and Magnetism in the Solar Atmosphere (WAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Y. K.; Auchere, F.; Casini, R.; Fineschi, S.; Gibson, S. E.; Knoelker, M.; Korendyke, C.; Laming, J. M.; Mcintosh, S. W.; Moses, J. D.; Romoli, M.; Rybak, J.; Socker, D. G.; Strachan, L.; Tomczyk, S.; Vourlidas, A.; Wu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere provide the energy for most varieties of solar activity, including high-energy electromagnetic radiation, solar energetic particles, flares, and coronal mass ejections, as well as powering the solar wind. Despite the fundamental role of magnetic fields in solar and heliospheric physics, there exists only very limited measurements of the field above the base of the corona. What is needed are direct measurements of not only the strength and orientation of the magnetic field but also the signatures of wave motions in order to better understand coronal structure, solar activity and the role of MHD waves in heating and accelerating the solar wind. Fortunately, the remote sensing instrumentation used to make magnetic field measurements is also well suited for measuring the Doppler signature of waves in the solar structures. With this in mind, we are proposing the WAMIS (Waves and Magnetism in the Solar Atmosphere) investigation. WAMIS will take advantage of greatly improved infrared (IR) detectors, forward models, advanced diagnostic tools and inversion codes to obtain a breakthrough in the measurement of coronal magnetic fields and in the understanding of the interaction of these fields with space plasmas. This will be achieved with a high altitude balloon borne payload consisting of a coronagraph with an IR spectro-polarimeter focal plane assembly. The balloon platform provides minimum atmospheric absorption and scattering at the IR wavelengths in which these observations are made. Additionally, a NASA long duration balloon flight mission from the Antarctic can achieve continuous observations over most of a solar rotation, covering all of the key time scales for the evolution of coronal magnetic fields. With these improvements in key technologies along with experience gained from current ground-based instrumentation, WAMIS will provide a low-cost mission with a high technology readiness leve.

  7. Solar-wind interactions - Nature and composition of lunar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, N. R.

    1975-01-01

    The nature and composition of the lunar atmosphere are examined on the basis of solar-wind interactions, and the nature of the species in the trapped-gas layer is discussed using results of theoretical and experimental investigations. It is shown that the moon has a highly tenuous atmosphere consisting of various species derived from five sources: solar-wind interaction products, cosmic-ray interaction products, effects of meteoritic impacts, planetary degassing, and radioactive-decay products. Atmospheric concentrations are determined for those species derived from solar-wind protons, alpha particles, and oxygen ions. Carbon chemistry is briefly discussed, and difficulties encountered in attempts to determine quantitatively the concentrations of molecular oxygen, atomic oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane are noted. The calculated concentrations are shown to be in good agreement with observations by the Apollo 17 lunar-surface mass spectrometer and orbital UV spectrometer.

  8. Atmospheric environmental implications of propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mcdonald, A.J.; Bennett, R.R.

    1995-03-01

    Three independent studies have been conducted for assessing the impact of rocket launches on the earth`s environment. These studies have addressed issues of acid rain in the troposphere, ozone depletion in the stratosphere, toxicity of chemical rocket exhaust products, and the potential impact on global warming from carbon dioxide emissions from rocket launches. Local, regional, and global impact assessments were examined and compared with both natural sources and anthropogenic sources of known atmospheric pollutants with the following conclusions: (1) Neither solid nor liquid rocket launches have a significant impact on the earth`s global environment, and there is no real significant difference between the two. (2) Regional and local atmospheric impacts are more significant than global impacts, but quickly return to normal background conditions within a few hours after launch. And (3) vastly increased space launch activities equivalent to 50 U.S. Space Shuttles or 50 Russian Energia launches per year would not significantly impact these conclusions. However, these assessments, for the most part, are based upon homogeneous gas phase chemistry analysis; heterogeneous chemistry from exhaust particulates, such as aluminum oxide, ice contrails, soot, etc., and the influence of plume temperature and afterburning of fuel-rich exhaust products, need to be further addressed. It was the consensus of these studies that computer modeling of interactive plume chemistry with the atmosphere needs to be improved and computer models need to be verified with experimental data. Rocket exhaust plume chemistry can be modified with propellant reformulation and changes in operating conditions, but, based upon the current state of knowledge, it does not appear that significant environmental improvements from propellant formulation changes can be made or are warranted.

  9. The Venus atmospheric response to solar cycle variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, Gerald M.; Hsu, N. Christina

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric drag measurements from the orbital decay of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Magellan spacecraft have recently been obtained of the Venus dayside and nightside atmosphere between 130 and 210 km during a period of low solar activity. These new measurements, combined with the earlier Pioneer Venus drag measurements (1978-80) obtained near the maximum of the 11-year solar cycle, have allowed the detection of the detailed response of temperature, atomic oxygen and carbon dioxide to solar variations. We have found a weak but detectable temperature response on the dayside which is in accord with the response predicted by Keating and Bougher when they assumed very strong CO2 radiative cooling resulting from atomic oxygen exciting CO2 into 15 micron emission. This same radiative process may cause strong cooling in the Earth's upper atmosphere with the doubling of CO2 in the future. With decreasing solar activity, the O/CO2 ratio in the lower thermosphere is found to decrease, apparently due to decreased photodissociation of CO2 and lower temperatures. The percent decrease in atomic oxygen with decreasing solar activity on the dayside is found to be approximately the same as the percent decreases of atomic oxygen transported to the nightside. A very weak response of nightside temperatures to solar activity variations has also been detected.

  10. The Venus Atmospheric Response to Solar Cycle Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, Gerald M.; Hsu, N. Christina

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric drag measurements from the orbital decay of the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and Magellan spacecraft have recently been obtained of the Venus dayside and nightside atmosphere between 130 and 210 km during a period of low solar activity. These new measurements, combined with the earlier Pioneer Venus drag measurements (1978-80) obtained near the maximum of the 11-year solar cycle, have allowed the detection of the detailed response of temperature, atomic oxygen and carbon dioxide to solar variations. We have found a weak but detectable temperature response on the dayside which is in accord with the response predicted by Keating and Bougher when they assumed very strong CO2 radiative cooling resulting from atomic oxygen exciting CO2 into 15 micron emission. This same radiative process may cause strong cooling in the Earth's upper atmosphere with the doubling of CO2 in the future. With decreasing solar activity, the O/CO2 ratio in the lower thermosphere is found to decrease, apparently due to decreased photodissociation of CO2 and lower temperatures. The percent decrease in atomic oxygen with decreasing solar activity on the dayside is found to be approximately the same as the percent decreases of atomic oxygen transported to the nightside. A very weak response of nightside temperatures to solar activity variations has also been detected.

  11. The radiation in the atmosphere during major solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clucas, S.; Dyer, C.; Lei, F.

    Major solar particle events can give rise to greatly enhanced radiation throughout the entire atmosphere including at aircraft altitudes. These particle events are very hard to predict and their effect on aircraft is difficult to calculate. A comprehensive model of the energetic radiation in the atmosphere has been developed based on a response matrix of the atmosphere to energetic particle incidence. This model has previously been used to determine the spectral form of several ground level neutron events including February 56 and September/October 1989. Significant validation of the model has been possible using CREAM data flying onboard Concorde during the September/October 1989 events. Further work has been carried out for this solar maximum, including estimates of the solar particle spectra during the July 2000, April 2001, and October 2003 events and comparisons of predicated atmospheric measurements with limited flight data. Further CREAM data has being obtained onboard commercial airlines and high altitude business jets during quiet time periods. In addition, the atmospheric radiation model, along with solar particle spectra, have been used to calculate the neutron flux and dose rates along several commercial aircraft flight paths including London - LA. The influence of suppression on cut-off rigidity by geomagnetic storms is examined and shows that the received flight dose during disturbed periods can be significantly enhanced compared with quiet periods.

  12. The radiation in the atmosphere during major solar particle events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clucas, Simon N.; Dyer, Clive S.; Lei, Fan

    Major solar particle events can give rise to greatly enhanced radiation throughout the entire atmosphere including at aircraft altitudes. These particle events are very hard to predict and their effect on aircraft is difficult to calculate. A comprehensive model of the energetic radiation in the atmosphere has been developed based on a response matrix of the atmosphere to energetic particle incidence. This model has previously been used to determine the spectral form of several ground level neutron events including February 1956 and September/October 1989. Significant validation of the model has been possible using CREAM data flying onboard Concorde during the September/October 1989 events. Further work has been carried out for the current solar maximum, including estimates of the solar particle spectra during the July 2000, April 2001, and October 2003 events and comparisons of predicted atmospheric measurements with limited flight data. Further CREAM data have been obtained onboard commercial airlines and high altitude business jets during quiet time periods. In addition, the atmospheric radiation model, along with solar particle spectra, have been used to calculate the neutron flux and dose rates along several commercial aircraft flight paths including London to Los Angeles. The influence of rigidity cut-off suppression by geomagnetic storms is examined and shows that the received flight dose during disturbed periods can be significantly enhanced compared with quiet periods.

  13. The ancient oxygen exosphere of Mars - Implications for atmosphere evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Bougher, S. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1993-06-01

    The paper considers absorption of oxygen (atoms and ions) by the surface as a mechanism for the early Martian atmosphere escape, due to the effect of high EUV flux of the ancient sun. Hot oxygen exosphere densities in ancient atmosphere and ionosphere are calculated for different EUV fluxes and the escape fluxes associated with these exposures. Using these densities, the ion production rate above the ionopause is calculated for different epochs including photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact. It is found that, when the inferred high solar EUV fluxes of the past are taken into account, oxygen equivalent to that in several tens of meters of water, planet-wide, should have escaped Martian atmosphere to space over the last 3 Gyr.

  14. The ancient oxygen exosphere of Mars - Implications for atmosphere evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Bougher, S. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper considers absorption of oxygen (atoms and ions) by the surface as a mechanism for the early Martian atmosphere escape, due to the effect of high EUV flux of the ancient sun. Hot oxygen exosphere densities in ancient atmosphere and ionosphere are calculated for different EUV fluxes and the escape fluxes associated with these exposures. Using these densities, the ion production rate above the ionopause is calculated for different epochs including photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact. It is found that, when the inferred high solar EUV fluxes of the past are taken into account, oxygen equivalent to that in several tens of meters of water, planet-wide, should have escaped Martian atmosphere to space over the last 3 Gyr.

  15. Atmospheric environmental implications of propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Allan J.; Bennett, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    Three independent studies have been conducted for assessing the impact of rocket launches on the earth's environment. These studies have addressed issues of acid rain in the troposphere, ozone depletion in the stratosphere, toxicity of chemical rocket exhaust products, and the potential impact on global warming from carbon dioxide emissions from rocket launches. Local, regional, and global impact assessments were examined and compared with both natural sources and anthropogenic sources of known atmospheric pollutants with the following conclusions: (1) Neither solid nor liquid rocket launches have a significant impact on the earth's global environment, and there is no real significant difference between the two. (2) Regional and local atmospheric impacts are more significant than global impacts, but quickly return to normal background conditions within a few hours after launch. And (3) vastly increased space launch activities equivalent to 50 U.S. Space Shuttles or 50 Russian Energia launches per year would not significantly impact these conclusions. However, these assessments, for the most part, are based upon homogeneous gas phase chemistry analysis; heterogeneous chemistry from exhaust particulates, such as aluminum oxide, ice contrails, soot, etc., and the influence of plume temperature and afterburning of fuel-rich exhaust products, need to be further addressed. It was the consensus of these studies that computer modeling of interactive plume chemistry with the atmosphere needs to be improved and computer models need to be verified with experimental data. Rocket exhaust plume chemistry can be modified with propellant reformulation and changes in operating conditions, but, based upon the current state of knowledge, it does not appear that significant environmental improvements from propellant formulation changes can be made or are warranted. Flight safety, reliability, and cost improvements are paramount for any new rocket system, and these important aspects

  16. Injection of magnetic flux and helicity in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pariat, E.

    2006-09-01

    This thesis is related to the mechanisms of emergence into the solar atmosphere, of two quantities playing key roles in solar activity: magnetic flux and magnetic helicity. Helicity, which is a topological measure of twist and shear, is believed to be a conserved quantity for solar conditions, in the frame of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A crucial phase in the emergence process of these quantities, which are generated and amplified in the solar interior, are their injection through the solar photosphere, the transition region between the solar interior and atmosphere. The first part of my work provided new answers to questions unsolved by the classical scenario of emergence. I have analyzed multi-wavelength observations (FGE, TRACE, SoHO, THEMIS) of an emerging active region. I demonstrated that magnetic flux tubes emerge with a flat undulated shape and that small scale magnetic reconnection events, are necessary to this emergence process. Then, using a 3D MHD numerical simulation, I studied the mechanism of magnetic reconnection and in particular the natural formation of current layers where regions of strong variations of magnetic connectivity, called quasi-separatrix layers, are present. Finally, I demonstrated that the classical definition of helicity flux density is biased and proposed a more accurate definition. I applied my new definition to observations of active regions and showed that the photospheric injection pattern of magnetic helicity is unipolar and homogenous. This study allows to link the generation of helicity in the solar atmosphere, its injection and its distribution in the solar corona and its ejection in the interplanetary medium.

  17. C/O Ratios In Exoplanetary Atmospheres - New Results And Major Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2012-01-01

    Recent observations are allowing unprecedented constraints on the carbon-to-oxygen (C/O) ratios of giant exoplanetary atmospheres. Atmospheric C/O ratios provide important constraints on chemical and dynamical processes in the atmospheres, and on the planetary interior compositions and formation scenarios. In addition, for super-Earths, the potential availability of water and oxygen, and hence the notion of `habitability', is contingent on the C/O ratio assumed. Typically, an oxygen-rich composition, motivated by the solar nebula C/O of 0.5, is assumed in models of exoplanetary formation, interiors, and atmospheres. However, recent observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are suggesting the possibility of C/O ratios of 1.0 or higher, motivating the new class of Carbon-rich Planets (CRPs). In this talk, we will present observational constraints on atmospheric C/O ratios for an ensemble of transiting exoplanets and discuss their implications on the various aspects of exoplanetary characterization described above. Motivated by these results, we propose a two-dimensional classification scheme for irradiated giant exoplanets in which the incident irradiation and the atmospheric C/O ratio are the two dimensions. We demonstrate that some of the extreme anomalies reported in the literature for hot Jupiter atmospheres can be explained based on this 2-D scheme. An overview of new theoretical avenues and observational efforts underway for chemical characterization of extrasolar planets, from hot Jupiters to super-Earths, will be presented.

  18. Mars lower atmosphere - Some new implications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, W. H., Jr.; Wallio, H. A.; Levine, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Based on occultation data from the Mariner spacecraft, there are some preliminary indications of an apparent systematically higher surface pressure on the night side of Mars than on the day side. If confirmed by additional data currently becoming available, this apparent surface pressure difference could be attributed to several causes, including topography effects as has been assumed previously, an actual increase of pressure on the night side caused by diurnal effects, an apparent increase on the night side due to some mechanisms such as a dust layer, or an apparent lower pressure on the day side due to the existence of a low-lying electron layer. By calculating the effect of a low-lying electron layer on the combined neutral atmosphere and electron layer refractivity profile, it is found that the day side and night side surface pressures would be in agreement if a layer with maximum density of about 80,000 electrons per cu cm below 15 km altitude were present on the day side.

  19. Excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Fomichev, V. V.; Fainshtein, S. M.; Chernov, G. P.

    2013-05-15

    An alternative mechanism for the excitation of electron Langmuir frequency harmonics as a result of the development of explosive instability in a weakly relativistic beam-plasma system in the solar atmosphere is proposed. The efficiency of the new mechanism as compared to the previously discussed ones is analyzed.

  20. Waves and Oscillations in the Solar Atmosphere (IAU S247)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, Robert; Mendoza-Briceno, César A.

    2008-06-01

    Preface; Organizing committee; Conference participants; Address by the Scientific Organizing Committee R. Erdélyi; Progress in coronal seismology B. Roberts; Session 1. Waves and oscillations in solar and stellar interior Robert Erdélyi; Session 2. Coupling of global solar and stellar motions into the lower atmosphere Bernard Roberts; Session 3. Seismology of the lower solar atmosphere and stellar chromospheres Siraj S. Hasan; Session 4. Seismology of open versus closed magnetic structures Marcel Goossens; Session 5. Prominence seismology Jose Luis Ballester; Session 6. Dynamical processes and coupling in the magnetic atmosphere of Sun and stars Miguel Ibañez; Session 7. Wave-particle interactions in magnetized plasmas Cesar A. Mendoza-Briceño; Session 8. Solar and stellar global coronal seismology Viggo Hansteen; Session 9. Fundamental physical processes in coronae: waves, turbulence, reconnection Saku Tsuneta; Session 10. Waves and instabilities in atmospheric plasmas Arnold O. Benz; Summary of meeting Cesar A. Mendoza-Briceño; Concluding remarks A. O. Benz; Late papers; Author index.

  1. A numerical calculation of outward propagation of solar disturbances. [solar atmospheric model with shock wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1974-01-01

    The responses of the solar atmosphere due to an outward propagation shock are examined by employing the Lax-Wendroff method to solve the set of nonlinear partial differential equations in the model of the solar atmosphere. It is found that this theoretical model can be used to explain the solar phenomena of surge and spray. A criterion to discriminate the surge and spray is established and detailed information concerning the density, velocity, and temperature distribution with respect to the height and time is presented. The complete computer program is also included.

  2. Highly physical penumbra solar radiation pressure modeling with atmospheric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Robert; Flury, Jakob; Bandikova, Tamara; Schilling, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    We present a new method for highly physical solar radiation pressure (SRP) modeling in Earth's penumbra. The fundamental geometry and approach mirrors past work, where the solar radiation field is modeled using a number of light rays, rather than treating the Sun as a single point source. However, we aim to clarify this approach, simplify its implementation, and model previously overlooked factors. The complex geometries involved in modeling penumbra solar radiation fields are described in a more intuitive and complete way to simplify implementation. Atmospheric effects are tabulated to significantly reduce computational cost. We present new, more efficient and accurate approaches to modeling atmospheric effects which allow us to consider the high spatial and temporal variability in lower atmospheric conditions. Modeled penumbra SRP accelerations for the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites are compared to the sub-nm/s2 precision GRACE accelerometer data. Comparisons to accelerometer data and a traditional penumbra SRP model illustrate the improved accuracy which our methods provide. Sensitivity analyses illustrate the significance of various atmospheric parameters and modeled effects on penumbra SRP. While this model is more complex than a traditional penumbra SRP model, we demonstrate its utility and propose that a highly physical model which considers atmospheric effects should be the basis for any simplified approach to penumbra SRP modeling.

  3. The atmospheric radiation response to solar-particle-events.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, K; Sauer, H H

    2003-01-01

    High-energy solar particles, produced in association with solar flares and coronal mass ejections, occasionally bombard the earth's atmosphere. resulting in radiation intensities additional to the background cosmic radiation. Access of these particles to the earth's vicinity during times of geomagnetic disturbances are not adequately described by using static geomagnetic field models. These solar fluxes are also often distributed non uniformly in space, so that fluxes measured by satellites obtained at great distances from the earth and which sample large volumes of space around the earth cannot be used to predict fluxes locally at the earth's surface. We present here a method which uses the ground-level neutron monitor counting rates as adjoint sources of the flux in the atmosphere immediately above them to obtain solar-particle effective dose rates as a function of position over the earth's surface. We have applied this approach to the large September 29-30, 1989 ground-level event (designated GLE 42) to obtain the magnitude and distribution of the solar-particle effective dose rate from an atypically large event. The results of these calculations clearly show the effect of the softer particle spectra associated with solar particle events, as compared with galactic cosmic rays, results in a greater sensitivity to the geomagnetic field, and, unlike cosmic rays, the near-absence of a "knee" near 60 degrees geomagnetic latitude. PMID:14727666

  4. Atmospheric heating by solar EUV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Hays, P. B.; Roble, R. G.

    1975-01-01

    A diurnal model of the mid-latitude ionospheric R region is used to calculate the diurnal variation of the neutral gas heating rates and neutral gas heating efficiency for conditions similar to those over Millstone Hill on March 23-24, 1970. The calculations show that the absorbed solar EUV (wavelength less than or equal to 1025 A) energy is almost equally split between photoelectrons and ion pair production. Photoelectrons heat the ambient electron gas by Coulomb collisions and by the quenching of certain excited ion species, whereas the ion gas is primarily heated by collisions with hot electrons and by chemical reactions. Heating processes above 300 km, between 170 and 300 km, and below 170 km are identified.

  5. UV Spectra, Bombs, and the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip G.

    2015-08-01

    A recent analysis of UV data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) reports plasma “bombs” with temperatures near 8 × 104 K within the solar photosphere. This is a curious result, first because most bomb plasma pressures p (the largest reported case exceeds 103 dyn cm-2) fall well below photospheric pressures (\\gt 7× {10}3), and second, UV radiation cannot easily escape from the photosphere. In the present paper the IRIS data is independently analyzed. I find that the bombs arise from plasma originally at pressures between ≤ 80 and 800 dyne cm-2 before explosion, i.e., between ≥ 850 and 550 km above {τ }500=1. This places the phenomenon’s origin in the low-mid chromosphere or above. I suggest that bomb spectra are more compatible with Alfvénic turbulence than with bi-directional reconnection jets.

  6. A conjecture concerning thermodynamic limits to solar atmospheric heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Mayr, H. G.

    1984-01-01

    Considering the solar atmosphere in its entirety, that large-scale nonadiabatic processes (MHD waves, and so on) effectively tend to yield an 'equalization of temperature', such that the atmospheric temperature is limited to the base temperature associated with its heat source. This conjecture suggests that (1) the chromospheric temperature is limited by the granulation base temperature (10,000 K), (2) the spicule temperatures are limited by the base temperature (100,000 K) where the supergranular cells form, and (3) the quiet coronal temperature is less than or equal to the convection zone base temperature (2,000,000 K). Thermodynamical arguments are provided which may serve to augment the detailed heating models wherein large-scale mechanical energy is transported into the solar atmosphere involving MHD waves, current dissipation, and other nonthermal processes.

  7. Multi-height spectroscopy for probing the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, A.; Roth, M.; Staiger, J.

    We present preliminary results from multi-height observations, taken with the HELLRIDE (HELioseismic Large Region Interferometric DEvice) instrument at the VTT (Vacuum Tower Telescope) in Izaña, Tenerife. The goal of this work is to study solar oscillations at different atmospheric heights. The data was obtained in May 2014 for 10 different wavelengths with high spatial, spectral and temporal resolution. In this paper we discuss the results from quiet sun measurements. The region was selected in such a way to be near to the disk center. Using spectral and cross-spectral analysis methods we derive phase differences of waves propagating between the atmospheric layers. The formation heights of the photospheric spectral lines were calculated by τ^c_{5000} = 1 in agreement with an LTE approximation and chromospheric lines with an NLTE method, respectively. We find that the acoustic cut-off frequency is a function of height in the solar atmosphere.

  8. Atmospheric solar heating rate in the water vapor bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1986-01-01

    The total absorption of solar radiation by water vapor in clear atmospheres is parameterized as a simple function of the scaled water vapor amount. For applications to cloudy and hazy atmospheres, the flux-weighted k-distribution functions are computed for individual absorption bands and for the total near-infrared region. The parameterization is based upon monochromatic calculations and follows essentially the scaling approximation of Chou and Arking, but the effect of temperature variation with height is taken into account in order to enhance the accuracy. Furthermore, the spectral range is extended to cover the two weak bands centered at 0.72 and 0.82 micron. Comparisons with monochromatic calculations show that the atmospheric heating rate and the surface radiation can be accurately computed from the parameterization. Comparisons are also made with other parameterizations. It is found that the absorption of solar radiation can be computed reasonably well using the Goody band model and the Curtis-Godson approximation.

  9. Is magnetic topology important for heating the solar atmosphere?

    PubMed

    Parnell, Clare E; Stevenson, Julie E H; Threlfall, James; Edwards, Sarah J

    2015-05-28

    Magnetic fields permeate the entire solar atmosphere weaving an extremely complex pattern on both local and global scales. In order to understand the nature of this tangled web of magnetic fields, its magnetic skeleton, which forms the boundaries between topologically distinct flux domains, may be determined. The magnetic skeleton consists of null points, separatrix surfaces, spines and separators. The skeleton is often used to clearly visualize key elements of the magnetic configuration, but parts of the skeleton are also locations where currents and waves may collect and dissipate. In this review, the nature of the magnetic skeleton on both global and local scales, over solar cycle time scales, is explained. The behaviour of wave pulses in the vicinity of both nulls and separators is discussed and so too is the formation of current layers and reconnection at the same features. Each of these processes leads to heating of the solar atmosphere, but collectively do they provide enough heat, spread over a wide enough area, to explain the energy losses throughout the solar atmosphere? Here, we consider this question for the three different solar regions: active regions, open-field regions and the quiet Sun. We find that the heating of active regions and open-field regions is highly unlikely to be due to reconnection or wave dissipation at topological features, but it is possible that these may play a role in the heating of the quiet Sun. In active regions, the absence of a complex topology may play an important role in allowing large energies to build up and then, subsequently, be explosively released in the form of a solar flare. Additionally, knowledge of the intricate boundaries of open-field regions (which the magnetic skeleton provides) could be very important in determining the main acceleration mechanism(s) of the solar wind. PMID:25897085

  10. Nearly sonic and transsonic convective motions in the solar atmosphere related to the solar wind origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veselovsky, I. S.

    1995-01-01

    MHD equations are considered for the solar atmosphere. 15 different simplest MHD regimes are indicated for the momentum transport equation depending on the mutual binary interplay between 6 possible and locally dominant terms: non-stationarity and inhomogeneity of the flow, gas pressure, magnetic tensions, viscous and gravity forces. These regimes are delimited by five physically independent dimensionless parameters, for example, Strouhal, sonic Mach, alfvenic Mach, Reynolds and Froude numbers or their combinations. Another partially overlapping classification of the simplest regimes may be introduced based on the energy conservation equation. There are also 15 independent binary combinations between nonstationary and inhomogeneous convective terms, dissipative energy sinks and sources (viscous, heat-conductive, Joule and radiative ones) in the energy equation. More complicated regimes are considered with multiple dominated terms. All these MHD regimes play their important role somewhere in the solar atmosphere complicated by the tensor transport coefficients in the magnetically dominated regions of the upper atmosphere. Nearly sonic and transsonic nonstationary convective motions with ascending and descending flows are observed in the solar chromosphere. the transition region and the lower pans of the solar corona together with related horizontal velocity components. This convection represents a kind of the 'cocoonery' manufacturing nonstationary vortices generated here and partially connected to the photosphere and to the solar wind. The solar wind originates from this powerful transsonic muddle in the solar atmosphere as a tiny fraction of the streamlines which are temporarily getting detached from the 'cocoons; and going to the infinity. The topologically complicated instantaneous 'runaway surface' around the Sun, i.e., the surface which separates outgoing to the infinity streams from other finite flows in the solar atmosphere was not described in the

  11. Automated Detection of Oscillating Regions in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ireland, J.; Marsh, M. S.; Kucera, T. A.; Young, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently observed oscillations in the solar atmosphere have been interpreted and modeled as magnetohydrodynamic wave modes. This has allowed for the estimation of parameters that are otherwise hard to derive, such as the coronal magnetic-field strength. This work crucially relies on the initial detection of the oscillations, which is commonly done manually. The volume of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) data will make manual detection inefficient for detecting all of the oscillating regions. An algorithm is presented that automates the detection of areas of the solar atmosphere that support spatially extended oscillations. The algorithm identifies areas in the solar atmosphere whose oscillation content is described by a single, dominant oscillation within a user-defined frequency range. The method is based on Bayesian spectral analysis of time series and image filtering. A Bayesian approach sidesteps the need for an a-priori noise estimate to calculate rejection criteria for the observed signal, and it also provides estimates of oscillation frequency, amplitude, and noise, and the error in all of these quantities, in a self-consistent way. The algorithm also introduces the notion of quality measures to those regions for which a positive detection is claimed, allowing for simple post-detection discrimination by the user. The algorithm is demonstrated on two Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) datasets, and comments regarding its suitability for oscillation detection in SDO are made.

  12. Io's fast sodium: Implications for molecular and atomic atmospheric escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jody K.; Schneider, Nicholas M.

    1994-01-01

    Recent observational evidence for sodium-bearing molecular ions in the Io plasma torus has strong implications for the nature of Io's atmosphere (Schneider et al. 1991). We use a Monte Carlo model offast-sodium production to analyze high-resolution ground-based images of sodium emission. We find the observations can be explained if a significant fraction of Io's exobase is molecular, possible including a sodium-bearing molecule, Total sodium loss rates from Io imply a collisionally thick atmosphere. Most of the images indicate significant slow-down of the corotating plasma near Io.

  13. Empirical Determination of Solar Proton Access to the Polar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Jason; Rodger, Craig; Green, Janet; Whittaker, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Violent expulsions on the Sun's surface release high energy solar protons that ultimately affect ionization levels and the local chemical composition in the upper atmosphere as well as High Frequency (HF) communication used by aircraft. The geomagnetic field screens the low altitude equatorial region, but these protons can access the atmosphere over the poles. The latitudes over which the solar protons can reach vary with geomagnetic indices such as Kp and Dst. In this study we use observations from Low Earth Orbit to determine the atmospheric access of solar protons and hence the flights paths most likely to be affected. Observations taken by up to six polar orbiting satellites during 15 solar proton events are analyzed. From this we determine 16,850 proton rigidity cutoff estimates across 3 energy channels. Empirical fits are undertaken to estimate the most likely behavior of the cutoff dependence with geomagnetic activity. We provide simple equations by which the geomagnetic latitude (spatial extent) at which the protons impact the atmosphere can be determined from a given Kp or Dst value. The variation found in the cutoff with Kp is similar to that used in existing operational models, although the changing Kp value is found to lead the variation in the cutoffs by ~3 hours .We also suggest a ~1-2° equatorward shift in latitude would provide greater accuracy. This solar proton access can be used as an input into coupled chemistry climate models and give the likely polar regions to be effected by Polar Cap Absorption (PCA) which causes HF radio 'blackout zones'. We find that a Kp predictive model can provide additional warning to the variation in proton cutoffs. Hence a prediction of the cutoff latitudes can be made ~3 hours to as much as 7 hours into the future, meeting suggested minimum planning times required by the aviation industry.

  14. Solar energetic particle interactions with the Venusian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plainaki, Christina; Paschalis, Pavlos; Grassi, Davide; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Andriopoulou, Maria

    2016-07-01

    In the context of planetary space weather, we estimate the ion production rates in the Venusian atmosphere due to the interactions of solar energetic particles (SEPs) with gas. The assumed concept for our estimations is based on two cases of SEP events, previously observed in near-Earth space: the event in October 1989 and the event in May 2012. For both cases, we assume that the directional properties of the flux and the interplanetary magnetic field configuration would have allowed the SEPs' arrival at Venus and their penetration to the planet's atmosphere. For the event in May 2012, we consider the solar particle properties (integrated flux and rigidity spectrum) obtained by the Neutron Monitor Based Anisotropic GLE Pure Power Law (NMBANGLE PPOLA) model (Plainaki et al., 2010, 2014) applied previously for the Earth case and scaled to the distance of Venus from the Sun. For the simulation of the actual cascade in the Venusian atmosphere initiated by the incoming particle fluxes, we apply the DYASTIMA code, a Monte Carlo (MC) application based on the Geant4 software (Paschalis et al., 2014). Our predictions are afterwards compared to other estimations derived from previous studies and discussed. Finally, we discuss the differences between the nominal ionization profile due to galactic cosmic-ray-atmosphere interactions and the profile during periods of intense solar activity, and we show the importance of understanding space weather conditions on Venus in the context of future mission preparation and data interpretation.

  15. Ozone changes under solar geoengineering: implications for UV exposure and air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, P. J.; Abraham, N. L.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Various forms of geoengineering have been proposed to counter anthropogenic climate change. Methods which aim to modify the Earth's energy balance by reducing insolation are often subsumed under the term Solar Radiation Management (SRM). Here, we present results of a standard SRM modelling experiment in which the incoming solar irradiance is reduced to offset the global mean warming induced by a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. For the first time in an atmosphere-ocean coupled climate model, we include atmospheric composition feedbacks such as ozone changes under this scenario. Including the composition changes, we find large reductions in surface UV-B irradiance, with implications for vitamin D production, and increases in surface ozone concentrations, both of which could be important for human health. We highlight that both tropospheric and stratospheric ozone changes should be considered in the assessment of any SRM scheme, due to their important roles in regulating UV exposure and air quality.

  16. Effect of the shrinking dipole on solar-terrestrial energy input to the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherron, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The global average temperature of the Earth is rising rapidly. This rise is primarily attributed to the release of greenhouse gases as a result of human activity. However, it has been argued that changes in radiation from the Sun might play a role. Most energy input to the Earth is light in the visible spectrum. Our best measurements suggest this power input has been constant for the last 40 years (the space age) apart from a small 11-year variation due to the solar cycle of sunspot activity. Another possible energy input from the Sun is the solar wind. The supersonic solar wind carries the magnetic field of the Sun into the solar system. As it passes the Earth it can connect to the Earth's magnetic field whenever it is antiparallel t the Earth's field. This connection allows mass, momentum, and energy from the solar wind to enter the magnetosphere producing geomagnetic activity. Ultimately much of this energy is deposited at high latitudes in the form of particle precipitation (aurora) and heating by electrical currents. Although the energy input by this process is miniscule compared to that from visible radiation it might alter the absorption of visible radiation. Two other processes affected by the solar cycle are atmospheric entry of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar energetic protons (SEP). A weak solar magnetic field at sunspot minimum facilitates GCR entry which has been implicated in creation of clouds. Large coronal mass ejections and solar flares create SEP at solar maximum. All of these alternative energy inputs and their effects depend on the strength of the Earth's magnetic field. Currently the Earth's field is decreasing rapidly and conceivably might reverse polarity in 1000 years. In this paper we describe the changes in the Earth's magnetic field and how this might affect GCR, SEP, electrical heating, aurora, and radio propagation. Whether these effects are important in global climate change can only be determined by detailed physical models.

  17. Basic Modeling of the Solar Atmosphere and Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avrett, Eugene; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This grant supported the research and publication of a major 26-page paper in The Astrophysical Journal, by Fontenla, Avrett, & Loeser (2002): 'Energy Balance in the Solar Transition Region. IV. Hydrogen and Helium Mass Flows with Diffusion.' This paper extended our previous modeling of the chromosphere-corona transition region to include cases with particle and mass flows. Inflows and outflows were shown to produce striking changes in the profiles of hydrogen and helium lines. An important conclusion is that line shifts are much less significant than the changes in line intensity and central reversal due to the influence of flows on the excitation and ionization of atoms in the solar atmosphere. This modeling effort at SAO is the only current one being undertaken anywhere to simulate in detail the full range of non-LTE absorption, emission, and scattering processes in the solar atmosphere to account for the entire solar spectrum from radio waves to X-rays. This effort is being continued with internal SAO funding at a relatively slow pace. Further NASA support in the future would yield results of great value for the interpretation of solar observations from NASA spacecraft.

  18. Climate response to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide and solar irradiance on the time scale of days to weeks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Long; Bala, Govindasamy; Caldeira, Ken

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies show that fast climate response on time scales of less than a month can have important implications for long-term climate change. In this study, we investigate climate response on the time scale of days to weeks to a step-function quadrupling of atmospheric CO2 and contrast this with the response to a 4% increase in solar irradiance. Our simulations show that significant climate effects occur within days of a stepwise increase in both atmospheric CO2 content and solar irradiance. Over ocean, increased atmospheric CO2 warms the lower troposphere more than the surface, increasing atmospheric stability, moistening the boundary layer, and suppressing evaporation and precipitation. In contrast, over ocean, increased solar irradiance warms the lower troposphere to a much lesser extent, causing a much smaller change in evaporation and precipitation. Over land, both increased CO2 and increased solar irradiance cause rapid surface warming that tends to increase both evaporation and precipitation. However, the physiological effect of increased atmospheric CO2 on plant stomata reduces plant transpiration, drying the boundary layer and decreasing precipitation. This effect does not occur with increased solar irradiance. Therefore, differences in climatic effects from CO2 versus solar forcing are manifested within days after the forcing is imposed.

  19. Generation of currents in the solar atmosphere by acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riutov, D. D.; Riutova, M. P.

    The novel mechanism presented for current and magnetic field generation by acoustic-wave fluxes in solar plasmas is especially potent in the region where acoustic-wave damping is due to such nonlinear effects as weak-shock formation. An evaluation is made of the significance of this effect for the solar atmosphere, under the proviso that this treatment is restricted to effects due to the usual acoustic waves. Wave absorption is governed by the classical collisional effects of thermal conductivity, viscosity, and ohmic losses.

  20. Observational Investigation of Solar Interior and Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jeffrey R.

    2003-01-01

    The Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) has been modified to make it easier to observe at more than one spectral line. The cell holding the blocking filter has been replaced by a four-position filter wheel, so that changing to a different line is a matter of a few minutes rather than the several hours it used to take to disassemble the cell and install a new filter. Three new filters have been obtained, for Na 1589.6 nm, Fe 1630.25 nm, and H 1656.3 nm. The new filters have better bandpass profiles than the ones they replaced: somewhat wider, with flatter tops and steeper wings. This results in a reduction of parasitic light coming from adjacent Fabry-Perot orders, from seven percent to about two percent, and flattens the apparent continuum. The Mees CCD Imaging Spectrograph (MCCD) was upgraded under this grant, with a new control computer and data system. The camera was replaced with a faster, larger-format frame-transfer camera. Final integration of the upgrades is not yet complete, but tests indicate that the system cadence will be improved by a factor of five to ten, while increasing the spatial coverage by a factor of two (depending on observation options). Synoptic observations with the IVM and MCCD continue to be conducted daily, to the extent permitted by the fact that we have a single observer responsible for the observations. The older Haleakala Stokes Polarimeter is also used to make a daily vector magnetogram, normally of the region selected by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) duty scientists. This instrument, however, is showing its age to the extent that its maintenance is becoming something of a challenge. We also run a white light full-disk imager and a video H alpha prominence camera, continuously during times of observations. Of particular interest, we obtained rapid-cadence observations of the 2003 July 15 white light flare with both the IVM and MCCD. The vector magnetograms show no obvious difference between the

  1. Solar nebula chemistry - Implications for volatiles in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Current theoretical models of solar nebula chemistry which take into account the interplay between chemistry and dynamics are presented for the abundant reactive volatile elements including hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Results of these models indicate that, in the solar nebula, the dominant carbon and nitrogen gases were CO and NO, whereas, in giant planet subnebulae, the dominant carbon and nitrogen gases were CH4 and NH3; in the solar nebula, the Fe metal grains catalyzed the formation of organic compounds from CO and H2 via the Fischer-Tropsch-type reaction. It was also found that, in solar nebula, bulk FeS formation was kinetically favorable, while FeO incorporation into silicates and bulk Fe3O4 formation were kinetically inhibited. Furthermore, clathrate formation was kinetically inhibited in the solar nebula, while it was kinetically favorable in giant planet subnebulae.

  2. Episodic Atmospheric Heating at Venus and Mars by Solar Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, D. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Cohen, C. M.; Bougher, S. W.; Lillis, R. J.; Luhmann, J. G.; Delory, G. T.; Lammer, H.; Leblanc, F.

    2007-05-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. One potentially important energy source is solar energetic particle (SEP) events consisting of large fluxes of charged particles accelerated near the Sun during and following fast coronal mass ejections. While other mechanisms provide more constant sources of energy, SEP events can significantly affect an atmosphere for short periods, possibly enhancing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. At unmagnetized planets, in particular, SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Here we present the results calculations of the energy input by a single large SEP event in the CO2 atmospheres of Venus and Mars. Using simplifying assumptions we calculate the penetration depth and energy deposition profile of energetic protons having different incident energies, and weight the profiles by the event-integrated energy spectrum of a SEP event to estimate the total energy deposition. We also use a more sophisticated radiation code (TRIM/HZETRN) to include the effects of secondary particles on the energy deposition profiles.

  3. Particle acceleration and transport in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Eduard

    2016-07-01

    During periods of sporadic flare activity, the Sun releases energy stored in the magnetic field into the plasma of the solar atmosphere. This is an extremely efficient process, with a large fraction of the magnetic energy going into plasma particles. The solar flares are accompanied by prompt electromagnetic emission virtually over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma-rays down to radio frequencies. The Sun, through its activity, also plays a driving role in the Sun-Earth system that substantially influences geophysical space. Solar flare energetic particles from the Sun are detected in interplanetary space by in-situ measurements making them a vital component of the single Sun-Earth system. Although a qualitative picture is generally agreed upon, many processes solar flare processes are poorly understood. Specifically, the processes of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles interacting on various physical scales remain major challenges in solar physics and basic plasma physics. In the talk, I will review the current understanding of solar flare energetic particles focusing on recent observational progress, which became possible due to the numerous spacecraft and ground-based observations.

  4. Atmospheric boundary layer processes during a total solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S.; Prabhu, A.; Narahari Rao, K.; Narasimha, R.

    1980-01-01

    The total solar eclipse that occurred over the southern part of India on February 16, 1980, gave a unique opportunity to study the earth's atmospheric boundary layer. The meteorological experiments during the 1980 solar eclipse were conducted at Raichur, India (16/sup 0/12'N, 77/sup 0/21'E) located in the state of Karnataka, approximately 400-m above sea level. The main objective was to determine the changes in the earth's atmosphere during and immediately after the eclipse. The goal was to study the changes in the momentum and heat fluxes in the boundary layer due to the eclipse. Measurements were made for 2 days prior to and 1 day after the day of the eclipse to determine background characteristics of the boundary layer which might be site-dependent.

  5. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  6. Solar cycle effect on atmospheric carbon dioxide levels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, B.L.; Rust, B.W.

    1983-01-01

    The authors present a causal time-series model for the Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 record which supersedes a mathematical model consisting of four effects represented by exponential and sine functions. One effect is a 142-month oscillation which trails the sunspot numbers by exactly a quarter-cycle. This suggests that solar activity affects the rate of change in the atmospheric CO2 abundance. The new model replaces the mathematical functions with four measured time series representing proposed physical causes and reduces the number of adjustable parameters from 13 to 5 with no significant deterioration in the fit. The authors present evidence that solar activity affects the CO2 abundance through variations in ocean temperature or circulation.

  7. Solar geoengineering, atmospheric water vapor transport, and land plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, Ken; Cao, Long

    2015-04-01

    This work, using the GeoMIP database supplemented by additional simulations, discusses how solar geoengineering, as projected by the climate models, affects temperature and the hydrological cycle, and how this in turn is related to projected changes in net primary productivity (NPP). Solar geoengineering simulations typically exhibit reduced precipitation. Solar geoengineering reduces precipitation because solar geoengineering reduces evaporation. Evaporation precedes precipitation, and, globally, evaporation equals precipitation. CO2 tends to reduce evaporation through two main mechanisms: (1) CO2 tends to stabilize the atmosphere especially over the ocean, leading to a moister atmospheric boundary layer over the ocean. This moistening of the boundary layer suppresses evaporation. (2) CO2 tends to diminish evapotranspiration, at least in most land-surface models, because higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations allow leaves to close their stomata and avoid water loss. In most high-CO2 simulations, these effects of CO2 which tend to suppress evaporation are masked by the tendency of CO2-warming effect to increase evaporation. In a geoengineering simulation, with the warming effect of CO2 largely offset by the solar geoengineering, the evaporation suppressing characteristics of CO2 are no longer masked and are clearly exhibited. Decreased precipitation in solar geoengineering simulations is a bit like ocean acidification - an effect of high CO2 concentrations that is not offset by solar geoengineering. Locally, precipitation ultimately either evaporates (much of that through the leaves of plants) or runs off through groundwater to streams and rivers. On long time scales, runoff equals precipitation minus evaporation, and thus, water runoff generated at a location is equal to the net atmospheric transport of water to that location. Runoff typically occurs where there is substantial soil moisture, at least seasonally. Locations where there is enough water to maintain

  8. Equilibrium model of thin magnetic flux tubes. [solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodo, G.; Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of a physically realizable domain in which approximations that lead to a self consistent solution for flux tube stratification in the solar atmosphere, without ad hoc hypotheses, is proved. The transfer equation is solved assuming that no energy transport other than radiative is present. Convective motions inside the tube are assumed to be suppressed by magnetic forces. Only one parameter, the plasma beta at tau = 0, must be specified, and this can be estimated from observations of spatially resolved flux tubes.

  9. The evolution of solar ultraviolet luminosity. [influence on planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1982-01-01

    Astronomical observations of stars analogous to the sun are used to construct a tentative account of the evolution of solar UV luminosity. Evidence exists that the young sun was a much more powerful source of energetic particles and radiation than it is today, and while on the main sequence, solar activity has declined as an inverse power law of age as a consequence of angular momentum loss to the solar wind. Observations of pre-main sequence stars indicate that before the sun reached the main sequence, it may have emitted as much as ten thousand times the amount of ultraviolet radiation that it does today. The impact of the results on knowledge of photochemistry and escape of constituents of primordial planetary atmospheres is discussed.

  10. Heating of the outer solar atmosphere. I. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, E. N.

    The magnetic field coming up through the surface of the sun is responsible for the solar activity that heats the outer solar atmosphere. The field behaves in ways that are unexpected and little understood. Beckers and Schroeter (1969) found that the field of the sun has a fibril structure made up of separate, compressed flux tubes having fields of 1000-2000 G and 100-500 km diameters. Immediately above the solar surface, the field expands to fill the available volume. Nothing is known about the state beneath the surface of the sun. Attention is presently given to the state of knowledge on the heating of the corona as well as to a model for magnetic merging. In the second part of this presentation, the mutual wrapping and shuffling of the lines of force of a bipolar magnetic field above the photosphere and the structure of the cross section through a flux tube bundle are discussed.

  11. The effects of solar particle events on the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Douglass, Anne R.; Meade, Paul E.

    1989-01-01

    Solar particle events (SPEs) have been investigated since the late 1960's for possible effects on the middle atmosphere. Solar protons from SPEs produce ionizations, dissociations, dissociative ionizations, and excitations in the middle atmosphere. The production of HO(x) and NO(x) and their subsequent effects on ozone can also be computed using energy deposition and photochemical models. The effects of SPE-produced HO(x) species on the odd nitrogen abundance of the middle atmosphere as well as the SPE-produced long term effects on ozone. Model computations indicate fairly good agreement with ozone data for the SPE-induced ozone depletion caused by NO(y) species connected with the August 1972 SPE. The model computations indicate that NO(y) will not be substantially changed over a solar cycle by SPEs. The changes are mainly at high latitudes and are on time scales of several months, after which the NO(y) drifts back to its ambient levels.

  12. Statistical equilibrium of copper in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, J. R.; Mashonkina, L.; Zhao, G.; Gehren, T.; Zeng, J. L.

    2014-02-20

    Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for neutral copper in the one-dimensional solar atmospheres is presented for the atomic model, including 96 terms of Cu I and the ground state of Cu II. The accurate oscillator strengths for all the line transitions in model atom and photoionization cross sections were calculated using the R-matrix method in the Russell-Saunders coupling scheme. The main NLTE mechanism for Cu I is the ultraviolet overionization. We find that NLTE leads to systematically depleted total absorption in the Cu I lines and, accordingly, positive abundance corrections. Inelastic collisions with neutral hydrogen atoms produce minor effects on the statistical equilibrium of Cu I in the solar atmosphere. For the solar Cu I lines, the departures from LTE are found to be small, the mean NLTE abundance correction of ∼0.01 dex. It was found that the six low-excitation lines, with excitation energy of the lower level E {sub exc} ≤ 1.64 eV, give a 0.14 dex lower mean solar abundance compared to that from the six E {sub exc} > 3.7 eV lines, when applying experimental gf-values of Kock and Richter. Without the two strong resonance transitions, the solar mean NLTE abundance from 10 lines of Cu I is log ε{sub ☉}(Cu) = 4.19 ± 0.10, which is consistent within the error bars with the meteoritic value 4.25 ± 0.05 of Lodders et al. The discrepancy between E {sub exc} = 1.39-1.64 eV and E {sub exc} > 3.7 eV lines can be removed when the calculated gf-values are adopted and a mean solar abundance of log ε{sub ☉}(Cu) = 4.24 ± 0.08 is derived.

  13. Statistical Equilibrium of Copper in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J. R.; Gehren, T.; Zeng, J. L.; Mashonkina, L.; Zhao, G.

    2014-02-01

    Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) line formation for neutral copper in the one-dimensional solar atmospheres is presented for the atomic model, including 96 terms of Cu I and the ground state of Cu II. The accurate oscillator strengths for all the line transitions in model atom and photoionization cross sections were calculated using the R-matrix method in the Russell-Saunders coupling scheme. The main NLTE mechanism for Cu I is the ultraviolet overionization. We find that NLTE leads to systematically depleted total absorption in the Cu I lines and, accordingly, positive abundance corrections. Inelastic collisions with neutral hydrogen atoms produce minor effects on the statistical equilibrium of Cu I in the solar atmosphere. For the solar Cu I lines, the departures from LTE are found to be small, the mean NLTE abundance correction of ~0.01 dex. It was found that the six low-excitation lines, with excitation energy of the lower level E exc <= 1.64 eV, give a 0.14 dex lower mean solar abundance compared to that from the six E exc > 3.7 eV lines, when applying experimental gf-values of Kock & Richter. Without the two strong resonance transitions, the solar mean NLTE abundance from 10 lines of Cu I is log ɛ⊙(Cu) = 4.19 ± 0.10, which is consistent within the error bars with the meteoritic value 4.25 ± 0.05 of Lodders et al. The discrepancy between E exc = 1.39-1.64 eV and E exc > 3.7 eV lines can be removed when the calculated gf-values are adopted and a mean solar abundance of log ɛ⊙(Cu) = 4.24 ± 0.08 is derived.

  14. Origin and stability of exomoon atmospheres: implications for habitability.

    PubMed

    Lammer, Helmut; Schiefer, Sonja-Charlotte; Juvan, Ines; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Weber, Christof; Kislyakova, Kristina G; Güdel, Manuel; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2014-09-01

    We study the origin and escape of catastrophically outgassed volatiles (H2O, CO2) from exomoons with Earth-like densities and masses of 0.1, 0.5 and 1 M⊕ orbiting an extra-solar gas giant inside the habitable zone of a young active solar-like star. We apply a radiation absorption and hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model to the three studied exomoon cases. We model the escape of hydrogen and dragged dissociation products O and C during the activity saturation phase of the young host star. Because the soft X-ray and EUV radiation of the young host star may be up to ~100 times higher compared to today's solar value during the first 100 Myr after the system's origin, an exomoon with a mass < 0.25 M⊕ located in the HZ may not be able to keep an atmosphere because of its low gravity. Depending on the spectral type and XUV activity evolution of the host star, exomoons with masses between ~0.25 and 0.5 M⊕ may evolve to Mars-like habitats. More massive bodies with masses >0.5 M⊕, however, may evolve to habitats that are a mixture of Mars-like and Earth-analogue habitats, so that life may originate and evolve at the exomoon's surface. PMID:25515344

  15. Extreme Ultra-Violet Spectroscopy of the Lower Solar Atmosphere During Solar Flares (Invited Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, Ryan O.

    2015-12-01

    The extreme ultra-violet (EUV) portion of the solar spectrum contains a wealth of diagnostic tools for probing the lower solar atmosphere in response to an injection of energy, particularly during the impulsive phase of solar flares. These include temperature- and density-sensitive line ratios, Doppler-shifted emission lines, nonthermal broadening, abundance measurements, differential emission measure profiles, continuum temperatures and energetics, among others. In this article I review some of the recent advances that have been made using these techniques to infer physical properties of heated plasma at footpoint and ribbon locations during the initial stages of solar flares. I primarily focus on studies that have utilised spectroscopic EUV data from Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar Dynamics Observatory/EUV Variability Experiment (SDO/EVE), and I also provide some historical background and a summary of future spectroscopic instrumentation.

  16. Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) Applications at Solar System Bodies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, G.; Sen, B.; Polidan, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Introduction: Northrop Grumman and L'Garde have continued the development of a hypersonic entry, maneuverable platform capable of performing long-duration (months to a year) in situ and remote measurements at any solar system body that possesses an atmosphere. The Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) family of vehicles achieve this capability by using a semi-buoyant, ultra-low ballistic coefficient vehicle whose lifting entry allows it to enter the atmosphere without an aeroshell. In this presentation, we discuss the application of the LEAF system at various solar system bodies: Venus, Titan, Mars, and Earth. We present the key differences in platform design as well as operational differences required by the various target environments. The Venus implementation includes propulsive capability to reach higher altitudes during the day and achieves full buoyancy in the "habitable layers" of Venus' atmosphere at night. Titan also offers an attractive operating environment, allowing LEAF designs that can target low, medium, or high altitude operations, also with propulsive capabilities to roam within each altitude regime. The Mars version is a glider that descends gradually, allowing targeted delivery of payloads to the surface. Finally, an Earth version could remain in orbit in a stowed state until activated, allowing rapid response type deployments to any region of the globe.

  17. The statistical properties of vortex flows in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Kato, Yoshiaki; Steiner, Oskar

    2015-08-01

    Rotating magnetic field structures associated with vortex flows on the Sun, also known as “magnetic tornadoes”, may serve as waveguides for MHD waves and transport mass and energy upwards through the atmosphere. Magnetic tornadoes may therefore potentially contribute to the heating of the upper atmospheric layers in quiet Sun regions.Magnetic tornadoes are observed over a large range of spatial and temporal scales in different layers in quiet Sun regions. However, their statistical properties such as size, lifetime, and rotation speed are not well understood yet because observations of these small-scale events are technically challenging and limited by the spatial and temporal resolution of current instruments. Better statistics based on a combination of high-resolution observations and state-of-the-art numerical simulations is the key to a reliable estimate of the energy input in the lower layers and of the energy deposition in the upper layers. For this purpose, we have developed a fast and reliable tool for the determination and visualization of the flow field in (observed) image sequences. This technique, which combines local correlation tracking (LCT) and line integral convolution (LIC), facilitates the detection and study of dynamic events on small scales, such as propagating waves. Here, we present statistical properties of vortex flows in different layers of the solar atmosphere and try to give realistic estimates of the energy flux which is potentially available for heating of the upper solar atmosphere

  18. Searching for Motion within the Solar Atmosphere (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oatney, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The mystery of heat transfer within the solar atmosphere has long been a subject of study and debate. Not unlike large solar observatories that are funded by public monies, amateur solar observers also have a keen interest in this subject and are able to creatively employ tools at hand such as a two slit interferometer used to create interference lines in an attempt to measure motion. (Interference patterns: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-slit_experiment) With a 6-inch equatorially pier mounted refractor focused just above the visible disk of the sun, images taken with a Meade Lunar Planetary Imager video LPI CMOS camera at ~30 Hz sample rates and stored as FITS files. A variety of photometry, unrated color, and full aperture solar filters are combined with and without a two slit interferometer placed at the focus of the telescope. These images, explored through the NASA FITS viewer (https://heasarc.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/software/ftools/fv/) were applied to show logarithmic color contours. Selected fv images were placed consecutively in a movie format that shows some cyclical motion around and between the contours, mostly of the solar corona.

  19. The Influence of Large Solar Proton Events on the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) can cause changes in constituents in the Earth s polar middle atmosphere. A number of large SPEs have occurred over the past 50 years and tend to happen most frequently near solar maximum. The highly energetic protons cause ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents. Complicated ion chemistry leads to HOx (H, OH, HO2) production and dissociation of N2 leads to NOy (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2) production. Both the HOx and NOy increases can result in changes to ozone in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The HOx increases lead to short-lived (days) ozone decreases in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. The NOy increases lead to long-lived (several months) stratospheric ozone changes because of the long lifetime of NOy constituents in this region. UARS HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) instrument observations showed SPE-caused polar stratospheric NOx (NO+NO2) increases over 10 ppbv in September 2000 due to the very large SPE of July 2000, which are reasonably well simulated with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). WACCM-computed SPE-caused polar stratospheric ozone decreases >10% continued for up to 5 months past the largest events in the past 50 years, however, SPE-caused total ozone changes were not found to be statistically significant. Small polar middle atmospheric temperature changes of <4 K have also been predicted to occur as a result of the larger SPEs. The polar atmospheric effects of large SPEs during solar cycle 23 and 24 will be emphasized in this presentation.

  20. Solar activity impact on the Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutiev, Ivan; Tsagouri, Ioanna; Perrone, Loredana; Pancheva, Dora; Mukhtarov, Plamen; Mikhailov, Andrei; Lastovicka, Jan; Jakowski, Norbert; Buresova, Dalia; Blanch, Estefania; Andonov, Borislav; Altadill, David; Magdaleno, Sergio; Parisi, Mario; Miquel Torta, Joan

    2013-02-01

    The paper describes results of the studies devoted to the solar activity impact on the Earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere, conducted within the frame of COST ES0803 Action. Aim: The aim of the paper is to represent results coming from different research groups in a unified form, aligning their specific topics into the general context of the subject. Methods: The methods used in the paper are based on data-driven analysis. Specific databases are used for spectrum analysis, empirical modeling, electron density profile reconstruction, and forecasting techniques. Results: Results are grouped in three sections: Medium- and long-term ionospheric response to the changes in solar and geomagnetic activity, storm-time ionospheric response to the solar and geomagnetic forcing, and modeling and forecasting techniques. Section 1 contains five subsections with results on 27-day response of low-latitude ionosphere to solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) radiation, response to the recurrent geomagnetic storms, long-term trends in the upper atmosphere, latitudinal dependence of total electron content on EUV changes, and statistical analysis of ionospheric behavior during prolonged period of solar activity. Section 2 contains a study of ionospheric variations induced by recurrent CIR-driven storm, a case-study of polar cap absorption due to an intense CME, and a statistical study of geographic distribution of so-called E-layer dominated ionosphere. Section 3 comprises empirical models for describing and forecasting TEC, the F-layer critical frequency foF2, and the height of maximum plasma density. A study evaluates the usefulness of effective sunspot number in specifying the ionosphere state. An original method is presented, which retrieves the basic thermospheric parameters from ionospheric sounding data.

  1. Observational Evidence for Variations of the Acoustic Cutoff Frequency with Height in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, A.; Musielak, Z. E.; Staiger, J.; Roth, M.

    2016-03-01

    Direct evidence for the existence of an acoustic cutoff frequency in the solar atmosphere is given by observations performed by using the HELioseismological Large Regions Interferometric DEvice operating on the Vacuum Tower Telescope located on Tenerife. The observational results demonstrate variations of the cutoff with atmospheric heights. The observed variations of the cutoff are compared to theoretical predictions made by using five acoustic cutoff frequencies that have been commonly used in helioseismology and asteroseismology. The comparison shows that none of the theoretical predictions is fully consistent with the observational data. The implication of this finding is far reaching as it urgently requires either major revisions of the existing methods of finding acoustic cutoff frequencies or developing new methods that would much better account for the physical picture underlying the concept of cutoff frequencies in inhomogeneous media.

  2. Solar Wind Interaction with the Martian Upper Atmosphere at Early Mars/Extreme Solar Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, C.; Bougher, S. W.; Ma, Y.; Toth, G.; Lee, Y.; Nagy, A. F.; Tenishev, V.; Pawlowski, D. J.; Combi, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The investigation of ion escape fluxes from Mars, resulting from the solar wind interaction with its upper atmosphere/ionosphere, is important due to its potential impact on the long-term evolution of Mars atmosphere (e.g., loss of water) over its history. In the present work, we adopt the 3-D Mars cold neutral atmosphere profiles (0 ~ 300 km) from the newly developed and validated Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM) and the 3-D hot oxygen profiles (100 km ~ 5 RM) from the exosphere Monte Carlo model Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (AMPS). We apply these 3-D model output fields into the 3-D BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD (MF-MHD) model (100 km ~ 20 RM) that can simulate the interplay between Mars upper atmosphere and solar wind by considering the dynamics of individual ion species. The multi-fluid MHD model solves separate continuity, momentum and energy equations for each ion species (H+, O+, O2+, CO2+). The M-GITM model together with the AMPS exosphere model take into account the effects of solar cycle and seasonal variations on both cold and hot neutral atmospheres. This feature allows us to investigate the corresponding effects on the Mars upper atmosphere ion escape by using a one-way coupling approach, i.e., both the M-GITM and AMPS model output fields are used as the input for the multi-fluid MHD model and the M-GITM is used as input into the AMPS exosphere model. In this study, we present M-GITM, AMPS, and MF-MHD calculations (1-way coupled) for 2.5 GYA conditions and/or extreme solar conditions for present day Mars (high solar wind velocities, high solar wind dynamic pressure, and high solar irradiance conditions, etc.). Present day extreme conditions may result in MF-MHD outputs that are similar to 2.5 GYA cases. The crustal field orientations are also considered in this study. By comparing estimates of past ion escape rates with the current ion loss rates to be returned by the MAVEN spacecraft (2013-2016), we can better constrain the

  3. Theoretical studies of the physics of the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1992-01-01

    Significant advances in our theoretical basis for understanding several physical processes related to dynamical phenomena on the sun were achieved. We have advanced a new model for spicules and fibrils. We have provided a simple physical view of resonance absorption of MHD surface waves; this allowed an approximate mathematical procedure for obtaining a wealth of new analytical results which we applied to coronal heating and p-mode absorption at magnetic regions. We provided the first comprehensive models for the heating and acceleration of the transition region, corona, and solar wind. We provided a new view of viscosity under coronal conditions. We provided new insights into Alfven wave propagation in the solar atmosphere. And recently we have begun work in a new direction: parametric instabilities of Alfven waves.

  4. Solar pressure and molecular decay in cometary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, D. B.; Whelan, T. A.; Gast, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of solar pressure and molecular decay on number density in cometary atmospheres are rigorously separated and scale lengths for each are determined from an analysis of observed brightness profiles in the solar and antisolar directions. It is found that the pressure scale length of CN is approximately 160,000 km and that of C2 is approximately 110,000 km. The scale length for molecular decay, heretofore incorrectly inferred from the observational data, is approximately 3 times as long as the pressure scale lengths. It is difficult to determine adequately from observations that extend no more than about 100,000 km from the comet nucleus. The scale length for molecular decay by photodissociation or whatever cause is found to be about 350,000 km for C2 and 500,000 km for CN.

  5. Solar Flux Deposition And Heating Rates In Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Hoyos, Santiago; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2009-09-01

    We discuss here the solar downward net flux in the 0.25 - 2.5 µm range in the atmosphere of Jupiter and the associated heating rates under a number of vertical cloud structure scenarios focusing in the effect of clouds and hazes. Our numerical model is based in the doubling-adding technique to solve the radiative transfer equation and it includes gas absorption by CH4, NH3 and H2, in addition to Rayleigh scattering by a mixture of H2 plus He. Four paradigmatic Jovian regions have been considered (hot-spots, belts, zones and Polar Regions). The hot-spots are the most transparent regions with downward net fluxes of 2.5±0.5 Wm-2 at the 6 bar level. The maximum solar heating is 0.04±0.01 K/day and occurs above 1 bar. Belts and zones characterization result in a maximum net downward flux of 0.5 Wm-2 at 2 bar and 0.015 Wm-2 at 6 bar. Heating is concentrated in the stratospheric and tropospheric hazes. Finally, Polar Regions are also explored and the results point to a considerable stratospheric heating of 0.04±0.02 K/day. In all, these calculations suggest that the role of the direct solar forcing in the Jovian atmospheric dynamics is limited to the upper 1 - 2 bar of the atmosphere except in the hot-spot areas. Acknowledgments: This work has been funded by Spanish MEC AYA2006-07735 with FEDER support and Grupos Gobierno Vasco IT-464-07.

  6. Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) System Concept Applications at Solar System Bodies With an Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Greg; Polidan, Ronald; Ross, Floyd; Sokol, Daniel; Warwick, Steve

    2015-11-01

    Northrop Grumman and L’Garde have continued the development of a hypersonic entry, semi-buoyant, maneuverable platform capable of performing long-duration (months to a year) in situ and remote measurements at any solar system body that possesses an atmosphere.The Lifting Entry & Atmospheric Flight (LEAF) family of vehicles achieves this capability by using a semi-buoyant, ultra-low ballistic coefficient vehicle whose lifting entry allows it to enter the atmosphere without an aeroshell. The mass savings realized by eliminating the heavy aeroshell allows significantly more payload to be accommodated by the platform for additional science collection and return.In this presentation, we discuss the application of the LEAF system at various solar system bodies: Venus, Titan, Mars, and Earth. We present the key differences in platform design as well as operational differences required by the various target environments. The Venus implementation includes propulsive capability to reach higher altitudes during the day and achieves full buoyancy in the mid-cloud layer of Venus’ atmosphere at night.Titan also offers an attractive operating environment, allowing LEAF designs that can target low or medium altitude operations, also with propulsive capabilities to roam within each altitude regime. The Mars version is a glider that descends gradually, allowing targeted delivery of payloads to the surface or high resolution surface imaging. Finally, an Earth version could remain in orbit in a stowed state until activated, allowing rapid response type deployments to any region of the globe.

  7. Water loss from Venus: Implications for the Earth's early atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, S. M.; Pollack, J. B.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The atmosphere of Venus outgassed rapidly as a result of planetary heating during accretion, resulting in massive water loss. The processes affecting atmospheric chemistry following accretion have consisted largely of hydrogen escape and internal re-equilibrium. The initial bulk composition of Venus and Earth are assumed to have been roughly similar. Chemical speciation on Venus was controlled by the temperature and oxygen buffering capacity of the surface magma. It is also assumed that the surfaces of planetary bodies of the inner solar system were partly or wholly molten during accretion with a temperature estimated at 1273 to 1573 K. To investigate the range of reasonable initial atmospheric compositions on Venus, limits have to be set for the proportion of total hydrogen and the buffered fugacity of oxygen. Using the C/H ratio of 0.033 set for Earth, virtually all of the water generated during outgassing must later have been lost in order to bring the current CO2/H2O ratio for Venus up to its observed value of 10 sup 4 to 10 sup 5. The proportion of H2O decreases in model atmospheres with successfully higher C/H values, ultimately approaching the depleted values currently observed on Venus. Increasing C/H also results in a rapid increase in CO/H2O and provides an efficient mechanism for water loss by the reaction CO+H2O = CO2 + H2. This reaction, plus water loss mechanisms involving crustal iron, could have removed a very large volume of water from the Venusian atmosphere, even at a low C/H value.

  8. Atmospheric Solar Absorption measurements in the lowest 3-km of the atmosphere with small UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramana, M. V.; Ramanathan, V.; Roberts, G.; Corrigan, C.; Nguyen, H. V.; McFarquhar, G.

    2007-12-01

    This paper reports unique measurements of atmospheric solar absorption and heating rates in the visible (0.4- 0.7 Ým) and broadband (0.3-2.8 Ým) spectral regions using vertically stacked multiple light weight autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) during the Maldives autonomous UAV campaign (MAC). The UAVs and ground based remote sensing instruments determined most of the parameters required for calculating the albedo and vertical distribution of solar fluxes. Measured fluxes have been compared with those derived from a Monte-Carlo radiative transfer algorithm which can incorporate both gaseous and aerosol components. The analysis focuses on a cloud-free day when the air was polluted due to long range transport from India, and the mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) was 0.31 and mean single scattering albedo was 0.92. The UAV measured absorption AOD was 0.019 which agreed within 20% of the value of 0.024 reported by a ground based instrument. The observed and simulated solar absorption agreed within 5% above 1.0 km and aerosol absorption accounted for 30% to 50% of the absorption depending upon the altitude and solar zenith angle. Thus there was no need to invoke anomalous or excess absorption or unknown physics in clear skies, provided we account for aerosol black carbon. The diurnal mean absorption values for altitudes between 0.5 and 3.0 km msl were observed to be 41¡Ó3 Wm-2 (1.5 K/day) in the broadband region and 8¡Ó2 Wm-2 (0.3 K/day) in the visible region. Future investigations into the atmospheric absorption in cloudy skies will characterize the spatial and temporal variation of the cloudy atmosphere in sufficient detail to simulate the vertical distribution of net solar fluxes to permit comparison with the collected radiative observations. This next phase will utilize 4 stacked UAVs to observe the extended cloud decks off the coast of California. A combination of observations and models will then be used to assess if the amount of solar absorption

  9. Satellite solar occultation sounding of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. M., III

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses the principles, achievements, and prospects for satellite solar occultation sounding of the middle atmosphere. Advantages, disadvantages, and spatial and temporal coverage capabilities are described. Progress over the past 15 years is reviewed, and results from a recent satellite aerosol experiment are presented. Questions with regard to Doppler shift, atmospheric refraction, instrument pointing, pressure sensing, and measurement of diurnally active species are addressed. Two experiments now orbiting on the Nimbus-7 and AEM-B satellites, and approved experiments under development for future flights on Spacelab and the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, are also described. In some cases more than one experiment is scheduled to be flown on the same spacecraft, and the advantages and synergistic effects of these applications are discussed.

  10. Impacts of solar particle events on middle atmospheric chlorine compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Holger; Sinnhuber, Miriam; Wissing, Jan-Maik; Kallenrode, May-Britt; Stiller, Gabrielle; von Clarmann, Thomas; Funke, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    Solar particle events (SPEs) are well known sources of chemical perturbations in the middle atmosphere. A well-understood effect is the release of reactive NOx and HOx, and the subsequent destruction of ozone. Satellite measurements (HALOE, MIPAS, AURA-MLS) have shown that there is also chlorine activation in the stratosphere and mesosphere, and an increase of chlorine nitrate in the lower and middle stratosphere during SPEs. This cannot be explained by the NOx and HOx increase alone. Atmospheric models with standard parametrizations of NOx and HOx production due to SPEs fail to reproduce the magnitude of the observed chlorine disturbances. Numerical simulations using the University of Bremen ion chemistry (UBIC) model show a much better agreement with measurements if full negative ion chemistry is considered additionally to the NOx and HOx production. The UBIC results in combination with atmospheric models indicate that reactions of negative cluster ions can have a significant impact on the middle atmosphere's chlorine chemistry during SPEs. There is a transformation of HCl into active chlorine via anion cluster chemistry. Additionally, the release of O(1D) through N(2D) + O2 - NO + O(1D) has a considerable impact on chlorine species. Results of UBIC simulations for different SPEs (July 2000, October 2003, January 2005) are presented. They are compared with the observed changes of chlorine compounds - HCl, HOCl, ClO and ClONO2 - from the satellite instruments HALOE, MIPAS and AURA-MLS.

  11. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-06-01

    The fact that this electrified plasma speeds up to almost 3 million kilometres per hour as it leaves the Sun - twice as fast as originally predicted - has been known for years. The interpretation of how it happens is the real and surprising novelty: "The waves in the Sun's atmosphere are produced by vibrating solar magnetic field lines, which give solar wind particles a push just like an ocean wave gives a surfer a ride" said Dr John Kohl, principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) - the instrument among the 12 aboard SOHO which gathered the data - and for the Spartan 201 mission. The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is only seen from Earth during a total eclipse of the Sun, when it appears as a shimmering, white veil surrounding the black lunar disc. The corona is an extremely tenuous, electrically charged gas, known as plasma, that flows throughout the solar system as the solar wind. The waves are formed by rapidly vibrating magnetic fields in the coronal plasma. They are called magneto - hydro - dynamic (MHD) waves and are believed to accelerate the solar wind. The solar wind is made up of electrons and ions, electrically charged atoms that have lost electrons. The electric charge of the solar wind particles forces them to travel along invisible lines of magnetic force in the corona. The particles spiral around the magnetic field lines as they rush into space. "The magnetic field acts like a violin string: when it's touched, it vibrates. When the Sun's magnetic field vibrates with a frequency equal to that of the particle spiraling around the magnetic field, it heats it up, producing a force that accelerates the particle upward and away from the Sun," says Dr. Ester Antonucci, an astronomer at the observatory of Turin, Italy, and co-investigator for SOHO's UVCS an instrument developed with considerable financial support by the Italian Space Agency, ASI. In a way this is similar to what happens if two people hold a string at

  12. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    The fact that this electrified plasma speeds up to almost 3 million kilometres per hour as it leaves the Sun - twice as fast as originally predicted - has been known for years. The interpretation of how it happens is the real and surprising novelty: "The waves in the Sun's atmosphere are produced by vibrating solar magnetic field lines, which give solar wind particles a push just like an ocean wave gives a surfer a ride" said Dr John Kohl, principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) - the instrument among the 12 aboard SOHO which gathered the data - and for the Spartan 201 mission. The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is only seen from Earth during a total eclipse of the Sun, when it appears as a shimmering, white veil surrounding the black lunar disc. The corona is an extremely tenuous, electrically charged gas, known as plasma, that flows throughout the solar system as the solar wind. The waves are formed by rapidly vibrating magnetic fields in the coronal plasma. They are called magneto - hydro - dynamic (MHD) waves and are believed to accelerate the solar wind. The solar wind is made up of electrons and ions, electrically charged atoms that have lost electrons. The electric charge of the solar wind particles forces them to travel along invisible lines of magnetic force in the corona. The particles spiral around the magnetic field lines as they rush into space. "The magnetic field acts like a violin string: when it's touched, it vibrates. When the Sun's magnetic field vibrates with a frequency equal to that of the particle spiraling around the magnetic field, it heats it up, producing a force that accelerates the particle upward and away from the Sun," says Dr. Ester Antonucci, an astronomer at the observatory of Turin, Italy, and co-investigator for SOHO's UVCS an instrument developed with considerable financial support by the Italian Space Agency, ASI. In a way this is similar to what happens if two people hold a string at

  13. Surface solitary waves and solitons. [in solar atmosphere and solar wind magnetic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Roberts, B.

    1984-01-01

    The solar atmosphere and solar wind are magnetically structured. The structuring can include tangential discontinuities, which can support surface waves. Such waves can be dispersive. This means that dispersion and nonlinearity can balance in such a way that solitary waves (or solitons) can result. This general point is illustrated by a two-dimensional nonlinear analysis which explicitly demonstrates the presence of long-wavelength solitary waves propagating on tangential discontinuities. If the waves are only weakly nonlinear, then they obey the Korteweg-de Vries equation and are true solitons.

  14. Small scale MHD wave processes in the solar atmosphere and solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1987-01-01

    Solar wind observations suggesting wave-particle interactions via ion-cyclotron resonances are reviewed. The required power at high frequencies is presumably supplied via a turbulent cascade. Tu's (1987) model, which considers a turbulent cascade explicitly, is outlined. In the solar atmosphere, resonance absorption is considered. The meanings of the cusp and Alfven resonances are discussed, and it is shown how energy gets pumped into small scales. It is shown that resonance absorption can heat the corona and spicules in a manner consistent with observations, if turbulence provides an eddy viscosity.

  15. Stratospheric ozone changes under solar geoengineering: implications for UV exposure and air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowack, Peer Johannes; Abraham, Nathan Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John Adrian

    2016-03-01

    Various forms of geoengineering have been proposed to counter anthropogenic climate change. Methods which aim to modify the Earth's energy balance by reducing insolation are often subsumed under the term solar radiation management (SRM). Here, we present results of a standard SRM modelling experiment in which the incoming solar irradiance is reduced to offset the global mean warming induced by a quadrupling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. For the first time in an atmosphere-ocean coupled climate model, we include atmospheric composition feedbacks for this experiment. While the SRM scheme considered here could offset greenhouse gas induced global mean surface warming, it leads to important changes in atmospheric composition. We find large stratospheric ozone increases that induce significant reductions in surface UV-B irradiance, which would have implications for vitamin D production. In addition, the higher stratospheric ozone levels lead to decreased ozone photolysis in the troposphere. In combination with lower atmospheric specific humidity under SRM, this results in overall surface ozone concentration increases in the idealized G1 experiment. Both UV-B and surface ozone changes are important for human health. We therefore highlight that both stratospheric and tropospheric ozone changes must be considered in the assessment of any SRM scheme, due to their important roles in regulating UV exposure and air quality.

  16. A comprehensive NMR structural study of Titan aerosol analogs: Implications for Titan's atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chao; Smith, Mark A.

    2014-11-01

    Titan has a thick atmosphere composed primarily of nitrogen and methane. Complex organic chemistry induced by solar ultraviolet radiation and energetic particles, takes place in Titan's upper atmosphere, producing an optically thick reddish brown carbon based haze encircling this moon. The chemistry in Titan's atmosphere and its resulting chemical structures are still not fully understood in spite of a great many efforts being made. In our previous work, we have investigated the structure of the 13C and 15N labeled, simulated Titan haze aerosols (tholin) by NMR and identified several dominant small molecules in the tholin. Here we report our expanded structural investigation of the bulk of the tholin by more comprehensive NMR study. The NMR results show that the tholin materials are dominated by heavily nitrogenated compounds, in which the macromolecular structures are highly branched polymeric or oligomeric compounds terminated in methyl, amine, and nitrile groups. The structural characteristic suggest that the tholin materials are formed via different copolymerization or incorporation mechanisms of small precursors, such as HCN, CH2dbnd NH, NH3 and C2H2. This study helps to understand the formation process of nitrogenated organic aerosols in Titan's atmosphere and their prebiotic implications.

  17. A Probable Approx. 2400 Year Solar Quasi-cycle in Atmospheric Delta C-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Jirikowic, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    A 2200 to 2600 year quasi-periodicity is present in atmospheric delta C-14 records after removal of long-term trends due to the geomagnetic dipole amplitude variation. This periodicity consists of both a long-term variation of the mean and a superposed, approximately recurring pattern of century-scale variations. The strongest of these latter variations occur near maxima of the approx. 2400 year delta C-14 cycles. The residual record can be modeled to first order as an amplitude modulation of a century-scale periodic forcing function by a approx. 2400 year periodic forcing function. During the last millennium, the largest century-scale variations (occurring near the most recent 2400 year delta C-14 maximum) are known to be mainly a consequence of the pronounced Maunder, Sporer, and Wolf solar activity minima, as verified by independent proxy solar activity records. Therefore, during this period, amplitude modulation has been occurring primarily in the sun and not in the terrestrial radiocarbon system. It is therefore inferred that the approx. 2400 year forcing function is mainly solar although some secondary terrestrial feedback into the delta C-14 record is likely. This conclusion has implications for the predictability of future pronounced solar activity minima and for the interpretation of certain minor Holocene climatic variations.

  18. Magnetic energy release and topology in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Janvier, Miho

    2016-07-01

    The energy released in a wide range of atmospheric events in the Sun is contained in current-carrying magnetic fields that have emerged after traversing the convection zone. Once the magnetic flux reaches the solar atmosphere, it may be further stressed via motions at the photosphere. Magnetic field reconnection is thought to be the mechanism through which the stored magnetic energy is transformed into kinetic energy of accelerated particles, mass flows, and radiative energy along the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Though this mechanism is efficient only at very small spatial scales, it implies a large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field inferred from the analysis of observations, models of the coronal magnetic field and numerical simulations, combined with the computation of the magnetic field topology. The consequences of energy release include phenomena that range from nano-flares and the slow solar wind to powerful flares that may be accompanied by the ejection of large amounts of plasma into the interplanetary medium. We will discuss how the computation and analysis of the magnetic field topology, applied to a wide variety of observed and modeled magnetic configurations, can be used to identify the energy release locations and their physical characteristics.

  19. Theoretical studies of the solar atmosphere and interstellar pickup ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Solar atmosphere research activities are summarized. Specific topics addressed include: (1) coronal mass ejections and related phenomena; (2) parametric instabilities of Alfven waves; (3) pickup ions in the solar wind; and (4) cosmic rays in the outer heliosphere. Also included is a list of publications covering the following topics: catastrophic evolution of a force-free flux rope; maximum energy release in flux-rope models of eruptive flares; sheet approximations in models of eruptive flares; material ejection, motions of loops and ribbons of two-ribbon flares; dispersion relations for parametric instabilities of parallel-propagating; parametric instabilities of parallel-propagating Alfven waves; beat, modulation, and decay instabilities of a circularly-polarized Alfven wave; effects of time-dependent photoionization on interstellar pickup helium; observation of waves generated by the solar wind pickup of interstellar hydrogen ions; ion thermalization and wave excitation downstream of the quasi-perpendicular bowshock; ion cyclotron instability and the inverse correlation between proton anisotrophy and proton beta; and effects of cosmic rays and interstellar gas on the dynamics of a wind.

  20. Terminology of Large-Scale Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vršnak, Bojan

    2005-03-01

    This is the fourth in a series of essays on terms used in solar-terrestrial physics that are thought to be in need of clarification. Terms are identified and essays are commissioned by a committee chartered by Division II (Sun and Heliosphere) of the International Astronomical Union. Terminology Committee members include Ed Cliver (chair), Jean-Louis Bougeret, Hilary Cane, Takeo Kosugi, Sara Martin, Rainer Schwenn, and Lidia van Driel-Gestelyi. Authors are asked to review the origins of terms and their current usage/misusage. The goals are to inform the community and to open a discussion. The following article by Bojan Vršnak focuses on terms used to describe large-scale waves in the solar atmosphere, an area of research that has been given great impetus by the images of waves from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The committee welcomes suggestions for other terms to address in this forum.

  1. Waves and Magnetism in the Solar Atmosphere (WAMIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Moses, John; Laming, John; Strachan, Leonard; Tun Beltran, Samuel; Tomczyk, Steven; Gibson, Sarah; Auchere, Frederic; Casini, Roberto; Fineschi, Silvano; Knoelker, Michael; Korendyke, Clarence; McIntosh, Scott; Romoli, Marco; Rybak, Jan; Socker, Dennis; Vourlidas, Angelos; Wu, Qian

    2016-02-01

    Comprehensive measurements of magnetic fields in the solar corona have a long history as an important scientific goal. Besides being crucial to understanding coronal structures and the Sun’s generation of space weather, direct measurements of their strength and direction are also crucial steps in understanding observed wave motions. In this regard, the remote sensing instrumentation used to make coronal magnetic field measurements is well suited to measuring the Doppler signature of waves in the solar structures. In this paper, we describe the design and scientific values of the Waves and Magnetism in the Solar Atmosphere (WAMIS) investigation. WAMIS, taking advantage of greatly improved infrared filters and detectors, forward models, advanced diagnostic tools and inversion codes, is a long-duration high-altitude balloon payload designed to obtain a breakthrough in the measurement of coronal magnetic fields and in advancing the understanding of the interaction of these fields with space plasmas. It consists of a 20 cm aperture coronagraph with a visible-IR spectro-polarimeter focal plane assembly. The balloon altitude would provide minimum sky background and atmospheric scattering at the wavelengths in which these observations are made. It would also enable continuous measurements of the strength and direction of coronal magnetic fields without interruptions from the day-night cycle and weather. These measurements will be made over a large field-of-view allowing one to distinguish the magnetic signatures of different coronal structures, and at the spatial and temporal resolutions required to address outstanding problems in coronal physics. Additionally, WAMIS could obtain near simultaneous observations of the electron scattered K-corona for context and to obtain the electron density. These comprehensive observations are not provided by any current single ground-based or space observatory. The fundamental advancements achieved by the near-space observations of

  2. Influences of atmospheric conditions and air mass on the ratio of ultraviolet to total solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Riordan, C.J.; Hulstrom, R.L.; Myers, D.R.

    1990-08-01

    The technology to detoxify hazardous wastes using ultraviolet (UV) solar radiation is being investigated by the DOE/SERI Solar Thermal Technology Program. One of the elements of the technology evaluation is the assessment and characterization of UV solar radiation resources available for detoxification processes. This report describes the major atmospheric variables that determine the amount of UV solar radiation at the earth's surface, and how the ratio of UV-to-total solar radiation varies with atmospheric conditions. These ratios are calculated from broadband and spectral solar radiation measurements acquired at SERI, and obtained from the literature on modeled and measured UV solar radiation. The following sections discuss the atmospheric effects on UV solar radiation and provide UV-to-total solar radiation ratios from published studies, as well as measured values from SERI's data. A summary and conclusions are also given.

  3. Ar Atmosphere: Implications for Structure and Composition of Mercury's Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, R. M.; Morgan, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    We examine the possibilities of sustaining an argon atmosphere by diffusion from the upper 10 km of crust, and alternatively by effusion from a molten or previously molten area at great depth . Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in surface-bounded exospheres is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon, Mercury and probably Europa is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the body. Argon content will be a function of K content, temperature, grain size distribution, connected pore volume and possible seismic activity. Although Mercury and the Moon differ in many details, we can train the solutions to diffusion equations to predict the average lunar atmosphere. Then these parameters can be varied for Hermean conditions. Assuming a lunar crustal potassium abundance of 300 ppm, the observed argon atmosphere requires equilibrium between the argon production in the upper 9 Km of the moon (1.135 x 10(exp -3) cm(exp -3) s(exp -1)) and its loss. Hodges et al. conclude that this loss rate and the observed time variability requires argon release through seismic activity, tapping a deep argon source. An important observation is that the extreme surface of the Moon is enhanced in argon rather than depleted, as one would expect from outgassing of radiogenic argon. Manka and Michel concluded that ion implantation explains the surface enhancement of Ar-40. About half of the argon ions produced in the lunar atmosphere would return to the surface, where they would become embedded in the rocks. Similarly, at Mercury we expect the surface rocks to be enhanced in Ar-40 wherever

  4. The Influence of Solar Proton Events in Solar Cycle 23 on the Neutral Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; vonKonig, Miriam; Anderson, John; Roble, Raymond G.; McPeters, Richard D.; Fleming, Eric L.; Russell, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) can cause changes in constituents in the Earth's middle atmosphere. The highly energetic protons cause ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents, which lead to the production of HO(x) (H, OH, HO2) and NO(y) (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2). The HO(x) increases lead to short-lived ozone decreases in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere due to the short lifetimes of the HO, constituents. The NO(x) increases lead to long-lived stratospheric ozone changes because of the long lifetime of NO(y) constituents in this region. Solar cycle 23 was quite active with SPEs and very large fluxes of high energy protons occurred in July and November 2000, November 200 1, and April 2002. Smaller, but still substantial, proton fluxes impacted the Earth during other months in the 1997-2003 time period. The impact of the very large SPEs on the neutral middle atmosphere during solar cycle 23 will be discussed, including the HO(x), NO(y), ozone variations and induced atmospheric transport changes. Two multi-dimensional models, the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Two-dimensional (2D) Model and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM), were used in computing the influence of the SPEs. The results of the GSFC 2D Model and the TIME-GCM will be shown along with comparisons to the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments.

  5. Satellite Measurements of Middle Atmospheric Impacts by Solar Proton Events in Solar Cycle 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, C.; Labow, G.; DeLand, M.; Fleming, E.; Sinnhuber, M.; Russell, J.

    2005-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) are known to have caused changes in constituents in the Earth's neutral polar middle atmosphere in the most recent solar maximum period (solar cycle 23). The highly energetic protons produced ionizations, excitations, dissociations, and dissociative ionizations of the background constituents in the polar cap regions (greater than 60 degrees geomagnetic latitude), which led to the production of HOx (H, OH, HO2) and NOy (N, NO, NO2, NO3, N2O5, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, BrONO2). The HOx increases led to short-lived ozone decreases in the polar mesosphere and upper stratosphere due to the short lifetimes of the HOx constituents. Polar middle mesospheric ozone decreases greater than 50% were observed and computed to last for hours to days due to the enhanced HOx. The NOy increases led to long-lived polar stratospheric ozone changes because of the long lifetime of the NOy family in this region. Upper stratospheric ozone decreases of greater than 10% were computed to last for several months past the solar events in the winter polar regions because of the enhanced NOy. Solar cycle 23 was especially replete with SPEs and huge fluxes of high energy protons occurred in July and November 2000, September and November 2001, April 2002, October 2003, and January 2005. Smaller, but still substantial, proton fluxes impacted the Earth during other months in this cycle. Observations by the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet 2 (SBUV/2) instruments along with GSFC 2D Model predictions will be shown in this talk.

  6. Recent advances in satellite observations of solar variability and global atmospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    The launch of Nimbus 4 in April 1974 has made possible simultaneous measurements of the ultraviolet solar irradiance and the global distribution of atmospheric ozone by the monitor of ultraviolet solar energy (MUSE) and backscatter ultraviolet (BUV) experiments respectively. Two long lived ultraviolet active solar regions which are about 180 deg apart in solar longitude were observed to be associated with central meridian passages of solar magnetic sector boundaries. The boundaries may be significant in the evaluation of correlations between solar magnetic sector structure and atmospheric circulation.

  7. ON THE COMBINATION OF IMAGING-POLARIMETRY WITH SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF UPPER SOLAR ATMOSPHERES DURING SOLAR ECLIPSES

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Z. Q.; Deng, L. H.; Dun, G. T.; Chang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Cheng, X. M.; Qu, Z. N.; Xue, Z. K.; Ma, L.; Allington-Smith, J.; Murray, G.

    2013-09-01

    We present results from imaging polarimetry (IP) of upper solar atmospheres during a total solar eclipse on 2012 November 13 and spectropolarimetry of an annular solar eclipse on 2010 January 15. This combination of techniques provides both the synoptic spatial distribution of polarization above the solar limb and spectral information on the physical mechanism producing the polarization. Using these techniques together we demonstrate that even in the transition region, the linear polarization increases with height and can exceed 20%. IP shows a relatively smooth background distribution in terms of the amplitude and direction modified by solar structures above the limb. A map of a new quantity that reflects direction departure from the background polarization supplies an effective technique to improve the contrast of this fine structure. Spectral polarimetry shows that the relative contribution to the integrated polarization over the observed passband from the spectral lines decreases with height while the contribution from the continuum increases as a general trend. We conclude that both imaging and spectral polarimetry obtained simultaneously over matched spatial and spectral domains will be fruitful for future eclipse observations.

  8. Detailed and Simplified Nonequilibrium Helium Ionization in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit

    2014-03-01

    Helium ionization plays an important role in the energy balance of the upper chromosphere and transition region. Helium spectral lines are also often used as diagnostics of these regions. We carry out one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the solar atmosphere and find that the helium ionization is set mostly by photoionization and direct collisional ionization, counteracted by radiative recombination cascades. By introducing an additional recombination rate mimicking the recombination cascades, we construct a simplified three-level helium model atom consisting of only the ground states. This model atom is suitable for modeling nonequilibrium helium ionization in three-dimensional numerical models. We perform a brief investigation of the formation of the He I 10830 and He II 304 spectral lines. Both lines show nonequilibrium features that are not recovered with statistical equilibrium models, and caution should therefore be exercised when such models are used as a basis for interpretating observations.

  9. Detailed and simplified nonequilibrium helium ionization in the solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2014-03-20

    Helium ionization plays an important role in the energy balance of the upper chromosphere and transition region. Helium spectral lines are also often used as diagnostics of these regions. We carry out one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the solar atmosphere and find that the helium ionization is set mostly by photoionization and direct collisional ionization, counteracted by radiative recombination cascades. By introducing an additional recombination rate mimicking the recombination cascades, we construct a simplified three-level helium model atom consisting of only the ground states. This model atom is suitable for modeling nonequilibrium helium ionization in three-dimensional numerical models. We perform a brief investigation of the formation of the He I 10830 and He II 304 spectral lines. Both lines show nonequilibrium features that are not recovered with statistical equilibrium models, and caution should therefore be exercised when such models are used as a basis for interpretating observations.

  10. On carbon monoxide cooling in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauas, Pablo J.; Avrett, Eugene H.; Loeser, Rudolf

    1990-01-01

    The CO cooling rate for models of the solar atmosphere using the detailed line-by-line CO opacity in the fundamental band, and carrying out a full radiative transfer calculation for each line is computed. The importance of the different assumptions that have been made to obtain the CO cooling rate and find that when detailed optical depth effects are taken into account, the calculated CO cooling rate at line optical depths near unity can be smaller than optically thin estimates by more than an order of magnitude is studied. It is found that CO cooling does not account for the missing source of radiative cooling in the temperature minimum region of the quiet sun.

  11. Spectropolarimetry of fine magnetized structures in the upper solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas Anthony

    2013-12-01

    One of the earliest indications of magnetic fields acting in the solar atmosphere came at the beginning of the 20th century when George Hale noted a "decided definiteness of structure" in photographs within the Hydrogen Balmer-alpha line core. Fine structure both in the chromosphere and in the corona result from processes that are not well understood but accepted as a consequence of the solar magnetic field. Our knowledge of this field is lacking, and until recently, the assumed relationship between fine thermal structure and the magnetic field remained untested. Here, spectropolarimetric diagnostics of fine structures in the solar chromosphere and cool corona are advanced using the infrared He I triplet at 1083 nm. Precise calibration procedures are developed for the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS), recently commissioned at the Dunn Solar Telescope. Together with high-order adaptive optics, we simultaneously map fine structures while obtaining a polarimetric sensitivity of up to 2 x 10--4 of the incoming intensity. These instrument improvements result in the first maps of the He I polarized signatures within an active region superpenumbra, where Hale first recognized fine-structuring. Selective absorption and emission processes due to non-equilibrium optical pumping are recognized. Our interpretation, using advanced inversions of the He I triplet, provides confirmation of Hale's initial suspicion---the fine structures of the solar chromosphere are visual markers for the magnetic field. Yet, the fine chromospheric thermal structure is not matched by an equivalently fine magnetic structure. Our ability to measure this field suggests the utility of the He I triplet as an inner boundary condition for the inner heliospheric magnetic field. In the corona itself, we infer the vector properties of a catastrophically-cooled coronal loop, uniting space-based and ground-based instrumentation. We determine how fine loops are anchored in the photosphere via a

  12. Solar wind interaction with the Martian upper atmosphere: Crustal field orientation, solar cycle, and seasonal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chuanfei; Bougher, Stephen W.; Ma, Yingjuan; Toth, Gabor; Lee, Yuni; Nagy, Andrew F.; Tenishev, Valeriy; Pawlowski, Dave J.; Combi, Michael R.; Najib, Dalal

    2015-09-01

    A comprehensive study of the solar wind interaction with the Martian upper atmosphere is presented. Three global models: the 3-D Mars multifluid Block Adaptive Tree Solar-wind Roe Upwind Scheme MHD code (MF-MHD), the 3-D Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM), and the Mars exosphere Monte Carlo model Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (M-AMPS) were used in this study. These models are one-way coupled; i.e., the MF-MHD model uses the 3-D neutral inputs from M-GITM and the 3-D hot oxygen corona distribution from M-AMPS. By adopting this one-way coupling approach, the Martian upper atmosphere ion escape rates are investigated in detail with the combined variations of crustal field orientation, solar cycle, and Martian seasonal conditions. The calculated ion escape rates are compared with Mars Express observational data and show reasonable agreement. The variations in solar cycles and seasons can affect the ion loss by a factor of ˜3.3 and ˜1.3, respectively. The crustal magnetic field has a shielding effect to protect Mars from solar wind interaction, and this effect is the strongest for perihelion conditions, with the crustal field facing the Sun. Furthermore, the fraction of cold escaping heavy ionospheric molecular ions [(O2+ and/or O2+)/Total] are inversely proportional to the fraction of the escaping (ionospheric and corona) atomic ion [O+/Total], whereas O2+ and O2+ ion escape fractions show a positive linear correlation since both ion species are ionospheric ions that follow the same escaping path.

  13. IMPLICATIONS OF THE RECENT LOW SOLAR MINIMUM FOR THE SOLAR WIND DURING THE MAUNDER MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, M.; Owens, M. J.

    2014-01-20

    The behavior of the Sun and near-Earth space during grand solar minima is not understood; however, the recent long and low minimum of the decadal-scale solar cycle gives some important clues, with implications for understanding the solar dynamo and predicting space weather conditions. The speed of the near-Earth solar wind and the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) embedded within it can be reliably reconstructed for before the advent of spacecraft monitoring using observations of geomagnetic activity that extend back to the mid-19th century. We show that during the solar cycle minima around 1879 and 1901 the average solar wind speed was exceptionally low, implying the Earth remained within the streamer belt of slow solar wind flow for extended periods. This is consistent with a broader streamer belt, which was also a feature of the recent low minimum (2009), and yields a prediction that the low near-Earth IMF during the Maunder minimum (1640-1700), as derived from models and deduced from cosmogenic isotopes, was accompanied by a persistent and relatively constant solar wind of speed roughly half the average for the modern era.

  14. Rossby rogons in atmosphere and in the solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, A. P.; Shukla, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of Rossby rogue waves (Rossby rogons), as well as the excitation of bright and dark Rossby envelpe solitons are demonstrated on the basis of the modulational instability (MI) of a coherent Rossby wave packet. The evolution of an amplitude-modulated Rossby wave packet is governed by a one-dimensional (1D) nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). The latter is used to study the amplitude modulation of Rossby wave packets for fluids in Earth's atmosphere and in the solar photosphere. It is found that an ampitude-modulated Rossby wave packet becomes stable (unstable) against quasi-stationary, long-wavelength (in comparision with the Rossby wavelength) perturbations, when the carrier Rossby wave number satisfies k2 < 1/2 or \\sqrt {2}+1 (k2 > 3 or 1/2). It is also shown that a Rossby rogon or a bright Rossby envelope soliton may be excited in the shallow-water approximation for the Rossby waves in solar photosphere. However, the excitation of small- or large-scale perturbations may be possible for magnetized plasmas in the ionosphereic E-layer.

  15. Numerical simulation of the middle atmosphere chemical composition and temperature under changing solar conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zadorozhny, A. M.; Dyominov, I. G.; Tuchkov, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    There are given results of the numerical experiments on modelling the influence of solar activity on chemical composition and temperature of the middle atmosphere. The consideration is made for peculiarities of solar activity impact under different values of antropogenic pollution of the atmosphere with chlorofluorocarbons and other stuff.

  16. CO and the Temperature Structure of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1997-01-01

    The surface layers of the Sun provide a crucial boundary condition for many of the processes that occur in the deep interior. The stratification of the outer solar atmosphere once was thought to be well understood. However, studies of thermally sensitive molecular absorptions in the infrared revealed puzzling anomalies. Strong lines of the CO fundamental vibration-rotation bands near 5 microns showed very cool temperatures at the extreme limb, and remarkable off-limb emissions extending well into the supposedly hot chromosphere. The conflicting pictures of the photosphere/chromosphere interface, from the widely separated wavelength regimes, has raised suspicions that those "layers" of the atmosphere are much more inhomogeneous than previously suspected. One proposal is that the low chromosphere is dominated by cool gas--the "COmosphere," if you will--which is threaded by a network of persistent small-scale hot magnetic filaments and occasionally disrupted by localized acoustic disturbances. The COmosphere is capped by the merged fields of the network elements in the chromospheric "canopy." I will describe the evidence in favor of that model, including recent work at the NSO McMath-Pierce telescope (including use of the new "Phoenix" spectrometer) and translimb far-UV spectroscopy by SOHO/SUMER.

  17. Modeling of the atmospheric response to a strong decrease of the solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Eugene V.; Egorova, Tatiana A.; Shapiro, Alexander I.; Schmutz, Werner K.

    2012-07-01

    We estimate the consequences of a potential strong decrease of the solar activity using the model simulations of the future driven by pure anthropogenic forcing as well as its combination with different solar activity related factors: total solar irradiance, spectral solar irradiance, energetic electron precipitation, solar protons and galactic cosmic rays. The comparison of the model simulations shows that introduced strong decrease of solar activity can lead to some delay of the ozone recovery and partially compensate greenhouse warming acting in the direction opposite to anthropogenic effects. The model results also show that all considered solar forcings are important in different atmospheric layers and geographical regions. However, in the global scale the solar irradiance variability can be considered as the most important solar forcing. The obtained results constitute probably the upper limit of the possible solar influence. Development of the better constrained set of future solar forcings is necessary to address the problem of future climate and ozone layer with more confidence.

  18. The mechanism of temperature and pressure changes in the Earth's atmosphere during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reshetov, V. D.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of solar flares on the weather on Earth is examined. It is concluded that the processes which arise in the atmosphere are so intricate that a single calculation of solar activity is insufficient for long-range forecasting. However, combined consideration of processes dependent upon the dynamic instability of the atmosphere and the effect of solar activity will contribute to the improvement of long-range forecasts.

  19. Observations and Modeling of the Pulse-driven Cool Plasma Ejecta in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Abhishek K.; Murawski, . Kris; Kayshap, Pradeep

    2012-07-01

    The cool plasma ejecta are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere, and have significant implications on its mass and energy transport. We present two case studies of the SDO/AIA observations of (i) cool jet at north polar region, and (ii) the cool surge ejecta at the active region boundary. The common nature between these two different class of plasma dynamics is that both do not reveal any signature of strong heating during course of their life-times. The surge shows some evidence of heating at its footpoint, however, mostly not visible in the SDO/AIA filters sensitive to the higher coronal temperatures. Similarly, the polar jet is also only evident in the SDO/AIA 304 Å channel that is sensitive to the plasma maintained around 0.1 MK, and does not show any signature of heating. We model these cool jets by launching reconnection generated pulses in the VAL-III C model of the solar temperature as an initial condition. For the case of cool polar jet, we launch reconnection generated velocity pulse in the more realistic solar atmosphere, which steepens into a shock at higher altitudes and triggers plasma perturbations exhibiting the observed features of the jet. However, the footpoint of the surge shows small heating episode in the second case study, therefore, we consider the excitation of reconnection generated thermal pulse which triggers plasma perturbations approximately exhibiting the observed features of the surge, e.g., average velocity, height, width, life-time, and fine structures at its base. We also compare our new results with the existing models and observations of such jets, and plasma flows especially reported in the SDO era.

  20. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The

  1. Implications of L1 observations for slow solar wind formation by solar reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepko, L.; Viall, N. M.; Antiochos, S. K.; Lepri, S. T.; Kasper, J. C.; Weberg, M.

    2016-05-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is known to be coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained a mystery. Long time scale trends in the composition and charge states show strong correlations between solar wind velocity and plasma parameters, yet these correlations have proved ineffective in determining the slow wind source. We take advantage of new high time resolution (12 min) measurements of solar wind composition and charge state abundances at L1 and previously identified 90 min quasiperiodic structures to probe the fundamental timescales of slow wind variability. The combination of new high temporal resolution composition measurements and the clearly identified boundaries of the periodic structures allows us to utilize these distinct solar wind parcels as tracers of slow wind origin and acceleration. We find that each 90 min (2000 Mm) parcel of slow wind has near-constant speed yet exhibits repeatable, systematic charge state and composition variations that span the entire range of statistically determined slow solar wind values. The classic composition-velocity correlations do not hold on short, approximately hourlong, time scales. Furthermore, the data demonstrate that these structures were created by magnetic reconnection. Our results impose severe new constraints on slow solar wind origin and provide new, compelling evidence that the slow wind results from the sporadic release of closed field plasma via magnetic reconnection at the boundary between open and closed flux in the Sun's atmosphere.

  2. The Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere at Solar Minimum: Cyclical and Secular Variation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Qian, L.; Luan, X.

    2009-12-01

    Solar activity during 2007 and 2008 was extremely low, including ultraviolet irradiance, solar wind parameters, and the interplanetary magnetic field. During this protracted solar minimum period, the terrestrial upper atmosphere and ionosphere were expectedly cooler, lower in density, and consequently lower in altitude, than usual. The question remains as to whether the terrestrial response to this solar minimum is significantly different from previous solar minima, and if so, how different. This question is posed against the backdrop of secular change due to increased levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which increase tropospheric temperature but have the inverse effect of cooling the upper atmosphere. In order to understand the causes of these changes, and to quantify the interplay of the solar cycle with the evolution of upper atmosphere and ionosphere climate, we present a combination of data analysis and global numerical simulation. Thermospheric density data from atmospheric drag on satellites, ionospheric measurements by the COSMIC mission and from ground-based sources, and cooling rate data from the SABER instrument on the TIMED mission are compared to model simulations by the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). Solar ultraviolet irradiance observations, solar wind and geomagnetic data, and measurements of anthropogenic greenhouse gases, provide the external forcing of the model. Changes during the descent into solar minimum are compared to previous solar minima, and to model simulations, to evaluate how much of the current phenomenon is attributable to solar variation, and how much to anthropogenic sources.

  3. Slow solar wind boundaries and implication for its formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Roberts, Aaron; Lepri, Susan; Kocher, Manan

    2015-04-01

    Solar wind and the associated magnetic field permeate the heliosphere. Their temporal and spatial variations contribute significantly in the large range of variations in related geomagnetic effects as well as in the properties of solar energetic particles. Among the least understood is the slow solar wind for how it is formed at the Sun and what causes the large variations in its physical properties. This work investigates the variations in the slow solar wind streams measured in-situ at 1 AU and the correlations among the protons, heavy ions, suprathermal electrons, and magnetic field properties. Besides well-established correlations among the proton speed, proton temperature and ion charge states, we also found certain distinct characteristics in the correlation and temporal relationship between the ion charge states, proton velocity fluctuations and, in many cases, suprathermal electron halos. The implications from our findings in the slow wind formation and whether the slow wind has a distinct boundary with the fast wind will be discussed.

  4. A Solar Radiation Parameterization for Atmospheric Studies. Volume 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Suarez, Max J. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The solar radiation parameterization (CLIRAD-SW) developed at the Goddard Climate and Radiation Branch for application to atmospheric models are described. It includes the absorption by water vapor, O3, O2, CO2, clouds, and aerosols and the scattering by clouds, aerosols, and gases. Depending upon the nature of absorption, different approaches are applied to different absorbers. In the ultraviolet and visible regions, the spectrum is divided into 8 bands, and single O3 absorption coefficient and Rayleigh scattering coefficient are used for each band. In the infrared, the spectrum is divided into 3 bands, and the k-distribution method is applied for water vapor absorption. The flux reduction due to O2 is derived from a simple function, while the flux reduction due to CO2 is derived from precomputed tables. Cloud single-scattering properties are parameterized, separately for liquid drops and ice, as functions of water amount and effective particle size. A maximum-random approximation is adopted for the overlapping of clouds at different heights. Fluxes are computed using the Delta-Eddington approximation.

  5. Solar spectral irradiance and atmospheric transmission at Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G E

    1982-06-01

    A radiometer was operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory during calendar year 1980 to estimate the spectral irradiance of the sun and its possible fluctuation in time near the peak of solar activity. Data were also acquired on seasonal trends of atmospheric transmissivity above the marine mixing layer in the central Pacific. Spectral irradiance remained constant to at least (1/2)% at all wavelengths monitored. Furthermore its absolute magnitude was in agreement with the Labs and Neckel values to +/-2% except at blue wavelengths where the Mauna Loa values are from 4 to 12% higher and at lambda = 850 nm where the Mauna Loa value is 9% lower. The residual aerosol optical depth above Mauna Loa Observatory during 1980 averaged tau(0) = 0.020. An intrusion of dust into the central Pacific from the Gobi Desert (as deduced by the composition of collected particles) invaded the Central Pacific from Mar. to May 1980 and caused a perturbation in optical depth (at lambda = 500 nm) of Deltatau(0) ~ 0.01-0.02. The optical depth increment caused by the Mt. St. Helens volcano was <0.005 in the 2-month period following the eruption. PMID:20389986

  6. Solar spectral irradiance and atmospheric transmission at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.E.

    1982-06-01

    A radiometer was operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory during calendar year 1980 to estimate the spectral irradiance of the sun and its possible fluctuation in time near the peak of solar activity. Data were also acquired on seasonal trends of atmospheric transmissivity above the marine mixing layer in the central Pacific. Spectral irradiance remained c constant to at least 1/2% at all wavelengths monitored. Furthermore its absolute magnitude was in agreement with the Labs and Neckel values to +- 2% except at blue wavelengths where the Mauna Loa values are from 4 to 12% higher and at lambda = 850 nm where the Mauna Loa value is 9% lower. The residual aerosol optical depth above Mauna Loa Observatory during 1980 averaged tau/sub 0/ = 0.020. An intrusion of dust into the central Pacific from the Gobi Desert (as deduced by the composition of collected particles) invaded the Central Pacific from Mar. to May 19890 and caused a perturbation in optical depth (at lambda = 500 nm) of ..delta..tau/sub 0/approx.0.01--0.02. The optical depth increment caused by the Mt. St. Helens volcano was <0.005 in the 2-month period following the eruption.

  7. The variations of geomagnetic energy and solar irradiance and their impacts on Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanshi

    2012-10-01

    It is important to understand and estimate the energy inputs to the upper atmosphere, in order to provide accurate calculation and prediction of the thermospheric neutral density, which is important for satellite orbital determination. The primary energy sources of Earth's upper atmosphere are the solar irradiance and geomagnetic energy including Joule heating and particle precipitation. Various data (OMNI2, CHAMP, DMSP) and models (SOLAR2000, FISM, Weimer05, AMIE, NCAR TIE-GCM) are utilized to investigate the variations of energy inputs and their influences on the coupled thermosphere-ionosphere system, with focus on the wavelength dependence of solar irradiance enhancement during are events, the geomagnetic energy associated with high-speed solar wind streams, the altitudinal distribution of Joule heating in different solar conditions, and the variation of solar irradiance and geomagnetic energy inputs during last solar cycle.

  8. Atmospheric chloride: Its implication for foliar uptake and damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, E. L.; Sealy, R. L.

    Atmospheric chloride is inversely related to distance from the Texas coast; r2 = 0.86. Levels of atmospheric chloride are higher in the early summer than in the winter because of salt storms. Leaf chloride l'evels of Tillandsia usneoides L. (Spanish moss) reflect the atmospheric chloride levels; r2 = 0.78. The importance of considering the effect of atmospheric chloride on leaf damage to horticultural crops is discussed.

  9. Absorption of Solar Energy in the Atmosphere: Discrepancy Between Model and Observations

    PubMed

    Arking

    1996-08-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model, which assimilates data from daily observations of temperature, humidity, wind, and sea-level air pressure, was compared with a set of observations that combines satellite and ground-based measurements of solar flux. The comparison reveals that the model underestimates by 25 to 30 watts per square meter the amount of solar energy absorbed by Earth's atmosphere. Contrary to some recent reports, clouds have little or no overall effect on atmospheric absorption, a consistent feature of both the observations and the model. Of several variables considered, water vapor appears to be the dominant influence on atmospheric absorption. PMID:8670414

  10. The Onset of Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, R. M.; Klimchuk, J. A.; van der Holst, B.

    2014-12-01

    A fundamental question concerning magnetic energy release on the Sun is why the release occurs only after substantial stresses have been built up in the field. If reconnection were to occur readily, then the released energy would be much less than the energy required for coronal heating, CMEs, flares, jets, spicules, etc. How can we explain this switch-on property? What is the physical nature of the onset conditions? One idea involves the secondary instability of current sheets, which switches on when the rotation of the magnetic field across a current sheet reaches a critical angle. Such conditions would occur at the boundaries of flux tubes that become tangled and twisted by turbulent photospheric convection, for example. Other ideas focus on a critical thickness for the current sheet. We report here on the preliminary results of our investigation of reconnection onset. Unlike our earlier work on the secondary instability (Dahlburg, Klimchuk, and Antiochos 2005), here we treat the coupled chromosphere-corona system. Using the BATS-R-US MHD code (Toth et al. 2012), we simulate a single current sheet in a sheared magnetic field that extends from the chromosphere into the corona. Driver motions are applied at the base of the model. The configuration and chromosphere are both idealized, but capture the essential physics of the problem. The advantage of this unique approach is that it resolves the current sheet to the greatest extent possible while maintaining a realistic solar atmosphere. It thus bridges the gap between reconnection in a box studies and studies of large-scale systems such as active regions. One question we will address is whether onset conditions are met first in the chromosphere or corona.

  11. The Onset of Magnetic Reconnection in the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Rebekah M.; Klimchuk, James A.; Van Der Holst, Bart

    2014-06-01

    A fundamental question concerning magnetic energy release on the Sun is why the release occurs only after substantial stresses have been built up in the field. If reconnection were to occur readily, then the released energy would be much less than the energy required for coronal heating, CMEs, flares, jets, spicules, etc. How can we explain this switch-on property? What is the physical nature of the onset conditions? One idea involves the "secondary instability" of current sheets, which switches on when the rotation of the magnetic field across a current sheet reaches a critical angle. Such conditions would occur at the boundaries of flux tubes that become tangled and twisted by turbulent photopheric convection, for example. Other ideas focus on a critical thickness for the current sheet. We report here on the preliminary results of our investigation of reconnection onset. Unlike our earlier work on the secondary instability (Dahlburg, Klimchuk, and Antiochos 2005), here we treat the coupled chromosphere-corona system. Using the BATS-R-US MHD code (Toth et al. 2012), we simulate a single current sheet in a sheared magnetic field that extends from the chromosphere into the corona. Driver motions are applied at the base of the model. The configuration and chromosphere are both idealized, but capture the essential physics of the problem. The advantage of this unique approach is that it resolves the current sheet to the greatest extent possible while maintaining a realistic solar atmosphere. It thus bridges the gap between "reconnection in a box" studies and studies of large-scale systems such as active regions. One question we will address is whether onset conditions are met first in the chromosphere or corona.

  12. Atmospheric chemistry of carboxylic acids: microbial implication versus photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaïtilingom, M.; Charbouillot, T.; Deguillaume, L.; Maisonobe, R.; Parazols, M.; Amato, P.; Sancelme, M.; Delort, A.-M.

    2011-02-01

    Clouds are multiphasic atmospheric systems in which the dissolved organic compounds, dominated by carboxylic acids, are subject to multiple chemical transformations in the aqueous phase. Among them, solar radiation, by generating hydroxyl radicals (•OH), is considered as the main catalyzer of the reactivity of organic species in clouds. We investigated to which extent the active biomass existing in cloud water represents an alternative route to the chemical reactivity of carboxylic acids. Pure cultures of seventeen bacterial strains (Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Clavibacter, Frigoribacterium, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas and Rhodococcus), previously isolated from cloud water and representative of the viable community of clouds were first individually incubated in two artificial bulk cloud water solutions at 17 °C and 5 °C. These solutions mimicked the chemical composition of cloud water from "marine" and "continental" air masses, and contained the major carboxylic acids existing in the cloud water (i.e. acetate, formate, succinate and oxalate). The concentrations of these carboxylic compounds were monitored over time and biodegradation rates were determined. In average, they ranged from 2 ×10-19 for succinate to 1 × 10-18 mol cell-1 s-1 for formate at 17 °C and from 4 × 10-20 for succinate to 6 × 10-19 mol cell-1 s-1 for formate at 5 °C, with no significant difference between "marine" and "continental" media. In parallel, irradiation experiments were also conducted in these two artificial media to compare biodegradation and photodegradation of carboxylic compounds. To complete this comparison, the photodegradation rates of carboxylic acids by •OH radicals were calculated from literature data. Inferred estimations suggested a significant participation of microbes to the transformation of carboxylic acids in cloud water, particularly for acetate and succinate (up to 90%). Furthermore, a natural cloud water sample was incubated (including its indigenous microflora

  13. Ellerman Bombs in a Solar Active Region: Statistical Properties and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, M. K.; Rust, D. M.; Bernasconi, P. N.

    2001-05-01

    We have embedded the concept of Self-Organized Criticality (SOC) in deterministic Cellular Automata (CA) models in an attempt to simulate the emergence of flaring and sub-flaring activity in solar active regions. SOC CA models reproduce reasonably well several aspects of the statistical properties of flares and, moreover, they allow predictions regarding the respective properties of the unresolved nanoflares. We compare the above-mentioned predictions with observed arcsecond and sub-arcsecond activity on the low-chromosphere, in a newly formed active region. The source of the observations is the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE) which has provided us with high-resolution maps of the magnetic field and the velocity field vectors on the photospheric boundary, as well as Hα filtergrams on the low-chromosphere. Moreover, UV and EUV data from TRACE are used for determining the activity on the overlying atmospheric layers. We present preliminary results on the statistical properties of transient Hα brightenings (Ellerman Bombs) which correlate well with significant overlying UV emission. Implications of these results, as well as potential directions for modeling the low-lying activity in the solar atmosphere are discussed. This work was sponsored by NASA grant NAG5-8331 and NSF grant OPP-9909162

  14. Atmospheric corrosion of batten and enclosure materials for flat-plate solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    As part of the Solar Reliability and Materials Program at Argonne National Laboratory, the atmospheric-corrosion-monitoring project is to assess the materials used for battens and enclosures for flat-plate solar collectors. Sensors at nine test sites have provided atmospheric data. Other data have been obtained by analyzing corrosion samples that were exposed for varying periods of time. This interim report summarizes the results of the first test period.

  15. Interactions of cosmic rays with the venusian atmosphere during different periods of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plainaki, Christina; Paschalis, Pavlos; Grassi, Davide; Mavromichalaki, Helen; Andriopoulou, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Interactions of the galactic and solar cosmic ray particles with the atmosphere of Venus result in extensive nuclear and electromagnetic cascades that can affect cloud formation and chemistry in deep atmospheric layers. Variability in the energy spectrum of the cosmic ray particles and in their integrated flux and direction would have possible effects in the local neutral densities, particle ionization and escape. It is therefore of significant importance to understand and quantify such space weather phenomena at Venus, in the context of future mission preparation and also data interpretations of previous missions (e.g. Venus Express). In this paper, we perform a calculation of the atmosphere ionization and ion production rates caused by cosmic rays, as a function of depth in the Venusian atmosphere. We examine the interactions of the planet's atmosphere with galactic and solar cosmic rays (during solar energetic particle events). The latter scenario was studied for two paradigm cases: the very energetic solar event in October 1989 and the recent, less energetic, solar event in May 2012, assuming that the directional and energy properties of the solar particles allowed their arrival and penetration to the Venusian atmosphere. For the event in 2012, we considered the solar particle properties (integrated flux and spectrum) obtained by the NMBANGLE PPOLA model (Plainaki et al., 2010; 2014) applied previously for the Earth case, scaled to the distance of Venus (i.e. 0.72 AU from the Sun). In order to simulate the actual cascade in the atmosphere initiated by the incoming cosmic ray fluxes we use a Monte Carlo modeling technique based on the Geant4 software, previously applied for the Earth case (Paschalis et al., 2014), namely DYASTIMA. Our predictions are afterwards compared to other estimations derived from previous studies. The current method is furthermore proposed as a paradigm for studying cosmic ray-atmosphere interactions in the terrestrial planets possessing

  16. Interference of solar-probe inherent atmosphere with in-situ observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Alekseev, V.A.; Konkashbaev, A.I.; Konkashbaev, I.K.; Nikandrov, L.B.

    1998-01-01

    The solar corona is the source of solar wind that leads to the existence of the heliosphere and plays a crucial role in solar terrestrial phenomena. A comprehensive understanding of these phenomena can be provided only by directly measuring ion and electron velocity distributions, plasma waves, and fluxes of energetic particles. The problem presented by the inherent atmosphere of a spacecraft moving in the vicinity of the sun (4--20)R{sub {circle_dot}} and its influence on in-situ measurements of the solar corona plasma is the key to the realization and success of any solar probe mission. Models are developed to study and evaluate the effect of the inherent atmosphere on the in-situ measurements of future solar probes.

  17. On the physics of waves in the solar atmosphere: Wave heating and wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents work performed on the generation and physics of acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere. The investigators have incorporated spatial and temporal turbulent energy spectra in a newly corrected version of the Lighthill-Stein theory of acoustic wave generation in order to calculate the acoustic wave energy fluxes generated in the solar convective zone. The investigators have also revised and improved the treatment of the generation of magnetic flux tube waves, which can carry energy along the tubes far away from the region of their origin, and have calculated the tube energy fluxes for the sun. They also examine the transfer of the wave energy originated in the solar convective zone to the outer atmospheric layers through computation of wave propagation and dissipation in highly nonhomogeneous solar atmosphere. These waves may efficiently heat the solar atmosphere and the heating will be especially significant in the chromospheric network. It is also shown that the role played by Alfven waves in solar wind acceleration and coronal hole heating is dominant. The second part of the project concerned investigation of wave propagation in highly inhomogeneous stellar atmospheres using an approach based on an analytic tool developed by Musielak, Fontenla, and Moore. In addition, a new technique based on Dirac equations has been developed to investigate coupling between different MHD waves propagating in stratified stellar atmospheres.

  18. The effect of solar forcing induced atmospheric perturbations on LEO satellites' nominal aerodynamic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Weigel, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric drag is the strongest force perturbing the motion of satellites in low Earth orbits LEO, and could cause re-entry of satellites, difficulty in identifying and tracking of the satellites and other space objects, manuvering and prediction of lifetime and re-entry. Solar activities influence the temperature, density and composition of the upper atmosphere. These effects thus strongly depend on the phase of a solar cycle. The frequency of intense flares and storms increase during solar maximum. Heating up of the atmosphere causes its expansion eventually leading to accelerated drag of orbiting satellites, especially those in LEO. In this paper, we present the model of the atmospheric drag effect on the trajectory of hypothetical LEO satellites of different ballistic coefficients. We investigate long-term trend of atmospheric drag on LEO satellites due to solar forcing induced atmospheric perturbations and heating at different phases of the solar cycle, and during interval of strong geomagnetic disturbances or storms. We show the dependence of orbital decay on severity of both the solar cycle and phase, and the extent of geomagnetic perturbations. The result of the model compares well with the observed decay profile of existing LEO satellites and provides a better understanding of the issue of the orbital decay. Our result may also be useful for selection of launch window of satellites for an extended lifetime in the orbit.

  19. Solar UV Irradiances and Associated Issues for the Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W.

    Several new solar proxies have been developed in the past year as the beginning of a second generation solar UV modeling and forecasting capability. These proxies help characterize the energy input into operational space physics models that provide information content on the neutral thermosphere and ionosphere. Between 1999-2000, a full solar spectrum was developed (SOLAR2000) for use in numerical atmospheric and ionospheric models relevant to climatological studies and the E10.7 index was produced for empirical thermospheric and ionospheric model applications. In 20012002, new proxies have been derived including a sunspot number, Rsn, for use by operational HF radio ray-trace algorithms and the Qeuv thermospheric heating rate for use by the aeronomy community to compare airglow-derived versus solar-derived upper atmosphere heating. The Peuv heat production term has also been developed as an index for comparing solar heating to joule heating on a global scale. The S(t) index is the integrated solar spectrum used for solar radiation pressure calculations related to spacecraft attitude control. Finally, the Tinf is the exospheric temperature that is provided for long-term climate change studies. Second generation modeling and forecasting is in development and includes higher cadence solar input information beyond daily flux values where solar flare characterization will soon become reality. The second generation forecasting is also incorporating improved algorithms ranging from wavelet transforms to solar dynamo theory in order to specify solar variability on seven time scales from nowcast and 72-hour forecast to 5 solar cycle estimation. These new proxies are derivatives of the SOLAR2000 model whose solar irradiance specification is compliant with the developing ISO draft standard WD 21348 for Determining Solar Irradiances.

  20. Application of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability in a Earth Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Merkel, A.; Fontenla, J.; Marsh, D.; Woods, T. N.

    2010-12-01

    The Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) measures solar spectral variability in the 200-2400 nm range, accounting for about 97% of the total solar irradiance (TSI). SIM monitored the descending phase of solar cycle 23 and is now continuing these observations into the rising phase of cycle 24. The SIM observations indicate a slower evolutionary trend in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) over solar cycle times periods that are both in and out of phase with the TSI. To estimate the atmospheric response to the solar variability implied by these observations, quiet sun and active solar reference spectra were created as input into the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The SIM observations were combined with the SORCE SOLSTICE instrument in the 110-240 nm range and SRPM (Solar Radiation Physical Modeling) estimates in the infrared beyond the 2400 nm measurement limit of SIM to generate the reference spectra. The model output suggest a very different response in ozone than from atmospheric forcing from semi-empirical models of SSI. The model predicts a reduction in lower mesosphere at higher solar activity and a large increase in mid- to upper stratosphere. This structure can be explained by enhanced production of HOx,, and O3 self-healing effect. This structure is commensurate with contemporaneous observations of O3 from AURA-MLS and SABER.

  1. Development of local atmospheric model for estimating solar irradiance in Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, E. C.; Lau, A. M. S.; Busu, I.; Kanniah, K. D.; Rasib, A. W.; Kadir, W. H. W.

    2014-02-01

    Incoming solar irradiance covers a wide range of wavelengths with different intensities which drives almost every biological and physical cycle on earth at a selective wavelength. Estimation of the intensities of each wavelength for the solar irradiance on the earth surface provides a better way to understand and predict the radiance energy. It requires that the atmospheric and geometric input and the availability of atmospheric parameter is always the main concern in estimating solar irradiance. In this study, a local static atmospheric model for Peninsular Malaysia was built to provide the atmospheric parameters in the estimation of solar irradiance. Ten years of monthly Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) average data (water vapor, temperature, humidity and pressure profile) of the Peninsular Malaysia was used for the building of the atmospheric model and the atmospheric model were assessed based on the measured meteorological data with RMSE of 4.7% and 0.7k for both humidity and temperature respectively. The atmospheric model were applied on a well-established radiative transfer model namely SMARTS2. Some modifications are required in order to include the atmospheric model into the radiative transfer model. The solar irradiance results were then assessed with measured irradiance data and the results show that both the radiative transfer model and atmospheric model were reliable with RMSE value of 0.5 Wm-2. The atmospheric model was further validated based on the measured meteorological data (temperature and humidity) provided by the Department of Meteorology, Malaysia and high coefficient of determination with R2 value of 0.99 (RMSE value = 4.7%) and 0.90 (RMSE value = 0.7k) were found for both temperature and humidity respectively.

  2. A comparative study of Venus and Mars - Upper atmospheres, ionospheres and solar wind interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahajan, K. K.; Kar, J.

    1990-01-01

    The neutral atmospheres of Mars and Venus are discussed. A comparative study is presented of the upper atmospheres, ionospheres, and solar wind interactions of these two planets. The review is mainly concerned with the region about 100 km above the surface of the planets.

  3. Effects of Large Solar Events on Atmospheric Drag of Earth Artificial Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mircea, Liviu

    2008-09-01

    Sharp bursts of Solar activity, in the form of highly energetic radiation (extreme UV and X-rays), mass transfers (coronal mass ejections) and energetic charged particles (electrons, protons and ions), act on the upper atmosphere of the Earth, and change its state parameters (temperature, structure-altitude distribution, chemical composition and density) and also interact with Earth's magnetic field. This solar outputs increase dramatically during cyclic periods of intensive solar activity or due to irregular major storm events. This are causing high temporary correlation with above mentioned state parameters perturbations, inducing thermospheric expansion and density increasing, generating atmospheric brake off terrestrial artificial satellites.

  4. Numerical experiments on short-term meteorological effects of solar variability. [earth atmosphere model considering solar luminosity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.; Hansen, J. E.; Stone, P. H.; Quirk, W. J.; Lacis, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Set of numerical experiments has been carried out to test the short range sensitivity of a large atmospheric general circulation model to changes in solar constant and ozone amount. On the basis of the results of 12-day integrations with very large variations in these parameters, it is concluded that realistic variations would produce insignificant meteorological effects. Thus any causal relationships between solar variability and weather, for time scales of two weeks or less, will have to rely upon changes in parameters other than solar constant or ozone amounts, or upon mechanisms not yet incorporated in the model.

  5. Influence of solar-probe inherent atmosphere on in-situ observations

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, A.I.; Konkashbaev, I.K.; Nikandrov, L.B.

    1998-08-01

    The solar corona is the source of the solar wind, which is responsible for the heliosphere and plays a crucial role in solar/terrestrial phenomena. A comprehensive understanding of these phenomena can be established only by directly measuring ion and electron velocity distributions, plasma waves, and fluxes of energetic particles near the sun. The problem resulting from the inherent atmosphere of a spacecraft moving in the vicinity of the sun and the influence of this atmosphere on in-situ measurements of the solar corona plasma is key to the realization and success of any solar probe mission. To evaluate the influence of the probe-inherent atmosphere on in-situ observations, the authors have developed comprehensive radiation hydrodynamic models. The physics of plasma/probe/vapor interaction are also being developed in a self-consistent model to predict the effect of probe inherent atmosphere on in-situ measurements of corona parameters during solar flares. Interaction of the ionized atmosphere with the ambient natural plasma will create a turbulent shock wave that can affect in-situ measurements and must be taken into account in designing the spacecraft and its scientific components.

  6. Solar-wind tritium limit and the mixing rate of the solar atmosphere. [from recovered Surveyor 3 parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium has been measured, in Surveyor 3 samples, some of which were adjacent to those in which solar-wind-implanted He-4 had previously been measured. Little of the H-3 can be attributed to solar-wind implantation. The upper limit for the H-3/He-4 ratio in the solar wind is four times ten to the minus tenth power and corresponds to a H-3/H-1 limit of two times ten to the minus eleventh power. This limit imposes a requirement on the mixing rate in the solar atmosphere if the H-3 production rate in solar-surface nuclear reactions is greater than 160 sq cm/sec.

  7. Improving the Ni I atomic model for solar and stellar atmospheric models

    SciTech Connect

    Vieytes, M. C.; Fontenla, J. M. E-mail: johnf@digidyna.com

    2013-06-01

    Neutral nickel (Ni I) is abundant in the solar atmosphere and is one of the important elements that contribute to the emission and absorption of radiation in the spectral range between 1900 and 3900 Å. Previously, the Solar Radiation Physical Modeling (SRPM) models of the solar atmosphere only considered a few levels of this species. Here, we improve the Ni I atomic model by taking into account 61 levels and 490 spectral lines. We compute the populations of these levels in full NLTE using the SRPM code and compare the resulting emerging spectrum with observations. The present atomic model significantly improves the calculation of the solar spectral irradiance at near-UV wavelengths, which is important for Earth atmospheric studies, and particularly for ozone chemistry.

  8. Ionization in Earth's atmosphere following the solar storm on January 20, 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seripienlert, A.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Saiz, A.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Mangeard, P. S.; Tortermpun, U.

    2014-12-01

    To estimate possible effects of atmospheric ionization on clouds and Earth's climate as well as radiation exposure of air travelers and aircraft electronics due to space weather, relativistic solar ions are the only solar particles of concern because the less energetic particles do not penetrate to cloud/aircraft altitudes. Some solar storms produce relativistic ions that lead to showers of secondary particles in Earth's atmosphere and generate signals in ground-based detectors such as neutron monitors at a rate that can be observed above the background due to galactic cosmic rays, hence the term ground-level enhancements (GLEs). In this work we study the January 20, 2005 event, one of the most intense GLEs ever observed. From the bare counter to neutron monitor count rate ratio at South Pole, we estimate a spectral index in rigidity of 5.0. From the Spaceship Earth network, supplemented to comprise 13 polar neutron monitors, we model the time profile of relativistic solar ions impinging on Earth's atmosphere in the polar regions. We then perform Monte Carlo simulations using a realistic atmospheric model to determine ionization as a function of altitude and time in Earth's atmosphere. The results will allow us to investigate a possible connection between solar activity and Earth's climate as mediated by the cosmic ray flux, atmospheric ionization, and cloud formation. This work is partially supported by Thailand Research Fund and a Postdoctoral Fellowship from Mahidol University.

  9. Global biomass burning - Atmospheric, climatic and biospheric implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in the trace gas composition of the atmosphere due to global biomass burning are examined. The environmental consequences of those changes which have become areas of international concern are discussed.

  10. Jupiter's microwave spectrum - Implications for the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, S.; Klein, M. J.; Poynter, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown through the use of weighting functions that Jupiter's brightness temperature in the wavelength range 0.8-1.5 cm contains information on the thermal structure and abundance of ammonia in and above the tropopause in Jupiter's atmosphere. We present new data of Jupiter's brightness temperature in this wavelength range, and compare the results with theoretical spectra. The pressure in the Jovian atmosphere is estimated from these data to be 0.48 atm at 130 K.

  11. Absorption of Solar Radiation by the Cloudy Atmosphere Interpretations of Collocated Aircraft Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.; Cess, Robert D.; Zhang, Minghua; Pope, Shelly K.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bush, Brett; Vitko, John, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE), we have obtained and analyzed measurements made from collocated aircraft of the absorption of solar radiation within the atmospheric column between the two aircraft. The measurements were taken during October 1995 at the ARM site in Oklahoma. Relative to a theoretical radiative transfer model, we find no evidence for excess solar absorption in the clear atmosphere and significant evidence for its existence in the cloudy atmosphere. This excess cloud solar absorption appears to occur in both visible (0.224-0.68 microns) and near-infrared (0.68-3.30 microns) spectral regions, although not at 0.5 microns for the visible contribution, and it is shown to be true absorption rather than an artifact of sampling errors caused by measuring three-dimensional clouds.

  12. On the relationship between early solar activity and the evolution of terrestrial planet atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repin, Robert O.

    1989-01-01

    Mass fractionation during hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen-rich primordial atmospheres form Venus, earth, and Mars can account for most of the salient features of mass distributions in their present-day atmospheres. The principal assumptions and results of an escape-fractionation model for the evolution of terrestrial planet atmospheres from primary to final states are qualitatively described, with emphasis on the astrophysical conditions needed to enable the loss process. A substantial and rapidly declining flux of energetic solar radiation into atmospheric exospheres is required, initially (at solar ages of about 1-10 million years) two to three orders of magnitude more intense than that supplied by extreme-ultraviolet emission from the contemporary sun. The solar accretion disk must have dissipated if such radiation is to penetrate the system midplane to planetray distances. On both criteria, hydrodynamic escape from planets appears plausible in the astrophysical environment of the naked T-Tauri stars.

  13. Variation of Acoustic Cutoff Period with Height in the Solar Atmosphere: Theory versus Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, K.; Musielak, Z. E.; Konkol, P.; Wiśniewska, A.

    2016-08-01

    Recently Wiśniewska et al. demonstrated observationally how the acoustic cutoff frequency varies with height in the solar atmosphere including the upper photosphere and the lower and middle chromosphere, and showed that the observational results cannot be accounted for by the existing theoretical formulas for the acoustic cutoff. In order to reproduce the observed variation of the cutoff with atmospheric height, numerical simulations of impulsively generated acoustic waves in the solar atmosphere are performed, and the spectral analysis of temporal wave profiles is used to compute numerically changes of the acoustic cutoff with height. Comparison of the numerical results with the observational data shows good agreement, which clearly indicates that the obtained results may be used to determine the structure of the background solar atmosphere.

  14. Midlatitude atmospheric OH response to the most recent 11-y solar cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuhui; Li, King-Fai; Pongetti, Thomas J.; Sander, Stanley P.; Yung, Yuk L.; Liang, Mao-Chang; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.; Harder, Jerald W.; Snow, Martin; Mills, Franklin P.

    2013-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in middle atmospheric photochemistry, particularly in ozone (O3) chemistry. Because it is mainly produced through photolysis and has a short chemical lifetime, OH is expected to show rapid responses to solar forcing [e.g., the 11-y solar cycle (SC)], resulting in variabilities in related middle atmospheric O3 chemistry. Here, we present an effort to investigate such OH variability using long-term observations (from space and the surface) and model simulations. Ground-based measurements and data from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Aura satellite suggest an ∼7–10% decrease in OH column abundance from solar maximum to solar minimum that is highly correlated with changes in total solar irradiance, solar Mg-II index, and Lyman-α index during SC 23. However, model simulations using a commonly accepted solar UV variability parameterization give much smaller OH variability (∼3%). Although this discrepancy could result partially from the limitations in our current understanding of middle atmospheric chemistry, recently published solar spectral irradiance data from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment suggest a solar UV variability that is much larger than previously believed. With a solar forcing derived from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment data, modeled OH variability (∼6–7%) agrees much better with observations. Model simulations reveal the detailed chemical mechanisms, suggesting that such OH variability and the corresponding catalytic chemistry may dominate the O3 SC signal in the upper stratosphere. Continuing measurements through SC 24 are required to understand this OH variability and its impacts on O3 further. PMID:23341617

  15. Midlatitude atmospheric OH response to the most recent 11-y solar cycle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhui; Li, King-Fai; Pongetti, Thomas J; Sander, Stanley P; Yung, Yuk L; Liang, Mao-Chang; Livesey, Nathaniel J; Santee, Michelle L; Harder, Jerald W; Snow, Martin; Mills, Franklin P

    2013-02-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) plays an important role in middle atmospheric photochemistry, particularly in ozone (O(3)) chemistry. Because it is mainly produced through photolysis and has a short chemical lifetime, OH is expected to show rapid responses to solar forcing [e.g., the 11-y solar cycle (SC)], resulting in variabilities in related middle atmospheric O(3) chemistry. Here, we present an effort to investigate such OH variability using long-term observations (from space and the surface) and model simulations. Ground-based measurements and data from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aura satellite suggest an ∼7-10% decrease in OH column abundance from solar maximum to solar minimum that is highly correlated with changes in total solar irradiance, solar Mg-II index, and Lyman-α index during SC 23. However, model simulations using a commonly accepted solar UV variability parameterization give much smaller OH variability (∼3%). Although this discrepancy could result partially from the limitations in our current understanding of middle atmospheric chemistry, recently published solar spectral irradiance data from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment suggest a solar UV variability that is much larger than previously believed. With a solar forcing derived from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment data, modeled OH variability (∼6-7%) agrees much better with observations. Model simulations reveal the detailed chemical mechanisms, suggesting that such OH variability and the corresponding catalytic chemistry may dominate the O(3) SC signal in the upper stratosphere. Continuing measurements through SC 24 are required to understand this OH variability and its impacts on O(3) further. PMID:23341617

  16. Preliminary experiment requirements document for Solar and Terrestrial Atmospheres Spectrometer (STAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The principal scientific objective of the Solar and Terrestrial Atmospheres Spectrometer (STAS) project is the measurement of the absolute ultraviolet solar spectral irradiance with: (1) resolution of better than 15 mA, and (2) absolute irradiance uncertainty at the state of the art (less than or equal to 3%). High measurement accuracy coupled with high spectral resolution are necessary to identify the nature of the radiation, its variability, and to identify solar processes which may cause the changes. Solar radiation between 1200 and 3600 A dominates the photochemistry of the mesosphere and stratosphere. Some important minor species, such as NO, show very complex and fundamentally narrow structure in their photodestruction cross sections, especially in the region of the Schumann-Runge bands of O2. Understanding the photochemical processes in the terrestrial atmosphere requires knowledge of both the cross sections and of the solar spectrum with the highest possible resolution and accuracy.

  17. Waves, shocks and non-stationary phenomena in the outer solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansteen, V. H.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamics of the solar chromosphere, transition region and corona were investigated. The consequences of the solar dynamics on the formation of spectral features in solar atmosphere regions are discussed. Data mainly from the solar ultraviolet measurement of emitted radiation (SUMER) instrument, showing signatures of non-stationary processes, are presented. These data are compared to the predictions of numerical models of the chromosphere and transition region. The observations seem to support the importance of upwardly propagating acoustic shocks in the heating of the chromosphere.

  18. Analysis of Solar Cell Efficiency for Venus Atmosphere and Surface Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Haag, Emily

    2013-01-01

    A simplified model of solar power in the Venus environment is developed, in which the solar intensity, solar spectrum, and temperature as a function of altitude is applied to a model of photovoltaic performance, incorporating the temperature and intensity dependence of the open-circuit voltage and the temperature dependence of the bandgap and spectral response of the cell. We use this model to estimate the performance of solar cells for both the surface of Venus and for atmospheric probes at altitudes from the surface up to 60 km. The model shows that photovoltaic cells will produce power even at the surface of Venus.

  19. Correlation of Upper-Atmospheric Be-7 With Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, G. W.; Share, G. H.; August, R. A.; Tylka, A. J.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Nymmik, R. A.; Kuzhevskjj, B. M.; Kulikauskas, V. S.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor); Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Surprisingly large concentrations of radioactive Be-7 have been found in the upper atmosphere at levels of one to three orders of magnitude greater than observed in the stratosphere. This phenomenon was originally observed on the LDEF satellite which was recovered in January 1990 following a period of extremely high solar activity in the fall of 1989. We report on follow-up measurements on the Russian COSMOS and RESURS F1 spacecraft during the period of 1996 to 1999 which was a period of minimal to moderate solar activity. The Be-7 concentrations observed on these flights were down substantially from the LDEF observations but were still one to two orders of magnitude higher than stratospheric levels. A significant correlation is observed between the Be-7 activity and the combined fluence of solar energetic protons (SEP) and galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) protons. The Be-7 activity is not correlated with overall solar activity as represented by the solar x-ray flux. We discuss possible mechanisms for the solar proton correlation. However, it is likely that the Be-7 is ionized and it is unknown how this will affect the calculations. There were several large solar flares in the fall of 1989 that produced extraordinarily intense solar particle events at the Earth and record geophysical disturbances. These may have acted to increase production of Be-7 from spallation in the stratosphere and also to enhance transport to higher altitudes from the effects of heating and expansion of the upper atmosphere. Be-7 in the upper atmosphere may also have been produced directly at the Sun. Be-7 and Li-7 are produced in solar flares when accelerated alpha-particles fuse with He-4 in the solar atmosphere. Under optimistic assumptions for Sun to Earth transport and subsequent insertion into low Earth orbit, a Be-7 density of about 10(exp -7) atom/cubic cm at 310 km is estimated.

  20. Atmospheric CO2 retrieved from ground-based solar spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Z.; Toon, G. C.; Margolis, J. S.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2002-01-01

    The column-averaged volume mixing ration of CO2 over Kitt Peak, Arizona, has been retrieved from high-resolution solar absorption spectra obtained with the fourier transform spectrometer on the McMath telescope.

  1. Arecibo radar micrometeor studies: Interplanetary dust in the solar system and the atmospheric fate of this dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, J.; Briczinski, S.; Meisel, D.; Zhou, Q.; Janches, D.

    Radar (head-echo) observations of micrometeors at Arecibo uniquely yield velocity, deceleration, radiant, and scattering mechanism information of large numbers of interplanetary dust particles. The resulting high accuracy meteoroid orbit determinations indicate that most of these particles are in heliocentric orbits with about 5% in hyperbolic, usually extrasolar orbits, and with a comparable fraction appearing to enter the atmosphere from highly eccentric geocentric orbits. Heliocentric orbits range from low/high inclination, prograde/retrograde, and interstellar particles are readily discerned even in the large flux of ecliptic and near-ecliptic particles. Observed particle masses range from a few micrograms to a small fraction of a nanogram, a size range that requires taking into account radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag, as well as dusty plasma effects in the solar wind---particle charging and motion in the solar wind magnetic field. The atmospheric fate of these meteoroids is also of interest with 10-20% of all particles disappearing in ``terminal'' events and with perhaps 5% of the slow (15-25 km/sec) particles displaying evidence of trail-scattering with implications for the atmospheric interaction process. Terminal events are presumed to deposit the meteoroid mass as ``smoke'' particles rather than in atomic form that results from ablation. We give the micrometeoroid altitude, speed, deceleration, mass, and orbital distributions from February 2001, the first data set for which a completely automated analysis approach was employed.

  2. On the dynamically driven temperature response in the middle atmosphere to the solar cycle signal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Bodil; Kuilman, Maartje

    2016-04-01

    Noctilucent clouds (NLC), formed in the summer polar mesosphere, are exposed to solar radiation around the clock. These clouds consist of water ice, and are thus expected to be sensitive to changes in the solar Lyman alpha flux since it efficiently destroys water vapor in this region. Moreover, during solar maxima, the upper parts of the atmosphere are in general significantly warmer due to physical and chemical processes that are intensified at high solar activity. It is thus surprising that a clear solar cycle signal in NLC is hard to trace. We investigate how the circulation in the summer mesosphere is affected by changes in the solar flux using a 30-year run from the extended and nudged version of the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM30). We find that, as a result of a chain of wave-mean flow interactions primarily initiated in the winter stratosphere, the solar cycle signal from direct solar heating is suppressed by an enhanced circulation which adiabatically cools the region at increased solar activity.

  3. Carbon monoxide on Jupiter and implications for atmospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, R. G.; Barshay, S. S.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the equilibrium and disequilibrium thermochemistry of the recently discovered carbon monoxide on Jupiter suggests that the presence of this gas in the visible atmosphere is a direct result of very rapid upward mixing from levels in the deep atmosphere where the temperature is about 1100 K and where carbon monoxide is thermodynamically much more stable. As a consequence the observed carbon monoxide mixing ratio is a sensitive function of the vertical eddy mixing coefficient. We infer a value for this latter coefficient which is about three to four orders of magnitude greater than that in the earth's troposphere. This result directly supports existing structural and dynamical theories implying very rapid convection in the deep Jovian atmosphere, driven by an internal heat source.

  4. Solar-Induced Fluorescence (SIF) Captured by California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, X.

    2015-12-01

    Solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) is emitted from the core of the photosynthetic apparatus and can serve as a direct indicator of photosynthetic efficiency. It could be exploited for large scale monitoring of plant health, which is crucial for studies in ecosystem, carbon cycle, agriculture, and other related fields. In this study, we use Fourier Transform Spectrometers at California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (CLARS) to measure high-resolution spectra near the oxygen A band. Measurement campaigns conducted in recent two years provide weeks of measurements that capture the diurnal variations of SIF from a variety of species including grasses and oak trees. Stationed on the top of Mount. Wilson in Southern California, CLARS is capable of monitoring SIF over the nearby mountains and the Los Angeles basin. This study aims to demonstrate that instruments at CLARS are capable of capturing SIF with high precision over different times of day. The high spatiotemporal variations of SIF are unique features of the CLARS measurements. The results have implications for the proposed constellation of geostationary satellites that are designed to capture SIF at regional scales.

  5. Pressure Sounding of the Middle Atmosphere from ATMOS Solar Occultation Measurements of Atmospheric CO(sub 2) Absorption Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.; Gunson, M.; Lowes, L.; Rinsland, C.; Zander, R.

    1994-01-01

    A method for retrieving the atmospheric pressure corresponding to the tangent point of an infrared spectrum recorded in the solar occultation mode is described and applied to measurements made by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer. Tangent pressure values are inferred from measurements of isolated CO(sub 2) lines with temperature-insensitive intensities. Tangent pressures are determined with a spectroscopic precision of 1-3%, corresponding to a tangent point height precision, depending on the scale height, of 70-210 meters.

  6. Realistic Modeling of Multi-Scale MHD Dynamics of the Solar Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitiashvili, Irina; Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan; Couvidat, Sebastian; Yoon, Seokkwan; Kosovichev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Realistic 3D radiative MHD simulations open new perspectives for understanding the turbulent dynamics of the solar surface, its coupling to the atmosphere, and the physical mechanisms of generation and transport of non-thermal energy. Traditionally, plasma eruptions and wave phenomena in the solar atmosphere are modeled by prescribing artificial driving mechanisms using magnetic or gas pressure forces that might arise from magnetic field emergence or reconnection instabilities. In contrast, our 'ab initio' simulations provide a realistic description of solar dynamics naturally driven by solar energy flow. By simulating the upper convection zone and the solar atmosphere, we can investigate in detail the physical processes of turbulent magnetoconvection, generation and amplification of magnetic fields, excitation of MHD waves, and plasma eruptions. We present recent simulation results of the multi-scale dynamics of quiet-Sun regions, and energetic effects in the atmosphere and compare with observations. For the comparisons we calculate synthetic spectro-polarimetric data to model observational data of SDO, Hinode, and New Solar Telescope.

  7. Modified solar flux index for upper atmospheric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    The F10.7 solar flux index was modified in order to better describe short-term variations in solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance for application in ionosphere and thermosphere studies. Several parameters were computed from the F10.7 time series with the assistance of an artificial neural network (ANN) technique, and the daily F10.7 index value was converted to a new solar flux index, MEI10.7. The ANN consists of an input layer that includes an experimental solar input and the day of the year to take seasonal factors into account, one hidden layer, and a target layer of ionospheric total electron content (TEC). The ANN training and validation data set covered one solar cycle from 1997 to 2008. The parameter set that yielded the smallest root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) between the observed and ANN-predicted TECs was adopted for modifying the solar flux index. The MEI10.7 index was evaluated via the same ANN technique. MEI10.7 yielded a smaller RMSE than the magnesium index (Mg II core-to-wing ratio) and a similar RMSE to the EUV index based on the integrated 26-34 nm emission measured by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. An advantage of MEI10.7 is long-term availability since the 1940s, unlike satellite measurements. A long-term trend analysis of the ionospheric critical frequency (foF2) at Kokubunji, Japan, conducted for the period from 1957 to 2010 examined the difference between the ANN-modeled and measured foF2 values. The linear regression error when foF2 was modeled by MEI10.7 was appreciably smaller than when it was modeled by F10.7.

  8. Middle Atmosphere Program. Handbook for MAP, volume 29. Part 1: Extended Abstracts, International Symposium on Solar Activity Forcing of the Middle Atmosphere. Part 2: MASH Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lastovicka, Jan (Editor); Miles, Thomas (Editor); Oneill, Alan (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings of the symposium is presented. Eight different sessions were presented: (1) Papers generally related to the subject; (2) Papers on the influence of the Quasi Biennial Oscillation; (3) Papers on the influence of the solar electromagnetic radiation variability; (4) Papers on the solar wind and high energy particle influence; (5) Papers on atmospheric circulation; (6) Papers on atmospheric electricity; (7) Papers on lower ionospheric variability; and (8) Solar posters, which are not included in this compilation.

  9. Helium 584 Å and H Lyman-α Airglow in Giant Planetary Atmospheres: Modeling, Observations, and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Esposito, Larry W.

    2016-07-01

    The atmosphere of the outer planets is mainly composed of H2 and neutral atomic helium. The study of He 584 Å and H Lyman-α brightnesses is interesting as the EUV and FUV (Extreme and Far Ultraviolet) planetary airglow have the potential to yield useful information about mixing and other important parameters in their thermospheres. Time variation, asymmetries, and polar enhancement of the airglow are also possible and analysis of the public archived NASA mission data sets (i.e. Voyager and Cassini) can help solve some of the outstanding problems associated with these phenomena. The comparison of observations with results from sophisticated photochemical and radiative transfer models can also help ameliorate unexplained differences in the dynamical processes operating within planetary upper atmospheres. Powerful analysis techniques allow us to extract information on atmospheric mixing, temperatures, and temporal changes due to the solar and seasonal cycles from the variations in distribution and intensity of airglow emissions that result. The presentation will discuss the implications of interpretations from comparison of modeling and observations in giant planetary atmospheres.

  10. Coupled Gas Giant Atmospheres: Solar Heating vs. Interior Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Morgan E.; Kaspi, Yohai; Galanti, Eli

    2015-11-01

    The weather layers of Jupiter and Saturn receive both solar radiation and heat from the deep interior. Currently, numerical models fall into two broad categories: deep, convecting interiors that lack an outer, solar-heated troposphere, or thin shells that represent only a troposphere, with parameterized heating from the lower boundary. Here we present results from a new coupled circulation model that allows deep convective plumes and columnar structures to interact with a stable troposphere that is heated by the sun. Equatorial superrotation, observed on Jupiter and Saturn, extends in axially-aligned columns from the deep interior through the troposphere. A tropospheric midlatitude baroclinic zone due to solar heating competes with the outer edges of the deep rotating columns to characterize midlatitude jet and temperature structure. We demonstrate this interplay between solar heating and interior heating in setting the strength and depth of the jets for a range of idealized gas giants. The relative impact of each is modulated by the static stability of the troposphere, which acts as a proxy for water abundance. We also show the impact of axial tilt, with respect to solar radiation, on asymmetries between the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

  11. PROBING THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE USING OSCILLATIONS OF INFRARED CO SPECTRAL LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, M. J.; Schad, T.; Cox, E.

    2011-06-10

    Oscillations were observed across the whole solar disk using the Doppler shift and line center intensity of spectral lines from the CO molecule near 4666 nm with the National Solar Observatory's McMath/Pierce solar telescope. Power, coherence, and phase spectra were examined, and diagnostic diagrams reveal power ridges at the solar global mode frequencies to show that these oscillations are solar p-modes. The phase was used to determine the height of formation of the CO lines by comparison with the IR continuum intensity phase shifts as measured in Kopp et al.; we find that the CO line formation height varies from 425 km < z < 560 km as we move from disk center toward the solar limb 1.0 > {mu} > 0.5. The velocity power spectra show that while the sum of the background and p-mode power increases with height in the solar atmosphere as seen in previous work, the power in the p-modes only (background subtracted) decreases with height. The CO line center intensity weakens in regions of stronger magnetic fields, as does the p-mode oscillation power. Across most of the solar surface the phase shift is larger than the expected value of 90{sup 0} for an adiabatic atmosphere. We fit the phase spectra at different disk positions with a simple atmospheric model to determine that the acoustic cutoff frequency is about 4.5 mHz with only small variations, but that the thermal relaxation frequency drops significantly from 2.7 to 0 mHz at these heights in the solar atmosphere.

  12. Response of the Upper Atmosphere to Variations in the Solar Soft X-Ray Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Scott Martin

    1995-11-01

    Terrestrial Far Ultraviolet (FUV) airglow emissions have been suggested as a means for remote sensing the structure of the upper atmosphere. The energy which leads to the excitation of FUV airglow emissions is solar irradiance at Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray wavelengths. Solar irradiance at these wavelengths is known to be highly variable; studies of Nitric Oxide (NO) in the lower thermosphere have suggested a variability of more than an order of magnitude in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. To properly interpret the FUV airglow, the magnitude of the solar energy deposition must be known. Previous analyses have used the electron impact excited Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands of N _2 to infer the flux of photoelectrons in the atmosphere and thus to infer the magnitude of the solar irradiance. This dissertation presents the first simultaneous measurements of the FUV airglow, the major atmospheric constituent densities, and the solar EUV and soft x-ray irradiances. The measurements were made on three flights of an identical sounding rocket payload at different levels of solar activity. The linear response in brightness of the LBH bands to variations in solar irradiance is demonstrated. In addition to the N_2 LBH bands, atomic oxygen lines at 135.6 and 130.4 nm are also studied. Unlike the LBH bands, these emissions undergo radiative transfer effects in the atmosphere. The OI emission at 135.6 nm is found to be well modeled using a radiative transfer calculation and the known excitation processes. Unfortunately, the assumed processes leading to OI 130.4 nm excitation are found to be insufficient to reproduce the observed variability of this emission. Production of NO in the thermosphere is examined; it is shown that a lower than previously reported variability in the solar soft x-ray irradiance is required to explain the variability of NO.

  13. On the importance of reverse current ohmic losses in electron-heated solar flare atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    The passage of a beam of nonthermal electrons through the flaring solar atmosphere is considered, paying particular attention to the requirement that the beam be stable to the generation of plasma turbulence. The ratio is computed of energy losses due to reverse current ohmic heating, and heating by Coulomb collisions, respectively, for the greatest flux which can pass stably through the atmosphere. It is demonstrated that this ratio is determined by the low energy cutoff of the beam, by the electron temperature of the ambient atmosphere, and by the electron to ion temperature ratio. It is also independent of the atmospheric density.

  14. SUMER: Temperatures, densities, and velocities in the outer solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaire, Philippe; Wilhelm, K.; Axford, W. I.; Curdt, W.; Gabriel, A. H.; Grewing, M.; Huber, M. C. E.; Jordan, Stuart D.; Kuehne, M.; Marsch, Eckart

    1992-01-01

    The SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation) instrumentation that will be mounted on the SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) spacecraft is in development. It has some capability of improving the solar angular resolution and the spectral resolution already obtained in the far UV to the extreme UV, corresponding to the temperature range between 10,000 and a few 1,000,000 K. Some insights into the SUMER spectrometer, developed to study the dynamics and to infer temperatures and densities of the low corona and the chromosphere-corona transition zone in using the 50 to 160 nm wavelength range, are given. The SUMER scientific goals and the techniques used are outlined. The instrumentation and the expected performances are described. The way the observations can be conducted is emphasized and the operation of SUMER in coordination with other SOHO instrumentations and in cooperation with ground based observations is explained.

  15. The noneffect of solar eclipses on the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theon, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of the removal of solar radiation, through solar eclipse, on the structure of the thermosphere are examined. The March 7, 1970 eclipse was explored with pilot probe rockets at times during the 42 minute period corresponding to 40, 80, and 100 percent totality. Measuring results show small temperature disturbances especially below 90 km. At levels above 100 km, temperature changes were very large. Results also show that temperature profiles have a warming trend at the start of the eclipse followed by a continuous cooling as the eclipse progresses.

  16. The atmosphere structure of coronal hole and solar wind parameters connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosovetsky, Dmitry; Myagkova, Irina

    The problem of high-speed solar wind acceleration and the dependence of its parameters on atmosphere structure of coronal holes at different altitudes is one of the key problems in modern solar physics. UV and microwave observations may be useful for investigations in this direction. We have analyzed the results of measurements on board spacecrafts SOHO and ACE, and also the observation data in a microwave range obtained by radio heliographs of Nobeyama, SSR and Nancy, magnetic field measurements in an observatory the Kit Peak. The dependence of solar wind speed from magnetic flux at low levels of solar atmosphere was confirmed. However such dependence at coronal level was not founded. We notice this fact doesn't allow performing forecasting solar wind parameters from super-radial divergence of magnetic field lines. The strong dependence of solar wind speed from the flux of microwave emission has been founded for 17 GHz, 5.7 GHz and 327 MHz which correspond to altitudes from the top chro-mosphere to coronal heights. However such dependence is absent for frequency 150.9 MHz at high coronal levels. We assume this fact connected with the presence of two solar wind acceleration mechanisms from coronal holes of the middle and top corona. The observations of scintillation in the radio emissions of a solar corona for a high-speed and slow solar wind confirm this assumption. Geomagnetic disturbances depending on coronal hole structure at different altitudes of solar atmosphere were studied. The obtained results specify that high-latitude magnetic disturbances depend on relation of magnetic field vector component in coronal holes. During investigated time period the most powerful high latitude magnetic disturbances (Kp and AE) were observed when the southern magnetic field component dominates inside coronal holes at cromospheric altitudes.

  17. Simulated solar cycle effects on the middle atmosphere: WACCM3 Versus WACCM4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, E. D.; Randall, C. E.; Harvey, V. L.; Marsh, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model version 4 (WACCM4) is used to quantify solar cycle impacts, including both irradiance and particle precipitation, on the middle atmosphere. Results are compared to previous work using WACCM version 3 (WACCM3) to estimate the sensitivity of simulated solar cycle effects to model modifications. The residual circulation in WACCM4 is stronger than in WACCM3, leading to larger solar cycle effects from energetic particle precipitation; this impacts polar stratospheric odd nitrogen and ozone, as well as polar mesospheric temperatures. The cold pole problem, which is present in both versions, is exacerbated in WACCM4, leading to more ozone loss in the Antarctic stratosphere. Relative to WACCM3, a westerly shift in the WACCM4 zonal winds in the tropical stratosphere and mesosphere, and a strengthening and poleward shift of the Antarctic polar night jet, are attributed to inclusion of the QBO and changes in the gravity wave parameterization in WACCM4. Solar cycle effects in WACCM3 and WACCM4 are qualitatively similar. However, the EPP-induced increase from solar minimum to solar maximum in polar stratospheric NOy is about twice as large in WACCM4 as in WACCM3; correspondingly, maximum increases in polar O3 loss from solar min to solar max are more than twice as large in WACCM4. This does not cause large differences in the WACCM3 versus WACCM4 solar cycle responses in temperature and wind. Overall, these results provide a framework for future studies using WACCM to analyze the impacts of the solar cycle on the middle atmosphere.

  18. Effect of atmospheric scattering and surface reflection on upwelling solar radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suttles, J. T.; Barkstrom, B. R.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    A study is presented of the solar radiation transfer in the complete earth-atmosphere system, and numerical results are compared with satellite data obtained during the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment on Nimbus 6, in August, 1975. Emphasis is placed on the upwelling radiance distribution at the top of the atmosphere, assumed to be at 50 km. The numerical technique is based on the finite difference method, which includes azimuth and spectral variations for the entire solar wavelength range. Detailed solar properties, atmospheric physical properties, and optical properties are used. However, since the property descriptions are based on a trade-off between accuracy and computational realities, aerosol and cloud optical properties are treated with simple approximations. The radiative transfer model is in good agreement with the satellite radiance observations. The method provides a valuable tool in analyzing satellite- and ground-based radiation budget measurements and in designing instrumentation.

  19. Observational Test for the Solar Wind Sputtering Origin of the Moon's Extended Sodium Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Michael; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Wilson, Jody

    1999-01-01

    We present observations of the lunar sodium atmosphere during four lunar eclipses between 1993 and 1997. With the Moon inside the magnetosphere, and therefore shielded from solar wind impact, we find its Na atmosphere to be comparable in abundance to cases near first and third quarter, implying that solar wind ion sputtering is not a significant source of the atmosphere. The atmosphere is azimuthally symmetric, and it extends beyond the field of view of our observations (∼12 Lunar radii). The average sodium atmospheric profile is best characterized by anr-1.4radial power law, close to that for an entirely escaping atmosphere. The average extrapolated near-surface brightness of 1145 rayleighs is in agreement with the near-surface polar brightness seen at quarter Moon. This corresponds to a line-of-sight neutral column content of 1.4×109Na atoms cm-2above the limb and a density of ∼3 atoms cm-3above the surface, decreasing asr-2.4. We suggest that a blend of sources (15% micrometeor impact uniform over the surface and 85% photon-induced desorption dependent on solar-zenith angle over the sunlit hemisphere) could account for the observed extended sodium atmospheres.

  20. Lower and middle atmosphere and ozone layer responses to solar variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Ana G.

    2010-02-01

    Global warming in the troposphere and the decrease of stratospheric ozone concentration has become a major concern to the scientific community. The increase in greenhouse gases and aerosols concentration is believed to be the main cause of this global change in the lower atmosphere and in stratospheric ozone, which is corresponded by a cooling in the middle and upper atmosphere. However, there are natural sources, such as the sun and volcanic eruptions, with the same ability to produce global changes in the atmosphere. The present work will focus on solar variation and its signature in lower and middle atmosphere parameters. The Sun can influence the Earth and its climate through electromagnetic radiation variations and also through changes in the solar wind which causes geomagnetic storms. The effects of both mechanisms over the lower and middle atmosphere and ozone layer will be discussed through an overview of selected papers, which by no means cover this subject that is extremely wide and complex. A fundamental understanding of the atmosphere response to solar variations is required for understanding and interpreting the causes of atmospheric variability. This is an essential focus of climate science, which is seeking to determine the extent to which human activities are altering the planetary energy balance through the emission of greenhouse gases and pollutants.

  1. The ancient oxygen exosphere of Mars: Implications for atmosphere evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Bougher, S. W.

    1992-12-01

    This study involves the calculation, by the 2-stream method of Nagy and Cravens, of 'hot' oxygen exosphere density profiles for 'ancient' atmospheres and ionospheres (e.g., different extreme ultraviolet fluxes) and the associated escaping fluxes. We computed the total production rates above different 'nominal' ionopause altitudes (not taking into account the fact that some will reenter the atmosphere). We do not consider the additional neutral escape due to the sputtering process described by Luhmann and Kozyra. The results presented here thus represent conservative estimations of the neutral escape fluxes, but generous estimates of ion loss rates (except that here we do not consider charge exchange and impact ionization ion production processes). Further work along the lines of Luhmann and Kozyra can lead to estimates of sputtering losses over time and the roles played by impact ionization and charge exchange.

  2. The ancient oxygen exosphere of Mars: Implications for atmosphere evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Bougher, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    This study involves the calculation, by the 2-stream method of Nagy and Cravens, of 'hot' oxygen exosphere density profiles for 'ancient' atmospheres and ionospheres (e.g., different extreme ultraviolet fluxes) and the associated escaping fluxes. We computed the total production rates above different 'nominal' ionopause altitudes (not taking into account the fact that some will reenter the atmosphere). We do not consider the additional neutral escape due to the sputtering process described by Luhmann and Kozyra. The results presented here thus represent conservative estimations of the neutral escape fluxes, but generous estimates of ion loss rates (except that here we do not consider charge exchange and impact ionization ion production processes). Further work along the lines of Luhmann and Kozyra can lead to estimates of sputtering losses over time and the roles played by impact ionization and charge exchange.

  3. Global biomass burning - Atmospheric, climatic, and biospheric implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume discusses the biomass burning (BMB) studies of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry project, GEO satellite estimation of Amazonian BMB, remote sensing of BMB in West Africa with NOAA-AVHRR, an orbital view of the great Chinese fire of 1987, BMB's role in tropical rainforest reduction, CO and O3 measurements of BMB in the Amazon, effects of vegetation burning on the atmospheric chemistry of the Venezuelan savanna, an assessment of annually-burned biomass in Africa, and light hydrocarbon emissions from African savanna burnings. Also discussed are BMB in India, trace gas and particulate emissions from BMB in temperate ecosystems, ammonia and nitric acid emissions from wetlands and boreal forest fires, combustion emissions and satellite imagery of BMB, BMB in the perspective of the global carbon cycle, modeling trace-gas emissions from BMB, NO(x) emissions from BMB, and cloud-condensation nuclei from BMB.

  4. Global biomass burning. Atmospheric, climatic, and biospheric implications

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    Biomass burning is a significant source of atmospheric gases and, as such, may contribute to global climate changes. Biomass burning includes burning forests and savanna grasslands for land clearing, burning agricultural stubble and waste after harvesting, and burning biomass fuels. The chapters in this volume include the following topics: remote sensing of biomass burning from space;geographical distribution of burning; combustion products of burning in tropical, temperate and boreal ecosystems; burning as a global source of atmospheric gases and particulates; impacts of biomass burning gases and particulates on global climate; and the role of biomass burning on biodiversity and past global extinctions. A total of 1428 references are cited for the 63 chapters. Individual chapters are indexed separately for the data bases.

  5. Correlation of Upper-Atmospheric 7-Be with Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, G. W.; Share, G. H.; King, S. E.; August, R. A.; Tylka, A. J.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Nymmik, R. A.; Kuzhevskij, B. M.; Kulikauskas, V. S.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A surprisingly large concentration of radioactive 7-Be was observed in the upper atmosphere at altitudes above 320 km on the LDEF satellite that was recovered in January 1990. We report on follow-up experiments on Russian spacecraft at altitudes of 167 to 370 km during the period of 1996 to 1999, specifically designed to measure 7-Be concentrations in low earth orbit. Our data show a significant correlation between the 7-Be concentration and the solar energetic proton fluence at Earth, but not with the overall solar activity. During periods of low solar proton fluence, the concentration is correlated with the galactic cosmic ray fluence. This indicates that spallation of atmospheric N by both solar energetic particles and cosmic rays is the primary source of 7-Be in the ionosphere.

  6. Evolution of Martian atmospheric argon: Implications for sources of volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, Kevin S.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    We have examined processes affecting isotopes of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, 40Ar) in order to determine important atmospheric sources and sinks. Our simple model for argon evolution incorporates production of radiogenic argon in the mantle, outgassing of all argon species by extrusive and intrusive volcanism, and loss to space by knock-on sputtering above the exobase. Sputtering has been shown previously to be an important loss process for atmospheric species, especially isotopes of noble gases, which have few other mechanisms of escape. The integrated evolution of argon (36Ar, 38Ar, and 40Ar, respectively) is modeled in terms of these variables: (1) the planetary concentration of potassium, (2) the fraction of juvenile argon released catastrophically during the first 600 Myr., (3) potential variation in the time-history of sputtering loss from that suggested by Luhmann et al. [1992], and (4) the volume of total outgassing to the surface as compared to outgassing contributed by volcanic release. Our results indicate that Mars has lost between 85-95% of 36Ar and 70-88% of outgassed 40Ar. Due to this substantial loss, the planet must have outgassed the equivalent of between 10 and 100 times the total volume of gases released by extrusive and intrusive volcanics. This indicates that volcanic outgassing, alone, is insufficient to explain the present-day abundances of 36Ar and 40Ar in the Martian atmosphere. Similar calculations for 20Ne suggest outgassed volumes of between 100 and 1800 times in excess of that due to volcanism. This results in a distinct Ne/Ar elemental fractionation, with a preference for outgassing argon, of the order of 10 to 17. Although the results must be evaluated within the model uncertainties, the results are compelling in that they unequivocally show the existence of additional sources of atmospheric volatiles and helps define a means to identify them.

  7. Understanding atmospheric peroxyformic acid chemistry: observation, modeling and implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Huang, D.; Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.

    2015-01-01

    The existence and importance of peroxyformic acid (PFA) in the atmosphere has been under controversy. We present here, for the first time, the observation data for PFA from four field measurements carried out in China. These data provided powerful evidence that PFA can stay in the atmosphere, typically in dozens of pptv level. The relationship between PFA and other detected peroxides was examined. The results showed that PFA had a strong positive correlation with its homolog, peroxyacetic acid, due to their similar sources and sinks. Through an evaluation of PFA production and removal rates, we proposed that the reactions between peroxyformyl radical (HC(O)O2) and formaldehyde or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) were likely to be the major source and degradation into formic acid (FA) was likely to be the major sink for PFA. Based on a box model evaluation, we proposed that the HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry was a major source for FA under low NOx conditions. Furthermore, it is found that the impact of the HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry on radical cycling was dependent on the yield of HC(O)O2 radical from HC(O) + O2 reaction. When this yield exceeded 50%, the HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry should not be neglected for calculating the radical budget. To make clear the exact importance of HC(O)O2 and PFA chemistry in the atmosphere, further kinetic, field and modeling studies are required.

  8. Solar influences on spatial patterns of Eurasian winter temperature and atmospheric general circulation anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haishan; Ma, Hedi; Li, Xing; Sun, Shanlei

    2015-09-01

    Solar influences on spatial patterns of Eurasian winter climate and possible mechanisms are investigated based on a multiple linear regression method and multisource observational and reanalysis data. Robust and significant solar signals are detected in Eurasian surface air temperature (SAT), and strong solar activity evidently warms most area of the continent. The spatial pattern of sea level pressure (SLP) responses to solar activity is similar but not identical to that of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Compared to the NAO, geographic distribution of solar-induced SLP anomalies shifts eastward, with significantly enhanced influences over northern Eurasia. Relatively weaker solar signals were also found in mid-to-upper troposphere. The spatial pattern of 500 hPa geopotential anomalies resembles a negative Scandinavia teleconnection pattern, and the 200 hPa subtropical jet is weakened, while zonal wind at high latitudes is enhanced due to strong solar activity. The anomalous zonal circulations can be attributed to the "top-down" mechanism. During high solar activity winters, an enhanced stratospheric zonal wind anomaly propagates downward, causing zonal wind anomalies in the troposphere. However, the "bottom-up" mechanisms may provide more reasonable explanations of the distinct solar influences on Eurasian climate. Solar-induced strong warm advection in lower atmosphere tends to increase SAT but decrease SLP, resulting in enhanced solar influences over northern Eurasia. Meanwhile, change in the land-ocean thermal contrast (LOTC) could also amplify the circulation anomaly. Inhomogeneous surface heating caused by anomalous solar activity modifies LOTC, which probably enhances the solar-induced circulation patterns. Such a positive feedback may potentially strengthen the solar influences.

  9. Retrieval of upper atmosphere pressure-temperature profiles from high resolution solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Park, J. H.; Namkung, J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure-temperature profiles over the 18 to 75 km altitude range were retrieved from 0.01 cm(-1) resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the solar occultation mode during the Spacelab 3 shuttle mission (April 30 to May 1, 1985). The analysis method is described and preliminary results deduced for five occultation events are compared to correlative pressure-temperature measurments.

  10. Interior and its implications for the atmosphere. [effects of Titan interior structure on its atmospheric composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The bulk composition and interior structure of Titan required to explain the presence of a substantial methane atmosphere are shown to imply the presence of solid CH4 - 7H2O in Titan's primitive material. Consideration of the possible composition and structure of the present atmosphere shows plausible grounds for considering models with total atmospheric pressures ranging from approximately 20 mb up to approximately 1 kb. Expectations regarding the physical state of the surface and its chemical composition are strongly conditioned by the mass of atmosphere believed to be present. A surface of solid CH4, liquid CH4 solid, CH4 hydrate, H2O ice, aqueous NH3 solution, or even a non-surface of supercritical H2O-NH3-CH4 fluid could be rationalized.