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Sample records for solar coatings designed

  1. Antireflection Coating Design for Series Interconnected Multi-Junction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    AIKEN,DANIEL J.

    1999-11-29

    AR coating design for multi-junction solar cells can be more challenging than in the single junction case. Reasons for this are discussed. Analytical expressions used to optimize AR coatings for single junction solar cells are extended for use in monolithic, series interconnected multi-junction solar cell AR coating design. The result is an analytical expression which relates the solar cell performance (through J{sub SC}) directly to the AR coating design through the device reflectance. It is also illustrated how AR coating design can be used to provide an additional degree of freedom for current matching multi-junction devices.

  2. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  3. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  4. Optimization of antireflection coating design for multijunction solar cells and concentrator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Christopher E.; Desfonds, Eric; Masson, Denis; Fafard, Simon; Carlson, Andrew; Cook, John; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin

    2008-06-01

    Photovoltaic solar cells are a route towards local, environmentally benign, sustainable and affordable energy solutions. Antireflection coatings are necessary to input a high percentage of available light for photovoltaic conversion, and therefore have been widely exploited for silicon solar cells. Multi-junction III-V semiconductor solar cells have achieved the highest efficiencies of any photovoltaic technology, yielding up to 40% in the laboratory and 37% in commercial devices under varying levels of concentrated light. These devices benefit from a wide absorption spectrum (300- 1800 nm), but this also introduces significant challenges for antireflection coating design. Each sub-cell junction is electrically connected in series, limiting the overall device photocurrent by the lowest current-producing junction. Therefore, antireflection coating optimization must maximize the current from the limiting sub-cells at the expense of the others. Solar concentration, necessary for economical terrestrial deployment of multi-junction solar cells, introduces an angular-dependent irradiance spectrum. Antireflection coatings are optimized for both direct normal incidence in air and angular incidence in an Opel Mk-I concentrator, resulting in as little as 1-2% loss in photocurrent as compared to an ideal zero-reflectance solar cell, showing a similar performance to antireflection coatings on silicon solar cells. A transparent conductive oxide layer has also been considered to replace the metallic-grid front electrode and for inclusion as part of a multi-layer antireflection coating. Optimization of the solar cell, antireflection coating, and concentrator system should be considered simultaneously to enable overall optimal device performance.

  5. Design of broadband multilayer dichroic coating for a high-efficiency solar energy harvesting system.

    PubMed

    Jiachen, Wang; Lee, Sang Bae; Lee, Kwanil

    2015-05-20

    We report on the design and performance of a broadband dichroic coating for a solar energy conversion system. As a spectral beam splitter, the coating facilitates a hybrid system that combines a photovoltaic cell with a thermal collector. When positioned at a 45° angle with respect to incident light, the coating provides high reflectance in the 40-1100 nm and high transmission in the 1200-2000 nm ranges for a photovoltaic cell and a thermal collector, respectively. Numerical simulations show that our design leads to a sharp transition between the reflection and transmission bands, low ripples in both bands, and slight polarization dependence. PMID:26192518

  6. Selective optical coatings for solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    For best performance, energy-absorbing surface of solar collector should be characterized by high ratio of solar absorptance to thermal emitance. Report on optical characteristics of several chemical treatments and electrodeposited coatings for metal solar-absorbing surfaces should interest designers and users of solar-energy systems. Moisture resistance of some coatings is also reported.

  7. Design of coated standing nanowire array solar cell performing beyond the planar efficiency limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yang; Ye, Qinghao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-05-01

    The single standing nanowire (SNW) solar cells have been proven to perform beyond the planar efficiency limits in both open-circuit voltage and internal quantum efficiency due to the built-in concentration and the shifting of the absorption front. However, the expandability of these nano-scale units to a macro-scale photovoltaic device remains unsolved. The main difficulty lies in the simultaneous preservation of an effective built-in concentration in each unit cell and a broadband high absorption capability of their array. Here, we have provided a detailed theoretical guideline for realizing a macro-scale solar cell that performs furthest beyond the planar limits. The key lies in a complementary design between the light-trapping of the single SNWs and that of the photonic crystal slab formed by the array. By tuning the hybrid HE modes of the SNWs through the thickness of a coaxial dielectric coating, the optimized coated SNW array can sustain an absorption rate over 97.5% for a period as large as 425 nm, which, together with the inherited carrier extraction advantage, leads to a cell efficiency increment of 30% over the planar limit. This work has demonstrated the viability of a large-size solar cell that performs beyond the planar limits.

  8. Zr-ZrO2 cermet solar coatings designed by modelling calculations and deposited by dc magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi-Chu; Hadavi, M. S.; Lee, K.-D.; Shen, Y. G.

    2003-03-01

    High solar performance Zr-ZrO2 cermet solar coatings were designed using a numerical computer model and deposited experimentally. The layer thickness and Zr metal volume fraction for the Zr-ZrO2 cermet solar selective coatings on a Zr or Al reflector with a surface ZrO2 or Al2O3 anti-reflection layer were optimized to achieve maximum photo-thermal conversion efficiency at 80°C under concentration factors of 1-20 using the downhill simplex method in multi-dimensions in the numerical calculation. The dielectric function and the complex refractive index of Zr-ZrO2 cermet materials were calculated using Sheng's approximation. Optimization calculations show that Al2O3/Zr-ZrO2/Al solar coatings with two cermet layers and three cermet layers have nearly identical solar absorptance, emittance and photo-thermal conversion efficiency that are much better than those for films with one cermet layer. The optimized Al2O3/Zr-ZrO2/Al solar coating film with two cermet layers has a high solar absorptance value of 0.97 and low hemispherical emittance value of 0.05 at 80°C for a concentration factor of 2. The Al2O3/Zr-ZrO2/Al solar selective coatings with two cermet layers were deposited using dc magnetron sputtering technology. During the deposition of Zr-ZrO2 cermet layer, a Zr metallic target was run in a gas mixture of argon and oxygen. By control of oxygen flow rate the different metal volume fractions in the cermet layers were achieved using dc reactive sputtering. A solar absorptance of 0.96 and normal emittance of 0.05 at 80°C were achieved.

  9. Design of selective coatings for solar thermal applications using sub-wavelength metal-dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Nicholas P.; Agrawal, Mukul; Peumans, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Spectral control of the emissivity of surfaces is essential in applications such as solar thermal energy and thermophotovoltaic energy conversion in order to achieve the highest conversion efficiencies possible. We investigated surfaces consisting of periodic, nanoscale V-grooves coated with aperiodic metal-dielectric stacks. This approach combines impedance matching using tapered metallic features with the excellent spectral selectivity of aperiodic metal-dielectric stacks. We explain how changes in the angle of the V-grooves can be used to tailor the spectral selectivity over a wide angular range to significantly increase the efficiency of thermophotovoltaic and solar thermal systems. Optimal coatings for concentrated solar power are predicted to have thermal emissivity below 5% at 450°C while absorbing >90% of the incident light.

  10. Selective coating for solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Schardein, D.J.

    1983-03-15

    A selective solar coating for solar collectors is disclosed. The coating is characterized by its high absorptance and low emittance. The coating comprises an organic compound or substance having a high molecular weight and a high carbon content, such as a petroleum, vegetable or animal oil, fat or wax, which is pyrolyzed to produce a carbon black pigmented varnish.

  11. Electrocurtain coating process for coating solar mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Boyd, Donald W.; Buchanan, Michael J.; Kelly, Patrick; Kutilek, Luke A.; McCamy, James W.; McPheron, Douglas A.; Orosz, Gary R.; Limbacher, Raymond D.

    2013-10-15

    An electrically conductive protective coating or film is provided over the surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by flowing or directing a cation containing liquid and an anion containing liquid onto the conductive surface. The cation and the anion containing liquids are spaced from, and preferably out of contact with one another on the surface of the reflective coating as an electric current is moved through the anion containing liquid, the conductive surface between the liquids and the cation containing liquid to coat the conductive surface with the electrically conductive coating.

  12. Solar Selective Coatings for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Shumway, Dean A.

    2003-01-01

    Solar selective coatings are envisioned for use on minisatellites, for applications where solar energy is to be used to power heat engines or to provide thermal energy for remote regions in the interior of the spacecraft. These coatings are designed to have the combined properties of high solar absorptance and low infrared emittance. The coatings must be durable at elevated temperatures. For thermal bus applications, the temperature during operation is likely to be near 100 C. For heat engine applications. the temperature is expected to be much greater. The objective of this work was to screen candidate solar selective coatings for their high temperature durability. Candidate solar selective coatings were composed of molecular mixtures of metal and dielectric, including: nickel and aluminum oxide, titanium and aluminum oxide, and platinum and aluminum oxide. To identify high temperature durability, the solar absorptance and infrared emittance of the candidate coatings were evaluated initially, and after heating to temperatures in the range of 400 C to 700 C. The titanium and aluminum oxide molecular mixture was found to be the most durable.

  13. Multilayer coatings for solar energy control applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kivaisi, R.T.; Mbise, G.

    1993-12-31

    This work presents some results for window coatings that are suitable for solar control applications. Selected research results are given for metal/dielectric based coatings optimized for normal incidence. These coatings can be used to improve the performance of windows both for architectural and automobile sectors. Surface coatings which are transparent at 0.3 < {lambda} < 0.7 {micro}m can be used to solar control windows. A thin homogeneous noble metal film (eg Ag) can combine short wavelength transmittance with high long wavelength reflectance. By embedding the metal film between high refractive index dielectric layers one can optimize the transmittance in the desired spectral region. Transmittance data for multilayer stacks designed for normal and non normal incidence to the coating are presented.

  14. Optical design and co-sputtering preparation of high performance Mo-SiO2 cermet solar selective absorbing coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liqing; Gao, Fangyuan; Zhao, Shuxi; Zhou, Fuyun; Nshimiyimana, Jean Pierre; Diao, Xungang

    2013-09-01

    In order to optimize and prepare high performance Mo-SiO2 cermet solar selective absorbing coating, a series of Mo-SiO2 cermet films with different metal volume fraction were deposited on optical glass using mid-frequency (MF) and radio frequency (RF) co-sputtering. The reflectance (R) and transmittance (T) in the wavelength range of 250-2500 nm have been simulated using SCOUT software with different dielectric function models. The optical constants, film thickness, metal volume fraction and other parameters have been deduced from the modeling. The fitted optical constants were then used to simulate and optimize the Mo-SiO2 solar selective coating and samples were prepared based on the optimized parameters. The Maxwell Garnett (MG) and Bruggeman (BR) effective-medium theory have been added in the dielectric function models to describe low metal volume fraction cermet layer (LMVF) and high metal volume fraction cermet layer (HMVF), separately. The optical spectra (R and T) of all single films were in a good agreement with the fitted spectra by dielectric function models. The experimental measured reflectance of the solar selective coating was also in rather good agreement with the optimized result. The solar absorptance of theoretically optimized selective coating was 0.945, while the absorptance of the experimental coating was 0.95. The thermal emittance of 0.15 (at 400 °C) was obtained.

  15. Design and demonstration of a system for the deposition of atomic-oxygen durable coatings for reflective solar dynamic power system concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A system for the vacuum deposition of atomic-oxygen durable coatings for reflective solar dynamic power systems (SDPS) concentrators was designed and demonstrated. The design issues pertinent to SDPS were developed by the Government Aerospace Systems Division of the Harris Corporation and are described in NASA-CR-179489. Both design and demonstration phases have been completed. At the time of this report the deposition system was ready for coating of facets for SDPS concentrators. The materials issue relevant to the coating work were not entirely resolved. These issues can only be resolved when substrates which are comparable to those which will be used in flight hardware are available. The substrates available during the contract period were deficient in the areas of surface roughness and contamination. These issues are discussed more thoroughly in the body of the report.

  16. Black chrome solar selective coating

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, R.B.; Sowell, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Electrodeposited black chrome solar selective coatings have frequently experienced thermal stability problems when heated to temperatures above 250/sup 0/C (480/sup 0/F) in air. By reducing the trivalent chromium concentration in the standard black chrome plating bath, coatings on nickel substrates are obtained which are stable for thousands of hours at 350/sup 0/C (660/sup 0/F) and for hundreds of hours at 400/sup 0/C (750/sup 0/F). These results have been obtained consistently on a laboratory scale, but difficulty in reproducing the results has been encountered in a production environment. A current study of the effects of known plating variables on the optical properties and thermal stability of coatings is aimed at establishing an acceptable range for each plating parameter. A preliminary process specification for electroplating mild steel substrates with a stable black chrome coating is presented.

  17. High temperature solar selective coatings

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, Cheryl E

    2014-11-25

    Improved solar collectors (40) comprising glass tubing (42) attached to bellows (44) by airtight seals (56) enclose solar absorber tubes (50) inside an annular evacuated space (54. The exterior surfaces of the solar absorber tubes (50) are coated with improved solar selective coatings {48} which provide higher absorbance, lower emittance and resistance to atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures. The coatings are multilayered structures comprising solar absorbent layers (26) applied to the meta surface of the absorber tubes (50), typically stainless steel, topped with antireflective Savers (28) comprising at least two layers 30, 32) of refractory metal or metalloid oxides (such as titania and silica) with substantially differing indices of refraction in adjacent layers. Optionally, at least one layer of a noble metal such as platinum can be included between some of the layers. The absorbent layers cars include cermet materials comprising particles of metal compounds is a matrix, which can contain oxides of refractory metals or metalloids such as silicon. Reflective layers within the coating layers can comprise refractory metal silicides and related compounds characterized by the formulas TiSi. Ti.sub.3SiC.sub.2, TiAlSi, TiAN and similar compounds for Zr and Hf. The titania can be characterized by the formulas TiO.sub.2, Ti.sub.3O.sub.5. TiOx or TiO.sub.xN.sub.1-x with x 0 to 1. The silica can be at least one of SiO.sub.2, SiO.sub.2x or SiO.sub.2xN.sub.1-x with x=0 to 1.

  18. Absorptive coating for aluminum solar panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.; Parr, A.

    1979-01-01

    Method for coating forming coating of copper oxide from copper component of sheet aluminum/copper alloy provides strong durable solar heat collector panels. Copper oxide coating has solar absorption characteristics similar to black chrome and is much simpler and less costly to produce.

  19. Anti-static coat for solar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellas, C. N.

    1982-06-01

    A Kapton based composite material, suitable as a substrate for flexible solar arrays, was designed, constructed and tested under electron energies ranging from 5 to 30 keV. The rear of the array under adverse eclipse conditions (-197 C) produced voltages well below the discharge threshold. An antistatic coat suitable as a front cover for solar arrays is also described. The thermal and optical transmission characteristics were tested and are satisfactory, but the UV and particle degradation of the Tedlar material needs to be evaluated.

  20. Solar Design Workbook

    SciTech Connect

    Franta, G.; Baylin, F.; Crowther, R.; Dubin, F.; Grace, A., Griffith, J.W.; Holtz, M.; Kutscher, C.; Nordham, D.; Selkowitz, S.; Villecco, M.

    1981-06-01

    This Solar Design Workbook presents solar building design applications for commercial buildir^s. The book is divided into four sections. The first section describes the variety of solar applications in buildings including conservation aspects, solar fundamentals, passive systems, active systems, daylighting, and other solar options. Solar system design evaluation techniques including considerations for building energy requirements, passive systems, active systems, and economics are presented in Section II. The third section attempts to assist the designer in the building design process for energy conservation and solar applications including options and considerations for pre-design, design, and post-design phases. The information required for the solar design proee^ has not been fully developed at this time. Therefore, Section III is incomplete, but an overview of the considerations with some of the design proces elements is presented. Section IV illustrates ease studies that utilize solar applications in the building design.

  1. Cermet Coatings for Solar Stirling Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Raack, Taylor

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic are being considered for the heat inlet surface of a solar Stirling space power converter. This paper will discuss the solar absorption characteristics of as-deposited cermet coatings as well as the solar absorption characteristics of the coatings after heating. The role of diffusion and island formation, during the deposition process and during heating will also be discussed.

  2. Solar Control design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information used in the evaluation of design of Solar Control's solar heating and cooling system controller and the Solarstat is given. Some of the information includes system performance specifications, design data brochures, and detailed design drawings.

  3. Design of optical coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunkel, Claus W.

    1990-08-01

    A highly sophisticated antireflection coating and a cut-on-filter - designed by the Leitz program "RDP" - will be pointed out. The program runs on a VAX 8530 and allows to calculate reflectance, transmittance and phase of randomly polarized light which interacts with marginal surfaces. The number of layers is not limited. Some or even all layers are allowed to be anistropic. Up to four layers may be inhomogeneous both in refractive indices and absorption constants. At a time two thicknesses, two refractive indices and absorption constants as well as the angles of incidence may be varied independently in each run. The calculated values will be compared with the results of measurements. The antireflection coating is evaporated in a Balzers high vacuum evaporation plant, controlled by the process unit BPU 420, whereas the cut-on filter is evaporated in a Leybold box coater with Leycom III and two electron-beam guns.

  4. Natural-oxide solar-collector coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupnick, A. C.; Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    Optically selective coatings for solar collectors are produced by thermally treating stainless steel in furnace after series of cleaning and soaking operations. Coatings have withstood 18-month exposure tests at 100 percent relative humidity and temperatures of 95 F. Room temperature coatings are valuable as they are inexpensive to produce, highly production oriented, and environmentally stable.

  5. Coatings Boost Solar-Cell Outputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Campbell, Robert B.; O'Keefe, T. W.; Rai-Choudbury, Posenjit; Hoffman, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Efficiencies increased by more-complete utilization of incident light. Electrical outputs of thin solar photovoltaic cells made of dendritic-web silicon increased by combination of front-surface, antireflective coatings and back-surface, reflective coatings. Improvements achieved recently through theoretical and experimental studies of ways to optimize coatings for particular wavelengths of incident light, cell thicknesses, and cell materials.

  6. Solar Absorptance of Cermet Coatings Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic, are being considered for the heat inlet surface of solar Stirling convertors. In this application, the key role of the cermet coating is to absorb as much of the incident solar energy as possible. To achieve this objective, the cermet coating has a high solar absorptance value. Cermet coatings are manufactured utilizing sputter deposition, and many different metal and ceramic combinations can be created. The ability to mix metal and ceramic at the atomic level offers the opportunity to tailor the composition, and hence, the optical properties of these coatings. The NASA Glenn Research Center has prepared and characterized a wide variety of cermet coatings utilizing different metals deposited in an aluminum oxide ceramic matrix. In addition, the atomic oxygen durability of these coatings has been evaluated.

  7. Design of a Three-Layer Antireflection Coating for High Efficiency Indium Phosphide Solar Cells Using a Chemical Oxide as First Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moulot, Jacques; Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Goradia, Chandra; Goradia, Manju; Bailey, Sheila

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the behavior of III-V compound based solar cells is largely controlled by their surface, since the majority of light generated carriers (63% for GaAs and 79% for InP) are created within 0.2 microns of the illuminated surface of the cell. Consequently, the always observed high surface recombination velocity (SRV) on these cells is a serious limiting factor for their high efficiency performance, especially for those with the p-n junction made by either thermal diffusion or ion implantation. A good surface passivation layer, ideally, a grown oxide as opposed to a deposited one, will cause a significant reduction in the SRV without adding interface problems, thus improving the performance of III-V compound based solar cells. Another significant benefit to the overall performance of the solar cells can be achieved by a substantial reduction of their large surface optical reflection by the use of a well designed antireflection (AR) coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a chemically grown, thermally and chemically stable oxide, not only for surface passivation but also as an integral part of a 3- layer AR coating for thermally diffused p(+)n InP solar cells. A phosphorus-rich interfacial oxide, In(PO3)3, is grown at the surface of the p(+) emitter using an etchant based on HNO3, o-H3PO4 and H2O2. This oxide has the unique properties of passivating the surface as well as serving as a fairly efficient antireflective layer yielding a measured record high AM0, 25 C, open-circuit voltage of 890.3 mV on a thermally diffused InP(Cd,S) solar cell. Unlike conventional single layer AR coatings such as ZnS, Sb2O3, SiO or double layer AR coatings such as ZnS/MgF2 deposited by e-beam or resistive evaporation, this oxide preserves the stoichiometry of the InP surface. We show that it is possible to design a three-layer AR coating for a thermally diffused InP solar cell using the In(PO3)3 grown oxide as the first layer and Al2O3, MgF2 or

  8. Design of a three-layer antireflection coating for high efficiency indium phosphide solar cells using a chemical oxide as first layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moulot, Jacques; Faur, M.; Faur, M.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.; Bailey, S.

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the behavior of III-V compound based solar cells is largely controlled by their surface, since the majority of light generated carriers (63% for GaAs and 79% for InP) are created within 0.2 mu m of the surface of the illuminated cell. Consequently, the always observed high surface recombination velocity (SRV) on these cells is a serious limiting factor for their high efficiency performance, especially for those with p-n junction made by either thermal diffusion or ion implantation. A good surface passivation layer, ideally a grown oxide as opposed to a deposited one, will cause a significant reduction in the SRV without adding interface problems, thus improving the performance of III-V compound based solar cells. Another significant benefit to the overall performance of the solar cells can be achieved by a substantial reduction of their large surface optical reflection by the use of a well designed antireflection (AR) coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a chemically grown thermally and chemically stable oxide, not only for surface passivation but also as an integral part of a 3-layer AR coating for thermally diffused p+n InP solar cells. A phosphorus-rich interfacial oxide, In(PO3)3, is grown at the surface of the p+ emitter using an etchant based on HNO3, o-H3PO4 and H2O2. This oxide has the unique properties of passivating the surface as well as serving as an efficient antireflective layer yielding a measured record high AMO open-circuit voltage of 890.3 mV on a thermally diffused InP(Cd,S) solar cell. Unlike conventional single layer AR coatings such as ZnS, Sb2O3, SiO or double layer AR coatings such as ZnS/MgF2 deposited by e-beam or resistive evaporation, this oxide preserves the stoichiometry of the InP surface. We show that it is possible to design a three-layer AR coating for a thermally diffused InP solar cell using the In(PO3)3 grown oxide as the first layer and Al2O3 and MgF2 as the second and third

  9. Antisoiling Coatings for Solar-Energy Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Willis, P.

    1986-01-01

    Fluorocarbons resist formation of adherent deposits. Promising coating materials reduce soiling of solar photovoltaic modules and possibly solar thermal collectors. Contaminating layers of various degrees of adherence form on surfaces of devices, partially blocking incident solar energy, reducing output power. Loose soil deposits during dry periods but washed off by rain. New coatings help prevent formation of more-adherent, chemically and physically bonded layers rain alone cannot wash away.

  10. Processing on high efficiency solar collector coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M.

    1977-01-01

    Wavelength selective coatings for solar collectors are considered. Substrates with good infrared reflectivity were examined along with their susceptibility to physical and environmental damage. Improvements of reflective surfaces were accomplished through buffing, chemical polishing and other surface processing methods.

  11. EUV multilayer coatings for solar imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windt, David L.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of new EUV multilayer coatings for solar physics. In particular, we present results obtained with Pd/B4C/Y, Al/Zr, and Al-Mg/SiC multilayers, designed for normal incidence operation in the 9 - 50 nm wavelength range. We describe the development of both periodic multilayer films designed for narrowband imaging, and non-periodic multilayers designed to have a broad-spectral response for spectroscopy. The higher EUV reflectance provided by these new coatings, relative to older-generation coatings such as Si/Mo, Mo/Y, and others, will facilitate the development of future solar physics instruments for both imaging and spectroscopy having higher spatial and spectral resolution, while supporting the exposure times and cadences necessary to capture the evolution of flares, jets, CMEs and other dynamic processes in the solar atmosphere.

  12. Survey of coatings for solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    Optimum solar selective properties of black chrome require some tailoring of current and time for plating solution being used. Black zinc is produced from high zinc electroplate by subsequent conversion with chromate dip. Measurements have also been made of reflectance of previously known solar selective coatings of black copper and electroplated black nickel.

  13. SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    A REPORT OF A PROGRAM HELD AS PART OF THE BUILDING RESEARCH INSTITUTE 1962 SPRING CONFERENCE ON THE SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN. TOPICS DISCUSSED ARE--(1) SOLAR ENERGY DATA APPLICABLE TO BUILDING DESIGN, (2) THERMAL EFFECTS OF SOLAR RADIATION ON MAN, (3) SOLAR EFFECTS ON ARCHITECTURE, (4) SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING COSTS, (5) SELECTION OF…

  14. TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect

    Glatkowski, P. J.; Landis, D. A.

    2013-04-16

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT

  15. Protective coatings and sealants for solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wischmann, K. B.; Gonzales, M. H.

    1980-09-01

    An aging study has been completed which evaluated a number of polymeric materials for potential use as (1) protective coatings for back surfaces of mirrors and (2) solar heliostat edge seals. These investigations were conducted in an artificial weathering chamber that accelerated thermal cycling. The primary mirror failure mode was observed to be silver corrosion resulting from moisture exposure. To increase mirror longevity in current heliostat designs, intimate bonding at all the composite interfaces is essential to minimize moisture pathways to the silvered surface. If any voids or delaminations are present, mirror degradation will eventually occur. Delaminations can also occur as the result of mechanical stresses brought about by mismatches in the various materials coefficients of thermal expansion. If good bonding cannot be achieved or mechanical stresses avoided, then improved moisture barriers must be designed to assure mirror longevity. With good adhesion, a KRATON rubber was found to exhibit superior back surface mirror protection (12 months in environmental chamber with no corrosion). An ultraviolet stabilized butyl rubber appeared to be the best edge seal. All heliostats edge sealed with silicones showed silver corrosion which indicated either poor bonding or moisture permeation.

  16. Reflective coatings for solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.

    1993-05-01

    Many applications of solar energy require large mirrors to provide high levels of concentrated sunlight. The success of such conversion systems hinges on the optical durability and economic viability of the reflector materials. A major effort at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been to improve the existing reflector materials technology and to identify candidates that retain optical performance and durability criteria and offer potential for reduced cost. To attain the goals, it is desirable to maintain and increase the involvement of industrial organizations in reflective materials R&D related to the conversion of solar resources to useful energy. Toward this end, NREL has recently initiated several collaborative efforts with industry to develop advanced reflector materials.

  17. Reflective coatings for solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.

    1993-05-01

    Many applications of solar energy require large mirrors to provide high levels of concentrated sunlight. The success of such conversion systems hinges on the optical durability and economic viability of the reflector materials. A major effort at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been to improve the existing reflector materials technology and to identify candidates that retain optical performance and durability criteria and offer potential for reduced cost. To attain the goals, it is desirable to maintain and increase the involvement of industrial organizations in reflective materials R D related to the conversion of solar resources to useful energy. Toward this end, NREL has recently initiated several collaborative efforts with industry to develop advanced reflector materials.

  18. Dip-coated sheet silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Zook, J. D.; Scott, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    A cost-effective method is being developed for producing solar cell quality sheet silicon by dip coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large grain silicon. Mullite (Aluminum Silicate) ceramic substrates coated with a thin layer of graphite have been dipped into molten silicon to produce 20-150 micron thick layers having grain sizes as large as .4 cm x 4 cm. With these silicon layers photovoltaic diodes have been fabricated with measured and inherent conversion efficiencies of 4% and 7%, respectively.

  19. Advanced solar panel designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    Solar panel designs that utilize new high-efficiency solar cells and lightweight rigid panel technologies are described. The resulting designs increase the specific power (W/kg) achievable in the near-term and are well suited to meet the demands of higher performance small satellites (smallsats). Advanced solar panel designs have been developed and demonstrated on two NASA SBIR contracts at Applied Solar. The first used 19% efficient, large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells with a lightweight rigid graphite epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A 1,445 cm(exp 2) coupon was fabricated and tested to demonstrate 60 W/kg with a high potential of achieving 80 W/kg. The second panel design used new 22% efficiency, dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with a lightweight aluminum core/graphite fiber mesh facesheet substrate. A 1,445 cm(exp 2) coupon was fabricated and tested to demonstrate 105 W/kg with the potential of achieving 115 W/kg. This paper will address the construction details for the GaAs/isogrid and dual-junction GaAs/carbon mesh panel configurations. These are ultimately sized to provide 75 Watts and 119 Watts respectively for smallsats or may be used as modular building blocks for larger systems. GaAs/isogrid and dual-junction GaAs/carbon mesh coupons have been fabricated and tested to successfully demonstrate critical performance parameters and results are also provided here.

  20. Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2008-03-01

    The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

  1. Solar Energy: Solar System Design Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on solar system design fundamentals is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy…

  2. Advanced solar panel designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes solar cell panel designs that utilize new hgih efficiency solar cells along with lightweight rigid panel technology. The resulting designs push the W/kg and W/sq m parameters to new high levels. These new designs are well suited to meet the demand for higher performance small satellites. This paper reports on progress made on two SBIR Phase 1 contracts. One panel design involved the use of large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells of 19% efficiency combined with a lightweight rigid graphite fiber epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power level of 60 W/kg with a potential of reaching 80 W/kg. The second panel design involved the use of newly developed high efficiency (22%) dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with an advanced lightweight rigid substrate using aluminum honeycomb core with high strength graphite fiber mesh facesheets. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power of 105 W/kg and 230 W/sq m. This paper will address the construction details of the panels and an a analysis of the component weights. A strawman array design suitable for a typical small-sat mission is described for each of the two panel design technologies being studied. Benefits in respect to weight reduction, area reduction, and system cost reduction are analyzed and compared to conventional arrays.

  3. Coating Processes Boost Performance of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    NASA currently has spacecraft orbiting Mercury (MESSENGER), imaging the asteroid Vesta (Dawn), roaming the red plains of Mars (the Opportunity rover), and providing a laboratory for humans to advance scientific research in space (the International Space Station, or ISS). The heart of the technology that powers those missions and many others can be held in the palm of your hand - the solar cell. Solar, or photovoltaic (PV), cells are what make up the panels and arrays that draw on the Sun s light to generate electricity for everything from the Hubble Space Telescope s imaging equipment to the life support systems for the ISS. To enable NASA spacecraft to utilize the Sun s energy for exploring destinations as distant as Jupiter, the Agency has invested significant research into improving solar cell design and efficiency. Glenn Research Center has been a national leader in advancing PV technology. The Center s Photovoltaic and Power Technologies Branch has conducted numerous experiments aimed at developing lighter, more efficient solar cells that are less expensive to manufacture. Initiatives like the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiments I and II in which PV cells developed by NASA and private industry were mounted outside the ISS have tested how various solar technologies perform in the harsh conditions of space. While NASA seeks to improve solar cells for space applications, the results are returning to Earth to benefit the solar energy industry.

  4. Bilayer structures optimization as antireflective coating for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccon, S.; Zuppella, P.; Corso, A. J.; Pelizzo, M. G.

    2014-10-01

    The optimization of a silicon solar cell involves also the design of a proper antireflective coating (AR). We have considered different bilayer structures. The use of bilayers is oriented to have an antireflective effect on a broader range of wavelengths compared to single film AR. The materials considered include silicon oxide, magnesium fluoride, silicon nitride and titanium oxide. The thickness of each film in each structure has been optimized by theoretical calculations in order to minimize the weighted reflectivity, Rw. This is calculated taking into account the optical reflectivity, the internal quantum efficiency of the silicon solar cell and the solar flux on all the range of wavelengths of interest. Some of these optimized structures have been realized by e-beam vapor deposition as first tests. The improved optical performance of the samples have been verified at the UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer.

  5. Full device analysis of novel metamaterial coated PN and MIS solar cells using numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Isroel; Gollub, Jonah N.; Sarantos, Chris; Pishbin, Nafiseh; Crouse, David T.

    2012-02-01

    In this work we describe how to model the efficiency of solar cells with novel metamaterial coatings optimized for light harvesting. Full device modeling is implemented using optical and electrical simulations. As a proof of concept, we simulate the operation of a metamaterial contact on a first generation monocrystalline silicon solar cell. We compare device characteristics and efficiencies to standard antireflective coatings applied to a grid contact cell. The effects of the metamaterial contact on silicon solar cell efficiencies is discussed for PN junction and metal-insulator-semiconductor cell structures. It is found that the metal-insulator-semiconductor solar cell designed performs better than the PN junction cell.

  6. Practical anti-reflection coating for metal semiconductor solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y.-C. M.; Stirn, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The metal-semiconductor solar cell is a possible candidate for converting solar to electrical energy for terrestrial application. A method is given for obtaining optical parameters of practical antireflection coatings for the metal-semiconductor solar cell. This method utilizes the measured refractive index obtained from ellipsometry since the surface to be AR coated has a multilayer structure. Both the experimental results and theoretical calculation of optical parameters for Ta2O5 antireflection coatings on Au-GaAs and Au-GaAs(0.78)P(0.22) solar cells are presented for comparison.

  7. Advances in Concentrating Solar Power Collectors: Mirrors and Solar Selective Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kenendy, C. E.

    2007-10-10

    The intention is to explore the feasibility of depositing the coating by lower-cost methods and to perform a rigorous cost analysis after a viable high-temperature solar-selective coating is demonstrated by e-beam.

  8. Broadband omnidirectional antireflection coatings for metal-backed solar cells optimized using simulated annealing algorithm incorporated with solar spectrum.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yin-Jung; Chen, Yu-Ting

    2011-07-01

    Broadband omnidirectional antireflection (AR) coatings for solar cells optimized using simulated annealing (SA) algorithm incorporated with the solar (irradiance) spectrum at Earth's surface (AM1.57 radiation) are described. Material dispersions and reflections from the planar backside metal are considered in the rigorous electromagnetic calculations. Optimized AR coatings for bulk crystalline Si and thin-film CuIn(1-x)GaxSe(2) (CIGS) solar cells as two representative cases are presented and the effect of solar spectrum in the AR coating designs is investigated. In general, the angle-averaged reflectance of a solar-spectrum-incorporated AR design is shown to be smaller and more uniform in the spectral range with relatively stronger solar irradiance. By incorporating the transparent conductive and buffer layers as part of the AR coating in CIGS solar cells (2μm-thick CIGS layer), a single MgF(2) layer could provide an average reflectance of 8.46% for wavelengths ranging from 350 nm to 1200 nm and incident angles from 0° to 80°. PMID:21747557

  9. New solar selective coating based on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Thomas; Leupolt, Beate; Mäder, Gerrit; Härtel, Paul; Grählert, Wulf; Althues, Holger; Kaskel, Stefan; Beyer, Eckhard

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be applied to assemble a new type of solar selective coating system for solar thermal applications. In this work the predominant absorption processes occurring by interaction with π-plasmon and Van Hove singularities (VHS) were investigated by UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopy and ellipsometry. Not only optical properties for as deposited SWCNT thin films itself, but also the potential for systematic tailoring will be presented. Besides low cost technologies required, the adjustability of optical properties, as well as their thermal stability render CNT based solar selective coatings as promising alternative to commercially available coating systems.

  10. Durability of Solar Selective Coatings in a Simulated Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Solar selective coatings are being considered for heat engine and thermal switching applications on minisatellites. Such coatings must have the combined properties of high solar absorptance and low infrared emittance. High solar absorptance is needed to collect solar energy as efficiently as possible while low infrared emittance is needed to minimize radiant energy loss at operating temperature. These properties are achieved in sputter deposited thin films through the use of molecular mixtures of metal and dielectric. Solar selective coatings having a solar absorptance to infrared emittance ratio of 9 have been successfully deposited using a mixture of nickel and aluminum oxide. The space environment, however, presents some challenges for the use of materials on the exterior of spacecraft, including durability to atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet radiation. To address these concerns, several candidate solar selective coatings were exposed to atomic oxygen in a plasma asher and to ultraviolet radiation in a vacuum facility equipped with calibrated deuterium lamps. The optical properties of the coatings were monitored as a function of time to evaluate their performance over long term exposure to the simulated space environment. Several coatings were found to be durable to both the atomic oxygen and the vacuum ultraviolet environments.

  11. Simulated space environmental exposure of optical coatings for spacecraft solar rejection.

    PubMed

    Barrie, James D; Meshishnek, Michael J; Fuqua, Peter D; Rostel, W Chris

    2002-06-01

    Dielectric multilayers composed of niobium pentoxide and silicon dioxide, designed for broadband solar rejection, were exposed to a simulated space environment of ultraviolet light and low-energy (10-20-keV) electron radiation. Samples exhibited various degrees of exposure-induced absorption extending from the ultraviolet to the infrared. Processing variations were correlated to damage susceptibility, and methods were identified that produced parts that exhibited no degradation even though the same materials and coating design were used. Coatings prepared under energetic deposition conditions that provided the densest and most moisture-stable coatings exhibited the best stability to the exposure conditions used. PMID:12064394

  12. Front surface passivation of silicon solar cells with antireflection coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crotty, G.; Daud, T.; Kachare, R.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the deposition and postdeposition sintering of an antireflection (AR) coating in hydrogen acts to passivate silicon solar cells. Cells with and without an SiO2 passivating layer, coated with a TiO(x)/Al2O3 AR coating, showed comparable enhancements in short-wavelength spectral response and in open-circuit voltage Voc after sintering at 400 C for 5 min in a hydrogen ambient. The improvement in Voc of cells without SiO2 is attributed to front-surface passivation by the AR coating during processing.

  13. Passive solar design handbook. Volume 3: Passive solar design analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, R. W.; Bascomb, J. D.; Kosiewicz, C. E.; Lazarus, G. S.; McFarland, R. D.; Wray, W. O.

    1982-07-01

    Simple analytical methods concerning the design of passive solar heating systems are presented with an emphasis on the average annual heating energy consumption. Key terminology and methods are reviewed. The solar load ratio (SLR) is defined, and its relationship to analysis methods is reviewed. The annual calculation, or Load Collector Ratio (LCR) method, is outlined. Sensitivity data are discussed. Information is presented on balancing conservation and passive solar strategies in building design. Detailed analysis data are presented for direct gain and sunspace systems, and details of the systems are described. Key design parameters are discussed in terms of their impact on annual heating performance of the building. These are the sensitivity data. The SLR correlations for the respective system types are described. The monthly calculation, or SLR method, based on the SLR correlations, is reviewed. Performance data are given for 9 direct gain systems and 15 water wall and 42 Trombe wall systems.

  14. Solar water heater design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Package describes commercial domestic-hot-water heater with roof or rack mounted solar collectors. System is adjustable to pre-existing gas or electric hot-water house units. Design package includes drawings, description of automatic control logic, evaluation measurements, possible design variations, list of materials and installation tools, and trouble-shooting guide and manual.

  15. Preliminary design package for solar collector and solar pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A solar-operated pump using an existing solar collector, for use on solar heating and cooling and hot water systems is described. Preliminary design criteria of the collector and solar-powered pump is given including: design drawings, verification plans, and hazard analysis.

  16. Solar Selective Coatings Developed for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2002-01-01

    A solar collector having the combined properties of high solar absorptance, low infrared emittance, and high thermal conductivity is envisioned for space power applications on minisatellites. A high solar absorptance is needed to collect as much of the incident solar radiation as possible and a low infrared emittance is needed to minimize radiant energy losses. A lightweight material having a high thermal conductivity is needed to transport the absorbed energy to where it is needed. Such a solar collector may be used with a low temperature-differential heat engine to provide electric power to the minisatellite components or as a source of thermal energy for a thermal bus that would heat remote regions of the spacecraft. The key to such a collector is the use of cermet coatings. Cermet coatings are composed of molecular islands of metal embedded in a three-dimensional matrix of dielectric. Recent research on molecular mixtures of aluminum and aluminum oxide at the NASA Glenn Research Center has yielded cermet coatings with a solar absorptance a of 0.797 and an infrared emittance epsilon of 0.131, yielding an alpha/epsilon ratio of 6. Although additional work is needed to further increase the alpha/epsilon ratio, these coatings are attractive owing to their potential durability in the space environment. The aluminum oxide surface should provide substantial protection from the atomic oxygen found in low Earth orbit. To help minimize emittance, these coatings are deposited on a smooth surface. The selected surface is aluminum that has been diamond turned to a mirror finish. Cermet coatings are manufactured by sputter deposition. To achieve the desired variable composition, Glenn's researchers implemented a novel approach using a cylindrical target composed of aluminum and aluminum oxide. Rotating the cylinder during the deposition process yields a coating of variable composition. A photograph of the custom-made aluminum and aluminum oxide cylindrical target installed

  17. Wet-chemistry based selective coatings for concentrating solar power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimon, Eran; Kribus, Abraham; Flitsanov, Yuri; Shkolnik, Oleg; Feuermann, Daniel; Zwicker, Camille; Larush, Liraz; Mandler, Daniel; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2013-09-01

    Spectrally selective coatings are common in low and medium temperature solar applications from solar water heating collectors to parabolic trough absorber tubes. They are also an essential element for high efficiency in higher temperature Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) systems. Selective coatings for CSP are usually prepared using advanced expensive methods such as sputtering and vapor deposition. In this work, coatings were prepared using low-cost wet-chemistry methods. Solutions based on Alumina and Silica sol gel were prepared and then dispersed with black spinel pigments. The black dispersions were applied by spray/roll coating methods on stainless steel plates. The spectral emissivity of sample coatings was measured in the temperature range between 200 and 500°C, while the spectral absorptivity was measured at room temperature and 500°C. Emissivity at wavelengths of 0.4-1.7 μm was evaluated indirectly using multiple measurements of directional reflectivity. Emissivity at wavelengths 2-14 μm was measured directly using a broadband IR camera that acquires the radiation emitted from the sample, and a range of spectral filters. Emissivity measurement results for a range of coated samples will be presented, and the impact of coating thickness, pigment loading, and surface preparation will be discussed.

  18. Novel Passivating/Antireflective Coatings for Space Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, S. G.; Flood, D. J.; Faur, H. M.; Mateescu, C. G.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Scheiman, D.; Jenkins, P. P.; Brinker, D. J.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a novel process to grow passivating/antireflective (AR) coatings for terrestrial and space solar cells. Our approach involves a Room Temperature Wet Chemical Growth (RTWCG) process, which was pioneered, and is under development at SPECMAT, Inc., under a Reimbursable Space Act Agreement with NASA Glenn Research Center. The RTWCG passivating/AR coatings with graded index of refraction are applied in one easy step on finished (bare) cells. The RTWCG coatings grown on planar, textured and porous Si, as well as on poly-Si, CuInSe2, and III-V substrates, show excellent uniformity irrespective of surface topography, crystal orientation, size and shape. In this paper we present some preliminary results of the RTWCG coatings on Si and III-V substrates that show very good potential for use as a passivation/AR coating for space solar cell applications. Compared to coatings grown using conventional techniques, the RTWCG coatings have the potential to reduce reflection losses and improve current collection near the illuminated surface of space solar cells, while reducing the fabrication costs.

  19. A design perspective on thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soechting, Friedrich O.

    1995-01-01

    This technical paper addresses the challenges for maximizing the benefit of thermal barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The perspective is from a customer's viewpoint, a turbine airfoil designer, who is continuously challenged to increase the turbine inlet temperature capability for new products while maintaining cooling flow levels or even reducing them. This is a fundamental requirement to achieve increased engine thrust levels. Developing advanced material systems for the turbine flowpath airfoils is one approach to solve this challenge; such as high temperature nickel based superalloys or thermal barrier coatings to insulate the metal airfoils from the hot flowpath environment. The second approach is to increase the cooling performance of the turbine airfoil, which enables increased flowpath temperatures and reduced cooling flow levels. Thermal barrier coatings have been employed in jet engine applications for almost 30 years. The initial application was on augmentor liners to provide thermal protection during afterburner operation. However, the production use of thermal barrier coating in the turbine section has only occurred in the past 15 years. The application was limited to stationary parts, and only recently incorporated on the rotating turbine blades. This lack of endorsement of thermal barrier coatings resulted from the poor initial durability of these coatings in high heat flux environments. Significant improvements have been made to enhance spallation resistance and erosion resistance which has resulted in increased reliability of these coatings in turbine applications.

  20. A design perspective on thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soechting, F. O.

    1995-01-01

    This technical paper addresses the challenges for maximizing the benefit of thermal barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The perspective is from a customer's viewpoint, a turbine airfoil designer, who is continuously challenged to increase the turbine inlet temperature capability for new products while maintaining cooling flow levels or even reducing them. This is a fundamental requirement to achieve increased engine thrust levels. Developing advanced material systems for the turbine flowpath airfoils is one approach to solve this challenge, for example, high temperature nickel based superalloys or thermal barrier coatings to insulate the metal airfoil from the hot flowpath environment. The second approach is to increase the cooling performance of the turbine airfoil, which enables increased flowpath temperatures and reduced cooling flow levels. Thermal barrier coatings have been employed in jet engine applications for almost 30 years. The initial application was on augmenter lines to provide thermal protection during afterburner operation. However, the production use of thermal barrier coating in the turbine section has only occurred in the past 15 years. The application was limited to stationary parts, and only recently incorporated on the rotating turbine blades. This lack of endorsement of thermal barrier coatings resulted from the poor initial durability of these coatings in high heat flux environments. Significant improvements have been made to enhance spallation resistance and erosion resistance which has resulted in increased reliability of these coatings in turbine applications.

  1. A design perspective on thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soechting, F. O.

    1999-12-01

    This article addresses the challenges for maximizing the benefit of thermal barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The perspective is from the viewpoint of a customer, a turbine airfoil designer who is continuously challenged to increase the turbine inlet temperature capability for new products while maintaining cooling flow levels or even reducing them. This is a fundamental requirement for achieving increased engine thrust levels. Developing advanced material systems for the turbine flowpath airfoils, such as high-temperature nickel-base superalloys or thermal barrier coatings to insulate the metal airfoils from the hot flowpath environment, is one approach to solve this challenge. The second approach is to increase the cooling performance of the turbine airfoil, which enables increased flowpath temperatures and reduced cooling flow levels. Thermal barrier coatings have been employed in jet engine applications for almost 30 years. The initial application was on augmentor liners to provide thermal protection during afterburner operation. However, the production use of thermal barrier coatings in the turbine section has only occurred in the past 15 years. The application was limited to stationary parts and only recently incorporated on the rotating turbine blades. This lack of endorsement of thermal barrier coatings resulted from the poor initial duratbility of these coatings in high heat flux environments. Significant improvements have been made to enhance spallation resistance and erosion resistance, which has resulted in increased reliability of these coatings in turbine applications.

  2. A design perspective on thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Soechting, F.O.

    1995-10-01

    This technical paper addresses the challenges for maximizing the benefit of thermal barrier coatings for turbine engine applications. The perspective is from a customer`s viewpoint, a turbine airfoil designer, who is continuously challenged to increase the turbine inlet temperature capability for new products while maintaining cooling flow levels or even reducing them. This is a fundamental requirement to achieve increased engine thrust levels. Developing advanced material systems for the turbine flowpath airfoils is one approach to solve this challenge; such as high temperature nickel based superalloys or thermal barrier coatings to insulate the metal airfoils from the hot flowpath environment. The second approach is to increase the cooling performance of the turbine airfoil, which enables increased flowpath temperatures and reduced cooling flow levels. Thermal barrier coatings have been employed in jet engine applications for almost 30 years. The initial application was on augmentor liners to provide thermal protection during afterburner operation. However, the production use of thermal barrier coating in the turbine section has only occurred in the past 15 years. The application was limited to stationary parts, and only recently incorporated on the rotating turbine blades. This lack of endorsement of thermal barrier coatings resulted from the poor initial durability of these coatings in high heat flux environments. Significant improvements have been made to enhance spallation resistance and erosion resistance which has resulted in increased reliability of these coatings in turbine applications.

  3. Solar Power System Design for the Solar Probe+ Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Kinnison, James; Fraeman, Martin; Roufberg, Lew; Vernon, Steve; Wirzburger, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Solar Probe+ is an ambitious mission proposed to the solar corona, designed to make a perihelion approach of 9 solar radii from the surface of the sun. The high temperature, high solar flux environment makes this mission a significant challenge for power system design. This paper summarizes the power system conceptual design for the solar probe mission. Power supplies considered included nuclear, solar thermoelectric generation, solar dynamic generation using Stirling engines, and solar photovoltaic generation. The solar probe mission ranges from a starting distance from the sun of 1 AU, to a minimum distance of about 9.5 solar radii, or 0.044 AU, from the center of the sun. During the mission, the solar intensity ranges from one to about 510 times AM0. This requires power systems that can operate over nearly three orders of magnitude of incident intensity.

  4. Advanced Antireflection Coatings for High-Performance Solar Energy Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop and refine antireflection coatings incorporating lanthanum titanate as an intermediate refractive index material; Investigate wet/dry thermal oxidation of aluminum containing semiconductor compounds as a means of forming a more transparent window layer with equal or better optical properties than its unoxidized form; Develop a fabrication process that allows integration of the oxidized window layer and maintains the necessary electrical properties for contacting the solar cell; Conduct an experimental demonstration of the best candidates for improved antireflection coatings.

  5. Transparent, Conductive Coatings Developed for Arc-Proof Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Transparent, conductive thin-film coatings have many potential applications where a surface must be able to dissipate electrical charges without sacrificing its optical properties. Such applications include automotive and aircraft windows, heat mirrors, optoelectronic devices, gas sensors, and solar cell array surfaces for space applications. Many spacecraft missions require that solar cell array surfaces dissipate charges in order to avoid damage such as electronic upsets, formation of pinholes in the protective coatings on solar array blankets, and contamination due to deposition of sputtered products. In tests at the NASA Lewis Research Center, mixed thin-films of sputter-deposited indium tin oxide (ITO) and magnesium fluoride (MgF2) that could be tailored to the desired sheet resistivity, showed transmittance values of greater than 90 percent. The samples evaluated were composed of mixed, thin-film ITO/MgF2 coatings, with a nominal thickness of 650 angstroms, deposited onto glass substrates. Preliminary results indicated that these coatings were durable to vacuum ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen. These coatings show promise for use on solar array surfaces in polar low-Earth-orbit environments, where a sheet resistivity of less than 10(exp 8)/square is required, and in geosynchronous orbit environments, where a resistivity of less than 10(exp 9)/square is required.

  6. Automated solar collector installation design

    DOEpatents

    Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

    2014-08-26

    Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives.

  7. Glass frits coated with silver nanoparticles for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingfen; Gan, Weiping; Zhou, Jian; Li, Biyuan

    2015-06-01

    Glass frits coated with silver nanoparticles were prepared by electroless plating. Gum Arabic (GA) was used as the activating agent of glass frits without the assistance of stannous chloride or palladium chloride. The silver-coated glass frits prepared with different GA dosages were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The characterization results indicated that silver-coated glass frits had the structures of both glass and silver. Spherical silver nanoparticles were distributed on the glass frits evenly. The density and particle size of silver nanoparticles on the glass frits can be controlled by adjusting the GA dosage. The silver-coated glass frits were applied to silver pastes to act as both the densification promoter and silver crystallite formation aid in the silver electrodes. The prepared silver-coated glass frits can improve the photovoltaic performances of solar cells.

  8. Evaluation of glass resin coatings for solar cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, M. B.

    1978-01-01

    Using a variety of non-vacuum deposition techniques coatings were implemented on silicon solar cells and arrays of cells interconnected on Kapton substrates. The coatings provide both antireflection optical matching and environmental protection. Reflectance minima near 2% was achieved at a single wavelength in the visible. Reflectance averaging below 5% across the useful collection range was demonstrated. The coatings and methods of deposition were: (1) Ta2O5 spun, dipped or sprayed; (2) Ta2O5.SiO2 spun, dipped or sprayed; (3) GR908 (SiO2) spun, dipped, or sprayed. Total coating thickness were in the range of 18 microns to 25 microns. The coatings and processes are compatible with single cells or cells mounted on Kapton substrates.

  9. Final Technical Report CONDUCTIVE COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS USING CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J Glatkowski; Jorma Peltola; Christopher Weeks; Mike Trottier; David Britz

    2007-09-30

    US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a grant for Eikos Inc. to investigate the feasibility of developing and utilizing Transparent Conducting Coatings (TCCs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) for solar cell applications. Conventional solar cells today employ metal oxide based TCCs with both Electrical Resistivity (R) and Optical Transparency (T), commonly referred to as optoelectronic (RT) performance significantly higher than with those possible with CNT based TCCs available today. Transparent metal oxide based coatings are also inherently brittle requiring high temperature in vacuum processing and are thus expensive to manufacture. One such material is indium tin oxide (ITO). Global demand for indium has recently increased rapidly while supply has diminished causing substantial spikes in raw material cost and availability. In contrast, the raw material, carbon, needed for CNT fabrication is abundantly available. Transparent Conducting Coatings based on CNTs can overcome not only cost and availability constraints while also offering the ability to be applied by existing, low cost process technologies under ambient conditions. Processes thus can readily be designed both for rigid and flexible PV technology platforms based on mature spray or dip coatings for silicon based solar cells and continuous roll to roll coating processes for polymer solar applications.

  10. Testing of a new solar coating for solar water heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    AlShamaileh, Ehab

    2010-09-15

    A novel and affordable solar selective coating exhibiting higher solar absorption efficiency compared to the commercial black paint coating used in most ordinary solar water heating systems (SWHSs) has been developed. The coating is fabricated by embedding a metallic particle composed of a nickel-aluminium (NiAl) alloy into the black paint. The optical behaviour of several percentages of the NiAl alloy in the coating is studied using UV-Vis and IR spectroscopies. The chemical composition of the coating was characterized using XRD and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) for both the black and alloy-containing paint. The results allowed deducing that the optimum composition to consider for further testing was 6% NiAl alloy by mass. The applicability of the coating in a real thermosyphonic SWHS was evaluated throughout the year, spanning both hot and cold seasons. It is found that the new coating shows better performance compared to the untreated black paint by an average of 5 C over a period of 1 year. The corrosion resistance of the coating was investigated using electrochemical polarization and weight-loss measurements in the corrosive medium of 3% NaCl in 0.50 M HCl. Higher inhibition efficiency of corrosion was found for the alloy-containing paint compared to the untreated paint by more than 12%. Finally, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to explore the morphology of the modified coating surface, and compared to the untreated surface. (author)

  11. Selective coating for collecting solar energy on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Presently used coatings, which were originally developed for brass, copper, and steel substrates, yield relatively low absorptance/emittance ratios when applied to aluminum. Efficient, black-nickel plating applied to aluminum substrate enhances solar absorptance to 93% and reduces emittance to 6%.

  12. Another Viewpoint On Antireflection Coating Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, Ronald R.

    1990-04-01

    Most antireflection coatings in use today are derived from concepts based on the use of quarter-wave (Q) and half-wave (H) optical thickness layers. We show an alternative and more general way of viewing the concepts and how special cases reduce to the commonly used forms. The monotonically graded inhomogeneous index layer from the substrate to the medium has been extensively reported by Jacobsson and Martensson(1), Dobrowolski and Ho(2), and others. Various oscillating index profiles between the substrate and the medium show promise in producing superior broadband AR coatings. These concepts have evolved from observation of broadband designs using multiple homogeneous quarter- and half-wave optical thickness layers as described by DeBell(3). The viewpoint leads to some further understanding of the possibilities and limitations of AR coatings in general.

  13. Nanowire-based multifunctional antireflection coatings for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiralal, Pritesh; Chien, Chihtao; Lal, Niraj N.; Abeygunasekara, Waranatha; Kumar, Abhishek; Butt, Haider; Zhou, Hang; Unalan, Husnu Emrah; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Organic (P3HT/PCBM) solar cells are coated with ZnO nanowires as antireflection coatings and show up to 36% enhancement in efficiency. The improvement is ascribed to an effective refractive index which results in Fabry-Perot absorption bands which match the polymer band-gap. The effect is particularly pronounced at high light incidence angles. Simultaneously, the coating is used as a UV-barrier, demonstrating a 50% reduction in the rate of degradation of the polymers under accelerated lifetime testing. The coating also allows the surface of the solar cell to self-clean via two distinct routes. On one hand, photocatalytic degradation of organic material on ZnO is enhanced by the high surface area of the nanowires and quantified by dye degradation measurements. On the other, the surface of the nanowires can be functionalized to tune the water contact angle from superhydrophilic (16°) to superhydrophobic (152°), resulting in self-cleaning via the Lotus effect. The multifunctional ZnO nanowires are grown by a low cost, low temperature hydrothermal method, compatible with process limitations of organic solar cells.Organic (P3HT/PCBM) solar cells are coated with ZnO nanowires as antireflection coatings and show up to 36% enhancement in efficiency. The improvement is ascribed to an effective refractive index which results in Fabry-Perot absorption bands which match the polymer band-gap. The effect is particularly pronounced at high light incidence angles. Simultaneously, the coating is used as a UV-barrier, demonstrating a 50% reduction in the rate of degradation of the polymers under accelerated lifetime testing. The coating also allows the surface of the solar cell to self-clean via two distinct routes. On one hand, photocatalytic degradation of organic material on ZnO is enhanced by the high surface area of the nanowires and quantified by dye degradation measurements. On the other, the surface of the nanowires can be functionalized to tune the water contact angle

  14. Solar absorption characteristics of several coatings and surface finishes. [for solar energy collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Solar absorption characteristics are established for several films potentially favorable for use as receiving surfaces in solar energy collectors. Included in the investigation were chemically produced black films, black electrodeposits, and anodized coatings. It was found that black nickel exhibited the best combination of selective optical properties of any of the coatings studied. A serious drawback to black nickel was its high susceptibility to degradation in the presence of high moisture environments. Electroplated black chrome generally exhibited high solar absorptivities, but the emissivity varied considerably and was also relatively high under some conditions. The black chrome had the greatest moisture resistance of any of the coatings tested. Black oxide coatings on copper and steel substrates showed the best combination of selective optical properties of any of the chemical conversion films studied.

  15. Solar optical materials for innovative window design

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, C.M.

    1982-08-01

    New and innovative optical materials and coatings can greatly improve the efficiency of window energy systems. These potential materials and coatings increase energy efficiency by reducing radiative losses in the infrared, or reducing visible reflection losses or controlling overheating due to solar gain. Current progress in heat mirror coatings for glass and polymeric substrates is presented. Highly doped semiconducting oxides and metal/dielectric interference coatings are reviewed. Physical and optical properties are outlined for antireflection films and transparent aerogel insulation media. The potential for optical switching films as window elements includes discussions of electrochromic, photochromic and other physical switching processes.

  16. Interior design for passive solar homes

    SciTech Connect

    Breen, J. C.

    1981-07-01

    The increasing emphasis on refinement of passive solar systems has brought recognition to interior design as an integral part of passive solar architecture. Interior design can be used as a finetuning tool minimizing many of the problems associated with passive solar energy use in residential buildings. In addition, treatment of interior space in solar model homes may be a prime factor in determining sales success. A new style of interior design is evolving in response to changes in building form incorporating passive solar design features. The psychology behind passive solar architecture is reflected in interiors, and selection of interior components increasingly depends on the functional suitability of various interior elements.

  17. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, Carl M.

    1980-04-01

    Solar absorber metal foils are discussed in terms of materials and basic processing science. Also included is the use of finished heavy sheet stock for direct fabrication of solar collector panels. Both the adhesives and bonding methods for foils and sheet are surveyed. Developmental and representative commercial foils are used as illustrative examples. As a result it was found that foils can compete economically with batch plating but are limited by adhesive temperature stability. Also absorber foils are very versatile and direct collector fabrication from heavy foils appears very promising.

  18. Investigation of critical surface degradation effects on coatings and solar cells developed in Germany (S1002)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preuss, L.

    1984-01-01

    Various coatings developed in the FRG (i.e., second-surface mirrors with interference filters with and without conductive layers, conductive layers on solar-cell covers, and selective absorber coatings) have been qualified by accelerated tests under simulated space environment conditions. Experiments with coatings and solar cells have shown, however, that the thermo-optical behavior can differ considerably when performed on the ground and in space because of the great difficulty in simulating the space environment realistically. The objective of this experiment is to qualify these coatings under realistic space environment conditions. In addition, the experiment will provide design criteria, techniques, and test methods to insure control of the combined space and spacecraft environment effects, such as contamination, electrical conductance, and optical degradation, on the coatings. Data to be measured include the temperature of the samples, the electrical resistance of the conductive layers of the samples, the short circuit current of the solar-cell modules, and the deposition of contaminants on the samples (using quartz crystal microbalances (QCM's)).

  19. Nanowire-based multifunctional antireflection coatings for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hiralal, Pritesh; Chien, Chihtao; Lal, Niraj N; Abeygunasekara, Waranatha; Kumar, Abhishek; Butt, Haider; Zhou, Hang; Unalan, Husnu Emrah; Baumberg, Jeremy J; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2014-11-01

    Organic (P3HT/PCBM) solar cells are coated with ZnO nanowires as antireflection coatings and show up to 36% enhancement in efficiency. The improvement is ascribed to an effective refractive index which results in Fabry-Perot absorption bands which match the polymer band-gap. The effect is particularly pronounced at high light incidence angles. Simultaneously, the coating is used as a UV-barrier, demonstrating a 50% reduction in the rate of degradation of the polymers under accelerated lifetime testing. The coating also allows the surface of the solar cell to self-clean via two distinct routes. On one hand, photocatalytic degradation of organic material on ZnO is enhanced by the high surface area of the nanowires and quantified by dye degradation measurements. On the other, the surface of the nanowires can be functionalized to tune the water contact angle from superhydrophilic (16°) to superhydrophobic (152°), resulting in self-cleaning via the Lotus effect. The multifunctional ZnO nanowires are grown by a low cost, low temperature hydrothermal method, compatible with process limitations of organic solar cells. PMID:25350481

  20. Passivating Window/First Layer AR Coating for Space Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, S. G.; Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Wheeler, D. R.; Matesscu, G.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.

    2004-01-01

    Chemically grown oxides, if well designed, offer excellent surface passivation of the emitter surface of space solar cells and can be used as effective passivating window/first layer AR coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a simple room temperature wet chemical technique to grow cost effective passivating layers on solar cell front surfaces after the front grid metallization step. These passivating layers can be grown both on planar and porous surfaces. Our results show that these oxide layers: (i) can effectively passivate the from the surface, (ii) can serve as an effective optical window/first layer AR coating, (iii) are chemically, thermally and UV stable, and (iv) have the potential of improving the BOL and especially the EOL efficiency of space solar cells. The potential of using this concept to simplify the III-V based space cell heterostructures while increasing their BOL and EOL efficiency is also discussed.

  1. Solar dynamic power module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secunde, Richard R.; Labus, Thomas L.; Lovely, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Studies have shown that the use of solar dynamic (SD) power for the growth areas of the Space Station Freedom program will result in life cycle cost savings when compared to power supplied by photovoltaic sources. In the SD power module, a concentrator collects and focuses solar energy into a heat receiver which has integral thermal energy storage. A Power Conversion Unit (PCU) based on the closed Brayton cycle removes thermal energy from the receiver and converts that energy to electrical energy. Since the closed Brayton cycle is a single phase gas cycle, the conversion hardware (heat exchangers, turbine, compressor, etc.) can be designed for operation in low earth orbit, and tested with confidence in test facilities on earth before launch into space. The concentrator subassemblies will be aligned and the receiver/PCU/radiator combination completely assembled and charged with gas and cooling liquid on earth before launch to, and assembly on, orbit.

  2. Solar dynamic power module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secunde, Richard R.; Labus, Thomas L.; Lovely, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Studies have shown that use of solar dynamic (SD) power for the growth eras of the Space Station Freedom program will result in life cycle cost savings when compared to power supplied by photovoltaic sources. In the SD power module, a concentrator collects and focuses solar energy into a heat receiver which has integral thermal energy storage. A power conversion unit (PCU) based on the closed Brayton thermodynamic cycle removes thermal energy from the receiver and converts that energy to electrical energy. Since the closed Brayton cycle is a single phase gas cycle, the conversion hardware (heat exchangers, turbine, compressor, etc.) can be designed for operation in low earth orbit, and tested with confidence in test facilities on earth before launch into space. The concentrator subassemblies will be aligned and the receiver/PCU/radiator combination completely assembled and charged with gas and cooling liquid on earth before launch to, and assembly on orbit.

  3. Development and Testing of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.; Price, H.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Energy Technologies Program is working to reduce the cost of parabolic trough solar power technology. System studies show that increasing the operating temperature of the solar field from 390 to >450 C will result in improved performance and cost reductions. This requires the development of new more-efficient selective coatings that have both high solar absorptance (>0.96) and low thermal emittance (<0.07) and are thermally stable above 450 C, ideally in air. Potential selective coatings were modeled, identified for laboratory prototyping, and manufactured at NREL. Optimization of the samples and high-temperature durability testing will be performed. Development of spectrally selective materials depends on reliable characterization of their optical properties. Protocols for testing the thermal/optical properties of selective coatings were developed and a round-robin experiment was conducted to verify and document the reflectance and high-temperature emittance measurements. The development, performance, and durability of these materials and future work will be described.

  4. Optimized Selective Coatings for Solar Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G.; Curtis, H. B.

    1967-01-01

    The spectral reflectance properties of black nickel electroplated over stainless steel and of black copper produced by oxidation of copper sheet were measured for various plating times of black nickel and for various lengths of time of oxidation of the copper sheet, and compared to black chrome over nickel and to converted zinc. It was determined that there was an optimum time for both plating of black nickel and for the oxidation of copper black. At this time the solar selective properties show high absorptance in the solar spectrum and low emittance in the infrared. The conditions are compared for production of optimum optical properties for black nickel, black copper, black chrome, and two black zinc conversions which at the same conditions had absorptances of 0.84, 0.90, 0.95, 0.84, and 0.92, respectively, and emittances of 0.18, 0.08, 0.09, 0.10, and 0.08, respectively.

  5. Space Station Freedom Solar Array design development

    SciTech Connect

    Winslow, C. )

    1993-01-01

    The design of Space Station Freedom's Solar Array (SSFSA) is reviewed highlighting the key design performance goals, challenges, design description, and development testing objectives, results and plans. Study results are discussed which illustrate many of the more important design decision.

  6. Silver nanoparticles-coated glass frits for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingfen; Gan, Weiping; Li, Biyuan

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles-coated glass frit composite powders for silicon solar cells were prepared by electroless plating. Silver colloids were used as the activating agent of glass frits. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The characterization results indicated that silver nanoparticles with the melting temperature of 838 °C were uniformly deposited on glass frit surface. The particle size of silver nanoparticles could be controlled by adjusting the [Ag(NH3)2]NO3 concentration. The as-prepared composite powders were applied in the front side metallization of silicon solar cells. Compared with those based on pure glass frits, the solar cells containing the composite powders had the denser silver electrodes and the better silver-silicon ohmic contacts. Furthermore, the photovoltaic performances of solar cells were improved after the electroless plating.

  7. An integrated approach for designing reliable coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, E.O. II

    1996-12-31

    In its simplest form, adhesive failure is predicted when some applied energy exceeds a critical property of the joint. The challenge in designing reliability is to establish the details of both the applied energies and the critical performance properties. Complications arise in determining performance properties, which include both adhesive and cohesive strengths, since they are strong functions of processing and environmental conditions. Thus, any test used to measure these must be able to mimic the correct conditions. Another complication that arises is the dependence of the applied debond energies on the mechanical properties of the coating and substrate. The available debond energy is also a function of the geometry and any external loads applied. In this presentation, the author shows how computational mechanics can be used to determine the role of mechanical properties on the applied energy. In doing so, key properties are identified that allow the coating manufacturer to optimize their material for specific applications. Examples are given for several microelectronic applications.

  8. Subsystem design package for Solar II collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The requirements for the design and performance of the Solar 2 Collector Subsystem developed for use in solar heating of single family residences and mobile homes are presented. Installation drawings are included.

  9. Coating Solar Cells By Microwave Plasma Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minaee, Behrooz; Chitre, Sanjeev R.; Zahedi, Narges

    1991-01-01

    Antireflection films deposited on silicon solar cells at high production rates with microwave-enhanced plasma deposition. Microwave energy at frequency of 2.45 GHz generates plasma in mixture of gases, from which thin film of silicon nitride deposits on silicon substrates. Reaction temperature relatively low (only 250 degrees C), and film deposition rate more than 500 Angstrom/minute - 2 to 5 times faster. Quality of antireflection film similar to that produced by chemical-vapor deposition. Uses less power and consumes smaller quantities of gas. Species formed in plasma longer lived and dissociate reactants in region of chamber well away from plasma-generation region.

  10. Comparison under a simulated sun of two black-nickel-coated flat-plate solar collectors with a nonselective black-paint-coated collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.

    1975-01-01

    A performance evaluation was made of two, black nickel coated, flat plate solar collectors. Collector performance was determined under a simulated sun for a wide range of inlet temperatures, including the temperature required for solar powered absorption air conditioning. For a basis of comparison a performance test was made on a traditional, two glass, nonselective, black paint coated, flat plate collector. Performance curves and performance parameters are presented to point out the importance of the design variables which determine an efficient collector. A black nickel coated collector was found to be a good performer at the conditions expected for solar powered absorption air conditioning. This collector attained a thermal efficiency of 50 percent at an inlet temperature of 366 K (200 F) and an incident flux of 946 watts/sq m (300 Btu/hr-sq ft).

  11. Chemical vapor deposited silica coatings for solar mirror protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Dever, Therese M.; Banholzer, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A variety of techniques is available to apply protective coatings to oxidation susceptible spacecraft components, and each has associated advantages and disadvantages. Film applications by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has the advantage of being able to be applied conformally to objects of irregular shape. For this reason, a study was made of the oxygen plasma durability of thin film (less than 5000 A) silicon dioxide coatings applied by CVD. In these experiments, such coatings were applied to silver mirrors, which are strongly subject to oxidation, and which are proposed for use on the space station solar dynamic power system. Results indicate that such coatings can provide adequate protection without affecting the reflectance of the mirror. Scanning electron micrographs indicated that oxidation of the silver layer did occur at stress crack locations, but this did not affect the measured solar reflectances. Oxidation of the silver did not proceed beyond the immediate location of the crack. Such stress cracks did not occur in thinner silica flims, and hence such films would be desirable for this application.

  12. Reactively sputtered silicon oxy-nitride films for solar absorber anti-reflection coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.

    1984-05-01

    The optical properties of films of SiO(x)N(y) produced by reactive sputtering in argon/oxygen/nitrogen are reported. The refractive index of the films can be continuously varied between 1.46 and 3.4. This large range of index allows considerable freedom in the design of multilayer thin film stacks. The practical use of these films is demonstrated by the fabrication of double layer antireflection coatings for amorphous silicon based solar thermal absorbers. An AM1 solar absorptance of 0.95 has been obtained with an emittance increment due to the antireflecting layers of only 0.055. Other possible uses are also identified.

  13. Advanced process development for high reflector coatings on solar concentrator panels. Final letter report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Stewart, C.D.; Bennett, W.D.; Johnston, J.W.

    1996-10-01

    Objectives were to develop and demonstrate the manufacturing process for vacuum deposition of low-cost thin-film high reflectance coatings onto large solar concentrator panels; demonstrate thin-film deposition processes for commercialization of this technology by United Solar Technologies (UST); apply reflective coatings to solar concentrator panels for prototype application by UST.

  14. Optical Design of Segmented Hexagon Array Solar Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huegele, Vince

    2000-01-01

    A segmented array of mirrors was designed for a solar concentrator test stand at MSFC for firing solar thermal propulsion engines. The 144 mirrors each have a spherical surface to approximate a parabolic concentrator when combined into the entire 18-foot diameter array. The mirror segments are aluminum hexagons that had the surface diamond turned and quartz coated. The array focuses sunlight reflected from a heliostat to a 4 inch diameter spot containing 10 kw of power at the 15-foot focal point. The derivation of the surface figure for the respective mirror elements is shown. The alignment process of the array is discussed and test results of the system's performance is given.

  15. Optical design of SHASM: segmented hexagon array solar mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huegele, Vinson B.

    2000-10-01

    A segmented array of mirrors was designed for a solar concentrator test stand at MSFC for firing solar thermal propulsion engines. The 144 mirrors each have s spherical surface to approximate a parabolic concentrator when combined into the entire 17-foot diameter array. The mirror segments are aluminum hexagons that had the surface diamond turned and quartz coated. The array focuses sunlight reflected from a heliostat to a 4 inch diameter spot containing 8 kilowatts of power at the 15 foot focal point. The derivation of the surface figure for the respective mirror elements is shown. The alignment process of the array is discussed and test results of the system's performance are given.

  16. Design of broadband omnidirectional antireflection coatings using ant colony algorithm.

    PubMed

    Guo, X; Zhou, H Y; Guo, S; Luan, X X; Cui, W K; Ma, Y F; Shi, L

    2014-06-30

    Optimization method which is based on the ant colony algorithm (ACA) is described to optimize antireflection (AR) coating system with broadband omnidirectional characteristics for silicon solar cells incorporated with the solar spectrum (AM1.5 radiation). It's the first time to use ACA method for optimizing the AR coating system. In this paper, for the wavelength range from 400 nm to 1100 nm, the optimized three-layer AR coating system could provide an average reflectance of 2.98% for incident angles from Raveθ+ to 80° and 6.56% for incident angles from 0° to 90°. PMID:24978076

  17. Coating and surface finishing definition for the Solar Orbiter/METIS inverted external occulter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, Federico; Romoli, Marco; Vives, Sebastien; Baccani, Cristian; Escolle, Clement; Pancrazzi, Maurizio; Focardi, Mauro; Da Deppo, Vania; Moses, John D.; Fineschi, Silvano

    2014-07-01

    The METIS coronagraph aboard the Solar Orbiter mission will undergo extreme environmental conditions (e.g., a thermal excursion of about 350 degrees throughout the various mission phases), due to the peculiar spacecraft trajectory that will reach a perihelion of 0.28 AUs. METIS is characterized by an innovative design for the occultation system that allows to halve the thermal load inside the instrument while guaranteeing the stray light reduction that is required for a solar coronagraph. The Inverted External Occulter (IEO) concept revolutionizes the classical scheme, by exchanging the usual positions of the entrance aperture (that is now the outermost element of the instrument facing the Sun) with the actual occulter (that is a spherical mirror inside the coronagraph boom). The chosen material for the IEO manufacturing is Titanium, as a trade o_ between light weight, strength and low thermal expansion coefficient. A 2 years long test campaign has been run to define the IEO geometry, and its results are addressed in previous dedicated papers. This work describes the results of a further campaign aimed at defining the IEO surface and edge finishing, the support flange geometry and the Titanium coating. Various edge finishing were installed on a prototype of the instrument occulting system and their performance in stray light reduction were compared. The support flange geometry was designed in order to reduce the overall weight, to control the thermal load and to accentuate its stray light suppression performance. The coating is a particularly delicate issue. A black coating is necessary in order to assess the stray light issues, typically critical for visible coronagraphs. Black coating of Titanium is not a standard process, thus several space qualified black coatings were experimented on Titanium and characterized. The impact of the IEO coatings was evaluated, the reflectivity and the BRDFs were measured and are addressed in the paper.

  18. Concentrator enhanced solar arrays design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lott, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The analysis and preliminary design of a 25 kW concentrator enhanced lightweight flexible solar array are presented. The study was organized into five major tasks: (1) assessment and specification of design requirements; (2) mechanical design; (3) electric design; (4) concentrator design; and (5) cost projection. The tasks were conducted in an iterative manner so as to best derive a baseline design selection. The objectives of the study are discussed and comparative configurations and mass data on the SEP (Solar Electric Propulsion) array design, concentrator design options and configuration/mass data on the selected concentrator enhanced solar array baseline design are presented. Design requirements supporting design analysis and detailed baseline design data are discussed. The results of the cost projection analysis and new technology are also discussed.

  19. Bifacial silicon solar cells in space: Antireflection (AR) coatings and thermal behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correig, X.; Calderer, J.

    1986-11-01

    An approach to antireflection coating (ARC) design which recognizes that bifacial silicon solar cell efficiency is related to antireflection coating design and operating temperature by optical, electrical, and thermal behavior of the structure, is proposed. Maximum efficiency coincides neither with minimum temperature nor maximum absorptance. A compromise among these variables can be reached. Calculations make it possible to design ARC to reach an absorptance value near 0.6. Calculations of back side reflectance show that reflectance of isotropic incident light is larger than that of normal incident. Efficiency values are much less affected by ARC thickness. Mass budgets of bifacial arrays are similar to those of monofacial ones, so the only difference in thermal cycle amplitude is due to differences in operating temperature.

  20. Concentrating solar collector subsystem: Preliminary design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary design data are presented for a concentrating solar collector including an attitude controller. Provided are schedules, technical status, all documents required for preliminary design, and other program activities.

  1. Design data brochure: Solar hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A design calculation is detailed for a single-family residence housing a family of four in a nonspecific geographical area. The solar water heater system is designed to provide 80 gallons of 140 F hot water per day.

  2. Design, fabrication, testing and delivery of a solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. H.; Ballheim, R. W.; Bartley, S. M.; Smith, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    A two phase program encompassing the redesign and fabrication of a solar collector which is low in cost and aesthetically appealing is described. Phase one work reviewed the current collector design and developed a low-cost design based on specific design/performance/cost requirements. Throughout this phase selected collector component materials were evaluated by testing and by considering cost, installation, maintainability and durability. The resultant collector design was composed of an absorber plate, insulation, frame, cover, desiccant and sealant. In Phase two, three collector prototypes were fabricated and evaluated for both nonthermal and thermal characteristics. Tests included static load tests of covers, burst pressure tests of absorber plates, and tests for optical characteristics of selective absorber plate coatings. The three prototype collectors were shipped to Marshall Space Flight Center for use in their solar heating and cooling test facility.

  3. Laser processing of solar cells with anti-reflective coating

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Dennis, Tim; Waldhauer, Ann; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2016-02-16

    Contact holes of solar cells are formed by laser ablation to accommodate various solar cell designs. Use of a laser to form the contact holes is facilitated by replacing films formed on the diffusion regions with a film that has substantially uniform thickness. Contact holes may be formed to deep diffusion regions to increase the laser ablation process margins. The laser configuration may be tailored to form contact holes through dielectric films of varying thicknesses.

  4. Design of a Traditional Solar Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsoum, Nader; Vasant, Pandian

    2010-06-01

    Solar energy is rapidly advancing as an important means of renewable energy resource. More energy is produced by tracking the solar panel to remain aligned to the sun at a right angle to the rays of light. This paper describes in detail the design and construction of a prototype for solar tracking system with two degrees of freedom, which detects the sunlight using photocells. The control circuit for the solar tracker is based on a PIC16F84A microcontroller (MCU). This is programmed to detect the sunlight through the photocells and then actuate the motor to position the solar panel where it can receive maximum sunlight.

  5. Reflectivity, polarization properties, and durability of metallic mirror coatings for the European Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feller, A.; Krishnappa, N.; Pleier, O.; Hirzberger, J.; Jobst, P. J.; Schürmann, M.

    2012-09-01

    In the context of the conceptual design study for the European Solar Telescope (EST) we have investigated different metallic mirror coatings in terms of reflectivity, polarization properties and durability. Samples of the following coating types have been studied: bare aluminum, silver with different dielectric layers for protection and UV enhancement, and an aluminum-silver combination. From 2009 to 2011 we have carried out a long-term durability test under realistic observing conditions at the VTT solar telescope of the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife, Spain), accompanied by repeated reflectivity measurements in the EST spectral working range (0.3 - 20 μm), and by polarization measurements in the visible range. The test results allow us to find the optimum coatings for the different mirrors in the EST beampath and to eventually assess aging effects and re-coating cycles. The results of the polarization measurements are a valuable input for an EST telescope polarization model, helping to meet the stringent requirements on polarimetric accuracy.

  6. PV Optics: A Software Package for Solar Cells and Module Design

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2007-01-01

    PV Optics is a user-friendly software package developed to design and analyze solar cells and modules. It is applicable to a variety of optical structures, including thin and thick cells with light-trapping structures and metal optics. Using a combination of wave and ray optics to include effects of coherence and interference, it can be used to design single-junction and multijunction solar cells and modules. This paper describes some basic applications of PV Optics for crystalline and amorphous Si solar cell design. We present examples to examine the effects on solar cell performance of wafer thickness, antireflection coating thickness, texture height, and metal loss.

  7. A performance evaluation of various coatings, substrate materials, and solar collector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, F. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was constructed and utilized in conjunction with both a solar simulator and actual sunlight to test and evaluate various solar panel coatings, panel designs, and scaled-down collector subsystems. Data were taken by an automatic digital data acquisition system and reduced and printed by a computer system. The solar collector test setup, data acquisition system, and data reduction and printout systems were considered to have operated very satisfactorily. Test data indicated that there is a practical or useful limit in scaling down beyond which scaled-down testing cannot produce results comparable to results of larger scale tests. Test data are presented as are schematics and pictures of test equipment and test hardware.

  8. Space exploration with a solar sail coated by materials that undergo thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2015-12-01

    For extrasolar space exploration it is suggested to use space environmental effects such as solar radiation heating to accelerate a solar sail coated by materials that undergo thermal desorption at a particular temperature. The developed approach allows the perihelion of the solar sail orbits to be determined based on the temperature requirement for the solar sail materials. Our study shows that the temperature of a solar sail increases as r - 2 / 5 when the heliocentric distance r decreases. The proposed sail has two coats of the materials that undergo desorption at different solar sail temperatures depending on the heliocentric distance. The first desorption occurs at the Earth orbit and provides the thrust needed to propel the solar sail toward the Sun. When the solar sail approaches the Sun, its temperature increases, and the second coat undergoes desorption at the perihelion of the heliocentric escape orbit. This provides a second thrust and boosts the solar sail to its escape velocity.

  9. NEW HIGHER PERFORMANCE LOW COST SELECTIVE SOLAR RADIATION CONTROL COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy Ellison; Buddie Dotter; David Tsu

    2003-10-28

    Energy Conversion Devices, Inc., ECD, has developed a new high-speed low-cost process for depositing high quality dielectric optical coatings--Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD). This process can deposit SiO{sub x} about 10 times faster than the state-of-the-art conventional technology, magnetron sputtering, at about 1/10th the cost. This process is also being optimized for depositing higher refractive index materials such as Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and TiO{sub 2}. In this program ECD, in collaboration with Southwall Technologies, Inc. (STI), demonstrated that this process can be used to fabricate high performance low cost Selective Solar Radiation Control (SSRC) films for use in the automotive industry. These coatings were produced on thin (2 mil thick) PET substrates in ECD's pilot roll-to-roll pilot MPECVD deposition machine. Such film can be laminated with PVB in a vehicle's windows. This process can also be used to deposit the films directly onto the glass. Such highly selective films, with a visible transmission (T{sub vis}) of > 70% and a shading coefficient of < 60% can significantly reduce the heat entering a car from solar radiation. Consequently, passenger comfort is increased and the energy needed to operate air conditioning (a/c) systems is reduced; consequently smaller a/c systems can be employed resulting in improved vehicle fuel efficiency.

  10. Design of Aerosol Coating Reactors: Precursor Injection

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, Beat; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Particles are coated with thin shells to facilitate their processing and incorporation into liquid or solid matrixes without altering core particle properties (coloristic, magnetic, etc.). Here, computational fluid and particle dynamics are combined to investigate the geometry of an aerosol reactor for continuous coating of freshly-made titanium dioxide core nanoparticles with nanothin silica shells by injection of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapor downstream of TiO2 particle formation. The focus is on the influence of HMDSO vapor jet number and direction in terms of azimuth and inclination jet angles on process temperature and coated particle characteristics (shell thickness and fraction of uncoated particles). Rapid and homogeneous mixing of core particle aerosol and coating precursor vapor facilitates synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles with uniform shell thickness and high coating efficiency (minimal uncoated core and free coating particles). PMID:23658471

  11. New three-layer antireflection/surface passivating coating for high efficiency III-V compound solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moulot, J.; Faur, M.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.; Faur, M.; Alterovitz, S.; Bailey, S.

    1996-12-31

    By using a chemically grown In(PO{sub 3}){sub 3}-rich oxide layer as the first layer of a 3-layer AR coating, with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgF{sub 2} as the second and third layers, the authors have addressed the problem of surface passivation and AR coating on InP solar cells. They have designed a 3-layer optimized AR coating for p{sup +}n InP solar cell, which reduces the average reflectance on the surface of cell from about 40% (bare) to less than 2%. At the same time the AR coating significantly improves the J{sub SC} and V{sub OC} by passivating the top surface of the emitter. The authors believe that the significant front surface passivation is to a large extent responsible for their achieving the record high AM0, 25 C, open-circuit voltage of 890.3 mV on a thermally diffused p{sup +}n InP(Cd,S) solar cell. This concept of using a passivating chemically grown oxide as the first layer of a multilayer AR coating can be beneficial to other III-V compound solar cells as well.

  12. Design and fabrication of solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaughnessy, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    A program conducted for design, fabrication and evaluation of twelve silicon solar cell modules is described. The purpose of the program was to develop a module design consistent with the requirements and objectives of JPL specification and to also incorporate elements of new technologies under development to meet LSSA Project goals. Module development emphasized preparation of a technically and economically competitive design based upon utilization of ion implanted solar cells and a glass encapsulation system. The modules fabricated, tested and delivered were of nominal 2 X 2 foot dimensions and 20 watt minimum rating. Basic design, design rationale, performance and results of environmental testing are described.

  13. Interplanetary spacecraft design using solar electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, J. H.; Paul, G. M.

    1974-01-01

    Emphasis of the electric propulsion technology program is now on the application of solar electric propulsion to scientific missions. Candidate planetary, cometary, and geosynchronous missions are being studied. The object of this paper is to describe a basic spacecraft design proposed as the means to accomplish (1) a comet Encke slow flyby, (2) a comet Encke rendezvous, and (3) an out-of-the-ecliptic mission. The discussion includes design differences foreseen for the various missions and indicates those areas where spacecraft design commonality is possible. Particular emphasis is placed on a solar electric propulsion module design which permits an attractive degree of design inheritance from mission to mission.

  14. Design data brochure: Solar hot air heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design, installation, performance, and application of a solar hot air heater for residential, commercial and industrial use is reported. The system has been installed at the Concho Indian School in El Reno, Oklahoma.

  15. Solar cell array design handbook, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    Twelve chapters discuss the following: historical developments, the environment and its effects, solar cells, solar cell filters and covers, solar cell and other electrical interconnections, blocking and shunt diodes, substrates and deployment mechanisms, material properties, design synthesis and optimization, design analysis, procurement, production and cost aspects, evaluation and test, orbital performance, and illustrative design examples. A comprehensive index permits rapid locating of desired topics. The handbook consists of two volumes: Volume 1 is of an expository nature while Volume 2 contains detailed design data in an appendix-like fashion. Volume 2 includes solar cell performance data, applicable unit conversion factors and physical constants, and mechanical, electrical, thermal optical, magnetic, and outgassing material properties. Extensive references are provided.

  16. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from the receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.

  17. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from themore » receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.« less

  18. Solafern solar system design brochure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A complete residential solar space heating and hot water system is described. Low maintenance, durable, and efficient air heating collectors are used. The collectors have a selective absorber and a tempered glass cover nearly one-quarter of an inch thick with an aluminum frame. The solar energy can be delivered directly to the living area when there is a demand; otherwise, it is stored in the form of hot water. Hot water storage is accomplished through the use of an air-to-water exchanger. The hot water storage is used simultaneously to preheat the domestic hot water, as well as to store energy for space heating.

  19. Properties of conductive coatings for thermal control mirrors and solar cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, D. E.; Kan, H. K. A.

    1975-01-01

    Conductive transparent coatings applied to the dielectric surfaces of a spacecraft offer the possibility of distributing charge uniformly over the entire spacecraft surface. Optical and electrical measurements of such a coating as a function of temperature are described. These results are used in considering the impact of a conductive coating on the absorptance of thermal control mirrors and on the transmittance of solar cell cover glass, which can be improved by the application of an antireflection coating.

  20. Solar Effective Envelope Design Advisor (SEEDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaek, Ekkachai

    The lack of effort by mainstream architects in integrating energy-efficient strategies in architectural designing is due to the complexity in a building's energy conscious concepts and theories, the difficulties to visualize and quantify energy consumption, and the late implementing of energy consumption analysis in the conventional design process. This task would be accomplishing by a building system's engineer where results might be determined only after the basic architectural design has been completed. An effective simple tool and method should then be available to assist architects in building's energy-efficient designing at the beginning of the design. The building's energy consumption is directly and mainly influenced by the relationship of the sun, site, and its building configuration. The solar radiations will first impact on the building's envelope, which will have a direct effect on the amount of energy a building will consume. If an architect can define or map the intensity of solar energy on the site's buildable volume, and use this information to determine the levels of solar insolation, a more energy efficient building form can be proposed. This research hypothesis has shared the fundamental techniques of the Solar Envelope projection by Professor Ralph Knowles [Knowles, 1981] of the University of Southern California. However a different approach is taken by including the influence of regional restrictions and the surrounding buildings' shadows when projecting of solar volumes and solar envelope. The research methodology will discuss the development of a computer-based approach to develop a three-dimensional architectural form based on an insolation map related to the design site. The prototype computer program is referred as the Solar Effective Envelope Design Advisor (SEEDA). The solar insolation volume of the site is determined by integrating three types of computer-generated models include the Buildable Volume model based on design constraints

  1. Method of forming oxide coatings. [for solar collector heating panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    This invention is concerned with an improved plating process for covering a substrate with a black metal oxide film. The invention is particularly directed to making a heating panel for a solar collector. A compound is electrodeposited from an aqueous solution containing cobalt metal salts onto a metal substrate. This compound is converted during plating into a black, highly absorbing oxide coating which contains hydrated oxides. This is achieved by the inclusion of an oxidizing agent in the plating bath. The inclusion of an oxidizing agent in the plating bath is contrary to standard electroplating practice. The hydrated oxides are converted to oxides by treatment in a hot bath, such as boiling water. An oxidizing agent may be added to the hot liquid treating bath.

  2. Black tungsten selective optical coatings for photothermal solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesheva, K. A.; Gogova, D. S.; Stoyanov, G.

    1992-08-01

    By pyrolytic decomposition of W(CO)6 in the presence of an oxygen bleed black tungsten solar selective coatings have been deposited on different substrates - quartz, silicon and stainless steel. Quartz substrates were used to check the opacity of the films deposited; the silicon substrates were used to study the possibility of obtaining low-resistance material when fully annealed and the steel substrates to study the properties of the films on substrates suitable for a large scale application. The films were obtained at a temperature of 400°C and further partially annealed in a reducing atmosphere. The dependence of the structure and chemical composition on the annealing temperature was studied, as well as reflectance measurements in the visible and in the infrared region.

  3. Evaluation of thermal control coatings for use on solar dynamic radiators in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Slemp, Wayne S.; Stoyack, Joseph E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal control coatings with high thermal emittance and low solar absorptance are needed for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic power module radiator (SDR) surfaces for efficient heat rejection. Additionally, these coatings must be durable to low earth orbital (LEO) environmental effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and deep thermal cycles which occur as a result of start-up and shut-down of the solar dynamic power system. Eleven candidate coatings were characterized for their solar absorptance and emittance before and after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation (200 to 400 nm), vacuum UV (VUV) radiation (100 to 200 nm) and atomic oxygen. Results indicated that the most durable and best performing coatings were white paint thermal control coatings Z-93, zinc oxide pigment in potassium silicate binder, and YB-71, zinc orthotitanate pigment in potassium silicate binder. Optical micrographs of these materials exposed to the individual environmental effects of atomic oxygen and vacuum thermal cycling showed that no surface cracking occurred.

  4. Evaluation of thermal control coatings for use on solar dynamic radiators in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Slemp, Wayne S.; Stoyack, Joseph E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal control coatings with high thermal emittance and low solar absorptance are needed for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic power module radiator (SDR) surfaces for efficient heat rejection. Additionally, these coatings must be durable to low earth orbital (LEO) environmental effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and deep thermal cycles which occur as a result of start-up and shut-down of the solar dynamic power system. Eleven candidate coatings were characterized for their solar absorptance and emittance before and after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation (200 to 400 nm), vacuum UV (VUV) radiation (100 to 200 nm) and atomic oxygen. Results indicated that the most durable and best performing coatings were white paint thermal control coatings Z-93, zinc oxide pigment in potassium silicate binder, and YB-71, zinc orthotitanate pigment in potassium silicate binder. Optical micrographs of these materials exposed to the individual environmental effects of atomic oxygen and vacuum thermal cycling showed that no surface cracking occurred.

  5. Biourbanism: Solar based urban and regional design

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.

    1999-07-01

    New neighborhoods for an additional one billion people will need to be constructed on the planet within the next 10 years. If the historic patterns of growth continue--the sprawl, the congestion, the draining of swamps, the loss of agricultural land--the requirement for all basic resources will outstrip the availability. While this is of great concern, it is the destruction of an acceptable quality of life--the sense of place--that will be the most difficult and expensive to change. An essential step to reverse the direction of this undesirable future is changing the design and planning of these communities to work with resident solar energies, regional biology, local renewable resources, and sustainable urban planning and design principles. Design can make a difference. This paper develops the view that the solar approach must include urban and regional design and presents solar-based renewable resources example of the design of regions.

  6. ROBUST, SPECTRALLY SELECTIVE CERAMIC COATINGS FOR RECYCLED SOLAR POWER TUBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven coating systems, listed in Table 1, were evaluated. Pemco U-3101 and Neo 126 are commercial enamel coatings commonly referred to as ground and cover coats, respectively. Ferro PL214 is a commercially available black enamel coating. Ferro XG-210 is a clear enamel coat...

  7. SEPS solar array design and technology evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.; Young, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    The technology developments required and a preliminary design of a lightweight 25 kW solar array for the solar electric propulsion stage (SEPS) have been defined. The requirements for a 65 W/Kg SEPS solar array system requires significant component weight reductions over present state-of-the-art flexible solar arrays in both electrical and structural-mechanical designs. A requirement for operation from 0.3 au to 6.0 au presents a wide range of temperature environments as well as severe combined thermal/vacuum/UV radiation environments. Additional requirements are capability for partial array retraction operation, and capability for full retraction and automatic preloading for survival of the Shuttle reentry environment. An assessment of current lightweight flexible solar array technology is made against the SEPS solar array requirements and new technology requirements are defined. A preliminary design and the operating characteristics of a flat-fold solar array system meeting the SEPS requirements is presented. A full-width, 10-ft-tall functional array model, including representative welded electrical modules and a model astromast, was fabricated and tested.

  8. High-performance broadband optical coatings on InGaN/GaN solar cells for multijunction device integration

    SciTech Connect

    Young, N. G. Farrell, R. M.; Iza, M.; Speck, J. S.; Perl, E. E.; Keller, S.; Bowers, J. E.; Nakamura, S.; DenBaars, S. P.

    2014-04-21

    We demonstrate InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well solar cells grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on a bulk (0001) substrate with high-performance broadband optical coatings to improve light absorption. A front-side anti-reflective coating and a back-side dichroic mirror were designed to minimize front surface reflections across a broad spectral range and maximize rear surface reflections only in the spectral range absorbed by the InGaN, making the cells suitable for multijunction solar cell integration. Application of optical coatings increased the peak external quantum efficiency by 56% (relative) and conversion efficiency by 37.5% (relative) under 1 sun AM0 equivalent illumination.

  9. Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator Being Designed and Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macosko, Robert P.; Donovan, Richard M.

    1998-01-01

    As the need for achieving super high temperatures (2000 K and above) in solar heat receivers has developed so has the need for secondary concentrators. These concentrators refocus the already highly concentrated solar energy provided by a primary solar collector, thereby significantly reducing the light entrance aperture of the heat receiver and the resulting infrared radiation heat loss from the receiver cavity. Although a significant amount of research and development has been done on nonimaging hollow reflective concentrators, there has been no other research or development to date on solid, single crystal, refractive concentrators that can operate at temperatures above 2000 K. The NASA Lewis Research Center recently initiated the development of single-crystal, optically clear, refractive secondary concentrators that, combined with a flux extractor, offer a number of significant advantages over the more conventional, hollow, reflective concentrators at elevated temperatures. Such concentrators could potentially provide higher throughput (efficiency), require no special cooling device, block heat receiver material boiloff from the receiver cavity, provide for flux tailoring in the cavity via the extractor, and potentially reduce infrared heat loss via an infrared block coating.The many technical challenges of designing and fabricating high-temperature refractive secondary concentrators and flux extractors include identifying optical materials that can survive the environment (high-temperature, vacuum and/or hydrogen atmosphere), developing coatings for enhanced optical and thermal performance, and developing crystal joining techniques and hardware that can survive launch loads.

  10. Demonstration of transparent solar array module design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    This report discusses the design, development, fabrication and testing of IR transparent solar array modules. Three modules, consisting of a baseline design using back surface reflector cells, and two modules using gridded back contact, IR transparent cells, were subjected to vacuum thermal balance testing to verify analytical predictions of lower operating emperature and increased efficiency. As a result of this test program, LMSC has verified that a significant degree of IR transparency can be designed into a flexible solar array. Test data correlates with both steady state and transient thermal analysis.

  11. Residential solar-heating system - design brochure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Design brochure for commercially-available solar-heating system is valuable to architects, engineers, and designers. It contains information on system configuration, system sizing, and mechanical layout. Drawings and specifications of all components and typical installation details are included in appendix.

  12. Application and design of solar photovoltaic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianze, Li; Hengwei, Lu; Chuan, Jiang; Luan, Hou; Xia, Zhang

    2011-02-01

    Solar modules, power electronic equipments which include the charge-discharge controller, the inverter, the test instrumentation and the computer monitoring, and the storage battery or the other energy storage and auxiliary generating plant make up of the photovoltaic system which is shown in the thesis. PV system design should follow to meet the load supply requirements, make system low cost, seriously consider the design of software and hardware, and make general software design prior to hardware design in the paper. To take the design of PV system for an example, the paper gives the analysis of the design of system software and system hardware, economic benefit, and basic ideas and steps of the installation and the connection of the system. It elaborates on the information acquisition, the software and hardware design of the system, the evaluation and optimization of the system. Finally, it shows the analysis and prospect of the application of photovoltaic technology in outer space, solar lamps, freeways and communications.

  13. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    In the past decade, research on organic solar cells has gone through an important development stage leading to major enhancements in power conversion efficiency, from 4% to 9% in single-junction devices. During this period, there are many novel processing techniques and device designs that have been proposed and adapted in organic solar-cell devices. One well-known device architecture that helps maximize the solar cell efficiency is the multi-junction tandem solar-cell design. Given this design, multiple photoactive absorbers as subcells are stacked in a monolithic fashion and assembled via series connection into one complete device, known as the tandem solar cell. Since multiple absorbers with different optical energy bandgaps are being applied in one tandem solar-cell device, the corresponding solar cell efficiency is maximized through expanded absorption spectrum and reduced carrier thermalization loss. In Chapter 3, the architecture of solution-processible, visibly transparent solar cells is introduced. Unlike conventional organic solar-cell devices with opaque electrodes (such as silver, aluminum, gold and etc.), the semi-transparent solar cells rely on highly transparent electrodes and visibly transparent photoactive absorbers. Given these two criteria, we first demonstrated the visibly transparent single-junction solar cells via the polymer absorber with near-infrared absorption and the top electrode based on solution-processible silver nanowire conductor. The highest visible transparency (400 ˜ 700 nm) of 65% was achieved for the complete device structure. More importantly, power conversion efficiency of 4% was also demonstrated. In Chapter 4, we stacked two semi-transparent photoactive absorbers in the tandem architecture in order to realize the semi-transparent tandem solar cells. A noticeable performance improvement from 4% to 7% was observed. More importantly, we modified the interconnecting layers with the incorporation of a thin conjugated

  14. Improvement of black nickel coatings. [product development for use in solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. E.; Lin, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Selectively absorbing black nickel coatings are among the most optically efficient low cost coatings for use on flat plate solar collectors. However, a current Ni-Zn-S-O coating in use is quite susceptible to a humid environment, degrading badly in less than ten days at 38 C (100 F) at 95 percent relative humidity. Therefore, a black nickel formula was developed which can withstand such exposures with no loss of optical efficiency, solar absorption of 0.92 and an infrared emittance (at 100 C) of 1.00 were still present after 14 days of humidity exposure. This compares to a solar absorptance of only 0.72 for the previous formula after a similar time period. The electroplating bath and conditions were changed to obtain the more stable coating configuration. The effect of bath composition, temperature, pH, and plating current density and time on the coating composition, spectral optical properties and durability were investigated systematically.

  15. Building Design Guidelines for Solar Energy Technologies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Givoni, B.

    1989-01-01

    There are two main objectives to this publication. The first is to find out the communalities in the experience gained in previous studies and in actual applications of solar technologies in buildings, residential as well as nonresidential. The second objective is to review innovative concepts and products which may have an impact on future developments and applications of solar technologies in buildings. The available information and common lessons were collated and presented in a form which, hopefully, is useful for architects and solar engineers, as well as for teachers of "solar architecture" and students in Architectural Schools. The publication is based mainly on the collection and analysis of relevant information. The information included previous studies in which the performance of solar buildings was evaluated, as well as the personal experience of the Author and the research consultants. The state of the art, as indicated by these studies and personal experience, was summarized and has served as basis for the development of the Design Guidelines. In addition to the summary of the state of the art, as was already applied in solar buildings, an account was given of innovative concepts and products. Such innovations have occurred in the areas of thermal storage by Phase Change Materials (PCM) and in glazing with specialized or changeable properties. Interesting concepts were also developed for light transfer, which may enable to transfer sunlight to the core areas of large multi story nonresidential buildings. These innovations may have a significant impact on future developments of solar technologies and their applications in buildings.

  16. Plasma-enhanced CVD silicon nitride antireflection coatings for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.; Donohoe, K.

    1983-01-01

    Multilayer plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride antireflection coatings were deposited on space quality silicon solar cells. Preliminary experiments indicated that multilayer coatings decreased the total reflectance of polished silicon from 35 percent to less than 3 percent over the spectral range 0.4-1.0 micron. The solar cell energy conversion efficiency was increased from an average of 8.84 percent to an average of 12.63 percent.

  17. Reflux solar receiver design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diver, R. B.

    Reflux heat-pipe and pool-boiler receivers are being developed to improve upon the performance and life of directly-illuminated tube receiver technology used in previous successful demonstrations of dish-Stirling systems. The design of a reflux receiver involves engineering tradeoffs. In this paper, on-sun performance measurements of the Sandia pool-boiler receiver are compared with results from the reflux receiver thermal analysis model, AEETES. Flux and performance implications of various design options are analyzed and discussed.

  18. Coatings for large-area low-cost solar concentrators and reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.; Bennett, W.D.

    1994-07-01

    Seven years ago, Pacific Northwest Laboratory constructed a large-optics coating facility to develop and fabricate high-performance multilayer laser-mirror coatings on large substrates. With the reduction of DoD funding for the development of optical coatings for large optics, new applications for this chamber were sought. In addition to new DoD applications, the facility is now being used to fabricate multilayer enhanced-metal reflectors for low-cost large-area solar concentrators using both magnetron-sputtered metal and dielectric coatings, with future extension to vacuum-evaporated polymer coatings. Other new applications include: Ti/Ti:Al lamellar composites on flexible webs; EMI cladding for heater wire; EMI-shielding coatings on flexible webs; microwave-absorbing coatings on flexible webs; heat mirrors; bulk micromachining; and protective coatings on cylindrical substrates and webs. The facility has also been established as a DoD user facility for development and experimentation in large-area optical coatings. This paper describes important changes in the large-optics coating chamber and additional deposition equipment that has been added to pursue these new non-DoD technological areas. Solar reflectors and the resulting new coatings will be described. Future work and new technological areas being pursued will also be discussed.

  19. Thermal design of spacecraft solar arrays using a polyimide foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, N.; Iasiello, M.; Naso, V.

    2015-11-01

    The design of the Thermal Control System (TCS) of spacecraft solar arrays plays a fundamental role. Indeed, the spacecraft components must operate within a certain range of temperature. If this doesn't occur, their performance is reduced and they may even break. Solar arrays, which are employed to recharge batteries, are directly exposed to the solar heat flux, and they need to be insulated from the earth's surface irradiation. Insulation is currently provided either with a white paint coating or with a Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) system [1]. A configuration based on an open-cell polyimide foam has also been recently proposed [2]. Using polyimide foams in TCSs looks very attractive in terms of costs, weight and assembling. An innovative thermal analysis of the above cited TCS configurations is carried out in this paper, by solving the porous media energy equation, under the assumption of Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) between the two phases. Radiation effects through the solar array are also considered by using the Rosseland approximation. Under a stationary daylight condition, temperature profiles are obtained by means of the finite-element based code COMSOL Multiphysics®. Finally, since the weight plays an important role in aerospace applications, weights of the three TCS configurations are compared.

  20. Design data brochure for the Owens-Illinois Sunpak (TM) air-cooled solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information necessary to evaluate the design and installation of the Owens-Illinois Sunpak TM Air-Cooled Solar Collector is presented. Information includes collector features, fluid flow, thermal performance, installation and system tips. The collector utilizes a highly selective wavelength coating in combination with vacuum insulation, which virtually eliminates conduction and convention losses.

  1. Photocatalytic Coatings for Exploration and Spaceport Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project developed self-cleaning photocatalytic coatings that remove contamination without human intervention. The coatings chemically remove organic contaminants and leave no residue. The photocatalyst will not negatively affect other coating properties, especially corrosion resistance. Titanium dioxide, TiO2, is an extremely popular photocatalyst because of its chemical stability, nontoxicity, and low cost. TiO2 is commonly used in the photocatalytic oxidation of organic matter or pollutants in the gas and liquid phases. However, TiO2 does have some drawbacks. It has limited light absorption because of its large band-gap and suffers from a photonic efficiency of less than 10 percent for organic degradation. Dopants can lower the band-gap and improve efficiency. Since the photocatalytically active form of TiO2 is a nanocrystalline powder, it can be difficult to make a robust coating with enough catalyst loading to be effective. Photocatalysts become active when certain light energy is absorbed. When photons with an energy greater than the band-gap, Eg, (wavelengths shorter than 400 nm) impinge upon the surface of the TiO2, an electron-hole pair is formed. The electron-hole pair oxidizes adsorbed substances either directly or via reactive intermediates that form on the surface, such as hydroxyl radicals (OH) or superoxide ions (O2-). Several factors can influence the band-gap energy of TiO2, two of which are crystal structure and impurities. TiO2 exists as three crystal structures brookite, anatase, and rutile that can be controlled via heat treatment. Anatase is the most photocatalytically active crystal form of TiO2. Doping TiO2 with impurities can alter its band-gap energy, as well as its effectiveness as a catalyst. Depending on their size, dopant atoms can occupy either the substitutional or interstitial lattice positions. Atoms that are relatively large will assume the interstitial positions and create a much greater energy disturbance in the crystal than

  2. Knowledge-based optical coatings design and manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Karl H.; Gonzalez, Avelino J.; Yoo, Hoi J.

    1990-12-01

    The theory of thin film optics is well developed for the spectral analysis of a given optical coating. The inverse synthesis - designing an optical coating for a certain spectral performance - is more complicated. Usually a multitude of theoretical designs is feasible because most design problems are over-determined with the number of layers possible with three variables each (n, k, t). The expertise of a good thin film designer comes in at this point with a mostly intuitive selection of certain designs based on previous experience and current manufacturing capabilities. Manufacturing a designed coating poses yet another subset of multiple solutions, as thin if in deposition technology has evolved over the years with a vast variety of different processes. The abundance of published literature may often be more confusing than helpful to the practicing thin film engineer, even if he has time and opportunity to read it. The choice of the right process is also severely limited by the given manufacturing hardware and cost considerations which may not easily allow for the adaption of a new manufacturing approach, even if it promises to be better technically (it ought to be also cheaper). On the user end of the thin film coating business, the typical optical designer or engineer who needs an optical coating may have limited or no knowledge at all about the theoretical and manufacturing criteria for the optimum selection of what he needs. This can be sensed frequently by overly tight tolerances and requirements for optical performance which sometimes stretch the limits of mother nature. We introduce here a know1edge-based system (KBS) intended to assist expert designers and manufacturers in their task of maximizing results and minimizing errors, trial runs, and unproductive time. It will help the experts to manipulate parameters which are largely determined through heuristic reasoning by employing artificial intelligence techniques. In a later state, the KBS will include a

  3. Accelerated aging tests on ENEA-ASE solar coating for receiver tube suitable to operate up to 550 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonaia, A.; D'Angelo, A.; Esposito, S.; Addonizio, M. L.; Castaldo, A.; Ferrara, M.; Guglielmo, A.; Maccari, A.

    2016-05-01

    A patented solar coating for evacuated receiver, based on innovative graded WN-AlN cermet layer, has been optically designed and optimized to operate at high temperature with high performance and high thermal stability. This solar coating, being designed to operate in solar field with molten salt as heat transfer fluid, has to be thermally stable up to the maximum temperature of 550 °C. With the aim of determining degradation behaviour and lifetime prediction of the solar coating, we chose to monitor the variation of the solar absorptance αs after each thermal annealing cycle carried out at accelerated temperatures under vacuum. This prediction method was coupled with a preliminary Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) in order to give evidence for any chemical-physical coating modification in the temperature range of interest before performing accelerated aging tests. In the accelerated aging tests we assumed that the temperature dependence of the degradation processes could be described by Arrhenius behaviour and we hypothesized that a linear correlation occurs between optical parameter variation rate (specifically, Δαs/Δt) and degradation process rate. Starting from Δαs/Δt values evaluated at 650 and 690 °C, Arrhenius plot gave an activation energy of 325 kJ mol-1 for the degradation phenomenon, where the prediction on the coating degradation gave a solar absorptance decrease of only 1.65 % after 25 years at 550 °C. This very low αs decrease gave evidence for an excellent stability of our solar coating, also when employed at the maximum temperature (550 °C) of a solar field operating with molten salt as heat transfer fluid.

  4. Solar Selective Coatings Prepared From Thin-Film Molecular Mixtures and Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Don A.

    2003-01-01

    Thin films composed of molecular mixtures of metal and dielectric are being considered for use as solar selective coatings for a variety of space power applications. By controlling molecular mixing during ion-beam sputter deposition, researchers can tailor the solar selective coatings to have the combined properties of high solar absorptance and low infrared emittance. On orbit, these combined properties simultaneously maximize the amount of solar energy captured by the coating and minimize the amount of thermal energy radiated. The solar selective coatings are envisioned for use on minisatellites, for applications where solar energy is used to power heat engines or to heat remote regions in the interior of the spacecraft. Such systems may be useful for various missions, particularly those to middle Earth orbit. Sunlight must be concentrated by a factor of 100 or more to achieve the desired heat inlet operating temperature. At lower concentration factors, the temperature of the heat inlet surface of the heat engine is too low for efficient operation, and at high concentration factors, cavity type heat receivers become attractive. The an artist's concept of a heat engine, with the annular heat absorbing surface near the focus of the concentrator coated with a solar selective coating is shown. In this artist's concept, the heat absorbing surface powers a small Stirling convertor. The astronaut's gloved hand is provided for scale. Several thin-film molecular mixtures have been prepared and evaluated to date, including mixtures of aluminum and aluminum oxide, nickel and aluminum oxide, titanium and aluminum oxide, and platinum and aluminum oxide. For example, a 2400- Angstrom thick mixture of titanium and aluminum oxide was found to have a solar absorptance of 0.93 and an infrared emittance of 0.06. On the basis of tests performed under flowing nitrogen at temperatures as high as 680 C, the coating appeared to be durable at elevated temperatures. Additional durability

  5. Edge coating apparatus with movable roller applicator for solar cell substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pavani, Luca; Abas, Emmanuel

    2012-12-04

    A non-contact edge coating apparatus includes an applicator for applying a coating material on an edge of a solar cell substrate and a control system configured to drive the applicator. The control system may drive the applicator along an axis to maintain a distance with an edge of the substrate as the substrate is rotated to have the edge coated with a coating material. The applicator may include a recessed portion into which the edge of the substrate is received for edge coating. For example, the applicator may be a roller with a groove. Coating material may be introduced into the groove for application onto the edge of the substrate. A variety of coating materials may be employed with the apparatus including hot melt ink and UV curable plating resist.

  6. CuO-PANI nanostructure with tunable spectral selectivity for solar selective coating application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cindrella, L.; Prabhu., S.

    2016-08-01

    CuO-PANI nanostructure has been demonstrated as the solar selective absorber coating for the first time. The effortless chemical methods and easily scalable techniques such as precipitation, in-situ polymerization and spray coating were adopted for the fabrication of CuO nanorods and CuO-PANI nanostructures for solar application. The synthesis was carried out without using any template. The morphology and phase structure of fabricated CuO nanorods and CuO-PANI nanostructure coatings were studied by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The energy dispersive X-ray spectra and elemental mapping confirm the presence of the chosen elements in the nanostructure. The solar absorptance (αs), thermal emittance (εt) and selectivity (ξ) of the nanostructure coatings on glass substrate were optimized to 0.94, 0.01 and 94 respectively by changing the polyaniline content on the surface of the CuO nanorods. The efficiency of the solar selective coatings were evaluated. The optimized solar absorber coating of CuO-PANI nanostructure is highly promising for its selective optical properties.

  7. Solar heating system final design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The system is composed of a warm air collector, a logic control unit and a universal switching and transport unit. The collector was originally conceived and designed as an integrated roof/wall system and therefore provides a dual function in the structure. The collector serves both as a solar energy conversion system and as a structural weather resistant skin. The control unit provides totally automatic control over the operation of the system. It receives input data from sensor probes in collectors, storage and living space. The logic was designed so as to make maximum use of solar energy and minimize use of conventional energy. The transport and switching unit is a high-efficiency air-handling system equipped with gear motor valves that respond to outputs from the control system. The fan unit was designed for maximum durability and efficiency in operation, and has permanently lubricated ball bearings and excellent air-handling efficiency.

  8. Effects of positive ion implantation into antireflection coating of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, A. E.; Harpster, J. W.; Collis, W. J.; Kim, C. K.

    1971-01-01

    The state of technological development of Si solar cells for highest obtained efficiency and radiation resistance is summarized. The various theoretical analyses of Si solar cells are reviewed. It is shown that factors controlling blue response are carrier diffusion length, surface recombination, impurity concentration profile in surface region, high level of surface impurity concentration (degeneracy), reflection coefficient of oxide, and absorption coefficient of Si. The theory of ion implantation of charge into the oxide antireflection coating is developed and side effects are discussed. The experimental investigations were directed at determining whether the blue response of Si solar cells could be improved by phosphorus ion charges introduced into the oxide antireflection coating.

  9. The design of solar tower power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gretz, J.

    The conversion of solar energy into electricity in solar thermal tower power plants is examined. Mirrors attached to mobile, sun-following heliostats concentrate solar rays into the opening of a receiver mounted on a tower. In the receiver, the radiant energy is absorbed by a system of pipes filled with a flowing material which is heated and drives a turbogenerator directly or via a heat exchanger. It is shown that the optics involved in this concept preclude the optimization of the pipe material, since the local distribution of rays in the heater of tower power plants varies diurnally and annually. This requires each pipe section to be designed for maximum stress, even though that stress occurs only at brief intervals during the day.

  10. Building design guidelines for solar energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Givoni, B.

    1989-01-01

    There are two main objectives to this publication. The first is to find out the communalities in the experience gained in previous studies and in actual applications of solar technologies in buildings, residential as well as nonresidential. The second objective is to review innovative concepts and products which may have an impact on future developments and applications of solar technologies in buildings. The available information and common lessons were collated and presented in a form which, hopefully, is useful for architects and solar engineers, as well as for teachers of solar architecture'' and students in Architectural Schools. The publication is based mainly on the collection and analysis of relevant information. The information included previous studies in which the performance of solar buildings was evaluated, as well as the personal experience of the Author and the research consultants. The state of the art, as indicated by these studies and personal experience, was summarized and has served as basis for the development of the Design Guidelines. In addition to the summary of the state of the art, as was already applied in solar buildings, an account was given of innovative concepts and products. Such innovations have occurred in the areas of thermal storage by Phase Change Materials (PCM) and in glazing with specialized or changeable properties. Interesting concepts were also developed for light transfer, which may enable to transfer sunlight to the core areas of large multi story nonresidential buildings. These innovations may have a significant impact on future developments of solar technologies and their applications in buildings. 15 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Preliminary study of a solar selective coating system using black cobalt oxide for high temperature solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G.

    1980-01-01

    Black cobalt oxide coatings were deposited on thin layers of silver or gold which had been deposited on oxidized stainless steel substrates. The reflectance properties of these coatings were measured at various thicknesses of cobalt oxide for integrated values of the solar and infrared spectrum. The values of absorptance and emittance were calculated from the measured reflectance values before and after exposure in air at 650 C for 1000 hours. Also, these cobalt oxide/noble metal/oxide diffusion barrier coatings have absorptances greater than 0.90 and emittances of approximately 0.20 even after about 1000 hours at 650 C.

  12. Current technology for development of low solar absorptance/high emittance coatings. [spacecraft thermal control surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, J. E.; Harada, Y.; Gates, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    A comprehensive program to develop low solar absorptance/high emittance coatings, to be successful, must coordinate basic materials preparation, coatings technology, environmental simulation, production, and flight-test evaluation. The prime criteria for 'white' thermal-control coatings are low solar absorptance and, most importantly, solar-absorptance stability. Many variables affect the solar absorptance and its stability. These effects must be discerned and evaluated. The factors involved, however, are not entirely independent; accordingly, the present paper emphasizes the major variables, the relationships among them, and how important they are in improving the properties and performance of the coatings.

  13. A handbook for solar central receiver design

    SciTech Connect

    Falcone, P.K.

    1986-12-01

    This Handbook describes central receiver technology for solar thermal power plants. It contains a description and assessment of the major components in a central receiver system configured for utility scale production of electricity using Rankine-cycle steam turbines. It also describes procedures to size and optimize a plant and discussed examples from recent system analyses. Information concerning site selection criteria, cost estimation, construction, and operation and maintenance is also included, which should enable readers to perform design analyses for specific applications.

  14. Design of nanocomposite polymer coatings for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julthongpiput, Duangrut

    The recent evolution in microelectronics of combining electrical and mechanical functions has brought about the exciting field of microelectromechanical system (MEMS). As the dimensions of the components shrink, adhesion, stiction, friction, and wear become a significant technological barrier for the successful development of durable microdevices. In this thesis, we investigate wear-resistant, nanocomposite, molecular coatings from advanced polymers with controlled nanomechanical and nanotribological properties from the prospective of long-term applications for MEMS. We discuss fundamentals governing the mechanical and tribological properties on a micro scale associated with the morphology and microstructure of these molecular coatings. In order to fabricate wear-resistant and superelastic molecular coatings, several types of the molecular designs are proposed and tested in this work. All designs are based on chemical attachment of the polymer layers onto a functionalized silicon surface. We focus on developing two different kinds of molecular coatings: reinforced elastomeric layers from grafted block-copolymers and polymer brush layers grown by the "grafted to" technique. A more complicated design included bilayered nanocomposite coatings consisting of a hard polymer layer placed on the top of an elastomeric layer to regulate surface adhesion and to increase surface stiffness of nanocomposite bilayers. Another design incorporates a paraffinic oil component to assure the presence of highly mobile molecules inside of the elastomeric phase. This oily fraction can be a source of an instant supply of mobile lubricant to a deformed contact area, thus providing potential self-lubrication and self-healing mechanisms for surface areas affected by excessive deformation. We observed that the interfacial assemblies, as presented in this paper, exhibited very low friction coefficient, low stiction, and better wear stability as compared to other, non-structured, non

  15. Refinement in black chrome for use as a solar selective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    Black chrome is significant as a solar selective coating because the current extensive use of black chrome in the electroplating industry as a durable decorative finish makes black chrome widely available on a commercial scale and potentially low in cost as a solar selective coating. Black-chrome deposits were modified by underplating with dull nickel or by being plated on rough surfaces. Both of these procedures increased the visible absorptance. There was no change in the infrared reflectance for the dull-nickel - black-chrome combination from that reported for the bright-nickel - black-chrome combination. However, the bright-nickel - black-chrome coating plated on rough surfaces indicated a slight decrease in infrared reflectance. As integrated over the solar spectrum for air mass 2, the reflectance of the dull-nickel - black-chrome coating was 0.077, of the bright-nickel - black-chrome coating plated on a 0.75-micron (30-microinch) surface was 0.070, of the bright-nickel - black-chrome coating plated on a 2.5 micron (100-microinch) surface was 0.064. The corresponding values for the bright-nickel - black-chrome coating on a 0.0125-micron (0.5-microinch) surface, two samples of black nickel, and two samples of Nextrel black paint were 0.132, 0.123, 0.133, and 0.033, respectively.

  16. Reclamation system design of nanostructured coatings of touch-panel.

    PubMed

    Pa, P S

    2010-02-01

    A newly design reclamation system using an ultrasonic micro electroetching (UMECE) as a machining process for Indium-tin-oxide(ITO) nanostructured coatings dissolved from a surface of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) of touch-panel is presented. The design features of the reclamation mechanism and a designed wedge-form tool are of major interest. The low yield of ITO nanostructured coatings is an important factor in optoelectronic semiconductor production. In the current experiment, a small diameter of the anode accompanying with a small distance between the two anodes, reduced the amount of time for effective ultrasonic micro electroetching of ITO since the effect of removal is facilitated by supplying sufficient electrochemical power. The performance of ultrasonics was found to be more effective than pulsed current, requiring no increase in electric power. Additionally, electric power, when combined with a fast feed rate, provides highly effective dissolution. Higher frequency or the greater power of ultrasonics corresponds to a higher dissolution rate for ITO nanostructured coatings. A small anode of the wedge-form tool or a small size of the cathode takes less time for the same amount of ITO removal. Importantly, ultrasonic micro electroetching with the designed wedge-form tool requires only a short period of time to dissolve the ITO's nanostructured coatings easily and cleanly. PMID:20352803

  17. Preliminary study of a solar selective coating system using black cobalt oxide for high temperature solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G.

    1980-01-01

    Black cobalt oxide coatings (high solar absorptance layer) were deposited on thin layers of silver or gold (low emittance layer) which had been previously deposited on oxidized (diffusion barrier layer) stainless steel substrates. The reflectance properties of these coatings were measured at various thicknesses of cobalt for integrated values of the solar and infrared spectrum. The values of absorptance and emittance were calculated from the measured reflectance values, before and after exposure in air at 650 C for approximately 1000 hours. Absorptance and emittance were interdependent functions of the weight of cobalt oxide. Also, these cobalt oxide/noble metal/oxide diffusion barrier coatings have absorptances greater than 0.90 and emittances of approximately 0.20 even after about 1000 hours at 650 C.

  18. Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) metric to characterize solar absorber coatings for the CSP industry

    SciTech Connect

    Boubault, Antoine; Ho, Clifford K.; Hall, Aaron; Lambert, Timothy N.; Ambrosini, Andrea

    2015-07-08

    The contribution of each component of a power generation plant to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) can be estimated and used to increase the power output while reducing system operation and maintenance costs. The LCOE is used in order to quantify solar receiver coating influence on the LCOE of solar power towers. Two new parameters are introduced: the absolute levelized cost of coating (LCOC) and the LCOC efficiency. Depending on the material properties, aging, costs, and temperature, the absolute LCOC enables quantifying the cost-effectiveness of absorber coatings, as well as finding optimal operating conditions. The absolute LCOC is investigated for different hypothetic coatings and is demonstrated on Pyromark 2500 paint. Results show that absorber coatings yield lower LCOE values in most cases, even at significant costs. Optimal reapplication intervals range from one to five years. At receiver temperatures greater than 700 °C, non-selective coatings are not always worthwhile while durable selective coatings consistently reduce the LCOE—up to 12% of the value obtained for an uncoated receiver. Moreover the absolute LCOC is a powerful tool to characterize and compare different coatings, not only considering their initial efficiencies but also including their durability.

  19. Levelized cost of energy (LCOE) metric to characterize solar absorber coatings for the CSP industry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boubault, Antoine; Ho, Clifford K.; Hall, Aaron; Lambert, Timothy N.; Ambrosini, Andrea

    2015-07-08

    The contribution of each component of a power generation plant to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) can be estimated and used to increase the power output while reducing system operation and maintenance costs. The LCOE is used in order to quantify solar receiver coating influence on the LCOE of solar power towers. Two new parameters are introduced: the absolute levelized cost of coating (LCOC) and the LCOC efficiency. Depending on the material properties, aging, costs, and temperature, the absolute LCOC enables quantifying the cost-effectiveness of absorber coatings, as well as finding optimal operating conditions. The absolute LCOC is investigatedmore » for different hypothetic coatings and is demonstrated on Pyromark 2500 paint. Results show that absorber coatings yield lower LCOE values in most cases, even at significant costs. Optimal reapplication intervals range from one to five years. At receiver temperatures greater than 700 °C, non-selective coatings are not always worthwhile while durable selective coatings consistently reduce the LCOE—up to 12% of the value obtained for an uncoated receiver. Moreover the absolute LCOC is a powerful tool to characterize and compare different coatings, not only considering their initial efficiencies but also including their durability.« less

  20. Residential Solar Design Review: A Manual on Community Architectural Controls and Solar Energy Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Martin; Erley, Duncan

    Presented are architectural design issues associated with solar energy use, and procedures for design review committees to consider in examining residential solar installation in light of existing aesthetic goals for their communities. Recommended design review criteria include the type of solar system being used and the ways in which the system…

  1. Solar coal gasification - Plant design and economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiman, W. R.; Thorsness, C. B.; Gregg, D. W.

    A plant design and economic analysis is presented for solar coal gasification (SCG). Coal pyrolysis and char gasification to form the gasified product are reviewed, noting that the endothermic gasification reactions occur only at temperatures exceeding 1000 K, an energy input of 101-136 kJ/mol of char reformed. Use of solar heat offers the possibility of replacing fuels needed to perform the gasification and the oxygen necessary in order to produce a nitrogen-free product. Reactions, energetics, and byproducts from the gasification of subbituminous coal are modeled for a process analysis code used for the SCG plant. Gas generation is designed to occur in a unit exposed to the solar flux focus from a heliostat field. The SCG gas would have an H2 content of 88%, compared to the 55% offered by the Lurgi process. Initial capital costs for the SCG plant are projected to be 4 times those with the Lurgi process, with equality being achieved when coal costs $4/gJ.

  2. Moth eye antireflection coated GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Arto; Tommila, Juha; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Niemi, Tapio; Guina, Mircea

    2014-09-01

    The performance of a GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell incorporating AlInP moth eye antireflection coating is reported and compared with the performance of a similar cell comprising TiO2/SiO2 antireflection coating. The moth eye coating exhibits an average reflectance of only 2% within the spectral range from 400 nm to 1600 nm. EQE measurements revealed absorption-related losses in the AlInP moth eye coating at wavelengths below 510 nm. Short wavelength absorption decreases the current generation in the top GaInP junction by 10%. Despite the absorption losses, the moth eye patterned GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell exhibited higher current generation under AM1.5G real sun illumination.

  3. Solar energy absorption characteristics and the effects of heat on the optical properties of several coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The solar energy absorption characteristics of several high temperature coatings were determined and effects of heat on these coatings were evaluated. Included in the investigation were an electroplated alloy of black chrome and vanadium, electroplated black chrome, and chemically colored 316 stainless steel. Each of the coatings possessed good selective solar energy absorption properties at laboratory ambient temperature. Measured at a temperature of 700 K (800 F), the emittances of black chrome, black chrome vanadium, and colored stainless steel were 0.11, 0.61, and 0.15, respectively. Black chrome and black chrome vanadium did not degrade optically in the presence of high heat (811 K (1000 F)). Chemically colored stainless steel showed slight optical degradation when exposed to moderately high heat (616 K (650 F)0, but showed more severe degradation at exposure temperatures beyond this level. Each of the coatings showed good corrosion resistance to a salt spray environment.

  4. Production and characterization of large-area sputtered selective solar absorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Wolfgang; Koehl, Michael; Wittwer, Volker

    1992-11-01

    Most of the commercially available selective solar absorber coatings are produced by electroplating. Often the reproducibility or the durability of their optical properties is not very satisfying. Good reproducibility can be achieved by sputtering, the technique for the production of low-(epsilon) coatings for windows. The suitability of this kind of deposition technique for flat-plate solar absorber coatings based on the principle of ceramic/metal composites was investigated for different material combinations, and prototype collectors were manufactured. The optical characterization of the coatings is based on spectral measurements of the near-normal/hemispherical and the angle-dependent reflectance in the wavelength-range 0.38 micrometers - 17 micrometers . The durability assessment was carried out by temperature tests in ovens and climatic chambers.

  5. Progress Toward Developing a Durable High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.; Price, H. W.

    2007-03-01

    Increasing the operating temperature of parabolic trough solar fields from 400 C to >450 C will increase their efficiency and reduce the cost of electricity. Current coatings do not have the stability and performance necessary to move to higher operating temperatures. The objective is to develop new, more efficient selective coatings with both high solar absoprtance ({alpha} > 0.96) and low thermal emittance ({var_epsilon} < 0.07) that are thermally stable above 450 C, ideally in air, with improved durability and manufacturability, and reduced cost.

  6. Nanostructured Semiconductor Device Design in Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hongmei

    We demonstrate the use of embedded CdS nanowires in improving spectral transmission loss and the low mechanical and electrical robustness of planar CdS window layer and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability of the CdS-CdTe solar cells. CdS nanowire window layer enables light transmission gain at 300nm-550nm. A nearly ideal spectral response of quantum efficiency at a wide spectrum range provides an evidence for improving light transmission in the window layer and enhancing absorption and carrier generation in absorber. Nanowire CdS/CdTe solar cells with Cu/graphite/silver paste as back contacts, on SnO2/ITO-soda lime glass substrates, yield the highest efficiency of 12% in nanostructured CdS-CdTe solar cells. Reliability is improved by approximately 3 times over the cells with the traditional planar CdS counterpart. Junction transport mechanisms are delineated for advancing the basic understanding of device physics at the interface. Our results prove the efficacy of this nanowire approach for enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability in windowabsorber type solar cells (CdS-CdTe, CdS-CIGS and CdS-CZTSSe etc) and other optoelectronic devices. We further introduce MoO3-x as a transparent, low barrier back contact. We design nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells on flexible foils of metals in a superstrate device structure, which makes low-cost roll-to-roll manufacturing process feasible and greatly reduces the complexity of fabrication. The MoO3 layer reduces the valence band offset relative to the CdTe, and creates improved cell performance. Annealing as-deposited MoO3 in N 2 reduces series resistance from 9.98 O/cm2 to 7.72 O/cm2, and hence efficiency of the nanowire solar cell is improved from 9.9% to 11%, which efficiency comparable to efficiency of planar counterparts. When the nanowire solar cell is illuminated from MoO 3-x /Au side, it yields an efficiency of 8.7%. This reduction in efficiency is attributed to decrease in Jsc from 25.5m

  7. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the cost of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.

  8. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the costmore » of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.« less

  9. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Solar heating and heating/cooling systems were designed for single family, multifamily, and commercial applications. Subsystems considered included solar collectors, heat storage systems, auxiliary energy sources, working fluids, and supplementary controls, piping, and pumps.

  10. Design package for a solar-heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Report contains sufficient information to assemble complete tested residential flat-plate solar heating system. Descriptive material provides design, performance, and hardware specifications for utilization by architectural engineers, and contractors in procurement, installation, operation, and maintenance of similar solar applications.

  11. Design of broadband dielectric coatings for near-infrared Fabry-Perot interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinfeng; Mao, Weijun; Cui, Xiangqun

    2007-12-01

    Fabry-Perot interferometer has an important effect on near-infrared high spectral resolution spectrograph. In 1896, Ch. Fabry and Alfred Perot designed and used the Fabry-Perot interferometer for the first time. Since then the instruments using Fabry-Perot interference phenomena have been applied broadly to multi-field, such as astronomy, laser, and fiber-optic transmission. Fabry-Perot interferometer has many advantages such as narrow passband, high spectral resolution, high throughput, easy wave-length adjustment, simple structure and large aperture. Comparing with traditional visible light, the solar observation in near-infrared has many advantages: for example, weaker magnetic field strength can be more precisely measured with near-infrared spectrum .So developing the key technology of near-infrared high spectral resolution spectrograph--Fabry-Perot interferometer has become urgent. For developing near-infrared Fabry-Perot interferometer, there are four difficulties: producing high quality optical plane: peak-to-valley surface flatness better than λ/100 coating Fabry-Perot interferometer plates with broadband multilayer dielectric films(including spectrum performance, thickness uniformity and stress effects); controlling the distance of interference cavity; keeping constant temperature. In this paper, the process of designing broadband dielectric reflective and antireflective coatings applied in near-infrared Fabry-Perot is described and some problems of designing Fabry-Perot interferometer are discussed: the design of broadband dielectric mirror is described with reflectivity of 93.9+/-1.0% over spectral ranges from 1.0μm to 1.7μm by reflective phase shifts in the design of mirror coating, computing the required film thickness uniformity atλ/100 of peak-to-valley surface flatness; degradation of surface figure is perhaps more thanλ/100 even if the soft coating materials-zinc sulfide and cryolite are used, and in order to reduce the degradation of surface

  12. A software tool to design thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrus, Gregory; Ferguson, B. Lynn

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes work completed for a NASA Phase 1 SBIR program which demonstrated the feasibility of developing a software tool to aid in the design of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. Toward this goal, three tasks were undertaken and completed. Task 1 involved the development of a database containing the pertinent thermal and mechanical property data for the top coat, bond coat and substrate materials that comprise a TBC system. Task 2 involved the development of an automated set-up program for generating two dimensional (2D) finite element models of TBC systems. Most importantly, task 3 involved the generation of a rule base to aid in the design of a TBC system. These rules were based on a factorial design of experiments involving FEM results and were generated using a Yates analysis. A previous study had indicated the suitability and benefit of applying finite element analysis to perform computer based experiments to decrease but not eliminate physical experiments on TBC's. This program proved feasibility by expanding on these findings by developing a larger knowledgebase and developing a procedure to extract rules to aid in TBC design.

  13. A software tool to design thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrus, G.; Ferguson, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes work completed for a NASA Phase 1 SBIR program which demonstrated the feasibility of developing a software tool to aid in the design of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems. Toward this goal, three tasks were undertaken and completed. Task 1 involved the development of a database containing the pertinent thermal and mechanical property data for the top coat, bond coat and substrate materials that comprise a TBC system. Task 2 involved the development of an automated set-up program for generating two dimensional (2D) finite element models of TBC systems. Most importantly, Task 3 involved the generation of a rule base to aid in the design of a TBC system. These rules were based on a factorial design of experiments involving FEM results, and were generated using a Yates analysis. A previous study has indicated the suitability and benefit of applying finite element analysis to perform computer based experiments to decrease but not eliminate physical experiments on TBC's. This program proved feasibility by expanding on these findings by developing a larger knowledge base and developing a procedure to extract rules to aid in TBC design.

  14. Performance of Hydrogenated a-Si:H Solar Cells with Downshifting Coating: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, B.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.; Sun, T.; Lee, B. G.; Duda, A.; Wang, Q.

    2011-05-01

    We apply a thin luminescent downshifting (LDS) coating to a hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) solar cell and study the mechanism of possible current enhancement. The conversion material used in this study converts wavelengths below 400 nm to a narrow line around 615 nm. This material is coated on the front of the glass of the a-Si:H solar cell with a glass/TCO/p/i/n/Ag superstrate configuration. The initial efficiency of the solar cell without the LDS coating is above 9.0 % with open circuit voltage of 0.84 V. Typically, the spectral response below 400 nm of an a-Si:H solar cell is weaker than that at 615 nm. By converting ultraviolet (UV) light to red light, the solar cell will receive more red photons; therefore, solar cell performance is expected to improve. We observe evidence of downshifting in reflectance spectra. The cell Jsc decreases by 0.13 mA/cm2, and loss mechanisms are identified.

  15. Solar selective absorber coating for high service temperatures, produced by plasma sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanxner, Michael; Elgat, Zvi

    1990-08-01

    Spectrally selective absorber coatings, deposited on engineering material substrates such as stainless steel, have been developed for service as efficient solar photothermal energy converters. The selective solar absorber is based on a multilayer of thin films, produced by sputtering. The main solar absorber is a metal/ceramic (cermet) composite, such as, Mo/Al2th or Mo/Si02, with a graded metal concentration. Such a cermet layer, strongly absorbs radiation over most of the range of the solar spectrum but is transparent to longer wavelength radiation. The cermet layer is deposited on a highly reflecting infrared metal layer. Two more layers were added: An AhO diffusion barrier layer which is deposited first on the substrate and an AI2O or a Si02 antireflection layer which is deposited on the top of the cermet film. In order to better understand the spectral reflectivity of the multilayered selective coating, a procedure for the calculation of the optical properties was developed. After the R&D development phase was successfully completed, a full scale production coating machine was constructed. The production machine is a linear in line coater. The selective coating is deposited on stainless steel tubes, translating in the coating machine while rotating about their axes, along their axial direction. Measurements of reflectance, solar absorptivity, a, thermal emissivity, C, and high temperature durability, are all parts of the quality control routine. The results show values of a in the range 0.96 - 0.98. The thermal emissivity at 350CC is in the range 0.16 - 0.18. Thermal durability tests, show no degradation of the coating when subjected to up to 65O in vacuum for one month and when passed through a temperature cycling test which includes 1200 cycles between temperatures of 150CC and 450CCfor a period of two months.

  16. Survey of coatings for solar collectors. [ceramic enamels and chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    Ceramic enamel is found to be more solar selective, (i.e., has high solar absorptance in combination with low infrared emittance) than organic enamel, but neither is as solar selective as black chrome, black copper, black zinc, or black nickel. Ceramic enamel is matched only by black chrome in durability and wide availability. Ceramic enamel and organic enamel have approximately the same cost, and both are currently slightly lower in cost than black chrome, black copper, or black zinc. Black nickel is relatively unavailable and, because of that, realistic cost comparisons are not possible.

  17. User participation in passive solar housing design

    SciTech Connect

    McLain-Kark, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    A field study was conducted in 1984 in order to compare the characteristics, lifestyle, attitudes, and behavioral adaptations of two groups of passive solar homeowners, those with high or low levels of participation in the design and/or building process. Forty-one Virginia passive solar homeowners were surveyed and interviewed in their home. Photographic slides and floor plans with furniture layout were also analyzed. The results indicate that the owner-built homeowners or those with high participation in design and/or building were older, more educated, and were more involved in community affairs than the low participation homeowners. They also were more involved in maintenance tasks, more likely to engage in a voluntary simplicity lifestyle, and more energy conserving. The owner-builders too had a higher level of satisfaction with their home. The majority of the homeowners expressed dissatisfaction with the flexibility of arranging furniture in the open plan. An analysis of the floor plans revealed that three factors were contributing to the problems: zones, circulation/furniture arrangement, and passive elements.

  18. Commercially available black chrome is an effective solar collector coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1974-01-01

    Black chrome, electroplated decorative finish, which absorbs and retains solar energy is readily available, easily applied, and low cost. It is indistinguishable from black nickel and is equally feasible on aluminum or steel.

  19. Design fabrication and testing of ceramic solar absorber plates

    SciTech Connect

    Sisson, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of fabrication procedures on the thermal performance of various ceramic systems for active solar applications were investigated. A shale-based structural clay body was used as a standard. This body was also coated with silicon carbide, a glossy black glaze and a matte black glaze. Metal samples used included copper, aluminum and aluminum coated with a flat black paint. Experiments were performed using a solar test box linked to an automated data acquisition system. Temperatures of samples were recorded at 3 min. intervals for 4 h solar periods. An F-statistical analysis was performed on the resulting data and was correlated with total solar emittance, total solar reflectance and monochromatic reflectance as a function of incident wavelength. The information above was also utilized in developing a computer model used to simulate the performance of various materials in active solar testing. Results suggest that a structural clay body fired to maturity and coated with a matte black glaze could be commercially useful for applications requiring large quantities of heated water.

  20. Selective coating for solar panels. [using black chrome and black nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The energy absorbing properties of solar heating panels are improved by depositing a black chrome coating of controlled thickness on a specially prepared surface of a metal substrate. The surface is prepared by depositing a dull nickel on the substrate, and the black chrome is plated on this low emittance surface to a thickness between 0.5 micron and 2.5 microns.

  1. Preliminary design package for Sunair SEC-601 solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The preliminary design of the Owens-Illinois model Sunair SEC-601 tubular air solar collector is presented. Information in this package includes the subsystem design and development approaches, hazard analysis, and detailed drawings available as the preliminary design review.

  2. High performance anti-reflection coatings for broadband multi-junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    AIKEN,DANIEL J.

    2000-02-23

    The success of bandgap engineering has made high efficiency broadband multi-junction solar cells possible with photo-response out to the band edge of Ge. Modeling has been conducted which suggests that current double layer anti-reflection coating technology is not adequate for these devices in certain cases. Approaches for the development of higher performance anti-reflection coatings are examined. A new AR coating structure based on the use of Herpin equivalent layers is presented. Optical modeling suggests a decrease in the solar weighted reflectance of over 2.5{percent} absolute as a result. This structure requires no additional optical material development and characterization because no new optical materials are necessary. Experimental results and a sensitivity analysis are presented.

  3. Preparation of silver-coated glass frit and its application in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiang; Biyuan, Li; Yingfen, Li; Jian, Zhou; Weiping, Gan

    2016-07-01

    A simple electroless plating process was employed to prepare silver-coated glass frits for solar cells. The surface of the glass frits was modified with polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP) before the electroless plating process. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the PVP modified glass frits and investigate the mechanism of the modification process. It was found that the PVP molecules adsorbed on the glass frit surface and reduced the silver ions to the silver nanoparticles. Through epitaxial growth, these nanoparticles were uniformly deposited onto the surface of the glass frit. Silicon solar cells with this novel silver coating exhibited a photoelectric conversion efficiency increase of 0.33%. Compared with the electroless plating processes, this method provides a simple route to prepare silver-coated glass frits without introducing impurity ions.

  4. Study of solar wind ions implantation effects in optical coatings in view of Solar Orbiter space mission operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacco, D.; Corso, A. J.; Zuppella, P.; Böttger, R.; Gerlin, F.; Napolitani, E.; Tessarolo, E.; Nardello, M.; Pelizzo, M. G.

    2015-09-01

    Low energy ions coming from the quite solar wind are considered among the causes of potential damage of the optical instrumentation and components on board of ESA Solar Orbiter. Predictions of space radiation parameters are available for instruments on board of such mission. Accelerators are commonly used to reproduce the particle irradiation on a spacecraft during its lifetime at the ground level. By selecting energies and equivalent doses it is possible to replicate the damage induced on space components. Implantation of Helium ions has been carried out on different single layer thin films at LEI facility at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf varying the total dose. Profile of the implanted samples has been experimentally recovered by SIMS measurements. The change in reflectance performances of such coatings has been experimentally evaluated and modelled. The outcomes have been used to verify the potential impact on the METIS instrument and to drive the optimization of the M0 mirror coating..

  5. Performance of "Moth Eye" Anti-Reflective Coatings for Solar Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.; Kane, M.; Jiang, P.

    2011-03-14

    An inexpensive, effective anti-reflective coating (ARC) has been developed at the University of Florida to significantly enhance the absorption of light by silicon in solar cells. This coating has nano-scale features, and its microstructure mimics that of various night active insects (e.g. a moth's eye). It is a square array of pillars, each about 700 nm high and having a diameter of about 300 nm. Samples of silicon having this coating were exposed either to various combinations of either elevated temperature and humidity or to gamma irradiation ({sup 60}Co) at the Savannah River National Laboratory, or to a broad spectrum ultraviolet light and to a 532 nm laser light at the University of Florida. The anti-reflective properties of the coatings were unaffected by any of these environmental stresses, and the microstructure of the coating was also unaffected. In fact, the reflectivity of the gamma irradiated ARC became lower (advantageous for solar cell applications) at wavelengths between 400 and 1000 nm. These results show that this coating is robust and should be tested in actual systems exposed to either weather or a space environment. Structural details of the ARCs were studied to optimize their performance. Square arrays performed better than hexagonal arrays - the natural moth-eye coating is indeed a square array. The optimal depth of the templated nanopillars in the ARC was investigated. A wet etching technology for ARC formation was developed that would be less expensive and much faster than dry etching. Theoretical modeling revealed that dimple arrays should perform better than nipple arrays. A method of fabricating both dimple and nipple arrays having the same length was developed, and the dimple arrays performed better than the nipple arrays, in agreement with the modeling. The commercial viability of the technology is quite feasible, since the technology is scalable and inexpensive. This technology is also compatible with current industrial fabrication of

  6. Recovery Act: A Low Cost Spray Deposited Solar PV Anti-Reflection Coating Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Michael D.

    2010-08-30

    PV module glass is typically low iron glass which exhibits extremely low absorption of light at solar wavelengths. However, reflection losses from typical high quality solar glass are about 4.5% of the input solar energy. By applying an antireflection coating to the cover glass of their modules, a PV module maker will gain at least a 3% increase in the light passing through the glass and being converted to electricity. Thus achieving an increase of >3% in electricity output from the modules. This Project focussed on developing a process that deposits a layer of porous silica (SiO2) on glass or plastic components, and testing the necessary subcomponents and subsystems required to demonstrate the commercial technology. This porous layer acts as a broadband single layer AR coating for glass and plastics, with the added benefit of being a hydrophilic surface for low surface soiling.

  7. SEPS solar array design and technology evaluation. [Solar Electric Propulsion Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.; Young, L. E.

    1975-01-01

    The solar array system considered is composed of two wings. Each wing consists of a solar array blanket, a blanket launch storage container, an extension/retraction mast assembly, a blanket tensioning system, and an array electrical harness. A technology evaluation is performed to assess the applicable solar array state-of-the-art and to define the supporting effort necessary to achieve technology readiness for meeting the Solar Electric Propulsion Stage (SEPS) solar array design requirements. Details of mechanical design are discussed along with questions of electrical design, operational reliability advantages, and array assembly advantages.

  8. Design Rules and Scaling for Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeiders, Glenn W.

    2005-01-01

    Useful design rules and simple scaling models have been developed for solar sails. Chief among the conclusions are: 1. Sail distortions contribute to the thrust and moments primarily though the mean squared value of their derivatives (slopes), and the sail behaves like a flat sheet if the value is small. The RMS slope is therefore an important figure of merit, and sail distortion effects on the spacecraft can generally be disregarded if the RMS slope is less than about 10% or so. 2. The characteristic slope of the sail distortion varies inversely with the tension in the sail, and it is the tension that produces the principle loading on the support booms. The tension is not arbitrary, but rather is the value needed to maintain the allowable RMS slope. That corresponds to a halyard force about equal to three times the normal force on the supported sail area. 3. Both the AEC/SRS and L Garde concepts appear to be structurally capable of supporting sail sizes up to a kilometer or more with 1AU solar flux, but select transverse dimensions must be changed to do so. Operational issues such as fabrication, handling, storage and deployment will be the limiting factors.

  9. Excellent anti-fogging dye-sensitized solar cells based on superhydrophilic nanoparticle coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung Tae; Kim, Jong Hak; Lee, Daeyeon

    2014-06-01

    We present a facile method for producing anti-fogging (AF) and anti-reflection (AR) coating functionalized photoanodes via one-step SiO2 nanoparticle coating for high performance solid state dye-sensitized solar cells (ssDSSCs). The AF and AR coating functionalized photoanodes are prepared by spin-coating of partially aggregated SiO2 colloidal solution. Poly((1-(4-ethenylphenyl)methyl)-3-butyl-imidazolium iodide) (PEBII), prepared via free radical polymerization, is used as a solid electrolyte in I2-free ssDSSCs. We systematically investigate the enhanced light harvesting characteristics of AF and AR coating functionalized photoanode-based ssDSSCs by measuring UV-visible spectroscopy, incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency (IPCE) curves under fogging conditions. Compared with conventional photoanode based ssDSSCs, the AF and AR coating functionalized photoanodes substantially suppress fogging and reduce reflection, leading to significantly enhanced light harvesting, especially under fogging conditions. ssDSSCs made of AF and AR coating functionalized photoanodes exhibit an improved photovoltaic efficiency of 6.0% and 5.9% under non-fogging and fogging conditions, respectively, and retain their device efficiencies for at least 20 days, which is a significant improvement of ssDSSCs with conventional photoanodes (4.7% and 1.9% under non-fogging and fogging conditions, respectively). We believe that AF and AR functionalization via one-step SiO2 colloidal coating is a promising method for enhancing light harvesting properties in various solar energy conversion applications.We present a facile method for producing anti-fogging (AF) and anti-reflection (AR) coating functionalized photoanodes via one-step SiO2 nanoparticle coating for high performance solid state dye-sensitized solar cells (ssDSSCs). The AF and AR coating functionalized photoanodes are prepared by spin-coating of partially aggregated SiO2 colloidal solution. Poly((1-(4-ethenylphenyl)methyl)-3

  10. A gravity gradient stabilized solar power satellite design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, M. L.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a solar power satellite (SPS) is reviewed, and a design proposed for such a satellite taking advantage of solar radiation pressure and gravity gradient forces to eliminate much of the structure from the baseline configuration. The SPS design consists of a solar cell array lying in the orbital plane and a free floating mirror above to reflect sunlight down onto it. The structural modes of the solar cell array are analyzed and found to be well within control limitations. Preliminary calculations concerning the free floating mirror and its position-keeping propellant requirements are also performed. A numerical example is presented, which shows that, even in terms of mass only, this configuration is a competitive design when compared to the conventional Department of Energy reference design. Other advantages, such as easier assembly in orbit, lower position-keeping propellant requirements, possibilities for decreasing necessary solar cell area, and longer solar cell life, may make this design superior.

  11. Coated Si microwire array solar cells for better light trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunsongyi; Gwon, Minji; Cho, Yunae; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2013-09-01

    We investigated optical properties of planar Si wafers and Si microwire (MW) arrays with and without ZnO thin films using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Reflectance of the MW array (diameter: 4 μm and period: 12 μm) was smaller than that of the planar wafer in the wavelength range from 400 to 1100 nm, which could be originated from antireflection effects due to low optical density and guided-mode-assisted field enhancement. The reflectance of ZnO (thickness: 50 and 80 nm)-coated MW array was drastically reduced compared with the bare array but somewhat larger than that of the coated planar wafer. This could be attributed to less-confined guided modes in the wires, which was supported by the field distribution simulation results. Our results provide some insights into possible roles of transparent conducting layers on MW arrays for photovoltaic applications.

  12. POSS(Registered TradeMark) Coatings for Solar Cells: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry; Isaacs-Smith, Tamara; Wells, Brian; Lichtenhan, Joseph D.; Fu, Bruce X.

    2007-01-01

    Presently, solar cells are covered with Ce-doped microsheet cover glasses that are attached with Dow Corning DC 93-500 silicone adhesive. Various antireflection coatings are often applied to the cover glass to increase cell performance. This general approach has been used from the beginning of space exploration. However, it is expensive and time consuming. Furthermore, as the voltage of solar arrays increases, significant arcing has occurred in solar arrays, leading to loss of satellite power. The cause has been traced to differential voltages between strings and the close spacing between them with no insulation covering the edges of the solar cells. In addition, this problem could be ameliorated if the cover glass extended over the edges of the cell, but this would impact packing density. An alternative idea that might solve all these issues and be less expensive and more protective is to develop a coating that could be applied over the entire array. Such a coating must be resistant to atomic oxygen for low earth orbits below about 700 km, it must be resistant to ultraviolet radiation for all earth and near-sun orbits and, of course, it must withstand the damaging effects of space radiation. Coating flexibility would be an additional advantage. Based on past experience, one material that has many of the desired attributes of a universal protective coating is the Dow Corning DC 93-500. Of all the potential optical plastics, it appears to be the most suitable for use in space. As noted above, DC 93-500 has been extensively used to attach cover glasses to crystalline solar cells and has worked exceptionally well over the years. It is flexible and generally resistant to electrons, protons and ultraviolet (UV and VUV) radiation; although a VUV-rejection coating or VUV-absorbing ceria-doped cover glass may be required for long mission durations. It can also be applied in a thin coating (< 25 m) by conventional liquid coating processes. Unfortunately, when exposed to

  13. Process and design considerations for high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohati, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper shows that oxide surface passivation coupled with optimum multilayer anti-reflective coating can provide approx. 3% (absolute) improvement in solar cell efficiency. Use of single-layer AR coating, without passivation, gives cell efficiencies in the range of 15 to 15.5% on high-quality, 4 ohm-cm as well as 0.1 to 0.2 ohm-cm float-zone silicon. Oxide surface passivation alone raises the cell efficiency to or = 17%. An optimum double-layer AR coating on oxide-passivated cells provides an additional approx. 5 to 10% improvement over a single-layer AR-coated cell, resulting in cell efficiencies in excess of 18%. Experimentally observed improvements are supported by model calculations and an approach to or = 20% efficient cells is discussed.

  14. Design and measured performance of a solar chimney for natural circulation solar energy dryers

    SciTech Connect

    Ekechukwu, O.V.; Norton, B.

    1996-02-01

    An experimental solar chimney consisted of a cylindrical polyethylene-clad vertical chamber supported by steel framework and draped internally with a selectively absorbing surface. The performance of the chimney which was monitored extensively is reported. Issues related to the design and construction of solar chimneys for natural circulation solar energy dryers are discussed.

  15. Variable Emittance Electrochromics Using Ionic Electrolytes and Low Solar Absorptance Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhar, Prasanna

    2011-01-01

    One of the last remaining technical hurdles with variable emittance devices or skins based on conducting polymer electrochromics is the high solar absorptance of their top surfaces. This high solar absorptance causes overheating of the skin when facing the Sun in space. Existing technologies such as mechanical louvers or loop heat pipes are virtually inapplicable to micro (< 20 kg) and nano (< 5 kg) spacecraft. Novel coatings lower the solar absorption to Alpha(s) of between 0.30 and 0.46. Coupled with the emittance properties of the variable emittance skins, this lowers the surface temperature of the skins facing the Sun to between 30 and 60 C, which is much lower than previous results of 100 C, and is well within acceptable satellite operations ranges. The performance of this technology is better than that of current new technologies such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), electrostatics, and electrophoretics, especially in applications involving micro and nano spacecraft. The coatings are deposited inside a high vacuum, layering multiple coatings onto the top surfaces of variable emittance skins. They are completely transparent in the entire relevant infrared region (about 2 to 45 microns), but highly reflective in the visible-NIR (near infrared) region of relevance to solar absorptance.

  16. Design Rules for Efficient Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.; Mühlbacher, D.; Morana, M.; Koppe, M.; Scharber, M. C.; Waller, D.; Dennler, G.; Brabec, C. J.

    There has been an intensive search for cost-effective photovoltaics since the development of the first solar cells in the 1950s [1-3]. Among all the alternative technologies to silicon-based pn-junction solar cells, organic solar cells are the approach that could lead to the most significant cost reduction [4]. The field of organic photovoltaics (OPV) is composed of organic/inorganic nanostructures, like the dyesensitized solar cell, multilayers of small organic molecules and mixtures of organic materials (bulk-heterojunction solar cell). A review of several so-called organic photovoltaic (OPV) technologies was recently presented [5].

  17. Design of an energy efficient solar powered water desalting plant

    SciTech Connect

    Nadler, M.

    1981-01-01

    A preliminary design was completed for a 6000 m/sup 3//day totally solar thermal energy powered seawater desalting plant. The objective was to design a process which would produce water at minimum cost using leading edge but commercial or near-commercial technology. Because the cost of solar energy is high, about half the cost of the plant is for solar equipment, minimum product water cost is achieved by minimizing energy consumption.

  18. Dip coating process: Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.; Maciolek, R. B.; Zook, J. D.; Harrison, W. B.; Scott, M. W.; Hendrickson, G.; Wolner, H. A.; Nelson, L. D.; Schuller, T. L.; Peterson, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing solar cell quality sheet silicon by dip-coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large grain polycrystalline silicon was investigated. The dip-coating methods studied were directed toward a minimum cost process with the ultimate objective of producing solar cells with a conversion efficiency of 10% or greater. The technique shows excellent promise for low cost, labor-saving, scale-up potentialities and would provide an end product of sheet silicon with a rigid and strong supportive backing. An experimental dip-coating facility was designed and constructed, several substrates were successfully dip-coated with areas as large as 25 sq cm and thicknesses of 12 micron to 250 micron. There appears to be no serious limitation on the area of a substrate that could be coated. Of the various substrate materials dip-coated, mullite appears to best satisfy the requirement of the program. An inexpensive process was developed for producing mullite in the desired geometry.

  19. Role of stent design and coatings on restenosis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hidehiko; Nakamura, Masato; Palmaz, Julio C; Schwartz, Robert S

    2006-06-01

    More than 15 years have passed since stent technology was introduced by Sigwart et al. [U. Sigwart, J. Puel, V. Mirkovitch, F. Joffe, et al. Intravascular stents to prevent occlusion and restenosis after transluminal angioplasty. N. Engl. J. Med. 316 (1987) 701-706.] among interventional cardiologists. Recently drug eluting stents have assumed dominance in the interventional world as positive trial results revealed their efficacy for preventing restenosis. Stent design, delivery-vehicle materials, and drug properties affect the function of these stents. Stainless steel stents with tubular and multicellular design have proven superior to coil or hybrid stent models. This chapter describes stents which have subtle influences of modular design, metal coverage, strut thickness, strut shape, surface smoothness, and coating materials like an alloy composition. PMID:16650911

  20. Solar absorptance and thermal emittance of some common spacecraft thermal-control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henninger, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Solar absorptance and thermal emittance of spacecraft materials are critical parameters in determining spacecraft temperature control. Because thickness, surface preparation, coatings formulation, manufacturing techniques, etc. affect these parameters, it is usually necessary to measure the absorptance and emittance of materials before they are used. Absorptance and emittance data for many common types of thermal control coatings, are together with some sample spectral data curves of absorptance. In some cases for which ultraviolet and particle radiation data are available, the degraded absorptance and emittance values are also listed.

  1. Applications of ``PV Optics`` for solar cell and module design

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Madjdpour, J.; Chen, W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes some applications of a new optics software package, PV Optics, developed for the optical design of solar cells and modules. PV Optics is suitable for the analysis and design of both thick and thin solar cells. It also includes a feature for calculation of metallic losses related to contacts and back reflectors.

  2. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  3. Design and installation package for a solar powered pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and installation procedures of a solar powered pump developed by Calmac Manufacturing Company are presented. Subsystem installation, operation and maintenance requirements, subsystem performance specifications, and detailed design drawings are included.

  4. Design and spacecraft-integration of RTGs for solar probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, A.; Noravian, H.; Or, T.; Sankarankandath, V.

    1990-01-01

    The design, analysis, and spacecraft integration of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) to power the Solar Probe under study at NASA JPL is described. The mission of the Solar Probe is to explore the solar corona by performing in situ measurements at up to four solar radii to the sun. Design constraints for the RTG are discussed. The chief challenge in the design and system integration of the Solar Probe's RTG is a heat rejection problem. Two RTG orientations, horizontal and oblique, are analyzed for effectiveness and results are summarized in chart form. A number of cooling strategies are also investigated, including heat-pipe and reflector-cooled options. A methodology and general computer code are presented for analyzing the performance of arbitrarily obstructed RTGs with both axial and circumferential temperature, voltage, and current variation. This methodology is applied to the specific example of the Solar Probe RTG obstructed by a semicylindrical reflector of 15-inch radius.

  5. (abstract) Scaling Nominal Solar Cell Impedances for Array Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L; Wallace, Matthew T.; Iles, Peter

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses a task the objective of which is to characterize solar cell array AC impedance and develop scaling rules for impedance characterization of large arrays by testing single solar cells and small arrays. This effort is aimed at formulating a methodology for estimating the AC impedance of the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) cruise and lander solar arrays based upon testing single cells and small solar cell arrays and to create a basis for design of a single shunt limiter for MPF power control of flight solar arrays having very different inpedances.

  6. Optimization of textured-dielectric coatings for crystalline-silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.M.; Gordon, R.; Liang, H.

    1996-07-01

    The authors report on the optimization of textured-dielectric coatings for reflectance control in crystalline-silicon (c-Si) photovoltaic modules. Textured-dielectric coatings reduce encapsulated-cell reflectance by promoting optical confinement in the module encapsulation; i.e., the textured-dielectric coating randomizes the direction of rays reflected from the dielectric and from the c-Si cell so that many of these reflected rays experience total internal reflection at the glass-air interface. Some important results of this work include the following: the authors demonstrated textured-dielectric coatings (ZnO) deposited by a high-throughput low-cost deposition process; they identified factors important for achieving necessary texture dimensions; they achieved solar-weighted extrinsic reflectances as low as 6% for encapsulated c-Si wafers with optimized textured-ZnO coatings; and they demonstrated improvements in encapsulated cell performance of up to 0.5% absolute compared to encapsulated planar cells with single-layer antireflection coatings.

  7. Antireflective coatings for multijunction solar cells under wide-angle ray bundles.

    PubMed

    Victoria, Marta; Domínguez, César; Antón, Ignacio; Sala, Gabriel

    2012-03-26

    Two important aspects must be considered when optimizing antireflection coatings (ARCs) for multijunction solar cells to be used in concentrators: the angular light distribution over the cell created by the particular concentration system and the wide spectral bandwidth the solar cell is sensitive to. In this article, a numerical optimization procedure and its results are presented. The potential efficiency enhancement by means of ARC optimization is calculated for several concentrating PV systems. In addition, two methods for ARCs direct characterization are presented. The results of these show that real ARCs slightly underperform theoretical predictions. PMID:22453483

  8. Development of processing procedures for advanced silicon solar cells. [antireflection coatings and short circuit currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Stella, P. M.; Avery, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Ten ohm-cm silicon solar cells, 0.2 mm thick, were produced with short circuit current efficiencies up to thirteen percent and using a combination of recent technical advances. The cells were fabricated in conventional and wraparound contact configurations. Improvement in cell collection efficiency from both the short and long wavelengths region of the solar spectrum was obtained by coupling a shallow junction and an optically transparent antireflection coating with back surface field technology. Both boron diffusion and aluminum alloying techniques were evaluated for forming back surface field cells. The latter method is less complicated and is compatible with wraparound cell processing.

  9. Shuttle Engine Designs Revolutionize Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine was built under contract to Marshall Space Flight Center by Rocketdyne, now part of Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR). PWR applied its NASA experience to solar power technology and licensed the technology to Santa Monica, California-based SolarReserve. The company now develops concentrating solar power projects, including a plant in Nevada that has created 4,300 jobs during construction.

  10. Alternative designs for nanocrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Atul

    Nanocrystalline silicon is an attractive material for solar cells. It has very small grains, about 20 nm, and yet its electronic properties are very similar to those of crystalline silicon. The material exhibits smaller mobilities than crystalline Silicon, but the minority carrier lifetimes are reasonable. It is known that the properties of the material depend critically upon deposition parameters, in particular, the degree of grain boundary passivation achieved during growth and grain size. Previous work has shown that as the material grows, the grains tend to agglomerate into a cluster, and the development of this cluster leads to poorer electronic properties. The traditional method for overcoming such clustering has been to change the hydrogen to silane dilution ratio as the material grows, keeping the material near its crystalline to amorphous transition zone. However, this method is dependent upon the precise growth chemistry and is not suitable for mass production. In this project, we develop a new device design, a superlattice comprising alternating layers of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon, which allows one to precisely control the agglomeration of grains without having to resort to hydrogen profiling techniques. We study structural properties such as grain size and the degree of crystallnity, and electronic properties such as carrier diffusion lengths and defect densities. We show that an appropriate design of the superlattice allows one to minimize defect densities and maximize carrier diffusion lengths. We also study how to reduce series resistance in solar cells, and show that an appropriate combination of superlattice and contacts can lead to devices with high fill factors and good solar cell efficiencies. We also report on a new discovery, namely that the optical absorption itself depends critically upon grain size. Larger grain sizes, up to 50 nm, lead to increased optical absorption, a totally unexpected and very useful discovery for devices

  11. Conceptual design of an aircraft automated coating removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.; Draper, J.V.; Pin, F.G.; Primm, A.H.; Shekhar, S.

    1996-05-01

    Paint stripping of the U.S. Air Force`s large transport aircrafts is currently a labor-intensive, manual process. Significant reductions in costs, personnel and turnaround time can be accomplished by the judicious use of automation in some process tasks. This paper presents the conceptual design of a coating removal systems for the tail surfaces of the C-5 plane. Emphasis is placed on the technology selection to optimize human-automation synergy with respect to overall costs, throughput, quality, safety, and reliability. Trade- offs between field-proven vs. research-requiring technologies, and between expected gain vs. cost and complexity, have led to a conceptual design which is semi-autonomous (relying on the human for task specification and disturbance handling) yet incorporates sensor- based automation (for sweep path generation and tracking, surface following, stripping quality control and tape/breach handling).

  12. High Lifetime Solar Cell Processing and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    In order to maximize efficiency a solar cell must: (1) absorb as much light as possible in electron-hole production, (2) transport as large a fraction as possible of the electrons to the n-type terminal and holes to the p-type terminal without their first recombining, and (3) produce as high as possible terminal voltage. Step (1) is largely fixed by the spectrum of sunlight and the fundamental absorption characteristics of silicon, although some improvements are possible through texturizing induced light trapping and back surface reflectors. Steps (2) and (3) are, however, dependent on the recombination mechanisms of the cell. The recombination, on the contrary, is strongly influenced by cell processing and design. Some of the lessons during the development of point-contact-cell are discussed. Cell dependence on recombination, surface recombination, and contact recombination are discussed. Results show the overwhelming influence of contact recombination on the operation of the cell when the other sources of recombination are reduced by careful processing.

  13. LDEF (Prelaunch), S1002 : Investigation of Critical Surface Degradation Effects on Coating and Solar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), S1002 : Investigation of Critical Surface Degradation Effects on Coating and Solar Cells Developed in Germany, Tray E03 The prelaunch photograph provides a view of the two (2) experiments located in a six (6) inch LDEF experiment tray. The A0187-02 is located in the right two thirds (2/3rd) of the tray and the EECC containing the S1002 experiment occupies the remaining section. The tan colored strips on the tray flanges are protective coatings that are removed prior to tray testing. S1002 - The Effects on Coatings and Solar Cells experiment is contained within the Experiment Exposure Control Canister (EECC) that is located in the left one third (1/3rd) of the experiment tray. The EECC hardware consists of the housing, the drawer that contains the experiment samples, the drawer opening and closing mechanism (a screw drive system) and chromic anodized aluminum thermal covers that are seen in the photograph. The hardware is fabricated from aluminum or non-magnetic steels and is assembled with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The canister will be opened in orbit after the LDEF has been deployed, the Orbiter has departed and initial outgassing of materials on the LDEF has occurred. The canister is programmed to close approximately nine (9) months after opening and prior to the scheduled LDEF retrieval. Experiment samples located in the EECC consist of Second Surface Mirrors (SSM), SSM with Interference Filters (SSM/IF), SSM/IF with a Conductive Layer (SSM/IF/LS, Optical Solar Reflectors (OSR), Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM), Coatings and Solar Cell Modules of the types flown on the GEOS and OTS satellites.

  14. Titanium dioxide antireflection coating for silicon solar cells by spray deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, W.; Tracy, E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-speed production process is described for depositing a single-layer, quarter-wavelength thick antireflection coating of titanium dioxide on metal-patterned single-crystal silicon solar cells for terrestrial applications. Controlled atomization spraying of an organotitanium solution was selected as the most cost-effective method of film deposition using commercial automated equipment. The optimal composition consists of titanium isopropoxide as the titanium source, n-butyl acetate as the diluent solvent, sec-butanol as the leveling agent, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to render the material uniformly depositable. Application of the process to the coating of circular, large-diameter solar cells with either screen-printed silver metallization or with vacuum-evaporated Ti/Pd/Ag metallization showed increases of over 40% in the electrical conversion efficiency. Optical characteristics, corrosion resistance, and several other important properties of the spray-deposited film are reported. Experimental evidence indicates a wide tolerance in the coating thickness upon the overall efficiency of the cell. Considerations pertaining to the optimization of AR coatings in general are discussed, and a comprehensive critical survey of the literature is presented.

  15. The effect of leveling coatings on the atomic oxygen durability of solar concentrator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Kim K.; Dever, Therese M.; Quinn, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Space power systems for Space Station Freedom will be exposed to the harsh environment of low earth orbit (LEO). Neutral atomic oxygen is the major constituent in LEO and has the potential of severely reducing the efficiency of solar dynamic power systems through degradation of the concentrator surfaces. Several transparent dielectric thin films have been found to provide atomic oxygen protection, but atomic oxygen undercutting at inherent defect sites is still a threat to solar dynamic power system survivability. Leveling coatings smooth microscopically rough surfaces, thus eliminating potential defect sites prone to oxidation attack on concentrator surfaces. The ability of leveling coatings to improve the atomic oxygen durability of concentrator surfaces was investigated. The application of a EPO-TEK 377 epoxy leveling coating on a graphite epoxy substrate resulted in an increase in solar specular reflectance, a decrease in the atomic oxygen defect density by an order of magnitude and a corresponding order of magnitude decrease in the percent loss of specular reflectance during atomic oxygen plasma ashing.

  16. Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A summary is given of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating systems. The analysis was made without site specific data other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items include system candidates, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test.

  17. Preliminary space station solar array structural design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, J. T.; Bush, H. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Structurally efficient ways to support the large solar arrays (3,716 square meters which are currently considered for space station use) are examined. An erectable truss concept is presented for the on orbit construction of winged solar arrays. The means for future growth, maintenance, and repair are integrally designed into this concept. Results from parametric studies, which highlight the physical and structural differences between various configuration options are presented. Consideration is given to both solar blanket and hard panel arrays.

  18. Design and optimization of dielectric optical coatings for GaN based high bright LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Yan; Yang, Hua; Yi, Xiaoyan; Wang, Liangchen; Wang, Guohong; Yang, Fuhua; Li, Jinmin

    2008-03-01

    Different types of dielectric optical coatings for GaN based high bright LEDs were designed and discussed. The optical coatings included the anti-reflection (AR) coating, high-reflection (HR) coating, and omni-directional high reflection coating. Main materials for the optical coatings were dielectric materials such as SiO II, Ta IIO 5 and Al IIO 3, which were different from the metallic reflector such as Ag usually used now. For the application of anti-reflection coating in GaN LEDs, it was introduced into the design of transparent electrodes with transparent materials such as ITO to form combined transparent electrodes. With the design of P, N transparent electrodes using the AR coating and ITO for GaN LEDs, the extraction efficiency was improved by about 15% experimentally. For the dielectric high-reflection coating, it has higher reflectivity and lower absorption than the metal reflector, and it was supposed to improve the extraction efficiency obviously. While the dielectric omni-directional reflection coating using dielectric materials was also designed and discussed in this article, since which was anticipated to improve the extraction efficiency furthermore. Using SiO II and Ta IIO 5, the average reflectivity of a design of all dielectric omni-directional high reflection coating on the sapphire surface was over 94%.

  19. Coating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A black chrome coating, originally developed for spacecraft solar cells, led to the development of an efficient flat plate solar collector. The coating, called Chromonyx, helps the collector absorb more heat. Olympic Solar Corporation was formed to electroplate the collector. The coating technique allows 95% of the sun's energy to be utilized. The process is widely used.

  20. Feasibility Study & Design of Brightfield Solar Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Susan

    2014-09-28

    This Congressionally Directed Project originally provided funds to the Township of Lower Providence, Pennsylvania for the purpose of investigating the potential for a renewable energy generation facility to make beneficial reuse of a closed landfill located within the Township, known as Moyer Landfill. Early in the course of the project, it was determined through collaboration and discussion with DOE to alter the scope of the project to include a feasibility assessment of a landfill solar project, as well as to construct a demonstration solar project at the municipal facilities to provide an educational and community outreach opportunity for the Township to offer regarding solar photovoltaic (“PV”) electricity generation.

  1. Development of nanostructured luminophor coating for broadening of solar cell absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryuchyn, A. A.; Beliak, Ie. V.

    2014-10-01

    One of the major concerns in the area of high efficient solar cell production is a substantial shift between the solar radiation spectra and optical absorption spectra of a photoelectric transducer that significantly reduces solar cell efficiency. We propose a concept which based on coating of conventional and cheap photoelectric transducer with a luminophor that transmits longer wavelengths of the sunlight, absorbs shorter wavelengths and converts them into longer ones by the value of the Stocks shift. While photoluminescent light is not collimated and thus losses may reach up to 50% of converted light, it was also proposed to make micropattern formation at photoelectric transducer surface. We propose synthesizing of specific materials based on composite pyrazoline dyes with addition of polymethylmethacrylate, polystyrene and UV-laquers. It was revealed that synthesized luminophor coating are characterized by sufficiently enough Stocks shift (200-400 nm), high quantum yield (near 80%) and stability under circumstances of long term radiation. Further research demonstrated potential of the significant characteristic's improvement by introducing of organic dye molecules in the white zeolite matrix with additional laser annealing at low intensity. Experimental results have shown that photoluminescent spectrum of pyrazoline dye didn't change shape, bandwidth and amplitude for last 10 years. It was decided that obtained stability is being caused by porous matrix of white zeolite. Simulation of the solar cell functioning helped to understand physics of the process and simplify problem of microrelief and luminophor optimal parameters search.

  2. Rapid double-dye-layer coating for dye-sensitized solar cells using a new method.

    PubMed

    Jung, Cho-long; Han, Chi-Hwan; Moon, Doo Kyung; Jun, Yongseok

    2014-10-01

    Intensive research with the specific aim of developing inexpensive renewable energy sources is currently being undertaken. In dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) production, the most time-consuming process is coating the dye on working electrodes: absorption of ruthenium-based dyes [e.g., N719=bis(trtrabutylammonium)-cis-di(thiocyanato)-N,N'-bis(4-carboxylato-4'-carboxylic acid-2,2'-bipyridine) ruthenium(II)] on a photoanode takes a long time. We report a simple dye-coating method using a mixed solvent of ethylene glycol (EG) and glycerol (Gly). According to our experiments, dye-coating time can be reduced to 5 min from several hours. Maximum performance was obtained with an EG/Gly ratio of 1:1. This mixture of solvents gave a performance of 9.1%. Furthermore, the viscous solvent system could control coating depth; positioning dye coatings to a specific depth was rapid and facile. A cell containing two different dyes (N719+black dye) had an efficiency of 9.4%. PMID:25154611

  3. Antireflection coatings based on fluoride formulations for organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanov, S. Kh.; Berger, P.; Dyskin, V. G.; Dzhanklych, M. U.; Bugakov, A. G.; Dudko, O. A.; Kulagina, N. A.; Kim, M.

    2016-04-01

    An alloy of a mixture of fluorides MgF2 and AlF3 with CaF2 has been obtained in a 3-kW solar furnace. It was supposed that a minor CaF2 additive compensates for the tensile stresses appearing in thin MgF2 and AlF3 films, with their mechanical properties being thereby improved. The results of X-ray phase analysis demonstrated that both components of the mixture are present in the alloy, while the complex oxide CaAl4O7, the formation of which is attributed to the melting in air, is only identified in AlF3: CaF2 = 95: 5 (wt %). The increase in the transmittance of glass and polyethylene terephthalate upon deposition onto their surface of a thin film of the material synthesized in the study is due to the optical properties of AlF3 and MgF2.

  4. Solar sustained plasma/absorber conceptual design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, R. J.; Krascella, N. L.; Kendall, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A space power system concept was evaluated which uses concentrated solar energy to heat a working fluid to temperatures as high as 4000 K. The high temperature working fluid could be used for efficient electric power production in advanced thermal or magnetohydrodynamic conversion cycles. Energy absorber configurations utilizing particles or cesium vapor absorber material were investigaed. Results of detailed radiant heat transfer calculations indicated approximately 86 percent of the incident solar energy could be absorbed within a 12-cm-dia flowing stream of gas borne carbon particles. Calculated total energy absorption in the cesium vapor seeded absorber configuration ranged from 34 percent to 64 percent of the incident solar energy. Solar flux concentration ratios of between approximately 3000 and 10,000 will be required to sustain absorber temperatures in the range from 3000 K to 4000 K.

  5. Graphene oxide as a p-dopant and an anti-reflection coating layer, in graphene/silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, S.; Kuru, C.; Choi, D.; Kargar, A.; Jin, S.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2016-03-01

    It is shown that coating graphene-silicon (Gr/Si) Schottky junction based solar cells with graphene oxide (GO) improves the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the cells, while demonstrating unprecedented device stability. The PCE has been shown to be increased to 10.6% (at incident radiation of 100 mW cm-2) for the Gr/Si solar cell with an optimal GO coating thickness compared to 3.6% for a bare/uncoated Gr/Si solar cell. The p-doping of graphene by the GO, which also serves as an antireflection coating (ARC) has been shown to be a main contributing factor to the enhanced PCE. A simple spin coating process has been used to apply GO with thickness commensurate with an anti-refection coating (ARC) and indicates the suitability of the developed methodology for large-scale solar cell assembly.It is shown that coating graphene-silicon (Gr/Si) Schottky junction based solar cells with graphene oxide (GO) improves the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the cells, while demonstrating unprecedented device stability. The PCE has been shown to be increased to 10.6% (at incident radiation of 100 mW cm-2) for the Gr/Si solar cell with an optimal GO coating thickness compared to 3.6% for a bare/uncoated Gr/Si solar cell. The p-doping of graphene by the GO, which also serves as an antireflection coating (ARC) has been shown to be a main contributing factor to the enhanced PCE. A simple spin coating process has been used to apply GO with thickness commensurate with an anti-refection coating (ARC) and indicates the suitability of the developed methodology for large-scale solar cell assembly. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (i) Experimental methods, (ii) optical images of devices with and without graphene oxide (GO), (iii) comparison of the power conversion efficiency (PCE) due to the GO coating and nitric acid doping, (iv) specular and diffuse reflectance measurements, (v) stability data of pristine graphene/silicon (Gr/Si) solar cells. See DOI: 10.1039/c5

  6. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of marketable solar heating and cooling systems for single family and commercial applications is described. The delivery, installation, and monitoring of the prototype systems are discussed. Seven operational test sites are discussed in terms of system performance. Problems encountered with equipment and installation were usually due to lack of skills required for solar system installation.

  7. Design data brochure for a pyramidal optics solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This Design Data Brochure provides information on a Pyramidal Optics Solar System for solar heating and domestic hot water. The system is made up of the collecting, storage, and distribution subsystems. Contained in the brochure are such items as system description, available accessories, installation arrangements, physical data, piping and wiring diagrams, and guide specifications.

  8. Seasonal adjustment of solar heat gain independent of coat coloration in a desert mammal.

    PubMed

    Walsberg, G E; Weaver, T; Wolf, B O

    1997-01-01

    Despite the apparent importance of solar radiation as a source of heat for free-living animals, there exists no substantial body of empirical data describing physiological responses to solar radiation under the range of convective conditions likely to occur in nature. We therefore quantified effects of simulated solar radiation and wind on metabolic heat production in the rock squirrel, Spermophilus variegatus. This diurnal mammal inhabits the Sonoran Desert and seasonally replaces its pelage in a fashion in which it retains constant external appearance but incorporates optical and structural changes that are thought to significantly alter heat-transfer properties of the coat. At a given wind speed, the presence of 950 W m-2 of simulated solar radiation reduces metabolic heat production by 15% (at a wind speed of 4 m s-1) to 37% (at a wind speed of 0.25 m s-1). Independent of effects of irradiance, metabolic heat production significantly increases with wind speed such that as wind speed is increased from 0.25 m s-1 to 4.0 m s-1, metabolic heat production is elevated by 66% (sunlight absent) or 88% (sunlight present). Previous analyses demonstrated that when exposed to identical radiative and convective environments rock squirrels with summer pelages accrue solar heat loads 33%-71% lower than those experienced by animals with winter coats. This reduction of solar heat gain during the extremely hot Sonoran Desert summer apparently constitutes a previously unappreciated mode of thermal adaptation by seasonal adjustment of radiative heat gain without changes in the animal's appearance. PMID:9231387

  9. Potential of optical design in tandem micromorph silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krc, J.; Campa, A.; Smole, F.; Topic, M.

    2006-04-01

    The potential of three advanced optical designs in tandem micromorph silicon solar cells are analysed by means of optical simulations: enhanced light scattering, intermediate reflector (interlayer) and antireflective coating (ARC) on glass. The effects on quantum efficiency, QE, and short circuit current density, J SC, of the top and bottom cell are investigated. In case of enhanced light scattering, the role of haze parameter and angular distribution function of scattered light is analysed separately. High haze parameter improves light trapping in top and bottom cell. However, the improvement in QE and J SC of the bottom cell is limited at higher haze parameters due to increased absorption in top cell and increased optical losses in realistic textured ZnO/Ag back contact. Broad ADF plays an important role for improving the performances of both, top and bottom cell. The role of refractive index of an interlayer between top and bottom cell is analysed. Significant increases in QE and J SC of the top cell are revealed for small refractive indexes of the interlayer (n < 2.0). At the same time noticeable decrease in the performance of the bottom cell is observed. Optimisation of thickness and refractive index of a single-layer ARC on glass is carried out in order to obtain maximal J SC either in top or in bottom cell. Moderate increases in J SC and QE are obtained for optimised ARC parameters. Among the three optical designs, the greatest potential, considering the improvements in both cells, is revealed for enhanced light scattering.

  10. Morphology-insensitive Performance Facilitates Transition from Spin-Coating to Roll-to-Roll Coating For High-Performance, Solution-Processed Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delongchamp, Dean

    Solution processing via roll-to-roll (R2R) coating promises a low cost, low thermal-budget, sustainable revolution for the production of solar cells. Yet virtually all high efficiency solution processed research cells have been demonstrated by spin-coating, a low-volume deposition process. We present detailed device and morphology studies of an organic photovoltaic (OPV) system deposited by a high volume manufacturing technique, blade-coating, that achieves greater than 9.5 % power conversion efficiency (PCE). The average crystal domain orientation and characteristic phase separation length distribution are markedly different when deposited by blade-coating rather than spin-coating,. This result allows us to determine which aspects of morphology are not relevant to the PCE of this system. Whether the crystallites are ``face on'' or ``edge on'' does not appear to impact the PCE of system, nor does the length scale or ``hierarchical'' nature of the phase length scale. Persistent morphological qualities that may be associated with high PCE in this system are relatively pure phases and relatively strong diffraction. We posit that OPV systems in which the PCE is less sensitive to morphology may also be less sensitive to film thickness, enabling some to maintain high PCE in active layers thicker than greater than ~200 nm. We confirm that blade-coating is a suitable prototyping technique for R2R coating by demonstrating nominally identical morphologies for both piece blade-coating and continuous-web, slot-die coating.

  11. Eco-friendly spray coating of organic solar cells through water-based nanoparticles ink (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryckers, Jeroen; D'Olieslaeger, Lien; Manca, Jean; Ethirajan, Anitha; Deferme, Wim

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasonic spray coating is currently proven to be a reliable, flexible and cost efficient fabrication method for printed electronics [1-2]. Ultrasonic nozzles are by design especially well-suited to deposit nano-suspension dispersions. Due to the ultrasonic vibration of the nozzle, droplets having a median diameter of 20 μm are created in a homogeneous droplet cloud and directed towards the substrate. When one prepares an ink having the right wetting properties, thin and homogeneous layers, fully covering the surface, can be achieved. Together with conjugated polymer nanoparticles (NPs), emerging as a new class of nanomaterials, [3] it opens possibilities towards eco-friendly roll-to-roll processing of state-of-the-art organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. A ultrasonic spray coater was used to print the conjugated polymer NP layers under different conditions. A first optimization of the spray coater settings (flow rate, spray speed and temperature) and the ink formulation (water and co-solvent mixture and NP content) was performed for polystyrene particles dissolved in a water-ethanol mixture. As a next step, the low bandgap donor polymer poly[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophene-diyl] (PCDTBT) [4] and the fullerene acceptor phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM[70]) were combined in a water-based blend NP dispersion which was prepared using the mini-emulsion technique. [5,6] Optical Microscopy, profilometry and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) are performed to study the roughness, surface structure, thickness and coverage of the spray coated layers. Finally the printed NP layers are integrated in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells and compared to spin coated reference devices.

  12. Preliminary design package for solar heating and hot water system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Two prototype solar heating and hot water systems for use in single-family dwellings or commercial buildings were designed. Subsystems included are: collector, storage, transport, hot water, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished site data acquisition. The systems are designed for Yosemite, California, and Pueblo, Colorado. The necessary information to evaluate the preliminary design for these solar heating and hot water systems is presented. Included are a proposed instrumentation plan, a training program, hazard analysis, preliminary design drawings, and other information about the design of the system.

  13. Prototype residential solar-energy system-design package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Compilation includes documents and drawings for complete solar-heating system. It discussed system installed in residential building at Veterns' Administration Hospital in Togus, Maine. System can be adapted to other buildings without changing design.

  14. Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary design review on the development of a prototype solar heating system for single family dwellings is presented. The collector, storage, transport, control, and site data acquisition subsystems are described.

  15. Design package for solar domestic hot water system

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    Information used to evaluate the initial design of the Elcam, Inc., Solar Domestic Hot Water System is presented. Included are such items as the system performance specification, detailed design drawings and other information. Elcam, Inc., has developed two solar heated prototype hot water systems and two heat exchangers. The hot water systems consist of the following subsystems: collector, storage, control, transport, auxiliary energy, and government-furnished Site Data Acquisition. The two systems are installed at Tempe, Arizona, and San Diego, California.

  16. Organic grain coatings in primitive interplanetary dust particles: Implications for grain sticking in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, George J.; Wirick, Sue; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2013-10-01

    The chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs), fragments of asteroids and comets collected by NASA high-altitude research aircraft from the Earth's stratosphere, are recognized as the least altered samples of the original dust of the Solar Nebula available for laboratory examination. We performed high-resolution, ~25 nm/pixel, x-ray imaging and spectroscopy on ultramicrotome sections of CP IDPs, which are aggregates of >104 grains, and identified and characterized ~100 nm thick coatings of organic matter on the surfaces of the individual grains. We estimated the minimum tensile strength of this organic glue to be ~150 to 325 N/m2, comparable to the strength of the weakest cometary meteors, based on the observation that the individual grains of ~5 μm diameter aggregate CP IDPs are not ejected from the particle by electrostatic repulsion due to charging of these IDPs to 10 to 15 volts at 1 A.U. in space. Since organic coatings can increase the sticking coefficient over that of bare mineral grains, these organic grain coatings are likely to have been a significant aid in grain sticking in the Solar Nebula, allowing the first dust particles to aggregate over a much wider range of collision speeds than for bare mineral grains.

  17. Reflectance, Solar Absorptivity, and Thermal Emissivity of SiO(2)-Coated Aluminum.

    PubMed

    Hass, G; Ramsey, J B; Heaney, J B; Triolo, J J

    1969-02-01

    The reflectance, solar absorptivity (alpha), and the total normal and hemispherical emissivity (epsilonNu and epsilon) of evaporated aluminum coated with SiO(2) films of various thicknesses were determined. High vacuum evaporation with an electron gun was used for preparing uv transparent undecomposed films of SiO(2) up to thicknesses of more than 3.5 micro Because of their hardness, chemical stability, and excellent adherence, evaporated SiO(2) films were found to be very suitable as protective layers for aluminum front surface mirrors, especially if high reflectance in the uv is required. alpha of SiO(2)-coated Al was determined to be about 11 % and to be essentially independent of the SiO(2) thickness, whereas epsilonNu and epsilon increased with increasing oxide thickness, and reached values of 0.62 and 0.55, respectively, for a SiO(2) thickness of 3.75 micro. Films of this type are, therefore, suitable as surface layers for controlling the temperature of satellites in orbit. Ultraviolet irradiation in vacuum at one and five times the equivalent solar energy decreased the uv and visible reflectance of SiO(2)-coated Al. The effect of this reflectance decrease on alpha/epsilon and on the temperature of an orbiting satellite is discussed. PMID:20072214

  18. Increasing Community Access to Solar: Designing and Developing a Shared Solar Photovoltaic System (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-06-01

    This document introduces the Energy Department's new Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project Development. The guide is designed to help those who want to develop community shared solar projects - from community organizers and advocates to utility managers and government officials - navigate the process of developing shared systems, from early planning to implementation.

  19. Passive-solar design manual for the United States Navy

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, W.O.; Biehl, F.A.; Kosiewicz, C.R.; Miles, C.R. Durlak, E.R.

    1982-01-01

    A passive solar design manual for single-family detached residences and dormitory-type buildings is being developed. The design procedure employed in the manual is a simplification of the original monthly solar load ratio (SLR) method. The new SLR correlations involve a single constant for each system. The correlation constant appears as a scale factor permitting the use of a universal performance curve for all passive systems. Furthermore, by providing location-dependent correlations between the annual solar heating fraction (SHF)* and the minimum monthly SHF, we have eliminated the need to perform an SLR calculation for each month of the heating season.

  20. An economic model for passive solar designs in commercial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, J. W.

    1980-06-01

    The model incorporates a life cycle costing approach that focuses on the costs of purchase, installation, maintenance, repairs, replacement, and energy. It includes a detailed analysis of tax laws affecting the use of solar energy in commercial buildings. Possible methods of treating difficult to measure benefits and costs, such as effects of the passive solar design on resale value of the building and on lighting costs, rental income from the building, and the use of commercial space, are presented. The model is illustrated in two case examples of prototypical solar design for low rise commercial buildings in an urban setting.

  1. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  2. Plasmonic enhancement of thin-film solar cells using gold-black coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Fredricksen, Christopher J.; Panjwani, D. R.; Arnold, J. P.; Figueiredo, P. N.; Rezaie, F. K.; Colwell, J. E.; Baillie, K.; Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.; Peale, Robert E.

    2011-08-11

    Coatings of conducting gold-black nano-structures on commercial thin-film amorphous-silicon solar cells enhance the short-circuit current by 20% over a broad spectrum from 400 to 800 nm wavelength. The efficiency, i.e. the ratio of the maximum electrical output power to the incident solar power, is found to increase 7% for initial un-optimized coatings. Metal blacks are produced cheaply and quickly in a low-vacuum process requiring no lithographic patterning. The inherently broad particle-size distribution is responsible for the broad spectrum enhancement in comparison to what has been reported for mono-disperse lithographically deposited or self-assembled metal nano-particles. Photoemission electron microscopy reveals the spatial-spectral distribution of hot-spots for plasmon resonances, where scattering of normally-incident solar flux into the plane increases the effective optical path in the thin film to enhance light harvesting. Efficiency enhancement is correlated with percent coverage and particle size distribution, which are determined from histogram and wavelet analysis of scanning electron microscopy images. Electrodynamic simulations reveal how the gold-black particles scatter the radiation and locally enhance the field strength.

  3. The extreme ultraviolet imager of solar orbiter: optical design and alignment scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halain, J.-P.; Mazzoli, A.; Meining, S.; Rochus, P.; Renotte, E.; Auchère, F.; Schühle, U.; Delmotte, F.; Dumesnil, C.; Philippon, A.; Mercier, R.; Hermans, A.

    2015-09-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) is one of the remote sensing instruments on-board the Solar Orbiter mission. It will provide dual-band full-Sun images of the solar corona in the extreme ultraviolet (17.1 nm and 30.4 nm), and high resolution images of the solar disk in both extreme ultraviolet (17.1 nm) and vacuum ultraviolet (Lyman-alpha 121.6 nm). The EUI optical design takes heritage of previous similar instruments. The Full Sun Imager (FSI) channel is a single mirror Herschel design telescope. The two High Resolution Imager (HRI) channels are based on a two-mirror optical refractive scheme, one Ritchey-Chretien and one Gregory optical design for the EUV and the Lyman-alpha channels, respectively. The spectral performances of the EUI channels are obtained thanks to dedicated mirror multilayer coatings and specific band-pass filters. The FSI channel uses a dual-band mirror coating combined with aluminum and zirconium band-pass filters. The HRI channels use optimized band-pass selection mirror coatings combined with aluminum band-pass filters and narrow band interference filters for Lyman-alpha. The optical performances result from accurate mirror manufacturing tolerances and from a two-step alignment procedure. The primary mirrors are first co-aligned. The HRI secondary mirrors and focal planes positions are then adjusted to have an optimum interferometric cavity in each of these two channels. For that purpose a dedicated alignment test setup has been prepared, composed of a dummy focal plane assembly representing the detector position. Before the alignment on the flight optical bench, the overall alignment method has been validated on the Structural and Thermal Model, on a dummy bench using flight spare optics, then on the Qualification Model to be used for the system verification test and qualifications.

  4. Performance and stability improvements for dye-sensitized solar cells in the presence of luminescent coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, Federico; Griffini, Gianmarco; Gerosa, Matteo; Turri, Stefano; Bongiovanni, Roberta

    2015-06-01

    Here we present how the sunlight radiation incident on a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) can be shifted of a few tens of nanometers by means of an economical, easy to prepare and multifunctional photocurable fluoropolymeric light-shifting (LS) coating, to achieve both improved efficiency and device stability. By the introduction of a very small amount of a luminescent agent in the LS coating, the down-shifting of near-UV photons to higher wavelengths easily harvestable by the organic dye of a DSSC is successfully demonstrated. This optical effect not only results in an over 60% improvement of the power conversion efficiency of DSSC devices, but the UV light filtering action promoted by the luminescent agent also provides protection to the photosensitive DSSC components. This aspect, combined with a potential thermal shielding effect and the easy-cleaning behavior imparted to the coating by its fluorinated nature, leads to excellent device stability as evidenced from an aging test performed outdoors under real operating conditions for more than 2000 h. Our study demonstrates that the use of light-cured multifunctional coatings with light management characteristics at the nanometer scale represents a new promising strategy to simultaneously increase the performance and durability of DSSC devices.

  5. A flexible polypyrrole-coated fabric counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Li, Meixia; Wu, Lei; Sun, Yongyuan; Zhu, Ligen; Gu, Shaojin; Liu, Li; Bai, Zikui; Fang, Dong; Xu, Weilin

    2014-07-01

    The current dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) technology is mostly based on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrate. The main problem with the FTO glass substrate is its rigidity, heavyweight and high cost. DSSCs with a fabric as substrate not only offer the advantages of flexibility, stretchability and light mass, but also provide the opportunities for easy implantation to wearable electronics. Herein, a novel fabric counter electrode (CE) for DSSCs has been reported employing a daily-used cotton fabric as substrate and polypyrrole (PPy) as catalytic material. Nickel (Ni) is deposited on the cotton fabric as metal contact by a simple electroless plating method to replace the expensive FTO. PPy is synthesized by in situ polymerization of pyrrole monomer on the Ni-coated fabric. The fabric CE shows sufficient catalytic activity towards the reduction of I3-. The DSSC fabricated using the fabric CE exhibits power conversion efficiency of ∼3.30% under AM 1.5.

  6. Fabrication of carbon-coated silicon nanowires and their application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhee; Lim, Jeongmin; Kim, Minsoo; Lee, Hae-Seok; Jun, Yongseok; Kim, Donghwan

    2014-11-12

    We report the fabrication of silicon/carbon core/shell nanowire arrays using a two-step process, involving electroless metal deposition and chemical vapor deposition. In general, foreign shell materials that sheath core materials change the inherent characteristics of the core materials. The carbon coating functionalized the silicon nanowire arrays, which subsequently showed electrocatalytic activities for the reduction of iodide/triiodide. This was verified by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We employed the carbon-coated silicon nanowire arrays in dye-sensitized solar cells as counter electrodes. We optimized the carbon shells to maximize the photovoltaic performance of the resulting devices, and subsequently, a peak power conversion efficiency of 9.22% was achieved. PMID:25319204

  7. NASA advanced aeronautics design solar powered remotely piloted vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elario, David S.; Guillmette, Neal H.; Lind, Gregory S.; Webster, Jonathan D.; Ferreira, Michael J.; Konstantakis, George C.; Marshall, David L.; Windt, Cari L.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental problems such as the depletion of the ozone layer and air pollution demand a change in traditional means of propulsion that is sensitive to the ecology. Solar powered propulsion is a favorable alternative that is both ecologically harmless as well as cost effective. Integration of solar energy into designs ranging from futuristic vehicles to heating is beneficial to society. The design and construction of a Multi-Purpose Remotely Piloted Vehicle (MPRPV) seeks to verify the feasibility of utilizing solar propulsion as a primary fuel source. This task has been a year long effort by a group of ten students, divided into five teams, each dealing with different aspects of the design. The aircraft was designed to take-off, climb to the design altitude, fly in a sustained figure-eight flight path, and cruise for approximately one hour. This mission requires flight at Reynolds numbers between 150,000 and 200,000 and demands special considerations in the aerodynamic design in order to achieve flight in this regime. Optimal performance requires a light weight configuration with both structural integrity and maximum power availability. The structure design and choice of solar cells for the propulsion was governed by the weight, efficiency, and cost considerations. The final design is a MPRPV weighting 35 N which cruises 7 m/s at the design altitude of 50 m. The configuration includes a wing composed of balsa and foam NACA 6409 airfoil sections and carbon fiber spars, a tail of similar construction, and a truss structure fuselage. The propulsion system consists of 98 10 percent efficient solar cells donated by Mobil Solar, a NiCad battery for energy storage, and a folding propeller regulated by a lightweight and efficient control system. The airfoils and propeller chosen for the design were research and tested during the design process.

  8. Coupling flexible solar cell with parabolic trough solar-concentrator-prototype design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Alexander; Bergquist, Jonathon

    2007-10-01

    Solar cells are still too expensive (5-20/watt) to compete with traditional fossil fuel power generating methods (˜1/watt). Parabolic trough solar concentrator has the advantage of modest concentration ratio (10-100) which is well suited for coupling with solar cell. Thus using small area solar cell placed in the focal line of parabolic trough may be economically viable alternative to flat solar panels. We experiment with flexible solar cell (backed by water cooling pipe) placed in the focus of parabolic trough reflector. Another advantage of parabolic trough concentrator is very relaxed tracking requirement. For example, east-west oriented concentrator (aligned with the ecliptic plane) does not even need any tracking during core 4-6 hours around noon (when maximum illumination is available). The design and the performance of the prototype, as well as possible economical benefits of full scale projects are discussed in the presentation.

  9. Implications of solar energy alternatives for community design

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, A.; Steinitz, C.

    1980-06-01

    A graduate-level studio at the Harvard School of Design explored how a policy of solar-based energy independence will influence the design of a new community of approximately 4500 housing units and other uses. Three large sites outside Tucson (a cooling problem), Atlanta (a humidity problem), and Boston (a heating problem) were selected. Each is typical of its region. A single program was assumed and designed for. Each site had two teams, one following a compact approach and one following a more dispersed approach. Each was free to choose the most appropriate mix of (solar) technology and scale, and was free to integrate energy and community in the design as it saw fit. These choice and integration issues are key areas where our experience may be of interest to those involved in community design and solar energy.

  10. Gas Turbine/Solar Parabolic Trough Hybrid Designs: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C. S.; Ma, Z.; Erbes, M.

    2011-03-01

    A strength of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) plants is the ability to provide reliable power by incorporating either thermal energy storage or backup heat from fossil fuels. Yet these benefits have not been fully realized because thermal energy storage remains expensive at trough operating temperatures and gas usage in CSP plants is less efficient than in dedicated combined cycle plants. For example, while a modern combined cycle plant can achieve an overall efficiency in excess of 55%; auxiliary heaters in a parabolic trough plant convert gas to electricity at below 40%. Thus, one can argue the more effective use of natural gas is in a combined cycle plant, not as backup to a CSP plant. Integrated solar combined cycle (ISCC) systems avoid this pitfall by injecting solar steam into the fossil power cycle; however, these designs are limited to about 10% total solar enhancement. Without reliable, cost-effective energy storage or backup power, renewable sources will struggle to achieve a high penetration in the electric grid. This paper describes a novel gas turbine / parabolic trough hybrid design that combines solar contribution of 57% and higher with gas heat rates that rival that for combined cycle natural gas plants. The design integrates proven solar and fossil technologies, thereby offering high reliability and low financial risk while promoting deployment of solar thermal power.