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Sample records for solar desiccant cooling

  1. Solar Assisted Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Kodama, Akio

    Desiccant cooling processes can supply dry air by using lower temperature heat energy such as waste heat or solar heat. Especially, solar heat is useful heat source for the desiccant cooling since solar heat in summer tends to be surplus. This paper discusses the hourly cooling performance of the solar assisted desiccant cooling system, which consists of a desiccant wheel, a thermal wheel, two evaporative coolers, a cooling coil and flat plate solar water heater, assuming that the cooling system is applied to an office room of 250m3 in volume. The estimation indicated that the surface area needed to satisfy the dehumidifying performance in a sunny day was at least 30m2. Furthermore, surface area of 40m2 or larger provided a surplus dehumidifying performance causing a sensible cooling effect in evaporative cooler. Surface area of 30 m2 did not satisfy the dehumidifying performance required for high humidity condition, over 18.0g/kg(DA). The cooling demand of the cooling coil increased in such humidity condition due to the decrease in the sensible cooling effect of evaporative cooler. Auxiliary heater was required in a cloudy day since the temperature of water supplied from solar water heater of 40m2 did not reach sufficient level.

  2. Solar Assisted Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Kodama, Akio

    Solar assisted desiccant coo1ing process is an effective means to reduce a latent heat load of the ventilation air. This paper describes the influences of ambient humidity and sensible heat factor (SHF) of the indoor room on the performance and scale of the desiccant cooling system. Two process configurations termed “ambient air mode” and “mixed air mode” were assumed. At “ambient air mode”, only ambient air is dehumidified and cooled in the desiccant process. The dehumidified air stream is mixed with return air and further cooled in the cooling coil. At “mixed air mode”, ambient air is mixed with return air and this mixed air stream is dehumidified in the desiccant process and cooled at the cooling coil. At “ambient air mode”, ambient air humidity had a significant impact on required amount of dehumidification since humid ambient air entered the desiccant process directly. In this case, higher temperature level and quantity, which is impossible to be supplied from commonly commercialized flat panel solar collectors, was required. At “mixed air mode”, the influence of increase of ambient humidity was not significant since humidity of the air entering the desiccant process became low by mixing with return air. At this mode, it was expected that 70°C of the circulating water and 37m2 of surface area of solar collector could produce a sufficient dehumidifying performance even in high latent heat condition. The contributing ratio of the desiccant wheel was also estimated. The ratio increased in higher latent heat condition due to increase of required amount of dehumidification. The contributing ratio of the thermal wheel became lower due to increase of saturated air temperature in the evaporative cooler.

  3. Desiccant cooling using unglazed transpired solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaran, A. A.; Wipke, K.

    1992-05-01

    The use of unglazed solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are lower in cost than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors was obtained. We found that the thermal performance of the unglazed system was lower than the thermal performance of the glazed system because the unglazed system could not take advantage of the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. For a 3-ton cooling system, although the area required for the unglazed collector was 69 percent more than that required for the glazed collector, the cost of the unglazed collector array was 44 percent less than the cost of the glazed collector array. The simple payback period of the unglazed system was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when compared to an equivalent gas-fired system. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors makes economic sense, some practical considerations may limit their use in desiccant regeneration.

  4. Advanced solar/gas desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huskey, B.; Sharp, J.; Venero, A.; Yen, M.

    1982-02-01

    A desiccant cooling system with significantly higher thermal efficiency than current state of the art desiccant systems is studied. The findings and data are based on extensive computer modeling and actual operating test results of an experimental breadboard unit employing an approach developed for the separation of moisture from an airstream using solid desiccants (silica gel). The results confirmed the theoretical concept of efficiency improvement over desiccant concepts and validated the computer model used for sizing and simulating the desiccant process. The results also identified specific components and areas of the system needing improvements such as air seals, wheel drive mechanisms, air distribution and materials.

  5. Experimental investigation of a solar desiccant cooling installation

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdoukan, P.; Wurtz, E.; Joubert, P.

    2009-11-15

    Desiccant cooling is a technique based on evaporative cooling and air dehumidification using desiccant regenerated by thermal energy. It is particularly interesting when it is driven by waste or solar heat making this technique environmentally friendly. In this paper, an experimental investigation is carried on a desiccant air handling unit powered by vacuum-tube solar collectors. First, the components are studied under various operating conditions. Then overall performance of the installation is evaluated over a day for a moderately humid climate with regeneration solely by solar energy. In these conditions the overall efficiency of the solar installation is 0.55 while the thermodynamic coefficient of performance is 0.45 and the performance indicator based on the electrical consumption is 4.5. Finally, the impact of outside and regeneration conditions on the performance indicators is studied. (author)

  6. Analysis of advanced solar hybrid desiccant cooling systems for buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Schlepp, D.; Schultz, K.

    1984-10-01

    This report describes an assessment of the energy savings possible from developing hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression air conditioning systems. Recent advances in dehumidifier design for solar desiccant cooling systems have resulted in a dehumidifier with a low pressure drop and high efficiency in heat and mass transfer. A recent study on hybrid desiccant/vapor compression systems showed a 30%-80% savings in resource energy when compared with the best conventional systems with vapor compression. A system consisting of a dehumidifier with vapor compression subsystems in series was found to be the simplest and best overall performer.

  7. Solar space heating and cooling by selective use of the components of a desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbud, Ihsan Aladdin

    The economic advantages of by-passing various components of a desiccant cooling system under conditions not requiring their use are estimated by evaluating the annual costs of heating and cooling a commercial building in three representative U.S. cities. Life-cycle costs of systems employing solar heat for space heating and desiccant regeneration are compared with those using electric heat. The costs of purchasing and operating heating and desiccant cooling systems, with and without solar heat supply, are compared with those employing conventional heating and vapor compression cooling. The conditions under which commercial buildings can be cooled with desiccant systems at costs competitive with conventional systems are identified. A commercially available vapor compression air conditioner is used as a standard of comparison for energy consumption and room comfort. Heating and cooling requirements of the building are determined by use of the BLAST computer model in a simulation of long term system operation. Performance of the desiccant cooling system and life cycle savings obtained by its use are determined by simulation employing the TRNSYS computer model. TRNSYS compatible subroutines are developed to simulate operation of the desiccant equipment, the building, and the controllers that operate and monitor the system components. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form. This study shows that in the widely different climates represented in Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, by-passing various components in the desiccant cooling system when they are not needed is economically advantageous. Operation cost of the complete system decreased by 47.3% in Los Angeles, by 30.9% in New York City, and by 23.9% in Miami by not operating the desiccant wheel and other elements. The ventilation desiccant cooling system has major economic advantage over conventional systems under conditions of moderate humidity, as in Los Angeles and New York City. In Miami, however

  8. Study of parameters affecting the performance of solar desiccant cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaran, A. A.; Hoo, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a solar desiccant cooling system depends on the performance of its components, particularly the desiccant dehumidifier and solar collectors. The desiccant dehumidifier performance is affected by the properties of the desiccant, particularly the shape of the isotherm and the regeneration temperature. The performance of a solar collector, as one would expect, depends on its operating temperature, which is very close to the desiccant regeneration temperature. The purpose of this study was to identify the desiccant isotherm shape (characterized by separation factor) that would result in the optimum performance - based on thermal coefficient of performance and cooling capacity - of a desiccant cooling cycle operating in ventilation mode. Different regeneration temperatures ranging from 65 to 160 C were investigated to identify the corresponding optimum isotherm shape at each. Thermal COP dictates the required area of the solar collectors, and the cooling capacity is an indication of the size and cost of the cooling equipment. Staged and no-staged regeneration methods were studied.

  9. High performance solar desiccant cooling system: Performance evaluation and research recommendations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlepp, D. R.; Schultz, K. J.

    1984-09-01

    The current status of solar desiccant cooling was assessed and recommendations were made for continued research to develop high performance systems competitive with conventional cooling systems. Solid desiccant, liquid desiccant, and hybrid systems combining desiccant dehumidifiers with vapor compressor units are considered. Currently, all desiccant systems fall somewhat short of being competitive with conventional systems. Hybrid systems appear to have the greatest potential in the short term. Solid systems are close to meeting performance goals. Development of high performance solid desiccant dehumidifiers based on parallel passage designs should be pursued. Liquid system collector/generators and efficient absorbers should receive attention. Model development is also indicated. Continued development by hybrid systems is directly tied to the above work.

  10. A low-cost-solar liquid desiccant system for residential cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Joel D., III

    The use of liquid desiccants for dehumidification of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) process air is becoming a more promising concept as the drive for energy conservation continues to grow. Recently, liquid desiccant systems have been implemented on the commercial level in conjunction with evaporative coolers and have recorded energy savings upwards of 50%. The aim of this research is to test the potential liquid desiccant systems have on the residential level when paired with a conventional vapor compression cycle and to construct a system that would overcome some of its barriers to the residential market. A complete low-cost-solar liquid desiccant system was designed, constructed, and tested in the Off-Grid Zero Emissions Building (OGZEB) at the Florida State University. Key design characteristics include turbulent process air flow through the conditioner and airside heating in the regenerator. The system was tested in the two following ways: (1) for the energy savings while maintaining a constant temperature over a twenty four hour period and (2) for the energy savings over a single cooling cycle. The liquid desiccant system achieved a maximum energy savings of 38% over a complete day and 52% over a single cooling cycle. It was projected that the system has the potential to save 1064 kWh over the course of a year. When combined with a renewable source of heat for regeneration, liquid desiccant systems become very cost effective. The levelized cost of energy for the combination of the liquid desiccant system and solar thermal collectors was calculated to be 7.06 C/kWh with a payback period of 4.4 years. This research provides evidence of the technology's potential on the residential sector and suggests ways for it to become competitive in the market.

  11. A Field-Test of Solar Assisted Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkura, Masashi; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu

    A field-test of solar assisted desiccant evaporative cooling process has been carried out, which is a quite attractive cooling / dehumidification process considering various environmental problems caused by conventional electricity driven air conditioners. The process performance has been examined by means of temperature drop between outside air and supply air and COPs (COP value based on solar irradiation). This cooling performance was strongly influenced by solar irradiation and ambient air condition. Stable irradiation produced a higher regeneration temperature resulting higher dehumidifying performance. At one day with as table solar irradiation, the cooling process could produce cool supply air of 18.7°C against the ambient air of 30.1°C and averaged COP, was 0.41. On the other hand, unstable irradiation due to some clouds made the dehumidifying performance lower. However, decrease in the cooling performance was small compared to that obtained at the stable irradiation condition. This is due to buffering by thermal storage of the water circulating in solar collectors. Influence of ambient humidity on the cooling performance was rather serious. At higher humidity condition, the amount of dehumidified water became larger due to increase of effective adsorption capacity of the desiccant rotor. However, the temperature drop was decreased to 6.9°C. This behavior was mainly due to simultaneous increase of humidity and temperature in the dehumidified air. In this situation, an effective evaporation in the following water spray evaporative cooler did not occur.

  12. Experiments on sorption characteristics of solid desiccant materials for solar desiccant cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1984-11-01

    A test facility for measuring the sorption properties of candidate solid desiccant materials under dynamic conditions as well as equilibrium conditions, those experienced during desiccant dehumidifier operation, was constructed and tested. The theory of perturbation chromatography was initially used to measure the equilibrium properties of a desiccant/water-vapor system for the first time. Silica gel, molecular sieve, and gamma-manganese dioxide were tested. The equilibrium capacity estimated by the perturbation chromatography was lower than those available in literature, which suggests that perturbation chromatography may not be applicable to desiccant/water-vapor systems. The perturbation chromatography was replaced with a gravimetric technique, and satisfactory results were obtained for a water-vapor/molecular-sieve system.

  13. Solar-regenerated desiccant dehumidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haves, P.

    1982-02-01

    The dehumidification requirements of buildings are discussed, and the most suitable desiccant material is identified as silica gel. Several conceptual designs for solar regenerated desiccant dehumidifiers using a solid desiccant are described. The construction and operation of a laboratory experiment to determine the performance of a packed bed of silica gel at low flow rate is described. The experimental results are presented and compared to the predictions of a simple computer model which assumes local equilibrium between the desiccant and the airstream. The simulations used to predict desiccant bed performance and the integration of the desiccant bed simulation with a simulation of the thermal performance of a passively cooled residence are described. Results for an average July day are presented. Sizing relationships derived from the simulation are described, and an economic analysis and recommendations for further work are presented.

  14. Optimizing the performance of desiccant beds for solar-regenerated cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, R.; Collier, K.

    1981-03-01

    The use of computer simulations as well as a simplified psychrometric analysis to determine the increase in cooling system performance that can be realized through the use of nonhomogeneous or staged desiccant beds was investigated. A staged bed of four hypothetical desiccants gives, a 10% higher cooling capacity than a silica gel bed of the same thickness. Alternatively, the same cooling capacity is produced by a staged bed 37% thinner than the silica gel bed. It is suggested that these effects can be employed to reduce the parasitic power requirements of deciccant cooling systems.

  15. Closed cycle desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernev, D. I.; Emerson, D. T.

    1986-10-01

    The breadboard prototype of a closed cycle desiccant cooling system was designed, constructed and its performance tested. The system combines the sorption properties of solid zeolite/refrigerant vapor pairs with the principle of regenerative heat exchangers. Since solid zeolites are difficult to move in vacuum tight containers and in order to avoid intermittent operation, the desiccant is housed in two separate containers which are alternately heated and cooled by a heat transfer fluid. Using the principle of energy regeneration, the heat removed from the container being cooled is recycled in the container being heated. The breadboard system, with 90 pounds of zeolite, demonstrated a recycling efficiency of 75%, while the system capacity was 2,000 Btu/hr. This significantly increased the system thermal Coefficient of Performance (COP) to 1.1 at ARI conditions from the single container thermal COP of 0.4.

  16. The performance of a solar-regenerated open-cycle desiccant bed grain cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, M.Z.; Angus, D.E. ); Thorpe, G.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The cooling of stored food grains suppresses the growth of populations of insect pests, inhibits spoilage by fungi and helps to preserve grain quality. In temperate and subtropical climates, grains may be effectively cooled by ventilating them with ambient air. In tropical climates, the enthalpy of the air must be reduced before it can be used for cooling grain. One method of achieving this is to isothermally reduce the humidity of the air. This paper describes experiments carried out on a simple-to-build solar-regenerated open-cycle grain cooling system. The device consists of a 5.85 m{sup 2} collector coupled with two beds of silica gel. Results from a series of experiments suggest that the device may be used to cool up to 200 tons of grain. The electrical power consumption of the device is of the order of 0.3 watt per ton of grain cooled, and the total electrical energy consumption is of the order of 0.7 kWh per ton of grain stored for a six-month period. The effectiveness of the device is a function of air flow rate and the enthalpy of ambient air, and results presented in this paper suggest that the solar cooling device is particularly effective in tropical climates.

  17. Preliminary study of the potential for performance improvements in solar desiccant cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlepp, D. R.; Barlow, R.

    1981-10-01

    A second-law thermodynamic system analysis was carried out, demonstrating that present desiccant systems only achieved 10% to 15% of theoretical maximum performance and that a large potential for improvement exists. Computer simulations were used to study the effects of improving desiccant properties and increasing the effectiveness of some components of the system. Results show that modification of desiccant properties can only produce a limited (10%) increase in COP. Larger increases can be achieved by increasing the effectiveness of the sensible heat exchanger. However, it is indicated that the key to obtaining higher COPs is in the design of the dehumidifier. One design that shows promise is the parallel passage dehumidifier.

  18. Desiccant cooling system performance: A simple approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, M.; Grolmes, M. A.

    1982-10-01

    The wave nature of heat and mass transfer in fixed desiccant bed adsorption is explained. A simple algebraic model of wave motion under single low desiccant bed operation is developed and applied to the prediction of the performance potential of the overall desiccant cooling system. The model is used to explain the increase in cooling system performance that is realized through the use of mixed inert desiccant material adsorption beds. The response of cooling system performance to changes in external process conditions is examined and conclusions are drawn relative to optimization of system characteristics.

  19. Advances in open-cycle solid desiccant cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, T R; Maclaine-cross, I

    1985-05-01

    Of the solar cooling options available open cycle solid desiccant cooling looks very promising. A brief review of the experimental and analytical efforts to date shows that within the last 10 years thermal performance has doubled. Research centers have been developed to explore new materials and geometry options and to improve and validate mathematical models that can be used by design engineers to develop new product lines. Typical results from the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) Desiccant Cooling Research Program are shown. Innovative ideas for new cycles and spinoff benefits provide incentives to continue research in this promising field.

  20. Options of desiccant cooling and dehumidification technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kweller, E. ); Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The recent CFC issue regarding the depleting of ozone layer and the greenhouse effect has become an impetus in research and development work for non-CFC air conditioning alternatives. Desiccant cooling is considered a good candidate for replacement of vapor compression chillers. A review of the present status of the desiccant based systems indicate that the technology has significantly advanced in recent years, and has become one of the most promising alternatives. New and better desiccants have been developed and novel cycles and more efficient system designs have been studied. As a result, the thermal coefficient of performance (COP) of desiccant cooling systems has been revised from around 0.6 to 1.0 or higher. These advances coupled with potentially reduced production cost could become very competitive with conventional systems in the near future. This study gives a review of the present status of desiccant materials, system designs, and computer models. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Experimental studies of heat and mass exchange in parallel-passage rotary desiccant dehumidifiers for solar cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, J. M.; Maclaine-Cross, I. L.

    1987-11-01

    This report presents results of work done to experimentally characterize the performance of rotary desiccant dehumidifiers and to develop and validate analytical methods for evaluating their performance in air-conditioning systems. A facility, the Cyclic Test Facility, and a test-and-analysis procedure were developed to evaluate the performance of the rotary dehumidifiers. Experiments were performed to develop a basic understanding of the simultaneous heat- and mass-transfer processes in the dehumidifiers. Two test articles were tested under cyclic operation to characterize their performance. Detailed accounts of the Cyclic Test Facility, its hardware and instrumentation, the two test articles, and data reduction and analysis methods are provided. The data provide an engineering data base for evaluating rotary desiccant dehumidifiers for cooling applications.

  2. Energy and economic assessment of desiccant cooling systems coupled with single glazed air and hybrid PV/thermal solar collectors for applications in hot and humid climate

    SciTech Connect

    Beccali, Marco; Finocchiaro, Pietro; Nocke, Bettina

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed analysis of the energy and economic performance of desiccant cooling systems (DEC) equipped with both single glazed standard air and hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/t) collectors for applications in hot and humid climates. The use of 'solar cogeneration' by means of PV/t hybrid collectors enables the simultaneous production of electricity and heat, which can be directly used by desiccant air handling units, thereby making it possible to achieve very energy savings. The present work shows the results of detailed simulations conducted for a set of desiccant cooling systems operating without any heat storage. System performance was investigated through hourly simulations for different systems and load combinations. Three configurations of DEC systems were considered: standard DEC, DEC with an integrated heat pump and DEC with an enthalpy wheel. Two kinds of building occupations were considered: office and lecture room. Moreover, three configurations of solar-assisted air handling units (AHU) equipped with desiccant wheels were considered and compared with standard AHUs, focusing on achievable primary energy savings. The relationship between the solar collector's area and the specific primary energy consumption for different system configurations and building occupation patterns is described. For both occupation patterns, sensitivity analysis on system performance was performed for different solar collector areas. Also, this work presents an economic assessment of the systems. The cost of conserved energy and the payback time were calculated, with and without public incentives for solar cooling systems. It is worth noting that the use of photovoltaics, and thus the exploitation of related available incentives in many European countries, could positively influence the spread of solar air cooling technologies (SAC). An outcome of this work is that SAC systems equipped with PV/t collectors are shown to have better performance in terms of

  3. An assessment of dehumidifier geometries for desiccant cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, R. S.

    1983-06-01

    Dehumidifier geometries for open-cycle, solid desiccant cooling systems are assessed in order to identify those configurations which have the greatest potential of achieving performance levels that will make desiccant cooling systems economically competitive with conventional vapor-compression systems. Five dehumidifier designs are described and compared quantitatively. Compared characteristics were then related to the requirements of solar cooling application. The wound-ribbon dehumidifer design showed the highest ratio of Stanton number to friction factor and the lowest solid-side resistance to mass transfer of any geometry tested. Because of the high potential of the wound-ribbon configuration, it is recommended that further research be carried out to fully characterized this type of dehumidifier.

  4. Analysis of solar desiccant systems and concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, R.

    1981-05-01

    The modeling of desiccant systems is described. Computer programs for predicting the performance of silica gel beds in single-blow situations and in cyclically operating desiccant cooling systems (DESSIM) are presented. The single-blow model has been validated and shows excellent agreement with experimental data. Experimental data published by Koh are shown along with the corresponding prediction using DESSIM.

  5. Desiccant cooling: State-of-the-art assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Penney, T.R.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this document are to present an overview of the work accomplished to date on desiccant cooling to provide assessment of the state of the art of desiccant cooling technology in the field of desiccant material dehumidifier components, desiccant systems, and models. The report also discusses the factors that affect the widespread acceptance of desiccant cooling technology. This report is organized as follows. First, a basic description and historical overview of desiccant cooling technology is provided. Then, the recent research and development (R&D) program history (focusing on DOE`s funded efforts) is discussed. The status of the technology elements (materials, components, systems) is discussed in detail and a preliminary study on the energy impact of desiccant technology is presented. R&D needs for advancing the technology in the market are identified. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s unique desiccant test facilities and their typical outputs are described briefly. Finally, the results of a comprehensive literature search on desiccant cooling are presented in a bibliography. The bibliography contains approximately 900 citations on desiccant cooling.

  6. Desiccant cooling: State-of-the-art assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Penney, T.R.; Czanderna, A.W.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this document are to present an overview of the work accomplished to date on desiccant cooling to provide assessment of the state of the art of desiccant cooling technology in the field of desiccant material dehumidifier components, desiccant systems, and models. The report also discusses the factors that affect the widespread acceptance of desiccant cooling technology. This report is organized as follows. First, a basic description and historical overview of desiccant cooling technology is provided. Then, the recent research and development (R D) program history (focusing on DOE's funded efforts) is discussed. The status of the technology elements (materials, components, systems) is discussed in detail and a preliminary study on the energy impact of desiccant technology is presented. R D needs for advancing the technology in the market are identified. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's unique desiccant test facilities and their typical outputs are described briefly. Finally, the results of a comprehensive literature search on desiccant cooling are presented in a bibliography. The bibliography contains approximately 900 citations on desiccant cooling.

  7. Testing of novel desiccant materials and dehumidifier matrices for desiccant cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

    1989-03-01

    This paper presents the results of testing of desiccant materials and dehumidifier matrices for desiccant cooling and dehumidification applications. In testing desiccant materials, we used a gravimetric technique to measure the moisture capacity of four desiccant materials. These materials were microporous silica gel powder, macroporous silica gel powder, polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt, and a silica-gel/epoxy composite. The microporous silica gel powder had the most desirable moisture capacity properties of the four materials tested for desiccant cooling applications. The polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt showed some promise. Our testing of dehumidifier matrices included measuring the pressure drop and heat- and mass-transfer rate characteristics of a silica-gel/corrugated dehumidifier matrix under conditions typical of desiccant cooling systems. The matrix is a section of a commercial dehumidifier. The transient dehumidification capacity of the matrix was calculated from the tests and compared with previously tested matrices. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Desiccant dehumidification and cooling systems assessment and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, R.K. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a preliminary analysis of the principles, sensitivities, and potential for national energy savings of desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems. The report is divided into four sections. Section I deals with the maximum theoretical performance of ideal desiccant cooling systems. Section II looks at the performance effects of non-ideal behavior of system components. Section III examines the effects of outdoor air properties on desiccant cooling system performance. Section IV analyzes the applicability of desiccant cooling systems to reduce primary energy requirements for providing space conditioning in buildings. A basic desiccation process performs no useful work (cooling). That is, a desiccant material drying air is close to an isenthalpic process. Latent energy is merely converted to sensible energy. Only when heat exchange is applied to the desiccated air is any cooling accomplished. This characteristic is generic to all desiccant cycles and critical to understanding their operation. The analyses of Section I show that desiccant cooling cycles can theoretically achieve extremely high thermal CoP`s (>2). The general conclusion from Section II is that ventilation air processing is the most viable application for the solid desiccant equipment analyzed. The results from the seasonal simulations performed in Section III indicate that, generally, the seasonal performance of the desiccant system does not change significantly from that predicted for outdoor conditions. Results from Section IV show that all of the candidate desiccant systems can save energy relative to standard vapor-compression systems. The largest energy savings are achieved by the enthalpy exchange devise.

  9. An assessment of desiccant cooling and dehumidification technology

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C. ); Lavan, Z. ); Collier, R.K. Jr. ); Meckler, G. )

    1992-07-01

    Desiccant systems are heat-actuated cooling and dehumidification technology. With the recent advances in this technology, desiccant systems can now achieve a primary energy coefficient of performance (COP) between 1.3 and 1.5, with potential to go to 1.7 and higher. It is becoming one of the most promising alternatives to conventional cooling systems. Two important and well-known advantages of desiccant cooling systems are that they are CFC free and they can reduce the electricity peak load. Another important but lesser-known advantage of desiccant technology is its potential for energy conservation. The energy impact study in this report indicated that a possible 13% energy saving in residential cooling and 8% in commercial cooling is possible. Great energy saving potential also exists in the industrial sector if industrial waste heat can be used for desiccant regeneration. The latest study on desiccant-integrated building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems indicated that the initial cost for the conventional cooling equipment was greatly reduced by using desiccant technology because of downsized compressors, fans, and ductworks. This cost reduction was more than enough to offset the cost of desiccant equipment. Besides, the system operation cost was also reduced. All these indicate that desiccant systems are also cost effective. This study provides an updated state-of-the-art assessment forsiccant technology in the field of desiccant materials, systems, computer models, and theoretical analyses. From this information the technology options were derived and the future research and development needs were identified. Because desiccant technology has already been applied in the commercial building sector with very encouraging results, it is expected that future market breakthroughs will probably start in this sector. A market analysis for the commercial building application is therefore included.

  10. Solar powered desiccant air conditioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-07-01

    A solar-powered desiccant air conditioning system using silica gel was developed, and modifications to the existing unit and additional testing are proposed to demonstrate the feasibility of the unit. Conversion from a rotating bed to a fixed bed of silica gel is proposed. Some general plans for commercialization are briefly discussed.

  11. Photovoltaic-electrodialysis regeneration method for liquid desiccant cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiu-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Song

    2009-12-15

    Liquid desiccant cooling system (LDCS) is an (a novel) air-conditioning system with good energy saving potential. Regenerator is the power centre for LDCS. Currently, the regeneration process is always fuelled by thermal energy. Nevertheless, this regeneration pattern has some disadvantages in that its performance will become poor when the surrounding atmosphere is of high humidity, and the heat provided for regeneration will be unfavourable to the following dehumidification process. To ameliorate that, a new regeneration method is proposed in this paper: a membrane regenerator is employed to regenerate the liquid desiccant in an electrodialysis way; while solar photovoltaic generator is adopted to supply electric power for this process. Analysis has been made about this new regeneration method and the result reveals: this new manner achieves good stability with the immunity against the adverse impact from the outside high humidity; its performance is much higher than that of the thermal regeneration manner while putting aside the low efficiency of the photovoltaic system. Besides, purified water can be obtained in company with the regeneration process. (author)

  12. Development of Membrane-Based Desiccant Fiber for Vacuum Desiccant Cooling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifan; Rana, Dipak; Lan, Christopher Q; Matsuura, Takeshi

    2016-06-22

    A novel hydrophobic membrane-based desiccant fiber (MDF) was developed by loading lithium chloride into hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes. The MDF thus made was then tested for vapor absorption under controlled conditions. Furthermore, an MDF pad, which was made by weaving MDF into a piece of garment, was built into a laboratory vacuum desiccant cooling (VDC) setup, which included the MDF pad as the desiccant layer and a cooling towel saturated with water as the water reservoir, to test the cooling effects at atmospheric pressure and vacuum of 25 in. of Hg. Results indicate that MDF is suitable for applications such as in VDC. Mass and heat transfer of vapor absorption by MDF were also analyzed. PMID:27253330

  13. Annual DOE Active Solar Heating and Cooling Contractors Review meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Ninety three project summaries dicussing the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling are presented: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology.

  14. Performance study of a heat recovery desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabek, Seifennasr; Ben Nasr, Kaouther; Chouikh, Ridha; Guizani, Amenallah

    2015-04-01

    The comparison between the experimental and theoretical simulations of a desiccant cooling system under various climatic conditions (outdoor temperature and relative humidity) on the system performance has been presented. The performance of the system is evaluated using Cooling Capacity (CC) parameter. The system under a typical summer day of hot and humid climate was tested. A remarkable decrease about 40-65% in the specific humidity and with a supply air temperature lower than 25°C of the proposed system was observed. The study is important and helpful to improve the effectiveness of this kind of liquid desiccant system in hot and humid places.

  15. Potential Evaluation of Solar Heat Assisted Desiccant Hybrid Air Conditioning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Thien Nha; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    The solar thermal driven desiccant dehumidification-absorption cooling hybrid system has superior advantage in hot-humid climate regions. The reasonable air processing of desiccant hybrid air conditioning system and the utility of clean and free energy make the system environment friendly and energy efficient. The study investigates the performance of the desiccant dehumidification air conditioning systems with solar thermal assistant. The investigation is performed for three cases which are combinations of solar thermal and absorption cooling systems with different heat supply temperature levels. Two solar thermal systems are used in the study: the flat plate collector (FPC) and the vacuum tube with compound parabolic concentrator (CPC). The single-effect and high energy efficient double-, triple-effect LiBr-water absorption cooling cycles are considered for cooling systems. COP of desiccant hybrid air conditioning systems are determined. The evaluation of these systems is subsequently performed. The single effect absorption cooling cycle combined with the flat plate collector solar system is found to be the most energy efficient air conditioning system.

  16. Simple predictive model for performance of desiccant beds for solar dehumidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, R.

    1981-08-01

    A computer model for the absorption/desorption process that predicts the performance of desiccant beds for solar regenerated dehumidification of passively cooled buildings is outlined. The model uses simple algebraic equations for steady state heat and mass exchangers. The validity and accuracy of the model is demonstrated. The physics of the adsorption process in two psychrometric process lines is discussed.

  17. Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1981-09-01

    Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

  18. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following tasks: (1) solar heating with isothermal collector operation and advanced control strategy; (2) solar cooling with solid desiccant; (3) liquid desiccant cooling system development; (4) solar house III -- development and improvement of solar heating systems employing boiling liquid collectors; (5) generic solar domestic water heating systems; (6) advanced residential solar domestic hot water (DHW) systems; (7) management and coordination of Colorado State/DOE program; and (8) the field monitoring workshop.

  19. Desiccant-based, heat-actuated cooling assessment for DHC (District Heating and Cooling) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patch, K.D.; DiBella, F.A.; Becker, F.E.

    1990-07-01

    An assessment has been completed of the use of desiccant-based, heat-actuated cooling for District Heating and Cooling (DHC) systems, showing that such desiccant-based cooling (DBC) systems are generally applicable to District Heating (DH) systems. Since the DH system only has to supply hot water (or steam) to its customers, systems that were designed as conventional two-pipe DH systems can now be operated as DHC systems without major additional capital expense. Desiccant-based DHC systems can be operated with low-grade DH-supplied heat, at temperatures below 180{degree}F, without significant loss in operating capacity, relative to absorption chillers. During this assessment, a systems analysis was performed, an experimental investigation was conducted, developmental requirements for commercializing DBC systems were examined, and two case studies were conducted. As a result of the case studies, it was found that the operating cost of a DBC system was competitive with or lower than the cost of purchasing DHC-supplied chilled water. However, because of the limited production volume and the current high capital costs of desiccant systems, the payback period is relatively long. In this regard, through the substitution of low-cost components specifically engineered for low-temperature DHC systems, the capital costs should be significantly reduced and overall economics made attractive to future users. 17 figs.

  20. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    This paper is a progress report for the period of July 1, 1990 to 31 August 1990 on activities at Colorado State University in a program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Topics covered are: solar heating with isothermal collectors; solid cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling systems; solar heating systems; solar water heaters; fields tests; and program management.

  1. Zero Carryover Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Solar Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, A.; Slayzak, S.; Kozubal, E.

    2006-07-01

    A novel liquid-desiccant air conditioner that dries and cools building supply air will transform the use of direct-contact liquid-desiccant systems in HVAC applications, improving comfort, air quality, and providing energy-efficient humidity control.

  2. Impact of ambient pressure on performance of desiccant cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaran, A. A.

    1991-12-01

    The impact of ambient pressure on the performance of the ventilation cycle desiccant cooling system and its components was studied using computer simulations. The impact of ambient pressure depended on whether the system was designed for fixed-mass flow rate or fixed-volume flow rate operation. As ambient pressure decreased from 1.0 to 0.8 atm, the system thermal coefficient of performance increased by 8 pct. for both fixed-mass and fixed-volume flow rate, the cooling capacity of the system (in kW) was decreased by 14 pct. for the fixed-volume flow rate system and increased by 7 pct. for the fixed-mass flow rate system, the electric power requirements for the system with fixed-volume flow rate did not change, and the electric power requirement for the fixed-mass flow rate system increased by 44 pct. The overall coefficient of performance increased up to 5 pct. for the fixed-volume flow rate systems, and decreased up to 4 pct. for the fixed-mass flow rate system.

  3. Desiccant grain applied to the storage of solar drying potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, T.; Richter, I.G.; Pecenka, R.

    1999-09-01

    Sorption storage of solar heat using a layer of wheat as the desiccant was analyzed by means of a deep-bed model. Intended to be applied to solar-assisted in-storage drying of agricultural bulk materials, the probability of the persistence of unfavorable weather periods was quantified statistically for Potsdam for the month of August, as an example. Simulation results demonstrate that a relative humidity of the drying air of 65% can be maintained day and night for weeks without combustion of fossil fuels. Using a simple strategy of control, periods with insufficient solar radiation can be bridged over. The desiccant grain is not endangered by mold growth as a matter of principle. Simple solar air heaters can be used to avoid economic losses due to overdrying and to reduce the danger of decay to a minimum even at unfavorable climatic conditions.

  4. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2014-02-26

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  5. 4-rotor Desiccant Cooling Process Equipped with a Double Stage Dehumidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Kosuke; Kodama, Akio; Okano, Hiroshi; Asada, Toshinobu

    2-rotor desiccant cooling process consisting of a honeycomb rotor dehumidifier and a sensible heat exchanger is a mainstream of the desiccant cooling process which are practically applied to supermarket, hospital and so on. However, this process cannot produce a sufficient dehumidifying performance in high humidity region. In this study, 4-rotor desiccant cooling process equipped with a double stage dehumidification was proposed and investigated experimentally. In this process, regeneration temperature around 60°C could produce a sufficient dehumidifying performance even at high ambient humidity. “Serial heat supply” mode was considered to improve the heat efficiency by the cascade use of regeneration heat inside the cooling cycle. The dehumidifying performance of the “serial heat supply” mode was only slightly lower than that of a “parallel heat supply” mode at which the same temperature hot air was supplied to the both heaters. However, dehumidifying performance of this “serial heat supply” mode was much higher than that of conventional 2-rotor desiccant cooling process. Furthermore, the desiccant rotors of 0.1m in thickness were mounted to 4-rotor desiccant cooling process in place of the 0.2m desiccant rotors. It was found that the drop of dehumidifying performance of the process equipped with 0.1m desiccant rotors was only by 10 percents comparing with the 0.2m rotor process. Moreover, it was found that optimization of rotation speed of the desiccant rotor was needed to improve the energy efficiency. Regarding the supply point of return air, it was also found that return air should be supplied to the regeneration inlet of the second stage for higher dehumidifying performance.

  6. Solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartera, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    To emphasize energy conservation and low cost energy, the systems of solar heating and cooling are analyzed and compared with fossil fuel systems. The application of solar heating and cooling systems for industrial and domestic use are discussed. Topics of discussion include: solar collectors; space heating; pools and spas; domestic hot water; industrial heat less than 200 F; space cooling; industrial steam; and initial systems cost. A question and answer period is generated which closes out the discussion.

  7. Performance Assessment of a Desiccant Cooling System in a CHP Application with an IC Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.; Slayzak, S.; Judkoff, R.; Schaffhauser, T.; DeBlasio, R.

    2005-04-01

    Performance of a desiccant cooling system was evaluated in the context of combined heat and power (CHP). The baseline system incorporated a desiccant dehumidifier, a heat exchanger, an indirect evaporative cooler, and a direct evaporative cooler. The desiccant unit was regenerated through heat recovery from a gas-fired reciprocating internal combustion engine. The system offered sufficient sensible and latent cooling capacities for a wide range of climatic conditions, while allowing influx of outside air in excess of what is typically required for commercial buildings. Energy and water efficiencies of the desiccant cooling system were also evaluated and compared with those of a conventional system. The results of parametric assessments revealed the importance of using a heat exchanger for concurrent desiccant post cooling and regeneration air preheating. These functions resulted in enhancement of both the cooling performance and the thermal efficiency, which are essential for fuel utilization improvement. Two approaches for mixing of the return air and outside air were examined, and their impact on the system cooling performance and thermal efficiency was demonstrated. The scope of the parametric analyses also encompassed the impact of improving the indirect evaporative cooling effectiveness on the overall cooling system performance.

  8. Solid Desiccant Cooling System Employed with Ventilation Cycle: A Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmar, H.; Hindoliya, D. A.

    2012-10-01

    For better use of evaporative cooling techniques in humid climate, employment of desiccant cooling system (DCS) can be a suitable option. Desiccant augmented evaporative cooling system may be employed for energy saving in buildings in place of conventional vapour compression based cooling system. This article presents a sensitive analysis of DCS simulated under the humid climate of Mumbai, India. Mathematical computations have been performed using outdoor specific humidity, ambient dry bulb temperature and room supply temperature. A sensitive analysis considering some important forcing parameters was conducted. It was observed that the "effectiveness" of direct evaporative cooler to be predominantly high influencing parameter compared to others, for the performance of DCS.

  9. Regeneration of desiccants with solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghate, S.R.; Butts, C.L.; Lown, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    Saturated silica gel was regenerated with solar energy. This paper describes the experimental set-up for silica gel regeneration and data collection. The regenerated silica gel can be used to dry high moisture in-shell pecans.

  10. Research and development needs for desiccant cooling technology 1992--1997. (Supplement to the NREL report, Desiccant Cooling: State-of-the-Art Assessment)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A

    1992-12-01

    This report is a supplement to Desiccant Cooling: State-of-the-Art Assessment (NREL/TP-254-4147, DE93000013). In this supplement document we have described a detailed program assuming sufficient funding to implement the R&D activities needed. Desiccant dehumidification is a mature technology for industrial applications, and in recent years the technology has been used for air conditioning a number of institutional and commercial buildings. Our proposal is based on argumentative discussions at various national meetings with leaders of the technology. The goal is the penetration of the broad air conditioning market. This work is funded by the Buildings technology Office of the US Department of Energy.

  11. Developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991 to 92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  12. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-24

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  13. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, D.; Oonk, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    Progress made in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. A comparison of the proposed Solaron Heat Pump and Solar Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, installation drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities are included.

  14. Controlling rotary desiccant wheels for dehumidification and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, K.W.; Banks, N.J.

    1996-12-31

    With greater focus on indoor air quality (IAQ) and ventilation, humidity control within spaces such as office buildings, hotels, schools, ice-skating rinks, nursing homes, and operating rooms has become paramount during the past decade. Control of relative humidity (RH) has been linked to increased comfort and the improved health of building occupants. The desiccant wheel process can be utilized in these applications to provide increased dehumidification while introducing minimal additional control parameters, often at lower cost.

  15. Open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier and hybrid solar/electric absorption refrigeration system. Annual report, January 1993--December 1993. Calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmo, B.G.; Thornbloom, M.D.

    1995-04-01

    This annual report presents work performed during calendar year 1993 by the Florida Solar Energy Center under contract to the US Department of Energy. Two distinctively different solar powered indoor climate control systems were analyzed: the open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier, and an improved efficiency absorption system which may be fired by flat plate solar collectors. Both tasks represent new directions relative to prior FSEC research in Solar Cooling and Dehumidification.

  16. Research and development needs for desiccant cooling technology 1992--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1992-12-01

    This report is a supplement to Desiccant Cooling: State-of-the-Art Assessment (NREL/TP-254-4147, DE93000013). In this supplement document we have described a detailed program assuming sufficient funding to implement the R D activities needed. Desiccant dehumidification is a mature technology for industrial applications, and in recent years the technology has been used for air conditioning a number of institutional and commercial buildings. Our proposal is based on argumentative discussions at various national meetings with leaders of the technology. The goal is the penetration of the broad air conditioning market. This work is funded by the Buildings technology Office of the US Department of Energy.

  17. Zero Energy Communities with Central Solar Plants using Liquid Desiccants and Local Storage: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.; Woods, J.; Kozubal, E.; Boranian, A.

    2012-08-01

    The zero energy community considered here consists of tens to tens-of-thousands of residences coupled to a central solar plant that produces all the community's electrical and thermal needs. A distribution network carries fluids to meet the heating and cooling loads. Large central solar systems can significantly reduce cost of energy vs. single family systems, and they enable economical seasonal heat storage. However, the thermal distribution system is costly. Conventional district heating/cooling systems use a water/glycol solution to deliver sensible energy. Piping is sized to meet the peak instantaneous load. A new district system introduced here differs in two key ways: (i) it continuously distributes a hot liquid desiccant (LD) solution to LD-based heating and cooling equipment in each home; and (ii) it uses central and local storage of both LD and heat to reduce flow rates to meet average loads. Results for piping sizes in conventional and LD thermal communities show that the LD zero energy community reduces distribution piping diameters meeting heating loads by {approx}5X and meeting cooling loads by {approx}8X for cooling, depending on climate.

  18. Competitive assessment of desiccant solar/gas systems for single family residences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    The solar/gas desiccant space conditioning system was compared with competing gas and electric technologies. Benefits and costs to the residential gas customer were evaluated, and practical recommendations regarding an appropriate R&D agenda to maximize the probability of successful development of an advanced desiccant system for that market were provided.

  19. Low cost solar energy collection for cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, W. G.

    1981-06-01

    Solar energy collector designs utilizing thin-film polymeric materials in the absorber and glazing are investigated. The main objective is dramatic cost reduction consistent with acceptable performance and life. These collectors now appear capable of high temperature applications including desiccant and absorption cooling (1500 to 2000 F). The performance and economics of the thin-film collector are compared with those of conventional flat-plate designs in cooling applications.

  20. Solar air conditioning with solid absorbents and earth cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, E.

    An experimental design is described for an efficient desiccant cooling system using natural cold sink to reduce the moisture content of the ambient air. Used in a warm, humid, tropical climate, the unit is shown to provide up to 0.77 ton of refrigeration under extreme conditions with an average daily coefficient of performance of 0.5. Solar heat is applied to regenerate the silica gel.

  1. The second-law analysis of a recirculation cycle desiccant cooling system: Cosorption of water vapor and carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. M.; Worek, W. M.

    The second law, of thermodynamics is applied to a desiccant cooling system operating in the recirculation mode. In this study, the adsorbent is 13X molecular sieve, and the process air stream is assumed to contain only dry air, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. The second law efficiencies of a desiccant wheel are documented in terms of overall number of transfer units and the regeneration temperature. The results show that based on the first law and second law of thermodynamics, a solid desiccant adsorber using 13X molecular sieve can be optimally designed.

  2. Energy and economic performance analysis of an open cycle solar desiccant dehumidification air-conditioning system for application in Hong Kong

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yutong; Lu, Lin; Yang, Hongxing

    2010-12-15

    In this article, a transient simulation model and the EnergyPlus were used to study the energy performance and economical feasibility for integrating a solar liquid desiccant dehumidification system with a conventional vapor compression air-conditioning system for the weather condition of Hong Kong. The vapor compression system capacity in the solar assisted air-conditioning system can be reduced to 19 kW from original 28 kW of a conventional air-conditioning system as a case study due to the solar desiccant cooling. The economical performance of the solar desiccant dehumidification system is compared with that of the conventional air-conditioning system. The results show that the energy saving potentials due to incorporation of the solar desiccant dehumidification system in a traditional air-conditioning system is significant for the hot wet weather in Hong Kong due to higher COP resulted from higher supply chilled water temperature from chiller plants. The annual operation energy savings for the hybrid system is 6760 kWh and the payback period of the hybrid system is around 7 years. The study shows that the solar assisted air-conditioning is a viable technology for utilizations in subtropical areas. (author)

  3. A packed bed dehumidifier/regenerator for solar air conditioning with liquid desiccants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Factor, H. M.; Grossman, G.

    1980-01-01

    A packed column air-liquid contactor has been studied in application to air dehumidification and regeneration in solar air conditioning with liquid desiccants. A theoretical model has been developed to predict the performance of the device under various operating conditions. Computer simulations based on the model are presented which indicate the practical range of air to liquid flux ratios and associated changes in air humidity and desiccant concentration. An experimental apparatus has been constructed and experiments performed with Monoethylene Glycol (MEG) and Lithium Bromide as desiccants. MEG experiments have yielded inaccurate results and have pointed out some practical problems associated with the use of Glycols. LiBr experiments show very good agreement with the theoretical model. Preheating of the air is shown to greatly enhance desiccant regeneration. The packed column yields good results as a dehumidifier/regenerator, provided pressure drop can be reduced with the use of suitable packing.

  4. Comparative study of different solar cooling systems for buildings in subtropical city

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, K.F.; Chow, T.T.; Lee, C.K.; Lin, Z.; Chan, L.S.

    2010-02-15

    In recent years, more and more attention has been paid on the application potential of solar cooling for buildings. Due to the fact that the efficiency of solar collectors is generally low at the time being, the effectiveness of solar cooling would be closely related to the availability of solar irradiation, climatic conditions and geographical location of a place. In this paper, five types of solar cooling systems were involved in a comparative study for subtropical city, which is commonly featured with long hot and humid summer. The solar cooling systems included the solar electric compression refrigeration, solar mechanical compression refrigeration, solar absorption refrigeration, solar adsorption refrigeration and solar solid desiccant cooling. Component-based simulation models of these systems were developed, and their performances were evaluated throughout a year. The key performance indicators are solar fraction, coefficient of performance, solar thermal gain, and primary energy consumption. In addition, different installation strategies and types of solar collectors were compared for each kind of solar cooling system. Through this comparative study, it was found that solar electric compression refrigeration and solar absorption refrigeration had the highest energy saving potential in the subtropical Hong Kong. The former is to make use of the solar electric gain, while the latter is to adopt the solar thermal gain. These two solar cooling systems would have even better performances through the continual advancement of the solar collectors. It will provide a promising application potential of solar cooling for buildings in the subtropical region. (author)

  5. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-01-01

    This program includes six tasks. The tasks are as follows: (1) a project measuring the performance of unique solar system components; (2) a project to develop a methodology for determining annual performance ratings of solar domestic hot water systems; (3) a project that will identify, analyze, design, build, and experimentally evaluate SDHW systems incorporating advanced concepts and components; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform TRNSYS simulations to determine potential energy savings for desiccant cooling systems, especially in humid climates; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described.

  6. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-07

    This program includes six tasks, including (1) a project measuring the performance of unique solar system components, (2) a project to develop a methodology for determining annual performance ratings of solar domestic hot water systems, (3) a project that will identify, analyze, design, build, and experimentally evaluate SDHW systems incorporating advanced concepts and components, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform TRNSYS simulations to determine potential energy savings for desiccant cooling systems, especially in humid climates, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described.

  7. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well a previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--1992 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space hearing systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Double-stage Dehumidification achieved in 2-rotor Desiccant Cooling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Toshinobu; Kodama, Akio

    A multi-divided rotary adsorber was proposed to realize a double-stage dehumidification in 2-rotor desiccant cooling process. In this process, once dehumidified and cooled air was dehumidified again at the different adsorption zone of the same desiccant rotor. Four process flow configurations were experimentally tested for investigations of the appropriate outside air inlet position and rotating directions of the rotary adsorber and rotary heat exchanger. It was found that dehumidifying performance was strongly influenced by the supply position of outside air to the adsorbent rotor. Humid outside air should be supplied to the latter half of the adsorption zone and once dehumidified air should be sent to the first half of the adsorption zone. This is because the increase in the amount adsorbed at the first half of the adsorption step resulted in a poor adsorbabilty at the latter half of the adsorption step for the once dehumidified dry air. Therefore, the effective use of the adsorbent rotor could be done by considering the angular distribution of the amount of adsorbed. Consequently, 30% larger amount of dehumidification than that of conventional processes under a humid summer condition was confirmed. Regarding the product air temperature, the process configurations at which secondary dehumidified air was cooled at the first half of the sensible rotor produced roughly 5 °C lower temperature air than that of the other. This implied that the directions of rotation of the adsorbent rotor and the rotary heat exchanger, or dehumidification - cooling sequence, also had a great impact on the product air condition.

  9. Solar Heating and Cooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffie, John A.; Beckman, William A.

    1976-01-01

    Describes recent research that has made solar energy economically competitive with other energy sources. Includes solar energy building architecture, storage systems, and economic production data. (MLH)

  10. Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

    1991-07-01

    The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Effective Operation for an Adsorptive Desiccant Cooling Process using a Double-Stage Regeneration of Honeycomb Rotary Dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Akio; Ando, Kouke; Hirose, Tsutomu; Goto, Motonobu; Tuziguchi, Takuya; Okano, Hiroshi

    A double-stage regeneration concept has been applied to a rotary dehumidifier to achieve a high efficient desiccant cooling process. In this concept, regeneration zone of the dehumidifier was divided into two zones. One was pre-regeneration zone where the desiccant rotor was regenerated by warm air heated at the sensible heat exchanger, and the other was heating regeneration zone where the rotor was further regenerated by hot air heated up to the controlled temperature at a heating system. In this paper, the influence of the area ratio of these two zones on the dehumidifying/cooling performance and energy efficiency of this desiccant system were mainly discussed at several levels of the regeneration temperature, supply air velocity and inlet air humidity. Experimental results indicated that the area ratio of the heating regeneration zone should be optimized to produce a sufficient dehumidifying/cooling performance with high energy efficiency, considering humidity requested in supply air. It was also found that the amount of energy input was rather decreased than the decrease of the cooling performance as the area ratio of the heating regeneration zone decreased, and this tendency was more remarkable at higher regeneration temperature. Finally, the double-stage regeneration was confirmed to be an effective operating method for the desiccant cooling process equipped with a otary dehumidifier.

  12. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating, and cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-10-01

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991 to 1992 fifteen month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  13. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluation and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, August--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report describes activities of the Colorado State University program on solar heating and cooling systems for the months of August and September 1993. The topics include: rating and certification of domestic water heating systems, unique solar system components, advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems, and desiccant cooling of buildings.

  14. Moving Advanced Desiccant Materials into Mainstream Non-CFC Cooling Products

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, J R; Grossman, G; Rice, C K; Fairchild, P D; Gross, I L

    1994-01-01

    Desiccant air-conditioning systems can be used as alternatives for conventional air-conditioning equipment in any commercial or residential building. Recent breakthroughs in desiccant materials technology and the creation of new markets by Indoor Air Quality issues make desiccant-based air-conditioning equipment practical for many space-conditioning applications.

  15. Experiences in solar cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.

    The results of performance evaluations for nine solar cooling systems are presented, and reasons fow low or high net energy balances are discussed. Six of the nine systems are noted to have performed unfavorably compared to standard cooling systems due to thermal storage losses, excessive system electrical demands, inappropriate control strategies, poor system-to-load matching, and poor chiller performance. A reduction in heat losses in one residential unit increased the total system efficiency by 2.5%, while eliminating heat losses to the building interior increased the efficiency by 3.3%. The best system incorporated a lithium bromide absorption chiller and a Rankine cycle compression unit for a commercial application. Improvements in the cooling tower and fan configurations to increase the solar cooling system efficiency are indicated. Best performances are expected to occur in climates inducing high annual cooling loads.

  16. Economic and technical assessment of the desiccant wheel effect on the thermal performance of cross flow cooling towers in variable wet bulb temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banooni, Salem; Chitsazan, Ali

    2014-05-01

    Performance improvements of cross flow cooling towers in variable wet bulb temperature were performed. A conventional mathematical model is used to predict desiccant wheel effect on the performance of cooling tower. It is found that by using optimum parameters of desiccant wheel, the inlet air wet bulb temperature into the cooling tower would decrease more than 6 °C and outlet water temperature would decrease more than 4 °C.

  17. Solar-powered cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C

    2013-12-24

    A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system uses nanostructural materials made of high specific surface area adsorption aerogel as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material. A circulation system circulates refrigerant from the nanostructural material to a cooling unit.

  18. Anisotropic stress accumulation in cooling lava flows and resulting fracture patterns: Insights from starch-water desiccation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodge, Robert W. D.; Lescinsky, David T.

    2009-09-01

    Desiccation of starch-water slurries is a useful analog for the production of polygonal fractures/columnar joints in cooling lava flows. When left to dry completely, a simple mixture of 1:1 starch and water will produce columns that appear remarkably similar to natural columnar joints formed in cooled lava flows. Columns form when the accumulation of isotropic stress exceeds the tensile strength of a material, at which point a fracture forms and advances through the material perpendicular to the desiccating surface. Individual fractures will initially form orthogonal to the desiccation surface but will quickly evolve into a hexagonal fracture network that advances incrementally through the material. However, some fracture patterns found within natural lava flows are not hexagonal ( Lodge and Lescinsky, 2009-this issue), but rather have fracture lengths that are much longer than the distance to adjacent fractures. These fractures are commonly found at lava flows that have interacted with glacial ice during emplacement. The purpose of this study is to utilize starch analog experiments to better understand the formation of these fractures and the stress regimes responsible for their non-hexagonal patterns. To simulate anisotropic conditions during cooling, the starch slurry was poured into a container with a movable wall that was attached to a screw-type jack. The jack was then set to slowly extend or retract while the slurry desiccated. This resulted in either a decrease or increase in the chamber cross-sectional area thus creating compressional or extensional regimes. Decreasing chamber area (DCA) experiments resulted in fractures with larger lengths parallel to the direction of wall movement (also direction of compression). It also caused localized thrust faulting and curved column development. Increasing chamber area (ICA) experiments produced a zone of horizontal column development along the expanding margin (produced when the wall detached from the sample

  19. Terrestrial cooling and solar variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agee, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence from surface temperature records is presented and discussed which suggests a significant cooling trend over the Northern Hemisphere from 1940 to the present. This cooling trend is associated with an increase of the latitudinal gradient of temperature and the lapse rate, as predicted by climate models with decreased solar input and feedback mechanisms. Evidence suggests that four of these 80- to 100-year cycles of global surface temperature fluctuation may have occurred, and in succession, from 1600 to the present. Interpretation of sunspot activity were used to infer a direct thermal response of terrestrial temperature to solar variability on the time scale of the Gleissberg cycle (90 years, an amplitude of the 11-year cycles). A physical link between the sunspot activity and the solar parameter is hypothesized. Observations of sensible heat flux by stationary planetary waves and transient eddies, as well as general circulation modeling results of these processes, were examined from the viewpoint of the hypothesis of cooling due to reduced insolation.

  20. Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, October--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of: Rating and certification of domestic water heating systems, unique solar system components, advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems, analysis of advanced desiccant solar cooling systems, and management and coordination of Colorado State/DOE program.

  1. Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, November--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-24

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

  2. Early developments in solar cooling equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    A brief description of a development program to design, fabricate and field test a series of solar operated or driven cooling devices, undertaken by the Marshall Space Flight Center in the context of the Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Act of 1974, is presented. Attention is given to two basic design concepts: the Rankine cycle principle and the use of a dessicant for cooling.

  3. Solar heating and cooling buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Sunshine is available in differing amounts everywhere in the world and the easiest method of capturing it is by absorption in the form of thermal energy (heat). Therefore, it is logical to utilize it directly in the heating and cooling of buildings and avoid losses that would occur by conversion to some other form. It may be emphasized that of the total energy consumed annually in the U.S., about 25% is used for heating and cooling in buildings. It is generally agreed that of all the possible widespread uses of solar energy, this application has the highest probability of success in the near term. Although there are significant uncertainties associated with some technological and economic aspects, they do not loom as large as those associated with other potentially significant applications, such as electrical power generation. It may, however, be noted that solar electrical power generation at the building site, or at a centralized station is an excellent long term prospect. Approximately 25 experimental solar heated structures have been built in various parts of the world.

  4. Testing and design of solar cooling systems employing liquid dessicants

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, T.; Loef, G.O.G.; Flaherty, M.; Misra, S.; Patnaik, S.

    1989-05-01

    An open cycle liquid desiccant cooling system with cooling capacity of 3 tons (10.5 kW) a subject of research at Colorado State University. The system comprises two main units: the dehumidifier and the regenerator. Lithium bromide is the desiccant solution that dehumidifies the air stream during a counter-current, liquid-gas contacting in the packed tower. The regenerator concentrates the lithium bromide solution during a similar gas-liquid contacting using solar heated air with the only difference being that the direction of heat and mass transfer are reversed in this unit. The earlier studies conducted on the dehumidifier revealed significant departures from an energy balance closure. An attempt has been made to provide a realistic energy balance closure to the dehumidifier side. This has resulted in substantial re-calibration of the major instruments involved. Performance data of the entire system with the regenerator and dehumidifier operated in coupled mode have been presented. An optimization scheme to predict operating conditions suited for best performance of the two units, for varying ambient temperature and humidity to the dehumidifier, has been devised. 15 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Effect of Water Spray Evaporative Cooling at the Inlet of Regeneration Air Stream on the Performance of an Adsorption Desiccant Cooling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Kosuke; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu; Goto, Motonobu; Okano, Hiroshi

    This paper shows an influence of evaporative cooler at the inlet of regeneration air stream of an adsorptive desiccant cooling process on the cooling/dehumidifying performance. This evaporative cooling was expected to cause humidity increase in regeneration air reducing the dehumidifying performance of the honeycomb absorber, while the evaporative cooling plays an important role to produce a lower temperature in supply air. Two different airs to be used for the regeneration of the desiccant wheel were considered. One was fresh outside air (OA mode) and the other was air ventilated from the room (RA mode). Experimental results showed that the amount of dehumidified water obtained at the process without water spray evaporative cooler was actually larger than that of process with water spray evaporative cooler. This behavior was mainly due to increase of humidity or relative humidity in the regeneration air as expected. However, temperature of supply air produced by the process with the evaporator was rather lower than that of the other because of the cooled return air, resulting higher CE value. Regarding the operating mode, the evaporative cooler at the OA-mode was no longer useful at higher ambient humidity because of the difficulty of the evaporation of the water in such high humidity. It was also found that its dehumidifying performance was remarkably decreased at higher ambient humidity and lower regeneration temperature since the effective adsorption capacity at the resulting high relative humidity of the regeneration air decreased.

  6. Solar-powered cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph C.

    2015-07-28

    A solar-powered adsorption-desorption refrigeration and air conditioning system that uses nanostructural materials such as aerogels, zeolites, and sol gels as the adsorptive media. Refrigerant molecules are adsorbed on the high surface area of the nanostructural material while the material is at a relatively low temperature, perhaps at night. During daylight hours, when the nanostructural materials is heated by the sun, the refrigerant are thermally desorbed from the surface of the aerogel, thereby creating a pressurized gas phase in the vessel that contains the aerogel. This solar-driven pressurization forces the heated gaseous refrigerant through a condenser, followed by an expansion valve. In the condenser, heat is removed from the refrigerant, first by circulating air or water. Eventually, the cooled gaseous refrigerant expands isenthalpically through a throttle valve into an evaporator, in a fashion similar to that in more conventional vapor recompression systems.

  7. Seminar 14 - Desiccant Enhanced Air Conditioning: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.

    2013-02-01

    This presentation explains how liquid desiccant based coupled with an indirect evaporative cooler can efficiently produce cool, dry air, and how a liquid desiccant membrane air conditioner can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification without the carryover problems of previous generations of liquid desiccant systems. It provides an overview to a liquid desiccant DX air conditioner that can efficiently provide cooling and dehumidification to high latent loads without the need for reheat, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems can outperform vapor compression based air conditioning systems in hot and humid climates, explains how liquid desiccant cooling and dehumidification systems work, and describes a refrigerant free liquid desiccant based cooling system.

  8. Advances in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Dan S.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on technological advancements in the fields of solar collectors, thermal storage systems, and solar heating and cooling systems. Diagrams aid in the understanding of the thermodynamics of the systems. (CP)

  9. Solar-Powered, Liquid-Desiccant Air Conditioner for Low-Electricity Humidity Control: Report and Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, J.; Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Miller, J.; Lowenstein, A.; Barker, G.; Slayzak, S.

    2012-11-01

    The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate the capabilities of a new high-performance, liquid-desiccant dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) to enhance cooling efficiency and comfort in humid climates while substantially reducing electric peak demand at Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB), which is 12 miles east of Panama City, Florida.

  10. Solar technology assessment project. Volume 4: Solar air conditioning: Active, hybrid and passive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellott, J. I.

    1981-04-01

    The status of absorption cycle solar air conditioning and the Rankine cycle solar cooling system is reviewed. Vapor jet ejector chillers, solar pond based cooling, and photovoltaic compression air conditioning are also briefly discussed. Hybrid solar cooling by direct and indirect evaporative cooling, and dehumidification by desiccation are described and discussed. Passive solar cooling by convective and radiative processes, evaporative cooling by passive processes, and cooling with roof ponds and movable insulation are reviewed. Federal and state involvement in solar cooling is discussed.

  11. Moving Advanced Desiccant Materials into Mainstream Non-CFC Cooling Products

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, J. R.; Grossman, T.; Rice, C. K.; Fairchild, P. D.; Gross, I. L.

    2004-12-30

    Desiccant dehumidification technology is emerging as a technically viable alternative for comfort conditioning in many commercial and institutional buildings. Attempts to improve the indoor air quality of buildings has resulted in increasingly stringent guidelines for occupant outdoor air ventilation rates. Additionally, revised building heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) design criteria based on regional peak dew point data highlight the important of the latent (moisture removal) building load relative to the sensible (temperature) building load.

  12. Polymers as advanced materials for desiccant applications, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A.W.; Neidlinger, H.H.

    1990-09-01

    This report documents work to identify a next-generation, low-cost material with which solar energy or heat from another low-cost energy source can be used for regenerating the water vapor sorption activity of the desiccant. The objective of the work is to determine how the desired sorption performance of advanced desiccant materials can be predicted by understanding the role of the material modifications and material surfaces. The work concentrates on solid materials to be used for desiccant cooling systems and which process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce cooling. The work involved preparing modifications of polystyrene sulfonic acid sodium salt, synthesizing a hydrogel, and evaluating the sorption performances of these and similar commercially available polymeric materials; all materials were studied for their potential application in solid commercial desiccant cooling systems. Background information is also provided on desiccant cooling systems and the role of a desiccant material within such a system, and it includes the use of polymers as desiccant materials. 31 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. The economics of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Analytic procedure evaluates cost of combining absorption-cycle chiller with solar-energy system in residential or commercial application. Procedure assumes that solar-energy system already exists to heat building and that cooling system must be added. Decision is whether to cool building with conventional vapor-compression-cycle chiller or to use solar-energy system to provide heat input to absorption chiller.

  14. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, March--November 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-07

    This program includes six tasks, including (1) a project measuring the performance of unique solar system components, (2) a project to develop a methodology for determining annual performance ratings of solar domestic hot water systems, (3) a project that will identify, analyze, design, build, and experimentally evaluate SDHW systems incorporating advanced concepts and components, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform TRNSYS simulations to determine potential energy savings for desiccant cooling systems, especially in humid climates, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described.

  15. Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air-Conditioning (DEVap): Evaluation of a New Concept in Ultra Efficient Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.; Woods, J.; Burch, J.; Boranian, A.; Merrigan, T.

    2011-01-01

    NREL has developed the novel concept of a desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVap) with the objective of combining the benefits of liquid desiccant and evaporative cooling technologies into an innovative 'cooling core.' Liquid desiccant technologies have extraordinary dehumidification potential, but require an efficient cooling sink. DEVap's thermodynamic potential overcomes many shortcomings of standard refrigeration-based direct expansion cooling. DEVap decouples cooling and dehumidification performance, which results in independent temperature and humidity control. The energy input is largely switched away from electricity to low-grade thermal energy that can be sourced from fuels such as natural gas, waste heat, solar, or biofuels.

  16. Solar heating and cooling of buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourke, R. D.; Davis, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Solar energy has been used for space heating and water heating for many years. A less common application, although technically feasible, is solar cooling. This paper describes the techniques employed in the heating and cooling of buildings, and in water heating. The potential for solar energy to displace conventional energy sources is discussed. Water heating for new apartments appears to have some features which could make it a place to begin the resurgence of solar energy applications in the United States. A project to investigate apartment solar water heating, currently in the pilot plant construction phase, is described.

  17. Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-28

    The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs.

  18. Rankine-cycle solar-cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weathers, H. M.

    1979-01-01

    Report reviews progress made by three contractors to Marshall Space Flight Center and Department of Energy in developing Rankine-cycle machines for solar cooling and testing of commercially available equipment involved.

  19. Solar Heating and Cooling Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaen, R.; Gossler, A.

    1984-01-01

    Heating is practical now, but cooling needs more development. Report describes program for design and development of solar heating and cooling systems having high performance, low cost and modular application. Describes main technical features of each of systems. Presents summary of performance and costs.

  20. Solar Heating and Cooling: An Economic Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarity, Arthur E.

    This study serves as an introduction to the important economic considerations that are necessary for an assessment of the potential for solar heating and cooling in the United States. The first chapter introduces the technology that is used to tap solar energy for residential and commercial applications and illustrates the potential significance…

  1. Solar heating and cooling: Technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The solar energy research is reported including climatic data, architectural data, heating and cooling equipment, thermal loads, and economic data. Lists of data sources presented include: selected data sources for solar energy heating and cooling; bibliography of solar energy, and other energy sources; sources for manufacturing and sales, solar energy collectors; and solar energy heating and cooling projects.

  2. Solar absorption cooling plant in Seville

    SciTech Connect

    Bermejo, Pablo; Pino, Francisco Javier; Rosa, Felipe

    2010-08-15

    A solar/gas cooling plant at the Engineering School of Seville (Spain) was tested during the period 2008-2009. The system is composed of a double-effect LiBr + water absorption chiller of 174 kW nominal cooling capacity, powered by: (1) a pressurized hot water flow delivered by mean of a 352 m{sup 2} solar field of a linear concentrating Fresnel collector and (2) a direct-fired natural gas burner. The objective of the project is to indentify design improvements for future plants and to serve as a guideline. We focused our attention on the solar collector size and dirtiness, climatology, piping heat losses, operation control and coupling between solar collector and chiller. The daily average Fresnel collector efficiency was 0.35 with a maximum of 0.4. The absorption chiller operated with a daily average coefficient of performance of 1.1-1.25, where the solar energy represented the 75% of generator's total heat input, and the solar cooling ratio (quotient between useful cooling and insolation incident on the solar field) was 0.44. (author)

  3. Solar cooling in Madrid: Available solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo, M.; Hernandez, F.; Martin, E. )

    1994-11-01

    This paper analyzes the behaviour of an absorption chiller lithium bromide installation fed by a field of flat-plate solar collectors and condensed by swimming pool water. A method of calculation in a variable regime is developed in terms of the obtained experimental results. Starting from the meteorological variables of a clear summer day and from the project data (collector normalization curve, collector and installation mass), the minimum solar radiation level necessary to initiate the process, I[sub min], and the instantaneous available solar energy, Q[sub u] + W[sub 1] is determined. The solar radiation threshold, I[sub min], necessary to obtain the process temperature, t[sub ave], in each instant, is obtained by adding to the corrected Klein radiation threshold, I[sub k,c], the heat capacity effects of the collector, HCE[sub CO], and of the installation, HCE[sub ins], as well as the losses of heat of the pipes to the surroundings, Q[sub 1]. The instantaneous available solar energy, available useful heat, in addition to the wind collector losses to the surroundings, Q[sub u] + W[sub 1], is the difference, in each instant, between the radiation, I[sub g1T], and the radiation threshold, I[sub min].The integration during the day of the instantaneous available solar energy allows us to calculate the daily available function, H[sub T]. The value of H[sub T], measured in the swimming-pool water condensation installation reached 6.92 MJ/(m[sup 2] day ). The calculated values of H[sub T] for a conventional installation condensed by tower water, or air, have been 6.35 and 0.56 MJ/(m[sup 2] day). respectively.

  4. Analysis of the adsorption process and of desiccant cooling systems: a pseudo- steady-state model for coupled heat and mass transfer. [DESSIM, DESSIM2, DESSIM4

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.S.

    1982-12-01

    A computer model to simulate the adiabatic adsorption/desorption process is documented. Developed to predict the performance of desiccant cooling systems, the model has been validated through comparison with experimental data for single-blow adsorption and desorption. A literature review on adsorption analysis, detailed discussions of the adsorption process, and an initial assessment of the potential for performance improvement through advanced component development are included.

  5. Analysis of the adsorption process and of desiccant cooling systems: A pseudo- steady-state model for coupled heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, R. S.

    1982-12-01

    A computer model to simulate the adiabatic adsorption/desorption process is documented. Developed to predict the performance of desiccant cooling systems, the model has been validated through comparison with experimental data for single-blow adsorption and desorption. A literature review on adsorption analysis, detailed discussions of the adsorption process, and an initial assessment of the potential for performance improvement through advanced component development are included.

  6. Residential solar-heating/cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Report documents progress of residential solar-heating and cooling system development program at 5-month mark of anticipated 17-month program. System design has been completed, and development and component testing has been initiated. Report includes diagrams, operation overview, optimization studies of subcomponents, and marketing plans for system.

  7. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The effort calls for the development, manufacture, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3, 25, and 75 ton size units.

  8. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A collection of monthly status reports are given on the development of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems. This effort calls for the development, manufacturing, test, system installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation. The systems are 3-, 25-, and 75-ton size units.

  9. Public policy for solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirshberg, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Recent analyses indicated that solar heating and cooling systems for residential buildings are nearly economically competitive with conventional fossil fuel or electric systems, the former having higher initial cost but a lower operating cost than the latter. The paper examines obstacles to the widespread acceptance and use of solar space conditioning systems and explores some general policies which could help to overcome them. The discussion covers such institutional barriers limiting the adoption of solar technologies as existing building codes, financing constraints, and organizational structure of the building industry. The potential impact of financial incentives is analyzed. It is noted that a tax incentive of 25% could speed the use of solar energy by 7 to 8 years and produce an 8% reduction in fossil fuel use by 1990. A preliminary incentive package which could be helpful in promoting solar energy both at federal and state levels is proposed, and the necessary incentive level is analysed.

  10. Advanced desiccant materials research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czanderna, A. W.; Thomas, T. M.

    1986-05-01

    The long-range goal of this task is to understand the role of surface phenomena in desiccant cooling materials. The background information includes a brief introduction to desiccant cooling systems (DCS) and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The purpose, background, rationale, and long-term technical approach for studying advanced desiccant materials are then treated. Experimental methods for measuring water vapor sorption by desiccants are described, and the rationale is then given for choosing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for measuring sorption isotherms, rates, and cyclic stability. Background information is given about the QCM, including the quartz crystal resonator itself, the support structure for the quartz crystal, and the advantages and limitations of a QCM. The apparatus assembled and placed into operation during CY 1985 is described. The functions of the principal components of the equipment, i.e., the QCM, vacuum system, pressure gauges, residual gas analyzer, constant temperature bath, and data acquisition system, are described as they relate to the water vapor sorption measurements now under way. The criteria for narrowing the potential candidates as advanced desiccant materials for the initial studies are given. Also given is a list of 20 principal candidate materials identified based on the criteria and data available in the literature.

  11. Solar-Cooled Hotel in the Virgin Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harber, H.

    1982-01-01

    Performance of solar cooling system is described in 21-page report. System provides cooling for public areas including ball rooms, restaurant, lounge, lobby and shops. Chilled water from solar-cooling system is also used to cool hot water from hotel's desalinization plant.

  12. Adiabatic cooling of solar wind electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Ornulf; Leer, Egil

    1992-01-01

    In thermally driven winds emanating from regions in the solar corona with base electron densities of n0 not less than 10 exp 8/cu cm, a substantial fraction of the heat conductive flux from the base is transfered into flow energy by the pressure gradient force. The adiabatic cooling of the electrons causes the electron temperature profile to fall off more rapidly than in heat conduction dominated flows. Alfven waves of solar origin, accelerating the basically thermally driven solar wind, lead to an increased mass flux and enhanced adiabatic cooling. The reduction in electron temperature may be significant also in the subsonic region of the flow and lead to a moderate increase of solar wind mass flux with increasing Alfven wave amplitude. In the solar wind model presented here the Alfven wave energy flux per unit mass is larger than that in models where the temperature in the subsonic flow is not reduced by the wave, and consequently the asymptotic flow speed is higher.

  13. Desiccant systems save money

    SciTech Connect

    Kister, P.

    1996-10-01

    Desiccant systems can save the Navy money through lower utility bills. Traditional vapor compression air conditioning systems are required to remove both sensible heat and latent heat (humidity) by cooling the outside air below the dewpoint in order to condense out water vapor. In some cases the air is then required to be reheated to a comfortable level. This requires large amounts of electricity at peak billing rates. Desiccant systems, on the other hand, use a desiccant to remove moisture from the outside air prior to cooling the air using traditional chillers. The desiccant is then reactivated using natural gas heat. This will shift up to 40 percent of the cooling load of the building to natural gas which in many areas of the country is cheaper than electricity, especially during the peak hours in the summer. It also eliminates inefficient reheating and in most cases the temperature of the building can be raised since dry air is more comfortable at higher temperatures than humid air. Many buildings also require special humidity control which is most effectively and efficiently met using a desiccant system. These buildings include hospitals, commissaries, avionics rooms, BOQ`s and BEQ`s, etc.

  14. Market potential for solar heating and cooling in buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The use of solar heating and cooling for buildings as a method of conserving fossil fuels is discussed. The residential and commercial end use consumption of energy is tabulated. A survey to project the energy requirements for home and industry heating and cooling is developed. The survey indicates that there is a market potential for solar heating and cooling of buildings. A prediction of three to five billion dollars per year as the potential for solar heating and cooling is made.

  15. Thermally Activated Desiccant Technology for Heat Recovery and Comfort

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh, A. A.

    2005-11-01

    Desiccant cooling is an important part of the diverse portfolio of Thermally Activated Technologies (TAT) designed for conversion of heat for the purpose of indoor air quality control. Thermally activated desiccant cooling incorporates a desiccant material that undergoes a cyclic process involving direct dehumidification of moist air and thermal regeneration. Desiccants fall into two categories: liquid and solid desiccants. Regardless of the type, solid or liquid, the governing principles of desiccant dehumidification systems are the same. In the dehumidification process, the vapor pressure of the moist air is higher than that of the desiccant, leading to transfer of moisture from the air to the desiccant material. By heating the desiccant, the vapor pressure differential is reversed in the regeneration process that drives the moisture from the desiccant. Figure 1 illustrates a rotary solid-desiccant dehumidifier. A burner or a thermally compatible source of waste heat can provide the required heat for regeneration.

  16. Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air-Conditioning: Demonstrated Performance and Cost Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.; Lowenstein, A.

    2014-09-01

    Cooling loads must be dramatically reduced when designing net-zero energy buildings or other highly efficient facilities. Advances in this area have focused primarily on reducing a building's sensible cooling loads by improving the envelope, integrating properly sized daylighting systems, adding exterior solar shading devices, and reducing internal heat gains. As sensible loads decrease, however, latent loads remain relatively constant, and thus become a greater fraction of the overall cooling requirement in highly efficient building designs, particularly in humid climates. This shift toward latent cooling is a challenge for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Traditional systems typically dehumidify by first overcooling air below the dew-point temperature and then reheating it to an appropriate supply temperature, which requires an excessive amount of energy. Another dehumidification strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove water from air more efficiently; however, these systems are large and increase fan energy consumption due to the increased airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors. A third dehumidification strategy involves high flow liquid desiccant systems. These systems require a high maintenance separator to protect the air distribution system from corrosive desiccant droplet carryover and so are more commonly used in industrial applications and rarely in commercial buildings. Both solid desiccant systems and most high-flow liquid desiccant systems (if not internally cooled) add sensible energy which must later be removed to the air stream during dehumidification, through the release of sensible heat during the sorption process.

  17. Solar thermal heating and cooling. A bibliography with abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arenson, M.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliographic series cites and abstracts the literature and technical papers on the heating and cooling of buildings with solar thermal energy. Over 650 citations are arranged in the following categories: space heating and cooling systems; space heating and cooling models; building energy conservation; architectural considerations, thermal load computations; thermal load measurements, domestic hot water, solar and atmospheric radiation, swimming pools; and economics.

  18. Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A; Neymark, J

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

  19. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test was reported. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for single family residences, multiple family residences and commercial applications.

  20. Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1985-01-01

    Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

  1. Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, A.S.

    1983-12-08

    Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

  2. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress made in the manufacture, test, evaluation, installation, problem resolution, performance evaluation, and development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is described.

  3. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are being developed. The effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  4. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems are considered. This effort includes development, manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and performance evaluation.

  5. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Solar heating and heating/cooling systems were designed for single family, multifamily, and commercial applications. Subsystems considered included solar collectors, heat storage systems, auxiliary energy sources, working fluids, and supplementary controls, piping, and pumps.

  6. Cooling performance of solar cell-driven, thermoelectric cooling prototype headgear

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, T.; Obora, H.; Sato, S.

    1998-07-01

    Cooling performance of solar cell driven, thermoelectric cooling prototype headgear was examined experimentally. Three types of prototype headgear were made and examined. They were cooled by thermoelectric elements and driven by solar cells. The authors are always able to be cooled anytime and anywhere inside the house in hot season. However, they were not able to be cooled when they worked outside the house. Especially, a personal air-conditioning system is required for the people working outside. Some cooling caps with an electric fan driven by solar cells can be often seen now. However, the fan only blows hot air to the face. They cannot cool down the face below the ambient temperature. The authors tried to cool down the face to the lower temperature below the ambient by a refrigeration system. A thermoelectric element was set at the front of a headgear such as baseball cap or straw hat to cool a forehead. Some pieces of solar cells were mounted on the top and the brim of the headgear to work the thermoelectric element. Hot side of thermoelectric element was cooled by a plate fin an electric fan. The electric fan was also driven by a solar cell. Two types of baseball caps with solar cells and a thermoelectric element and a type of straw hat with them were made and tested. Solar cells were connected to optimize the electric power for the thermoelectric element. An electric fan and its power input were selected to cool maximum the thermoelectric element. Cooling performance and thermal comfort of the headgear were examined by testers in case of sitting, walking and bicycling. The temperature difference between ambient and cooling temperature was required only about 4 degree Celsius. Required power by solar cells was up to about 1.5 watt for a personal cooling.

  7. Prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Schedules and technical progress in the development of eight prototype solar heating and combined solar heating and cooling systems are reported. Particular emphasis is given to the analysis and preliminary design for the cooling subsystem, and the setup and testing of a horizontal thermal energy storage tank configuration and collector shroud evaluation.

  8. Solar air-conditioning-active, hybrid and passive

    SciTech Connect

    Yellott, J. I.

    1981-04-01

    After a discussion of summer air conditioning requirements in the United States, active, hybrid, and passive cooling systems are defined. Active processes and systems include absorption, Rankine cycle, and a small variety of miscellaneous systems. The hybrid solar cooling and dehumidification technology of desiccation is covered as well as evaporative cooling. The passive solar cooling processes covered include convective, radiative and evaporative cooling. Federal and state involvement in solar cooling is then discussed. (LEW)

  9. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is reported. Manufacture, test, installation, maintenance, problem resolution, and monitoring the operation of prototype systems is included. Heating and cooling equipment for single family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling) is described.

  10. Performance Analysis of XCPC Powered Solar Cooling Demonstration Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyolar, Bennett K.

    A solar thermal cooling system using novel non-tracking External Compound Parabolic Concentrators (XCPC) has been built at the University of California, Merced and operated for two cooling seasons. Its performance in providing power for space cooling has been analyzed. This solar cooling system is comprised of 53.3 m2 of XCPC trough collectors which are used to power a 23 kW double effect (LiBr) absorption chiller. This is the first system that combines both XCPC and absorption chilling technologies. Performance of the system was measured in both sunny and cloudy conditions, with both clean and dirty collectors. It was found that these collectors are well suited at providing thermal power to drive absorption cooling systems and that both the coinciding of available thermal power with cooling demand and the simplicity of the XCPC collectors compared to other solar thermal collectors makes them a highly attractive candidate for cooling projects.

  11. SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. Status report. Preliminary data on the performance of a rotary parallel-passage silica-gel dehumidifier

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, K.J.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility. The facility can test bench-scale rotary dehumidifiers over a wide range of controlled conditions. We constructed and installed in the test loop a prototype parallel-passage rotary dehumidifier that has spirally wound polyester tape coated with silica gel. The initial tests gave satisfactory results indicating that approximately 90% of the silica gel was active and the overall Lewis number of the wheel was near unity. The facility has several minor difficulties including an inability to control humidity satisfactorily and nonuniform and highly turbulent inlet velocities. To completely validate the facility requires a range of dehumidifier designs. Several choices are available including constructing a second parallel-passage dehumidifier with the passage spacing more uniform.

  12. Air cooled absorption chillers for solar cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, W. J.; Reimann, R. C.

    1982-03-01

    The chemical composition of a 'best' absorption refrigerant system is identified, and those properties of the system necessary to design hot water operated, air cooled chilling equipment are determined. Air cooled chillers from single family residential sizes into the commercial rooftop size range are designed and operated.

  13. Solar powered dehumidifier apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jebens, Robert W.

    1980-12-30

    A thermally insulated light transmitting housing forms a chamber containing a desiccant and having a first gas port open to the ambient and a second gas port connected by a two way valve to a volume to be dried. Solar energy transmitted through the housing heats and dries the desiccant. The increased air pressure due to the heating of the volume to be dried causes the air from the volume to be expelled through the valve into the chamber. The desiccant is then cooled by shielding it from solar energy before the volume cools thereby increasing its moisture absorbing capacity. Then the volume is allowed to cool drawing dehumidified air through the desiccant and the valve into the volume to be dried. This cycle is then repeated.

  14. Performance of active solar space-cooling systems: The 1980 cooling season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, D.; Frock, S.; Logee, T.; Missal, D.; Wetzel, P.

    1980-12-01

    Solar cooling by an absorption chiller is not a cost effective method to use solar heat. This statement is substantiated by careful analysis of each subsystem and equipment component. Good designs and operating procedures are identified. The problems which reduce cost effectiveness are pointed out. There are specific suggestions for improvements. Finally, there is a comparison of solar cooling by absorption chilling and using photovoltaic cells.

  15. Preliminary design package for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Summarized preliminary design information on activities associated with the development, delivery and support of solar heating and cooling systems is given. These systems are for single family dwellings and commercial applications. The heating/cooling system use a reversible vapor compression heat pump that is driven in the cooling mode by a Rankine power loop, and in the heating mode by a variable speed electric motor. The heating/cooling systems differ from the heating-only systems in the arrangement of the heat pump subsystem and the addition of a cooling tower to provide the heat sink for cooling mode operation.

  16. Water cooled absorption chillers for solar cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, W. J.; Reimann, R. C.

    1982-03-01

    A broad line of absorption chillers designed to operate with hot fluids at as low a temperature as practical while rejecting heat to a stream of water was developed. A packaging concept for solar application in which controls, pumps, valves and other system components could be factor assembled into a unitary solar module was investigated.

  17. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, Anthony V.; Schertz, William W.

    1987-01-01

    A composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  18. Composite desiccant structure

    DOEpatents

    Fraioli, A.V.; Schertz, W.W.

    1984-06-06

    This patent discloses a composite formed of small desiccant particles retained in a dark matrix composed of a porous binder containing a transition metal oxide with pores to provide moisture transport with respect to the particles, and metallic fibers to remove the heat of condensation during dehumidification and provide heat for the removal of moisture during regeneration. The moisture absorbing properties of the composite may be regenerated by exposure of the dark matrix to solar radiation with dehumidification occurring at night.

  19. Solar heating and cooling diode module

    DOEpatents

    Maloney, Timothy J.

    1986-01-01

    A high efficiency solar heating system comprising a plurality of hollow modular units each for receiving a thermal storage mass, the units being arranged in stacked relation in the exterior frame of a building, each of the units including a port for filling the unit with the mass, a collector region and a storage region, each region having inner and outer walls, the outer wall of the collector region being oriented for exposure to sunlight for heating the thermal storage mass; the storage region having an opening therein and the collector region having a corresponding opening, the openings being joined for communicating the thermal storage mass between the storage and collector regions by thermosiphoning; the collector region being disposed substantially below and in parallel relation to the storage region in the modular unit; and the inner wall of the collector region of each successive modular unit in the stacked relation extending over the outer wall of the storage region of the next lower modular unit in the stacked relation for reducing heat loss from the system. Various modifications and alternatives are disclosed for both heating and cooling applications.

  20. Evaluation of thermal-storage concepts for solar cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.; Morehouse, J. H.; Choi, M. K.; White, N. M.; Scholten, W. B.

    1981-10-01

    Various configuration concepts for utilizing thermal energy storage to improve the thermal and economic performance of solar cooling systems for buildings were analyzed. The storge concepts evaluated provide short-term thermal storge via the bulk containment of water or salt hydrates. The evaluations were made for both residential-size cooling systems (3-ton) and small commercial-size cooling systems (25-ton). The residential analysis considers energy requirements for space heating, space cooling and water heating, while the commercial building analysis is based only on energy requirements for space cooling. The commercial building analysis considered a total of 10 different thermal storage/solar systems, 5 each for absorption and Rankine chiller concepts. The residential analysis considered 4 thermal storage/solar systems, all utilizing an absorption chiller. The trade-offs considered include: cold-side versus hot-side storage, single vs multiple stage storage, and phase-change vs sensible heat storage.

  1. POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF SOLAR HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses potential environmental consequences of solar energy utilization for heating and cooling buildings. It identifies the areas in which both positive and negative impacts are possible, summarizes the national research and development program directed toward sol...

  2. Prototype solar heating and combined heating cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The design and development of eight prototype solar heating and combined heating and cooling systems is discussed. The program management and systems engineering are reported, and operational test sites are identified.

  3. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress in the development of prototype solar heating/cooling systems is reported. Results obtained from refinement/improvement of the single family, multifamily, and commercial systems configurations and generalized studies on several of the subsystems are presented.

  4. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  5. Solar heating and cooling technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The research activities described herein were concentrated on the areas of economics, heating and cooling systems, architectural design, materials characteristics, climatic conditions, educational information packages, and evaluation of solar energy systems and components.

  6. Solar residential heating and cooling system development test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.; Melton, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling system is described, which was installed in a simulated home at Marshall Space Flight Center. Performance data are provided for the checkout and initial operational phase for key subsystems and for the total system. Valuable information was obtained with regard to operation of a solar cooling system during the first summer of operation. Areas where improvements and modifications are required to optimize such a system are discussed.

  7. Passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys

    SciTech Connect

    Mignon, G.V.; Cunningham, W.A.; Thompson, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    Computer models have been developed to describe the operation of both solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys. Design studies are being conducted at the present time to use the towers for cooling an experimental, well instrumented, structure to study passive cooling in residential buildings. (MHR)

  8. Solar heating and cooling systems design and development. [prototype development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The development of twelve prototype solar heating/cooling systems, six heating and six heating and cooling systems, two each for single family, multi-family, and commercial applications, is reported. Schedules and technical discussions, along with illustrations on the progress made from April 1, 1977 through June 30, 1977 are detailed.

  9. Passive thermosyphon solar heating and cooling module with supplementary heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A collection of three quarterly reports from Sigma Research, Inc., covering progress and status from January through September 1977 are presented. Three heat exchangers are developed for use in a solar heating and cooling system for installation into single-family dwellings. Each exchanger consists of one heating and cooling module and one submerged electric water heating element.

  10. Performance and operational analysis of a liquid desiccant open-flow solar collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzka, P. G.; Rico, S. S.

    1982-10-01

    Theoretical predictions of the heat and mass transfer in an open flow solar collector used in conjunction with an absorption chiller are compared with performance data from a rooftop system. The study focuses on aqueous solutions of a hygroscopic salt, e.g., LiCl, flowing continuously over a solar absorbing surface. Water in the solution sublimes to a region of lower vapor pressure, i.e., the atmosphere. Direction of the water-depleted dessiccant to a storage volume and then to circulation around an evaporator unit permits operation of a solar-powered air conditioner. A closed form solution was defined for the heat and mass transfer, along with a finite difference solution. The system studied comprised a sloped roof top with 2500 sq ft of asphalt shingles, collector pipes beneath the shingles, and two 500 gal storage tanks. Relatively good agreement was found between the models and the recorded data, although some discrepancies were present when considering temperatures and performance at specific times of day. The measured 30-40% efficiencies indicated that further development of the system is warranted.

  11. Convective Array Cooling for a Solar Powered Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Dolce, James (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A general characteristic of photovoltaics is that they increase in efficiency as their operating temperature decreases. Based on this principal, the ability to increase a solar aircraft's performance by cooling the solar cells was examined. The solar cells were cooled by channeling some air underneath the cells and providing a convective cooling path to the back side of the array. A full energy balance and flow analysis of the air within the cooling passage was performed. The analysis was first performed on a preliminary level to estimate the benefits of the cooling passage. This analysis established a clear benefit to the cooling passage. Based on these results a more detailed analysis was performed. From this cell temperatures were calculated and array output power throughout a day period were determined with and without the cooling passage. The results showed that if the flow through the cooling passage remained laminar then the benefit in increased output power more than offset the drag induced by the cooling passage.

  12. Problems encountered in solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, M.

    1979-01-01

    Report discussing various experiences of workers at Marshall Space Flight Center in developing solar heating and cooling systems is presented. Presents compilation of problems and their resolutions which can assist designers of solar-energy systems and prevent repetition of errors.

  13. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of marketable solar heating and cooling systems for single family and commercial applications is described. The delivery, installation, and monitoring of the prototype systems are discussed. Seven operational test sites are discussed in terms of system performance. Problems encountered with equipment and installation were usually due to lack of skills required for solar system installation.

  14. Inhibitor analysis for a solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabony, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A study of potential corrosion inhibitors for the NASA solar heating and cooling system which uses aluminum solar panels is provided. Research consisted of testing using a dynamic corrosion system, along with an economic analysis of proposed corrosion inhibitors. Very good progress was made in finding a suitable inhibitor for the system.

  15. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    These combined quarterly reports summarize the activities from November 1977 through September 1978, and over the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

  16. Preliminary design package for prototype solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A summary is given of the preliminary analysis and design activity on solar heating and cooling systems. The analysis was made without site specific data other than weather; therefore, the results indicate performance expected under these special conditions. Major items include a market analysis, design approaches, trade studies and other special data required to evaluate the preliminary analysis and design. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. Two heating and six heating and cooling units will be delivered for Single Family Residences, Multiple-family Residences and commercial applications.

  17. Solar cooling system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, Virgin Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harber, H.

    1981-01-01

    The operational and thermal performance of a variety of solar systems are described. The Solar Cooling System was installed in a hotel at St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. The system consists of the evacuated glass tube collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, computerized controller, a large solar optimized industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat.

  18. Solar cooling system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, Virgin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harber, H.

    1981-09-01

    The operational and thermal performance of a variety of solar systems are described. The Solar Cooling System was installed in a hotel at St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. The system consists of the evacuated glass tube collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, computerized controller, a large solar optimized industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat.

  19. Solar heating and cooling technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The accomplishments of a project to study solar heating and air conditioning are outlined. Presentation materials (data packages, slides, charts, and visual aids) were developed. Bibliographies and source materials on materials and coatings, solar water heaters, systems analysis computer models, solar collectors and solar projects were developed. Detailed MIRADS computer formats for primary data parameters were developed and updated. The following data were included: climatic, architectural, topography, heating and cooling equipment, thermal loads, and economics. Data sources in each of these areas were identified as well as solar radiation data stations and instruments.

  20. An approach for cooling by solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabeih, S. M.; Wahhab, M. A.; Asfour, H. M.

    The present investigation is concerned with the possibility to base the operation of a household refrigerator on solar energy instead of gas fuel. The currently employed heating system is to be replaced by a solar collector with an absorption area of two sq m. Attention is given to the required changes in the generator design, the solar parameters at the location of refrigerator installation, the mathematical approach for the thermal analysis of the solar collector, the development of a computer program for the evaluation of the important parameters, the experimental test rig, and the measurement of the experimental parameters. A description is given of the obtained optimum operating conditions for the considered system.

  1. Solar Induced Climate Changes and Cooling of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Shahinaz M.

    2011-06-01

    Evidences are given for the cooling effect induced by solar weak cycles. It is forecasted that the coming solar cycle number 24, which has started on January 2008, would be very weak. This cycle would be followed by several weak cycles. Its very start on January 2008 have induced a climate change that forced global cooling, Indeed all global temperature monitors have shown temperature drops. The GISS monitor showed a 0.75°C drop between January 2007 and January 2008. This sharp temperature drop characterizes cooling induced by weak cycles as was evident by historical temperature records. It also happened in the right exact timing of the start of cycle 24. This cooling is real and could last for some time. The cooling well width is location dependant. Last January cooling left many countries in deep freeze. Cooling is very serious and can destroy crops and cause famines. This cooling is instrumentally recorded. This is an appeal to scientists to consider the present cooling seriously, after all the truth ought to be followed. Alert is also given to the reaponsible authorities to work promptly to choose the proper crops that can tolerate the cold otherwise it would be a disaster worldwide.

  2. Solar-heating and cooling demonstration project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Florida Solar Energy Center has retrofitted office building, approximately 5,000 square feet of area, with solar heating and air-conditioning. Information on operation, installation, controls, and hardware for system is contained in 164 page report. Document includes manufacturer's product literature and detailed drawings.

  3. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling is described which is designed to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2,200 square feet. Five 3 ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3,000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two 3,000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  4. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-06-01

    A solar heating and cooling is described which is designed to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2,200 square feet. Five 3 ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3,000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two 3,000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  5. Application of solar ponds to district heating and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leboeuf, C. M.

    1981-04-01

    A preliminary investigation is reported of the feasibility of incorporating solar ponds into subdivisions to provide district heating, domestic hot water (DHW), and district cooling. Two locations were chosen for analysis: Fort Worth, Texas and Washington, D.C. Solar ponds were sized to meet space heating, cooling, and DHW loads in each location for differing community sizes. Parameters such as storage layer temperature, pond geometry, and storage depth vs surface area were varied to determine the most effective approach to solar pond utilization. A distribution system for the district heating system was designed, including sizing of heat exchangers, piping, and pumps. Cost estimates for the pond and distribution system were formulated by using data generated in pond sizing, as well as associated system costs (e.g., salt costs and distribution system costs). Finally, solar ponds were found to be competitive with residential flat plate collector systems, with delivered energy costs as low as $16.00/GJ.

  6. Solar heating and cooling technical data and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    The acquisition and processing of selected parametric data for inclusion in a computerized Data Base using the Marshall Information Retrieval and Data System (MIRADS) developed by NASA-MSFC is discussed. This data base provides extensive technical and socioeconomic information related to solar energy heating and cooling on a national scale. A broadly based research approach was used to assist in the support of program management and the application of a cost-effective program for solar energy development and demonstration.

  7. On carbon monoxide cooling in the solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauas, Pablo J.; Avrett, Eugene H.; Loeser, Rudolf

    1990-01-01

    The CO cooling rate for models of the solar atmosphere using the detailed line-by-line CO opacity in the fundamental band, and carrying out a full radiative transfer calculation for each line is computed. The importance of the different assumptions that have been made to obtain the CO cooling rate and find that when detailed optical depth effects are taken into account, the calculated CO cooling rate at line optical depths near unity can be smaller than optically thin estimates by more than an order of magnitude is studied. It is found that CO cooling does not account for the missing source of radiative cooling in the temperature minimum region of the quiet sun.

  8. Keeping Cool With Solar-Powered Refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In the midst of developing battery-free, solar-powered refrigeration and air conditioning systems for habitats in space, David Bergeron, the team leader for NASA's Advanced Refrigerator Technology Team at Johnson Space Center, acknowledged the need for a comparable solar refrigerator that could operate in conjunction with the simple lighting systems already in place on Earth. Bergeron, a 20-year veteran in the aerospace industry, founded the company Solus Refrigeration, Inc., in 1999 to take the patented advanced refrigeration technology he co-developed with his teammate, Johnson engineer Michael Ewert, to commercial markets. Now known as SunDanzer Refrigeration, Inc., Bergeron's company is producing battery-free, photovoltaic (PV) refrigeration systems under license to NASA, and selling them globally.

  9. Corrosion inhibitors for solar-heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes results of tests conducted to evaluate abilities of 12 candidate corrosion inhibitors to protect aluminum, steel, copper, or stainless steel at typical conditions encountered in solar heating and cooling systems. Inhibitors are based on sodium salts including nitrates, borates, silicates, and phosphates.

  10. Solar--heated and cooled office building--Dalton, Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Modern energy efficient building is heated and cooled by five rows of flat plate solar collectors; its domestic hot water needs are also met. Final report includes detailed drawings and photographs, manufacturer's literature, performance specifications, acceptance test data, and performance verification statements. Operation and maintenance manual is also attached.

  11. Solar Heating and Cooling of Residential Buildings: Design of Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Solar Energy Applications Lab.

    This is the second of two training courses designed to develop the capability of practitioners in the home building industry to design solar heating and cooling systems. The course is organized in 23 modules to separate selected topics and to facilitate learning. Although a compact schedule of one week is shown, a variety of formats can be…

  12. Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reviewed in the development, delivery, and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consisted of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

  13. International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, A. J.

    This trip was undertaken to participate in and represent the United States Industry at the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Program (SHCP) Task 14 Workshop. The meeting took place at the A1 Bani Hotel in Rome Italy.

  14. The development of a solar residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The MSFC solar heating and cooling facility was assembled to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar energy for heating and cooling buildings, to provide an engineering evaluation of the total system and the key subsystems, and to investigate areas of possible improvement in design and efficiency. The basic solar heating and cooling system utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling. A complete description of all systems is given. Development activities for this test system included assembly, checkout, operation, modification, and data analysis, all of which are discussed. Selected data analyses for the first 15 weeks of testing are included, findings associated with energy storage and the energy storage system are outlined, and conclusions resulting from test findings are provided. An evaluation of the data for summer operation indicates that the current system is capable of supplying an average of 50 percent of the thermal energy required to drive the air conditioner. Preliminary evaluation of data collected for operation in the heating mode during the winter indicates that nearly 100 percent of the thermal energy required for heating can be supplied by the system.

  15. Solar-Heated and Cooled Office Building--Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Final report documents solar-energy system installed in office building to provide space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. Collectors mounted on roof track Sun and concentrate rays on fluid-circulating tubes. Collected energy is distributed to hot-water-fired absorption chiller and space-heating and domestic-hot-water preheating systems.

  16. Active solar heating and cooling information user study

    SciTech Connect

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on active solar heating and cooling (SHAC). An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from 19 SHAC groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Manufacturers (4 groups), Distributors, Installers, Architects, Builders, Planners, Engineers (2 groups), Representatives of Utilities, Educators, Cooperative Extension Service County Agents, Building Owners/Managers, and Homeowners (2 groups). The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

  17. Solar-powered Rankine heat pump for heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, J.

    1978-01-01

    The design, operation and performance of a familyy of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. The systems feature a reversible heat pump operating with R-11 as the working fluid and using a motor-driven centrifugal compressor. In the cooling mode, solar energy provides the heat source for a Rankine power loop. The system is operational with heat source temperatures ranging from 155 to 220 F; the estimated coefficient of performance is 0.7. In the heating mode, the vapor-cycle heat pump processes solar energy collected at low temperatures (40 to 80 F). The speed of the compressor can be adjusted so that the heat pump capacity matches the load, allowing a seasonal coefficient of performance of about 8 to be attained.

  18. Overview-absorption/Rankine solar cooling program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlig, M.; Heitz, A.; Boyce, B.

    1980-03-01

    The tasks being performed in the absorption and Rankine program areas run the gamut from basic work on fluids to development of chillers and chiller components, to field and reliability testing of complete cooling systems. In the absorption program, there are six current and five essentially completed projects. In the Rankine program, there are five current projects directly supported by DOE, and three projects funded through and managed by NASA/MSFC (Manned Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama). The basic features of these projects are discussed. The systems under development in five of these current projects were selected for field testing in the SOLERAS program, a joint US-Saudi Arabian enterprise. Some technical highlights of the program are presented.

  19. Evaluation of hybrid solar/fossil Rankine-cooling concept

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, H M

    1980-11-01

    The hybrid solar/fossil Rankine cycle is analyzed thermodynamically to determine fuel use and efficiency. The hybrid system is briefly compared with solar organic Rankine systems with a fossil fuel auxiliary mode, and with geothermal resources. The economic evaluation compares the present value of the superheater fuel cost over the system lifetime with the first cost reduction obtained by substituting a hybrid solar/fossil Rankine engine for an organic Rankine engine. The economics analysis indicates that even if the hybrid solar/fossil Rankine cooling system were developed to the point of being a commercial product with an economic advantage over an otherwise equivalent solar organic Rankine cooling system, it would gradually lose that advantage with rising fuel costs and decreasing collector costs. From the standpoint of national fossil fuel conservation, the hybrid concept would be preferable only in applications where the operating duration in the solar/fossil mode would be substantially greater than in the fossil fuel-only auxiliary mode. (LEW)

  20. Solar heating and cooling demonstration project at the Florida solar energy center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The retrofitted solar heating and cooling system installed at the Florida Solar Energy Center is described. The system was designed to supply approximately 70 percent of the annual cooling and 100 percent of the heating load. The project provides unique high temperature, nonimaging, nontracking, evacuated tube collectors. The design of the system was kept simple and employs five hydronic loops. They are energy collection, chilled water production, space cooling, space heating and energy rejection. Information is provided on the system's acceptance test results operation, controls, hardware and installation, including detailed drawings.

  1. Solar heating and cooling system design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The progress of the program during the sixth program quarter is reported. The program calls for the development and delivery of eight prototype solar heating and cooling systems for installation and operational test. The William O'Brien single-family heating system was installed and is operational. The New Castle single-family heating residence is under construction. The Kansas University (KU) system is in the final design stages. The 25 ton cooling subsystem for KU is the debugging stage. Pressure drops that were greater than anticipated were encountered. The 3 ton simulation work is being finalized and the design parameters for the Rankine system were determined from simulation output.

  2. "Self-packaging" desiccant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Desiccant, consisting of water-soluble filler contained in water-permeable elastomeric matrix, absorbs large quantities of water without becoming sticky or releasing corrosive agents. Desiccant may be molded into virtually any shape depending on area of application.

  3. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The Solar Energy System was installed as a part of a new construction of a college building. The building will house classrooms and laboratories, administrative offices and three lecture halls. The Solar Energy System consists of 4,096 square feet (128 panels) Owens/Illinois Evacuated Glass Tube Collector Subsystem, and a 5,000 gallon steel tank below ground storage system. Hot water is circulated between the collectors and storage tank, passing through a water/lithium bromide absorption chiller to cool the building.

  4. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    The Solar Energy System was installed as a part of a new construction of a college building. The building will house classrooms and laboratories, administrative offices and three lecture halls. The Solar Energy System consists of 4,096 square feet (128 panels) Owens/Illinois Evacuated Glass Tube Collector Subsystem, and a 5,000 gallon steel tank below ground storage system. Hot water is circulated between the collectors and storage tank, passing through a water/lithium bromide absorption chiller to cool the building.

  5. Solar Cooling for Buildings. Workshop Proceedings (Los Angeles, California, February 6-8, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, Francis, Ed.

    A consensus has developed among U.S. solar researchers that the solar-powered cooling of buildings is an important topic. Most solar heating systems are technically simpler, and more highly developed, than solar cooling devices are. The determination of the best design concept for any particular application is not a simple process. Significant…

  6. Corrosion inhibitors for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Deramus, G. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Problems dealing with corrosion and corrosion protection of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. A test program was conducted to find suitable and effective corrosion inhibitors for systems employing either water or antifreeze solutions for heat transfer and storage. Aluminum-mild-steel-copper-stainless steel assemblies in electrical contact were used to simulate a multimetallic system which is the type most likely to be employed. Several inhibitors show promise for this application.

  7. Modern solar maximum forced late twentieth century Greenland cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, T.; Box, J. E.; Vinther, B. M.; Goto-Azuma, K.; Blunier, T.; White, J. W. C.; Nakaegawa, T.; Andresen, C. S.

    2015-07-01

    The abrupt Northern Hemispheric warming at the end of the twentieth century has been attributed to an enhanced greenhouse effect. Yet Greenland and surrounding subpolar North Atlantic remained anomalously cold in 1970s to early 1990s. Here we reconstructed robust Greenland temperature records (North Greenland Ice Core Project and Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2) over the past 2100 years using argon and nitrogen isotopes in air trapped within ice cores and show that this cold anomaly was part of a recursive pattern of antiphase Greenland temperature responses to solar variability with a possible multidecadal lag. We hypothesize that high solar activity during the modern solar maximum (approximately 1950s-1980s) resulted in a cooling over Greenland and surrounding subpolar North Atlantic through the slowdown of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation with atmospheric feedback processes.

  8. Solar heating and cooling demonstration project at the Florida Solar Energy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hankins, J.D.

    1980-02-01

    The retrofitted solar heating and cooling system installed at the Florida Solar Energy Center is described. Information is provided on the system's test, operation, controls, hardware and installation, including detailed drawings. The Center's office building, approximately 5000 square feet of space, with solar air conditioning and heating as a demonstration of the technical feasibility is located just north of Port Canaveral, Florida. The system was designed to supply approximately 70% of the annual cooling and 100% of the heating load. The project provides unique high-temperature, non-imaging, non-tracking, evacuated-tube collectors. The design of the system was kept simple and employs five hydronic loops. They are energy collection, chilled water production, space cooling, space heating and energy rejection.

  9. Double-sided solar-cell package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelpuk, B.

    1978-01-01

    Cost-effective solar-cell package is proposed for development of practical solar-cell system. Since cells are enclosed in inexpensive plastic tubes, forced-air-cooling loop is proposed to maintain cell temperature at adequate levels. Loop must include desiccant to remove moisture from hermetic enclosures to prevent cell corrosion.

  10. Citywide Impacts of Cool Roof and Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic Deployment on Near-Surface Air Temperature and Cooling Energy Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanca, F.; Georgescu, M.; Mahalov, A.; Moustaoui, M.; Martilli, A.

    2016-04-01

    Assessment of mitigation strategies that combat global warming, urban heat islands (UHIs), and urban energy demand can be crucial for urban planners and energy providers, especially for hot, semi-arid urban environments where summertime cooling demands are excessive. Within this context, summertime regional impacts of cool roof and rooftop solar photovoltaic deployment on near-surface air temperature and cooling energy demand are examined for the two major USA cities of Arizona: Phoenix and Tucson. A detailed physics-based parametrization of solar photovoltaic panels is developed and implemented in a multilayer building energy model that is fully coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting mesoscale numerical model. We conduct a suite of sensitivity experiments (with different coverage rates of cool roof and rooftop solar photovoltaic deployment) for a 10-day clear-sky extreme heat period over the Phoenix and Tucson metropolitan areas at high spatial resolution (1-km horizontal grid spacing). Results show that deployment of cool roofs and rooftop solar photovoltaic panels reduce near-surface air temperature across the diurnal cycle and decrease daily citywide cooling energy demand. During the day, cool roofs are more effective at cooling than rooftop solar photovoltaic systems, but during the night, solar panels are more efficient at reducing the UHI effect. For the maximum coverage rate deployment, cool roofs reduced daily citywide cooling energy demand by 13-14 %, while rooftop solar photovoltaic panels by 8-11 % (without considering the additional savings derived from their electricity production). The results presented here demonstrate that deployment of both roofing technologies have multiple benefits for the urban environment, while solar photovoltaic panels add additional value because they reduce the dependence on fossil fuel consumption for electricity generation.

  11. Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

  12. The development and cooling of a solar limb-flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veck, N. J.; Strong, K. T.; Jordan, C.; Simnett, G. M.; Cargill, P. J.; Priest, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of a flare that began in soft X-rays at 20:37 UT on April 12, 1980 at the west limb of the sun are discussed. The observations of the flare and postflare loops are first described, and the Solar Maximum Mission data are interpreted in terms of the temperature, density, and geometry of the emitting regions. The observed postflare cooling time is compared with that expected from radiation, conduction, and enthalpy flux. The loop model is discussed, and the observed events are compared with other proposed models.

  13. Quantum-radiative cooling for solar cells with textured surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Boris; Ivanov, Igor

    2004-11-01

    Efficient technique of Quantum Radiative Cooling (QRC) of textured Solar Cells and Modules is described that is capable of Solar Module (SM) temperature reduction by 5-20C, resulting in 3-10% efficiency increase. Novel methods are based on the quantum assisted IR emission from the surface covered by either multi-layer coatings made of Si-nitride, SiO or Si oxy-nitride films or specifically designed insulating sun-transparent chamber (QRC zone) that contains Selective Emissive (SE) gas or gas mix. QRC zone is mounted on the top of Solar Module replacing existing lamination coatings. To enhance the efficiency of QRC some specific methods and fabrication procedures are proposed to form an electricly charged textured surface that provide a high Electric Field at the surface thus enhancing IR emissivity from the surface. Such procedure can be also used to form the field Induced Surface Barriers in the Si-based Solar Cells that can substitute the existing diffused Emitters resulting in significant reduction of the Cycle Time as well as prospective Fabrication Cost.

  14. SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project. Final report, project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Proposals for research on solar cooling are presented for four Saudi Arabian universities. The universities are the University of Petroleum and Minerals in Dhahran, King Saud University in Riyadh, King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, and King Faisal University in Dammam. Topics researched include the Rankine cycle, passive solar cooling systems, a solar-powered lithium bromide-water absorption machine and a photovoltaic-powered thermoelectric cooling machine. (BCS)

  15. Site-dependent factors affecting the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure has been developed which can be used to determine the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling systems. This procedure has been used in a study to investigate the influence of the site-dependent parameters on the economic feasibility of solar absorption cooling. The purpose of this study was to make preliminary site selections for solar powered absorption cooling systems. This paper summarizes the results of that study.

  16. Small Scale Solar Cooling Unit in Climate Conditions of Latvia: Environmental and Economical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaunzems, Dzintars; Veidenbergs, Ivars

    2010-01-01

    The paper contributes to the analyses from the environmental and economical point of view of small scale solar cooling system in climate conditions of Latvia. Cost analyses show that buildings with a higher cooling load and full load hours have lower costs. For high internal gains, cooling costs are around 1,7 €/kWh and 2,5 €/kWh for buildings with lower internal gains. Despite the fact that solar cooling systems have significant potential to reduce CO2 emissions due to a reduction of electricity consumption, the economic feasibility and attractiveness of solar cooling system is still low.

  17. Energy-efficient regenerative liquid desiccant drying process

    DOEpatents

    Ko, Suk M.; Grodzka, Philomena G.; McCormick, Paul O.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to the use of desiccants in conjunction with an open oop drying cycle and a closed loop drying cycle to reclaim the energy expended in vaporizing moisture in harvested crops. In the closed loop cycle, the drying air is brought into contact with a desiccant after it exits the crop drying bin. Water vapor in the moist air is absorbed by the desiccant, thus reducing the relative humidity of the air. The air is then heated by the used desiccant and returned to the crop bin. During the open loop drying cycle the used desiccant is heated (either fossil or solar energy heat sources may be used) and regenerated at high temperature, driving water vapor from the desiccant. This water vapor is condensed and used to preheat the dilute (wet) desiccant before heat is added from the external source (fossil or solar). The latent heat of vaporization of the moisture removed from the desiccant is reclaimed in this manner. The sensible heat of the regenerated desiccant is utilized in the open loop drying cycle. Also, closed cycle operation implies that no net energy is expended in heating drying air.

  18. Influence of solar variability on the infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere from 2002 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mlynczak, Martin G; Hunt, Linda A; Mertens, Christopher J; Thomas Marshall, B; Russell, James M; Woods, Thomas; Earl Thompson, R; Gordley, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere by carbon dioxide (CO2, 15 µm) and by nitric oxide (NO, 5.3 µm) has been observed for 12 years by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite. For the first time we present a record of the two most important thermospheric infrared cooling agents over a complete solar cycle. SABER has documented dramatic variability in the radiative cooling on time scales ranging from days to the 11 year solar cycle. Deep minima in global mean vertical profiles of radiative cooling are observed in 2008–2009. Current solar maximum conditions, evidenced in the rates of radiative cooling, are substantially weaker than prior maximum conditions in 2002–2003. The observed changes in thermospheric cooling correlate well with changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance and geomagnetic activity during the prior maximum conditions. NO and CO2 combine to emit 7 × 1018 more Joules annually at solar maximum than at solar minimum. Key Points First record of thermospheric IR cooling rates over a complete solar cycleIR cooling in current solar maximum conditions much weaker than prior maximumVariability in thermospheric IR cooling observed on scale of days to 11 years PMID:26074647

  19. Liquid flat plate collector and pump for solar heating and cooling systems: A collection of quarterly reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development, fabrication, and delivery of solar subsystems consisting of a solar operated pump, and solar collectors which can be used in solar heating and cooling, or hot water, for single family, multifamily, or commercial applications is reported.

  20. Breakthrough Video: Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) invented a breakthrough technology that improves air conditioning in a novel way—with heat. NREL combined desiccant materials, which remove moisture from the air using heat, and advanced evaporative technologies to develop a cooling unit that uses 90% less electricity and up to 80% less total energy than traditional air conditioning (AC). This solution, called the desiccant enhanced evaporative air conditioner (DEVAP), also controls humidity more effectively to improve the comfort of people in buildings.

  1. Optimum hot water temperature for absorption solar cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lecuona, A.; Ventas, R.; Venegas, M.; Salgado, R.; Zacarias, A.

    2009-10-15

    The hot water temperature that maximizes the overall instantaneous efficiency of a solar cooling facility is determined. A modified characteristic equation model is used and applied to single-effect lithium bromide-water absorption chillers. This model is based on the characteristic temperature difference and serves to empirically calculate the performance of real chillers. This paper provides an explicit equation for the optimum temperature of vapor generation, in terms of only the external temperatures of the chiller. The additional data required are the four performance parameters of the chiller and essentially a modified stagnation temperature from the detailed model of the thermal collector operation. This paper presents and discusses the results for small capacity machines for air conditioning of homes and small buildings. The discussion highlights the influence of the relevant parameters. (author)

  2. Solar Heating and Cooling of Residential Buildings: Sizing, Installation and Operation of Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Univ., Ft. Collins. Solar Energy Applications Lab.

    This training course and a companion course titled "Design of Systems for Solar Heating and Cooling of Residential Buildings," are designed to train home designers and builders in the fundamentals of solar hydronic and air systems for space heating and cooling and domestic hot water heating for residential buildings. Each course, organized in 22…

  3. Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings: Phase 0. Executive Summary. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Baltimore, MD.

    After the Westinghouse Electric Corporation made a comprehensive analysis of the technical, economic, social, environmental, and institutional factors affecting the feasibility of utilizing solar energy for heating and cooling buildings, it determined that solar heating and cooling systems can become competitive in most regions of the country in…

  4. System design package for a solar heating and cooling system installed at Akron, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Information used to evaluate the design of a solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system is given. A conventional heat pump provides summer cooling items as the design data brochure, system performance specification, system hazard analysis, spare parts list, and detailed design drawings. A solar system is installed in a single-family dwelling at Akron, Ohio, and at Duffield, Virginia.

  5. National Program Plan for Research and Development in Solar Heating and Cooling. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This report presents the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) program plan for solar heating and cooling of buildings and for agricultural and industrial process applications. An overview of the program plan is followed by a description of the ten paths to the solar heating and cooling of buildings and a brief discussion of the…

  6. Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some application.

  7. Establish feasibility for providing passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporate downdraft chimneys

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, W.A.; Mignon, G.V.; Thompson, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Natural draft towers can be used for cooling and ventilating structures. From an operational perspective, the downdraft evaporatively cooled tower is preferred for a dry climate. Solar chimneys, when used alone, tend to require an excessively large solar collector area when appreciable quantities of air must be moved. When used in combination with a downdraft tower, the roof and attic of buildings may assist the solar chimney and their use becomes more attractive. Both a frame building and a greenhouse were successfully cooled during this program. The economics of the downdraft tower compare favorably with conventional evaporative cooling for some applications.

  8. Active Desiccant-Based Preconditioning Market Analysis and Product Development

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.

    2001-01-11

    The Phase 1 report (ORNL/Sub/94-SVO44/1), completed earlier in this program, involved a comprehensive field survey and market analysis comparing various specialized outdoor air handling units. This initial investigation included conventional cooling and reheat, conventional cooling with sensible recovery, total energy recovery systems (passive desiccant technology) and various active desiccant systems. The report concluded that several markets do promise a significant sales opportunity for a Climate Changer-based active desiccant system offering. (Climate Changer is a registered trademark of Trane Company.) This initial market analysis defined the wants and needs of the end customers (design engineers and building owners), which, along with subsequent information included in this report, have been used to guide the determination of the most promising active desiccant system configurations. This Phase 2 report begins with a summary of a more thorough investigation of those specific markets identified as most promising for active desiccant systems. Table 1 estimates the annual sales potential for a cost-effective product line of active desiccant systems, such as that built from Climate Changer modules. The Product Development Strategy section describes the active desiccant system configurations chosen to best fit the needs of the marketplace while minimizing system options. Key design objectives based on market research are listed in this report for these active desiccant systems. Corresponding performance goals for the dehumidification wheel required to meet the overall system design objectives are also defined. The Performance Modeling section describes the strategy used by SEMCO to design the dehumidification wheels integrated into the prototype systems currently being tested as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Desiccant Technology Program. Actual performance data from wheel testing was used to revise the system performance and energy analysis

  9. Methodology to determine cost and performance goals for active solar cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, M. L.; Wahlig, M.

    1981-11-01

    Systems analysis is used to calculate the 20 yr. present value of energy savings of solar cooling systems located in Texas, Arizona, Florida, and Washington, DC, and methods of solar system development to meet the cost goals of economic operation are outlined. Solar cooling systems are projected to begin commercial entry in 1986 and reach 20% of the total cooling market by the year 2000, producing 0.14 quads of displaced energy. A numerical simulation was carried out for both residential and commercial solar cooling units with consideration for system cost goals, cost goals per unit collector area, and the cost goals per ton of cooling. System size was targeted as a 3 ton residential chiller and a 25 ton commercial absorption cooling unit. The costs for volume production are provided, along with trends for an incrementally decreasing need for tax incentives, ending in about 1994

  10. Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air Conditioning: Parametric Analysis and Design; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, J.; Kozubal, E.

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a parametric analysis using a numerical model of a new concept in desiccant and evaporative air conditioning. The concept consists of two stages: a liquid desiccant dehumidifier and a dew-point evaporative cooler. Each stage consists of stacked air channel pairs separated by a plastic sheet. In the first stage, a liquid desiccant film removes moisture from the process (supply-side) air through a membrane. An evaporatively-cooled exhaust airstream on the other side of the plastic sheet cools the desiccant. The second-stage indirect evaporative cooler sensibly cools the dried process air. We analyze the tradeoff between device size and energy efficiency. This tradeoff depends strongly on process air channel thicknesses, the ratio of first-stage to second-stage area, and the second-stage exhaust air flow rate. A sensitivity analysis reiterates the importance of the process air boundary layers and suggests a need for increasing airside heat and mass transfer enhancements.

  11. Liquid-Desiccant Vapor Separation Reduces the Energy Requirements of Atmospheric Moisture Harvesting.

    PubMed

    Gido, Ben; Friedler, Eran; Broday, David M

    2016-08-01

    An innovative atmospheric moisture harvesting system is proposed, where water vapor is separated from the air prior to cooling and condensation. The system was studied using a model that simulates its three interconnected cycles (air, desiccant, and water) over a range of ambient conditions, and optimal configurations are reported for different operation conditions. Model results were compared to specifications of commercial atmospheric moisture harvesting systems and found to represent saving of 5-65% of the electrical energy requirements due to the vapor separation process. We show that the liquid desiccant separation stage that is integrated into atmospheric moisture harvesting systems can work under a wide range of environmental conditions using low grade or solar heating as a supplementary energy source, and that the performance of the combined system is superior. PMID:27435379

  12. Solar energy to heat and cool a new NASA Langley office building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    A solar heating and cooling system will be installed at a new NASA office building. The objective of this project is to establish a full-scale working test-bed facility to investigate solar energy for heating and cooling buildings. The energy collected will provide between 80 and 100 percent of the heating and cooling requirements during the cool months and between one-half and two-thirds of the cooling requirements in the summer. Thermal energy storage will be provided to bridge the gap between cloudy and clear days.

  13. Performance of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, W. S.; Loef, G. O. G.

    1981-03-01

    Operation of CSU Solar House I during the heating season of 1978-1979 and during the 1979 cooling season is discussed. The systems comprised an experimental evacuated tubular solar collector, a nonfreezing aqueous collection medium, heat exchange to an insulated conventional vertical cylindrical storage tank and to a built up rectangular insulated storage tank, heating of circulating air by solar heated water and by electric auxiliary in an off peak heat storage unit, space cooling by lithium bromide absorption chiller, and service water heating by solar exchange and electric auxiliary. The system is compared with CSU Solar Houses I, II and III. The experimental collector provides solar heating and cooling with minimum operational problems. Improved performance, particularly for cooling, resulted from the use of a very well insulated heat storage tank. Day time electric auxiliary heating is avoided by use of off peak electric heat storage.

  14. Solar heating and cooling system installed at RKL Controls Company, Lumberton, New Jersey. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-03-01

    Solar heating and cooling of a 40,000 square foot manufacturing building, sales offices and the solar computer control center/display room are described. Information on system description, test data, major problems and resolutions, performance, operation and maintenance manual, manufacturer's literature and as-built drawings are provided also. The solar system is composed of 6000 square feet of Sunworks double glazed flat plate collectors, external above ground storage subsystem, controls, ARKLA absorption chiller, heat recovery and a cooling tower.

  15. Degradation of desiccants upon contamination: An experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A

    1990-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to quantify the effects of thermal cycling and exposure to contamination on solid desiccant materials that may be used in desiccant cooling systems. A test apparatus was used to thermally cycle several desiccant samples and expose them to ambient or contaminated humid air. The source of contamination was cigarette smoke. Six different solid desiccants were tested: two types of silica gel, activated alumina, activated carbon, molecular sieves, and lithium chloride. The exposed desiccant samples were removed after 0.5, 1, 2, 4, or 11 months of exposure and their moisture capacities were measured. Other tests were conducted to characterize pollutants deposited on the exposed samples or to evaluate impact of exposure on internal structure of the samples. Compared to fresh samples, the capacity loss due to thermal cycling with ambient air was generally 10% to 30%. The capacity loss due to only cigarette smoke was generally between 20% to 50%. 7 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. How worms survive desiccation

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Cihan; Penkov, Sider; Fahmy, Karim; Kurzchalia, Teymuras V.

    2012-01-01

    While life requires water, many organisms, known as anhydrobiotes, can survive in the absence of water for extended periods of time. Although discovered 300 years ago, we know very little about the fascinating phenomenon of anhydrobiosis. In this paper, we summarize our previous findings on the desiccation tolerance of the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer larva. A special emphasis is given to the role of trehalose in protecting membranes against desiccation. We also propose a simple mechanism for this process. PMID:24058825

  17. Solar heating and cooling demonstration project at Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar heating and cooling system located at the Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas, is discussed. A technical description of the solar system is presented. The costs of the major components and the cost of installing the system are described. Flow diagrams and photographs of the solar system are provided.

  18. Analysis of the Solar Radiation Impact on Cooling Performance of the Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorčák, Pavol; Košičanová, Danica; Nagy, Richard; Mlynár, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Absorption cooling at low power is a new technology which has not yet been applied to current conditioning elements. This paper analyzes the various elements of solar absorption cooling. Individual states were simulated in which working conditions were set for the capability of solar absorption cooling to balance heat loads in the room. The research is based on an experimental device (absorption units with a performance of 10kW) developed at the STU in Bratislava (currently inputs and outputs of cold sources are being measured). Outputs in this paper are processed so that they connect the entire scheme of the solar absorption cooling system (i.e. the relationship between the solar systems hot and cold storage and the absorption unit). To determine the size of the storage required, calculated cooling for summer months is considered by the ramp rate of the absorption unit and required flow rate of the collectors.

  19. Performance evaluation of an active solar cooling system utilizing low cost plastic collectors and an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lof, G. O.; Westhoff, M. A.; Karaki, S.

    1984-02-01

    During the summer of 1982, air conditioning in Solar House 3 at Colorado State University was provided by an evaporatively-cooled absorption chiller. The single-effect lithium bromide chiller is an experimental three-ton unit from which heat is rejected by direct evaporative cooling of the condenser and absorber walls, thereby eliminating the need for a separate cooling tower. Domestic hot water was also provided by use of a double-walled heat exchanger and 80-gal hot water tank. A schematic of the system is given. Objectives of the project were: (1) evaluation of system performance over the course of one cooling season in Fort Collins, Colorado; (2) optimization of system operation and control; (3) development of a TRNSYS compatible model of the chiller; and (4) determination of cooling system performance in several U.S. climates by use of the model.

  20. Solar chimney design: Investigating natural ventilation and cooling in offices with the aid of computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelis, Nikolaos

    Solar chimney design is investigated as a means of improving natural ventilation and passive cooling in office buildings. Existing scientific research and built precedents are generally limited literature review findings on various features of solar chimneys were categorised and used to develop a building simulation strategy. Using UK climatic data, simulations were performed on several computer models in order to investigate solar chimney performance during a single day period and an entire cooling season. Passive cooling with a solar chimney is possible but actual reduction in temperatures in most cases examined could be negligible. Cooling potential is increased on still, warm days, while the prospects for night cooling are further improved. A solar chimney may help reduce considerably the occurrence of resultant temperatures at or above the 25 C and 28 C thresholds. Solar chimney width, height, apertures and integral use of thermal mass are the most significant parameters for cooling. Simulation results showed that a solar chimney can increase significantly natural ventilation rates. Total ventilation rates may be increased by at least 22%. During still days a solar chimney can enhance ventilation rates by 36% or more. Stack ventilation through a solar chimney is typically 20% of cross ventilation during night time this may increase to at least 40-45% and on still days it may reach 100% of typical cross ventilation rates. Solar chimney induced stack ventilation and cross ventilation are interrelated. Resultant air flow patterns may have an important effect on convective heat transfers and thermal comfort. Climate and microclimate conditions should be an integral part of solar chimney design. Key aspects and recommendations regarding solar chimneys, passive cooling and natural ventilation are provided for design guidance and feedback in further research.

  1. Polymers as advanced materials for desiccant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A.W.

    1990-12-01

    This research is concerned with solid materials used as desiccants for desiccant cooling systems (DCSs) that process water vapor in an atmosphere to produce cooling. Background information includes an introduction to DCSs and the role of the desiccant as a system component. The water vapor sorption performance criteria used for screening the modified polymers prepared include the water sorption capacity from 5% to 80% relative humidity (R.H.), isotherm shape, and rate of adsorption and desorption. Measurements are presented for the sorption performance of modified polymeric advanced desiccant materials with the quartz crystal microbalance. Isotherms of polystyrene sulfonic acid (PSSA) taken over a 5-month period show that the material has a dramatic loss in capacity and that the isotherm shape is time dependent. The adsorption and desorption kinetics for PSSA and all the ionic salts of it studied are easily fast enough for commercial DCS applications with a wheel rotation speed of 6 min per revolution. Future activities for the project are addressed, and a 5-year summary of the project is included as Appendix A. 34 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Survey and evaluation of available thermal insulation materials for use on solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    This is the final report of a survey and evaluation of insulation materials for use with components of solar heating and cooling systems. The survey was performed by mailing questionnaires to manufacturers of insulation materials and by conducting an extensive literature search to obtain data on relevant properties of various types of insulation materials. The study evaluated insulation materials for active and passive solar heating and cooling systems and for multifunction applications. Primary and secondary considerations for selecting insulation materials for various components of solar heating and cooling systems are presented.

  3. Subsystem design package for Mod 2 site data acquisition system: Solar heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Mod II Site Data Acquisition Subsystem (SDAS) is designed to collect data from sensors located on residential or commercial buildings using a solar heating and/or cooling system. The SDAS takes the data obtained from sensors located on the solar heating and/or cooling system, processes the data into a suitable format, stores the data for a period of time, and provides the capability for both telephone retrieval by the Central Data Processing System (CDPS) and manual retrieval of the data for transfer to the central site. The unit is designed so it will not degrade the operation of the solar heating/cooling system which it is monitoring.

  4. The NASA-Lewis/ERDA solar heating and cooling technology program. [project planning/energy policy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Couch, J. P.; Bloomfield, H. S.

    1975-01-01

    Plans by NASA to carry out a major role in a solar heating and cooling program are presented. This role would be to create and test the enabling technology for future solar heating, cooling, and combined heating/cooling systems. The major objectives of the project are to achieve reduction in solar energy system costs, while maintaining adequate performance, reliability, life, and maintenance characteristics. The project approach is discussed, and will be accomplished principally by contract with industry to develop advanced components and subsystems. Advanced hardware will be tested to establish 'technology readiness' both under controlled laboratory conditions and under real sun conditions.

  5. The development of a solar-powered residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Efforts to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar power for residential heating and cooling are described. These efforts were concentrated on the analysis, design, and test of a full-scale demonstration system which is currently under construction at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama. The basic solar heating and cooling system under development utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating and water heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling.

  6. Site dependent factors affecting the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure was developed to evaluate the cost effectiveness of combining an absorption cycle chiller with a solar energy system. A basic assumption of the procedure is that a solar energy system exists for meeting the heating load of the building, and that the building must be cooled. The decision to be made is to either cool the building with a conventional vapor compression cycle chiller or to use the existing solar energy system to provide a heat input to the absorption chiller. Two methods of meeting the cooling load not supplied by solar energy were considered. In the first method, heat is supplied to the absorption chiller by a boiler using fossil fuel. In the second method, the load not met by solar energy is net by a conventional vapor compression chiller. In addition, the procedure can consider waste heat as another form of auxiliary energy. Commercial applications of solar cooling with an absorption chiller were found to be more cost effective than the residential applications. In general, it was found that the larger the chiller, the more economically feasible it would be. Also, it was found that a conventional vapor compression chiller is a viable alternative for the auxiliary cooling source, especially for the larger chillers. The results of the analysis gives a relative rating of the sites considered as to their economic feasibility of solar cooling.

  7. Initial operation of a solar heating and cooling system in a full-scale solar building test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, R. H.; Miao, D.; Hamlet, I. L.; Jensen, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The Solar Building Test Facility (SBTF) located at Hampton, Virginia became operational in early summer of 1976. This facility is a joint effort by NASA-Lewis and NASA-Langley to advance the technology for heating and cooling of office buildings with solar energy. Its purposes are to (1) test system components which include high-performing collectors, (2) test performance of complete solar heating and cooling system, (3) investigate component interactions and (4) investigate durability, maintenance and reliability of components. The SBTF consists of a 50,000 square foot office building modified to accept solar heated water for operation of an absorption air conditioner and for the baseboard heating system. A 12,666 square foot solar collector field with a 30,000 gallon storage tank provides the solar heated water. A description of the system and the collectors selected is given here, along with the objectives, test approach, expected system performance and some preliminary results.

  8. Initial operation of a solar heating and cooling system in a full-scale solar building test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, R. H.; Miao, D.; Hamlet, I. L.; Jensen, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The Solar Building Test Facility (SBTF) was constructed to advance the technology for heating and cooling of office buildings with solar energy. Its purposes are to (1) test system components which include high-performing collectors, (2) test the performance of a complete solar heating and cooling system, (3) investigate component interactions, and (4) investigate durability, maintenance and reliability of components. The SBTF consists of a 50,000 square foot office building modified to accept solar heated water for operation of an absorption air conditioner and for the baseboard heating system. A 12,666 square foot solar collector field with a 30,000 gallon storage tank provides the solar heated water. A description of the system and the collectors selected is printed along with the objectives, test approach, expected system performance, and some preliminary results.

  9. Characterization of selected application of biomass energy technologies and a solar district heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alessio, Dr., Gregory J.; Blaunstein, Robert P.

    1980-09-01

    The following systems are discussed: energy self-sufficient farms, wood gasification, energy from high-yield silviculture farms, and solar district heating and cooling. System descriptions and environmental data are included for each one. (MHR)

  10. Development and testing of heat transport fluids for use in active solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Work on heat transport fluids for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is described. Program objectives and how they were accomplished including problems encountered during testing are discussed.

  11. Passive solar space heating and cooling. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the passive use of solar energy for space heating and cooling in buildings, houses, and homes. Citations discuss the design, performance, models, and economic analysis of heating and cooling systems. Topics include solar architecture, energy consumption analysis, energy conservation, and heat recovery. Also included are thermal comfort, quality of life, and housing for the elderly. (Contains a minimum of 209 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. ERDA/NASA-MSFC solar heating and cooling development and demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    The role of the Manned Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the National Solar Heating and Cooling program is evaluated. The responsibilities of the MSFC within this program are (1) to manage the development and testing of solar heating and cooling systems leading to marketable products, (2) to develop data acquisition equipment supporting a national data program, and (3) to manage and collect data from commercial demonstration sites. MSFC test facilities and demonstration sites are described.

  13. Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings (Phase O). Volume 1: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRW Systems Group, Redondo Beach, CA.

    The purpose of this study was to establish the technical and economic feasibility of using solar energy for the heating and cooling of buildings. Five selected building types in 14 selected cities were used to determine loads for space heating, space cooling and dehumidification, and domestic service hot water heating. Relying on existing and…

  14. Cooling-load implications for residential passive-solar-heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described, along with the computer simulation model used for calculating cooling loads. A sample of interim results is also presented. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy requirement of a given building.

  15. Observational and Modeling Study of Pickup Ion Cooling Behavior in Solar Wind Compression and Rarefaction Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Moebius, E.; Schwadron, N.; Klecker, B.; Bzowski, M.; Galvin, A. B.; Isenberg, P. A.; Sokol, J. M.; Gorby, M.; Bochsler, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    In many previous studies, the velocity distribution function of interstellar pickup ions (PUIs), which are produced by ionization of interstellar neutral atoms in the solar wind, were described as evolving through fast pitch angle scattering followed by adiabatic cooling during radial transport with in the reference frame of the solar wind [e.g., Vasyliunas & Siscoe, 1976 VS76 hereafter]. In the VS76 model, the slope of the velocity distributions is controlled by the combination of the ionization rate and the cooling process. Recently, Chen et al. [2013] have shown that the related adiabatic cooling index varies with solar activity between ~1 and 2, compared with 1.5 predicted by the VS76 model. Contributors to the observed variations include solar wind compression and rarefaction regions. Here, we performed a statistical study of the PUI cooling behavior in solar wind compression and rarefaction regions based on STEREO-A PLASTIC data sets using a set of events from the co-rotating interaction region (CIR) list (http://www-scc.igpp.ucla.edu/forms/stereo/stereo_level_3.html). We found that PUIs undergo stronger cooling in rarefaction regions and weaker cooling in compression regions. In order to analyze the PUI cooling behavior under these conditions, we modeled the PUI velocity distributions in CIRs using the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM) [Schwadron et al., 2010]. For this analysis, we adopted a magneto-hydrodynamic CIR model proposed by [Giacalone et al., 2002]. The resulting PUI distributions exhibit a flatter slope in the compression region and are steeper in the rarefaction region compared with those in the undisturbed solar wind, in accordance with STEREO observations. These results indicate that gradients in the solar wind speed, as observed in CIRs, have substantial effects on the PUI cooling process.

  16. Cooling of solar flares plasmas. 1: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, Peter J.; Mariska, John T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical models of the cooling of flare plasma are reexamined. By assuming that the cooling occurs in two separate phase where conduction and radiation, respectively, dominate, a simple analytic formula for the cooling time of a flare plasma is derived. Unlike earlier order-of-magnitude scalings, this result accounts for the effect of the evolution of the loop plasma parameters on the cooling time. When the conductive cooling leads to an 'evaporation' of chromospheric material, the cooling time scales L(exp 5/6)/p(exp 1/6), where the coronal phase (defined as the time maximum temperature). When the conductive cooling is static, the cooling time scales as L(exp 3/4)n(exp 1/4). In deriving these results, use was made of an important scaling law (T proportional to n(exp 2)) during the radiative cooling phase that was forst noted in one-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations (Serio et al. 1991; Jakimiec et al. 1992). Our own simulations show that this result is restricted to approximately the radiative loss function of Rosner, Tucker, & Vaiana (1978). for different radiative loss functions, other scaling result, with T and n scaling almost linearly when the radiative loss falls off as T(exp -2). It is shown that these scaling laws are part of a class of analytic solutions developed by Antiocos (1980).

  17. Tests of a reduced-scale experimental model of a building solar heating-cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental solar heating and cooling system model has been built and operated, combining elements that are programmable (e.g., heating and cooling load of a building and collected solar energy) with experimental equipment. The experimental system model was based on the loads and components used in the Solar Building Test Facility (SBTF), which includes a 1394 sq m solar collector field at NASA Langley. These tests covered 5 continuous days under summer conditions. For the system model up to 55 percent of the simulated collected solar energy was used for the building load. This amount of solar energy supplied 35 percent of the building cooling load. Heat loss was significant. If tank heat loss were eliminated, which would make it similar to the actual SBTF, 75 percent of the collected solar energy would be used. This amount would supply approximately 50 percent of the building cooling load. A higher fraction of solar energy is possible with a more performance-optimized system.

  18. Timonium Elementary School Solar Energy Heating and Cooling Augmentation Experiment. Final Engineering Report. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AAI Corp., Baltimore, MD.

    This report covers a two-year and seven-month solar space heating and cooling experiment conducted at the Timonium Elementary School, Timonium, Maryland. The system was designed to provide a minimum of 50 percent of the energy required during the heating season and to determine the feasibility of using solar energy to power absorption-type…

  19. Solar Heating and Cooling Experiment for a School in Atlanta. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    This report documents the performance and conclusions of a 13-month period of monitoring the performance of the experimental solar heating and cooling system installed in the George A. Towns Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia. The objectives of the project were to (1) make a significant contribution to solar design, technology, and acceptability;…

  20. Operations manual: On Site Monitor (OSM), solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The on-site monitor is a portable device which, when connected to a solar system site data acquisition subsystem; allows readouts of clock and sensor data in voltage or engineering units at instrumented solar heating and cooling sites. The unit is described and procedures for its proper operation are presented.

  1. Heat-stop structure design with high cooling efficiency for large ground-based solar telescope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyi; Gu, Naiting; Rao, Changhui; Li, Cheng

    2015-07-20

    A heat-stop is one of the most important thermal control devices for a large ground-based solar telescope. For controlling the internal seeing effect, the temperature difference between the heat-stop and the ambient environment needs to be reduced, and a heat-stop with high cooling efficiency is required. In this paper, a novel design concept for the heat-stop, in which a multichannel loop cooling system is utilized to obtain higher cooling efficiency, is proposed. To validate the design, we analyze and compare the cooling efficiency for the multichannel and existing single-channel loop cooling system under the same conditions. Comparative results show that the new design obviously enhances the cooling efficiency of the heat-stop, and the novel design based on the multichannel loop cooling system is obviously better than the existing design by increasing the thermal transfer coefficient. PMID:26367826

  2. System design package for the solar heating and cooling central data processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The central data processing system provides the resources required to assess the performance of solar heating and cooling systems installed at remote sites. These sites consist of residential, commercial, government, and educational types of buildings, and the solar heating and cooling systems can be hot-water, space heating, cooling, and combinations of these. The instrumentation data associated with these systems will vary according to the application and must be collected, processed, and presented in a form which supports continuity of performance evaluation across all applications. Overall software system requirements were established for use in the central integration facility which transforms raw data collected at remote sites into performance evaluation information for assessing the performance of solar heating and cooling systems.

  3. Integrated Modeling of Building Energy Requirements IncorporatingSolar Assisted Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

    2005-08-10

    This paper expands on prior Berkeley Lab work on integrated simulation of building energy systems by the addition of active solar thermal collecting devices, technology options not previously considered (Siddiqui et al 2005). Collectors can be used as an alternative or additional source of hot water to heat recovery from reciprocating engines or microturbines. An example study is presented that evaluates the operation of solar assisted cooling at a large mail sorting facility in southern California with negligible heat loads and year-round cooling loads. Under current conditions solar thermal energy collection proves an unattractive option, but is a viable carbon emission control strategy.

  4. System design package for solar heating and cooling site data acquisition subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Site Data Acquisition Subsystem (SDAS) designed to collect data from sensors located on residential or commercial buildings using a solar heating and/or cooling system is described. It takes the data obtained from sensors located on the solar system, processes the data into suitable format, stores the data for a period of time, and provides the capability for either telephone retrieval by the central data processing system or manual retrieval of the data for transfer to a central site. The SDAS is also designed so that it will not degrade the operation of the solar heating/cooling system which it is monitoring.

  5. Design and operation of a solar heating and cooling system for a residential size building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littles, J. W.; Humphries, W. R.; Cody, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The first year of operation of solar house is discussed. Selected design information, together with a brief system description is included. The house was equipped with an integrated solar heating and cooling system which uses fully automated state-of-the art. Evaluation of the data indicate that the solar house heating and cooling system is capable of supplying nearly 100 percent of the thermal energy required for heating and approximately 50 percent of the thermal energy required to operate the absorption cycle air conditioner.

  6. Comparison of solar panel cooling system by using dc brushless fan and dc water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwan, Y. M.; Leow, W. Z.; Irwanto, M.; M, Fareq; Hassan, S. I. S.; Safwati, I.; Amelia, A. R.

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss comparison of solar panel cooling system by using DC brushless fan and DC water pump. Solar photovoltaic (PV) power generation is an interesting technique to reduce non-renewable energy consumption and as a renewable energy. The temperature of PV modules increases when it absorbs solar radiation, causing a decrease in efficiency. A solar cooling system is design, construct and experimentally researched within this work. To make an effort to cool the PV module, Direct Current (DC) brushless fan and DC water pump with inlet/outlet manifold are designed for constant air movement and water flow circulation at the back side and front side of PV module representatively. Temperature sensors were installed on the PV module to detect temperature of PV. PIC microcontroller was used to control the DC brushless fan and water pump for switch ON or OFF depend on the temperature of PV module automatically. The performance with and without cooling system are shown in this experiment. The PV module with DC water pump cooling system increase 3.52%, 36.27%, 38.98%in term of output voltage, output current, output power respectively. It decrease 6.36 °C compare than to PV module without DC water pump cooling system. While DC brushless fan cooling system increase 3.47%, 29.55%, 32.23%in term of output voltage, output current, and output power respectively. It decrease 6.1 °C compare than to PV module without DC brushless fan cooling system. The efficiency of PV module with cooling system was increasing compared to PV module without cooling system; this is because the ambient temperature dropped significantly. The higher efficiency of PV cell, the payback period of the system can be shorted and the lifespan of PV module can also be longer.

  7. Characterization of a starch based desiccant wheel dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beery, Kyle Edward

    Starch, cellulose, and hemicellulose have an affinity for water, and adsorb water vapor from air. Materials made from combinations of these biobased sugar polymers also have been found to possess adsorptive properties. An interesting possible application of these starch-based adsorbents is the desiccant wheel dehumidifier. The desiccant wheel dehumidifier is used in conjunction with a standard air conditioning system. In this process, ambient air is passed through a stationary section while a wheel packed with desiccant rotates through that section. The desiccant adsorbs humidity (latent load) from the air, and the air conditioning system then cools the air (sensible load). Several starch based adsorbents were developed and tested for adsorptive capacity in a new high throughput screening system. The best formulations from the high throughput screening system, also taking into account economic considerations and structural integrity, were considered for use in the desiccant wheel dehumidifier. A suitable adsorbent was chosen and formulated into a matrix structure for the desiccant wheel system. A prototype desiccant wheel system was constructed and the performance was investigated under varying regeneration temperatures and rotation speeds. The results from the experiments showed that the starch based desiccant wheel dehumidification system does transfer moisture from the inlet process stream to the outlet regeneration stream. The DESSIM model was modified for the starch based adsorbent and compared to the experimental results. Also, the results when the wheel parameters were varied were compared to the predicted results from the model. The results given by the starch based desiccant wheel system show the desired proof of concept.

  8. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Potts, M

    1994-12-01

    The removal of cell-bound water through air drying and the addition of water to air-dried cells are forces that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of the prokaryotes. In bacterial cells that have been subjected to air drying, the evaporation of free cytoplasmic water (Vf) can be instantaneous, and an equilibrium between cell-bound water (Vb) and the environmental water (vapor) potential (psi wv) may be achieved rapidly. In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1. At these levels the monolayer coverage by water of macromolecules, including DNA and proteins, is disturbed. As a consequence the mechanisms that confer desiccation tolerance upon air-dried bacteria are markedly different from those, such as the mechanism of preferential exclusion of compatible solutes, that preserve the integrity of salt-, osmotically, and freeze-thaw-stressed cells. Desiccation tolerance reflects a complex array of interactions at the structural, physiological, and molecular levels. Many of the mechanisms remain cryptic, but it is clear that they involve interactions, such as those between proteins and co-solvents, that derive from the unique properties of the water molecule. A water replacement hypothesis accounts for how the nonreducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose preserve the integrity of membranes and proteins. Nevertheless, we have virtually no insight into the state of the cytoplasm of an air-dried cell. There is no evidence for any obvious adaptations of proteins that can counter the effects of air drying or for the occurrence of any proteins that provide a direct and a tangible contribution to cell stability. Among the prokaryotes that can exist as anhydrobiotic cells, the cyanobacteria have a marked capacity to do so. One

  9. Desiccation tolerance of prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Potts, M

    1994-01-01

    The removal of cell-bound water through air drying and the addition of water to air-dried cells are forces that have played a pivotal role in the evolution of the prokaryotes. In bacterial cells that have been subjected to air drying, the evaporation of free cytoplasmic water (Vf) can be instantaneous, and an equilibrium between cell-bound water (Vb) and the environmental water (vapor) potential (psi wv) may be achieved rapidly. In the air-dried state some bacteria survive only for seconds whereas others can tolerate desiccation for thousands, perhaps millions, of years. The desiccated (anhydrobiotic) cell is characterized by its singular lack of water--with contents as low as 0.02 g of H2O g (dry weight)-1. At these levels the monolayer coverage by water of macromolecules, including DNA and proteins, is disturbed. As a consequence the mechanisms that confer desiccation tolerance upon air-dried bacteria are markedly different from those, such as the mechanism of preferential exclusion of compatible solutes, that preserve the integrity of salt-, osmotically, and freeze-thaw-stressed cells. Desiccation tolerance reflects a complex array of interactions at the structural, physiological, and molecular levels. Many of the mechanisms remain cryptic, but it is clear that they involve interactions, such as those between proteins and co-solvents, that derive from the unique properties of the water molecule. A water replacement hypothesis accounts for how the nonreducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose preserve the integrity of membranes and proteins. Nevertheless, we have virtually no insight into the state of the cytoplasm of an air-dried cell. There is no evidence for any obvious adaptations of proteins that can counter the effects of air drying or for the occurrence of any proteins that provide a direct and a tangible contribution to cell stability. Among the prokaryotes that can exist as anhydrobiotic cells, the cyanobacteria have a marked capacity to do so. One

  10. Design of a test facility for gas-fired desiccant-based air conditioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.A.; Steele, W.G.; Hodge, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    The design of a facility for testing desiccant-based air conditioning systems is presented. The determination of the performance parameters of desiccant systems is discussed including moisture removal capacity, latent and total cooling capacities, and efficiency indexes. The appropriate procedures and key measurements for determining these parameters are identified using uncertainty analysis.