Science.gov

Sample records for solar dust corona

  1. The colour of the solar corona and dust grains in it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aimanov, A. K.; Nikolskii, G. M.

    1980-02-01

    The paper examines the photometry of coronal color negatives and determines the distribution of the coronal brightness in the red, green, and blue wavelength intervals up to distances of 6-7 solar radii. A correlation between the color indexes and diffuse external reinforcement brightness (RED) is indicated, and the results show that RED consists of dust grains with radii of at least 1 micron. It is concluded that the whole dust mass of RED is at least 1% of the coronal mass within the RED region, and the dust grain number density is about 10 to the -11th power/cu cm.

  2. The New Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Poland, Arthur I.; Rabin, Douglas M.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We focus on new observational capabilities (Yohkoh, SoHO, TRACE) observations, modeling, approaches, and insights into physical processes of the solar corona. The most impressive new results and problems discussed in this article can be appreciated from the movies and available on the Annual Reviews web site.

  3. The New Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Poland, Arthur I.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    We focus on new observational capabilities (Yohkoh, SoHO, TRACE), observations, modeling approaches, and insights into physical processes of the solar corona. The most impressive new results and problems discussed in this article can be appreciated from the movies available on the Annual Reviews website and at http://www.lmsal.com/pub/araa/araa.html. "The Sun is new each day." Heraclites (ca 530-475 BC) "Everything flows." Heraclites (ca 530-475 BC)

  4. Solar corona top heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, I. A.; Ryabova, N. A.

    2016-05-01

    The solar magnetic field fragmentation into thin magnetic tubes above the photosphere makes it possible to transform and factorize MHD equations analytically and to obtain explicit expressions for Alfvén and magnetosonic fields. A physical model that enables an explanation of the effect of strong heating of the solar chromosphere and corona has been proposed. This model makes it possible to estimate analytically a powerful Alfvén disturbance entering the chromosphere due to convective motions of the photosphere and a thermal release due to a three-wave interaction within the chromosphere.

  5. Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The solar corona, the hot, tenuous outer atmosphere of the Sun, exhibits many fascinating phenomena on a wide range of scales. One of the ways that the Sun can affect us here at Earth is through the large-scale structure of the corona and the dynamical phenomena associated with it, as it is the corona that extends outward as the solar wind and encounters the Earth's magnetosphere. The goal of our research sponsored by NASA's Supporting Research and Technology Program in Solar Physics is to develop increasingly realistic models of the large-scale solar corona, so that we can understand the underlying properties of the coronal magnetic field that lead to the observed structure and evolution of the corona. We describe the work performed under this contract.

  6. Corona solar blind ultraviolet image detecting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Li-min; Tang, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu

    2009-07-01

    Corona is one of important reasons of electrical energy loss in the electric power. According to incomplete statistics, corona loss electrical energy has achieved two thousands and fifty millions kW.h in our nation every year. Sometimes corona also can have some disturbance to radio and communication. Therefore to discover and examine corona promptly has the extremely vital significance for conserving energy and realizing high quality communication. Ultraviolet image detecting technology is a preferred corona detection method in electric power. It may realize all-weather reliable survey to corona. The solar blind ultraviolet signal discharged by corona is quite weak. Moreover the ultraviolet image quality has been affected seriously by the detection system noise. A corona solar blind ultraviolet image processing method is proposed in this paper. Ultraviolet image has so small target, low contrast image, district characteristic and real-time demand that it is processed by multi-scale ultraviolet morphology filter technology based on mathematics morphology in this paper. Results show that the method can stretch image contrast, enhance target and weaken noise. The algorithm is easy to deal in parallel and it can be realized easily by hardware. It will be accurately demarcated when the condition of device need to be absolutely measured. The paper proposes a kind of mathematics morphology algorithm. Solar blind ultraviolet image will be further processed according to temperature and humidity in order to remove the infection of corona discharge demarcation and solve correct demarcation question when equipment condition need to be absolutely measured.

  7. Solar Corona on 08.01.2010

    NASA Video Gallery

    The solar corona on 2010/08/01, observed by SDO’s AIA. The false colors represent images taken with different filters that are sensitive to distinct coronal temperatures: blue- 1 million degrees...

  8. Solar Corona on 10.21.2010

    NASA Video Gallery

    The solar corona on 2010/10/21, observed by SDO’s AIA. The false colors represent images taken with different filters that are sensitive to distinct coronal temperatures: blue for one million de...

  9. Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    1998-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field defines the structure of the solar corona, the position of the heliospheric current sheet, the regions of fast and slow solar wind, and the most likely sites of coronal mass ejections. There are few measurements of the magnetic fields in the corona, but the line-of-sight component of the global magnetic fields in the photosphere have been routinely measured for many years (for example, at Stanford's Wilcox Solar Observatory, and at the National Solar Observatory at Kitt Peak). The SOI/MDI instrument is now providing high-resolution full-disk magnetograms several times a day. Understanding the large-scale structure of the solar corona and inner heliosphere requires accurately mapping the measured photospheric magnetic field into the corona and outward. Ideally, a model should not only extrapolate the magnetic field, but should self-consistently reconstruct both the plasma and magnetic fields in the corona and solar wind. Support from our NASA SR&T contract has allowed us to develop three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computations of the solar corona that incorporate observed photospheric magnetic fields into the boundary conditions. These calculations not only describe the magnetic field in the corona and interplanetary spice, but also predict the plasma properties as well. Our computations thus far have been successful in reproducing many aspects of both coronal and interplanetary data, including the structure of the streamer belt, the location of coronal hole boundaries, and the position and shape of the heliospheric current sheet. The most widely used technique for extrapolating the photospheric magnetic field into the corona and heliosphere are potential field models, such as the potential field source-surface model (PFSS),and the potential field current-sheet (PFCS) model

  10. Meteoroid ablation during entry into the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Hervé; Mann, Ingrid; Lemaire, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    The deposition of dust material in the close vicinity of the sun has been discussed before in the context of pick up ion production near the sun and in the context of the FIP (First Ionization Potential) effect. Pick-up ions are ions that are carried with the solar wind but have distinctly different charge states and velocities than the solar wind ions. The FIP effect describes an abundance anomaly observed in the slow speed wind, where elements with FIP below about 10 eV are enhanced in abundance. In order to estimate the possible contribution of dust and meteoroids to these two phenomena, we study the mass deposition during entry of dust and meteoroids into the solar corona. The first-order model that we apply is similar to the one-dimensional ablation models previously developed by other groups for the Earth's atmosphere and for the atmosphere of Venus. We present the results of mass deposition profiles for a wide range of masses and velocities of objects falling into the Sun. Our main focus is in the bigger objects (masses greater than 1 Kg) for which most of the mass is deposited in the lower layers of the solar corona. As a first step, we consider only the ecliptic plane and extrapolate the mass flux from empirical models of the dust and meteoroid flux near Earth orbit. We calculate the mass deposition and estimate its effects on the coronal heavy ion composition. With a simple two-dimensional generalization of the model we can also include the interaction of sungrazing comets with the solar corona. We finally discuss the effect of different material compositions of these objects taking into account refractory and volatile materials.

  11. Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    1997-01-01

    Under this contract, we have continued our investigations of the large scale structure of the solar corona and inner heliosphere using global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. These computations have also formed the basis for studies of coronal mass ejections (CMES) using realistic coronal configurations. We have developed a technique for computing realistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) computations of the solar corona and inner heliosphere. To perform computations that can be compared with specific observations, it is necessary to incorporate solar observations into the boundary conditions. We have used the Wilcox Solar Observatory synoptic maps (collected during a solar rotation by daily measurements of the line-of-sight magnetic field at central meridian) to specify the radial magnetic field (B,) at the photosphere. For the initial condition, we use a potential magnetic field consistent with the specified distribution of B, at the lower boundary, and a wind solution consistent with the specified plasma density and temperature at the solar surface. Together this initial condition forms a (non-equilibrium) approximation of the state of the solar corona for the time-dependent MHD computation. The MHD equations are then integrated in time to steady state. Here we describe solutions relevant to a recent solar eclipse, as well as Ulysses observations. We have also developed a model configuration of solar minimum, useful for studying CME initiation and propagation.

  12. Meteoroids in solar corona and planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, Herve; Mann, Ingrid; Lemaire, Emeritus Joseph

    We simulate the meteoroid entry into the solar corona with a model similar to the one-dimensional ablation model developed by Campbell-Brown and Koschny (2004) for the Earth's atmosphere and by McAuliffe and Christou (2005) for the case of the atmosphere of Venus. We present the results of mass deposition profiles for a wide range of masses for objects falling into the Sun. Several representative chemical compositions of these objects are also considered in-cluding refractory and volatile materials. Our main focus is in the bigger objects (mass ¿ 1 Kg) for which most of the mass is deposited in the lower layers of the solar corona. The interaction of sungrazing comets with the solar corona is studied with a two-dimensional generalization of the model. The cumulative profile of mass deposition is calculated and we look for the actual effects on the coronal heavy ions composition. In particular we discuss possible implications for the FIP (First Ionization Potential) effect and for the formation of pick-up ions that are measured in the solar wind. We consider the similarities and differences of the entry process in the Solar corona and in planetary atmospheres and we shortly address the survival probability of molecular species.

  13. Seeing the solar corona in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez, Alberto M.

    2016-03-01

    The large availability and rich spectral coverage of today's observational data of the solar corona, and the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by many instruments, has enabled the evolution of three-dimensional (3D) physical models to a great level of detail. However, the 3D information provided by the data is rather limited as every instrument observes from a single angle of vision, or two at the most in the case of the STEREO mission. Two powerful available observational techniques to infer detailed 3D information of the solar corona from empirical data are stereoscopy and tomography. In particular, the technique known as differential emission measure tomography (DEMT) allows determination of the 3D distribution of the coronal electron density and temperature in the inner corona. This paper summarizes the main technical aspects of DEMT, reviews all published work based on it, and comments on its future development and applications.

  14. Global Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the progress made in the investigation of the solar corona using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Coronal mass ejections (CME) are believed to be the primary cause of nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms and these have been investigated through the use of three-dimensional computer simulation.

  15. The F and K components of the solar corona.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calbert, R.; Beard, D. B.

    1972-01-01

    Numerical calculations of the F component are conducted for a large range of parameters, particle size distribution, minimum particle size, minimum approach to the sun, albedo, and spatial distribution. Various parametrized functional forms for the electron spatial distribution are assumed, and the parametrical elongation dependence of the K component is calculated. New and old data are analyzed by fitting the theoretical parametrized elongation dependence to observations of the total intensity of the solar corona. The orbital behavior of the dust is estimated together with the temperature and thermal emission.

  16. STOCHASTIC COUPLING OF SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE AND CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M.; Coyner, Aaron J.

    2013-05-20

    The observed solar activity is believed to be driven by the dissipation of nonpotential magnetic energy injected into the corona by dynamic processes in the photosphere. The enormous range of scales involved in the interaction makes it difficult to track down the photospheric origin of each coronal dissipation event, especially in the presence of complex magnetic topologies. In this paper, we propose an ensemble-based approach for testing the photosphere-corona coupling in a quiet solar region as represented by intermittent activity in Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Michelson Doppler Imager and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Extreme Ultraviolet Imager image sets. For properly adjusted detection thresholds corresponding to the same degree of intermittency in the photosphere and corona, the dynamics of the two solar regions is described by the same occurrence probability distributions of energy release events but significantly different geometric properties. We derive a set of scaling relations reconciling the two groups of results and enabling statistical description of coronal dynamics based on photospheric observations. Our analysis suggests that multiscale intermittent dissipation in the corona at spatial scales >3 Mm is controlled by turbulent photospheric convection. Complex topology of the photospheric network makes this coupling essentially nonlocal and non-deterministic. Our results are in an agreement with the Parker's coupling scenario in which random photospheric shuffling generates marginally stable magnetic discontinuities at the coronal level, but they are also consistent with an impulsive wave heating involving multiscale Alfvenic wave packets and/or magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade. A back-reaction on the photosphere due to coronal magnetic reconfiguration can be a contributing factor.

  17. Probing the Solar Corona with VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, Benedikt; Sun, Jing; Heinkelmann, Robert; Schuh, Harald; Böhm, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    Radio observations close to the Sun are sensitive to the dispersive effects of the Sun corona. This has been used to determine (among other parameters) the electron density in the corona during solar conjunctions with spacecrafts. Although geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations close to the Sun have already been performed before 2002 (but suspended afterwards) they have not yet been used for calculations of corona electron densities. Almost 10 years later the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) decided to schedule twelve 24 hours VLBI sessions in 2011 and 2012 including observations closer than 15 degrees to the heliocenter. Both the recent and the earlier sessions are analysed in order to determine electron densities of the Sun corona. Based on the ionospheric delay corrections derived from two-frequency VLBI measurements, other dispersive effects like instrumental biases and, most important of all, the Earth's ionosphere effects are estimated and then eliminated. The residual delays are used to successfully determine power-law parameters of the electron density of the Sun corona for several of these sessions. In some cases, scheduled observations close to the Sun had failed, making it impossible to derive meaningful results from them. Both, the successful and the lost observations were analysed including external information like Sunspot numbers and flare occurrences. The estimated electron densities were compared to previous models of the Sun corona derived by radio measurements to spacecrafts during solar conjunctions. Our investigations show that it is possible to use geodetic VLBI sessions with observations close to the Sun to determine electron densities of the corona. The success depends on the geometry, i.e. the source position with respect to the Sun, and on the schedule, which can be optimized for such investigations. Unpredictable disturbances at the Sun's surface, such as flares, play also a role. So far

  18. MASC: Magnetic Activity of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auchere, Frederic; Fineschi, Silvano; Gan, Weiqun; Peter, Hardi; Vial, Jean-Claude; Zhukov, Andrei; Parenti, Susanna; Li, Hui; Romoli, Marco

    We present MASC, an innovative payload designed to explore the magnetic activity of the solar corona. It is composed of three complementary instruments: a Hard-X-ray spectrometer, a UV / EUV imager, and a Visible Light / UV polarimetric coronagraph able to measure the coronal magnetic field. The solar corona is structured in magnetically closed and open structures from which slow and fast solar winds are respectively released. In spite of much progress brought by two decades of almost uninterrupted observations from several space missions, the sources and acceleration mechanisms of both types are still not understood. This continuous expansion of the solar atmosphere is disturbed by sporadic but frequent and violent events. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large-scale massive eruptions of magnetic structures out of the corona, while solar flares trace the sudden heating of coronal plasma and the acceleration of electrons and ions to high, sometimes relativistic, energies. Both phenomena are most probably driven by instabilities of the magnetic field in the corona. The relations between flares and CMEs are still not understood in terms of initiation and energy partition between large-scale motions, small-scale heating and particle acceleration. The initiation is probably related to magnetic reconnection which itself results magnetic topological changes due to e.g. flux emergence, footpoints motions, etc. Acceleration and heating are also strongly coupled since the atmospheric heating is thought to result from the impact of accelerated particles. The measurement of both physical processes and their outputs is consequently of major importance. However, despite its fundamental importance as a driver for the physics of the Sun and of the heliosphere, the magnetic field of our star’s outer atmosphere remains poorly understood. This is due in large part to the fact that the magnetic field is a very difficult quantity to measure. Our knowledge of its strength and

  19. Nanoflare Heating of Solar and Stellar Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of observational and theoretical evidence suggests that much, and perhaps most, of the Sun's corona is heated by small unresolved bursts of energy called nanoflares. It seems likely that stellar coronae are heated in a similar fashion. Kanoflares are here taken to mean any impulsive heating that occurs within a magnetic flux strand. Many mechanisms have this property, including waves, but we prefer Parker's picture of tangled magnetic fields. The tangling is caused by turbulent convection at the stellar surface, and magnetic energy is released when the stresses reach a critical level. We suggest that the mechanism of energy release is the "secondary instability" of electric current sheets that are present at the boundaries between misaligned strands. I will discuss the collective evidence for solar and stellar nanoflares and hopefully present new results from the Solar Dynamics Observatory that was just launched.

  20. Solar Corona Explorer: A mission for the physical diagnosis of the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Mission objectives and spacecraft requirements for the Solar Corona Explorer (SCE), a proposed free flying, unmanned solar research craft to be tenatively launched in 1987, were defined. The SCE's purpose is to investigate structure, dynamics and evolution of the corona, globally and in the required physical detail, to study the close coupling between the inner corona and the heliosphere. Investigative objectives are: (1) to understand the corona as the source of varying interplanetary plasma and of varying solar X-ray and extreme ultraviolet fluxes; (2) to develop the capabilities to model the corona with sufficient precision to forecast the Earth's variable environment in space, on the scales from weeks to years; (3) to develop an understanding of the physical processes that determine the dynamics and physical state of the coronal plasma, particularly acceleration processes; and (4) to develop insight and test theory on the Sun applicable to stellar coronae and winds, and in particular, to understand why cool stars put such a large fraction of their energy into X-rays. Considered related factors are: (1) duration of the mission; (2) onboard measuring instrumentation; (3) ground support equipment and procedures; and (4) programs of interpretation and modeling.

  1. Radio seismology of the outer solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoliy; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Konovalenko, Alexander; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Rucker, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Observed oscillations of coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines have been successfully used to estimate plasma parameters in the inner corona (< 0.2R0, where R0 is the solar radius). However, coronal seismology in EUV lines fails for higher altitudes because of rapid decrease in line intensity. We aim to use radio observations to estimate the plasma parameters of the outer solar corona (> 0.2R0). We used the large Ukrainian radio telescope URAN-2 to observe type IV radio bursts at the frequency range of 8-32 MHz during the time interval of 09:50-12:30 UT on April 14, 2011. The burst was connected to C2.3 flare, which occurred in AR 11190 during 09:38-09:49 UT. The dynamic spectrum of radio emission shows clear quasi-periodic variations in the emission intensity at almost all frequencies. Wavelet analysis at four different frequencies (29 MHz, 25 MHz, 22 MHz, and 14 MHz) shows the quasi-periodic variation of emission intensity with periods of ~ 34 min and ~ 23 min. The periodic variations can be explained by the first and second harmonics of vertical kink oscillation of transequatorial coronal loops, which were excited by the same flare. The apex of transequatorial loops may reach up to 1.2 R0 altitude. We derive and solve the dispersion relation of trapped magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a longitudinally inhomogeneous magnetic slab. The analysis shows that a thin (with width to length ratio of 0.1), dense (with the ratio of internal and external densities of ≥ 20) magnetic slab with weak longitudinal inhomogeneity may trap the observed oscillations. Seismologically estimated Alfvén speed inside the loop at the height of ~ 1 R0 is ~ 1000 km s-1. The magnetic field strength at this height is estimated as ~ 0.9 G. Extrapolation of magnetic field strength to the inner corona gives ~ 10 G at the height of 0.1 R0. Radio observations can be successfully used for the sounding of the outer solar corona, where EUV observations of coronal loops fail

  2. Observations of the White Light Corona from Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, R. A.; Thernisien, A. F.; Vourlidas, A.; Plunkett, S. P.; Korendyke, C. M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Morrill, J. S.; Socker, D. G.; Linton, M. G.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M.; Velli, M. M.; Mikic, Z.; Bothmer, V.; Lamy, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    The SoloHI instrument on Solar Orbiter and the WISPR instrument on Solar Probe+ will make white light coronagraphic images of the corona as the two spacecraft orbit the Sun. The minimum perihelia for Solar Orbiter is about 60 Rsun and for SP+ is 9.5 Rsun. The wide field of view of the WISPR instrument (about 105 degrees radially) corresponds to viewing the corona from 2.2 Rsun to 20 Rsun. Thus the entire Thomson hemisphere is contained within the telescope's field and we need to think of the instrument as being a traditional remote sensing instrument and then transitioning to a local in-situ instrument. The local behavior derives from the fact that the maximum Thomson scattering will favor the electron plasma close to the spacecraft - exactly what the in-situ instruments will be sampling. SoloHI and WISPR will also observe scattered light from dust in the inner heliosphere, which will be an entirely new spatial regime for dust observations from a coronagraph, which we assume to arise from dust in the general neighborhood of about half way between the observer and the Sun. As the dust grains approach the Sun, they evaporate and do not contribute to the scattering. A dust free zone has been postulated to exist somewhere inside of 5 Rsun where all dust is evaporated, but this has never been observed. The radial position where the evaporation occurs will depend on the precise molecular composition of the individual grains. The orbital plane of Solar Orbiter will gradually increase up to about 35 degrees, enabling a very different view through the zodiacal dust cloud to test the models generated from in-ecliptic observations. In this paper we will explore some of the issues associated with the observation of the dust and will present a simple model to explore the sensitivity of the instrument to observe such evaporations.

  3. Recycling of the Solar Corona's Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, R. M.; Parnell, C. E.; Longcope, D. W.; Priest, E. R.

    2004-09-01

    Magnetic fields play a dominant role in the atmospheres of the Sun and other Sun-like stars. Outside sunspot regions, the photosphere of the so-called quiet Sun contains myriads of small-scale magnetic concentrations, with strengths ranging from the detection limit of ~1016 Mx up to ~3×1020 Mx. The tireless motion of these magnetic flux concentrations, along with the continual appearance and disappearance of opposite-polarity pairs of fluxes, releases a substantial amount of energy that may be associated with a whole host of physical processes in the solar corona, not least the enigma of coronal heating. We find here that the timescale for magnetic flux to be remapped in the quiet-Sun corona is, surprisingly, only 1.4 hr (around 1/10 of the photospheric flux recycling time), implying that the quiet-Sun corona is far more dynamic than previously thought. Besides leading to a fuller understanding of the origins of magnetically driven phenomena in our Sun's corona, such a process may also be crucial for the understanding of stellar atmospheres in general.

  4. VARIABLE WINDS AND DUST FORMATION IN R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Zhang Wanshu; Geballe, T. R. E-mail: wzhan21@lsu.edu

    2013-08-01

    We have observed P-Cygni and asymmetric, blue-shifted absorption profiles in the He I {lambda}10830 lines of 12 R Coronae Borealis stars over short (1 month) and long (3 yr) timescales to look for variations linked to their dust-formation episodes. In almost all cases, the strengths and terminal velocities of the line vary significantly and are correlated with dust formation events. Strong absorption features with blue-shifted velocities {approx}400 km s{sup -1} appear during declines in visible brightness and persist for about 100 days after recovery to maximum brightness. Small residual winds of somewhat lower velocity are present outside of the decline and recovery periods. The correlations support models in which recently formed dust near the star is propelled outward at high speed by radiation pressure and drags the gas along with it.

  5. Scintillation effects on radio wave propagation through solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Sue, M. K.; Bedrossian, A.; Sniffin, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    When RF waves pass through the solar corona and solar wind regions close to the Sun, strong scintillation effects appear at their amplitude, frequency and phase, especially in the regions very close to the Sun (less than 4 solar radius).

  6. RADIATIVE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, Thomas G.

    2011-10-20

    We investigate the effect of solar visible and infrared radiation on electrons in the Sun's atmosphere using a Monte Carlo simulation of the wave-particle interaction and conclude that sunlight provides at least 40% and possibly all of the power required to heat the corona, with the exception of dense magnetic flux loops. The simulation uses a radiation waveform comprising 100 frequency components spanning the solar blackbody spectrum. Coronal electrons are heated in a stochastic manner by low coherence solar electromagnetic radiation. The wave 'coherence time' and 'coherence volume' for each component is determined from optical theory. The low coherence of solar radiation allows moving electrons to gain energy from the chaotic wave field which imparts multiple random velocity 'kicks' to these particles causing their velocity distribution to broaden or heat. Monte Carlo simulations of broadband solar radiative heating on ensembles of 1000 electrons show heating at per particle levels of 4.0 x 10{sup -21} to 4.0 x 10{sup -20} W, as compared with non-loop radiative loss rates of {approx}1 x 10{sup -20} W per electron. Since radiative losses comprise nearly all of the power losses in the corona, sunlight alone can explain the elevated temperatures in this region. The volume electron heating rate is proportional to density, and protons are assumed to be heated either by plasma waves or through collisions with electrons.

  7. Globally propagating waves in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    High-cadence space-based observations, available for over a decade now, have revealed globally propagating wave-like disturbances in the solar corona. These coronal waves have now been imaged in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Still, no consensus on their physical nature has been reached yet. While many findings are consistent with fast-mode MHD waves and/or shocks, other characteristics have given rise to alternative models which involve magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an erupting coronal mass ejection. In this paper, the observational signatures of coronal waves will be reviewed, and the different physical interpretations of coronal waves and how they are motivated by observations will be discussed. Finally, the potential of using coronal waves as a diagnostic tool for the corona will be shown.

  8. Green corona and solar sector structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Svalgaard, L.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of the green-line corona for the interval 1947-1970 suggests the existence of large-scale organization of the emission. The green-line emission at high northern latitudes (approximately 40 to 60 deg) is correlated with the emission at high southern latitudes 6, 15, and 24 days later, while the low-latitude green corona seems to be correlated on both sides of the equator with no time lag. These coronal features are recurrent with a 27-day period at all latitudes between plus or minus 60 deg, and these large-scale structures are believed to be associated with the solar magnetic sector structure. The high correlation between northern and southern high-latitude emission at 15 days time lag is explained as a signature of a two-sector structure, while four sectors are associated with the 6- and 24-day peaks.

  9. Torsional oscillations in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. I.; Tlatov, A. G.

    1997-07-01

    The dependence of the differential rotation of the solar corona on latitude and time is investigated using observations in the Fe XIV 5303 Angstrom line from 1940 to 1992. Five bands of fast and slow rotation relative to the average value are distinguished. The bands of slow rotation arise after the reversal of the polar magnetic field of the Sun and migrate toward the equator over the course of 8 to 15 years along the `butterfly' patterns of polar faculae and of the sunspots of the following cycle. The bands of fast rotation arise 5-6 years later and also migrate toward the equator parallel to the bands of slow rotation. The fastest latitude drift of the bands was observed from 1945 to 1955, and preceded the maximum of the 19th solar activity cycle (1955-1965). The amplitude of the azimuthal component of the coronal rotation relative to the mean rotation varied within 30 m/s. The equatorial drift velocity varied from 3 to 5 m/s. The latitude-time distribution of the zones with slow coronal rotation is associated with the appearance of high-latitude and middle-latitude coronal holes after the reversal of the solar polar magnetic field and during the solar activity maximum of the next sunspot cycle. The origin of the zones of anomalous rotation in the corona and their dynamics in the global activity cycle are discussed.

  10. Torsional oscillations in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. I.; Tlatov, A. G.

    1997-08-01

    The dependence of the differential rotation of the solar corona on latitude and time is investigated using observations in the Fe XIV 5303 A line from 1940 to 1992. Five bands of fast and slow rotation relative to the average value are distinguished. The bands of slow rotation arise after the reversal of the polar magnetic field of the sun and migrate toward the equator over the course of eight to 15 years along the 'butterfly' patterns of polar faculae and of the sunspots of the following cycle. The bands of fast rotation arise 5-6 years later, and also migrate toward the equator parallel to the bands of slow rotation. The fastest latitude drift of the bands was observed from 1945 to 1955 and preceded the maximum of the 19th solar activity cycle (1955-1965). The amplitude of the azimuthal component of the coronal rotation relative to the mean rotation varied within +/- 30 m/s. The equatorial drift velocity varied from 3 to 5 m/s. The latitude-time distribution of the zones with slow coronal rotation is associated with the appearance of high-latitude and middle-latitude coronal holes after the reversal of the solar polar magnetic field and during the solar activity maximum of the next sunspot cycle. The origin of the zones of anomalous rotation in the corona and their dynamics in the global activity cycle are discussed.

  11. Faraday Rotation Observations of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Spangler, S. R.

    1998-05-01

    Faraday rotation measures the path integral of the product of electron density and line of sight component of the magnetic field from the observer to a source of linearly polarized radio emission. For our observations, the line of sight passes through the solar corona. These observations were made with the NRAO Very Large Array at frequencies of 1465 and 1635 MHz. Observations at two frequencies can confirm the lambda (2) dependence of position angle rotation characteristic of Faraday rotation. We observed the extended radio source 0036+030 (4C+03.01) on March 28, 1997, when the source was 8.6 Rsun from the center of the Sun. Nearly continuous observations were made over an 11 hour period. Our observations measure an average rotation measure (RM) of about +7 radians/m(2) attributable to the corona. The RM showed slow variations during the observing session, with a total change of about 3 radians/m(2) . This variation is attributed to large scale gradients and static plasma structures in the corona, and is the same for two source components separated by 30 arcseconds (22000 km). We have also detected RM variations on time scales of 15 minutes to one hour, which may be coronal Alfven waves. We measure an rms variation of 0.57 radians/m(2) for such fluctuations, which is comparable to previous reports.

  12. The Solar Corona at the 2015 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Carter, Allison L.

    2015-04-01

    We report on our successful observations of the solar corona at the 20 March 2015 total solar eclipse from our site at a latitude of about 78° on the Svalbard archipelago, and related observations by colleagues aloft. Our equipment included cameras for imaging at a variety of scales for use in making high-contrast composites, as reported our Astrophysical Journal article (2015) about our 2012 total solar eclipse observations and similar articles about the corona and changes in it at previous total eclipses. Our Svalbard equipment also included a spectrograph, with which we continued our monitoring of the ratio of the Fe XIV and Fe X coronal lines, which has recently been >1 with the solar maximum, a reversal from <1 at earlier eclipses closer to the last solar minimum. Our 2013 observations from Gabon showed two coronal mass ejections and an erupting prominence; the 2015 eclipse showed an erupting prominence and some unusual coronal structure in an overall coronal shape typical of solar maximum. We use our ground-based eclipse observations to fill the gap in imaging between the SDO and SWAP (17.4 nm) EUV observations on the solar disk and the inner location of the LASCO C2 occultation disk, with STEREO observations providing the possibility of three-dimensional interpretations. Our expedition was supported by a grant (9616-14) from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  13. Dynamics and energetics of the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is to improve our understanding of the dynamics and energetics of the solar corona both in the quiescent dynamic equilibrium state when coronal structure is dominated by the equatorial streamer belt and in the eruptive state when coronal plasma is ejected into the interplanetary medium. Numerical solutions of the time-dependent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations and comparisons of the computed results with observations form the core of the approach to achieving this objective. Some of the specific topics that have been studied are: (1) quiescent coronal streamers in an atmosphere dominated by a dipole magnetic field at large radii, (2) the formation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in quiescent streamers due to the emergence of new magnetic flux and due to photospheric shear motion, (3) MHD shock formation near the leading edge of CMEs, (4) coronal magnetic arcade eruption as a result of applied photospheric shear motion, and (5) the three-dimensional structure of CMEs.

  14. Untwisting magnetic fields in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Ramit; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr; Chye Low, Boon

    2012-07-01

    The solar corona is the tenuous atmosphere of the Sun characterized by a temperature of the order of million degrees Kelvin, an ambient magnetic field of 10 to 15 Gauss and a very high magnetic Reynolds number because of which it qualifies as a near-ideal magnetofluid system. It is well known that for such a system, the magnetic flux across every fluid surface remains effectively constant to a good approximation. Under this so called ``frozen-in'' condition then, it is possible to partition this magnetofluid into contiguous magnetic subvolumes each entrapping its own subsystem of magnetic flux. Thin magnetic flux tubes are an elementary example of such magnetic subvolumes evolving in time with no exchange of fluid among them. The internal twists and interweaving of these flux tubes, collectively referred as the magnetic topology, remains conserved under the frozen-in condition. Because of the dynamical evolution of the magnetofluid, two such subvolumes can come into direct contact with each other by expelling a third interstitial subvolume. In this process, the magnetic field may become discontinuous across the surface of contact by forming a current sheet there. Because of the small spatial scales generated by steepening of magnetic field gradient, the otherwise negligible resistivity becomes dominant and allows for reconnection of field lines which converts magnetic energy into heat. This phenomenon of spontaneous current sheet formation and its subsequent resistive decay is believed to be a possible mechanism for heating the solar corona to its million degree Kelvin temperature. In this work the dynamics of spontaneous current sheet formation is explored through numerical simulations and the results are presented.

  15. Exploring dynamic events in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, Cooper James

    With the advent of modern computational technology it is now becoming the norm to employ detailed 3D computer models as empirical tools that directly account for the inhomogeneous nature of the Sun-Heliosphere environment. The key advantage of this approach lies in the ability to compare model results directly to observational data and to use a successful comparison (or lack thereof) to glean information on the underlying physical processes. Using extreme ultraviolet waves (EUV waves) as the overarching scientific driver, we apply this observation modeling approach to study the complex dynamics of the magnetic and thermodynamic structures that are observed in the low solar corona. Representing a highly non-trivial effort, this work includes three main scientific thrusts: an initial modeling effort and two EUV wave case-studies. First we document the development of the new Low Corona (LC) model, a 3D time-dependent thermodynamic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model implemented within the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF). Observation synthesis methods are integrated within the LC model, which provides the ability to compare model results directly to EUV imaging observations taken by spacecraft. The new model is then used to explore the dynamic interplay between magnetic structures and thermodynamic energy balance in the corona that is caused by coronal heating mechanisms. With the model development complete, we investigate the nature of EUV waves in detail through two case-studies. Starting with the 2008 March 25 event, we conduct a series of numerical simulations that independently vary fundamental parameters thought to govern the physical mechanisms behind EUV waves. Through the subsequent analysis of the 3D data and comparison to observations we find evidence for both wave and non-wave mechanisms contributing to the EUV wave signal. We conclude with a comprehensive observation and modeling analysis of the 2010 June 13 EUV wave event, which was observed by the

  16. A study of the background corona near solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, K.; Poland, A. I.; Munro, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Equatorial and polar K and F coronal components during the declining phase of the solar cycle are studied through use of the white light coronagraph data obtained by Skylab. At this phase of the solar cycle, streams and holes dominate the equatorial corona (approximately 50 and 30% of the time, respectively) between 2.5 and 5.5 solar radii; however, two episodes are noted when equatorial background density of the corona could be distinguished. The derived background density is less than 15% below values predicted by the models of Newkirk (1967) and Saito (1970). The brightness of the F-corona is also discussed.

  17. Solar corona/prominence seen through the White Light Coronograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The solar corona and a solar prominence as seen through the White Light Coronograph, Skylab Experiment S052, on January 17, 1974. This view was reproduced from a television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The bright spot is a burn in the vidicon. The solar corona is the halo around the Sun which is normally visible only at the time of solar eclipse by the Moon. The Skylab coronography uses an externally-mounted disk system which occults the brilliant solar surface while allowing the fainter radiation of the corona to enter an annulus and be photographed. A mirror system allows either TV viewing of the corona or photographic recording of the image.

  18. Radio Observations of the Solar Corona During an Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathiravan, C.; Ramesh, R.; Barve, Indrajit V.; Rajalingam, M.

    2011-04-01

    We carried out radio observations of the solar corona at 170 MHz during the eclipse of 2008 August 1, from the Gauribidanur observatory located about 100 km north of Bangalore in India. The results indicate the presence of a discrete radio source of very small angular dimension (≈15'') in the corona from where the observed radiation originated.

  19. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR CORONA DURING AN ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Kathiravan, C.; Ramesh, R.; Barve, Indrajit V.; Rajalingam, M. E-mail: ramesh@iiap.res.in E-mail: rajalingam@iiap.res.in

    2011-04-01

    We carried out radio observations of the solar corona at 170 MHz during the eclipse of 2008 August 1, from the Gauribidanur observatory located about 100 km north of Bangalore in India. The results indicate the presence of a discrete radio source of very small angular dimension ({approx}15'') in the corona from where the observed radiation originated.

  20. Heating of the Solar Corona: Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, R.

    2005-06-01

    The heating of solar and stellar chromospheres and coronae are one of the key fundamental and yet unresolved questions of modern space and plasma physics. In spite of the multi-fold efforts spanning over half a century including the many superb technological advances and theoretical developments (both analytical and computational) the unveiling of the subtles of coronal heating still remained an exciting job for the 21st century! In the present paper I review the various popular heating mechanisms put forward in the existing extensive literature. The heating processes are, somewhat arbitrarily, classified as hydrodynamic (HD), magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) or kinetic based on the model medium. These mechanisms are further divided based on the time scales of the ultimate dissipation involved (i.e. AC and DC heating, turbulent heating). In particular, attention is paid to discuss shock dissipation, Landau damping, mode coupling, resonant absorption, phase mixing, and, reconnection. Finally, I briefly review the various observational consequences of the many proposed heating mechanisms and confront them with high-resolution ground-based and satellite data currently available.

  1. Results of observations of the dust distribution in the F-corona of the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, L. I.; Demchenko, B. I.

    2016-03-01

    The results of modeling of the distribution of dust in the circumsolar zone are presented. The dust distribution was retrieved from observations of the line-of-sight velocities in the F-corona to the distances of 7-11 solar radii during the total eclipses of the Sun in different years: on July 31, 1981; August 11, 1991; March 29, 2006; and August 1, 2008. Comparison of the results has shown that the dust composition varies from year to year and the dust is dynamically nonuniform. In addition to the dust related to the zodiacal cloud and concentrating to the ecliptic plane, the dust of retrograde motion and the ejections and accretion in the polar regions are observed. From the results of observations of eclipses on July 31, 1981, August 11, 1991, and August 1, 2008, the east-west asymmetry in a sign of the line-of-sight velocities was detected: they are negative to the east of the Sun and positive to the west. Such distribution of the velocities is indicative of the nearecliptic orbital dust motion, whose direction coincides with that of the motion of the planets. In the course of the eclipse of March 29, 2006, almost no dynamical connection with the zodiacal cloud was found. At the same time, the direction, where the observed velocities are largest in value and opposite in sign on opposite sides of the Sun, was determined, which provides evidence of the orbital motion deviating from the ecliptic plane. The results of observations in 2006 reveal a clear genetic connection of the observed orbital motion of dust with the parent comets of the Kreutz family found near the Sun close to the eclipse date. The velocities observed near the symmetry line in the plane of the sky grow by absolute value with increasing the elongation, which may take place, if the line of sight croßses an empty zone that is free of dust. The modeling of the data of observations near the symmetry plane allowed the parameters of the dust distribution near the sublimation zone to be obtained. In

  2. Peculiarities of propagation of charged particles in solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisarenko, N. F.; Mikryukova, N. A.; Shafer, Y. G.; Morozova, E. I.; Klimenko, V. V.; Timofeev, V. E.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of boundaries of the large scale unipolar magnetic regions (UMR) on the Sun upon the charged particle propagation in the solar corona and interplanetary space is investigated. Increases of the charged particle fluxes from solar flares on November 4 and 20, 1978 detected by Venera-11 and Prognoz-1 and on December 7, 1982 by Venera-13 and "GMS-2" were analyzed.

  3. Topological Structure of the Magnetic Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, R. C.

    2007-12-01

    The solar corona is a highly complex and active plasma environment, containing many exotic phenomena such as solar flares, coronal mass ejections, prominences, coronal loops, and bright points. The fundamental element giving coherence to all this apparent diversity is the strong coronal magnetic field, the dominant force shaping the plasma there. In this thesis, I model the 3D magnetic fields of various coronal features using the techniques of magnetic charge topology (MCT) in a potential field. Often the real coronal field has departures from its potential state, but these are so small that the potential field method is accurate enough to pick out the essential information about the structure and evolution of the magnetic field. First I perform a topological analysis of the magnetic breakout model for an eruptive solar flare. Breakout is represented by a topological bifurcation that allows initially enclosed flux from the newly emerging region in my MCT model of a delta sunspot to reconnect out to large distances. I produce bifurcation diagrams showing how this behaviour can be caused by changing the strength or position of the emerging flux source, or the force-free parameter α. I also apply MCT techniques to observational data of a coronal bright point, and compare the results to 3D numerical MHD simulations of the effects of rotating the sources that underlie the bright point. The separatrix surfaces that surround each rotating source are found to correspond to locations of high parallel electric field in the simulations, which is a signature of magnetic reconnection. The large-scale topological structure of the magnetic field is robust to changes in the method of deriving point magnetic sources from the magnetogram. Next, I use a Green's function expression for the magnetic field to relax the standard topological assumption of a flat photosphere and extend the concept of MCT into a spherical geometry, enabling it to be applied to the entire global coronal

  4. The magnetic field structure in the active solar corona.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1971-01-01

    The structure of the magnetic field of the active solar corona is discussed with reference to optical and radio observations of the solar atmosphere. Eclipse observations provide evidence of fine scale structures in the solar atmosphere that appear to relate to the coronal magnetic field. The coronal magnetic field used for comparison is calculated from potential theory; the influence of solar activity upon the potential theory field is discussed with reference to observations of the Faraday rotation of a microwave signal from Pioneer 6 as it was occulted by the solar atmosphere. Evidence has been found suggesting the existence of expanding magnetic bottles located at 10 solar radii above flaring active regions. The dynamics of these events is discussed. It is further suggested that these magnetic bottles are an important component in the solar corona.

  5. Patchy reconnection in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidoni, Silvina Esther

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic reconnection in plasmas, a process characterized by a change in connectivity of field lines that are broken and connected to other ones with different topology, owes its usefulness to its ability to unify a wide range of phenomena within a single universal principle. There are newly observed phenomena in the solar corona that cannot be reconciled with two-dimensional or steady-state standard models of magnetic reconnection. Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) and supra-arcade downflowing loops (SADLs) descending from reconnection regions toward solar post-flare arcades seem to be two different observational signatures of retracting, isolated reconnected flux tubes with irreducible three-dimensional geometries. This dissertation describes work in refining and improving a novel model of patchy reconnection, where only a small bundle of field lines is reconnected across a current sheet (magnetic discontinuity) and forms a reconnected thin flux tube. Traditional models have not been able to explain why some of the observed SADs appear to be hot and relatively devoid of plasma. The present work shows that plasma depletion naturally occurs in flux tubes that are reconnected across nonuniform current sheets and slide trough regions of decreasing magnetic field magnitude. Moreover, through a detailed theoretical analysis of generalized thin flux tube equations, we show that the addition to the model of pressure-driven parallel dynamics, as well as temperature-dependent, anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity is essential for self-consistently producing gas-dynamic shocks inside reconnected tubes that heat and compress plasma to observed temperatures and densities. The shock thickness can be as long as the entire tube and heat can be conducted along tube's legs, possibly driving chromospheric evaporation. We developed a computer program that solves numerically the thin flux tube equations that govern the retraction of reconnected tubes. Simulations carried out

  6. THE 2008 AUGUST 1 ECLIPSE SOLAR-MINIMUM CORONA UNRAVELED

    SciTech Connect

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Minarovjech, M.; Druckmueller, M.; Aniol, P.

    2009-09-10

    We discuss the results stemming from observations of the white-light and [Fe XIV] emission corona during the total eclipse of the Sun of 2008 August 1, in Mongolia (Altaj region) and in Russia (Akademgorodok, Novosibirsk, Siberia). Corresponding to the current extreme solar minimum, the white-light corona, visible up to 20 solar radii, was of a transient type with well pronounced helmet streamers situated above a chain of prominences at position angles 48 deg., 130 deg., 241 deg., and 322 deg. A variety of coronal holes, filled with a number of thin polar plumes, were seen around the poles. Furthering an original method of image processing, stars up to 12 mag, a Kreutz-group comet (C/2008 O1) and a coronal mass ejection (CME) were also detected, with the smallest resolvable structures being of, and at some places even less than, 1 arcsec. Differences, presumably motions, in the corona and prominences are seen even with the 19 minutes time difference between our sites. In addition to the high-resolution coronal images, which show the continuum corona (K-corona) that results from electron scattering of photospheric light, images of the overlapping green-emission-line (530.3 nm, [Fe XIV]) corona were obtained with the help of two narrow-passband filters (centered on the line itself and for the continuum in the vicinity of 529.1 nm, respectively), each with an FWHM of 0.15 nm. Through solar observations, on whose scheduling and details we consulted, with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, Hinode's XRT and SOT, Transition Region and Coronal Explorer, and STEREO, as well as Wilcox Solar Observatory and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms, we set our eclipse observations in the context of the current unusually low and prolonged solar minimum.

  7. Probing the solar corona with very long baseline interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, B.; Heinkelmann, R.; Schuh, H.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding and monitoring the solar corona and solar wind is important for many applications like telecommunications or geomagnetic studies. Coronal electron density models have been derived by various techniques over the last 45 years, principally by analysing the effect of the corona on spacecraft tracking. Here we show that recent observational data from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), a radio technique crucial for astrophysics and geodesy, could be used to develop electron density models of the Sun’s corona. The VLBI results agree well with previous models from spacecraft measurements. They also show that the simple spherical electron density model is violated by regional density variations and that on average the electron density in active regions is about three times that of low-density regions. Unlike spacecraft tracking, a VLBI campaign would be possible on a regular basis and would provide highly resolved spatial-temporal samplings over a complete solar cycle.

  8. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF LOOPS IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, David H.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-08-01

    Understanding how the solar corona is structured is of fundamental importance to determine how the Sun's upper atmosphere is heated to high temperatures. Recent spectroscopic studies have suggested that an instrument with a spatial resolution of 200 km or better is necessary to resolve coronal loops. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) achieved this performance on a rocket flight in 2012 July. We use Hi-C data to measure the Gaussian widths of 91 loops observed in the solar corona and find a distribution that peaks at about 270 km. We also use Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data for a subset of these loops and find temperature distributions that are generally very narrow. These observations provide further evidence that loops in the solar corona are often structured at a scale of several hundred kilometers, well above the spatial scale of many proposed physical mechanisms.

  9. Probing the solar corona with very long baseline interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Soja, B.; Heinkelmann, R.; Schuh, H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and monitoring the solar corona and solar wind is important for many applications like telecommunications or geomagnetic studies. Coronal electron density models have been derived by various techniques over the last 45 years, principally by analysing the effect of the corona on spacecraft tracking. Here we show that recent observational data from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), a radio technique crucial for astrophysics and geodesy, could be used to develop electron density models of the Sun’s corona. The VLBI results agree well with previous models from spacecraft measurements. They also show that the simple spherical electron density model is violated by regional density variations and that on average the electron density in active regions is about three times that of low-density regions. Unlike spacecraft tracking, a VLBI campaign would be possible on a regular basis and would provide highly resolved spatial–temporal samplings over a complete solar cycle. PMID:24946791

  10. Probing the solar corona with very long baseline interferometry.

    PubMed

    Soja, B; Heinkelmann, R; Schuh, H

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and monitoring the solar corona and solar wind is important for many applications like telecommunications or geomagnetic studies. Coronal electron density models have been derived by various techniques over the last 45 years, principally by analysing the effect of the corona on spacecraft tracking. Here we show that recent observational data from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), a radio technique crucial for astrophysics and geodesy, could be used to develop electron density models of the Sun's corona. The VLBI results agree well with previous models from spacecraft measurements. They also show that the simple spherical electron density model is violated by regional density variations and that on average the electron density in active regions is about three times that of low-density regions. Unlike spacecraft tracking, a VLBI campaign would be possible on a regular basis and would provide highly resolved spatial-temporal samplings over a complete solar cycle. PMID:24946791

  11. A theory of heating of quiet solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C. S.; Yoon, P. H.; Wang, C. B.

    2015-03-15

    A theory is proposed to discuss the creation of hot solar corona. We pay special attention to the transition region and the low corona, and consider that the sun is quiet. The proposed scenario suggests that the protons are heated by intrinsic Alfvénic turbulence, while the ambient electrons are heated by the hot protons via collisions. The theory contains two prime components: the generation of the Alfvénic fluctuations by the heavy minor ions in the transition region and second, the explanation of the temperature profile in the low solar atmosphere. The proposed heating process operates continuously in time and globally in space.

  12. A theory of heating of quiet solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Yoon, P. H.; Wang, C. B.

    2015-03-01

    A theory is proposed to discuss the creation of hot solar corona. We pay special attention to the transition region and the low corona, and consider that the sun is quiet. The proposed scenario suggests that the protons are heated by intrinsic Alfvénic turbulence, while the ambient electrons are heated by the hot protons via collisions. The theory contains two prime components: the generation of the Alfvénic fluctuations by the heavy minor ions in the transition region and second, the explanation of the temperature profile in the low solar atmosphere. The proposed heating process operates continuously in time and globally in space.

  13. Modeling the multi-ion structure of the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena; Wang, Tongjiang

    2014-06-01

    The solar corona is typically observed in EUV by SDO/AIA and other instruments using the heavy ion emission lines such as Fe IX, Fe XII, and other ion emission lines. However, the relative (to protons) abundance of the emitting ions is very low and the collisional coupling between the Fe ions and electrons decreases rapidly with height in the low corona, while gravitational settling may become significant in quiescent long-lived magnetic structures, such as streamers. Thus, the structure of the weakly collisional solar corona imaged in Fe IX (and other heavy ions) may differ significantly from the structure of the main electron-proton constituents of the corona. The electron structure is observed by white light coronagraphs, and during solar eclipses in the low corona. I present the results of multi-fluid modeling of coronal streamers and other magnetic structures that demonstrate the effects of weak coupling between the heavy ions and the coronal electron-proton components, and show that the multi-ion coronal structure must be taken into account in interpretation of EUV observations.

  14. Element Abundances in Solar Energetic Particles and the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2014-03-01

    This is a study of abundances of the elements He, C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe in solar energetic particles (SEPs) in the 2 - 15 MeV amu-1 region measured on the Wind spacecraft during 54 large SEP events occurring between November 1994 and June 2012. The origin of most of the temporal and spatial variations in abundances of the heavier elements lies in rigidity-dependent scattering during transport of the particles away from the site of acceleration at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Variation in the abundance of Fe is correlated with the Fe spectral index, as expected from scattering theory but not previously noted. Clustering of Fe abundances during the "reservoir" period, late in SEP events, is also newly reported. Transport-induced enhancements in one region are balanced by depletions in another, thus, averaging over these variations produces SEP abundances that are energy independent, confirms previous SEP abundances in this energy region, and provides a credible measure of element abundances in the solar corona. These SEP-determined coronal abundances differ from those in the solar photosphere by a well-known function that depends upon the first ionization potential (FIP) or ionization time of the element.

  15. The solar extreme ultra-violet corona: Resolved loops and the unresolved active region corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirtain, Jonathan Wesley

    In this work, physical characteristics of the solar corona as observed in the Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) regime are investigated. The focus will be the regions of intense EUV radiation generally found near the locations of sunspots. These regions are commonly called active regions. Multiple space- based observing platforms have been deployed in the last decade; it is possible to use several of these observatories in combination to develop a more complete picture of the solar corona. Joint Observing Program 146 was created to collect spectroscopic intensities using the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and EUV images using NASA's Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. The emission line intensities are analyzed to develop an understanding of the temperature and density of the active region coronal plasma. However, the performance of the CDS instrument in the spatial and temporal domains is limited and to compensate for these limitations, data collected by the TRACE instrument provide a high spatial and temporal resolution set of observations. One of the most exciting unsolved problems in solar astrophysics is to understand why the corona maintains a temperature roughly two orders of magnitude higher than the underlying material. A detailed investigation of the coronal emission has provided constraints on models of the heating mechanism, since the temperature, density and evolution of emission rates for multiple ionic species are indicative of the mechanism(s) working to heat the corona. The corona appears to consist of multiple unresolved structures as well as resolved active region structures, called coronal loops. The purpose of the present work is to determine the characteristics of the unresolved background corona. Using the characterizations of the coronal unresolved background, results for loops after background subtraction are also presented. This work demonstrates the magnitude of the unresolved coronal emission with

  16. Imaging and Processing Images of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espenak, Fred

    Of all astronomical phenomena visible to the naked eye, none is as spectacular, or as fleeting, as a total eclipse of the Sun. For a few brief minutes, the Moon blocks the Sun's blindingly bright photosphere to reveal the ethereal solar corona. This gossamer halo, forming the outer atmosphere of the Sun, can only be seen in the eerie twilight brought on by totality.

  17. Modeling Jets in the Corona and Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torok, Tibor; Lionello, Roberto; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Leake, James E.; Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.; Linton, Mark G.

    2016-04-01

    Coronal jets are transient, collimated eruptions that occur in regions of open or semi-open magnetic fields in the solar corona. Our understanding of these events has significantly improved in recent years, owing to improved observational capabilities and numerical simulations. Yet, several important questions concerning coronal jets remain largely unanswered. For example: What exactly are the physical mechanisms that heat and accelerate the plasma? And to what extent do jets contribute to the heating of the corona and in providing mass and energy to the fast solar wind? Here we present a "new generation" of coronal-jet simulations that will allow us to address such questions in more detail than before. In contrast to previous simulations, our code models the large-scale corona in a spherical domain, uses an advanced description of the energy transfer in the corona ("thermodynamic MHD"), and includes the solar wind. As a first application, we consider a purely radial coronal magnetic field and a simple coronal heating function that decreases exponentially with height above the surface. We produce so-called standard and blowout jets by continuously driving the system at the lower boundary with data extracted from flux-emergence simulations. We discuss the formation, dynamics, and evolution of the jets, as well as their contribution to coronal heating and the solar wind.

  18. New Views of the Solar Corona from STEREO and SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, A.

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, we have been treated to an unusual visual feast of solar observations of the corona in EUV wavelengths. The observations from the two vantage points of STEREO/SECCHI are now capturing the entire solar atmosphere simultaneously in four wavelengths. The SDO/AIA images provide us with arcsecond resolution images of the full visible disk in ten wavelengths. All these data are captured with cadences of a few seconds to a few minutes. In this talk, I review some intriguing results from our first attempts to deal with these observations which touch upon the problems of coronal mass ejection initiation and solar wind generation. I will also discuss data processing techniques that may help us recover even more information from the images. The talk will contain a generous portion of beautiful EUV images and movies of the solar corona.

  19. Seeing the corona with the solar probe plus mission: the wide-field imager for solar probe+ (WISPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vourlidas, Angelos; Howard, Russell A.; Plunkett, Simon P.; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Carter, Michael T.; Thernisien, Arnaud F. R.; Chua, Damien H.; Van Duyne, Peter; Socker, Dennis G.; Linton, Mark G.; Liewer, Paulett C.; Hall, Jeffrey R.; Morrill, Jeff S.; DeJong, Eric M.; Mikic, Zoran; Rochus, Pierre L. P. M.; Bothmer, Volker; Rodman, Jens; Lamy, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission scheduled for launch in 2018, will orbit between the Sun and Venus with diminishing perihelia reaching as close as 7 million km (9.86 solar radii) from Sun center. In addition to a suite of in-situ probes for the magnetic field, plasma, and energetic particles, SPP will be equipped with an imager. The Wide-field Imager for the Solar PRobe+ (WISPR), with a 95° radial by 58° transverse field of view, will image the fine-scale coronal structure of the corona, derive the 3D structure of the large-scale corona, and determine whether a dust-free zone exists near the Sun. Given the tight mass constrains of the mission, WISPR incorporates an efficient design of two widefield telescopes and their associated focal plane arrays based on novel large-format (2kx2k) APS CMOS detectors into the smallest heliospheric imaging package to date. The flexible control electronics allow WISPR to collect individual images at cadences up to 1 second at perihelion or sum several of them to increase the signal-to-noise during the outbound part of the orbit. The use of two telescopes minimizes the risk of dust damage which may be considerable close to the Sun. The dependency of the Thomson scattering emission of the corona on the imaging geometry dictates that WISPR will be very sensitive to the emission from plasma close to the spacecraft in contrast to the situation for imaging from Earth orbit. WISPR will be the first `local' imager providing a crucial link between the large scale corona and the in-situ measurements.

  20. New Synoptic Maps of the Solar Corona from UVCS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Miralles, M.; Kohl, J. L.; Baham, M.

    2005-05-01

    We present for the first time synoptic maps of the extended solar corona (r/Ro > 1.5) based on eight years of data from the SOHO Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS). The data reveal the changes in the physical properties of the large scale features in the corona. Maps of O VI line intensities, line widths, and line ratios for the O VI 1032/1037 doublet and intensities and line widths for the H I Ly-alpha line reveal information about the evolution of coronal densities, temperatures, and outflow velocities over the solar cycle. In particular these data are used in support of program to understand the solar cycle variation of coronal holes and coronal streamers. This work is supported by NASA Grant NAG5-12781 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and NASA subcontract OGSP21010200061SAO awarded to SAO through a grant to Southern Universty at Baton Rouge.

  1. Heating of the Solar Corona and its Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2009-01-01

    At several million degrees, the solar corona is more than two orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying solar surface. The reason for these extreme conditions has been a puzzle for decades and is considered one of the fundamental problems in astrophysics. Much of the coronal plasma is organized by the magnetic field into arch-like structures called loops. Recent observational and theoretical advances have led to great progress in understanding the nature of these loops. In particular, we now believe they are bundles of unresolved magnetic strands that are heated by storms of impulsive energy bursts called nanoflares. Turbulent convection at the solar surface shuffles the footpoints of the strands and causes them to become tangled. A nanoflare occurs when the magnetic stresses reach a critical threshold, probably by way of a mechanism called the secondary instability. I will describe our current state of knowledge concerning the corona, its loops, and how they are heated.

  2. Measuring the IR solar corona during the 2017 eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryans, Paul; Hannigan, James; Philip, Judge; Larson, Brandon; Sewell, Scott; McIntire, Lauren

    2016-05-01

    On 21 August 2017 a total solar eclipse will pass across the continental United States, offering a unique opportunity to conduct scientific research of the solar atmosphere. With the light from the Sun eclipsed, the solar corona becomes visible in a way not possible when swamped by the light from the photosphere. The infrared (IR) spectrum of the corona, in particular, is predicted to contain some of the most magnetically sensitive spectral lines. However, no comprehensive survey of this spectral range has been carried out to date. Here, we describe a Fourier Transform Spectrometer, currently under construction at NCAR, to measure the IR spectrum from 2 to 12 microns. We will discuss the operation of the experiment, which will be deployed along the path of totality in Wyoming, and the scientific results we hope to obtain.

  3. Plasma Compression in Magnetic Reconnection Regions in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provornikova, E.; Laming, J. M.; Lukin, V. S.

    2016-07-01

    It has been proposed that particles bouncing between magnetized flows converging in a reconnection region can be accelerated by the first-order Fermi mechanism. Analytical considerations of this mechanism have shown that the spectral index of accelerated particles is related to the total plasma compression within the reconnection region, similarly to the case of the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. As a first step to investigate the efficiency of Fermi acceleration in reconnection regions in producing hard energy spectra of particles in the solar corona, we explore the degree of plasma compression that can be achieved at reconnection sites. In particular, we aim to determine the conditions for the strong compressions to form. Using a two-dimensional resistive MHD numerical model, we consider a set of magnetic field configurations where magnetic reconnection can occur, including a Harris current sheet, a force-free current sheet, and two merging flux ropes. Plasma parameters are taken to be characteristic of the solar corona. Numerical simulations show that strong plasma compressions (≥4) in the reconnection regions can form when the plasma heating due to reconnection is efficiently removed by fast thermal conduction or the radiative cooling process. The radiative cooling process that is negligible in the typical 1 MK corona can play an important role in the low corona/transition region. It is found that plasma compression is expected to be strongest in low-beta plasma β ˜ 0.01–0.07 at reconnection magnetic nulls.

  4. OBSERVATION OF ULTRAFINE CHANNELS OF SOLAR CORONA HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Haisheng; Cao, Wenda; Goode, Philip R.

    2012-05-01

    We report the first direct observations of dynamical events originating in the Sun's photosphere and subsequently lighting up the corona. Continuous small-scale, impulsive events have been tracked from their origin in the photosphere on through to their brightening of the local corona. We achieve this by combining high-resolution ground-based data from the 1.6 m aperture New Solar Telescope (NST) at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), and satellite data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The NST imaging observations in helium I 10830 A reveal unexpected complexes of ultrafine, hot magnetic loops seen to be reaching from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Most of these ultrafine loops are characterized by an apparently constant, but surprisingly narrow diameter of about 100 km all along each loop, and the loops originate on the solar surface from intense, compact magnetic field elements. The NST observations detect the signature of upward injections of hot plasma that excite the ultrafine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. The ejecta have their individual footpoints in the intergranular lanes between the Sun's ubiquitous, convectively driven granules. In many cases, AIA/SDO detects cospatial and cotemporal brightenings in the overlying, million degree coronal loops in conjunction with the upward injections along the ultrafine loops. Segments of some of the more intense upward injections are seen as rapid blueshifted events in simultaneous H{alpha} blue wing images observed at BBSO. In sum, the observations unambiguously show impulsive coronal heating events from upward energy flows originating from intergranular lanes on the solar surface accompanied by cospatial mass flows.

  5. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the third year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona," between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period June 16, 1998 to August 15, 1999. This is also the final report for this contract. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the three-year duration of this contract we have published 49 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 3 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles. We summarize our progress during the third year of the contract. Full descriptions of our work can be found in the cited publications, a few of which are attached to this report.

  6. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2000-03-01

    This report covers technical progress during the third year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona," between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period June 16, 1998 to August 15, 1999. This is also the final report for this contract. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the three-year duration of this contract we have published 49 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 3 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles. We summarize our progress during the third year of the contract. Full descriptions of our work can be found in the cited publications, a few of which are attached to this report.

  7. Observational capabilities of solar satellite "Coronas-Photon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yu.

    Coronas-Photon mission is the third satellite of the Russian Coronas program on solar activity observation The main goal of the Coronas-Photon is the study of solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the wide energy range from UV up to high energy gamma-radiation sim 2000MeV Scientific payload for solar radiation observation consists of three type of instruments 1 monitors Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 Penguin-M BRM Phoka Sphin-X Sokol for spectral and timing measurements of full solar disk radiation with timing in flare burst mode up to one msec Instruments Natalya-2M Konus-RF RT-2 will cover the wide energy range of hard X-rays and soft Gamma rays 15keV to 2000MeV and will together constitute the largest area detectors ever used for solar observations Detectors of gamma-ray monitors are based on structured inorganic scintillators with energy resolution sim 5 for nuclear gamma-line band to 35 for GeV-band PSD analysis is used for gamma neutron separation for solar neutron registration T 30MeV Penguin-M has capability to measure linear polarization of hard X-rays using azimuth are measured by Compton scattering asymmetry in case of polarization of an incident flux For X-ray and EUV monitors the scintillation phoswich detectors gas proportional counter CZT assembly and Filter-covered Si-diodes are used 2 Telescope-spectrometer TESIS for imaging solar spectroscopy in X-rays with angular resolution up to 1 in three spectral lines and RT-2 CZT assembly of CZT

  8. ESTIMATING THE ''DARK'' ENERGY CONTENT OF THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; De Pontieu, Bart

    2012-12-20

    The discovery of ubiquitous low-frequency (3-5 mHz) Alfvenic waves in the solar chromosphere (with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope) and corona (with CoMP and SDO) has provided some insight into the non-thermal energy content of the outer solar atmosphere. However, many questions remain about the true magnitude of the energy flux carried by these waves. Here we explore the apparent discrepancy in the resolved coronal Alfvenic wave amplitude ({approx}0.5 km s{sup -1}) measured by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) compared to those of the Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) near the limb ({approx}20 km s{sup -1}). We use a blend of observational data and a simple forward model of Alfvenic wave propagation to resolve this discrepancy and determine the Alfvenic wave energy content of the corona. Our results indicate that enormous line-of-sight superposition within the coarse spatio-temporal sampling of CoMP hides the strong wave flux observed by Hinode and SDO and leads to the large non-thermal line broadening observed. While this scenario has been assumed in the past, our observations with CoMP of a strong correlation between the non-thermal line broadening with the low-amplitude, low-frequency Alfvenic waves observed in the corona provide the first direct evidence of a wave-related non-thermal line broadening. By reconciling the diverse measurements of Alfvenic waves, we establish large coronal non-thermal line widths as direct signatures of the hidden, or ''dark'', energy content in the corona and provide preliminary constraints on the energy content of the wave motions observed.

  9. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1998-01-01

    Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the period covered by this report we have published 17 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 4 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles.

  10. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report details progress during the third year of our Space Physics Theory Contract. This is the Final Report for this contract. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona. and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the three-year duration of this contract we have published 49 articles in the scientific literature.

  11. Magnetic tornadoes as energy channels into the solar corona.

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer-Böhm, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Steiner, Oskar; van der Voort, Luc Rouppe; de la Cruz Rodriguez, Jaime; Fedun, Viktor; Erdélyi, Robert

    2012-06-28

    Heating the outer layers of the magnetically quiet solar atmosphere to more than one million kelvin and accelerating the solar wind requires an energy flux of approximately 100 to 300 watts per square metre, but how this energy is transferred and dissipated there is a puzzle and several alternative solutions have been proposed. Braiding and twisting of magnetic field structures, which is caused by the convective flows at the solar surface, was suggested as an efficient mechanism for atmospheric heating. Convectively driven vortex flows that harbour magnetic fields are observed to be abundant in the photosphere (the visible surface of the Sun). Recently, corresponding swirling motions have been discovered in the chromosphere, the atmospheric layer sandwiched between the photosphere and the corona. Here we report the imprints of these chromospheric swirls in the transition region and low corona, and identify them as observational signatures of rapidly rotating magnetic structures. These ubiquitous structures, which resemble super-tornadoes under solar conditions, reach from the convection zone into the upper solar atmosphere and provide an alternative mechanism for channelling energy from the lower into the upper solar atmosphere. PMID:22739314

  12. Energy distribution of nanoflares in the quiet solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanov, Artyom

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of flare-like events in low layer of solar corona detected with TESIS instrument onboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite in 171 {Å} during high-cadence (5 sec) time-series. The estimated thermal energies of these small events amount to 10^{23} - 10^{26} erg. According to modern classification flare-like events with such energies are usually referred to as nanoflares. The big number of registered events (above 2000) allowed us to obtain precise distributions of geometric and physical parameters of nanoflares, the most intriguing being energy distribution. Following Aschwanden et al. (2000) and other authors we approximated the calculated energy distribution with a single power law slope: N(E)dE ˜ N^{-α}dE. The power law index was derived to be α = 2.4 ± 0.2, which is very close to the value reported by Krucker & Benz (1998): α ≈ 2.3 - 2.4. The total energy input from registered events constitute about 10^4 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}, which is well beyond net losses in quiet corona (3 \\cdot 10^5 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}). However, the value of α > 2 indicates that nanoflares with lower energies dominate over nanoflares with bigger energies and could contribute considerably to quiet corona heating.

  13. COMPOSITION OF THE SOLAR CORONA, SOLAR WIND, AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Reames, D. V.; Von Steiger, R.; Basu, S.

    2012-08-10

    Along with temperature and density, the elemental abundance is a basic parameter required by astronomers to understand and model any physical system. The abundances of the solar corona are known to differ from those of the solar photosphere via a mechanism related to the first ionization potential of the element, but the normalization of these values with respect to hydrogen is challenging. Here, we show that the values used by solar physicists for over a decade and currently referred to as the 'coronal abundances' do not agree with the data themselves. As a result, recent analysis and interpretation of solar data involving coronal abundances may need to be revised. We use observations from coronal spectroscopy, the solar wind, and solar energetic particles as well as the latest abundances of the solar photosphere to establish a new set of abundances that reflect our current understanding of the coronal plasma.

  14. A view of solar magnetic fields, the solar corona, and the solar wind in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    In the last few years it has been recognized that the solar corona and the solar wind are three-dimensional. The deviations from spherical or even cylindrical symmetry are first-order effects, which are important for a basic description and physical understanding of the coronal expansion. Models of coronal magnetic fields are considered along with the characteristics of large-scale solar structure, the interplanetary magnetic field, coronal holes, geomagnetic activity, cosmic rays, and polar fields of the sun. It is pointed out that the present understanding of coronal and interplanetary morphology is based on data acquired during the descending part and the minimum of the considered sunspot cycle.

  15. Particle acceleration processes in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, D. B.

    A review is presented of some theoretical ideas on particle acceleration associated with solar flares. Various acceleration mechanisms are discussed, including forms of stochastic acceleration, shock drift acceleration, resonant acceleration, diffusive acceleration at shock fronts, acceleration during magnetic reconnection, and acceleration by parallel electric fields in double layers or electrostatic shocks. Particular attention is given to first phase acceleration of electrons in solar flares, which is usually attributed to bulk energization of electrons. It is proposed that the dissipation cannot be due to classical resistivity and entails anomalous resistivity or hyperresistivity, such as in multiple double layers. A model is developed for bulk energization due to the continual formation and decay of weak double layers.

  16. Release timescales of solar energetic particles in the low corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueda, N.; Klein, K.-L.; Vilmer, N.; Rodríguez-Gasén, R.; Malandraki, O. E.; Papaioannou, A.; Subirà, M.; Sanahuja, B.; Valtonen, E.; Dröge, W.; Nindos, A.; Heber, B.; Braune, S.; Usoskin, I. G.; Heynderickx, D.; Talew, E.; Vainio, R.

    2014-10-01

    Aims: We present a systematic study of the timing and duration of the release processes of near-relativistic (NR; >50 keV) electrons in the low corona. Methods: We analyze seven well-observed events using in situ measurements by both the ACE and Wind spacecraft and context electromagnetic observations in soft X-rays, radio, hard X-rays and white light. We make use of velocity dispersion analysis to estimate the release time of the first arriving electrons and compare with the results obtained by using a simulation-based approach, taking interplanetary transport effects into account to unfold the NR electron release time history from in situ measurements. Results: The NR electrons observed in interplanetary space appear to be released during either short (<30 min) or long (>2 h) periods. The observation of NR electron events showing beamed pitch-angle distributions (PADs) during several hours is the clearest observational signature of sustained release in the corona. On the other hand, the in situ observation of PADs isotropizing in less than a couple of hours is a clear signature of a prompt release of electrons in the low corona. Short release episodes appear to originate in solar flares, in coincidence with the timing of the observed type III radio bursts. Magnetic connectivity plays an important role. Only type III radio bursts reaching the local plasma line measured at 1 AU are found to be related with an associated release episode in the low corona. Other type III bursts may also have a release of NR electrons associated with them, but these electrons do not reach L1. Long release episodes appear associated with signatures of long acceleration processes in the low corona (long decay of the soft X-ray emission, type IV radio bursts, and time-extended microwave emission). Type II radio bursts are reported for most of the events and do not provide a clear discrimination between short and long release timescales.

  17. Basic results of the CORONAS-F solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. D.

    2006-08-01

    142190 Troitsk, Moscow Region, Russia V.D. Kuznetsov N.V.Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Troitsk, Russia The report contains a review of the basic results of the CORONAS-F solar observations during the period of orbital operation of the satellite (from July 31, 2001 to December 6, 2005). Basic results are related with helioseismic observations of the Sun, with localization and study of the morphology of numerous active phenomena in the Sun, including the outstanding events in the declining phase of the solar cycle; with spectroscopic diagnostics of the coronal and flare-generated plasma; with the study of the atomic and nuclear processes in solar flares; with detection of the fluxes of solar cosmic rays, gamma-rays, and neutrons from the major flares reaching the Earth's orbit.

  18. Imaging the Transition from Corona to Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, Craig; Howard, Tim A.; Howard, Russell A.; Tenerani, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The region around the Alfvén surface -- the last frontier of the solar system -- is largely unexplored, mostly because of the difficulty of detecting the surface itself. Many important transitions happen between the mid-to-outer corona and the innermost heliosphere, including: the transition to superAlfvénic flow; the transition from structured, highly anisotropic structure to nearly isotropic turbulent structures; and the formation of identifiable, separable fast and slow wind streams. We will report new results from two recent imaging campaigns -- one with STEREO and one with SOHO/LASCO (coincidentally performed on the 20th anniversary of the first SOHO campaign) -- to explore and image the transition to turbulent flow and the outer boundary of the corona.

  19. Solar Activity in the Green Corona Over Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rušin, V.

    2006-12-01

    The intensity of the green coronal line (5303Å, Fe {\\sc xiv), which is directly proportional to the electron density as well as the temperature of the corona, is a good and sensitive indicator of the reflection of the photospheric activity in the emission corona, mapping also the evolution of the magnetic fields in the active regions on the solar surface. In cycle 23 (1996 -2007), the average intensity of the green corona was of about 30% less when compared with that of the preceding cycle; this, however, does not necessarily imply a lower temperature of the corona, but rather a smaller number of active regions and/or smaller strength of local magnetic fields in the latter. The maximum of the intensity of the green corona was observed in August 2001, preceding for about one and a half year that of sunspot number. Moreover, the increased intensities were not observed continuously in time and heliographic latitude, but rather in particular latitudes, with a slight time-lag between the north and south hemispheres. It is well known that a time-latitudinal distribution of the intensity of the green corona features two kinds of large-scale motions. The first is the so-called polar branch, which separates from the "main flow" in the middle latitudes in the cycle minimum, lasts for about 3 -4 years and disappears at the time of the maxima of solar activity near the poles. The other is the equatorial (or principal) branch, which after separation in middle-latitudes moves first towards the poles, then roughly 2 years after the polar branch reached the poles makes a U-turn at upper heliographic latitudes of ±70 degrees, and migrates towards the equator where it disappears in the next minimum; the life-time of this branch is about 18 years. Given the time of the splitting of the two branches, we can guess the time of the maximum and minimum of the forthcoming cycle - cycle 24: the corresponding numbers are 2011 and 2012.5 for the time of the "double" maximum and 2019 for

  20. RGB color photometry of the solar corona from total solar eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shopov, Y. Y.; Varonov, A.; Stoykova, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    In the following article we present some of our results from observations of two total solar eclipses (TSE). By combining appropriate photographic equipment and post-processing techniques we show that numerous solar phenomena can be captured in details during TSE. We use color slide RGB photometry technique to visualize invisible regions of the solar corona and to highlight some of the solar phenomena that are very difficult for observation by Earth-based observatories. In fact it reveals more details of the far solar corona than any original image taken from ground-based observations. RGB photometry visualizes different components of the solar corona in one image, which is impossible using conventional observations. This makes it valuable tool for studies of the solar corona. Here we first observe peculiar near infrared emission regions around the upper part of the solar limb during the 1999 TSE. So far its origin is unknown and they need further studies including observations during other solar eclipses. Our observational experiment was designed for other purposes and their registration was completely unexpected.

  1. Solar Cycle Variations of O VI and H I Lyman Alpha Intensities in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M. P.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Strachan, L.; Gardner, L. D.; Suleiman, R. M.; Smith, P. L.; Kohl, J. L.

    2000-05-01

    UVCS/SOHO measurements of O VI (103.2 and 103.7 nm) and H I Lyman alpha intensities in the solar corona have been made from 1996 to the present spanning the rising phase of cycle 23. During solar minimum the corona consisted of large coronal holes at the poles and quiescent streamers at the equator. During the ascending phase of the cycle, the corona presented high latitude streamers and finally polar streamers as the Sun approached solar maximum. Recent observations of the solar corona show the presence of coronal holes at the equator and streamers at the poles. Our observations provide descriptions of these structures over the rising phase of the solar cycle. We compare the properties of quiescent equatorial streamers which occurred at solar minimum to high latitude and polar streamers observed toward solar maximum. We also compare solar minimum polar coronal holes to equatorial coronal holes present at solar maximum. We discuss how these results are related to the plasma properties. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-7822 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  2. The EUV Emission in Comet-Solar Corona Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryans, Paul; Pesnell, William Dean; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Brown, John C.; Battams, Karl; Saint-Hilaire, Pasal; Liu, Wei; Hudson, Hugh S.

    2011-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AlA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) viewed a comet as it passed through the solar corona on 2011 July 5. This was the first sighting of a comet by a EUV telescope. For 20 minutes, enhanced emission in several of the AlA wavelength bands marked the path of the comet. We explain this EUV emission by considering the evolution of the cometary atmosphere as it interacts with the ambient solar atmosphere. Water ice in the comet rapidly sublimates as it approaches the Sun. This water vapor is then photodissociated, primarily by Ly-alpha, by the solar radiation field to create atomic Hand O. Other molecules present in the comet also evaporate and dissociate to give atomic Fe and other metals. Subsequent ionization of these atoms can be achieved by a number of means, including photoionization, electron impact, and charge exchange with coronal protons and other highly-charged species. Finally, particles from the cometary atmosphere are thermalized to the background temperature of the corona. Each step could cause emission in the AlA bandpasses. We will report here on their relative contribution to the emission seen in the AlA telescopes.

  3. Diagnosing the Prominence-Cavity Connection in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, D. J.

    The energetic equilibrium of the corona is described by a balance of heating, thermal conduction, and radiative cooling. Prominences can be described by the thermal instability of coronal energy balance which leads to the formation of cool condensations. Observationally, the prominence is surrounded by a density depleted elliptical structure known as a cavity. In this dissertation, we use extreme ultraviolet remote sensing observations of the prominence-cavity system to diagnose the static and dynamic properties of these structures. The observations are compared with numerical models for the time-dependent coronal condensation process and the time-independent corona-prominence magnetic field. To diagnose the density of the cavity, we construct a three-dimensional structural model of the corona. This structural model allows us to synthesize extreme ultraviolet emission in the corona in a way that incorporates the projection effects which arise from the optically thin plasma. This forward model technique is used to constrain a radial density profile simultaneously in the cavity and the streamer. We use a χ2 minimization to find the density model which best matches a density sensitive line ratio (observed with Hinode/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer) and the white light scattered intensity (observed with Mauna Loa Solar Observatory MK4 coronagraph). We use extreme ultraviolet spectra and spectral images to diagnose the dynamics of the prominence and the surrounding corona. Based on the doppler shift of extreme ultraviolet coronal emission lines, we find that there are large regions of flowing plasma which appear to occur within cavities. These line of sight flows have speeds of 10 km/s-1 and projected spatial scales of 100 Mm. Using the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) dataset, we observe dynamic emission from the prominence-cavity system. The SDO/AIA dataset observes multiple spectral bandpasses with different temperature

  4. Solar Corona Simulation Model With Positivity-preserving Property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X. S.

    2015-12-01

    Positivity-preserving is one of crucial problems in solar corona simulation. In such numerical simulation of low plasma β region, keeping density and pressure is a first of all matter to obtain physical sound solution. In the present paper, we utilize the maximum-principle-preserving flux limiting technique to develop a class of second order positivity-preserving Godunov finite volume HLL methods for the solar wind plasma MHD equations. Based on the underlying first order building block of positivity preserving Lax-Friedrichs, our schemes, under the constrained transport (CT) and generalized Lagrange multiplier (GLM) framework, can achieve high order accuracy, a discrete divergence-free condition and positivity of the numerical solution simultaneously without extra CFL constraints. Numerical results in four Carrington rotation during the declining, rising, minimum and maximum solar activity phases are provided to demonstrate the performance of modeling small plasma beta with positivity-preserving property of the proposed method.

  5. Exploring the prominence-corona connection and its expansion into the outer corona using total solar eclipse observations

    SciTech Connect

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw; Druckmüller, Miloslav

    2014-10-01

    Prominences constitute the most complex magnetic structures in the solar corona. The ubiquitous presence of their seemingly confined dense and cool plasma in an otherwise million-degree environment remains a puzzle. Using a decade of white light total solar eclipse observations, we show how these images reveal an intricate relationship between prominences and coronal structures both in their immediate vicinity, known as coronal cavities, and in the extended corona out to several solar radii. Observations of suspended prominences and twisted helical structures spanning several solar radii are central to these findings. The different manifestations of the prominence-corona interface that emerge from this study underscore the fundamental role played by prominences in defining and controlling the complex expansion and dynamic behavior of the solar magnetic field in the neighborhood of magnetic polarity reversal regions. This study suggests that the unraveling of prominences and the outward expansion of the helical twisted field lines linked to them could be the solar origin of twisted magnetic flux ropes detected in interplanetary space, and of the mechanism by which the Sun sheds its magnetic helicity. This work also underscores the likely role of the prominence-corona interface as a source of the slow solar wind.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Helicity Condensation in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-01-01

    The helicity condensation model has been proposed by Antiochos (2013) to explain the observed smoothness of coronal loops and the observed buildup of magnetic shear at filament channels. The basic hypothesis of the model is that magnetic reconnection in the corona causes the magnetic stress injected by photospheric motions to collect only at those special locations where prominences form. In this work we present the first detailed quantitative MHD simulations of the reconnection evolution proposed by the helicity condensation model. We use the well-known ansatz of modeling the closed corona as an initially uniform field between two horizontal photospheric plates. The system is driven by applying photospheric rotational flows that inject magnetic helicity into the system. The flows are confined to a finite region on the photosphere so as to mimic the finite flux system of, for example, a bipolar active region. The calculations demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, coronal loops having opposite helicity do not reconnect, whereas loops having the same sense of helicity do reconnect. Furthermore, we find that for a given amount of helicity injected into the corona, the evolution of the magnetic shear is insensitive to whether the pattern of driving photospheric motions is fixed or quasi-random. In all cases, the shear propagates via reconnection to the boundary of the flow region while the total magnetic helicity is conserved, as predicted by the model. We discuss the implications of our results for solar observations and for future, more realistic simulations of the helicity condensation process.

  7. 3- and 5- Minute Oscillatory Behavior in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabro, Brandon; McAteer, James; Pevtsov, Alexander

    2011-10-01

    We study the spatially- and temporally-localized oscillatory behavior of the solar corona using a 6-hour sequence of narrowband 171A (extreme ultraviolet) image from the SWAP instrument onboard Proba2. We use a Morlet wavelet transform to extract oscillation parameters from the temporal evolution of emission in each pixel and study the variation in space and time of oscillatory power in the 3- and 5-minute band. We extract and compare these parameters between active Sun, quiet Sun and coronal hole regions. In each region of the corona studied the 5-minute periodicity is more prevalent than the 3-minute periodicity by a factor of 2--3. All areas of the corona exhibit a similar temporal behavior in the 5-minute band, suggesting a global driving mechanism. However, the dominance of the 5-minute periodicity is stronger in active regions than in other areas of the Sun. The 3-minute periodicity in active regions tends to be localized in the sunspot umbra, whereas the 5-minute is more prevalent in the penumbra.

  8. Solar-Panel Dust Accumulation and Cleanings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Air-fall dust accumulates on the solar panels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers, reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the solar arrays. Pre-launch models predicted steady dust accumulation. However, the rovers have been blessed with occasional wind events that clear significant amounts of dust from the solar panels.

    This graph shows the effects of those panel-cleaning events on the amount of electricity generated by Spirit's solar panels. The horizontal scale is the number of Martian days (sols) after Spirit's Jan. 4, 2005, (Universal Time) landing on Mars. The vertical scale indicates output from the rover's solar panels as a fraction of the amount produced when the clean panels first opened. Note that the gradual declines are interrupted by occasional sharp increases, such as a dust-cleaning event on sol 420.

  9. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1998-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the first year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the period covered by this report we have published 26 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 4 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles.

  10. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    1998-06-01

    This report covers technical progress during the first year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the period covered by this report we have published 26 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 4 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles.

  11. Numerical Simulations of Helicity Condensation in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2015-05-01

    The helicity condensation model has been proposed by Antiochos to explain the observed smoothness of coronal loops and the observed buildup of magnetic shear at filament channels. The basic hypothesis of the model is that magnetic reconnection in the corona causes the magnetic stress injected by photospheric motions to collect only at those special locations where prominences are observed to form. In this work we present the first detailed quantitative MHD simulations of the reconnection evolution proposed by the helicity condensation model. We use the well-known ansatz of modeling the closed corona as an initially uniform field between two horizontal photospheric plates. The system is driven by applying photospheric rotational flows that inject magnetic helicity into the corona. The flows are confined to a finite region on the photosphere so as to mimic the finite flux system of a bipolar active region, for example. The calculations demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, opposite helicity twists do not lead to significant reconnection in such a coronal system, whereas twists with the same sense of helicity do produce substantial reconnection. Furthermore, we find that for a given amount of helicity injected into the corona, the evolution of the magnetic shear is insensitive to whether the pattern of driving photospheric motions is fixed or quasi-random. In all cases, the shear propagates via reconnection to the boundary of the flow region while the total magnetic helicity is conserved, as predicted by the model. We discuss the implications of our results for solar observations and for future, more realistic simulations of the helicity condensation process.

  12. Solar Cycle 23: Variation of the Solar Corona in the Ultraviolet from Solar Minimum to Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M. P.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Strachan, L.; Gardner, L. D.; Suleiman, R.; Cranmer, S. R.; Kohl, J. L.

    2001-06-01

    UVCS/SOHO measurements of H I Ly-alpha and O VI (103.2 nm and 103.7 nm) intensities in the solar corona have been made from solar Cycle 23's minimum in 1996 to its current maximum. At solar minimum, the corona consisted of large coronal holes at the poles and quiescent streamers at the equator. During the approach to solar maximum, equatorial coronal holes and high latitude streamers became more conspicuous. Recently, coronal holes at higher latitudes have reappeared, allowing a comparison to be made of O VI intensities and line widths of coronal holes at different latitudes. We also characterize the variation of coronal hole properties with height, and location over the solar cycle. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-10093 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution)

  13. Faraday Rotation Probing of the Solar Corona in 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, S.; Spangler, S. R.

    1999-05-01

    Faraday rotation observations of polarized radiation from natural radio sources yield a unique diagnostic of the coronal magnetic field and electron density at heliocentric distances not reached by spacecraft. Dual frequency polarization measurements yield the rotation measure, which is proportional to int n_e vec {B} * ds, where n_e is the electron density, vec {B} is the magnetic field, and the integral is along the line of sight. We made linear polarization observations with the NRAO Very Large Array of several polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona. The observations were made at frequencies of 1465 and 1665 MHz on four days in May, 1997. The observations cover a full solar rotation and sample solar elongations ranging from about 5 to 14 solar radii. The magnitudes of the rotation measures observed range from 11 to less than 1 radians/m(2) . We attribute the relatively low values for the rotation measures to the magnetohydrodynamic state of the corona at the time of the observations. The coronal magnetic field was quasi-dipolar with the lines of sight to the sources generally not crossing sector boundaries. The highest plasma density was at the streamer belt at low latitudes, which was missed by many of the lines of sight. The largest rotation measure was observed for the source 3C79 on May 11, 1997, and corresponds to a case in which the line of sight passed through the streamer belt at small solar elongation. This research was supported by grant ATM96-16721 from the National Science Foundation.

  14. Globally propagating waves in the solar corona -an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    Globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere since the 1960s. These "Moreton waves" were interpreted as the ground tracks of dome-shaped waves that expand through the corona and sweep over the chromosphere. However, only the recent decade has seen detailed analysis of these phenomena, prompted by the availability of coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, most famously SOHO/EIT. Globally propagating coronal waves have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Still, no consensus on their physical nature has been reached. While many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances -fast-mode MHD waves which are propagating in the solar corona and which may be shocked -other characteristics have given rise to alternative models which involve magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of a CME eruption. I will review the different observational signatures of coronal waves, as well as associated phenomena such as metric type II radio bursts. Furthermore, I will discuss the different physical interpretations of coronal waves and how they are supported by observations. Finally, I will consider how some of the lingering controversies might be resolved by observations.

  15. Corongraphic Observations and Analyses of The Ultraviolet Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, John L.

    2000-01-01

    The activities supported under NASA Grant NAG5-613 included the following: 1) reduction and scientific analysis of data from three sounding rocket flights of the Rocket Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, 2) development of ultraviolet spectroscopic diagnostic techniques to provide a detailed empirical description of the extended solar corona, 3) extensive upgrade of the rocket instrument to become the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) for Spartan 201,4) instrument scientific calibration and characterization, 5) observation planning and mission support for a series of five Spartan 201 missions (fully successful except for STS 87 where the Spartan spacecraft was not successfully deployed and the instruments were not activated), and 6) reduction and scientific analysis of the UVCS/Spartan 201 observational data. The Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer for Spartan 201 was one unit of a joint payload and the other unit was a White Light Coronagraph (WLC) provided by the High Altitude Observatory and the Goddard Space Flight Center. The two instruments were used in concert to determine plasma parameters describing structures in the extended solar corona. They provided data that could be used individually or jointly in scientific analyses. The WLC provided electron column densities in high spatial resolution and high time resolution. UVCS/Spartan provided hydrogen velocity distributions, and line of sight hydrogen velocities. The hydrogen intensities from UVCS together with the electron densities from WLC were used to determine hydrogen outflow velocities. The UVCS also provided O VI intensities which were used to develop diagnostics for velocity distributions and outflow velocities of minor ions.

  16. Radiative transfer of X-rays in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of resonance scattering of X-ray emission lines in the solar corona is investigated. For the resonance lines of some helium-like ions, significant optical depths are reached over distances small compared with the size of typical coronal features. A general integral equation for the transfer of resonance-line radiation under solar coronal conditions is derived. This expression is in a form useful for modeling the complex three-dimensional temperature and density structure of coronal active regions. The transfer equation is then cast in a form illustrating the terms which give rise to the attenuation or enhancement of the resonance-line intensity. The source function for helium-like oxygen (O VII) under coronal conditions is computed and discussed in terms of the relative importance of scattering.

  17. Measurements of Faraday Rotation through the Solar Corona at 4.6 Solar Radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Jason E.; Fischer, P. D.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2013-07-01

    Identifying and understanding (1) the coronal heating mechanism and (2) the acceleration mechanism for the high-speed solar wind are two of the most important modern problems in solar physics. Many competing models of the high-speed solar wind depend on the solar magnetic field inside heliocentric distances of 5 solar radii. We report on sensitive VLA full-polarization observations made in August, 2011, at 5.0 and 6.1 GHz (each with a bandwidth of 128 MHz) of the radio galaxy 3C228 through the solar corona at heliocentric distances of 4.6 - 5.0 solar radii. Observations at 5.0 GHz (C-band frequencies) permit measurements deeper in the corona than previous VLA observations at 1.4 and 1.7 GHz. These Faraday rotation observations provide unique information on the plasma density and magnetic field strength in this region of the corona. The measured Faraday rotation on this day was lower than our a priori expectations, but we have successfully modeled the measurement in terms of observed properties of the corona on the day of observation. Further, 3C228 provides two lines of sight (separated by 46”) that allow measurement of differential Faraday rotation. These data may provide constraints on the magnitude of coronal currents and, thus, on the role Joule heating plays in the corona. Fluctuations in the observed rotation measure may also place constraints on wave-turbulence models by constraining the magnitude of coronal Alfvén waves.

  18. A study of acoustic heating and forced convection in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, P. V.

    1980-01-01

    The S055 EUV spectra was used to perform emission measure and line intensity ratio analyses of loop plasma conditions in a study on the thermodynamics of magnetic loops in the solar corona. The evidence that loops contain plasma hotter than the background corona, and thus, require enhanced local dissipation of magnetic or mechanical energy is discussed. The S055 EUV raster pictures were used to study physical conditions in cool ultraviolet absorbing clouds in the solar corona, and optical data were used to derive constraints on the dimension, time scales and optical depths in dark opaque clouds not seen in H alpha and CaK as filaments or prominences. Theoretical modelling of propagation of magnetically guided acoustic shocks in the solar chromosphere finds it still unlikely that high frequency acoustic shocks could reach the solar corona. Dynamic modelling of spicules shows that such guided slow mode shocks can explain the acceleration of cool spicular material seen high in the corona.

  19. Constant cross section of loops in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, H.; Bingert, S.

    2012-12-01

    Context. The corona of the Sun is dominated by emission from loop-like structures. When observed in X-ray or extreme ultraviolet emission, these million K hot coronal loops show a more or less constant cross section. Aims: In this study we show how the interplay of heating, radiative cooling, and heat conduction in an expanding magnetic structure can explain the observed constant cross section. Methods: We employ a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (3D MHD) model of the corona. The heating of the coronal plasma is the result of braiding of the magnetic field lines through footpoint motions and subsequent dissipation of the induced currents. From the model we synthesize the coronal emission, which is directly comparable to observations from, e.g., the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (AIA/SDO). Results: We find that the synthesized observation of a coronal loop seen in the 3D data cube does match actually observed loops in count rate and that the cross section is roughly constant, as observed. The magnetic field in the loop is expanding and the plasma density is concentrated in this expanding loop; however, the temperature is not constant perpendicular to the plasma loop. The higher temperature in the upper outer parts of the loop is so high that this part of the loop is outside the contribution function of the respective emission line(s). In effect, the upper part of the plasma loop is not bright and thus the loop actually seen in coronal emission appears to have a constant width. Conclusions: From this we can conclude that the underlying field-line-braiding heating mechanism provides the proper spatial and temporal distribution of the energy input into the corona - at least on the observable scales. Movies associated to Figs. 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF WEAK ENERGY RELEASES IN THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Barve, Indrajit V.; Beeharry, G. K.; Rajasekara, G. N.

    2010-08-10

    We report observations of weak, circularly polarized, structureless type III bursts from the solar corona in the absence of H{alpha}/X-ray flares and other related activity, during the minimum between the sunspot cycles 23 and 24. The spectral information about the event obtained with the CALLISTO spectrograph at Mauritius revealed that the drift rate of the burst is {approx}-30 MHz s{sup -1} is in the range 50-120 MHz. Two-dimensional imaging observations of the burst at 77 MHz obtained with the Gauribidanur radioheliograph indicate that the emission region was located at a radial distance of {approx}1.5 R{sub sun} in the solar atmosphere. The estimated peak brightness temperature of the burst at 77 MHz is {approx}10{sup 8} K. We derived the average magnetic field at the aforementioned location of the burst using the one-dimensional (east-west) Gauribidanur radio polarimeter at 77 MHz, and the value is {approx}2.5 {+-} 0.2 G. We also estimated the total energy of the non-thermal electrons responsible for the observed burst as {approx}1.1 x 10{sup 24} erg. This is low compared to the energy of the weakest hard X-ray microflares reported in the literature, which is about {approx}10{sup 26} erg. The present result shows that non-thermal energy releases that correspond to the nanoflare category (energy {approx}10{sup 24} erg) are taking place in the solar corona, and the nature of such small-scale energy releases has not yet been explored.

  1. Observation of the corona between 1-2 solar radii at the total solar eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanaoka, Yoichiro

    2016-07-01

    The observation of the solar corona is now being carried out extensively with spaceborne instruments, but there is a blank gap of the height coverage of the current instruments; the corona between 1-2 Rsun is difficult to be observed. However, this height range is crucially important to understand the initiation of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At present, solar eclipses are the best chance to observe this height range (and beyond) with a wide dynamic range and a high signal-to-noise ratio. We have carried out white-light imaging observations of the corona at solar eclipses and obtained coronal images seamlessly combining the eclipse observations and the observations with space instruments such as the LASCO of the SOHO. Particularly, at the total solar eclipse on 13 November 2012, we found manifestations of CMEs in their initial phase in the height range of 1-2 Rsun. Continuous observations of the corona including the height range 1-2 Rsun in addition to those with the current spaceborne instruments are very important to observe the initial state of the CMEs, and the eclipse observation is a pathfinder for future space observations which fill the blank gap.

  2. R Coronae Borealis Stars Are Viable Factories of Pre-solar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Amanda I.; Ruiter, Ashley J.; Hampel, Melanie

    2015-08-01

    We present a new theoretical estimate for the birthrate of R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars that is in agreement with recent observational data. We find the current Galactic birthrate of RCB stars to be ≈25% of the Galactic rate of Type Ia supernovae, assuming that RCB stars are formed through the merger of carbon-oxygen and helium-rich white dwarfs. Our new RCB birthrate (1.8 × 10-3 yr-1) is a factor of 10 lower than previous theoretical estimates. This results in roughly 180-540 RCB stars in the Galaxy, depending on the RCB lifetime. From the theoretical and observational estimates, we calculate the total dust production from RCB stars and compare this rate to dust production from novae and born-again asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We find that the amount of dust produced by RCB stars is comparable to the amounts produced by novae or born-again post-AGB stars, indicating that these merger objects are a viable source of carbonaceous pre-solar grains in the Galaxy. There are graphite grains with carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios consistent with the observed composition of RCB stars, adding weight to the suggestion that these rare objects are a source of stardust grains.

  3. Milli-Arcsecond Imaging of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Joseph; Kamalabadi, Farzad; Oktem, Figen S.

    2016-07-01

    Dissipation in the solar corona is believed to occur in extremely thin current sheets of order 1-100 km. Emission from these hot but thin current sheets is visible in coronal EUV emission lines, however, this spatial scale is unresolved in existing imaging instruments. Conventional optics cannot be easily manufactured with sufficient surface figure accuracy to obtain the required resolution. A photon sieve, a diffractive imaging element similar to a Fresnel zone plate, can be manufactured to provide a few milli-arcsec (mas) resolution, with much more relaxed tolerances than conventional imaging technology. Images from photon sieves will not only show the structure of the corona at a resolution never before obtained, they will also allow a study of the temperature structure in the dissipation region. Several photon sieves have been designed, fabricated, and tested by us at Goddard Space Flight Center. To fully exploit the potential of these devices two new technologies, (1) formation flying and (2) computational image deconvolution must be used. Recent progress on photon sieve development as well as these issues will be discussed. A simple design for a sounding rocket payload is presented that obtains 80 mas (0.080 arcsec) imaging with a 100 mm diameter photon sieve to image Fe XIV 334 and Fe XVI 335 which would provide a demonstration of this technology.

  4. Milli-Arcsecond (MAS) Imaging of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Joseph M.; Oktem, Figen S.; Kamalabadi, Farzad; O'Neill, John; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Daw, Adrian N.; Rabin, Douglas M.

    2016-05-01

    Dissipation in the solar corona is believed to occur in extremely thin current sheets of order 1-100 km. Emission from these hot but thin current sheets should be visible in coronal EUV emission lines. However, this spatial scale is far below the resolution of existing imaging instruments, so these dissipation sites have never been observed individually. Conventional optics cannot be manufactured with sufficient surface figure accuracy to obtain the required spatial resolution in the extreme-ultraviolet where these hot plasmas radiate. A photon sieve, a diffractive imaging element similar to a Fresnel zone plate, can be manufactured to provide a few milli-arcsec (MAS) resolution, with much more readily achievable tolerances than with conventional imaging technology. Prototype photon sieve elements have been fabricated and tested in the laboratory. A full-scale ultra-high resolution instrument will require formation flying and computational image deconvolution. Significant progress has been made in overcoming these challenges, and some recent results in these areas are discussed. A simple design for a sounding rocket concept demonstration payload is presented that obtains 80 MAS (0.080 arcsec) imaging with a 100 mm diameter photon sieve to image Fe XIV 334 and Fe XVI 335. These images will show the structure of the corona at a resolution never before obtained, and they will also allow a study of the temperature structure in the dissipation region.

  5. Solar system exposure histories of interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, Alfred O.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: stratospheric collection of interplanetary dust particles (IDP's); sources of interplanetary dust particles; and solar wind and noble gas isotopic ratios in IDP's.

  6. The MiniMax24 corona at the November 14, 2012 total solar eclipse in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeva, Penka; Kuzin, Sergey; Benev, Boyan; Stoev, Alexey

    We discuss the results from observations of the white-light corona conducted half a year before the MiniMax24, during the November 14, 2012 total solar eclipse in Australia, in the region of Mount Molloy, 150km from Palm Cove, Cairns, Queensland. WL images show the continuum K-corona that result from scattering of photospheric light by electrons in the corona. Solar corona was observed with 300 mm objective and 2000 mm Macsutov-Cassegrain telescope. Photos were made with different exposures in order to obtain high-resolution composite image of the white light corona, which allows us to reveal its small- and large-scale structures. The eclipse observations were compared with near-simultaneous SOHO EUV and SOHO LASCO visible-light coronagraphic images. Analysis of the Ludendorf flattening index (0.024) and phase of the solar cycle (+0.87) shows that white light corona is solar maximum type - the shape is spherical with many streamers located at all azimuths around the occulted disk. Observations of the November 14, 2012 total solar eclipse give us the possibility to investigate solar corona structure during this unique minimal maximum of the solar activity cycle and compare it with previous eclipse observations during maximum.

  7. Simultaneous Observation of High Temperature Plasma of Solar Corona By TESIS CORONAS-PHOTON and XRT Hinode.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reva, A.; Kuzin, S.; Bogachev, S.; Shestov, S.

    2012-05-01

    The Mg XII spectroheliograph is a part of instrumentation complex TESIS (satellite CORONAS-PHOTON). This instrument builds monochromatic images of hot plasma of the solar corona (λ = 8.42 Å, T>5 MK). The Mg XII spectroheliograph observed hot plasma in the non-flaring active-region NOAA 11019 during nine days. We reconstructed DEM of this active region with the help of genetic algorithm (we used data of the Mg XII spectroheliograph, XRT and EIT). Emission measure of the hot component amounts 1 % of the emission measure of the cool component.

  8. Magnetic loops, downflows, and convection in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foukal, P.

    1978-01-01

    Optical and extreme-ultraviolet observations of solar loop structures show that flows of cool plasma from condensations near the loop apex are a common property of loops associated with radiations whose maximum temperature is greater than approximately 7000 K and less than approximately 3,000,000 K. It is suggested that the mass balance of these structures indicates reconnection by means of plasma motion across field lines under rather general circumstances (not only after flares). It is shown that the cool material has lower gas pressure than the surrounding coronal medium. The density structure of the bright extreme ultraviolet loops suggests that downflows of cool gas result from isobaric condensation of plasma that is either out of thermal equilibrium with the local energy deposition rate into the corona, or is thermally unstable. The evidence is thought to indicate that magnetic fields act to induce a pattern of forced convection.

  9. Creation of current filaments in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Z.; Schnack, D. D.; Van Hoven, G.

    1989-01-01

    It has been suggested that the solar corona is heated by the dissipation of electric currents. The low value of the resistivity requires the magnetic field to have structure at very small length scales if this mechanism is to work. In this paper it is demonstrated that the coronal magnetic field acquires small-scale structure through the braiding produced by smooth, randomly phased, photospheric flows. The current density develops a filamentary structure and grows exponentially in time. Nonlinear processes in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations produce a cascade effect, in which the structure introduced by the flow at large length scales is transferred to smaller scales. If this process continues down to the resistive dissipation length scale, it would provide an effective mechanism for coronal heating.

  10. Clementine Observes the Moon, Solar Corona, and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1994, during its flight, the Clementine spacecraft returned images of the Moon. In addition to the geologic mapping cameras, the Clementine spacecraft also carried two Star Tracker cameras for navigation. These lightweight (0.3 kg) cameras kept the spacecraft on track by constantly observing the positions of stars, reminiscent of the age-old seafaring tradition of sextant/star navigation. These navigation cameras were also to take some spectacular wide angle images of the Moon.

    In this picture the Moon is seen illuminated solely by light reflected from the Earth--Earthshine! The bright glow on the lunar horizon is caused by light from the solar corona; the sun is just behind the lunar limb. Caught in this image is the planet Venus at the top of the frame.

  11. The Temperature of the Corona as Derived from Total Solar Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, Shadia R.; Morgan, Huw; Druckmuller, Miloslav; Ding, Adalbert

    2016-05-01

    Multiwavelength imaging observations in a suite of coronal forbidden lines of the corona during total solar eclipses enables the empirical inference of the spatial distribution of temperature in the solar corona up to a few solar radii above the limb. The temperature sensitivity of coronal emission lines is such that temperature differences of 105 K can be detected in the images. Using high resolution multiwavelength and white light eclipse images acquired since 2006, covering almost a solar cycle, we show evidence for (1) how the distribution of the temperature in the corona is bimodal, with closed coronal structures dominated by 2 106 K plasma, while structures streaming away from the Sun are dominated by 106 K emission, (2) prominences are invariably enshrouded by the hottest material in the corona, and (3) that the dominance of one temperature versus the other is solar-cycle dependent.

  12. No evidence of a circumsolar dust ring from infrared observations of the 1991 solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Lamy, P; Kuhn, J R; Lin, H; Koutchmy, S; Smartt, R N

    1992-09-01

    During the past 25 years there have been many attempts to detect a possible dust ring around the sun, with contradictory results. Before the 1991 eclipse, infrared eclipse experiments used single-element detectors to scan the corona along the ecliptic for excess surface brightness peaks. The availability of relatively large-format infrared array detectors now provides a considerable observational advantage: two-dimensional mapping of the brightness and polarization of the corona with high photometric precision. The 1991 eclipse path included the high-altitude Mauna Kea Observatory, a further advantage to measure the corona out to large angular distances from the sun. Results are reported from an experiment conducted on Mauna Kea with a HgCdTe-array detector sensitive to wavelengths between 1 and 2.5 micrometers, using broad-band J, H, and K filters. Although the sky conditions were not ideal, the H- and K-band surface brightnesses clearly show the inhomogeneous structure in the K-corona and the elliptical flattening of the F-corona, but no evidence of a circumsolar, local dust component out to 15 solar radii. PMID:17738279

  13. White-light corona and solar polar magnetic field strength over solar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rušin, V.; Saniga, M.; Komžík, R.

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the large-scale structure of the solar corona, in particular its helmet streamers, as observed during total solar eclipses around maxima of solar cycles and make its comparison with solar polar magnetic field strength as observed by the Wilcox Solar Observatory (WSO) since 1976. Even though the magnetic field strength at the solar poles around cycle minima decreased minimally twice in the last forty years, distributions of helmet streamers around the Sun in different cycles around cycle maxima remain nearly the same. This indicates that large-scale magnetic structures governing the shape and evolution of helmet streamers must be of a different nature than those related with solar polar fields.

  14. Signature of open magnetic field lines in the extended solar corona and of solar wind acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Giordano, S.; Benna, C.; Kohl, J. L.; Noci, G.; Michels, J.; Fineschi, S.

    1997-01-01

    The observations carried out with the ultraviolet coronagraph spectrometer onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) are discussed. The purpose of the observations was to determine the line of sight and radial velocity fields in coronal regions with different magnetic topology. The results showed that the regions where the high speed solar wind flows along open field lines are characterized by O VI 1032 and HI Lyman alpha 1216 lines. The global coronal maps of the line of sight velocity were reconstructed. The corona height, where the solar wind reaches 100 km/s, was determined.

  15. Solar Corona and plasma effects on Radio Frequency waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkono, C.; Rosenblatt, P.; Dehant, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    Solar corona (plasma) effects on radio signal waves for three different frequency bands S (2.3 GHz), X (8.4 GHz), and Ka (32 GHz), currently used to track probes in the solar system, have been computed using different models of the total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path between the Earth and Mars. The Earth-Mars-Sun configuration has been obtained from the planetary ephemerides DE421 (using SPICE kernels) for the period from September 2004 to September 2006. This configuration is expressed as a function of the Sun-Earth-Probe (SEP) angles (the probe being in close orbit to Mars). We used the TEC values provided by the different models proposed in the literature in order to estimate the TEC along the propagation path (STEC, for Slant TEC). From these model-dependent STEC estimates, the time delay on the wave propagation as well as the associated frequency shift with a 10 seconds sampling time have been obtained for each of the three frequency bands. For the X-band mostly used in radio science, we have obtained estimates differing by up to several orders of magnitude due to the different STEC values derived from different models of TEC. For example, if the propagation path passes near the Sun such that SEP angle is 1.55° the STEC is ranging from 4.6x1020 electron/m2 to 6.07x1016 electron/m2, which corresponds to a time delay range between 0.87 μs and 1.15x10-4 μs, respectively. For SEP angles between 2° and 8°, the range of the different time delay values reduces to 2.8x10-1 μs and becomes as small as 1.6x10-2 μs for SEP angles larger than 8° (1x10-2 μs is about the order of magnitude of the radioscience instrument precision). These results show that the correction of the solar corona effect on radio frequency waves can be reliably done on usual X-band tracking data of spacecraft for SEP angles >12°, but should be use with caution for lower SEP angles, especially lower than 2°.

  16. THE EXPANSION OF ACTIVE REGIONS INTO THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Huw; Jeska, Lauren; Leonard, Drew

    2013-06-01

    Advanced image processing of Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) C2 observations reveals the expansion of the active region closed field into the extended corona. The nested closed-loop systems are large, with an apparent latitudinal extent of 50 Degree-Sign , and expanding to heights of at least 12 R{sub Sun }. The expansion speeds are {approx}10 km s{sup -1} in the AIA/SDO field of view, below {approx}20 km s{sup -1} at 2.3 R{sub Sun }, and accelerate linearly to {approx}60 km s{sup -1} at 5 R{sub Sun }. They appear with a frequency of one every {approx}3 hr over a time period of around three days. They are not coronal mass ejections (CMEs) since their gradual expansion is continuous and steady. They are also faint, with an upper limit of 3% of the brightness of background streamers. Extreme ultraviolet images reveal continuous birth and expansion of hot, bright loops from a new active region at the base of the system. The LASCO images show that the loops span a radial fan-like system of streamers, suggesting that they are not propagating within the main coronal streamer structure. The expanding loops brighten at low heights a few hours prior to a CME eruption, and the expansion process is temporarily halted as the closed field system is swept away. Closed magnetic structures from some active regions are not isolated from the extended corona and solar wind, but can expand to large heights in the form of quiescent expanding loops.

  17. Current Sheet Formation and Reconnection Dynamics in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, Justin K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2009-05-01

    Current sheet formation is a necessary consequence of the evolution of the multi-polar magnetic field topologies that are ubiquitous throughout the solar corona. We present a very high-resolution study of 3D MHD current sheet formation and the resulting reconnection dynamics in an environment appropriate for the corona. The initial field consists of a translationally invariant, potential field with a null-point topology (i.e., 4-flux systems) and a low-beta plasma. A finite-extent, 3D Syrovatskii-type current sheet forms as a result of stressing of this system by a uniform, incompressible flow applied at the line-tied photospheric boundary. The system is assumed to be ideal, except for the presence of numerical resistivity. The fully 3-D evolution is calculated with very high resolution (9x and 10x refinement across the full extent of the current sheet) using the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS). The initial evolution of this computationally-intensive simulation results in a current sheet with a nearly 30-to-1 aspect ratio, a significant fraction of the system characteristic length, that unexpectedly appears to be stable. In addition, up to this point in the evolution any magnetic reconnection that we observe is of the slow Sweet-Parker type. We expect, however, that as we continue stressing the field, the current sheet will become unstable and develop explosive dynamics. We discuss the implications of our results on coronal structure and activity, such as heating and eruptions. This work has been supported, in part, by the NASA HTP and SR&T programs.

  18. Diagnostics of the solar corona from comparison between Faraday rotation measurements and magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Le Chat, G.; Cohen, O.; Kasper, J. C.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-07-10

    Polarized natural radio sources passing behind the Sun experience Faraday rotation as a consequence of the electron density and magnetic field strength in coronal plasma. Since Faraday rotation is proportional to the product of the density and the component of the magnetic field along the line of sight of the observer, a model is required to interpret the observations and infer coronal structures. Faraday rotation observations have been compared with relatively ad hoc models of the corona. Here for the first time we compare these observations with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the solar corona driven by measurements of the photospheric magnetic field. We use observations made with the NRAO Very Large Array of 34 polarized radio sources occulted by the solar corona between 5 and 14 solar radii. The measurements were made during 1997 May, and 2005 March and April. We compare the observed Faraday rotation values with values extracted from MHD steady-state simulations of the solar corona. We find that (1) using a synoptic map of the solar magnetic field just one Carrington rotation off produces poorer agreements, meaning that the outer corona changes in the course of one month, even in solar minimum; (2) global MHD models of the solar corona driven by photospheric magnetic field measurements are generally able to reproduce Faraday rotation observations; and (3) some sources show significant disagreement between the model and the observations, which appears to be a function of the proximity of the line of sight to the large-scale heliospheric current sheet.

  19. Destruction of Sun-Grazing Comet C-2011 N3 (SOHO) Within the Low Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Brown, J. C.; Battams, K.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Liu, W.; Hudson, H.; Pesnell, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of comets in Sun-grazing orbits that survive solar insolation long enough to penetrate into the Suns inner corona provide information on the solar atmosphere and magnetic field as well as on the makeup of the comet. On 6 July 2011, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observed the demise of comet C2011 N3 (SOHO) within the low solar corona in five wavelength bands in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). The comet penetrated to within 0.146 solarradius (100,000 kilometers) of the solar surface before its EUV signal disappeared.

  20. DUST AROUND R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS. II. INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN AN H-POOR ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Lambert, D. L. E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in

    2013-08-20

    Residual Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph spectra for a sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are presented and discussed in terms of narrow emission features superimposed on the quasi-blackbody continuous infrared emission. A broad {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust emission complex is seen in the RCBs showing an extreme H-deficiency. A secondary and much weaker {approx}11.5-15 {mu}m broad emission feature is detected in a few RCBs with the strongest {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust complex. The Spitzer infrared spectra reveal for the first time the structure within the {approx}6-10 {mu}m dust complex, showing the presence of strong C-C stretching modes at {approx}6.3 and 8.1 {mu}m as well as of other dust features at {approx}5.9, 6.9, and 7.3 {mu}m, which are attributable to amorphous carbonaceous solids with little or no hydrogen. The few RCBs with only moderate H-deficiencies display the classical ''unidentified infrared bands (UIRs)'' and mid-infrared features from fullerene-related molecules. In general, the characteristics of the RCB infrared emission features are not correlated with the stellar and circumstellar properties, suggesting that the RCB dust features may not be dependent on the present physical conditions around RCB stars. The only exception seems to be the central wavelength of the 6.3 {mu}m feature, which is blueshifted in those RCBs showing also the UIRs, i.e., the RCBs with the smallest H deficiency.

  1. The State of the Corona During the Weak Solar Cycle 24: the View from LASCO Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlyaeva, T.; Lamy, P.; Llebaria, A.; Boclet, B.

    2016-04-01

    The LASCO-C2 coronagraph onboard SOHO continues its white-light imaging of the corona from 1.5 to 6.0 solar radii, thus allowing investigating the consequences of the weak Solar Cycle 24 on the corona and comparing it to the previous cycle (23). Temporal variations of the global radiance of the corona are presented. We pay particular attention to the mid-term variations which are distinctly different between the two cycles and highlight the similarities and differences. Finally, we rely on our ARTEMIS II catalog of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to compare their global rates during these two cycles.

  2. Dust Removal from Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  3. Dust removal from solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  4. Laboratory identification of MHD eruption criteria in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Clayton E.

    2015-11-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities such as the kink and torus instabilities are believed to play an important role in driving ``storage-and-release'' eruptions in the solar corona. These instabilities act on long-lived, arched magnetic flux ropes that are ``line-tied'' to the solar surface. In spite of numerous observational and computational studies, the conditions under which these instabilities produce an eruption remain a subject of intense debate. In this paper, we use a line-tied, arched flux rope experiment to study storage-and-release eruptions in the laboratory. An in situ array of miniature magnetic probes is used to assess the equilibrium and stability of the laboratory flux ropes. Two major results are reported here: First, a new stability regime is identified where torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. In this ``failed torus'' regime, the flux rope is torus-unstable but kink-stable. Under these conditions, a dynamic ``toroidal field tension force'' surges in magnitude, causing the flux rope to contract. This tension force, which is missing from existing eruption models, is the J × B force between self-generated poloidal currents in the flux rope and the toroidal (guide) component of the vacuum field. Secondly, a clear torus instability threshold is observed in the kink-unstable regime. This latter result, which is consistent with existing theoretical and numerical results, verifies the key role of the torus instability in driving solar eruptions. In collaboration with M. Yamada, H. Ji, J. Yoo, W. Fox, J. Jara-Almonte, A. Savcheva, and E. E. DeLuca. This research is supported by DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by the NSF/DoE Center for Magnetic Self-Organization (CMSO).

  5. The Corona of the Young Solar Analog EK Draconis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudel, M.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Benz, A. O.; Elias, N. M., II

    1995-01-01

    First coronal microwave and new soft X-ray observations of the very active, near-Zero-Age Main-Sequence (ZAMS) dGOe star EK Dra = HD 129333 show that this analog of the young Sun is more luminous in both emissions than most single M-dwarf flare stars. Variations in the 8.4 GHz flux include modulation with the optically determined rotation period of 2.7 days. This result points to a non-uniform filling of the corona with energetic electrons due to an incomplete coverage of the surface with active regions and a source volume that is not concentric with the star. The radio luminosity varying between log L(sub R) = 13.6 and 14.6 (L(sub R) in erg/s/Hz) shows evidence for unpolarized gyrosynchrotron flares, while strongly polarized flares were absent during the observations. This star is the first young, truly solar-like main sequence G star discovered in microwaves. Having just arrived on the main sequence, it conclusively proves that young, solar-like G stars can maintain very high levels of radio emission after their T Tau phase. The X-ray observations were obtained from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). The average X-ray luminosity amounts to log L(sub x) = 29.9 (L(sub x) in erg/s). A Raymond-Smith type plasma model fit yields two plasma components at temperatures of 1.9 and 10 MK, with volume emission measures of 1.2 and 2.5 x 10 (exp 52)/cu cm, respectively. The X-ray light curve is significantly variable, with the photon count rate from the cooler plasma being strongly modulated by the rotation period; the emission from the hotter plasma is only weakly variable. Modeling of the source distribution in the stellar corona yields electron densities of the order of 4 x 10(exp 10)/cu cm or higher for the cool plasma component. It indicates that a considerable portion of EK Dra's high X-ray luminosity is due to high-density plasma rather than large emission volume. Parameters for an X-ray flare indicate an electron density of 1.75 x 10(exp 11)/cu cm and a source height of

  6. Inbound waves in the solar corona: A direct indicator of Alfvén surface location

    SciTech Connect

    DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2014-06-01

    The tenuous supersonic solar wind that streams from the top of the corona passes through a natural boundary—the Alfvén surface—that marks the causal disconnection of individual packets of plasma and magnetic flux from the Sun itself. The Alfvén surface is the locus where the radial motion of the accelerating solar wind passes the radial Alfvén speed, and therefore any displacement of material cannot carry information back down into the corona. It is thus the natural outer boundary of the solar corona and the inner boundary of interplanetary space. Using a new and unique motion analysis to separate inbound and outbound motions in synoptic visible-light image sequences from the COR2 coronagraph on board the STEREO-A spacecraft, we have identified inbound wave motion in the outer corona beyond 6 solar radii for the first time and used it to determine that the Alfvén surface is at least 12 solar radii from the Sun over the polar coronal holes and 15 solar radii in the streamer belt, well beyond the distance planned for NASA's upcoming Solar Probe Plus mission. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of inbound waves in the outer solar corona and the first direct measurement of lower bounds for the Alfvén surface.

  7. Circumstellar Dust Shells: Clues to the Evolution of R Coronae Borealis Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, Edward J.; Clayton, Geoffrey C.

    2016-06-01

    R Coronae Borealis (RCB) stars are an exotic group of extremely hydrogen- deficient, carbon-rich supergiants that are known for their spectacular declines in brightness (up to 8 mags) at irregular intervals. Two scenarios are currently competing to explain the origins of these stars. One suggests that RCB stars are the products after a binary white dwarf (WD) system merges. The other takes a single, evolved star and has it undergo a final, helium-shell flash (FF) and becoming a cool giant. Recently, observations of elemental abundances in RCB stars have strongly swung the argument in favor of the WD merger model. The FF scenario has maintained its relevancy by seemingly being the only model able to offer a suitable explanation for one RCB feature that merger model has historically struggled with explaining: the presence of cold, circumstellar dust envelopes which might be fossil planetary nebulae (PNe). In reality, the shells could actually be fossil PNe, material left over from the WD merger, or mass lost during the RCB phase, itself. I will present the results of my dissertation, which is to try and discern the nature and history of the far-IR dust shells around RCB stars to help understand the origin of these enigmatic stars. I will discuss our efforts to determine the mass, size, temperature, and morphology of these diffuse structures surrounding a sample of RCB stars using multi-wavelength observations ranging from the ultraviolet to the submillimeter. These observations have provided unprecedented wavelength coverage for both the central stars and their CSM. They have been examined by eye for morphology and have been used in the construction of maximum-light spectral energy distributions (SEDs). I will present the results of our Monte Carlo radiative transfer of the maximum-light SEDs. Finally, I will highlight our work investigating the HI abundance of the envelope of R Coronae Borealis, itself, using archival 21—cm observations from the Arecibo

  8. Dynamics of Solar System Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, Stanley F.

    2002-01-01

    The ongoing aim of the research is to investigate the dynamical and physical evolution of interplanetary dust particles in order to produce a detailed global model of the zodiacal cloud and its constituent components that is capable of predicting thermal fluxes in mid-infrared wave bands to an accuracy of 1% or better; with the additional aim of exploiting this research as a basis for predicting structure in exozodiacal clouds that may be signatures of unseen planets.

  9. Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona During the December 4, 2002 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.; Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The solar magnetic field plays a key role in determining coronal. The principal input to MHD models is the observed solar magnetic field. 3D MHD models can be used to compare with eclipse and coronograph images, SOHO images (LOSCO, EIT), Ulysses and WIND spacecraft data, and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements. MHD computations can tell us about the structure of the corona. Eclipses can help us to verify the accuracy of the models. 4 December, 2002 total eclipce: visible in the southern hemisphere (South Atlantic, southern Africa, Indian Ocean, and Australia). Total in center Angola is at 06:00 UT.

  10. The Soft X-Ray/Microwave Ratio of Solar and Stellar Flares and Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, A. O.; Guedel, M.

    1994-01-01

    We have carried out plasma diagnostics of solar flares using soft X-ray (SXR) and simultaneous microwave observations and have compared the ratio of X-ray to microwave luminosities of solar flares with various active late-type stars available in the published literature. Both the SXR low-level ('quiescent') emission from stellar coronae and the flaring emission from the Sun and stars are generally interpreted as thermal radiations of coronal plasmas. On the other hand, the microwave emission of stars and solar flares is generally attributed to an extremely hot or nonthermal population of electrons. Solar flare SXR are conventionally measured in a narrower and harder passband than the stellar sources. Observations of the GOES-2 satellite in two energy channels have been used to estimate the luminosity of solar flares as it would appear in the ROSAT satellite passband. The solar and stellar flare luminosities fit well at the lower end of the active stellar coronae. The flare SXR/microwave ratio is similar to the ratio for stellar coronae. The average ratio follows a power-law relation L(sub X) varies as L(sub R)(sup 0.73 +/- 0.03) over 10 orders of magnitude from solar microflares to RS CVn and FK Com-type coronae. Dwarf Me and Ke stars, and RS CVn stars are also compatible with a linear SXR/microwave relation, but the ratio is slightly different for each type of star. Considering the differences between solar flares, stellar flares and the various active stellar coronae, the similarity of the SXR/microwave ratios is surprising. It suggests that the energetic electrons in low-level stellar coronae observed in microwaves are related in a similar way to the coronal thermal plasma as flare electrons to the flare thermal plasma, and, consequently, that the heating mechanism of active stellar coronae is a flare-like process.

  11. Alfvénic waves with sufficient energy to power the quiet solar corona and fast solar wind.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Scott W; De Pontieu, Bart; Carlsson, Mats; Hansteen, Viggo; Boerner, Paul; Goossens, Marcel

    2011-07-28

    Energy is required to heat the outer solar atmosphere to millions of degrees (refs 1, 2) and to accelerate the solar wind to hundreds of kilometres per second (refs 2-6). Alfvén waves (travelling oscillations of ions and magnetic field) have been invoked as a possible mechanism to transport magneto-convective energy upwards along the Sun's magnetic field lines into the corona. Previous observations of Alfvénic waves in the corona revealed amplitudes far too small (0.5 km s(-1)) to supply the energy flux (100-200 W m(-2)) required to drive the fast solar wind or balance the radiative losses of the quiet corona. Here we report observations of the transition region (between the chromosphere and the corona) and of the corona that reveal how Alfvénic motions permeate the dynamic and finely structured outer solar atmosphere. The ubiquitous outward-propagating Alfvénic motions observed have amplitudes of the order of 20 km s(-1) and periods of the order of 100-500 s throughout the quiescent atmosphere (compatible with recent investigations), and are energetic enough to accelerate the fast solar wind and heat the quiet corona. PMID:21796206

  12. Sun-grazing comets as probes of the physics of the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, C.

    2012-12-01

    In 2011, two Sun-grazing comets were observed at EUV wavelengths as they descended into the inner solar corona. The first, C/2011 N3 (SoHO), was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the Solar Dynamics Observatory up to the point at which it terminated its existence very near to its orbital perihelion. Its tail emission was visible to within 0.146 solar radii of the solar surface. The second comet in the inner corona, C/2011 W3, was observed by a fleet of observatories, including the STEREO spacecraft which saw it during its approach to, and subsequent voyage away from, its orbital perihelion behind the Sun as seen from Earth. C2011 W3 survied for only about 1.6 more days when the last of its material sublimated. The variable cometary tails, observed in a multiple EUV passbands, were seen to be deflected by the interaction with the solar magnetic field as the comets flew through the corona. In this talk, I will discuss lessons about the solar corona learned from the cometary emission and absorption features and from the interaction of the ionizing cometary material with the magnetized corona through which it traveled.

  13. Laboratory Identification of MHD Eruption Criteria in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.; Myers, C. E.; Ji, H.; Yoo, J.; Fox, W. R., II; Jara-Almonte, J.; Savcheva, A. S.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities such as the kink [1] and torus [2] instabilities are believed to play an important role in driving "storage-and-release" eruptions in the solar corona. These instabilities act on long-lived, arched magnetic flux ropes that are "line-tied" to the solar surface. In spite of numerous observational and computational studies, the conditions under which these instabilities produce an eruption remain a subject of intense debate. In this paper, we use a line-tied, arched flux rope experiment to study storage-and-release eruptions in the laboratory [3]. An in situ array of miniature magnetic probes is used to assess the equilibrium and stability of the laboratory flux ropes. Two major results are reported here: First, a new stability regime is identified where torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. In this "failed torus" regime, the flux rope is torus-unstable but kink-stable. Under these conditions, a dynamic "toroidal field tension force" surges in magnitude and causes the flux rope to contract. This tension force, which is missing from existing eruption models, is the J×B force between self-generated poloidal currents in the flux rope and the toroidal (guide) component of the vacuum field. Secondly, a clear torus instability threshold is observed in the kink-unstable regime. This latter result, which is consistent with existing theoretical [4] and numerical [5] findings, verifies the key role of the torus instability in driving some solar eruptions. This research is supported by DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and by the NSF/DoE Center for Magnetic Self-Organization (CMSO). [1] Hood & Priest, Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dynamics 17, 297 (1981) [2] Kliem & Török, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 255002 (2006) [3] Myers, Ph.D. Thesis, Princeton University (2015) [4] Olmedo & Zhang, Astrophys. J. 718, 433 (2010) [5] Török & Kliem, Astrophys. J. 630, L97 (2005)

  14. CORONAS-F Project: The Study of Solar Activity and Its Effects on the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. D.

    The CORONAS-F space mission is characterized in general terms as part of the Russian CORONAS space project aimed at the study of solar activity and solar-terrestrial coupling. The composition of the scientific payload and the basic characteristic of the instruments are described. Some observations carried out on board the CORONAS-F satellite are discussed, including global oscillations of the Sun, active regions, flares and mass ejections, high-energy particles in near-Earth space, etc. The results of investigation of the Earth's upper atmosphere are provided as obtained from the analysis of the absorption of solar hard X-rays at shadow entry and shadow exit of the satellite, as well as the night glow events caused by solar radiation fluxes, galactic cosmic rays, and precipitations of charged particles from the magnetosphere.

  15. Shock Formation Height in the Solar Corona Estimated from SDO and Radio Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Nitta, N.

    2011-01-01

    Wave transients at EUV wavelengths and type II radio bursts are good indicators of shock formation in the solar corona. We use recent EUV wave observations from SDO and combine them with metric type II radio data to estimate the height in the corona where the shocks form. We compare the results with those obtained from other methods. We also estimate the shock formation heights independently using white-light observations of coronal mass ejections that ultimately drive the shocks.

  16. Study of the solar corona using radio and space observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The physics of coronal transients, the characteristics of radiation and accelerated particles at the time of flares, and the density/temperature structure of the transition region and corona and the coronal magnetic field are investigated.

  17. The Writhe of Helical Structures in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toeroek, T.; Berger, M. A.; Kliem, B.

    2010-01-01

    Context. Helicity is a fundamental property of magnetic fields, conserved in ideal MHD. In flux rope topology, it consists of twist and writhe helicity. Despite the common occurrence of helical structures in the solar atmosphere, little is known about how their shape relates to the writhe, which fraction of helicity is contained in writhe, and how much helicity is exchanged between twist and writhe when they erupt. Aims. Here we perform a quantitative investigation of these questions relevant for coronal flux ropes. Methods. The decomposition of the writhe of a curve into local and nonlocal components greatly facilitates its computation. We use it to study the relation between writhe and projected S shape of helical curves and to measure writhe and twist in numerical simulations of flux rope instabilities. The results are discussed with regard to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Results. (1) We demonstrate that the relation between writhe and projected S shape is not unique in principle, but that the ambiguity does not affect low-lying structures, thus supporting the established empirical rule which associates stable forward (reverse) S shaped structures low in the corona with positive (negative) helicity. (2) Kink-unstable erupting flux ropes are found to transform a far smaller fraction of their twist helicity into writhe helicity than often assumed. (3) Confined flux rope eruptions tend to show stronger writhe at low heights than ejective eruptions (CMEs). This argues against suggestions that the writhing facilitates the rise of the rope through the overlying field. (4) Erupting filaments which are S shaped already before the eruption and keep the sign of their axis writhe (which is expected if field of one chirality dominates the source volume of the eruption), must reverse their S shape in the course of the rise. Implications for the occurrence of the helical kink instability in such events are discussed.

  18. Solar flares in soft X-rays detected in the Coronas-F experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankov, V. M.; Prokhin, V. L.; Khavenson, N. G.; Gusev, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    The RPS-1 spectrometer on the board of the Coronas-F satellite detecting solar X-rays in the range of 3-31.5 keV using a CdTe detector is described and some results of the observation of weak solar flares are presented.

  19. A New Solar System Dust Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy, Ashley J.; Dermott, S. F.; Kehoe, T. J.; Jayaraman, S.

    2007-10-01

    The relative proportions of asteroidal and cometary material in the zodiacal cloud is an evolving debate. The determination of the asteroidal component is constrained through the study of the dust bands (the fine-structure component superimposed on the broad background cloud), since they have been confidently linked to specific, young, asteroid family disruptions in the main belt. These disruptions represent recent injections of dust into the cloud and thus hold the key to determining at least a minimum value of the asteroidal contribution. There are currently known to be three dust band pairs, one at approximately 10 degrees corresponding to the Veritas family and two central band pairs near the ecliptic, one of which corresponds to the Karin cluster of the Koronis family. However, through careful co-adding of almost all the pole-to-pole intensity scans in the mid infrared wavebands of the IRAS data set, a new solar system dust band has been found at approximately 17 degrees inclination. We think this is a confirmation of the M/N partial band pair suggested by Sykes (1988). The new dust band appears to be mostly, yet not completely formed, which we attribute to the young age of the likely sources. We will present dynamical modeling of the new band which allows us to determine the most likely source and amount of cross-sectional area of dust in the band. This is turn allows us to put constraints on the size of the precursor and amount of dust contributed by this source to the background cloud. Since the band is incomplete, the dynamics of the distribution of the node will allow us to put loose constraints on the time of formation of this band and compare with the ages of the potential sources. This work is funded by NASA GSRP.

  20. Simulated kinetic effects of the corona and solar cycle on high altitude ion transport at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, S. M.; Liemohn, M.; Fang, X.; Brain, D.; Ma, Y.

    2013-06-01

    We present results from the Mars Test Particle (MTP) simulation as part of a community‒wide model comparison in order to quantify the role of different neutral atmospheric conditions in planetary ion transport and escape. This study examines the effects of individual ion motion by simulating particle trajectories for three cases: solar minimum without the neutral corona, solar minimum with the inclusion of the neutral corona, and solar maximum with the inclusion of the neutral corona. The MTP simulates 1.5 billion test particles through background electric and magnetic fields computed by a global magnetohydrodynamic model. By implementing virtual detectors in the simulation, the MTP has generated velocity space distributions of pickup ions and quantifies the ion acceleration at different spatial locations. The study found that the inclusion of a hot neutral corona greatly affects the total O+ production and subsequent loss, roughly doubling the total escape for solar minimum conditions and directly contributing to high energy sources above 10 keV. The solar cycle influences the amount of O+ flux observed by the virtual detectors, increasing the O+ flux and total escape by an order of magnitude from solar minimum to maximum. Additionally, solar maximum case induces greater mass loading of the magnetic fields, which decreases the gyroradius of the ions and redirects a significant ion population downtail to subsequently escape.

  1. Coordinated UVCS/SOHO and VLA Observations of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles, M. P.; Cranmer, S. R.; Raymond, J. C.; Spangler, S. R.; Kohl, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Coordinated UVCS/SOHO and VLA coronal observations took place during August 16--19, 2003. The radio source 3C 228 passed behind a streamer in the northeast at a heliocentric distance of about 7 solar radii, and behind the north coronal hole at about 4 solar radii in the latter part of the radio observation. The goal of this campaign is to combine the analysis of radio polarimetric sounding measurements of the corona with ultraviolet spectroscopy of the same regions, in order to obtain qualitatively new information about the properties of the solar coronal plasma. The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard SOHO observed O VI (103.2 and 103.7 nm) and H I Lyman alpha (121.6 nm) emission lines to determine kinetic temperatures, average densities and outflow speeds in the corona. UVCS observations provide unique information on the heating and acceleration processes in the corona. The Very Large Array (VLA) observations reveal the Faraday rotation of polarized radio waves due to passage through the magnetized plasma of the corona. These measurements provide limits on the coronal magnetic field strength and constrain the properties of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Radio propagation techniques are a useful complementary tool to ultraviolet coronagraphic spectroscopy in determining the physical processes that are responsible for the heating of the extended corona and the acceleration of the solar wind. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-12865 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  2. Solar corona synoptic observations from SOHO with an extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaboudiniere, Jean-Pierre; Gabriel, A. H.; Artzner, G. E.; Dere, Ken; Howard, Russell A.; Michels, D.; Catura, Richard; Lemen, J.; Stern, R.; Gurman, Joseph B.

    1992-01-01

    The major scientific objective of the EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT) is to study the evolution of coronal structure over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales and temperatures. A second strategic objective is to provide full disk synoptic maps of the global corona to aid in unifying SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory)/Cluster investigations. EIT will also provide images to support the planning of detailed spectroscopic investigations by the CDS (Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer) and SUMER spectrometers in SOHO. EIT observations will be made in four narrow spectral bands, centered at 171 A (Fe 9), 195 A(Fe 12), 284 A (Fe 15), and 304 A (He 2) representing restricted temperature domains within a wide temperature range from 40,000 to 3,000,000 K. The results will be images of the solar atmosphere from the upper chromosphere and transition region to the active region corona. These maps, made at appropriate time intervals, will be used to study the fine structures in the solar corona and to relate their dynamic properties to the underlying chromosphere and photosphere. Dynamic events in the inner corona will be related to white light transients in the outer corona, and observations of the internal structure of coronal holes will be used to investigate origins of the solar wind.

  3. Interactions of Dust Grains with Coronal Mass Ejections and Solar Cycle Variations of the F-Coronal Brightness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ragot, B. R.; Kahler, S. W.

    2003-01-01

    The density of interplanetary dust increases sunward to reach its maximum in the F corona, where its scattered white-light emission dominates that of the electron K corona above about 3 Solar Radius. The dust will interact with both the particles and fields of antisunward propagating coronal mass ejections (CMEs). To understand the effects of the CME/dust interactions we consider the dominant forces, with and without CMEs. acting on the dust in the 3-5 Solar Radius region. Dust grain orbits are then computed to compare the drift rates from 5 to 3 Solar Radius. for periods of minimum and maximum solar activity, where a simple CME model is adopted to distinguish between the two periods. The ion-drag force, even in the quiet solar wind, reduces the drift time by a significant factor from its value estimated with the Poynting-Robertson drag force alone. The ion-drag effects of CMEs result in even shorter drift times of the large (greater than or approx. 3 microns) dust grains. hence faster depletion rates and lower dust-pain densities, at solar maxima. If dominated by thermal emission, the near-infrared brightness will thus display solar cycle variations close to the dust plane of symmetry. While trapping the smallest of the grains, the CME magnetic fields also scatter the grains of intermediate size (0.1-3 microns) in latitude. If light scattering by small grains close to the Sun dominates the optical brightness. the scattering by the CME magnetic fields will result in a solar cycle variation of the optical brightness distribution not exceeding 100% at high latitudes, with a higher isotropy reached at solar maxima. A good degree of latitudinal isotropy is already reached at low solar activity since the magnetic fields of the quiet solar wind so close to the Sun are able to scatter the small (less than or approx. 3 microns) grains up to the polar regions in only a few days or less, producing strong perturbations of their trajectories in less than half their orbital

  4. Modeling the Acceleration Process of Dust in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. D.; Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.

    2015-12-01

    In previous studies we have identified structures created by nano-dust in the solar wind, and we have observed the expected draping and diverting signatures of such structures using well-spaced multi-spacecraft observations. In this study, we reproduce such an interaction event with our multi-fluid MHD model, modeling the dust particles as a fluid. When the number density of dust particles is comparable to the solar wind ions, a significant draping in the IMF is created, with amplitude larger than the ambient fluctuations. We note that such a density is well above several nano dust particles per Debye sphere and a dusty fluid is appropriate for modeling the dust-solar wind interaction. We assume a spherical cloud of dust travelling with 90% solar wind speed. In addition to reproducing the IMF response to the nano-dust at the end-stage of dust acceleration, we model the entire process of such acceleration in the gravity field of the inner heliosphere. It takes hours for the smallest dust with 3000 amu per proton charge to reach the solar wind speed. We find the dust cloud stretched along the solar wind flow. Such stretching enhances the draping of IMF, compared to the spherical cloud we used in an earlier stage of this study. This model will be further used to examine magnetic perturbations at an earlier stage of dust cloud acceleration, and then determine the size, density, and total mass of dust cloud, as well as its creation and acceleration.

  5. Ultra-fine-scale filamentary structures in the Outer Corona and the Solar Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Filamentary structures following magnetic field lines pervade the Sun's atmosphere and offer us insight into the solar magnetic field. Radio propagation measurements have shown that the smallest filamentary structures in the solar corona are more than 2 orders of magnitude finer than those seen in solar imaging. Here we use radio Doppler measurements to characterize their transverse density gradient and determine their finest scale in the outer corona at 20-30 R(circled dot operator), where open magnetic fields prevail. Filamentary structures overly active regions have the steepest gradient and finest scale, while those overlying coronal holes have the shallowest gradient and least finest scale. Their organization by the underlying corona implies that these subresolution structures extend radially from the entire Sun, confirming that they trace the coronal magnetic field responsible for the radial expansion of the solar wind. That they are rooted all over the Sun elucidates the association between the magnetic field of the photosphere and that of the corona, as revealed by the similarity between the power spectra of the photospheric field and the coronal density fluctuations. This association along with the persistence of filamentary structures far from the Sun demonstrate that subresolution magnetic fields must play an important role not only in magnetic coupling of the photosphere and corona, but also in coronal heating and solar wind acceleration through the process of small-scale magnetic reconnection. They also explain why current widely used theoretical models that extrapolate photospheric magnetic fields into the corona do not predict the correct source of the solar wind.

  6. Observational studies of reconnection in the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, David E.

    2011-11-15

    In recent years, observational studies of the corona have shifted focus. Where they were once purely qualitative morphological explorations seeking to support the presence of reconnection, more investigations are providing empirical estimates of the physical conditions in the reconnecting corona. These studies are enabled and enhanced by orbiting telescopes with high angular and temporal resolution. In this article, some recent findings about the empirical quantities are reviewed, including recent estimates of the flux transferred in individual patchy reconnection episodes, the size distribution of post-reconnection flux tubes, and the energy released by the flux tubes as they shrink.

  7. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere," NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and covers the period May 16, 2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) model.

  8. A new model of amplitude fluctuations for radio propagation in solar corona during superior solar conjunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guanjun; Song, Zhaohui

    2016-02-01

    Radio communication links through the solar corona are disturbed by electron density fluctuations caused by coronal turbulence. This has become a problem for deep space exploration when the spacecraft is near superior conjunction with the Sun. With a forecast of the signal fluctuations the link could be adapted to compensate for these impairments in real time. Motivated by this need, we present a theoretical study of the signal fluctuations including an analytical expression for the amplitude fluctuations. The proposed model includes an anisotropic spectrum of density fluctuations, the solar wind "outer scale," and the spectral exponent. The performance of this analytical solution is demonstrated by comparison with published data from spacecraft and with other existing analytical methods.

  9. Modeling electron density, temperature distribution in the solar corona based on solar surface magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, A.; Rodríguez, J. M.; Vieira, L.; Coelho Stekel, T. R.; Costa, J. E. R.; Pinto, T. S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fields constitute a natural link between the Sun, the Earth and the Heliosphere in general. The solar dynamo action maintains and strengthens the magnetic field in the solar interior. The structure of the solar corona is mostly determined by the configuration and evolution of the magnetic field. While open magnetic field lines carry plasma into the heliosphere, closed field lines confine plasma. Additionally, key physical processes that impact the evolution of Earth's atmosphere on time-scale from days to millennia, such as the soft X-ray and EUV emission, are also determined by the solar magnetic field. However, observations of the solar spectral irradiance are restricted to the last few solar cycles and are subject to large uncertainties. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct in near-real time the evolution of the solar EUV emission based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface and assuming that the emission lines are optically thin. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated employing a potential field source surface extrapolation based on the synoptic charts. The coronal plasma temperature and density are described by a hydrostatic model. The emission is estimated to employ the CHIANTI database. The performance of the model is compared to the emission observed by EVE instrument on board SDO spacecraft. The preliminary results and uncertainties are discussed in details. Furthermore, we examine the possibility of delivery the reconstruction of the solar spectral irradiance in near-real time using the infrastructure provided by the Brazilian Space weather program (EMBRACE/INPE). This work is partially supported by CNPq/Brazil under the grant agreement no. 140779/2015-9.

  10. Observaciones de la corona solar interior con un coronógrafo de espejo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenborg, G.; Schwenn, R.; Francile, C.; Rovira, M.

    El plasma de la corona solar es un buen indicador de las líneas de fuerza del campo magnético. Por lo tanto, el análisis de estructuras coronales cuasiestacionarias en la corona da importante información sobre el campo magnético y la actividad asociada. Se trata de poner límites a los modelos teóricos existentes mediante el estudio de distintas estructuras en la corona interior. En agosto de 1997 comenzó a operar el coronógrafo solar (MICA) en El Leoncito como parte del Observatorio Solar Alemán-Argentino. Desde su instalación obtiene imágenes de la corona solar (1.05 a 2.0 radios solares) en 2 líneas espectrales correspondientes a la emisión de Fe XIV y Fe X. El instrumento puede obtener imágenes cada minuto por lo que es ideal para estudiar procesos rápidos. Presentamos observaciones recientes que muestran la capacidad del coronógrafo así como la evolución de algunos eventos dinámicos observados por MICA.

  11. The structure of the white-light corona and the large-scale solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sime, D. G.; Mccabe, M. K.

    1990-01-01

    The large-scale density structure of the white-light solar corona is compared to the organization of the solar magnetic field as identified by the appearance of neutral lines in the photosphere to examine whether any consistent relationship exists between the two. During the period covering Carrington rotations 1717 to 1736 brightness enhancements in the low corona tend to lie over the global neutral sheet identified in the photospheric magnetic field. The brightest of these enhancements are associated with neutral lines throguh active regions. These associations are not 1-1, but do hold both in stable and evolving conditions of the corona. A significant number of long-lived neutral lines is found, including filaments seen in H-alpha, for which there are not coronal enhancements.

  12. Energy-Dependent Ionization States of Shock-Accelerated Particles in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.; Ng, C. K.; Tylka, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the range of possible energy dependence of the ionization states of ions that are shock-accelerated from the ambient plasma of the solar corona. If acceleration begins in a region of moderate density, sufficiently low in the corona, ions above about 0.1 MeV/amu approach an equilibrium charge state that depends primarily upon their speed and only weakly on the plasma temperature. We suggest that the large variations of the charge states with energy for ions such as Si and Fe observed in the 1997 November 6 event are consistent with stripping in moderately dense coronal. plasma during shock acceleration. In the large solar-particle events studied previously, acceleration occurs sufficiently high in the corona that even Fe ions up to 600 MeV/amu are not stripped of electrons.

  13. The corona near the time of the 1983 June 11 total solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sime, D. G.; Fisher, R. R.; Mccabe, M. K.; Mickey, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Observations are presented of the corona during the June 11, 1983 total solar eclipse, together with preliminary results of a coordinated observing program conducted to investigate the relationship between the corona and the lower parts of the solar atmosphere. Synoptic observations of the white light corona and disk in H-alpha are compared with the eclipse image, together with the inferred longitudinal component of the photospheric magnetic field measured using the magnetically sensitive Fe line at 6303 A. Using these data, an interpretation of the global three-dimensional coronal structure is attempted; showing that the eclipse image contains bright features which are far from the plane of the sky, and that it is dominated by streamers over polar filament neutral lines.

  14. Research on dual spectrum solar-blind ultraviolet corona detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feng; Gu, Yan; Sun, Jianning; Pan, Jingsheng; Zhu, Bo; Wang, Qi; Lu, Xiaoqing

    2015-04-01

    A dual spectrum solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) corona detection system is designed in this paper. A common optical axis using a dichroic mirror is applied to this system in order to make visible light and ultraviolet light spectroscopy to ultraviolet detector and visible detectors. A high speed circuit of image processing based on TMS320DM642 DSP and a circuit that is used into system control and power management based on microcontroller are designed for the presented system. On the basis of the multi-threaded programming ideas, real-time image acquisition of ultraviolet and visible detectors, ultraviolet image noise reduction, image registration, dual spectral integration, Characteristic superimposing, serial communication and image display are achieved by using the DSP image processing circuit. Experimental results show that the dual spectrum solar-blind ultraviolet corona detection system has a good performance of corona detection based on ultraviolet and visible image fusion.

  15. Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona for the Total Solar Eclipse of March 29,2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Z.; Linker, J. a.; Lionello, R.; Riley, P.; TItov, V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of a three-dimensional MHD model to predict the s tructure of the corona prior to the total solar eclipse of March 29, 2006. The calculation uses the observed photospheric radial magnetic f ield as a boundary condition. We use a new version of our model that has an improved description of energy transport in the corona. The mo del allows us to predict the emission of X-ray and EUV radiation in t he corona. We compare the predicted polarization brightness in the co rona with four observations of the eclipse from Greece, Egypt, and Li bya, and we demonstrate that the model accurately predicts the largescale structure of the corona. We also compare X-ray emission from the model with GOES/SXI images.

  16. Threaded-Field-Line Model for the Transition Region and Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-12-01

    In numerical simulations of the solar corona, both for the ambient state and especially for dynamical processes the most computational resources are spent for maintaining the numerical solution in the Low Solar Corona and in the transition region, where the temperature gradients are very sharp and the magnetic field has a complicated topology. The degraded computational efficiency is caused by the need in a highest resolution as well as the use of the fully three-dimensional implicit solver for electron heat conduction. On the other hand, the physical nature of the processes involved is rather simple (which still does not facilitate the numerical methods) as long as the heat fluxes as well as slow plasma motional velocities are aligned with the magnetic field. The Alfven wave turbulence, which is often believed to be the main driver of the solar wind and the main source of the coronal heating, is characterized by the Poynting flux of the waves, which is also aligned with the magnetic field. Therefore, the plasma state in any point of the three-dimensional grid in the Low Solar Corona can be found by solving a set of one-dimensional equations for the magnetic field line ("thread"), which passes through this point and connects it to the chromosphere and to the global Solar Corona. In the present paper we describe an innovative computational technology based upon the use of the magnetic-field-line-threads to forlmulate the boundary condition for the global solar corona model which traces the connection of each boundary point to the cromosphere along the threads.

  17. A Dust Characterization Experiment for Solar Cells Operating on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Krasowski, Michael; Greer, Lawrence; Wilt, David; Baraona, Cosmo; Scheiman, David; Lekki, John

    2001-01-01

    During the Viking and Pathfinder missions to Mars, significant amounts of dust accumulated on the spacecrafts. In Pathfinder's case, the dust obscured the solar panels on the lander and the rover degrading their output current. The material adherence experiment aboard the Pathfinder rover quantified the rate of decrease in short circuit current at 0.28% per day. This rate is unacceptably high for long duration missions. In response, NASA has developed the Dust Accumulation and Removal Technology (DART) experiment. DART has three instruments for characterizing dust settling out of the atmosphere and tests two methods to keep dust from settling on solar cells.

  18. Signatures of Slow Solar Wind Streams from Active Regions in the Inner Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, V.; Harra, L.; Urnov, A.; Kuzin, S.; Goryaev, F.; Berghmans, D.

    2013-08-01

    The identification of solar-wind sources is an important question in solar physics. The existing solar-wind models ( e.g., the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model) provide the approximate locations of the solar wind sources based on magnetic field extrapolations. It has been suggested recently that plasma outflows observed at the edges of active regions may be a source of the slow solar wind. To explore this we analyze an isolated active region (AR) adjacent to small coronal hole (CH) in July/August 2009. On 1 August, Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observations showed two compact outflow regions in the corona. Coronal rays were observed above the active-region coronal hole (ARCH) region on the eastern limb on 31 July by STEREO-A/EUVI and at the western limb on 7 August by CORONAS- Photon/TESIS telescopes. In both cases the coronal rays were co-aligned with open magnetic-field lines given by the potential field source surface model, which expanded into the streamer. The solar-wind parameters measured by STEREO-B, ACE, Wind, and STEREO-A confirmed the identification of the ARCH as a source region of the slow solar wind. The results of the study support the suggestion that coronal rays can represent signatures of outflows from ARs propagating in the inner corona along open field lines into the heliosphere.

  19. Mass and Energy Transfer Between the Solar Photosphere and Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, H.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of chromospheric and coronal heating is also a problem of mass supply to the corona. On average we see redshifts at transition region temperatures of the order of 10 km/s. If interpreted as downflows, this would quickly empty the corona, and fresh material has to be transported into the corona. Several models have been proposed to understand this mass cycle between the different atmospheric layers. However, as of yet all these proposals have serious shortcomings. On the observational side open questions remain, too. With the new IRIS mission we can observe the transition region at unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution, but the observational results are still puzzling. In particular the finding that the spatial distribution of line widths and Doppler shifts do not change with increasing resolution is against physical intuition. This shows that even with IRIS we still have significant velocity gradients along the line-of-sight, indicating that shocks might play a significant role. Likewise the temporal evolution might be a key for our understanding of the mass cycle. It might well be that the filling and draining of hot plasma occurs on significantly different time scales, which might be part of the difficulty to arrive at a conclusive observational picture. Considering the progress made for the quiet Sun, it seems clear that the processes responsible for the mass exchange are not resolved (yet). Therefore one might wonder to what extent one could use larger and resolved individual events in more active parts of the Sun to understand the details of the mass transport. In particular a common understanding of reconnection events such as Ellerman bombs in the photosphere, explosive events in the transition region and the recently discovered IRIS bombs in-between might provide the key to better understand the mass cycle throughout the atmospheric layers from the photosphere to the corona.

  20. THE CYCLING OF MATERIAL BETWEEN THE SOLAR CORONA AND CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Guerreiro, N.; Hansteen, Viggo; De Pontieu, B.

    2013-05-20

    Observations of transition region emission lines reveal the presence of redshifts in lines formed from the top of the chromosphere up to temperatures of about 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K and blueshifts for temperatures above that. However, it is doubtful that the apparent large downward flows in the lower transition region represents an emptying of the corona, so some mechanism must be responsible for maintaining the mass balance between the corona and the lower atmospheric layers. We use a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code to study the cycling of mass between the corona, transition region, and chromosphere by adding a tracer fluid to the simulation in various temperature intervals in the transition region. We find that most of the material seen in transition region emission lines formed at temperatures below 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K is material that has been rapidly heated from chromospheric temperatures and thereafter is pushed down as it cools. This implies that the bulk of transition region material resides in small loops. In these loops, the density is high and radiative cooling is efficient.

  1. Synoptic Solar Cycle 24 in Corona, Chromosphere, and Photosphere Seen by the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benevolenskaya, E.; Slater, G.; Lemen, J.

    2014-09-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory provides multiwavelength imagery from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to visible light as well as magnetic-field measurements. These data enable us to study the nature of solar activity in different regions of the Sun, from the interior to the corona. For solar-cycle studies, synoptic maps provide a useful way to represent global activity and evolution by extracting a central meridian band from sequences of full-disk images over a full solar Carrington rotation (≈ 27.3 days). We present the global evolution during Solar Cycle 24 from 20 May 2010 to 31 August 2013 (CR 2097 - CR 2140), using synoptic maps constructed from full-disk, line-of-sight magnetic-field imagery and EUV imagery (171 Å, 193 Å, 211 Å, 304 Å, and 335 Å). The synoptic maps have a resolution of 0.1 degree in longitude and steps of 0.001 in sine of latitude. We studied the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric structures of solar activity using these synoptic maps. To visualize the axisymmetric development of Cycle 24, we generated time-latitude (also called butterfly) images of the solar cycle in all of the wavelengths, by averaging each synoptic map over all longitudes, thus compressing it to a single vertical strip, and then assembling these strips in time order. From these time-latitude images we observe that during the ascending phase of Cycle 24 there is a very good relationship between the integrated magnetic flux and the EUV intensity inside the zone of sunspot activities. We observe a North-South asymmetry of the EUV intensity in high-latitudes. The North-South asymmetry of the emerging magnetic flux developed and resulted in a consequential asymmetry in the timing of the polar magnetic-field reversals.

  2. Evolution of interstellar dust and stardust in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovska, S.; Gail, H.-P.; Trieloff, M.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:We studied the evolution of the abundance in interstellar dust species that originate in stellar sources and from condensation in molecular clouds in the local interstellar medium of the Milky Way. We determined from this the input of dust material to the Solar System. Methods: A one-zone chemical evolution model of the Milky Way for the elemental composition of the disk combined with an evolution model for its interstellar dust component similar to that of Dwek (1998) is developed. The dust model considers dust-mass return from AGB stars as calculated from synthetic AGB models combined with models for dust condensation in stellar outflows. Supernova dust formation is included in a simple parametrised form that is gauged by observed abundances of presolar dust grains with a supernova origin. For dust growth in the ISM, a simple method is developed for coupling this with disk and dust evolution models. Results: A chemical evolution model of the solar neighbourhood in the Milky Way is calculated, which forms the basis for calculating a model of the evolution of the interstellar dust population at the galactocentric radius of the Milky Way. The model successfully passes all standard tests for the reliability of such models. In particular the abundance evolution of the important dust-forming elements is compared with observational results for the metallicity-dependent evolution of the abundances for G-type stars from the solar neighbourhood. It is found that the new tables of Nomoto et al. (2006) for the heavy element production give much better results for the abundance evolution of these important elements than the widely used tables of Woosley & Weaver (1995). The time evolution for the abundance of the following dust species is followed in the model: silicate, carbon, silicon carbide, and iron dust from AGB stars and from supernovae, as well as silicate, carbon, and iron dust grown in molecular clouds. It is shown that the interstellar dust population is

  3. Electron acceleration to high energies at quasi-parallel shock waves in the solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.

    1995-01-01

    In the solar corona shock waves are generated by flares and/or coronal mass ejections. They manifest themselves in solar type 2 radio bursts appearing as emission stripes with a slow drift from high to low frequencies in dynamic radio spectra. Their nonthermal radio emission indicates that electrons are accelerated to suprathermal and/or relativistic velocities at these shocks. As well known by extraterrestrial in-situ measurements supercritical, quasi-parallel, collisionless shocks are accompanied by so-called SLAMS (short large amplitude magnetic field structures). These SLAMS can act as strong magnetic mirrors, at which charged particles can be reflected and accelerated. Thus, thermal electrons gain energy due to multiple reflections between two SLAMS and reach suprathermal and relativistic velocities. This mechanism of accelerating electrons is discussed for circumstances in the solar corona and may be responsible for the so-called 'herringbones' observed in solar type 2 radio bursts.

  4. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2002-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the second quarter of the first year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation. and covers the period November 16, 1999 to February 15, 2000. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) model. The topics studied include: the effect of emerging flux on the stability of helmet streamers, coronal loops and streamers, the solar magnetic field, the solar wind, and open magnetic field lines.

  5. Zero-beta MHD simulations of a solar eruption driven by a solar wind in the corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwanhee; Magara, Tetsuya; Kang, Jihye

    2016-05-01

    Solar winds always exist in the corona, continuously carrying out magnetized plasmas from the solar surface toward the interplanetary space. We assume that a solar wind also plays an important role in producing a solar eruption. To confirm this hypothesis, we construct a solar eruption model in which a solar wind upflow is imposed at the top boundary of three-dimensional zero-beta magnetogydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The initial magnetic field is given by nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) reconstruction that is applied to the surface field provided by a flux emergence simulation. The simulation demonstrates that a solar eruption occurs due to the imbalance between magnetic pressure gradient force and magnetic tension force caused by a solar wind that gradually transports the envelope flux outward. This result provides important insights into the role of solar winds in producing solar eruptions.

  6. Dynamics and Thermodynamics of the Corona Observed During the Total Solar Eclipse of 20 March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habbal, S. R.; Ding, A.; Druckmuller, M.; Johnson, J.; Morgan, H.; Arndt, M. B.; Alzate, N.; Hutton, J.

    2015-12-01

    Total solar eclipse observations are snapshots of the instantaneous dynamic state of the corona, and each observation never fails to yield surprises. Occurring at the declining phase of solar cycle 24, the 20 March 2015 total solar eclipse was no exception. Images taken through narrow bandpass filters centered on the Fe XIV 530.3 nm and Fe XI 789.2 nm coronal emission lines, showed a corona dominated by strong Fe XIV emission, with a peak ionization temperature of 1.8 MK, and with weak Fe XI emission at 1.1 MK, present mostly over the two poles. Simultaneous imaging spectroscopy through a dual channel high-resolution spectrometer, centered on these two wavelengths, revealed Doppler red shifts exceeding 1000 km/s in the extended corona, covering a distance range of up to 1.5 solar radii above the solar surface. These redshifts together with the observed Doppler broadening could be assigned to specific coronal structures, which were observed simultaneously in high resolution white light images. By comparing these observations with contemporaneous observations from SDO, SWAP/Proba2 and LASCO/C2 and C3, the dynamics of the coronal plasma, as well as its thermodynamics, could be mapped in a region of space, untenable to present-day observatories. These latest eclipse observations underscore the unique scientific opportunities accessible with similar instrumentation during the all-american 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse.

  7. Nonlinear interaction between wave and convective disturbances in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovsky, I. S.; Mikhalyaev, B. B.; Bembitov, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    During more than two decades, many non-stationary events have been observed in the solar corona by different ground and space instruments, namely: oscillations and flows. These events play a crucial role in a solving two important problems of the solar physics: coronal heating and solar wind acceleration. Numerous observational data and theoretical works demonstrate the nonlinear interaction between waves and flows in the solar atmosphere. On other hand, nonlinear effects can also be used in coronal seismology, where a significant success leaded to many original works on linear disturbances in the coronal plasma. The nonlinear approach should make it possible to achieve more precise results.

  8. The flow of interstellar dust through the solar system: the role of dust charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Kempf, S.; Schwehm, G.; Srama, R.; Strub, P.; Grün, E.

    2011-11-01

    Interstellar dust can enter the solar system through the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the Local Interstellar Cloud. The trajectories of the dust through the solar system are not only influenced by gravitation and solar radiation pressure forces, but also by the Lorentz forces due to the interaction of the interplanetary magnetic field with the charged dust particles. The interplanetary magnetic field changes on two major time scales: 25 days (solar rotation frequency) and 22 years (solar cycle). The short-term variability averages out for regions that are not too close (>~2 AU) to the Sun. This interplanetary magnetic field variability causes a time-variability in the interstellar dust densities, that is correlated to the solar cycle. In this work we characterize the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system using simulations of the dust trajectories. We start from the simple case without Lorentz forces, and expand to the full simulation. We pay attention to the different ways of modeling the interplanetary magnetic field, and discuss the influence of the dust parameters on the resulting flow patterns. We also discuss the possibilities of using this modeling for prediction of dust fluxes for different space missions or planets, and we pay attention to where simplified models are justified, and where or when a full simulation, including all forces is necessary. One of the aims of this work is to understand measurements of spacecraft like Ulysses, Cassini and Stardust.

  9. The flow of interstellar dust through the solar system: the role of dust charging

    SciTech Connect

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Schwehm, G.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Strub, P.; Gruen, E.

    2011-11-29

    Interstellar dust can enter the solar system through the relative motion of the Sun with respect to the Local Interstellar Cloud. The trajectories of the dust through the solar system are not only influenced by gravitation and solar radiation pressure forces, but also by the Lorentz forces due to the interaction of the interplanetary magnetic field with the charged dust particles. The interplanetary magnetic field changes on two major time scales: 25 days (solar rotation frequency) and 22 years (solar cycle). The short-term variability averages out for regions that are not too close (>{approx}2 AU) to the Sun. This interplanetary magnetic field variability causes a time-variability in the interstellar dust densities, that is correlated to the solar cycle.In this work we characterize the flow of interstellar dust through the solar system using simulations of the dust trajectories. We start from the simple case without Lorentz forces, and expand to the full simulation. We pay attention to the different ways of modeling the interplanetary magnetic field, and discuss the influence of the dust parameters on the resulting flow patterns. We also discuss the possibilities of using this modeling for prediction of dust fluxes for different space missions or planets, and we pay attention to where simplified models are justified, and where or when a full simulation, including all forces is necessary. One of the aims of this work is to understand measurements of spacecraft like Ulysses, Cassini and Stardust.

  10. An MHD simulation model of time-dependent global solar corona with temporally varying solar-surface magnetic field maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.

    2013-11-01

    We present a model of a time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the sub-Alfvenic solar corona and super-Alfvenic solar wind with temporally varying solar-surface boundary magnetic field data. To (i) accommodate observational data with a somewhat arbitrarily evolving solar photospheric magnetic field as the boundary value and (ii) keep the divergence-free condition, we developed a boundary model, here named Confined Differential Potential Field model, that calculates the horizontal components of the magnetic field, from changes in the vertical component, as a potential field confined in a thin shell. The projected normal characteristic method robustly simulates the solar corona and solar wind, in response to the temporal variation of the boundary Br. We conduct test MHD simulations for two periods, from Carrington Rotation number 2009 to 2010 and from Carrington Rotation 2074 to 2075 at solar maximum and minimum of Cycle 23, respectively. We obtained several coronal features that a fixed boundary condition cannot yield, such as twisted magnetic field lines at the lower corona and the transition from an open-field coronal hole to a closed-field streamer. We also obtained slight improvements of the interplanetary magnetic field, including the latitudinal component, at Earth.

  11. The temperature structure, mass, and energy flow in the corona and inner solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withbroe, George L.

    1988-01-01

    Remote-sensing and in situ data are used to constrain a radiative energy balance model in order to study the radial variations of coronal temperatures, densities, and outflow speeds in several types of coronal holes and in an unstructured quiet region of the corona. A one-fluid solar wind model is used which takes into account the effects of radiative and inward conductive losses in the low corona and the chromospheric-coronal transition region. The results show that the total nonradiative energy input in magnetically open coronal regions is 5 + or - 10 to the 5th ergs/sq cm, and that most of the energy heating the coronal plasma is dissipated within 2 solar radii of the solar surface.

  12. EIT: Solar corona synoptic observations from SOHO with an Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaboudiniere, J. P.; Gabriel, A. H.; Artzner, G. E.; Michels, D. J.; Dere, K. P.; Howard, R. A.; Catura, R.; Stern, R.; Lemen, J.; Neupert, W.

    1988-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) of SOHO (solar and heliospheric observatory) will provide full disk images in emission lines formed at temperatures that map solar structures ranging from the chromospheric network to the hot magnetically confined plasma in the corona. Images in four narrow bandpasses will be obtained using normal incidence multilayered optics deposited on quadrants of a Ritchey-Chretien telescope. The EIT is capable of providing a uniform one arc second resolution over its entire 50 by 50 arc min field of view. Data from the EIT will be extremely valuable for identifying and interpreting the spatial and temperature fine structures of the solar atmosphere. Temporal analysis will provide information on the stability of these structures and identify dynamical processes. EIT images, issued daily, will provide the global corona context for aid in unifying the investigations and in forming the observing plans for SOHO coronal instruments.

  13. Corona during the total solar eclipse on March 20, 2015, and 24 cycle development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazev, Sergey; Mordvinov, Aleksandr; Dvorkina-Samarskaya, Antonina

    2016-06-01

    We analyzed the structure of coronal features, using data on the March 20, 2015 total solar eclipse. The Ludendorff index characterizing the flattening of the corona is 0.09. The solar corona structure in the Northern and Southern hemispheres corresponds to the maximum and post-maximum phases of solar activity, respectively. The asynchronous development of magnetic activity in the Sun's Northern and Southern hemispheres caused a substantial asymmetry of coronal features observed at the reversal of polar magnetic fields in the current cycle. The polar ray structures in the Southern Hemisphere are associated with the polar coronal hole, while in the Northern Hemisphere a polar hole has not been formed yet. We examine the relation between large-scale magnetic fields and location of high coronal structures.

  14. Global Magnetic Topology and Large-Scale Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Viacheslav; Linker, Jon; Mikic, Zoran; Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Torok, Tibor

    We consider the global topology of the coronal magnetic field in relation to the large-scale dynamics of the solar corona. Our consideration includes recent results on the structural analysis of this field determined in two different approximations, namely, potential field source surface model and solar magnetohydrodynamic model. We identify similarities and differences between structural features of the magnetic field obtained in these two models and discuss their implications for understanding various large-scale phenomena in the solar corona. The underlying magnetic topology manifests itself in a variety of observed morphological features such as streamers, pseudo-streamers or unipolar streamers, EUV dimmings, flare ribbons, coronal holes, and jets. For each of them, the related magnetic configuration has specific structural features, whose presence has to be not only identified but also verified on its independence from the used field model in order to reliably predict the impact of such features on physical processes in the corona. Among them are magnetic null points and minima, bald patches, separatrix surfaces and quasi-separatrix layers, and open and closed separator field lines. These features form a structural skeleton of the coronal magnetic field and are directly involved through the ubiquitous process of magnetic reconnection in many solar dynamic phenomena such as coronal mass ejections, solar wind, acceleration and transport of energetic particles. We will pinpoint and elucidate in our overview some of such involvements that have recently received a considerable attention in our ongoing projects at Predictive Science.

  15. On Shock Wave Formation in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, A.; Aurass, H.; Klein, K.-L.; Hofmann, A.; Mann, G.

    In order to investigate the formation of radio emitting shock waves above flaring active regions, we combine spectral and imaging observations of type II radio events with X-ray imaging and full-Sun observations and, in one case, with the extrapolated magnetic field configuration in the corona. We confirm and extend earlier findings that type II bursts develop above active region loops seen in soft X-ray images. Sources at successively lower frequencies are non-radially displaced from the axis of the active region loops. Two new radio features identified in high resolution spectrograms establish a possible link between the type II emission and the preceding activity in the underlying corona: 1. Fast-drift bursts and pulsations with a restricted bandwidth are observed in coronal loops from the impulsive flare phase until the onset of the type II emission. Envelope features of this burst group (starting frequency and/or cut-off frequency) drift gradually to lower frequencies, at a normalized drift rate similar to the following type II lanes. The source sites are located between the sites of H_alpha emission and of the type II emission. The envelope features of theburst group therefore appear as an early manifestation of the disturbance which later gives rise to the type II emission. We refer to these envelope features as a type II precursor. 2. Immediately before the type II emission a short (<= 1 min duration) series of narrow-band bursts occurs at frequencies between the split bands of the type II lanes. As a whole, the burst sequence has an inverted U--shaped spectral envelope. We therefore call it an arc. It has fundamental-harmonic structure as the subsequent type II burst, but no band splitting. The source is located near or above the summits of the coronal loops where the precursor emission occurred before, and close to the site where the type II emission starts. The arc feature occurs especially prior to high-frequency type II bursts, i.e. type II shocks

  16. Radial distribution of compressive waves in the solar corona revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Mayu; Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Radial variations of the amplitude and the energy flux of compressive waves in the solar corona were explored for the first time using a spacecraft radio occultation technique. By applying wavelet analysis to the frequency time series taken at heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 R{sub S} (solar radii), quasi-periodic density disturbances were detected at almost all distances. The period ranges from 100 to 2000 s. The amplitude of the fractional density fluctuation increases with distance and reaches ∼30% around 5 R{sub S} , implying that nonlinearity of the wave field is potentially important. We further estimate the wave energy flux on the assumption that the observed periodical fluctuations are manifestations of acoustic waves. The energy flux increases with distance below ∼6 R{sub S} and seems to saturate above this height, suggesting that the acoustic waves do not propagate from the low corona but are generated in the extended corona, probably through nonlinear dissipation of Alfvén waves. The compressive waves should eventually dissipate through shock generation to heat the corona.

  17. The Substructure of the Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore calculate how the intensity scales from a low-resolution (AIA) pixels to high-resolution (Hi-C) pixels for both the dynamic events and "background" emission (meaning, the steady emission over the 5 minutes of data acquisition time). We find there is no evidence of substructure in the background corona; the intensity scales smoothly from low-resolution to high-resolution Hi-C pixels. In transient events, however, the intensity observed with Hi-C is, on average, 2.6 times larger than observed with AIA. This increase in intensity suggests that AIA is not resolving these events. This result suggests a finely structured dynamic corona embedded in a smoothly varying background.

  18. DISCOVERY OF FINELY STRUCTURED DYNAMIC SOLAR CORONA OBSERVED IN THE Hi-C TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Savage, Sabrina; Alexander, Caroline; Golub, Leon; DeLuca, Edward; Schuler, Timothy

    2014-05-20

    In the Summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew on board a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e., have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70% of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  19. Discovery of Finely Structured Dynamic Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e. have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70 percent of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  20. Spatiotemporal Organization of Energy Release Events in the Quiet Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvenic interactions.

  1. Ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of the solar corona at the Naval Research Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Moses, J D; Ko, Y-K; Laming, J M; Provornikova, E A; Strachan, L; Beltran, S Tun

    2015-11-01

    We review the history of ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy with a specific focus on such activities at the Naval Research Laboratory and on studies of the extended solar corona and solar-wind source regions. We describe the problem of forecasting solar energetic particle events and discuss an observational technique designed to solve this problem by detecting supra-thermal seed particles as extended wings on spectral lines. Such seed particles are believed to be a necessary prerequisite for particle acceleration by heliospheric shock waves driven by a coronal mass ejection. PMID:26560611

  2. Spatiotemporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2014-11-01

    Using data from the STEREO and SOHO spacecraft, we show that temporal organization of energy release events in the quiet solar corona is close to random, in contrast to the clustered behavior of flaring times in solar active regions. The locations of the quiet-Sun events follow the meso- and supergranulation pattern of the underling photosphere. Together with earlier reports of the scale-free event size statistics, our findings suggest that quiet solar regions responsible for bulk coronal heating operate in a driven self-organized critical state, possibly involving long-range Alfvénic interactions.

  3. Unified Models of Turbulence and Nonlinear Wave Evolution in the Extended Solar Corona and Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The PI (Cranmer) and Co-I (A. van Ballegooijen) made significant progress toward the goal of building a "unified model" of the dominant physical processes responsible for the acceleration of the solar wind. The approach outlined in the original proposal comprised two complementary pieces: (1) to further investigate individual physical processes under realistic coronal and solar wind conditions, and (2) to extract the dominant physical effects from simulations and apply them to a one-dimensional and time-independent model of plasma heating and acceleration. The accomplishments in the report period are thus divided into these two categories: 1a. Focused Study of Kinetic MHD Turbulence. We have developed a model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the extended solar corona that contains the effects of collisionless dissipation and anisotropic particle heating. A turbulent cascade is one possible way of generating small-scale fluctuations (easy to dissipate/heat) from a pre-existing population of low-frequency Alfven waves (difficult to dissipate/heat). We modeled the cascade as a combination of advection and diffusion in wavenumber space. The dominant spectral transfer occurs in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field. As expected from earlier models, this leads to a highly anisotropic fluctuation spectrum with a rapidly decaying tail in the parallel wavenumber direction. The wave power that decays to high enough frequencies to become ion cyclotron resonant depends on the relative strengths of advection and diffusion in the cascade. For the most realistic values of these parameters, though, there is insufficient power to heat protons and heavy ions. The dominant oblique waves undergo Landau damping, which implies strong parallel electron heating. We thus investigated the nonlinear evolution of the electron velocity distributions (VDFs) into parallel beams and discrete phase-space holes (similar to those seen in the terrestrial magnetosphere

  4. Solar wind driven dust acoustic instability with Lorentzian kappa distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, Kashif; Ehsan, Zahida; Khan, S. A.; Mahmood, S.

    2014-02-15

    In a three species electron-ion-dust plasma following a generalized non-Maxwellian distribution function (Lorentzian or kappa), it is shown that a kinetic instability of dust-acoustic mode exists. The instability threshold is affected when such (quasineutral) plasma permeates through another static plasma. Such case is of interest when the solar wind is streaming through the cometary plasma in the presence of interstellar dust. In the limits of phase velocity of the waves larger and smaller than the thermal velocity of dust particles, the dispersion properties and growth rate of dust-acoustic mode are investigated analytically with validation via numerical analysis.

  5. Solar wind magnetic field bending of Jovian dust trajectories.

    PubMed

    Zook, H A; Grün, E; Baguhl, M; Hamilton, D P; Linkert, G; Liou, J; Forsyth, R; Phillips, J L

    1996-11-29

    From September 1991 to October 1992, the cosmic dust detector on the Ulysses spacecraft recorded 11 short bursts, or streams, of dust. These dust grains emanated from the jovian system, and their trajectories were strongly affected by solar wind magnetic field forces. Analyses of the on-board measurements of these fields, and of stream approach directions, show that stream-associated dust grain masses are of the order of 10(-18) gram and dust grain velocities exceed 200 kilometers per second. These masses and velocities are, respectively, about 10(3) times less massive and 5 to 10 times faster than earlier reported. PMID:8929405

  6. Unified Models of Turbulence and Nonlinear Wave Evolution in the Extended Solar Corona and Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The PI (Cranmer) and Co-I (A. van Ballegooijen) made substantial progress toward the goal of producing a unified model of the basic physical processes responsible for solar wind acceleration. The approach outlined in the original proposal comprised two complementary pieces: (1) to further investigate individual physical processes under realistic coronal and solar wind conditions, and (2) to extract the dominant physical effects from simulations and apply them to a 1D model of plasma heating and acceleration. The accomplishments in Year 2 are divided into these two categories: 1a. Focused Study of Kinetic Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Turbulence. lb. Focused Study of Non - WKB Alfven Wave Rejection. and 2. The Unified Model Code. We have continued the development of the computational model of a time-study open flux tube in the extended corona. The proton-electron Monte Carlo model is being tested, and collisionless wave-particle interactions are being included. In order to better understand how to easily incorporate various kinds of wave-particle processes into the code, the PI performed a detailed study of the so-called "Ito Calculus", i.e., the mathematical theory of how to update the positions of particles in a probabilistic manner when their motions are governed by diffusion in velocity space.

  7. Observations of mode coupling in the solar corona and bipolar noise storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Thejappa, G.; Kundu, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution observations of the sun which reflect on the role of mode coupling in the solar corona, and a number of new observations are presented. It is shown that typically, polarization inversion is seen at 5 GHz in active region sources near the solar limb, but not at 1.5 GHz. Although this is apparently in contradiction to the simplest form of mode coupling theory, it remains consistent with current models for the active region emission. Microwave bursts show no strong evidence for polarization inversion. Bipolar noise storm continuum emission is discussed in some detail, utilizing recent VLA observations at 327 MHz. It is shown that bipolar sources are common at 327 MHz. Further, the trailing component of the bipole is frequently stronger than the leading component, in apparent conflict with the 'leading-spot' hypothesis. The observations indicate that, at 327 MHz, mode coupling is apparently strong at all mode-coupling layers in the solar corona. The 327 MHz observations require a much weaker magnetic field strength in the solar corona to explain this result than did earlier lower-frequency observations: maximum fields are 0.2 G. This is a much weaker field than is consistent with current coronal models.

  8. On the Generation and Dissipation of Ion Cyclotron Waves in the Extended Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, S. R.

    1999-12-01

    The dissipation of high frequency (10 to 10,000 Hz) ion cyclotron resonant Alfven waves has been proposed as a leading candidate for the heating of the extended solar corona and the acceleration of the high speed solar wind. The competition between various wave generation mechanisms and resonant wave damping is examined in detail, and a database of more than 2000 low-abundance ion species is taken into account for completeness. Also, the Sobolev approximation from the theory of hot star winds is applied to the gyroresonant wave-particle interaction in the solar wind, and the surprisingly effective damping ability of ``minor'' ions is explained in simple terms. High frequency waves (propagating parallel to open magnetic field lines) that originate at the base of the corona are damped significantly when they resonate with ions having charge-to-mass ratios of about 0.1. Thus, if the waves came solely from the coronal base, there would be negligible wave power available to resonate with higher charge-to-mass ratio ions at larger heights. This result confirms preliminary suggestions from earlier work that the waves that heat and accelerate the high speed solar wind must be generated throughout the extended corona. This work is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under grant NAG5-7822 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, and by the ESA PRODEX program (Swiss contribution).

  9. Mapping the Solar Wind from its Source Region into the Outer Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esser, Ruth; Wagner, William J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The solar wind not only forms the space environment of Earth and other planets, but is also the cause of many phenomena observed in the Earth's atmosphere, such as aurorae. The expansion of the coronal plasma of the Sun is characteristic to many main sequence stars, and thus provides an example for understanding stellar winds as well. In spite of its importance for both space science and stellar physics, basic solar wind properties remain essentially unresolved. Since its discovery about 50 years ago, the complexity of the Sun corona - solar wind system has complicated the interpretation of observations. Recent progress in remote sensing observations as provided for example by YOHKOH, SOHO, SPARTAN and ULYSSES as well as some ground based techniques such as Interplanetary Scintillation observations, offer a compelling opportunity to unravel the 50 year old puzzle regarding the heat source or sources that cause the expansion of the solar corona. The new era of solar wind observations initiated by SOHO and ULYSSES, have also led to a wealth of new theoretical approaches. The goal of the proposed research was to carry out an integrated study of the coronal and solar wind plasma making use of the opportunities provided by the above spacecraft, as well as plasma emission calculations and new ideas on solar wind expansion theory.

  10. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the third quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period February 16, 2001 to May 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.In this report we summarize the accomplishments made by our group during the first seven quarters of our Sun-Earth Connection Theory Program contract. The descriptions are intended to illustrate our principal results. A full account can be found in the referenced publications.

  11. Diffusion in the chromosphere and the composition of the solar corona and energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vauclair, S.; Meyer, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Composition observations, in the solar photosphere, and in the upper transition region (TR) and corona imply a change of composition of the solar atmosphere somewhere between the photosphere and the upper TR. Heavy elements with first ionization potential (FIP) 9 eV (high-FIP element) are approx. 4 times less abundant in the TR and corona than in the photosphere, as compared to both hydrogen and heavy elements with lower low-FIP elements. A separation is suggested between neutral and ionized elements in a region where the high-FIP elements are mostly neutral, and the low-FIP elements ionized. This occurs in the chromosphere at altitudes above 600 km and below 2000 km above Photosphere. Whether the diffusion processes can explain the observed change in composition is investigated.

  12. Skylab and solar exploration. [chromosphere-corona structure, energy production and heat transport processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Puttkamer, J.

    1973-01-01

    Review of some of the findings concerning solar structure, energy production, and heat transport obtained with the aid of the manned Skylab space station observatory launched on May 14, 1973. Among the topics discussed are the observation of thermonuclear fusion processes which cannot be simulated on earth, the observation of short-wave solar radiation not visible to observers on earth, and the investigation of energy-transport processes occurring in the photosphere, chromosphere, and corona. An apparent paradox is noted in that the cooler chromosphere is heating the hotter corona, seemingly in defiance of the second law of thermodynamics, thus suggesting that a nonthermal mechanism underlies the energy transport. Understanding of this nonthermal mechanism is regarded as an indispensable prerequisite for future development of plasma systems for terrestrial applications.

  13. The Source of Alfven Waves That Heat the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzmaikin, A.; Berger, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We suggest a source for high-frequency Alfven waves invoked in coronal heating and acceleration of the solar wind. The source is associated with small-scale magnetic loops in the chromospheric network.

  14. "Kicking Up Some Dust": An Experimental Investigation Relating Lunar Dust Erosive Wear to Solar Power Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mpagazehe, Jeremiah N.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Delgado, Irebert R.; Higgs, C. Fred, III

    2013-01-01

    The exhaust from retrograde rockets fired by spacecraft landing on the Moon can accelerate lunar dust particles to high velocities. Information obtained from NASA's Apollo 12 mission confirmed that these high-speed dust particles can erode nearby structures. This erosive wear damage can affect the performance of optical components such as solar concentrators. Solar concentrators are objects which collect sunlight over large areas and focus the light into smaller areas for purposes such as heating and energy production. In this work, laboratory-scale solar concentrators were constructed and subjected to erosive wear by the JSC-1AF lunar dust simulant. The concentrators were focused on a photovoltaic cell and the degradation in electrical power due to the erosive wear was measured. It was observed that even moderate exposure to erosive wear from lunar dust simulant resulted in a 40 percent reduction in power production from the solar concentrators.

  15. Reduction in the intensity of solar X-ray emission in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range and heating of the solar corona

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoeva, I. K.

    2013-04-15

    The time profiles of the energy spectra of low-intensity flares and the structure of the thermal background of the soft X-ray component of solar corona emission over the period of January-February, 2003, are investigated using the data of the RHESSI project. A reduction in the intensity of X-ray emission of the solar flares and the corona thermal background in the 2- to 15-keV photon energy range is revealed. The RHESSI data are compared with the data from the Interball-Geotail project. A new mechanism of solar corona heating is proposed on the basis of the results obtained.

  16. SUPRATHERMAL ELECTRONS IN THE SOLAR CORONA: CAN NONLOCAL TRANSPORT EXPLAIN HELIOSPHERIC CHARGE STATES?

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-08-20

    There have been several ideas proposed to explain how the Sun's corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. Some models assume that open magnetic field lines are heated by Alfvén waves driven by photospheric motions and dissipated after undergoing a turbulent cascade. Other models posit that much of the solar wind's mass and energy is injected via magnetic reconnection from closed coronal loops. The latter idea is motivated by observations of reconnecting jets and also by similarities of ion composition between closed loops and the slow wind. Wave/turbulence models have also succeeded in reproducing observed trends in ion composition signatures versus wind speed. However, the absolute values of the charge-state ratios predicted by those models tended to be too low in comparison with observations. This Letter refines these predictions by taking better account of weak Coulomb collisions for coronal electrons, whose thermodynamic properties determine the ion charge states in the low corona. A perturbative description of nonlocal electron transport is applied to an existing set of wave/turbulence models. The resulting electron velocity distributions in the low corona exhibit mild suprathermal tails characterized by ''kappa'' exponents between 10 and 25. These suprathermal electrons are found to be sufficiently energetic to enhance the charge states of oxygen ions, while maintaining the same relative trend with wind speed that was found when the distribution was assumed to be Maxwellian. The updated wave/turbulence models are in excellent agreement with solar wind ion composition measurements.

  17. Filament Channels: Isolated Laboratories of Plasma Heating in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, O.; Velli, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar filament channels are complex systems comprising photospheric, chromospheric and coronal components. These components include magnetic neutral lines, supergranule cells, fibrils (spicules), filaments (prominences when observed on the limb), coronal cells, filament cavities and their overlying coronal arcades. Filaments are very highly structured and extend in height from the photosphere to the corona. Filament cores have chromospheric temperatures - 10,000 K (even at coronal heights ~ 100 Mm), surrounded by hotter plasma with temperature up to ~50,000 K. The whole filament is isolated from the rest of the solar corona by an envelope - the filament channel cavity - with temperatures of about 2,000,000 K. The filament channel cavity is even hotter than the solar corona outside the filament channel arcade. The compactness and big temperature variations make filament channels unique ready-to-go laboratories of coronal plasma heating and thermodynamics. In this work we discuss possible sources and mechanisms of heating in the filament channel environment. In particular, we address the mechanisms of magnetic canceling and current sheet dissipation.

  18. Spectroscopic measurements of element abundances in the solar corona: Variations on the FIP theme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1995-01-01

    Solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) data yield systematic differences between elemental abundances in the corona and in the photosphere related to the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements: low-FIP elements are preferentially enhanced relative to high-FIP elements by about a factor of four. Spectroscopic studies of the inner corona show that such a pattern may apply on average but not in detail for coronal loops: substantial abundance differences occur between different types of coronal structures, and variations have been found from flare to flare, from one active region to another, and over time in the same region; further, in some flares, anomalies such as enhanced Ne:O ratios, distinctly at odds with the FIP pattern, show that a competing element selection mechanism sometimes operates. Details of the observed abundance variability -- such as the magnitude of the variations, the relevant temporal and spatial scales, and correlations with other properties of the given coronal structure -- may give important clues to the processes which supply and heat the corona, or they may reflect the changing physical conditions or locations where those processes take place. However, many such details remain to be established definitively. At present, abundance variability is primarily a major complication to data analysis and interpretation. However, once it is better understood, it may provide a new diagnostic tool for probing the lower layers of the solar atmosphere.

  19. Low Frequency Radio Observations of Bi-directional Electron Beams in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, E.; Reid, H.; Vilmer, N.; Gallagher, P.

    2015-12-01

    The radio signature of a shock travelling through the solar corona is known as a type II solar radio burst. In rare cases, these bursts can exhibit a fine structure known as 'herringbones' which are a direct indicator of particle acceleration occurring at the shock front. However, few studies have been performed on herringbones and the details of the underlying particle acceleration processes are unknown. Here, we use an image processing technique known as the Hough transform to statistically analyse the herringbone fine structure in a radio burst at 20-90MHz observed from the Rosse Solar-Terrestrial Observatory on 2011 September 22. We identify 188 individual bursts which are signatures of bi-directional electron beams continuously accelerated to speeds of 0.16 c. This occurs at a shock acceleration site initially at a constant altitude of 0.6 Rsun in the corona, followed by a shift to 0.5 Rsun. The anti-sunward beams travel a distance of 170 Mm (and possibly further) away from the acceleration site, while those travelling toward the sun come to a stop sooner, reaching a smaller distance of 112 Mm. We show that the stopping distance for the sunward beams may depend on the total number density and the velocity of the beam. Our study concludes that a detailed statistical analysis of herringbone fine structure can provide information on the physical properties of the corona which lead to these relatively rare radio bursts.

  20. Satellite project "CORONAS-PHOTON" for study of solar hard radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yu.; Cor-Phot Team

    "CORONAS-PHOTON" is the Russian mission for study of the solar hard electromagnetic radiation in the very wide energy range from Extreme UV up to high-energy gamma - radiation. GOAL OF PROJECT: The investigation of energy accumulation and its transformation into energy of accelerated particles processes during solar flares; the study of the acceleration mechanisms, propagation and interaction of fast particles in the solar atmosphere; the study of the solar activity correlation with physical-chemical processes in the Earth upper atmosphere. SCIENTIFIC PAYLOAD CAPABILITY Radiation / Energy region / Detector type: Full solar disk X- radiation / 2keV - 2000MeV / Prop. counter; NaI(Tl); Full solar disk X- and γ-radiation / NaI(Tl)/CsI(Na) phoswich; Full solar disk X- and γ-radiation and solar neutrons / 20 - 300MeV / YalO_3(Ce); CsI(Tl); Hard X-ray polarization in large flares / 20 - 150keV / p-terphenyl scatterer and CsI(Na) absorbers; Full solar disk EUV-radiation monitoring / 6 spectral windows in <10 - 130nm / Filtered photodiodes; Solar images in narrow spectral bands and monochromatic emission lines of hot plasma / Emission of HeII, SiXI, FeXXI, FeXXIII, MgXII ions / Multi-layer and Bregg spherical crystal quartz mirrors with CCDs; Additionally, the temporal and energy spectra of electrons (0.2-14MeV), protons (1-61MeV) and nuclei (Z<26, 2-50MeV/nuclon) at the satellite orbit will be registrated by several instruments. MAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF SPACECRAFT: Spacecraft weight: 1900 kg; Orbit type: Circular; Scientific payload weight: 540 kg; Height: 500 km; Orientation to the Sun [arc min]: better 5; Inclination: 82.5 degree; Instability of orientation [deg/s]: less 0.005; Solar - synchronous orbit is under study. Launching date of "CORONAS-PHOTON" spacecraft is 2006.

  1. Solar activity and its evolution across the corona: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccarello, Francesca; Balmaceda, Laura; Cessateur, Gael; Cremades, Hebe; Guglielmino, Salvatore L.; Lilensten, Jean; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Lopez, Fernando M.; Mierla, Marilena; Parenti, Susanna; Pomoell, Jens; Romano, Paolo; Rodriguez, Luciano; Srivastava, Nandita; Vainio, Rami; West, Matt; Zuccarello, Francesco P.

    2013-04-01

    Solar magnetism is responsible for the several active phenomena that occur in the solar atmosphere. The consequences of these phenomena on the solar-terrestrial environment and on Space Weather are nowadays clearly recognized, even if not yet fully understood. In order to shed light on the mechanisms that are at the basis of the Space Weather, it is necessary to investigate the sequence of phenomena starting in the solar atmosphere and developing across the outer layers of the Sun and along the path from the Sun to the Earth. This goal can be reached by a combined multi-disciplinary, multi-instrument, multi-wavelength study of these phenomena, starting with the very first manifestation of solar active region formation and evolution, followed by explosive phenomena (i.e., flares, erupting prominences, coronal mass ejections), and ending with the interaction of plasma magnetized clouds expelled from the Sun with the interplanetary magnetic field and medium. This wide field of research constitutes one of the main aims of COST Action ES0803: Developing Space Weather products and services in Europe. In particular, one of the tasks of this COST Action was to investigate the Progress in Scientific Understanding of Space Weather. In this paper we review the state of the art of our comprehension of some phenomena that, in the scenario outlined above, might have a role on Space Weather, focusing on the researches, thematic reviews, and main results obtained during the COST Action ES0803.

  2. Energy release in the solar corona from spatially resolved magnetic braids.

    PubMed

    Cirtain, J W; Golub, L; Winebarger, A R; De Pontieu, B; Kobayashi, K; Moore, R L; Walsh, R W; Korreck, K E; Weber, M; McCauley, P; Title, A; Kuzin, S; DeForest, C E

    2013-01-24

    It is now apparent that there are at least two heating mechanisms in the Sun's outer atmosphere, or corona. Wave heating may be the prevalent mechanism in quiet solar periods and may contribute to heating the corona to 1,500,000 K (refs 1-3). The active corona needs additional heating to reach 2,000,000-4,000,000 K; this heat has been theoretically proposed to come from the reconnection and unravelling of magnetic 'braids'. Evidence favouring that process has been inferred, but has not been generally accepted because observations are sparse and, in general, the braided magnetic strands that are thought to have an angular width of about 0.2 arc seconds have not been resolved. Fine-scale braiding has been seen in the chromosphere but not, until now, in the corona. Here we report observations, at a resolution of 0.2 arc seconds, of magnetic braids in a coronal active region that are reconnecting, relaxing and dissipating sufficient energy to heat the structures to about 4,000,000 K. Although our 5-minute observations cannot unambiguously identify the field reconnection and subsequent relaxation as the dominant heating mechanism throughout active regions, the energy available from the observed field relaxation in our example is ample for the observed heating. PMID:23344359

  3. The flow of interstellar dust into the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Kempf, S.; Schwehm, G.; Srama, R.; Grün, E.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Interstellar dust (ISD) is a major component in the formation and evolution of stars, stellar systems, and planets. Astronomical observations of interstellar extinction and polarization, and of the infrared emission of the dust, are the most commonly used technique for characterizing interstellar dust. Besides this, the interstellar dust from the local interstellar cloud enters the solar system owing to the relative motion of the Sun with respect to this cloud. Once in the solar system, in-situ observations can be made by spacecraft using impact ionization detectors and time-of-flight spectrometers like the ones flown on the Cassini, Ulysses, and Galileo, spacecrafts. Also a sample return can be done, as in the Stardust mission. Once in the solar system, the trajectories of these dust grains are shaped by gravitational, solar radiation pressure, and Lorentz forces. The Lorentz forces result from the interaction of the charged dust particles with the interplanetary magnetic field. The ISD densities in the solar system thus depend both on the location in the solar system and on time, correlated to the solar cycle. Aims: This paper aims at giving the reader insight into the flow patterns of ISD when it moves through the solar system. This is useful for designing future in-situ or sample return missions or for knowing whether for specific missions, simplified assumptions can be used for the dust flux and direction, or whether full simulations are needed. Methods: We characterize the flow of ISD through the solar system using simulations of the dust trajectories. We start from the simple case without Lorentz forces and expand to the full simulation. We pay attention to the different ways of modeling the interplanetary magnetic field and discuss the influence of the dust parameters on the resulting flow patterns. Dust densities, fluxes, and directionalities are derived from the trajectory simulations. Different graphics representations are used to gain insight

  4. Conditions for electron-cyclotron maser emission in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morosan, D. E.; Zucca, P.; Bloomfield, D. S.; Gallagher, P. T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission ranging from long duration radio bursts associated with solar flares and coronal mass ejections to more complex, short duration radio bursts such as solar S bursts, radio spikes and fibre bursts. While plasma emission is thought to be the dominant emission mechanism for most radio bursts, the electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) mechanism may be responsible for more complex, short-duration bursts as well as fine structures associated with long-duration bursts. Aims: We investigate the conditions for ECM in the solar corona by considering the ratio of the electron plasma frequency ωp to the electron-cyclotron frequency Ωe. The ECM is theoretically possible when ωp/ Ωe< 1. Methods: Two-dimensional electron density, magnetic field, plasma frequency, and electron cyclotron frequency maps of the off-limb corona were created using observations from SDO/AIA and SOHO/LASCO, together with potential field extrapolations of the magnetic field. These maps were then used to calculate ωp/Ωe and Alfvén velocity maps of the off-limb corona. Results: We found that the condition for ECM emission (ωp/ Ωe< 1) is possible at heights <1.07 R⊙ in an active region near the limb; that is, where magnetic field strengths are >40 G and electron densities are >3 × 108 cm-3. In addition, we found comparatively high Alfvén velocities (>0.02c or >6000 km s-1) at heights <1.07 R⊙ within the active region. Conclusions: This demonstrates that the condition for ECM emission is satisfied within areas of the corona containing large magnetic fields, such as the core of a large active region. Therefore, ECM could be a possible emission mechanism for high-frequency radio and microwave bursts.

  5. Assessment and Validation of MHD Models for the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, L.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Kohl, J. L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Raymond, J. R.; van Ballegooijen, A.

    2007-12-01

    We describe the status of a model assessment and validation project for testing MHD codes that simulate the solar corona and inner heliosphere. The goal of the project is to test MHD codes by applying firm empirical constraints to their boundary conditions in the corona and at 1 AU. The project has produced a database of coronal and solar wind observations from SOHO, ACE, Wind, and Ulysses. In addition to the database, software tools for comparing these data sets to the outputs for the MHD model codes under test will be demonstrated. The first step is to take the plasma parameters that are produced from the model codes and apply forward modeling to simulate the coronal observations of emission lines (H I Lyman alpha and O VI 103.2 nm). In situ solar wind data are used not only to provide benchmarks near 1 AU but also to provide coronal constraints for the coronal source regions of the solar wind. Future stages will involve making more direct comparisons of the plasma properties predicted from the model codes through the use of empirical coronal and solar wind models. We also describe a set of metrics that are used for making comparisons between the model code outputs and the empirical data. This work is supported by NASA under Grants NNX07AB98G to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and NNX07AB99G to the University of Michigan.

  6. The FIP and Inverse FIP Effects in Solar and Stellar Coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laming, J. Martin

    2015-09-01

    We review our state of knowledge of coronal element abundance anomalies in the Sun and stars. We concentrate on the first ionization potential (FIP) effect observed in the solar corona and slow-speed wind, and in the coronae of solar-like dwarf stars, and the "inverse FIP" effect seen in the corona of stars of later spectral type; specifically M dwarfs. These effects relate to the enhancement or depletion, respectively, in coronal abundance with respect to photospheric values of elements with FIP below about 10 eV. They are interpreted in terms of the ponderomotive force due to the propagation and/or reflection of magnetohydrodynamic waves in the chromosphere. This acts on chromospheric ions, but not neutrals, and so can lead to ion-neutral fractionation. A detailed description of the model applied to closed magnetic loops, and to open field regions is given, accounting for the observed difference in solar FIP fractionation between the slow and fast wind. It is shown that such a model can also account for the observed depletion of helium in the solar wind. The helium depletion is sensitive to the chromospheric altitude where ion-neutral separation occurs, and the behavior of the helium abundance in the closed magnetic loop strongly suggests that the waves have a coronal origin. This, and other similar inferences may be expected to have a strong bearing on theories of solar coronal heating. Chromospheric waves originating from below as acoustic waves mode convert, mainly to fast-mode waves, can also give rise to ion-neutral separation. Depending on the geometry of the magnetic field, this can result in FIP or Inverse FIP effects. We argue that such configurations are more likely to occur in later-type stars (known to have stronger field in any case), and that this explains the occurrence of the Inverse FIP effect in M dwarfs. We conclude with a discussion of possible directions for future work.

  7. Comparative Study on Hot Atom Coronae of Solar and Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, Valery

    Solar/stellar forcing on the upper atmospheres of the solar and extrasolar planets via both absorption of the XUV (soft X-rays and extreme ultraviolet) radiation and atmospheric sputtering results in the formation of an extended neutral corona populated by the suprathermal (hot) H, C, N, and O atoms (see, e.g., Johnson et al., 2008). The hot corona, in turn, is altered by an inflow of the solar wind/magnetospheric plasma and local pick-up ions onto the planetary exosphere. Such inflow results in the formation of the superthermal atoms (energetic neutral atoms - ENAs) due to the charge exchange with the high-energy precipitating ions and can affect the long-term evolution of the atmosphere due to the atmospheric escape. The origin, kinetics and transport of the suprathermal H, C, N, and O atoms in the transition regions (from thermosphere to exosphere) of the planetary atmospheres are discussed. Reactions of dissociative recombination of the ionospheric ions CO _{2} (+) , CO (+) , O _{2} (+) , and N _{2} (+) with thermal electrons are the main photochemical sources of hot atoms. The dissociation of atmospheric molecules by the solar/stellar XUV radiation and accompanying photoelectron fluxes and the induced exothermic photochemistry are also the important sources of the suprathermal atoms. Such kinetic systems with the non-thermal processes are usually investigated with the different (test particles, DSMC, and hybrid) versions of the kinetic Monte Carlo method. In our studies the kinetic energy distribution functions of suprathermal and superthermal atoms were calculated using the stochastic model of the hot planetary corona (Shematovich, 2004, 2010; Groeller et al., 2014), and the Monte Carlo model (Shematovich et al., 2011, 2013) of the high-energy proton and hydrogen atom precipitation into the atmosphere respectively. These functions allowed us to estimate the space distribution of suprathermals in the planetary transition regions. An application of these

  8. Fast Magnetosonic Waves and Global Coronal Seismology in the Extended Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Ryun Young; Zhang, J.; Kramar, M.; Wang, T.; Ofman, L.; Davila, J. M.

    2013-07-01

    We present global coronal seismology, for the first time, that allows us to determine inhomogeneous magnetic field strengths in a wide range of the extended solar corona. We use observations of propagating disturbance associated with a coronal mass ejection observed on 2011 August 4 by the COR1 inner coronagraphs on board the STEREO spacecraft. We establish that the disturbance is in fact a fast magnetosonic wave as the upper coronal counterpart of the EIT wave observed by STEREO EUVI and travels across magnetic field lines with inhomogeneous speeds, passing through various coronal regions such as quiet/active corona, coronal holes, and streamers. We derive magnetic field strengths along the azimuthal trajectories of the fronts at heliocentric distances 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 Rs, using the varying speeds and electron densities. The derived magnetic field strengths are consistent with values determined with a potential field source surface model and reported in previous works. The ranges of the magnetic field strengths at these heliocentric distances are 0.44 ± 0.29, 0.23 ± 0.15, and 0.26 ± 0.14 G, respectively. The uncertainty in determining magnetic field strengths is about 40 %. This work demonstrates that observations of fast magnetosonic waves by white-light coronagraphs can provide us with a unique way to diagnose magnetic field strength of an inhomogeneous medium in a wide spatial range of the extended solar corona.

  9. Magnetic Untwisting in Solar Jets that Go into the Outer Corona in Polar Coronal Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from 14 exceptionally high-reaching large solar jets observed in the polar coronal holes. EUV movies from SDO/AIA show that each jet is similar to many other similar-size and smaller jets that erupt in coronal holes, but each is exceptional in that it goes higher than most other jets, so high that it is observed in the outer corona beyond 2.2 R(sub Sun) in images from the SOHO/LASCO/C2 coronagraph. For these high-reaching jets, we find: (1) the front of the jet transits the corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun) at a speed typically several times the sound speed; (2) each jet displays an exceptionally large amount of spin as it erupts; (3) in the outer corona, most jets display oscillatory swaying having an amplitude of a few degrees and a period of order 1 hour. We conclude that these jets are magnetically driven, propose that the driver is a magnetic-untwisting wave that is grossly a large-amplitude (i.e., nonlinear) torsional Alfven wave that is put into the reconnected open magnetic field in the jet by interchange reconnection as the jet erupts, and estimate from the measured spinning and swaying that the magnetic-untwisting wave loses most of its energy in the inner corona below 2.2 R(sub Sun). From these results for these big jets, we reason that the torsional magnetic waves observed in Type-II spicules should dissipate in the corona in the same way and could thereby power much of the coronal heating in coronal holes.

  10. Semiempirical Two-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Model of the Solar Corona and Interplanetary Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Sittler, E.C. Jr.; Guhathakurta, M.

    1999-10-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional semiempirical MHD model of the solar corona and solar wind. The model uses empirically derived electron density profiles from white-light coronagraph data measured during the {ital Skylab} period and an empirically derived model of the magnetic field which is fitted to observed streamer topologies, which also come from the white-light coronagraph data. The electron density model comes from that developed by Guhathakurta and coworkers. The electron density model is extended into interplanetary space by using electron densities derived from the {ital Ulysses} plasma instrument. The model also requires an estimate of the solar wind velocity as a function of heliographic latitude and radial component of the magnetic field at 1 AU, both of which can be provided by the {ital Ulysses} spacecraft. The model makes estimates as a function of radial distance and latitude of various fluid parameters of the plasma such as flow velocity {bold {ital V}}, effective temperature T{sub eff}, and effective heat flux q{sub eff}, which are derived from the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, respectively. The term {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} indicates that wave contributions could be present. The model naturally provides the spiral pattern of the magnetic field far from the Sun and an estimate of the large-scale surface magnetic field at the Sun, which we estimate to be {approximately}12{endash}15 G. The magnetic field model shows that the large-scale surface magnetic field is dominated by an octupole term. The model is a steady state calculation which makes the assumption of azimuthal symmetry and solves the various conservation equations in the rotating frame of the Sun. The conservation equations are integrated along the magnetic field direction in the rotating frame of the Sun, thus providing a nearly self-consistent calculation of the fluid parameters. The model makes a minimum number of assumptions about the physics

  11. Common observations of solar X-rays from SPHINX/CORONAS-PHOTON and XRS/MESSENGER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepa, Anna; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Siarkowski, Marek; Mrozek, Tomasz; Gryciuk, Magdalena; Phillips, Kenneth

    SphinX was a soft X-ray spectrophotometer constructed in the Space Research Centre of Polish Academy of Sciences. The instrument was launched on 30 January 2009 aboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite as a part of TESIS instrument package. SphinX measured total solar X-ray flux in the energy range from 1 to 15 keV during the period of very low solar activity from 20 February to 29 November 2009. For these times the solar detector (X-ray Spectrometer - XRS) onboard MESSENGER also observed the solar X-rays from a different vantage point. XRS measured the radiation in similar energy range. We present results of the comparison of observations from both instruments and show the preliminary results of physical analysis of spectra for selected flares.

  12. A Simple Dynamical Model for Filament Formation in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Filament formation in the solar corona is considered in the case of a slowly evolving force-free magnetic field. The strong-field approximation is used, which takes into account the magnetohydrodynamic equations of motion, induction, and compressibility. Methods for solving the relevant equations are presented and applied to filament modeling. A three-dimensional calculation is presented, which uses linear force-free magnetic fields. The boundary conditions are chosen to resemble the qualitative linkage model for the formation of filaments, suggested by Martens and Zwaan (2001). Consistent with this model, dense formations, reminiscent of filament pillars, are shown to appear in the corona above the region of converging and canceling magnetic bipoles. The results demonstrate the principal role of magnetic field in the dynamical processes of dense plasma accumulation and support in filaments. The model can be useful for clarifying the role of flux emergence in coronal mass ejection initiation.

  13. The effects of restricted “EIT wave” propagation on the low solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David; Perez-Suarez, David

    2015-08-01

    We present observations of an “EIT wave” associated with an X-class flare from 2012-July-6, the propagation of which was severely restricted by the magnetic structure of the solar corona surrounding the erupting active region. The “EIT wave” was observed by both SDO and STEREO-A, allowing a three-dimensional examination of how the propagation of the disturbance was affected both by a neighbouring coronal hole and a trans-equatorial loop system. In addition, the eruption was observed at the limb by the ground-based CoMP instrument, allowing the Doppler motion associated with the eruption and resulting coronal loop oscillation to be investigated in detail. This combination of data-sets provides a unique insight into the three-dimensional evolution of the “EIT wave” and its effects on the surrounding corona.

  14. Formation and Evolution of Large-Scale Magnetic Funnels in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, Olga; Velli, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The existence of open coronal magnetic fields with peculiar geometry - large-scale magnetic funnels - can be attributed to three factors: (i) the presence of two or more corona holes of the same polarity (or pseudostreamers - PSs), (ii) specific configurations of closed magnetic field in the low corona up to 1.3 Rs (filament channels) and (iii) the presence of strong active regions in the vicinity of the pseudostreamer. The important property of magnetic funnels is their strongly non-monotonic expansion factor below 2 Rs. The case study presented here is a pseudostreamer near the equator, formed between two isolated coronal holes of the same polarity, and harboring a pair of twin filaments in its base. Following the evolution of these coronal holes we find that the PS topology changes when two coronal holes merged together. Using a potential field source-surface (PFSS) extrapolation to compute the coronal field from photospheric maps (SDO/HMI), we show that the funnel-like geometry of the open magnetic field changes to a regular one with monotonic expansion factor after the merging of coronal holes. The presence of coronal magnetic funnels becomes directly visible when sufficient plasma accumulates inside them: when the plasma density grows to become observable coronal cloud prominences appear in the corona. The plasma suspension at heights of 0.3 Rs coincides with the largest gradients in the field which naturally leads to a diamagnetic hypothesis for the force counteracting gravity. We study the evolution of the funnel-like open fields during several solar rotations and find a direct relation between funnels and the presence of coronal clouds at great heights in the solar corona.

  15. Simultaneous VLA and UVCS/SOHO Observations of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, S. R.; Miralles, M. P.; Cranmer, S. R.; Raymond, J. C.

    2004-12-01

    Measurement of Faraday rotation of radio waves which propagate through the solar corona is one of the best ways of measuring the coronal magnetic field. Faraday rotation can provide information on both the large scale, static component of this field as well as the fluctuating, turbulent component, but the technique requires supplementary information on the coronal plasma. On August 16, 2003, the line of sight to the extended, polarized radio source 3C228 passed through the corona, with a closest heliocentric distance of 7 to 8 solar radii. Polarimetric observations with the Very Large Array of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory were made at 21 and 18 cm. These data yielded measurements of the rotation measure (proportional to the path integral of plasma density and line-of-sight component of the magnetic field) along several, closely-spaced lines of sight through the corona. Simultaneous observations of the OVI and HI Lyman alpha emission lines with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard SOHO were used to determine kinetic temperature, average densities, and outflow speeds in the corona. On that day, the line of sight passed close to a coronal streamer. The VLA data show a very large Faraday rotation event during the eight hour observing session, in which the rotation measure changed by 62 rad/m2. This large variation seems to be associated with passage of the coronal current sheet through the line of sight. We will present models of the coronal magnetic field consistent with our observations. This work was supported at the University of Iowa by grant ATM03-54782 from the Division of Atmospheric Sciences, National Science Foundation. At Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, this work is supported by NASA under grant NNG04GE84G, by the Italian Space Agency, and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  16. Semiempirical Two-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Model of the Solar Corona and Interplanetary Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, Edward C., Jr.; Guhathakurta, Madhulika

    1999-01-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional semiempirical MHD model of the solar corona and solar wind. The model uses empirically derived electron density profiles from white-light coronagraph data measured during the Skylub period and an empirically derived model of the magnetic field which is fitted to observed streamer topologies, which also come from the white-light coronagraph data The electron density model comes from that developed by Guhathakurta and coworkers. The electron density model is extended into interplanetary space by using electron densities derived from the Ulysses plasma instrument. The model also requires an estimate of the solar wind velocity as a function of heliographic latitude and radial component of the magnetic field at 1 AU, both of which can be provided by the Ulysses spacecraft. The model makes estimates as a function of radial distance and latitude of various fluid parameters of the plasma such as flow velocity V, effective temperature T(sub eff), and effective heat flux q(sub eff), which are derived from the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy, respectively. The term effective indicates that wave contributions could be present. The model naturally provides the spiral pattern of the magnetic field far from the Sun and an estimate of the large-scale surface magnetic field at the Sun, which we estimate to be approx. 12 - 15 G. The magnetic field model shows that the large-scale surface magnetic field is dominated by an octupole term. The model is a steady state calculation which makes the assumption of azimuthal symmetry and solves the various conservation equations in the rotating frame of the Sun. The conservation equations are integrated along the magnetic field direction in the rotating frame of the Sun, thus providing a nearly self-consistent calculation of the fluid parameters. The model makes a minimum number of assumptions about the physics of the solar corona and solar wind and should provide a very accurate

  17. New View of Gas and Dust in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2010-08-01

    The recognizable components in meteorites differ in their relative abundances of the three oxygen isotopes (16O, 17O, and 18O). In particular, the amount of 16O varies from being like that of the Earth to substantially enriched compared to the other two isotopes. The current explanation for this interesting range in isotopic composition is that dust and gas in the solar nebula (the cloud of gas and dust surrounding the primitive Sun) began with the same 16O-rich composition, but the solids evolved towards the terrestrial value. A new analysis of the problem by Alexander Krot (University of Hawaii) and colleagues at the University of Hawaii, the University of Chicago, Clemson University, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory leads to the bold assertion that primordial dust and gas differed in isotopic composition. The gas was rich in 16O as previously thought (possibly slightly richer in 16O than the measurements of the solar wind returned by the Genesis Mission), but that the dust had a composition close to the 16O-depleted terrestrial average. In this new view, the dust had a different history than did the gas before being incorporated into the Solar System. Solids with compositions near the terrestrial line may have formed in regions of the solar nebula where dust had concentrated compared to the mean solar dust/gas ratio (1 : ~100). The idea has great implications for understanding the oxygen-isotope composition of the inner Solar System and the origin of materials in the molecular cloud from which the Solar System formed.

  18. Polarization observations and results of the 1998 February 26th solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabryl, J.-R.; Cugnon, P.; Clette, F.

    1999-03-01

    In the frame of the long-term study program of the solar corona, we have organized an expedition in Curacao (Dutch Antillas) to observe the total solar eclipse of February 26th, 1998. As the totality duration was quite short, we had to improve again the CCD experiment layout in order to record a sample of images as wide as possible in both polarization and brightness ranges. This was made possible by the acquisition of a new PC with fast hard disc and data transfer port. We managed then to record 7 series of different exposures, each containing polarization measurements of 24 images (thus 8 times oversampled). The data processing led to accurate brightness and polarization maps as well as electron density models. The shape of the corona is highly flattened with large polar holes filled by numerous wide plumes. Large streamers are also observed and are essentially aligned along the solar equatorial plane. Moreover, the polarization indicates that these structures are located in the vicinity of the plane of the sky. Unfortunately, the unusually high sky brightness hid the faintest coronal structures and limited the visibility up to 3 solar radii implying a similar limitation in our modelling. We present here these results and give a brief comparison with our previous eclipse observation.

  19. A Space Weather mission concept: Observatories of the Solar Corona and Active Regions (OSCAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Janitzek, Nils; Lee, Arrow; Löschl, Philipp; Seifert, Bernhard; Hoilijoki, Sanni; Kraaikamp, Emil; Isha Mrigakshi, Alankrita; Philippe, Thomas; Spina, Sheila; Bröse, Malte; Massahi, Sonny; O'Halloran, Liam; Pereira Blanco, Victor; Stausland, Christoffer; Escoubet, Philippe; Kargl, Günter

    2015-02-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) are major sources of magnetic storms on Earth and are therefore considered to be the most dangerous space weather events. The Observatories of Solar Corona and Active Regions (OSCAR) mission is designed to identify the 3D structure of coronal loops and to study the trigger mechanisms of CMEs in solar Active Regions (ARs) as well as their evolution and propagation processes in the inner heliosphere. It also aims to provide monitoring and forecasting of geo-effective CMEs and CIRs. OSCAR would contribute to significant advancements in the field of solar physics, improvements of the current CME prediction models, and provide data for reliable space weather forecasting. These objectives are achieved by utilising two spacecraft with identical instrumentation, located at a heliocentric orbital distance of 1 AU from the Sun. The spacecraft will be separated by an angle of 68° to provide optimum stereoscopic view of the solar corona. We study the feasibility of such a mission and propose a preliminary design for OSCAR.

  20. PROPAGATION OF ALFVENIC WAVES FROM CORONA TO CHROMOSPHERE AND CONSEQUENCES FOR SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A. J. B.; Fletcher, L.

    2013-03-10

    How do magnetohydrodynamic waves travel from the fully ionized corona, into and through the underlying partially ionized chromosphere, and what are the consequences for solar flares? To address these questions, we have developed a two-fluid model (of plasma and neutrals) and used it to perform one-dimensional simulations of Alfven waves in a solar atmosphere with realistic density and temperature structure. Studies of a range of solar features (faculae, plage, penumbra, and umbra) show that energy transmission from corona to chromosphere can exceed 20% of incident energy for wave periods of 1 s or less. Damping of waves in the chromosphere depends strongly on wave frequency: waves with periods 10 s or longer pass through the chromosphere with relatively little damping, however, for periods of 1 s or less, a substantial fraction (37%-100%) of wave energy entering the chromosphere is damped by ion-neutral friction in the mid- and upper chromosphere, with electron resistivity playing some role in the lower chromosphere and in umbras. We therefore conclude that Alfvenic waves with periods of a few seconds or less are capable of heating the chromosphere during solar flares, and speculate that they could also contribute to electron acceleration or exciting sunquakes.

  1. The Funnel Geometry of Open Flux Tubes in the Low Solar Corona Constrained by O VI and Ne VIII Outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byhring, Hanne S.; Esser, Ruth; Lie-Svendsen, Oystein

    2008-01-01

    Model calculations show that observed outflow velocities of order 7-10 km/s of C IV and O VI ions, and 15-20 km/s of Ne VIII ions, are not only consistent with models of the solar wind from coronas holes, but also place unique constraints on the degree of flow tube expansion as well as the location of the expansion in the transition region/lower corona.

  2. Dust inventory through the Solar System: From Earth to Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquette, M. R.; Horanyi, M.; Stern, A.; Bagenal, F.; Szalay, J.; Poppe, A. R.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Student Dust Counter (SDC) is an impact dust detector onboard the New Horizons spacecraft, observing the dust density distribution since April 2006 across the Solar System. SDC measures the mass of dust grains in the range of 10-12 < m < 10-9 g, covering an approximate size range of 0.5-10 um in particle radius. The measurements can be compared to model predictions following the orbital evolution of dust grains originating from the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt and migrating inward due to Poynting-Robertson drag. SDC's results, as well as data taken by the Pioneer 10 dust detector, are compared to model predictions to estimate the mass production rate and the ejecta size distribution power law exponent. On July 14, 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft passed through the Pluto system and is now continuing to take measurements in the solar system's third zone, the Kuiper Belt. The measurements SDC has taken throughout the solar system, including in the Pluto-Charon system, will be discussed in this presentation, as well as predictions for the dust distribution it will measure as it explores the Kuiper Belt.

  3. Faraday Rotation Fluctuations of MESSENGER radio signals through the Corona during the 2009 Solar Minimum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, David; Vierinen, Juha; Coster, Anthea; Jensen, Elizabeth A.

    2015-04-01

    Faraday rotation (FR) techniques have been used to probe variations of coronal plasma velocity, density and magnetic field. The plane of polarization for an electromagnetic wave rotates in proportion to the integrated product of parallel magnetic field components and electron density along the radio signal line-of-sight as directed towards the receiving antenna. Fluctuations in FR through the corona thus represent the evolution of these line-integrated plasma parameters, providing a unique measurement of regional corona physics. The MESSENGER spacecraft radio 8 GHz radio beacon, transmitting through the corona at offsets 1.6 to 1.9 solar radii and near-equatorial heliolatitude, was recorded on the Green Bank radio telescope during the solar minimum of 2009. Here we reanalyze at higher temporal resolution the data previously published (Jensen et al 2013, Solar Physics 285:83-95). Combinations of coherent and incoherent integration were used to estimate Stokes parameters, from which the FR phase differences were obtained for serial one-second frames. Results were concatenated and corrected for phase wrap-around to produce a continuous FR phase curve. The general FR phase curve was broad and sweeping, with greatest spectral power observed in periods of hours. Also, finer wave-like fluctuations were noted with periods on the order of 100's of seconds. With the lowest-frequency components removed by detrending techniques, spectral analysis revealed a power spectrum of form P=kνα with spectral index α = -2.25 over frequencies ν = 2-20 milliHertz (mHz), and a flat noise spectrum at higher frequencies. Imposed upon the general power spectrum were trends of enhanced spectral power around 3.5 and 6 mHz, corresponding to approximately 5- and 3-minute period waves. Temporal evolution plots demonstrated that the increased power in these spectral bands appeared intermittently and irregularly. Our results reinforce the findings of prior coronal FR studies, and now extend the

  4. Coronagraph observations and analyses of the ultraviolet solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, John L.

    1989-01-01

    The major activities on the Spartan Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer project include both scientific and experimental/technical efforts. In the scientific area, a detailed analysis of the previously reported Doppler dimming of HI Ly-alpha from the July 1982 rocket flight has determined an outflow velocity at 2 solar radii from sun center to be between 153 and 251 km/s at 67 percent confidence. The technical activities include, several improvements made to the instrument that will result in enhanced scientific performance or in regaining a capability that had deteriorated during the delay time in the launch date. These include testing and characterizing the detector for OVI radiation, characterizing a serrated occulter at UV and visible wavelengths, fabricating and testing telescope mirrors with improved edges, testing and evaluating a new array detector system, modifying the slit mask mechanism and installing a mask in the instrument to block the Ly-alpha resonance line when the electron scattered component is being observed.

  5. Nonequilibrium ionization effects in asymmetrically heated loops. [in solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spadaro, D.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Mariska, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of nonequilibrium ionization on magnetic loop models with a steady siphon flow that is driven by a nonuniform heating rate are investigated. The model developed by Mariska (1988) to explain the observed redshifts of transition region emission lines is examined, and the number densities of the ions of carbon and oxygen along the loop are computed, with and without the approximation of ionization equilibrium. Considerable deviations from equilibrium were found. In order to determine the consequences of these nonequilibrium effects on the characteristics of the EUV emission from the loop plasma, the profiles and wavelength positions of all the important emission lines due to carbon and oxygen were calculated. The calculations are in broad agreement with Mariska's conclusions, although they show a significant diminution of the Doppler shifts, as well as modifications to the line widths. It is concluded that the inclusion of nonequilibrium effects make it more difficult to reproduce the observed characteristics of the solar transition region by means of the asymmetric-heating models.

  6. Heating of the solar and stellar coronae: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, R.; Ballai, I.

    2007-10-01

    Despite great advances in observations and modelling, the problem of solar and stellar heating still remains one of the most challenging problems of space physics. To find a definite answer to what sort of mechanisms act to heat the plasma to a few million degrees requires a collaborative effort of small scales observations, large capacity numerical modelling and complicated theoretical approaches. A unique theory should incorporate aspects such as the generation of energy, its transport and dissipation. Up to now, the first two problems are rather clarified. However, the modality of transfer of magnetic or kinetic energy into heat is a question still awaiting for an answer. In the present paper we review the various popular heating mechanisms put forward in the existing extensive literature. The heating processes are, somewhat arbitrarily, classified as hydrodynamic, magnetohydrodynamic or kinetic based on the characteristics of the model medium. These mechanisms are further divided based on the time scales of the ultimate dissipation involved (i.e. AC and DC heating, turbulent heating). In particular, special attention is paid to discuss shock dissipation, mode coupling, resonant absorption, phase mixing, and, reconnection. Finally, we briefly review the various heating mechanisms proposed to heat other stars.

  7. The thermal and spatial structure of the solar corona over the cycle and its implication for the coronae of inactive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, P.; Landi, E.; Saar, S.

    2012-12-01

    We use spectral (SOHO/SUMER and Hinode/EIS) and imaging (Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA) solar coronal data to systematically measure the thermal structure of different types of solar features (coronal hole, quiet Sun, X-ray bright points, active regions...), and how they vary over the solar cycle. We use a combination of these structures to construct a model for the quiet corona of the inactive G8V star tau Ceti, which is a candidate stellar analog of a solar magnetic minimum. Since tau Ceti is significantly metal-poor relative to the Sun, we reconstruct the solar results with corresponding lower metallicities to generate more appropriate coronal structures.

  8. Expansion of the solar wind from a two-hole corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.

    1983-01-01

    A one-fluid model is employed to study the global expansion of the solar wind from a two-hole corona, under the assumptions that the holes are confined to polar caps within 30 deg of heliographic colatitude, the flow is steady and axisymmetric, and the geometry of streamlines is prescribed. The boundary conditions are adjusted in such a way that the calculated solar-wind properties at 1 AU are in reasonable agreement with observational results. A series of numerical solutions are obtained, the series produces a maximum terminal speed of 829 km/s at the pole. The calculated solar-wind speeds are strongly latitude-dependent and are positively correlated with local divergence factor of a stream tube. The solutions imply that most plasma properties are highly inhomogeneous at the polar caps. The flow velocity, the temperature, the proton-number flux and the conduction-heat flux all increase towards the hole center.

  9. Low frequency radio observations of bi-directional electron beams in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, Eoin P.; Reid, Hamish; Vilmer, Nicole; Gallagher, Peter T.

    2015-09-01

    The radio signature of a shock travelling through the solar corona is known as a type II solar radio burst. In rare cases these bursts can exhibit a fine structure known as "herringbones", which are a direct indicator of particle acceleration occurring at the shock front. However, few studies have been performed on herringbones and the details of the underlying particle acceleration processes are unknown. Here, we use an image processing technique known as the Hough transform to statistically analyse the herringbone fine structure in a radio burst at ~20-90 MHz observed from the Rosse Solar-Terrestrial Observatory on 2011 September 22. We identify 188 individual bursts which are signatures of bi-directional electron beams continuously accelerated to speeds of 0.16-0.10+0.11 c. This occurs at a shock acceleration site initially at a constant altitude of ~0.6 R⊙ in the corona, followed by a shift to ~0.5 R⊙. The anti-sunward beams travel a distance of 170-97+174 Mm (and possibly further) away from the acceleration site, while those travelling toward the Sun come to a stop sooner, reaching a smaller distance of 112-76+84 Mm. We show that the stopping distance for the sunward beams may depend on the total number density and the velocity of the beam. Our study concludes that a detailed statistical analysis of herringbone fine structure can provide information on the physical properties of the corona which lead to these relatively rare radio bursts.

  10. Proton Heating in the Extended Solar Corona Resulting From Kinetic Alfven Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranmer, S. R.; van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    2002-12-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the solar corona have made it clear that the ``coronal heating problem'' comprises not only the local deposition of heat immediately above the transition region, but also extended heat deposition throughout the (collisionless) acceleration region of the solar wind. The dissipation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves and/or turbulence has been considered as a likely heating mechanism in the solar wind for several decades. However, it is still not well understood how MHD fluctuations are generated, how they evolve in frequency and wavenumber, or how their damping leads to the observed proton, electron, and ion properties of the fast wind. We present a model of MHD turbulence that specifically addresses the issue of kinetic dissipation and particle heating in the collisionless extended corona. The nonlinear cascade is modeled as a combination of advection and diffusion in wavenumber space, with the dominant cascade occurring in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field. This leads to a highly anisotropic fluctuation spectrum (as expected, based on many earlier simulations and scaling models) with a rapidly decreasing power-law tail in the parallel wavenumber direction. In the low-plasma-beta corona, the dominant oblique fluctuations (with dispersion properties of kinetic Alfven waves) are dissipated by electron Landau damping, with only a tiny fraction of the energy going to high-frequency ion cyclotron waves. This implies strong parallel electron heating and weak proton and ion heating, which is not what is observed. We discuss the probable nonlinear evolution of the electron velocity distributions into parallel beams and discrete phase-space holes (similar to those seen in the terrestrial magnetosphere) which can possibly heat protons via stochastic interactions.

  11. Generalized Squashing Factors for Covariant Description of Magnetic Connectivity in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titov, V. S.

    2007-01-01

    The study of magnetic connectivity in the solar corona reveals a need to generalize the field line mapping technique to arbitrary geometry of the boundaries and systems of coordinates. Indeed, the global description of the connectivity in the corona requires the use of the photospheric and solar wind boundaries. Both are closed surfaces and therefore do not admit a global regular system of coordinates. At least two overlapping regular systems of coordinates for each of the boundaries are necessary in this case to avoid spherical-pole-like singularities in the coordinates of the footpoints. This implies that the basic characteristic of magnetic connectivity-the squashing degree or factor Q of elemental flux tubes, according to Titov and coworkers-must be rewritten in covariant form. Such a covariant expression of Q is derived in this work. The derived expression is very flexible and highly efficient for describing the global magnetic connectivity in the solar corona. In addition, a general expression for a new characteristic Q1, which defines a squashing of the flux tubes in the directions perpendicular to the field lines, is determined. This new quantity makes it possible to filter out the quasi-separatrix layers whose large values of Q are caused by a projection effect at the field lines nearly touching the photosphere. Thus, the value Q1 provides a much more precise description of the volumetric properties of the magnetic field structure. The difference between Q and Q1 is illustrated by comparing their distributions for two configurations, one of which is the Titov-Demoulin model of a twisted magnetic field.

  12. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Solar Panels on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Mantovani, J. G.; Clements S.; Chen, A.; Mazumder, M. K.; Biris, A. S.; Nowicki, A. W.

    2004-01-01

    The Materials Adherence Experiment on the Mars Pathfinder mission measured an obscuration of the solar arrays due to dust deposition at a rate of about 0.2 8% per day. It was estimated that settling dust may cause degradation in performance of a solar panel of between 22% and 89% over the course of two years [1, 2]. These results were obtained without the presence of a global dust storm. Several types of adherence forces keep dust particles attached to surfaces. The most widely discussed adherence force is the electrostatic force. Laboratory experiments [3] as well as indirect evidence from the Wheel Abrasion Experiment on Pathfinder [4] indicate that it is very likely that the particles suspended in the Martian atmosphere are electrostatically charged.

  13. SWAP OBSERVATIONS OF THE LONG-TERM, LARGE-SCALE EVOLUTION OF THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Seaton, Daniel B.; De Groof, Anik; Berghmans, David; Nicula, Bogdan; Shearer, Paul

    2013-11-01

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV solar telescope on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 spacecraft has been regularly observing the solar corona in a bandpass near 17.4 nm since 2010 February. With a field of view of 54 × 54 arcmin, SWAP provides the widest-field images of the EUV corona available from the perspective of the Earth. By carefully processing and combining multiple SWAP images, it is possible to produce low-noise composites that reveal the structure of the EUV corona to relatively large heights. A particularly important step in this processing was to remove instrumental stray light from the images by determining and deconvolving SWAP's point-spread function from the observations. In this paper, we use the resulting images to conduct the first-ever study of the evolution of the large-scale structure of the corona observed in the EUV over a three year period that includes the complete rise phase of solar cycle 24. Of particular note is the persistence over many solar rotations of bright, diffuse features composed of open magnetic fields that overlie polar crown filaments and extend to large heights above the solar surface. These features appear to be related to coronal fans, which have previously been observed in white-light coronagraph images and, at low heights, in the EUV. We also discuss the evolution of the corona at different heights above the solar surface and the evolution of the corona over the course of the solar cycle by hemisphere.

  14. SWAP Observations of the Long-term, Large-scale Evolution of the Extreme-ultraviolet Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaton, Daniel B.; De Groof, Anik; Shearer, Paul; Berghmans, David; Nicula, Bogdan

    2013-11-01

    The Sun Watcher with Active Pixels and Image Processing (SWAP) EUV solar telescope on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 spacecraft has been regularly observing the solar corona in a bandpass near 17.4 nm since 2010 February. With a field of view of 54 × 54 arcmin, SWAP provides the widest-field images of the EUV corona available from the perspective of the Earth. By carefully processing and combining multiple SWAP images, it is possible to produce low-noise composites that reveal the structure of the EUV corona to relatively large heights. A particularly important step in this processing was to remove instrumental stray light from the images by determining and deconvolving SWAP's point-spread function from the observations. In this paper, we use the resulting images to conduct the first-ever study of the evolution of the large-scale structure of the corona observed in the EUV over a three year period that includes the complete rise phase of solar cycle 24. Of particular note is the persistence over many solar rotations of bright, diffuse features composed of open magnetic fields that overlie polar crown filaments and extend to large heights above the solar surface. These features appear to be related to coronal fans, which have previously been observed in white-light coronagraph images and, at low heights, in the EUV. We also discuss the evolution of the corona at different heights above the solar surface and the evolution of the corona over the course of the solar cycle by hemisphere.

  15. Induced emission of Alfvén waves - the missing source of solar corona heating and solar wind acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, Vitaly; Shevchenko, Valentin

    2013-10-01

    The solar corona is considerably hotter than Sun's surface or photosphere. However, the mechanism that heats it to millions of degrees is still under debates. Recent observations revealed presence of the ubiquitous outward-propagating Alfvénic motions with amplitudes up to 25 km s-1 and periods of the order of 100-500s throughout the quiescent atmosphere, thus suggesting the possible source of energy for acceleration of the fast solar wind and heating the quiet corona. Nevertheless, the challenge remains to understand how these waves are dissipated in the solar atmosphere, and how that dissipation delivers energy to the ions and electrons that comprise the coronal plasma and solar wind. Here we report a method that extends and extrapolates these observational data up to the level suitable for constraining and verification of heating and acceleration models. The macro-scale instability of the marginally stable particle distribution function compliments the resonant frequency sweeping dissipation of transient Alfvén waves by their induced emission in inhomogeneous streaming plasma that provides enough energy for keeping the plasma temperature decaying not faster than r-1 - in close agreement with in situ heliospheric observations.

  16. Short-period intensity oscillations in the solar corona observed during the total solar eclipse of 26 February 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowsik, Ramanath; Singh, Jagdev; Saxena, A. K.; Srinivasan, R.; Raveendran, A. V.

    1999-08-01

    Encouraged by the detection of high-frequency, low-amplitude continuum intensity oscillations in the solar corona during the total solar eclipse of 1995, we designed and fabricated a six-channel photometer incorporating low-noise Hamamatsu R647 photomultipliers. Fast photometry at five different locations in the solar corona was performed at Don Bosco Mission, Venezuela during the total solar eclipse of 26 February 1998. Three interference filters with passbands of about 150 Å and centered around 4700, 4900, and 5000 Å were used. The photometric data were recorded at a rate of 20 Hz in three channels and 50 Hz in the remaining three channels. The power spectrum analysis of one of the channels that recorded appreciable counts indicates the existence of intensity oscillations in the frequency range 0.01-0.2 Hz. A least-squares analysis yields 90.1, 25.2, and 6.9 s periods for the three prominent components which have amplitudes in the range 0.5-3.5% of the coronal brightness. These periods and their amplitudes are similar to those detected in the coronal intensity oscillations during the 1995 eclipse.

  17. Polarization observation of white light corona during the total solar eclipse on 2006 march 29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi; Zhang, Shu-Xin; Sin, Sun Ae; Pak, Hye Yong

    2006-12-01

    The digital photographic records of the white light corona polarization were made during the total solar eclipse on March 29, 2006 in El-Saloum (Egypt). By means of a reflector telescope, f=640mm (f/D=8), 20 pictures were obtained with different exposure time and successive rotation of a polaroid by 45°. The main results about the degree and direction of polarization in the range of 1.3Rsolar < r < 3.0Rsolar are discussed and graphically presented.

  18. Observations of the brightness temperature distribution of the quiet solar corona at decametric wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, Ch. V.

    1987-01-01

    The brightness temperature distribution of the quiet solar corona at a wavelength of 8.9 meters is measured by two types of radio telescope: (1) a 'T' type array with a resolution of 26'X38', and (2) a fan beam interferometer with an E-W resolution of 3'. It is found that the persistent bright regions do not have any angular structure on scales of 6' or less. The daily variations of the brightness temperature of different regions are studied and the possible interpretation discussed.

  19. Coexistence of Self-Organized Criticality and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Corona

    SciTech Connect

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Paczuski, Maya; Davila, Joseph M.; Jones, Shaela I.

    2007-07-13

    An extended data set of extreme ultraviolet images of the solar corona provided by the SOHO spacecraft is analyzed using statistical methods common to studies of self-organized criticality (SOC) and intermittent turbulence (IT). The data exhibit simultaneous hallmarks of both regimes: namely, power-law avalanche statistics as well as multiscaling of structure functions for spatial activity. This implies that both SOC and IT may be manifestations of a single complex dynamical process entangling avalanches of magnetic energy dissipation with turbulent particle flows.

  20. Numerical Modeling of the Solar Chromosphere and Corona: What Has Been Done? What Should Be Done?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansteen, V.; Carlsson, M.; Gudiksen, B.

    2015-10-01

    A number of increasingly sophisticated numerical simulations spanning the solar atmosphere from below the photosphere in the convection zone to far above in the corona have shed considerable insight into the role of the magnetic field in the structure and energetics of the Sun's outer layers. This development is strengthened by the wealth of observational data now coming on-line from both ground and space based observatories. In this talk we will concentrate on the successes and failures of the modeling effort thus far and discuss the inclusion of various effects not traditionally considered in the MHD description such as time dependent ionization, non-LTE radiative transfer, and generalized Ohm's law.

  1. Dust to planetesimals - Settling and coagulation in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of solid particles in a low-mass solar nebula during settling to the central plane and the formation of planetesimals is discussed. The gravitational instability in a dust layer and collisional accretion are examined as possible mechanisms of planetesimal formation. The shear between the gas and a dust layer is considered along with the differences in the planetesimal formation mechanisms between the inner and outer nebula. A numerical model for computing simultaneous coagulation and settling is described.

  2. Formation and Reconnection of Three-Dimensional Current Sheets in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, J. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    Current-sheet formation and magnetic reconnection are believed to be the basic physical processes responsible for much of the activity observed in astrophysical plasmas, such as the Sun s corona. We investigate these processes for a magnetic configuration consisting of a uniform background field and an embedded line dipole, a topology that is expected to be ubiquitous in the corona. This magnetic system is driven by a uniform horizontal flow applied at the line-tied photosphere. Although both the initial field and the driver are translationally symmetric, the resulting evolution is calculated using a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) simulation with adaptive mesh refinement that resolves the current sheet and reconnection dynamics in detail. The advantage of our approach is that it allows us to apply directly the vast body of knowledge gained from the many studies of 2D reconnection to the fully 3D case. We find that a current sheet forms in close analogy to the classic Syrovatskii 2D mechanism, but the resulting evolution is different than expected. The current sheet is globally stable, showing no evidence for a disruption or a secondary instability even for aspect ratios as high as 80:1. The global evolution generally follows the standard Sweet- Parker 2D reconnection model except for an accelerated reconnection rate at a very thin current sheet, due to the tearing instability and the formation of magnetic islands. An interesting conclusion is that despite the formation of fully 3D structures at small scales, the system remains close to 2D at global scales. We discuss the implications of our results for observations of the solar corona. Subject Headings: Sun: corona Sun: magnetic fields Sun: reconnection

  3. Hot carbon corona in Mars' upper thermosphere and exosphere: 2. Solar cycle and seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yuni; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy; Bougher, Stephen W.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents the variability over seasons (i.e., orbital position) and solar cycle of the Martian upper atmosphere and hot carbon corona. We investigate the production and distribution of energetic carbon atoms and the impacts on the total global hot carbon loss from dominant photochemical processes at five different cases: AL (aphelion and low solar activity), EL (equinox and low solar activity), EH (equinox and high solar activity), PL (perihelion and low solar activity), and PH (perihelion and high solar activity). We compare our results with previously published results but only on the limited cases due to the dearth of studies on solar EUV flux and seasonal variabilities. Photodissociation of CO and dissociative recombination of CO+ are generally regarded as the two most important source reactions for the production of hot atomic carbon. Of these two, photodissociation of CO is found to be the dominant source in all cases considered. To describe self-consistently the exosphere and the upper thermosphere, a 3-D kinetic particle simulator, the Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator, and the 3-D Mars Thermosphere General Circulation Model are one-way coupled. The basic description of this hot carbon calculation can be found in the companion paper to this one. The spatial distributions and profiles of density and temperature and atmospheric loss rates are discussed for the cases considered. Finally, our computed global escape rate of hot carbon ranges from 5.28 × 1023 s-1 (AL) to 55.1 × 1023 s-1 (PL).

  4. STEREO OBSERVATIONS OF FAST MAGNETOSONIC WAVES IN THE EXTENDED SOLAR CORONA ASSOCIATED WITH EIT/EUV WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Ryun-Young; Ofman, Leon; Kramar, Maxim; Olmedo, Oscar; Davila, Joseph M.; Thompson, Barbara J.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-03-20

    We report white-light observations of a fast magnetosonic wave associated with a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO/SECCHI/COR1 inner coronagraphs on 2011 August 4. The wave front is observed in the form of density compression passing through various coronal regions such as quiet/active corona, coronal holes, and streamers. Together with measured electron densities determined with STEREO COR1 and Extreme UltraViolet Imager (EUVI) data, we use our kinematic measurements of the wave front to calculate coronal magnetic fields and find that the measured speeds are consistent with characteristic fast magnetosonic speeds in the corona. In addition, the wave front turns out to be the upper coronal counterpart of the EIT wave observed by STEREO EUVI traveling against the solar coronal disk; moreover, stationary fronts of the EIT wave are found to be located at the footpoints of deflected streamers and boundaries of coronal holes, after the wave front in the upper solar corona passes through open magnetic field lines in the streamers. Our findings suggest that the observed EIT wave should be in fact a fast magnetosonic shock/wave traveling in the inhomogeneous solar corona, as part of the fast magnetosonic wave propagating in the extended solar corona.

  5. ON THE CONSTANCY OF THE ELECTRON TEMPERATURE IN THE EXPANDING CORONA THROUGHOUT SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw; Druckmueller, Miloslav; Ding, Adalbert

    2010-03-10

    A recent analysis of Fe emission lines observed during the total solar eclipses of 2006 March 29 and 2008 August 1 established the first empirical link between the electron temperature in the expanding corona and Fe charge states measured in interplanetary space. In this Letter, we use this link to infer this temperature throughout solar cycle 23 from in situ charge state measurements from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and on Ulysses. The distribution of the SWICS/ACE Fe charge states, which span cycle 23 from 1998 to 2009, is skewed with a peak centered on Fe{sup 8+}, Fe{sup 9+}, and Fe{sup 10+} and a tail spanning Fe{sup 12+} to Fe{sup 20+}. An iterative process based on this distribution and on the Fe ion fraction as a function of electron temperature yields a narrow peak at 1.1 x 10{sup 6} K. The tail in the measured charge state distribution is attributed to the sporadic release of material hotter than 2 x 10{sup 6} K from closed magnetic structures within the bulges of streamers. The Fe Ulysses charge state measurements between 1992 and 1997 from cycle 22 peaked at Fe{sup 11+}, indicative of a slightly higher temperature of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} K. The relative constancy of the electron temperature in the expanding corona throughout solar cycle 23 points to the presence of an unknown mechanism regulating the energy input to electrons in the acceleration region of the solar wind at all latitudes during this cycle.

  6. Observations of high-energy jets in the corona above the quiet sun, the heating of the corona, and the acceleration of the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, G. E.; Bartoe, J.-D. F.

    1983-01-01

    High spatial resolution observations of the ultraviolet solar spectrum which reveal high-energy events in the quiet sun are presented. The tandem Wadsworth spectrograph used to make the observations is described along with the observing techniques, and a brief description of the characteristics of high-resolution transition zone spectra is given. The sizes, velocities, line profiles, time behavior, temperature range, differential emission measures, densities, masses, energies, and birthrates of turbulent events and jets in the quiet sun are derived from the observations and discussed. Possible accelerating mechanisms for these events are discussed, and the consequences of these events for the heating of the solar corona are discussed. A cloud model of the solar wind is proposed and possible correlations between the high-energy events and other solar fine-structure features are discussed.

  7. Kinetic Simulation of Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Quasi-Periodic Upflows in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Wenzhi; He, Jiansen; Zhang, Lei; Vocks, Christian; Marsch, Eckart; Tu, Chuanyi; Peter, Hardi; Wang, Linghua

    2016-07-01

    Quasi-periodic disturbances of emission-line parameters are frequently observed in the corona. These disturbances propagate upward along the magnetic field with speeds of ∼100 km s‑1. This phenomenon has been interpreted as evidence of the propagation of slow magnetosonic waves or has been argued to be a signature of intermittent outflows superposed on the background plasmas. Here we aim to present a new “wave + flow” model to interpret these observations. In our scenario, the oscillatory motion is a slow-mode wave, and the flow is associated with a beam created by the wave–particle interaction owing to Landau resonance. With the help of a kinetic model, we simulate the propagation of slow-mode waves and the generation of beam flows. We find that weak periodic beam flows can be generated by to Landau resonance in the solar corona, and the phase with the strongest blueward asymmetry is ahead of that with the strongest blueshift by about 1/4 period. We also find that the slow wave damps to the level of 1/e after the transit time of two wave periods, owing to Landau damping and Coulomb collisions in our simulation. This damping timescale is similar to that resulting from thermal conduction in the MHD regime. The beam flow is weakened/attenuated with increasing wave period and decreasing wave amplitude since Coulomb collisions become more and more dominant over the wave action. We suggest that this “wave + flow” kinetic model provides an alternative explanation for the observed quasi-periodic propagating perturbations in various parameters in the solar corona.

  8. Polar and equatorial coronal hole winds at solar minima: From the heliosphere to the inner corona

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-02-01

    Fast solar wind can be accelerated from at least two different sources: polar coronal holes and equatorial coronal holes. Little is known about the relationship between the wind coming from these two different latitudes and whether these two subcategories of fast wind evolve in the same way during the solar cycle. Nineteen years of Ulysses observations, from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present provide us with in situ measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles. These missions provide an ideal data set to study the properties and evolution of the fast solar wind originating from equatorial and polar holes. In this work, we focus on these two types of fast solar wind during the minima between solar cycles 22 and 23 and 23 and 24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton kinetic, thermal, and dynamic characteristics, heavy ion composition, and magnetic field properties of these two fast winds. The comparison shows that: (1) their kinetic, thermal, compositional, and magnetic properties are significantly different at any time during the two minima and (2) they respond differently to the changes in solar activity from cycle 23 to 24. These results indicate that equatorial and polar fast solar wind are two separate subcategories of fast wind. We discuss the implications of these results and relate them to remote-sensing measurements of the properties of polar and equatorial coronal holes carried out in the inner corona during these two solar minima.

  9. Polar and Equatorial Coronal Hole Winds at Solar Minima: From the Heliosphere to the Inner Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Landi, E.

    2014-02-01

    Fast solar wind can be accelerated from at least two different sources: polar coronal holes and equatorial coronal holes. Little is known about the relationship between the wind coming from these two different latitudes and whether these two subcategories of fast wind evolve in the same way during the solar cycle. Nineteen years of Ulysses observations, from 1990 to 2009, combined with ACE observations from 1998 to the present provide us with in situ measurements of solar wind properties that span two entire solar cycles. These missions provide an ideal data set to study the properties and evolution of the fast solar wind originating from equatorial and polar holes. In this work, we focus on these two types of fast solar wind during the minima between solar cycles 22 and 23 and 23 and 24. We use data from SWICS, SWOOPS, and VHM/FGM on board Ulysses and SWICS, SWEPAM, and MAG on board ACE to analyze the proton kinetic, thermal, and dynamic characteristics, heavy ion composition, and magnetic field properties of these two fast winds. The comparison shows that: (1) their kinetic, thermal, compositional, and magnetic properties are significantly different at any time during the two minima and (2) they respond differently to the changes in solar activity from cycle 23 to 24. These results indicate that equatorial and polar fast solar wind are two separate subcategories of fast wind. We discuss the implications of these results and relate them to remote-sensing measurements of the properties of polar and equatorial coronal holes carried out in the inner corona during these two solar minima.

  10. NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program: The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Grebowsky, Joseph M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the fourth quarter of the second year of NASA Sun-Earth Connections Theory Program (SECTP) contract 'The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona and Inner Heliosphere,' NAS5-99188, between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period May 16,2001 to August 15, 2001. Under this contract SAIC and the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model.