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Sample records for solar flare occurrence

  1. Universality in Solar Flare and Earthquake Occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    De Arcangelis, L.; Godano, C.; Lippiello, E.; Nicodemi, M.

    2006-02-10

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analyzing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely, both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, interoccurrence times, and the same temporal clustering: We find after flare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for seismic sequences. The observed universality suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism.

  2. Universality in solar flare and earthquake occurrence.

    PubMed

    de Arcangelis, L; Godano, C; Lippiello, E; Nicodemi, M

    2006-02-10

    Earthquakes and solar flares are phenomena involving huge and rapid releases of energy characterized by complex temporal occurrence. By analyzing available experimental catalogs, we show that the stochastic processes underlying these apparently different phenomena have universal properties. Namely, both problems exhibit the same distributions of sizes, interoccurrence times, and the same temporal clustering: We find after flare sequences with power law temporal correlations as the Omori law for seismic sequences. The observed universality suggests a common approach to the interpretation of both phenomena in terms of the same driving physical mechanism. PMID:16486917

  3. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  4. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  5. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their X-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions > approx.20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons >300 keV, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances.

  6. Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rust, David

    1998-01-01

    The Sun is constantly changing. Not an hour goes by without a rise or fall in solar x-radiation or radio emission. Not a day goes by without a solar flare. Our active star, this inconsistent Sun, this gaseous cloud that blows in all directions, warms the air we breathe and nourishes the food we eat. From Earth, it seems the very model of stability, but in space it often creates havoc. Over the past century, solar physicists have learned how to detect even the weakest of solar outbursts or flares. We know that flares must surely trace their origins to the magnetic strands stretched and tangled by the rolling plasma of the solar interior. Although a century of astrophysical research has produced widely accepted, fundamental understanding about the Sun, we have yet to predict successfully the emergence of any magnetic fields from inside the Sun or the ignition of any flare. As in any physical experiment, the ability to predict events not only validates the scientific ideas, it also has practical value. In astrophysics, a demonstrated understanding of sunspots, flares, and ejections of plasma would allow us to approach many other mysteries, such as stellar X-ray bursters, with tested theories.

  7. Towards understanding solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Instrumentation and spacecraft payloads developed at Lockheed for solar flare studies are reviewed, noting the significance of the observations for adding to a data base for eventual prediction of the occurrence of flares and subsequent radiation hazards to people in space. Developmental work on the two solar telescopes on board the Skylab pallet was performed at a Lockheed facility, as was the fabrication of very-large-area proportional counter for flights on the Aerobee rocket in 1967. The rocket work led to the fabrication of the Mapping X Ray Heliometer on the Orbiting Solar Observatory and the X Ray Polychromator for the Solar Maximum Mission. The Polychromator consists of a bent crystal spectrometer for high time resolution flare studies over a wide field of view, and a flat crystal spectrometer for simultaneous polychromatic imaging at 7 different X ray wavelengths.

  8. Intensity thresholds and the statistics of the temporal occurrence of solar flares.

    PubMed

    Baiesi, Marco; Paczuski, Maya; Stella, Attilio L

    2006-02-10

    Introducing thresholds to analyze time series of emission from the Sun enables a new and simple definition of solar flare events and their interoccurrence times. Rescaling time by the rate of events, the waiting and quiet time distributions both conform to scaling functions that are independent of the intensity threshold over a wide range. The scaling functions are well-described by a two-parameter function, with parameters that depend on the phase of the solar cycle. For flares identified according to the current, standard definition, similar behavior is found. PMID:16486918

  9. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

  10. Solar flare nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.

    1995-03-01

    The evolution of solar flare nomenclature is reviewed in the context of the paradigm shift, in progress, from flares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in solar-terrestrial physics. Emphasis is placed on: the distinction between eruptive (Class II) flares and confined (Class I) flares; and the underlying similarity of eruptive flares inside (two-ribbon flares) and outside (flare-like brightenings accompanying disappearing filaments) of active regions. A list of reserach questions/ problems raised, or brought into focus, by the new paradigm is suggested; in general, these questions bear on the inter- relationships and associations of the two classes (or phases) or flares. Terms such as 'eruptive flare' and 'eruption' (defined to encompass both the CME and its associated eruptive flare) may be useful as nominal links between opposing viewpoints in the 'flares vs CMEs' controversy.

  11. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  12. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  13. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  14. Observations of small solar flares with BATSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Ryan, J. M.; Fishman, G. J.

    1994-12-01

    The Burst and Transient Source Experiment on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory is being used to observe solar flares. The Large Area Detectors are sensitive to small solar flares. We are searching the BATSE data for solar flares with an automated algorithm that allows for independent confirmation of the event origin. With this search method, we have detected solar flares almost an order of magnitude smaller than those found in a visual search of the BASTE data. We present results that are consistent with the differential distribution of peak flare rates observed by other researchers. These results show that the rate of occurrence of the smallest flares observed by BATSE can be predicted from the rate of occurrence of larger flares.

  15. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  16. Towards Predicting Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Lisa; Balasubramaniam, Karatholuvu S.

    2015-04-01

    We present a statistical study of solar X-ray flares observed using GOES X-ray observations of the ~50,000 fares that occurred from 1986 - mid-2014. Observed X-ray parameters are computed for each of the flares, including the 24-hour non-flare X-ray background in the 1-8 A band and the maximum ratio of the short (0.5 - 4 A) to long band (1-8 A) during flares. These parameters, which are linked to the amount of active coronal heating and maximum flare temperature, reveal a separation between the X-, M-, C-, and B- class fares. The separation was quantified and verified through machine-learning algorithms (k nearest neighbor; nearest centroid). Using the solar flare parameters learned from solar cycles 22-23, we apply the models to predict flare categories of solar cycle 24. Skill scores are then used to assess the success of our models, yielding correct predictions for ~80% of M-, C-, and B-class flares and 100% correct predictions for X-flares. We present details of the analysis along with the potential uses of our model in flare forecasting.

  17. Flare models: Chapter 9 of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    By reviewing the properties of solar flares analyzed by each of the seven teams of the Skylab workshop, a set of primary and secondary requirements of flare models are derived. A number of flare models are described briefly and their properties compared with the primary requirements. It appears that, at this time, each flare model has some strong points and some weak points. It has not yet been demonstrated that any one flare model meets all the proposed requirements.

  18. Using subsurface helicity measurements to predict flare occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, A. A.; Henthorn, J.; Komm, R.; Hill, F.

    2009-12-01

    Solar flares are responsible for a number of hazardous effects including disabling high-frequency radio communications, interfering with GPS measurements, and disrupting satellites. Forecasting flare occurrence is very difficult, giving little advanced notice of these events. One possible means for predicting flare occurrence lies in helioseismology, i.e. analysis of the region below the active region for signs of an impending flare. Time series helioseismic data collected by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) have been analyzed for a subset of active regions that produce large flares and a subset with very high magnetic field strength that produce no flares. A predictive parameter has been developed and analyzed using discriminant analysis as well as traditional forecasting tools such as the Heidke skill score. Preliminary results indicate this parameter predicts flare occurrence with a high success rate.

  19. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  20. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  1. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  2. Amplitude and phase changes on VLF/LF radio signals depending on solar zenith angle during occurrences of solar X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulic, Desanka; Sreckovic, Vladimir; Mihajlov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The focus of this work is on the extraction of D-region electron density that is induced by the intensive X-ray flux under different solar zenith angle. The sensitivity of Very Low and Low Frequency (VLF and LF) propagation in the lower ionosphere makes it an ideal probe for remotely sensing the ambient state and localized perturbations of the ionosphere. The basis of this work is amplitude and phase data acquired by monitoring DHO/23.40 kHz and NSC/45.90 kHz radio signals during the period of ascending and maximum of the solar cycle 24. All the data were recorded at Belgrade station (44.85 ^{0} N, 20.38 ^{0} E) by AWESOME system. DHO-BEL and NSC-BEL are short paths with distances of 1300 and 953 km, respectively. These paths are in the same time zone. The diurnal amplitude and phase variations on VLF/LF radio signal against time vary in characteristic ways that are caused by solar zenith angles over path. Two amplitude minima are observed when sunrise and sunset terminators reach the middle of the propagation path. During daytime condition there are two amplitude minima (in morning and afternoon) developed under solar zenith angles χ ˜80 ^{0} over short path. In this study we considered amplitude and phase perturbations on VLF/LF radio signal induced by solar X-ray flares under solar zenith angles which are close with timings of amplitude minima during daytime under normal ionospheric condition. We expected and estimated differences in amplitude and phase perturbations on DHO/23.40 kHz and NSC/45.90 kHz radio signals induced by solar X-ray flares which occurrences are under solar zenith angles χ ≤ 80 ^{0}. The observations include solar flares with magnitudes in the range from C2 (I_{X} = 2 10^{-6} Wm^{-2} of X-ray flux in the band at 0.1 - 0.8 nm) to X2.1 (I_{X} = 2.1 10^{-4} Wm^{-2}) class. For example on 11 March 2015 occurred X2.1 class flare with maximum of intensity at 16:22 UT, when solar angle was χ = 81^{0} at Belgrade. One day before, under normal

  3. Activation of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P.J.; Migliuolo, S.; Hood, A.W.

    1984-11-01

    The physics of the activation of two-ribbon solar flares via the MHD instability of coronal arcades is presented. The destabilization of a preflare magnetic field is necessary for a rapid energy release, characteristic of the impulsive phase of the flare, to occur. The stability of a number of configurations are examined, and the physical consequences and relative importance of varying pressure profiles and different sets of boundary conditions (involving field-line tying) are discussed. Instability modes, driven unstable by pressure gradients, are candidates for instability. Shearless vs. sheared equilibria are also discussed. (ESA)

  4. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past year we have been working with the HESSI (High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) team in preparation for launch in early 2001. HESSI has as its primary scientific goal photometric imaging and spectroscopy of solar flares in hard X-rays and gamma-rays with an approx. 2 sec angular resolution, approx. keV energy resolution and approx. 2 s time resolution over the 6 keV to 15 MeV energy range. We have performed tests of the imager using a specially designed experiment which exploits the second-harmonic response of HESSI's sub-collimators to an artificial X-ray source at a distance of 1550 cm from its front grids. Figures show the response to X-rays at energies in the range where HESSI is expected to image solar flares. To prepare the team and the solar user community for imaging flares with HESSI, we have written a description of the major imaging concepts. This paper will be submitted for publication in a referred journal.

  5. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  6. The solar-flare induced earth's environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.; Han, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    A composite numerical simulation model developed from a series of MHD models was used to compute the solar-flare-generated disturbances of physical parameters, such as density, temperature, velocity, and magnetic field from the solar surface (i.e., the photospheric level) to the earth's environment. It is shown that the disturbed earth's environment at high latitudes can be approximated by starting with the knowledge of the occurrence and the strength of a solar flare, then simulating the evolutionary consequences of the solar disturbance through interplanetary space up to and through the magnetosphere.

  7. Solar flare discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the discoveries that have appreciably changed our understanding of the physics of solar flares. A total of 42 discoveries from all disciplines, ranging from Galileo's initial observation of faculae to the recent discovery of strong limb brightening in 10-MeV gamma-radiation, are identified. The rate of discovery increased dramatically over the past four decades as new observational tools became available. The assessment of significance suggests that recent discoveries -though more numerous - are individually less significant; perhaps this is because the minor early discoveries tend to be taken for granted.

  8. Solar flares, flare particles and geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, T.

    1986-03-01

    Geomagnetic disturbances related to solar-terrestrial events during the period June-September 1982 are described. The cause of these activities is investigated using solar phenomena and solar flare particles observed by the geostationary satellite GMS-2/SEM (Space Environment Monitor). It is noted that the geomagnetic disturbances in June were weak, two big geomagnetic storms occurred in September, and the largest storm, caused by a large flare, occurred on July 13-14. The July 13-14, 1972 storm is compared to the February 11-12, 1958 storm observed by Hakura and Nagai (1964, 1965) and the August 4-5, 1972 storm data of Hakura (1976). The July storm was characterized by a deep depression of the H-component caused by an abnormal expansion of the substorm-associated current system in the auroral zone toward the Far East and was short-lived.

  9. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    1998-01-01

    We have continued our previous efforts in studies of fourier imaging methods applied to hard X-ray flares. We have performed physical and theoretical analysis of rotating collimator grids submitted to GSFC(Goddard Space Flight Center) for the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI). We have produced simulation algorithms which are currently being used to test imaging software and hardware for HESSI. We have developed Maximum-Entropy, Maximum-Likelihood, and "CLEAN" methods for reconstructing HESSI images from count-rate profiles. This work is expected to continue through the launch of HESSI in July, 2000. Section 1 shows a poster presentation "Image Reconstruction from HESSI Photon Lists" at the Solar Physics Division Meeting, June 1998; Section 2 shows the text and viewgraphs prepared for "Imaging Simulations" at HESSI's Preliminary Design Review on July 30, 1998.

  10. Avalanches and the distribution of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.

    1991-01-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is proposed to be in a self-organized critical state, thus explaining the observed power-law dependence of solar-flare-occurrence rate on flare size which extends over more than five orders of magnitude in peak flux. The physical picture that arises is that solar flares are avalanches of many small reconnection events, analogous to avalanches of sand in the models published by Bak and colleagues in 1987 and 1988. Flares of all sizes are manifestations of the same physical processes, where the size of a given flare is determined by the number of elementary reconnection events. The relation between small-scale processes and the statistics of global-flare properties which follows from the self-organized magnetic-field configuration provides a way to learn about the physics of the unobservable small-scale reconnection processes. A simple lattice-reconnection model is presented which is consistent with the observed flare statistics. The implications for coronal heating are discussed and some observational tests of this picture are given.

  11. 6Li from Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Ramaty; Tatischeff; Thibaud; Kozlovsky; Mandzhavidze

    2000-05-10

    By introducing a hitherto ignored 6Li producing process, due to accelerated 3He reactions with 4He, we show that accelerated particle interactions in solar flares produce much more 6Li than 7Li. By normalizing our calculations to gamma-ray data, we demonstrate that the 6Li produced in solar flares, combined with photospheric 7Li, can account for the recently determined solar wind lithium isotopic ratio, obtained from measurements in lunar soil, provided that the bulk of the flare-produced lithium is evacuated by the solar wind. Further research in this area could provide unique information on a variety of problems, including solar atmospheric transport and mixing, solar convection and the lithium depletion issue, and solar wind and solar particle acceleration. PMID:10813684

  12. Nuclear processes in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of solar gamma-ray line production is reviewed and new calculations of line production yields are presented. Observations, carried out with gamma-ray spectrometers on OSO-7, HEAO-1, HEAO-3 and SMM are reviewed and compared with theory. These observations provide direct evidence for nuclear reactions in flares and furnish unique information on particle acceleration and flare mechanisms.

  13. Ion acceleration in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinacker, Jurgen; Jaekel, Uwe; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    1993-01-01

    Nonrelativistic spectra of protons and ions accelerated in impulsive solar flares are derived using more realistic turbulence power spectra. The calculation is based on a particle transport equation extracted from a second step acceleration model containing stochastic acceleration. The turbulence model is generalized to waves with a small angle to the magnetic field vector and to turbulence power spectra with spectral indices s smaller than 2. Due to the occurrence of impulsive flares at low coronal heights, Coulomb losses at the dense coronal plasma and diffusive particle escape are taken into account. The ion spectra show deviations from long-duration spectra near the Coulomb barrier, where the losses become maximal. The Z-squared/A-dependence of the Coulomb losses leads to spectral variations for different ions. We present a method to estimate the turbulence parameters and injection conditions of the flare particles using ion ratios like Fe/O of impulsive flares.

  14. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Forman, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth atmosphere, and gamma rays, neutrons, hard X-rays, and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere. The stochastic and shock acceleration theories in flares are reviewed and the implications of observations on particle energy spectra, particle confinement and escape, multiple acceleration phases, particle anistropies, and solar atmospheric abundances are discussed.

  15. Largest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The largest solar flare ever recorded occurred at 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001. as Observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. Solar flares, among the solar systems mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds, solar flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. The recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Second to the most severe R5 classification of radio blackout, this flare produced an R4 blackout as rated by the NOAA SEC. This classification measures the disruption in radio communications. Launched December 2, 1995 atop an ATLAS-IIAS expendable launch vehicle, the SOHO is a cooperative effort involving NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (Image courtesy NASA Goddard SOHO Project office)

  16. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  17. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures. PMID:10859129

  18. Radiation hydrodynamics in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.H.

    1985-10-18

    Solar flares are rather violent and extremely complicated phenomena, and it should be made clear at the outset that a physically complete picture describing all aspects of flares does not exist. From the wealth of data which is available, it is apparent that many different types of physical processes are involved during flares: energetic particle acceleration, rapid magnetohydrodynamic motion of complex field structures, magnetic reconnection, violent mass motion along magnetic field lines, and the heating of plasma to tens of millions of degrees, to name a few. The goal of this paper is to explore just one aspect of solar flares, namely, the interaction of hydrodynamics and radiation processes in fluid being rapidly heated along closed magnetic field lines. The models discussed are therefore necessarily restrictive, and will address only a few of the observed or observable phenomena. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  19. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  20. Solar flare emissions and geophysical disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1973-01-01

    Various geophysical phenomena are produced by both wave and particle emissions from solar flares. Using the observed data for these emissions, a review is given on the nature of solar flares and their development. Geophysical phenomena are discussed by referring to the results for solar flare phenomena.

  1. Biggest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    View an animation from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). At 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001, the sun unleashed the biggest solar flare ever recorded, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The flare was definitely more powerful than the famous solar flare on March 6, 1989, which was related to the disruption of power grids in Canada. This recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Solar flares, among the solar system's mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. Solar ejections are often associated with flares and sometimes occur shortly after the flare explosion. Coronal mass ejections are clouds of electrified, magnetic gas weighing billions of tons ejected from the Sun and hurled into space with speeds ranging from 12 to 1,250 miles per second. Depending on the orientation of the magnetic fields carried by the ejection cloud, Earth-directed coronal mass ejections cause magnetic storms by interacting with the Earth's magnetic field, distorting its shape, and accelerating electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) trapped within. Severe solar weather is often heralded by dramatic auroral displays, northern and southern lights, and magnetic storms that occasionally affect satellites, radio communications and power systems. The flare and solar ejection has also generated a storm of high-velocity particles, and the number of particles with ten million electron-volts of energy in the space near

  2. Collective acceleration in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, W.; Sessler, A.M.; Xie, M.; Gershtein, S.S.; Krishan, V.; Reiser, M.

    1993-11-01

    Solar flare data are examined with an eye to seeing if they suggest collective acceleration of ions. That, in fact, seems to be the case. The collective acceleration mechanism of Gershtein is reviewed and the possibilities of the mechanism are discussed.

  3. Magnetic reconnection in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic energy stored in the corona is the only plausible source for the energy released during large solar flares. During the last 20 years most theoretical work has concentrated on models which store magnetic energy in the corona in the form of electrical currents, and a major goal of present day research is to understand how these currents are created, and then later dissipated during a flare. Another important goal is to find a flare model which can eject magnetic flux into interplanetary space. Although many flares do not eject magnetic flux, those which do are of special importance for solar-terrestrial relations since the ejected flux can have dramatic effects if it hits the Earth's magnetosphere. Three flare models which have been extensively investigated are the emerging-flux model, the sheared-arcade model, and the magnetic-flux-rope model. All of these models can store and release magnetic energy efficiently provided that rapid magnetic reconnection occurs. However, only the magnetic-flux-rope model appears to provide a plausible mechanism for ejecting magnetic flux into interplanetary space.

  4. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  5. Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Terry G.

    2016-05-01

    Reconnection has at least three possible roles in solar flares: First, it may contribute to the build-up of magnetic energy in the solar corona prior to flare onset; second, it may directly trigger the onset of the flare; and third, it may allow the release of magnetic energy by relaxing the magnetic field configuration to a lower energy state. Although observational support for the first two roles is somewhat limited, there is now ample support for the third. Within the last few years EUV and X-ray instruments have directly observed the kind of plasma flows and heating indicative of reconnection. Continued improvements in instrumentation will greatly help to determine the detailed physics of the reconnection process in the solar atmosphere. Careful measurement of the reconnection outflows will be especially helpful in this regard. Current observations suggest that in some flares the jet outflows are accelerated within a short diffusion region that is more characteristic of Petschek-type reconnection than Sweet-Parker reconnection. Recent resistive MHD theoretical and numerical analyses predict that the length of the diffusion region should be just within the resolution range of current X-ray and EUV telescopes if the resistivity is uniform. On the other hand, if the resistivity is not uniform, the length of the diffusion region could be too short for the outflow acceleration region to be observable.

  6. Relativistic electrons associated with solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    Solar flares which produce relativistic electrons generally occur within sunspot groups which are active in the emission of meter type I noise storms. It is suggested that relativistic electrons in solar flares are accelerated from the keV-energy electrons responsible for the type I noise storms. The relationship between flare developments and the ejection of keV-electrons is briefly considered.

  7. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  8. Solar flares and energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, Nicole

    2012-07-13

    Solar flares are now observed at all wavelengths from γ-rays to decametre radio waves. They are commonly associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. These particles play a major role in the active Sun because they contain a large amount of the energy released during flares. Energetic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere and produce high-energy X-rays and γ-rays. Energetic particles can also escape to the corona and interplanetary medium, produce radio emissions (electrons) and may eventually reach the Earth's orbit. I shall review here the available information on energetic particles provided by X-ray/γ-ray observations, with particular emphasis on the results obtained recently by the mission Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. I shall also illustrate how radio observations contribute to our understanding of the electron acceleration sites and to our knowledge on the origin and propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium. I shall finally briefly review some recent progress in the theories of particle acceleration in solar flares and comment on the still challenging issue of connecting particle acceleration processes to the topology of the complex magnetic structures present in the corona. PMID:22665901

  9. Statistical properties of solar flares and coronal mass ejections through the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telloni, Daniele; Carbone, Vincenzo; Lepreti, Fabio; Antonucci, Ester

    2016-03-01

    Waiting Time Distributions (WTDs) of solar flares are investigated all through the solar cycle. The same approach applied to Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in a previous work is considered here for flare occurrence. Our analysis reveals that flares and CMEs share some common statistical properties, which result dependent on the level of solar activity. Both flares and CMEs seem to independently occur during minimum solar activity phases, whilst their WTDs significantly deviate from a Poisson function at solar maximum, thus suggesting that these events are correlated. The characteristics of WTDs are constrained by the physical processes generating those eruptions associated with flares and CMEs. A scenario may be drawn in which different mechanisms are actively at work during different phases of the solar cycle. Stochastic processes, most likely related to random magnetic reconnections of the field lines, seem to play a key role during solar minimum periods. On the other hand, persistent processes, like sympathetic eruptions associated to the variability of the photospheric magnetism, are suggested to dominate during periods of high solar activity. Moreover, despite the similar statistical properties shown by flares and CMEs, as it was mentioned above, their WTDs appear different in some aspects. During solar minimum periods, the flare occurrence randomness seems to be more evident than for CMEs. Those persistent mechanisms generating interdependent events during maximum periods of solar activity can be suggested to play a more important role for CMEs than for flares, thus mitigating the competitive action of the random processes, which seem instead strong enough to weaken the correlations among flare event occurrence during solar minimum periods. However, it cannot be excluded that the physical processes at the basis of the origin of the temporal correlation between solar events are different for flares and CMEs, or that, more likely, more sophisticated effects are

  10. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Weir, Sue B.

    1996-01-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic and interesting phenomena in the Solar system, releasing up to 1032 ergs of energy on timescales of several tens of seconds to several tens of minutes. Much of this energy is in the form of suprathermal electrons and ions, which remain trapped at the Sun and produce a wide variety of radiations, as well as escape into interplanetary space, where they can be directly observed. The radiation from trapped particles consists in general of (1) continuum emission; (2) narrow gamma-ray nuclear deexcitation lines; and (3) high-energy neutrons observed in space or by ground-based neutron monitors. The particles that escape into space consist of both electrons and ions, which often have compositions quite different than that of the ambient solar atmosphere. Flares thus present many diagnostics of the particle acceleration mechanism(s), the identification of which is the ultimate goal of flare research. Moreover, flares in fact offer the only opportunity in astrophysics to study the simultaneous energization of both electrons and ions. Hopefully, an understanding of flares with their wealth of diagnostic data will lead to a better understanding of particle acceleration at other sites in the Universe. It is now generally accepted that flares are roughly divided into two classes: impulsive and gradual. Gradual events are large, occur high in the corona, have long-duration soft and hard X-rays and gamma rays, are electron poor, are associated with Type II radio emission and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and produce energetic ions with coronal abundance ratios. Impulsive events are more compact, occur lower in the corona, produce short-duration radiation, and exhibit dramatic abundance enhancements in the energetic ions. Their He-3/He-4 ratio is - 1, which is a huge increase over the coronal value of about 5 x 10(exp -4), and they also posses smaller but still significant enhancements of Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe relative to He-4, C, N, and O

  11. FNAS/solar flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed an extensive study of solar flare energy buildup and release, concentrating in two aspects: (1) relationship with 3D field topology and measured electric currents; and (2) flare onset characteristics as determined from combined x ray and ultraviolet observations. We extended our previous studies on the characteristic topology of flaring regions, by following the evolution of an active region over three consecutive days. From comparison with flare observations in x rays and h alpha, we found further support for the hypothesis that flares were triggered by taking place at the separators (3D generalization of and x-type neutral point). Furthermore, we found that emerging in flux at a site within the active regions where no (or little) activity was previously observed, caused the appearance of a secondary separator and thereon continuous triggering of activity at such site. Our topology arguments were then applied to a study of sympathetic activity between two regions within an active complex. Here again we found that interacting field structures along separators and separatrices, which act as pathways for recurrent flaring to spread between the regions, could be used to understand how activity spread to potentially explosive sites with the complex. We also finished our study of flare onset characteristics as determined from combined x ray and ultraviolet observations. Using a quasi-static modeling approach, we find that this phase is characterized by a relatively low level of energy release, 10 exp 26-27 erg/s, which is sufficient to produce 'gentle' evaporation, a shift in the location of the transition zone as compared to pre-flare conditions, and an increase in the temperature and density of coronal loops. All these changes have profound implications on the observed signatures of impulsive phase phenomena, which had been neglected in the past. As a follow-up of this investigation, we now plan to apply our results to the interpretation of high

  12. Pulsed acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.; Dennis, Brian R.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    1994-01-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of particle acceleration in solar flares by analyzing the time series of various quasi-periodic radio signatures during flares. In particular we present the radio and hard X-ray data of three flares which suppport the following tentative conclusions: (1) Particle acceleration and injection into magnetic structures occurs intrinsically in a pulsed mode (with a typical period of 1-2 s), produced by a single, spatially coherent, nonlinear system, rather than by a stochastic system with many spatially independent components ('statistical flare' produced by a fragmented primary energy release). (2) The nonlinear (quasi-periodic) mode of pulsed particle acceleration and injection into a coronal loop can be stabilized by phase locking with an MHD wave (oscillation) mode, if both periods are close to each other. (3) Pulsed injection of electron beams into a coronal loop may trigger nonlinear relaxational oscillations of wave-particle interactions. This is particularly likely when the limit cycles of both systems are similar.

  13. Prediction of M and X Solar flares by Using Machine Learning Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raboonik, Abbas; Safari, Hossein; Dadashi, Neda; Alipour, Nasibeh

    2016-07-01

    The study and prediction of the solar flares are very important due to their thorough impact on the Earth's climate, space weather, and telecommunications. Flares are abrupt magnetic explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun. The exact mechanism(s) for the energy release and occurrence of the flares is(are) still unknown. The only way for prediction of the solar flares is based on the probabilistic methods. Observations strongly suggest that their occurrence is highly dependent on the magnetic structures of the solar atmospheric features. The occurrence probabilities for M and X class flares are calculated up to 18 hours before the ignition of them using solar magnetic field data recorded by HMI/SDO. To achieve this goal, Zernike moments and "Support Vector Machine algorithm" are applied to analyze the data. Our calculations guarantee almost 94 percent accuracy in the prediction of solar flares.

  14. Solar flares controlled by helicity conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliner, Erast B.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy release in a class of solar flares is studied on the assumption that during burst events in highly conducting plasma the magnetic helicity of plasma is approximately conserved. The available energy release under a solar flare controlled by the helicity conservation is shown to be defined by the magnetic structure of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominences; the discontinuation of the reconnection of magnetic lines long before the complete reconnection of participated fields occurs; the existence of quiet prominences which, in spite of their usual optical appearance, do not initiate any flare events; the small energy release under a solar flare in comparison with the stockpile of magnetic energy in surrounding fields. The predicted scale of the energy release is in a fair agreement with observations.

  15. Helium (3) Rich Solar Flares

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Colgate, S. A.; Audouze, J.; Fowler, W. A.

    1977-05-03

    The extreme enrichment of {sup 3} He {sup 4} He greater than or equal to 1 in some solar flares as due to spallation and the subsequent confinement of the products in a high temperature, kT approx. = 200 keV, high density, n{sub e} approx. = 3 x 10{sup 15} cm {sup -3} plasma associated with the magnetic instability producing the flare is interpreted. The pinch or filament is a current of high energy protons that creates the spallation and maintains the temperature that produces the high energy x-ray spectrum and depletes other isotopes D, Li, Be, and B as observed. Finally the high temperature plasma is a uniquely efficient spallation target that is powered by the interaction of stellar convection and self generated magnetic field.

  16. Fast electrons in small solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    This review summarizes both the direct spacecraft observations of nonrelativistic solar electrons, and observations of the X-ray and radio emission generated by these particles at the sun and in the interplanetary medium. These observations bear on the basic astrophysical process of particle acceleration in tenuous plasmas. We find that in many small solar flares, the nearly 5-100 keV electrons accelerated during flash phase constitute the bulk of the total flare energy. Thus the basic flare mechanism in these flares essentially converts the available flare energy into fast electrons. These electrons may produce the other flare electromagnetic emissions through their interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large proton flares these electrons may provide the energy to eject material from the sun and to create a shock wave which could accelerate nuclei and electrons to much higher energies.

  17. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Ding, Feng; Ning, Baiqi; Wan, Weixing; Yu, You; Hu, Lianhuan

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 elm-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008. Owing to the high sensitivity and temporal resolution, ISFAI can be utilized as a solar flare detection parameter to monitor space weather.

  18. FLARING SOLAR HALE SECTOR BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Svalgaard, L.; Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S.

    2011-05-20

    The sector structure that organizes the magnetic field of the solar wind into large-scale domains has a clear pattern in the photospheric magnetic field as well. The rotation rate, 27-28.5 days, implies an effectively rigid rotation originating deeper in the solar interior than the sunspots. The photospheric magnetic field is known to be concentrated near that portion (the Hale boundary) in each solar hemisphere, where the change in magnetic sector polarity matches that between the leading and following sunspot polarities in active regions in the respective hemispheres. We report here that flares and microflares also concentrate at the Hale boundaries, implying that flux emergence and the creation of free magnetic energy in the corona also have a direct cause in the deep interior.

  19. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  20. Solar and Stellar Flares and Their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Recent space observations of the Sun revealed that the solar atmosphere is full of explosions, such as flares and flare-like phenomena. These flares generate not only strong electromagnetic emissions but also nonthermal particles and bulk plasma ejections, which sometimes lead to geomagnetic storms and affect terrestrial environment and our civilization, damaging satellite, power-grids, radio communication etc. Solar flares are prototype of various explosions in our universe, and hence are important not only for geophysics and environmental science but also for astrophysics. The energy source of solar flares is now established to be magnetic energy stored near sunspots. There is now increasing observational evidence that solar flares are caused by magnetic reconnection, merging of anti-parallel magnetic field lines and associated magneto-plasma dynamics (Shibata and Magara 2011, Living Review). It has also been known that many stars show flares similar to solar flares, and often such stellar flares are much more energetic than solar flares. The total energy of a solar flare is typically 10^29 - 10^32 erg. On the other hand, there are much more energetic flares (10^33 - 10^38 erg) in stars, especially in young stars. These are called superflares. We argue that these superflares on stars can also be understood in a unified way based on the reconnection mechanism. Finally we show evidence of occurrence of superflares on Sun-like stars according to recent stellar observations (Maehara et al. 2012, Nature, Shibayama et al. 2013), which revealed that superflares with energy of 10^34 - 10^35 erg (100 - 1000 times of the largest solar flares) occur with frequency of once in 800 - 5000 years on Sun-like stars which are very similar to our Sun. Against the previous belief, these new observations as well as theory (Shibata et al. 2013) suggest that we cannot deny the possibility of superflares on the present Sun. Finally, we shall discuss possible impacts of these superflares

  1. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  2. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  3. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Wan, Weixing; Ning, Baiqi; Ding, Feng; Hu, Lianhuan; Yu, You

    2014-01-01

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, the statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008.

  4. A search for solar flare positrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The detection of solar gamma-ray line emission and observations of the isotopes H2, H-3, and He-3 in solar cosmic rays provide direct evidence for the occurrence of high energy nuclear reactions in solar flare events. Appreciable numbers of other reaction products, including positrons with energies near about 1 MeV, should also be produced in such events. We have searched for positrons in the 0.16-1.6 MeV energy interval during 5 H-3 rich solar particle events. Based on calculations of positron and He-3 production at the sun, and using a simplified model of interplanetary propagation, we might expect comparable fluences of positrons and He-3 to be observed. Summing over these 5 events, we find the 0.16 to 1.6 MeV positron fluence to be a maximum of about 10% of the He-3 fluence with more tnan 1 MeV/nuc. This suggests that other processes, such as preferential trapping by the solar magnetic field, may be important.

  5. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  6. Sun Releases X-class Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows the July 6, 2012 X1.1 flare in the 171 Angstrom wavelength as captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). AR1515 was the source for this flare. AR1515 has been active ...

  7. Excitation of XUV radiation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to understand the means by which XUV radiation in solar flares is excited, and to use this radiation as diagnostics of the energy release and transport processes occurring in the flare. Significant progress in both of these areas, as described, was made.

  8. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES TRIGGERING SOLAR FLARES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, K.; Bamba, Y.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Iida, Y.; Toriumi, S.; Asai, A.

    2012-11-20

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections, the most catastrophic eruptions in our solar system, have been known to affect terrestrial environments and infrastructure. However, because their triggering mechanism is still not sufficiently understood, our capacity to predict the occurrence of solar eruptions and to forecast space weather is substantially hindered. Even though various models have been proposed to determine the onset of solar eruptions, the types of magnetic structures capable of triggering these eruptions are still unclear. In this study, we solved this problem by systematically surveying the nonlinear dynamics caused by a wide variety of magnetic structures in terms of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. As a result, we determined that two different types of small magnetic structures favor the onset of solar eruptions. These structures, which should appear near the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), include magnetic fluxes reversed to the potential component or the nonpotential component of major field on the PIL. In addition, we analyzed two large flares, the X-class flare on 2006 December 13 and the M-class flare on 2011 February 13, using imaging data provided by the Hinode satellite, and we demonstrated that they conform to the simulation predictions. These results suggest that forecasting of solar eruptions is possible with sophisticated observation of a solar magnetic field, although the lead time must be limited by the timescale of changes in the small magnetic structures.

  9. C3-class Solar Flare Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    Just as sunspot 1105 was turning away from Earth on Sept. 8, the active region erupted, producing a C3-class solar flare (peak @ 2330 UT) and a fantastic prominence. This is a three color closeup o...

  10. SDO Sees Late Phase in Solar Flares

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 5, 2010, shortly after the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) began normal operation, the sun erupted with numerous coronal loops and flares. Many of these showed a previously unseen "late pha...

  11. Composition of energetic particles from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, T. L.; Stone, E. C.

    1994-01-01

    We present a model for composition of heavy ions in the Solar Energetic Particles (SEP). The SEP composition in a typical large solar particle event reflects the composition of the Sun, with adjustments due to fractionation effects which depend on the First Ionization Potential (FIP) of the ion and on the ratio of ionic charge to mass (Q/M). Flare-to flare variations in composition are represented by parameters describing these fractionation effects and the distributions of these parameters are presented.

  12. Soliton and strong Langmuir turbulence in solar flare processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, M. T.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of modulational instability in the current sheet of a solar flare is investigated. Special attention is given to the plasma microinstability in this sheet and its relation to the flare process. It is found that solitons or strong Langmuir turbulence are likely to occur in the diffusion region under solar flare conditions in which the electric resistivity could be enhanced by several orders of magnitude in the region, resulting in significant heating and stochastic acceleration of particles. A numerical example is used to demonstrate the transition of the magnetic field velocity and plasma density from the outer MHD region into the diffusive region and then back out again with the completion of the energy conversion process. This is all made possible by an increase in resistivity of four to five orders of magnitude over the classical value.

  13. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  14. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  15. Solar Flares and the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar flares are the biggest explosions in the solar system. They are important both for understanding explosive events in the Universe and for their impact on human technology and communications. The satellite-based HESSI is designed to study the explosive release of energy and the acceleration of electrons, protons, and other charged particles to high energies in solar flares. HESSI produces "color" movies of the Sun in high-energy X rays and gamma rays radiated by these energetic particles. HESSI's X-ray and gamma-ray images of flares are obtained using techniques similar to those used in radio interferometry. Ground-based radio observations of the Sun provide an important complement to the HESSI observations of solar flares. I will describe the HESSI Project and the high-energy aspects of solar flares, and how these relate to radio astronomy techniques and observations.

  16. Origins and effects of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Rust, D.M. ||

    1993-12-31

    During the 1989 - 1991 peak of solar activity, geomagnetic storms from interplanetary shocks caused a massive failure in the Canadian power grid, minor failures in other power eqipment, and many communications disruptions and satellite malfunctions. The proton storms would have been lethal for unshielded space travellers. Had the power managers been given a credible, timely forecast of the solar storm, they could have protected their generating equipment and the grid. They do not keep protective circuits in place full-time because that reduces efficiency and increases the cost of power distribution. Nor will astronauts on the moon or in deep space confine themselves full-time to thick-walled, radiation-resistant closets. To enable manned deep space exploration we have to find a way to determine what happens in solar flares. Only this will improve the forecasts. Expensive and restrictive protective measures would then have to be applied only when a major flare is clearly imminent. There is no generally accepted flare theory or description of the pre-flare state or of the instabilities. The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) cleared up many questions about electromagnetic flare emissions and the structure of the flaring atmosphere, but the dynamic of the magnetic fields is still a mystery.

  17. An Observational Overview of Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay; Battaglia, M.; Dennis, Brian R.; Liu, W.; Milligan, R. O.; Hudson, H. S.; Krucker, S.; Phillips, K.; Bone, L.; Veronig, A.; Caspi, A.; Temmer, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an overview of solar flares and associated phenomena, drawing upon a wide range of observational data primarily from the RHESSI era. Following an introductory discussion and overview of the status of observational capabilities, the article is split into topical sections which deal with different areas of flare phenomena (footpoints and ribbons, coronal sources, relationship to coronal mass ejections) and their interconnections. We also discuss flare soft X-ray spectroscopy and the energetics of the process. The emphasis is to describe the observations from multiple points of view, while bearing in mind the models that link them to each other and to theory. The present theoretical and observational understanding of solar flares is far from complete, so we conclude with a brief discussion of models, and a list of missing but important observations.

  18. Energetic electrons generated during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Gottfried

    2015-12-01

    > electrons are accelerated up to energies beyond 30 keV is one of the open questions in solar physics. A flare is considered as the manifestation of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona. Which mechanisms lead to the production of energetic electrons in the magnetic reconnection region is discussed in this paper. Two of them are described in more detail.

  19. Dependence of Sunspot Properties on Flare Occurrence and Flare-CME Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ya-Hui

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies showed that the intense flares tend to erupt from the large sunspot region with complex magnetic configuration and strong magnetic field. However, note that not all the active regions (ARs) classified as βγδ would produce X-class flares. To clarify the significance of sunspot properties on solar explosive events, we reexamine the dependence of flare magnitude on sunspot size and magnetic type during 1996-2014 based on the report of NOAA Solar Region Summary and the measurements of GOES soft X-ray flux. In particular, we focus on the βγδ-type ARs to relate the flare productivity to the sunspot area and magnetic field strength by means of the line-of-sight magnetograms from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. Two flare-productive ARs, 10486 and 12192, with βγδ magnetic configuration during most periods of their disk passages are further investigated to characterize the sunspots and flare-CME association.

  20. Carbon-poor solar flare events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1979-01-01

    Energetic particle flux enhancements over the period October 1973 - December 1977 were surveyed using ULET sensor on the IMP-8 spacecraft. During the four year period the most extreme periods of Fe enrichment compared to oxygen were during solar flare events in February 1974 and May 1974. In these same events, the carbon abundance with respect to oxygen was significantly depleted when compared with a value C:0 is approximately 0.45:1 for typical solar flares. These observations, taken together with previously reported He-3 enrichment in these events, give strong evidence for the importance of a wave-particle interaction in the pre-injection heating of the ambient matter.

  1. When and where to look to observe major solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.

    1989-01-01

    When and where to look is an important issue to observers planning to observe major solar flares. Prediction of major flares is also important because they influence the Earth's environment. Techniques for utilizing recently discovered solar hot spots and a solar activity periodicity of about 154 days in determining when and where to look to catch major flares are discussed.

  2. Positron annihilation radiation from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Share, G. H.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Rieger, E.

    1983-01-01

    Positron-annihilation radiation has been observed from the June 21, 1980 and June 3, 1982 flares by the gamma-ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. The observed 0.511-MeV line fluences from the flares were 14.6 + or - 3.3 gamma/sq cm and 103 + or - 8 gamma/sq cm, respectively. Measurement of the line width establishes an upper limit to the temperature in the annihilation region of 3 x 10 to the 6th K. The time dependence of the 0.511-MeV line during the 1980 flare is consistent with the calculations of Ramaty et al. (1983) for positrons created in the decay of radioactive nuclei. The time dependence of the 0.511-MeV line for the 1982 flare is more complex and requires more detailed study.

  3. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Low, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures that are mainly observed as a prominence activity. Aims: We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. Methods: High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303) and their EUV waves with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195 Å are analysed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171 Å. Results: Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within ten hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with the accelerating tornado motion after the third flare. Conclusions: Flares in the neighbouring active region may have affected the cavity prominence system and triggered the solar tornado. A plausible mechanism is that the active-region coronal field contracted by the "Hudson effect" through the loss of magnetic energy as flares. Subsequently, the cavity expanded by its magnetic pressure to fill the surrounding low corona. We suggest that the tornado is the dynamical response of the helical prominence field to the cavity expansion. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Solar flare proton evaluation at geostationary orbits for engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Stassinopoulos, E.G.; Barth, J.L.; Brucker, G.J.; Nakamura, D.W.; Stauffer, C.A.; Gee, G.B.

    1996-04-01

    This work presents the results of novel analyses of spacecraft solar flare proton measurements for solar cycles 20, 21, and 22. Solar events and cycles were classified and ranked by fluence and frequency of occurrence, and events were characterized by the mean energy of the proton spectral distributions. Spacecraft observations permitted a detailed study of event characteristics, such as special consideration of solar minimum flares and cycle variability. Tables and curves are presented to allow evaluations of potential threats to spacecraft survivability at GEO, particularly for types of flare environments that emulate solar cycle 22. Upsets for major events are calculated for several Bendel A parameter values and shield thicknesses, and effective energy thresholds of events are determined as a function of these variables. Critical fluence levels, required to cause errors, versus A are presented. SEU`s (single event upsets) of 93L422 devices on TDRS-1 are evaluated for various shielding conditions. Finally, upset dependencies on A and shield thickness are correlated with event fluences for threshold energies of >30, >50, and >60 MeV.

  5. Flare Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, M.; Dubieniecki, P.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of the Solar Maximum Mission observations, Švestka ( Solar Phys. 121, 399, 1989) introduced a new class of flares, the so-called flare hybrids. When they start, they look like typical compact flares (phase 1), but later on, they look like flares with arcades of magnetic loops (phase 2). We summarize the characteristic features of flare hybrids in soft and hard X-rays as well as in the extreme ultraviolet; these features allow us to distinguish flare hybrids from other flares. In this article, additional energy release or long plasma cooling timescales are suggested as possible causes of phase 2. We estimate the frequency of flare hybrids, and study the magnetic configurations favorable for flare hybrid occurrence. Flare hybrids appear to be quite frequent, and the difference between the lengths of magnetic loops in the two interacting loop systems seem to be a crucial parameter for determining their characteristics.

  6. WOLF - A computer expert system for sunspot classification and solar-flare prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Richard W.

    1988-08-01

    An expert systmem, WOLF, has been developed that acts as an expert in analyzing solar active regions and predicting the probable occurrence of solar flares. The system has a knowledge base consisting of a set of IF-THEN rules and an inference engine which applies the rules. WOLF asks questions concerning an observed solar active region and uses the answers to determine the McIntosh (1968) sunspot classification. WOLF then indicates the probability of that group producing a flare of specified X-ray intensity based on the statistical analysis of past flare activity of similar groups.

  7. Diagnostics of Solar Flare Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Procheta; Brown, J. C.; MacKinnon, A. L.

    2009-05-01

    For work on my thesis dissertation, we have been studying some energetic processes in solar flares. On our work on Hard X-ray (HXR) emission from flares, we have shown that recombination emission can exceed the bremsstrahlung HXR flux for certain flare conditions. We will show some spectral features characteristic of non-thermal recombination HXR emission and will suggest how it plays a significant role in the flare HXR continuum, something that has been ignored in the past. It is important to note that these results could demand a reconsideration of the numbers of accelerated electrons since recombination can be much more efficient in producing HXR photons than bremsstrahlung. In related work on diagnosing particle acceleration in flares, we also have an interest in studying solar neutrons. To this end, we will present our work done with new-age neutron detectors developed by our colleagues at the University of New Hampshire. Using laboratory and simulated data from the detector to produce its response matrix, we then employ regularisation and deconvolution techniques to produce encouraging results for data inversion. As a corollary, we have also been reconsidering the role of inverse Compton (IC) scattering of photospheric photons. Gamma-ray observations clearly show the presence of 100 MeV electrons and positrons in the solar corona, by-products of GeV energy ions. Here we will present results of IC scattering of such photons taking proper account of radiation field geometry near the solar surface. If observed, such radiation would let us determine the number of secondary positrons produced in large flares, contributing to a full picture of ion acceleration and to predicting neutron fluxes to be encountered by future inner heliosphere space missions. This work is supported by a UK STFC Rolling Grant and a Dorothy Hodgkin's Scholarship (PM).

  8. Predicting large solar flares with data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Solar and stellar flares are magnetically-driven, scale-invariant energy release events spanning over 8 orders of magnitude in energy. The prediction of the largest solar flares, of class X, is a particularly hard task due the scarcity of such events. The detailed 3D modelling of flaring active regions still requires today too much numerical resources to be routinely used for near real-time predictions. Alternative, empirical models hence have to be designed to perform such predictions. Among the models that adequately reproduce the power-law distribution in flare sizes, avalanche models have the advantage of being numerically cheap to operate. However, they usually rely on a stochastic driver, which can be expected to degrade their predictive capabilities. Building on the pioneering work of Lu and Hamilton, we develop a class of avalanche models which succeed in minimizing the built-in stochastic ingredients while retaining the solar flares power-law distribution. We show that the largest avalanches occurring in these models are robust with respect to the stochastic realization, which opens new perspectives for the prediction of the largest (and most dangerous) solar flares.We further combine data assimilation of the GOES X-ray flux with our avalanche models to carry out actual predictions. The GOES X-ray flux is transformed into a series of peaks that is fed to the model, which automatically finds an initial condition that is compatible with the observed series of events. We then test our prediction model against past GOES large events and discuss the possibility to use our data assimilation package in near real-time applications.

  9. Investigations of turbulent motions and particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakimiec, J.; Fludra, A.; Lemen, J. R.; Dennis, B. R.; Sylwester, J.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations of X-raya spectra of solar flares show that intense random (turbulent) motions are present in hot flare plasma. Here it is argued that the turbulent motions are of great importance for flare development. They can efficiently enhance flare energy release and accelerate particles to high energies.

  10. The energy spectra of solar flare electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Meyer, P.; Moses, D.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of 50 electron energy spectra from .1 to 100 MeV originating from solar flares was made by the combination of data from two spectrometers onboard the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 spacecraft. The observed spectral shapes of flare events can be divided into two classes through the criteria of fit to an acceleration model. This standard two step acceleration model, which fits the spectral shape of the first class of flares, involves an impulsive step that accelerates particles up to 100 keV and a second step that further accelerates these particles up to 100 MeV by a single shock. This fit fails for the second class of flares that can be characterized as having excessively hard spectra above 1 MeV relative to the predictions of the model. Correlations with soft X-ray and meter radio observations imply that the acceleration of the high energy particles in the second class of flares is dominated by the impulsive phase of the flares.

  11. Absolute Abundance Measurements in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry

    2014-06-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with EVE/SDO and EIS/Hinode. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines Fe XV-XXIV and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (F). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is F=1.17+-0.22. Furthermore, we have compared the EVE measurements with corresponding flare observations of intermediate temperature S, Ar, Ca, and Fe emission lines taken with EIS. Our initial calculations also indicate a photospheric composition for these observations. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation in the non-flaring corona occurs.

  12. Solar Flare Impacts on Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2012-01-01

    The sudden increase of X-ray and extreme ultra-violet irradiance during flares increases the density of the ionosphere through enhanced photoionization. In this paper, we use model simulations to investigate possible additional contributions from electrodynamics, finding that the vertical E X B drift in the magnetic equatorial region plays a significant role in the ionosphere response to solar flares. During the initial stage of flares, upward E X B drifts weaken in the magnetic equatorial region, causing a weakened equatorial fountain effect, which in turn causes lowering of the peak height of the F2 region and depletion of the peak electron density of the F2 region. In this initial stage, total electron content (TEC) enhancement is predominantly determined by solar zenith angle control of photoionization. As flares decay, upward E X B drifts are enhanced in the magnetic equatorial region, causing increases of the peak height and density of the F2 region. This process lasts for several hours, causing a prolonged F2-region disturbance and TEC enhancement in the magnetic equator region in the aftermath of flares. During this stage, the global morphology of the TEC enhancement becomes predominantly determined by these perturbations to the electrodynamics of the ionosphere.

  13. Observations of particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar flares provide several examples of nonthermal particle acceleration. The paper reviews the information gained about these processes via X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, which can presently distinguish among three separate particle-acceleration processes at the sun: an impulsive accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, a gradual accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, and a gradual accelerator of more than 10 MeV ions. The acceleration energy efficiency (total particle energy divided by total flare energy) of any of these mechanisms cannot be less than about 0.1%, although the gradual acceleration does not occur in every flare. The observational material suggests that both the impulsive and gradual accelerations take place preferentially in closed magnetic-field structures, but that the electrons decay in these traps before they can escape. The ions escape very efficiently.

  14. A kinematic model of a solar flare.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Y.; Wu, S. T.; Han, S. M.

    1973-01-01

    Hyder advocated the idea that the optical (H-alpha) flares can be identified with the response of the solar chromosphere to an infalling material stream resulting from the 'disparition brusque' of a prominence. Since some flares are observed without any apparent association with infalling streams, in this paper we examine the possibility of identifying the optical flare with the response of the chromosphere to a supersonic disturbance, i.e., a shock, propagating downward. The undisturbed chromosphere is represented by the Harvard-Smithsonian Reference Atmosphere and the evolution of the shock is evaluated with the use of the CCW (Chisnell, Chester, Whitham) approximation based on the theory of characteristics. It is shown that the chromosphere is heated by the shock, that radiation is enhanced, and that the enhanced radiation terminates the shock around the height of the temperature minimum.

  15. X-Class: A Guide to Solar Flares

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar flares are classified according to their strength. The smallest ones are B-class, followed by C, M and X, the largest. A powerful X-class flare can create long lasting radiation storms, which...

  16. Spectral Diagnostics and Radiative Hydrodynamics of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. X.

    2011-03-01

    useful information for diagnosing the heating processes by using the fine time structures observed in chromospheric lines. (4) A statistical study of RHESSI hard X-ray spikes is made. The spikes refer to fine time structures on time scales of seconds to milliseconds in hard X-ray time profiles during solar flares. We get a preliminary statistical result of temporal and spectral properties of hard X-ray spikes. About one fifth of the spikes can be detected in photon energies higher than 100 keV. Some main properties of the spikes are as follows: (i) Spikes are produced in both impulsive flares and long-duration flares with nearly the same occurrence rates. 90% of the spikes occur during the rise phase of the flares, and about 70% occur around the peaks of the flares. (ii) The durations of the spikes vary from 0.2 s to 2 s, with an average being 1.3 s, which is independent of photon energies. The spikes exhibit symmetric time profiles with no significant difference between the rise and decay phases. (iii) Among the most energetic spikes, about two thirds of them have harder count spectra than their underlying slow-varying components. There is also a weak indication that spikes exhibiting time lags in high-energy emissions tend to have harder spectra than spikes with time lags in low-energy emissions.

  17. Radio Frequency-Tomography of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, M. J.

    2002-05-01

    The Frequency-Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) is designed to produce simultaneous images of solar phenomena at many frequencies. A data cube with a stack of multiple frequency images can be used for tomographic reconstruction of the 3D density and temperature distribution of flares, based on the free-free emission at cm and mm wavelengths. We simulate a set of multi-frequency images for the Bastille-Day flare of 2000-July-14, based on EUV observations from TRACE and soft X-ray observations from Yohkoh. The 3D model consists of some 200 postflare loops with observationally constrained densities and temperatures. The temporal evolution involves flare plasma heating, a phase of conductive cooling, followed by a phase of radiative cooling. The images simulated at different microwave frequencies reveal a sequence of optically-thick free-free emission layers, which can be "pealed off" like onion shells with increasing radio frequency. We envision a tomographic method that yields information on the density and temperature structure of flare systems and their evolution. Comparison with EUV and soft X-ray based 3D models will also allow to quantify wave scattering at radio frequencies and provide information on small-scale inhomogeneities and wave turbulence. Besides the thermal free-free emission, radio images contain also information on coherent emission processes, such as plasma emission from electron beams and loss-cone emission from gyroresonant trapped particles, conveying information on particle acceleration processes.

  18. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  19. Measurements of Absolute Abundances in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  20. Solar flare hard X-ray observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    1988-01-01

    Recent hard X-ray observations of solar flares are reviewed with emphasis on results obtained with instruments on the solar maximum satellite. Flares with three sets of characteristics, designated as Type A, Type B, and Type C, are discussed and hard X-ray temporal, spatial spectral, and polarization measurements are reviewed in this framework. Coincident observations are reviewed at other wavelengths including the UV, microwaves, and soft X-rays, with discussions of their interpretations. In conclusion, a brief outline is presented of the potential of future hard X-ray observations with sub-second time resolution, arcsecond spatial resolution, and keV energy resolution, and polarization measurements at the few percent level up to 100 keV.

  1. Carbon-poor solar flare events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of energetic particle flux enhancements over the period from October 1973 to December 1977 has been performed by using the University of Maryland/Max-Planck-Institut ULET sensor on the IMP 8 spacecraft. During the four-year period of the study, it is found that the most extreme periods of Fe enrichment compared with oxygen were during solar flare events in February 1974 and May 1974. In these same events, the carbon abundance with respect to oxygen was significantly depleted when compared with a value C:O of about 0.45:1 for typical solar flares. These observations, taken together with previously reported He-3 enrichment in these events, give strong evidence for the importance of a wave-particle interaction in the preinjection heating of the ambient matter.

  2. A phenomenological model of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The energy of solar flares is derived from the magnetic energy of fields convected to the sun's surface and subsequently converted to heat and energetic particles within the chromosphere. The circumstances of this conversion in most current models is magnetic flux annihilation at a neutral sheet. An analysis is conducted of the constraints of flux annihilation. It is shown that the present evidence of solar cosmic rays, X-rays, gamma-rays, and total energy suggests a choice of annihilation not at a neutral point, but by an enhanced dissipation of a field-aligned current. The field configuration is related both to its origin and to the extensive theory and laboratory experiments concerned with this configuration in magnetic fusion. The magnetic field model is applied to the August 4 flare. It is shown how the plasma heating in the annihilation region balanced by thermal conduction leads to a plasma temperature of about 20 million deg K.

  3. Solar flare gamma-ray line spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Forrest, D. J.; Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1985-01-01

    The techniques and the results of solar elemental abundance determinations using observations of gamma ray lines from the April 27 1981 olar flare were outlined. The techniques are elaborated on and observed and the best-fitting theoretical spectra are presented. Numerical values for the photon fluences and the total number of protons involved in the thick-target production of these gamma rays are derived.

  4. TESTING AUTOMATED SOLAR FLARE FORECASTING WITH 13 YEARS OF MICHELSON DOPPLER IMAGER MAGNETOGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J. P.; Hoeksema, J. T. E-mail: JTHoeksema@sun.stanford.ed

    2010-11-01

    Flare occurrence is statistically associated with changes in several characteristics of the line-of-sight magnetic field in solar active regions (ARs). We calculated magnetic measures throughout the disk passage of 1075 ARs spanning solar cycle 23 to find a statistical relationship between the solar magnetic field and flares. This expansive study of over 71,000 magnetograms and 6000 flares uses superposed epoch (SPE) analysis to investigate changes in several magnetic measures surrounding flares and ARs completely lacking associated flares. The results were used to seek any flare associated signatures with the capability to recover weak systematic signals with SPE analysis. SPE analysis is a method of combining large sets of data series in a manner that yields concise information. This is achieved by aligning the temporal location of a specified flare in each time series, then calculating the statistical moments of the 'overlapping' data. The best-calculated parameter, the gradient-weighted inversion-line length (GWILL), combines the primary polarity inversion line (PIL) length and the gradient across it. Therefore, GWILL is sensitive to complex field structures via the length of the PIL and shearing via the gradient. GWILL shows an average 35% increase during the 40 hr prior to X-class flares, a 16% increase before M-class flares, and 17% increase prior to B-C-class flares. ARs not associated with flares tend to decrease in GWILL during their disk passage. Gilbert and Heidke skill scores are also calculated and show that even GWILL is not a reliable parameter for predicting solar flares in real time.

  5. Explosive plasma flows in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.; Canfield, Richard C.; Metcalf, Thomas R.; Strong, Keith T.

    1988-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission soft X-ray data and Sacramento Peak Observatory H-alpha observations are combined in a study of the impulsive phase of a solar flare. A blue asymmetry, indicative of upflows, was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft X-ray rise phase. A red asymmetry, indicative of downflows, was observed simultaneously in chromospheric H-alpha emitted from bright flare kernels during the period of hard X-ray emission. Combining the velocity data with a measurement of coronal electron density, it is shown that the impulsive phase momentum of upflowing soft X-ray-emitting plasma equalled that of the downflowing H-alpha-emitting plasma to within one order of magnitude. In particular, the momentum of the upflowing plasma was 2 x 10 to the 21st g cm/s while that of the downflowing plasma was 7 x 10 to the 21st g cm/s, with a factor of 2 uncertainty on each value. This equality supports the explosive chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares, in which a sudden pressure increase at the footprint of a coronal loop produces oppositely directed flows in the heated plasma.

  6. Ion Acceleration and Transport in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the work proposed for this grant was to develop a promising model for ion acceleration in impulsive solar flares. Solar flares are among the most energetic and interesting phenomena in the solar system, releasing up to 10(exp 32) ergs of energy over timescales ranging from a few tens of seconds to a few tens of minutes. Much of this energy appears as energetic electrons and ions, which produce a wide range of observable radiations. These radiations, in turn, are valuable diagnostics of the acceleration mechanism, the identification of which is the fundamental goal of solar flare research. The specific mechanism we proposed to investigate was based on cascading Alfven waves, the essence of which was as follows: During the primary flare energy release, it is widely believed that magnetic free energy is made available through the large-scale restructuring of the flare magnetic field. Any perturbation of a magnetic field will lead to the formation of MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) waves of wavelength comparable to the initial scale of the perturbation. Since the scalesize of a flare energy release region will likely be 10(exp 8)-10(exp 9) cm, the MHD waves will be of very long wavelength. However, it is well known that wave steepening will lead to a cascade of wave energy to smaller wavelengths. Now, MHD waves consist of two specific modes-the Alfven wave and the fast mode wave, and it is the Alfven wave which can interact with the ambient ions and accelerate them via cyclotron resonance. As the Alfven waves cascade to smaller wavenumbers, they can resonate with ions of progressively lower energy, until they eventually (actually, this is less than approx. 1 s) can resonate with ions in the thermal distribution. These ions are then energized out of the thermal background and, since lower-frequency waves are already present as a result of the cascading, to relativistic energies. Hence, cascading Alfven waves naturally accelerate ions from thermal to

  7. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-09-10

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast ({>=}1000 km s{sup -1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes ({alpha} values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 A fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes {>=}1 pr cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}) and (b) fast CMEs were {approx}1.3-1.4 compared to {approx}1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and {approx}2 for the peak 1-8 A fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of {approx}0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  8. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  9. Statistical study of spatio-temporal distribution of precursor solar flares associated with major flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenge, N.; Ballai, I.; Baranyi, T.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the spatio-temporal distribution of precursor flares during the 24 h interval preceding M- and X-class major flares and the evolution of follower flares. Information on associated (precursor and follower) flares is provided by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Flare list, while the major flares are observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system satellites between 2002 and 2014. There are distinct evolutionary differences between the spatio-temporal distributions of associated flares in about one-day period depending on the type of the main flare. The spatial distribution was characterized by the normalized frequency distribution of the quantity δ (the distance between the major flare and its precursor flare normalized by the sunspot group diameter) in four 6 h time intervals before the major event. The precursors of X-class flares have a double-peaked spatial distribution for more than half a day prior to the major flare, but it changes to a lognormal-like distribution roughly 6 h prior to the event. The precursors of M-class flares show lognormal-like distribution in each 6 h subinterval. The most frequent sites of the precursors in the active region are within a distance of about 0.1 diameter of sunspot group from the site of the major flare in each case. Our investigation shows that the build-up of energy is more effective than the release of energy because of precursors.

  10. Statistical study of spatio-temporal distribution of precursor solar flares associated with major flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenge, N.; Ballai, I.; Baranyi, T.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the spatio-temporal distribution of precursor flares during the 24-hour interval preceding M- and X-class major flares and the evolution of follower flares. Information on associated (precursor and follower) flares is provided by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Flare List, while the major flares are observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system satellites between 2002 and 2014. There are distinct evolutionary differences between the spatio-temporal distributions of associated flares in about one day period depending on the type of the main flare. The spatial distribution was characterised by the normalised frequency distribution of the quantity δ (the distance between the major flare and its precursor flare normalised by the sunspot group diameter) in four 6-hour time intervals before the major event. The precursors of X-class flares have a double-peaked spatial distribution for more than half a day prior to the major flare, but it changes to a lognormal-like distribution roughly 6 hours prior to the event. The precursors of M-class flares show lognormal-like distribution in each 6-hour subinterval. The most frequent sites of the precursors in the active region are within a distance of about 0.1 diameter of sunspot group from the site of the major flare in each case. Our investigation shows that the build-up of energy is more effective than the release of energy because of precursors.

  11. Acceleration of electrons during the flash phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the electron acceleration process operating during the flash phase of solar flares are deduced from the high time resolution observations of impulsive solar X rays greater than or equal to 10 keV and other flash phase emissions from small solar flares, and the implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. Prediction and warning system of SEP events and solar flares for risk estimation in space launch operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rigo, Alberto; Núñez, Marlon; Qahwaji, Rami; Ashamari, Omar; Jiggens, Piers; Pérez, Gustau; Hernández-Pajares, Manuel; Hilgers, Alain

    2016-07-01

    A web-based prototype system for predicting solar energetic particle (SEP) events and solar flares for use by space launch operators is presented. The system has been developed as a result of the European Space Agency (ESA) project SEPsFLAREs (Solar Events Prediction system For space LAunch Risk Estimation). The system consists of several modules covering the prediction of solar flares and early SEP Warnings (labeled Warning tool), the prediction of SEP event occurrence and onset, and the prediction of SEP event peak and duration. In addition, the system acquires data for solar flare nowcasting from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)-based techniques (GNSS Solar Flare Detector, GSFLAD and the Sunlit Ionosphere Sudden Total Electron Content Enhancement Detector, SISTED) as additional independent products that may also prove useful for space launch operators.

  13. Predicting the Response of the Mars Ionosphere to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, K.; Withers, P.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased soft X-ray irradiance during solar flares generates increased electron densities in the lower ionosphere of Mars. The relative changes in electron density during a flare are greater for larger flares and also at lower altitudes and larger flares, due to the wavelength dependence of both the flux increase during the flare and the absorption of flux by the neutral atmosphere. These relationships have been explored [Bougher et al. 2001, Fox et al. 2004, Mendillo et al. 2006, Mahajan et al. 2011, Lollo et al. 2012] but not quantified, which has impeded the validation of simulations of the ionospheric effects of solar flares. Such simulations are necessary for developing accurate descriptions of the physical processes governing ionospheric behavior under extreme conditions. We present a response function, a mathematical expression for the change in electron density during a solar flare as a function of the change in solar flux and an optical depth proxy. This response function is based on analysis of 20 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation electron density profiles measured during solar flares. Characterizing the response as a function of optical depth, rather than altitude, provides the best description of ionospheric variability during a flare; otherwise non-negligible solar zenith angle effects are present. We demonstrate that the response function can be used to predict ionospheric electron densities during a specified solar flare by reproducing profiles known to be disturbed by a solar flare. We also demonstrate that the response function can be used to infer the strength of solar flares not visible at Earth by finding the flux enhancement required to reproduce an apparently flare affected profile given an undisturbed profile on the same date.

  14. Stochastic Acceleration of Electrons in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Chandran, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    Stochastic particle acceleration (SPA) is a process in which turbulent fluctuations or randomly phased waves energize particles. We develop an SPA model for electron acceleration in solar flares based on turbulent fast magnetosonic waves and transit-time damping. Our model is two dimensional in both velocity space and wavenumber space, so that it takes into account anisotropy in the wave power spectrum P and electron distribution function f. We use quasilinear theory to obtain a set of equations that describes the coupled evolution of P and f. We solve these equations numerically, and find that the electron distribution function develops a power-law-like non-thermal tail between energies Emin and Emax. We obtain approximate analytic expressions for Emin and Emax that describe how these minimum and maximum energies depend upon plasma parameters such as the electron temperature and number density. We compare our results to previous studies that assume that P and f are isotropic and use our analysis to explain the observed hard x-ray spectrum seen in the June 27, 1980 flare. In our numerical simulations, the power-law indices of the electron energy spectra range from -2.3 to -4.4. The absolute values of these indices are larger than the corresponding values in studies with isotropic P and f and closer to the observed values in solar flares.

  15. Particle acceleration in solar flares - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    1992-01-01

    Contrary to our historical understanding, the energetic particles in most major solar proton events do not come from the flare itself. The particle abundances, ionization states, time evolution, and longitude distributions all indicate that the particles are accelerated from the ambient plasma by a shock wave driven by a coronal mass ejection in these events. In contrast, the particles that do come from impulsive solar flares are unique in character. These particles are electron rich, have He-3/He-4 enhancements of up to 10,000, and enhancements in heavy elements such as Fe/C by factors of 10. The high ionization state of Fe, +20 indicates that the material has been heated to temperatures of about 2 x 10 exp 7 K. It is generally believed that preferential heating by selective absorption of plasma waves is combined with stochastic acceleration in these events. Recent studies of the broad gamma-ray lines emitted by energetic particles within the flare loops indicate that they are also Fe-rich, He-3 rich and proton-poor like the particles seen at 1 AU. In large impulsive events, particles from the impulsive phase may be reaccelerated by a coronal blast-wave shock.

  16. Solar Aurora and a White Light Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    A white light flare analyzed by Krucker et al. (2011) poses a severe challenge to the solar physicist because of the high energy fluxes implied by a hitherto not achieved spatial resolution of simultaneous observations with Hinode and RHESSI. A scenario based on the auroral acceleration mechanism applied to flare conditions, 'Solar Aurora', is able to reproduce the observations, but implies several far-reaching assumptions on the mechanism as well as on the environmental parameters. Unavoidable consequences exist with regard to the spatial and temporal scales. They are extremely short because of the high density of the corona and the need for an energy conversion process involving some kind of anomalous resistivity, i.e. extremely high electric current densities. A further postulate is that of spontaneous propagation of an energy conversion front (ENF), once established, in three dimensions. It is assumed that about one half of the converted energy appears in form of runaway electrons. Obliqueness of the ENFs prevents the existence of a return current problem for the emerging runaway electrons. The key flare parameters are formulated quantitatively in terms of the environmental properties. Transverse length scales turn out to be in the ten centimeter range, time-scales in the range of one millisecond. The energy conversion occurs in 10E3 -10E4 ENFs just above the transition region in a background field of the order of 2000 G. Observational consequences are being discussed.

  17. BATSE flare observations in Solar Cycle 22

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Dennis, B. R.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    The Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) group at GSFC has developed and is maintaining a quick-look analysis system for solar flare hard x-ray data from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the recently launched Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO). The instrument consists, in part, of 8 large planar detectors, each 2025 sq cm, placed on the corners of the GRO spacecraft with the orientation of the faces being those of a regular octahedron. Although optimized for the detection of gamma-ray bursts, these detectors are far more sensitive than any previous spacecraft-borne hard x-ray flare instrumentation both for the detection of small microflares and the resolution of fine temporal structures. The data in this BATSE solar data base are from the discriminator large area (DISCLA) rates. From each of eight detectors there are hard x-ray data in four energy channels, 25-50, 50-100, 100-300, and greater than 300 keV with a time resolution of 1.024 seconds. These data are suitable for temporal correlation with data at other wavelengths, and they provide a first look into the BATSE and other GRO instrument flare data sets. The BATSE and other GRO principle investigator groups should be contacted for the availability of data sets at higher time or spectral resolution or at higher energies.

  18. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2.

  19. Acceleration of runaway electrons in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam-taaheri, E.; Goertz, C.K. )

    1990-03-01

    The dc electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the evolution of the runaway tail are studied numerically, using a relativistic quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. A small field-aligned electric field is turned on at a certain time. The resulting distribution function from the runaway process is used to calculate the synchrotron emission during the evolution of the runaway tail. It is found that, during the runaway tail formation, which lasts a few tens of seconds for typical solar flare conditions, the synchrotron emission level is low, almost ot the same order as the emission from the thermal plasma, at the high-frequency end of the spectrum. However, the emission is enhanced explosively in a few microseconds by several orders of magnitude at the time the runaway tail stops growing along the magnetic field and tends toward isotropy due to the pitch-angle scattering of the fast particles. Results indicate that, in order to account for the observed synchrotron emission spectrum of a typical solar flare, the electric field acceleration phase must be accompanied or preceded by a heating phase which yields an enhanced electron temperature of about 2-15 keV in the flare region if the electric field is 0.1-0.2 times the Dreicer field and cyclotron-to-plasma frequency ratios are of order 1-2. 23 refs.

  20. A slingshot model for solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    Recent observations of intense, impulsive gamma-ray and X-ray-emitting solar flares underline the suddenness of these events. The simultaneous emission of X-rays greater than 40 keV from electron bremsstrahlung and gamma-rays requiring several MeV protons shows that all particles must be accelerated in less than 5 s. This paper proposes a simple model to explain such events, using the energy stored in the stretched field lines of a coronal arch. When reconnection occurs at the top of the arch, field lines retract like stretched rubber bands, sweeping up plasma and acting like a piston or slingshot. When the slug of plasma caught in the magnetic fields strikes the photosphere, it deposits its considerable kinetic energy, heating and compressing the intruding slug. Ten slugs of 100 km radius striking the photosphere may account for the 10 to the 29th ergs radiation from loop flares.

  1. Millimeter Observation of Solar Flares with Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. F.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We present the investigation of two solar flares on February 17 and May 13, 2013, studied in radio from 5 to 405 GHz (RSTN, POEMAS, SST), and in X-rays up to 300 keV (FERMI and RHESSI). The objective of this work is to study the evolution and energy distribution of the population of accelerated electrons and the magnetic field configuration. For this we constructed and fit the radio spectrum by a gyro synchrotron model. The optically thin spectral indices from radio observations were compared to that of the hard X-rays, showing that the radio spectral index is harder than the latter by 2. These flares also presented 10-15 % circular polarized emission at 45 and 90 GHz that suggests that the sources are located at different legs of an asymmetric loop.

  2. Isotopic overabundances and the energetic particle model of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Enriquez, R.; Bravo, S.

    1985-01-01

    According to the energetic particle model of solar flares particles are efficiently accelerated in the magnetic field loop of an active region (AR) by hydromagnetic turbulence. It is demonstrated that the isotopic overabundances observed in some flares are not a consequence of the flare itself but are characteristic of the plasma in the AR. Only when a flare releases the plasma into the interplanetary space it is possible to observe this anomalous composition at spacecraft locations.

  3. Radio Emissions Precursors of Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares Recorded by CALLISTO-BR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Francisco; Cunha-Silva, Rafael; Galdino, Marcela; Sodré, Zuleika

    2016-07-01

    A solar flare consists in an eruptive process and involves a sudden release of energy generated by processes carried on from instabilities in the magnetic configuration at solar atmosphere, generating emissions at different wavelengths. Usually, the pre-flare phase presents an increasing of soft X-ray, ultraviolet and radio emissions. In this work, we present a survey of solar radio emission recorded in metric wavelengths (45 - 250 MHz) by CALLISTO-BR spectrograph, belong to the e-Callisto network, associated with pre-flare phase of solar X-rays flares. A sample of 281 radio emissions was analyzed, and 120 were identified as precursor emissions of X-rays flares. The main results of the statistics can be summarized as: (a) 55% of the precursor radio emissions start less than 60 minutes before the beginning of the associated X-ray flare and about 20% start less than 20 minutes before the X-ray emission; (b) 27% of flares with precursor emissions are classified as B class, 61% of C class, and less than 22% of M class. No precursors radio emissions were associated with X class flare; (c) about 42% of radio precursor emissions are of type III bursts and 33% have complex morphology, as drifting pulsating structures. Analysis of global emission trends recorded during the precursor phase of the C4.8 flare of February 15, 2011 (14:32-14:51 UT) is also presented. The occurrence of radio emission during the pre-impulsive phase of a solar flare suggests the presence of plasma turbulence in the active region, since during the impulsive phase, when the energy is released, occur the heating of the plasma and increasing of soft X-ray emission as identified in the event analyzed. The results are presented and discussed.

  4. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  5. Space observations of comets during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon; Ibodov, Firuz S.

    Problems connected with mechanisms for comet outbursts as well as for gamma-ray bursts remain open. Meantime, calculations show that an irradiation of a certain class of cometary nuclei, having high specific electric resistance, by intense fluxes of energetic protons and posi-tively charged ions with kinetic energies more than 1 MeV/nucleon, ejected from the Sun during strong solar flares, can produce a macroscopic high-voltage electric double layer with positive charge in the subsurface region of the nucleus, during irradiation time of the order of 10-100 hours at heliocentric distances around 1-10 AU. The maximum electric energy accumulated in such layer will be restricted by discharge potential of the layer material. For the comet nuclei with the typical radius of the order of 1-10 km the accumulated energy of such natural electric capacitor is comparable to the energy of large comet outbursts that are estimated on the basis of ground-based optical observations of comets. The impulse X-ray radiation anticipated from the high-voltage electric discharge of the capacitor may serve as an indicator of realization of the processes above considered. Therefore, space observations of comets and pseudo-asteroids of cometary origin, having brightness correlation with solar activity, using space X-ray obser-vatories during strong solar flares are very interesting for the physics of comets as well as for high energy astrophysics.

  6. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  7. Magnetic reconnection and solar flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    Reconnection models of the main phase of large solar flares are used to explain the energetics and the motions of the large flare loops that occur during this phase. Correct predictions for the density and temperature of the X-ray emitting loops are obtained by coupling magnetic reconnection with chromospheric ablation. In the reconnection models the ablation is driven by the thermal conduction of heat along magnetic field lines connecting the reconnection shocks in the corona with the flare ribbons in the chromosphere. Combining the compressible reconnection theory of Soward and Priest (1982) with the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) subshock criteria of Coroniti (1970) shows that the Petschek-type slow-mode shocks in the vicinity of the x-line always dissociate into pairs of isothermal slow-mode subshocks and thermal conduction fronts. The rate of expansion of the loops is a function of the reconnection rate, and loops can be evolving self-similarly in time with their height increasing as sq root t and the reconnection rate decreasing as t to the minus 1.

  8. An essay on sunspots and solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    1984-11-01

    The author reviews some of the recent findings on large-scale magnetic fields and sunspots. Then, instead of relying on the hypothetical flux tube beneath the photosphere, he considers an amplification process of the observed large-scale fields by a dynamo process on the basis of the observed and possible photospheric shear flows. Thus, the photosphere is considered as an active medium, rather than the passive medium through which the hypothetical flux tube merely penetrates. Specifically, the author considers the dynamo process associated with vortex motions which can supply the power needed for the formation of sunspots from the observed weak field and the power needed for solar flares.

  9. The acceleration and propagation of solar flare energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Ramaty, R.; Zweibel, E. G.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the most pertinent data on solar energetic particles is presented, and the implications of the data are discussed, taking into account radio emissions, hard X-rays, gamma rays, energy spectra and electron-proton correlations, chemical compositions, and isotopic and ionic compositions. The mechanisms of solar flare particle acceleration are considered along with solar flare particle spectra in interplanetary space. Attention is given to stochastic acceleration, shock acceleration, acceleration in direct electric fields, the mean free paths of solar electrons and protons in interplanetary space, and an illustration of the probable effect of adiabatic deceleration on the spectra of solar flare ions at the time of maximum.

  10. SDO's View of May 5, 2010 Solar Flare - With Timeline

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a composite view of the solar flare on May 5, 2010, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) cameras in multiple wavelengths (211, 193, 17...

  11. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  12. SECONDARY FLARE RIBBONS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Yang, Shuhong E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn

    2014-02-20

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we statistically investigate the flare ribbons (FRs) of 19 X-class flares of the 24th solar cycle from 2010 June to 2013 August. Of these 19 flares, the source regions of 16 can be observed by AIA and the FRs of each flare are well detected, and 11 of the 16 display multiple ribbons. Based on the ribbon brightness and the relationship between the ribbons and post-flare loops, we divide the multiple ribbons into two types: normal FRs, which are connected by post-flare loops and have been extensively investigated, and secondary flare ribbons (SFRs), which are weaker than the FRs, not connected by post-flare loops, and always have a short lifetime. Of the 11 SFRs, 10 appear simultaneously with the FRs, and none of them have post-flare loops. The last one, on the other hand, appears 80 minutes later than the FR, lasts almost two hours, and also has no post-flare loops detected. We suggest that the magnetic reconnection associated with this SFR is triggered by the blast wave that results from the main flare. These observations imply that in some flare processes, more than two sets of magnetic loops or more than twice the number of magnetic reconnections are involved.

  13. The Origin of the Solar Flare Waiting-Time Distribution.

    PubMed

    Wheatland

    2000-06-20

    It was recently pointed out that the distribution of times between solar flares (the flare waiting-time distribution) follows a power law for long waiting times. Based on 25 years of soft X-ray flares observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite instruments, it is shown that (1) the waiting-time distribution of flares is consistent with a time-dependent Poisson process and (2) the fraction of time the Sun spends with different flaring rates approximately follows an exponential distribution. The second result is a new phenomenological law for flares. It is shown analytically how the observed power-law behavior of the waiting times originates in the exponential distribution of flaring rates. These results are argued to be consistent with a nonstationary avalanche model for flares. PMID:10859130

  14. Study of the Influences of the Ionospheric Responses to the Solar Flares by the Solar Flare Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Electron densities in the ionosphere increase during solar flares due to the sudden increase in the solar irradiance at soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelengths. In this study, we perform simulations for a list of solar flares with different classes and locations on the solar disk (center-to-limb variations) using the Global Ionosphere and Thermosphere Model (GITM). First, we make an analysis of magnitudes and distribution of the TEC perturbations due to different solar flares. Solar flares occurring in different seasons are chosen from the list in order to examine how perturbations of electron densities depend on altitudes (E and F regions), latitudes (seasonal variations) and longitudes (sunrise, dayside and sunset), as well as the time dependences of the increasing and decaying of the electron densities around the flares. Also, we investigate the TEC data by the global GPS network from the Madrigal database for the solar flares on the list, determining the characteristics of solar flare that would allow them to be detected by the ground-based GPS observations. The TEC data by GPS and by GITM are compared to determine how well the modeling and observations match each other during different solar flares.

  15. PRODUCTIVITY OF SOLAR FLARES AND MAGNETIC HELICITY INJECTION IN ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-hong; Wang Haimin; Chae, Jongchul

    2010-07-20

    The main objective of this study is to better understand how magnetic helicity injection in an active region (AR) is related to the occurrence and intensity of solar flares. We therefore investigate the magnetic helicity injection rate and unsigned magnetic flux, as a reference. In total, 378 ARs are analyzed using SOHO/MDI magnetograms. The 24 hr averaged helicity injection rate and unsigned magnetic flux are compared with the flare index and the flare-productive probability in the next 24 hr following a measurement. In addition, we study the variation of helicity over a span of several days around the times of the 19 flares above M5.0 which occurred in selected strong flare-productive ARs. The major findings of this study are as follows: (1) for a sub-sample of 91 large ARs with unsigned magnetic fluxes in the range from (3-5) x 10{sup 22} Mx, there is a difference in the magnetic helicity injection rate between flaring ARs and non-flaring ARs by a factor of 2; (2) the GOES C-flare-productive probability as a function of helicity injection displays a sharp boundary between flare-productive ARs and flare-quiet ones; (3) the history of helicity injection before all the 19 major flares displayed a common characteristic: a significant helicity accumulation of (3-45) x 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2} during a phase of monotonically increasing helicity over 0.5-2 days. Our results support the notion that helicity injection is important in flares, but it is not effective to use it alone for the purpose of flare forecast. It is necessary to find a way to better characterize the time history of helicity injection as well as its spatial distribution inside ARs.

  16. Solar Flare Super-Events: When they Can Occur and the Energy Limits of their Realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, Vitaly N.

    2015-03-01

    For the successful development of terrestrial civilization it is necessary to estimate the space factors, including phenomena on Sun, which can ruin it or cause such catastrophic loss, that the restoration to the initial level can take unacceptably long time. Super-powerful solar flares are the only such phenomena. Therefore an attempt is undertaken to estimate the possibility of such super-event occurrence at this stage of our star evolution. Since solar flare events are the consequence of the newly emerging magnetic fluxes interacting with the already existing magnetic fields of active regions, are investigated the observed cases which lead to the realization of such super-events. From the observations of the maximal magnetic fluxes during the period of reliable solar observations, the conclusion is made that the super- extreme solar flares cannot significantly exceed the most powerful solar flares which have already been observed. On the statistics of the reliable solar cycles the sunspot groups, in which occurred the most powerful solar super-events (August- September 1859 - solar cycle 10; June 1991 - SC 22; October-November 2003 - SC 23) appeared in the periods of the solar magnetic field reorganization between the epochs of "increased" and "lowered" solar activity.

  17. The Characteristics of Solar X-Class Flares and CMEs: A Paradigm for Stellar Superflares and Eruptions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harra, Louise K.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Janvier, Miho; Toriumi, Shin; Hudson, Hugh; Matthews, Sarah; Woods, Magnus M.; Hara, Hirohisa; Guedel, Manuel; Kowalski, Adam; Osten, Rachel; Kusano, Kanya; Lueftinger, Theresa

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores the characteristics of 42 solar X-class flares that were observed between February 2011 and November 2014, with data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and other sources. This flare list includes nine X-class flares that had no associated CMEs. In particular our aim was to determine whether a clear signature could be identified to differentiate powerful flares that have coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from those that do not. Part of the motivation for this study is the characterization of the solar paradigm for flare/CME occurrence as a possible guide to the stellar observations; hence we emphasize spectroscopic signatures. To do this we ask the following questions: Do all eruptive flares have long durations? Do CME-related flares stand out in terms of active-region size vs. flare duration? Do flare magnitudes correlate with sunspot areas, and, if so, are eruptive events distinguished? Is the occurrence of CMEs related to the fraction of the active-region area involved? Do X-class flares with no eruptions have weaker non-thermal signatures? Is the temperature dependence of evaporation different in eruptive and non-eruptive flares? Is EUV dimming only seen in eruptive flares? We find only one feature consistently associated with CME-related flares specifically: coronal dimming in lines characteristic of the quiet-Sun corona, i.e. 1 - 2 MK. We do not find a correlation between flare magnitude and sunspot areas. Although challenging, it will be of importance to model dimming for stellar cases and make suitable future plans for observations in the appropriate wavelength range in order to identify stellar CMEs consistently.

  18. An interacting loop model of solar flare bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of the strong heating produced at chromospheric levels during a solar flare burst, the local gas pressure can transiently attain very large values in certain regions. The effectiveness of the surrounding magnetic field at confining this high pressure plasma is therefore reduced and the flaring loop becomes free to expand laterally. In so doing it may drive magnetic field lines into neighboring, nonflaring, loops in the same active region, causing magnetic reconnection to take place and triggering another flare burst. The features of this interacting loop model are found to be in good agreement with the energetics and time structure of flare associated solar hard X-ray bursts.

  19. The standard flare model in three dimensions. II. Upper limit on solar flare energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulanier, G.; Démoulin, P.; Schrijver, C. J.; Janvier, M.; Pariat, E.; Schmieder, B.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar flares strongly affect the Sun's atmosphere as well as the Earth's environment. Quantifying the maximum possible energy of solar flares of the present-day Sun, if any, is thus a key question in heliophysics. Aims: The largest solar flares observed over the past few decades have reached energies of a few times 1032 erg, possibly up to 1033 erg. Flares in active Sun-like stars reach up to about 1036 erg. In the absence of direct observations of solar flares within this range, complementary methods of investigation are needed to assess the probability of solar flares beyond those in the observational record. Methods: Using historical reports for sunspot and solar active region properties in the photosphere, we scaled to observed solar values a realistic dimensionless 3D MHD simulation for eruptive flares, which originate from a highly sheared bipole. This enabled us to calculate the magnetic fluxes and flare energies in the model in a wide paramater space. Results: Firstly, commonly observed solar conditions lead to modeled magnetic fluxes and flare energies that are comparable to those estimated from observations. Secondly, we evaluate from observations that 30% of the area of sunspot groups are typically involved in flares. This is related to the strong fragmentation of these groups, which naturally results from sub-photospheric convection. When the model is scaled to 30% of the area of the largest sunspot group ever reported, with its peak magnetic field being set to the strongest value ever measured in a sunspot, it produces a flare with a maximum energy of ~6 × 1033 erg. Conclusions: The results of the model suggest that the Sun is able to produce flares up to about six times as energetic in total solar irradiance fluence as the strongest directly observed flare of Nov. 4, 2003. Sunspot groups larger than historically reported would yield superflares for spot pairs that would exceed tens of degrees in extent. We thus conjecture that superflare

  20. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  1. Searching for Missing Pieces for Solar Flare Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the state of the solar photospheric magnetic field at a single instant in time does not appear sufficient to uniquely predict the size and timing of impending solar flares. Such knowledge may provide necessary conditions, such as estimates of the magnetic energy needed for a flare to occur. Given the necessary conditions, it is often assumed that the evolution of the field, possibly by only a small amount, may trigger the onset of a flare. We present the results of a study using time series of photospheric vector field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to quantitatively parameterize both the state and evolution of solar active regions - their complexity, magnetic topology and energy - as related to solar flare events. We examine both extensive and intensive parameters and their short-term temporal behavior, in the context of predicting flares at various thresholds. Statistical tests based on nonparametric Discriminant Analysis are used to compare pre-flare epochs to a control group of flare-quiet epochs and active regions. Results regarding the type of photospheric signature examined and the efficacy of using the present state vs. temporal evolution to predict solar flares is quantified by standard skill scores. This work is made possible by contracts NASA NNH12CG10C and NOAA/SBIR WC-133R-13-CN-0079.

  2. The Conundrum of the Solar Pre-Flare Photospheric State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, KD; Barnes, Graham; Wagner, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the state of the solar photospheric magnetic field at a single instant in time does not appear sufficient to predict the size and timing of impending solar flares. Such knowledge may provide necessary conditions, such as the free magnetic energy needed for a flare to occur. Given the necessary conditions, it is often assumed that the evolution of the field, possibly by only a small amount, may trigger the onset of a flare. We present the results of a study using time series of photospheric vector field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to quantitatively parameterize both the state and evolution of solar active regions - their complexity, magnetic topology and energy - as related to solar flare events. We examine both extensive and intensive parameters and their temporal behavior, in the context of both large and small flaring episodes. Statistical tests based on nonparametric Discriminant Analysis are used to compare pre-flare epochs to a control group of flare-quiet epochs and active regions. Results regarding the type of photospheric signature examined and the efficacy of using the present state vs. temporal evolution to predict solar flares is quantified by standard skill scores.This work is made possible by contracts NASA NNH12CG10C and NOAA/SBIR WC-133R-13-CN-0079.

  3. Decimetric gyrosynchrotron emission during a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.; Benz, A. O.; Wiehl, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A decimetric, microwave, and hard X-ray burst was observed during a solar flare in which the radio spectrum below peak flux fits an f+2 power law over more than a decade in frequency. The spectrum is interpreted to mean that the radio emission originated in a homogeneous, thermal, gyrosynchrotron source. This is the first time that gyrosynchrotron radiation has been identified at such low decimetric frequencies (900-998) MHz). The radio emission was cotemporal with the largest single hard X-ray spike burst ever reported. The spectrum of the hard X-ray burst can be well represented by a thermal bremsstrahlung function over the energy range from 30 to 463 keV at the time of maximum flux. The temporal coincidence and thermal form of both the X-ray and radio spectra suggest a common source electron distribution. The unusual low-frequency extent of the single-temperature thermal radio spectrum and its association with the hard X-ray burst imply that the source had an area approx. 10(18) sq cm a temperature approx 5x10(8) K, an electron density approx. 7.10(9) cu cm and a magnetic field of approx. 120 G. H(alpha) and 400-800 MHz evidence suggest that a loop structure of length 10,000 km existed in the flare active region which could have been the common, thermal source of the observed impulsive emissions.

  4. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of adiabatic heating in two impulsive solar flares on the basis of dynamic X-ray spectra in the 28-254 keV range, H-alpha, microwave, and meter-wave radio observations. It is found that the X-ray spectra of the events are like those of thermal bremsstrahlung from single-temperature plasmas in the 10-60 keV range if photospheric albedo is taken into account. The temperature-emission correlation indicates adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion and that the electron distribution remains isotropic. H-alpha data suggest compressive energy transfer. The projected areas and volumes of the flares are estimated assuming that X-ray and microwave emissions are produced in a single thermal plasma. Electron densities of about 10 to the 9th/cu cm are found for homogeneous, spherically symmetric sources. It is noted that the strong self-absorption of hot-plasma gyrosynchrotron radiation reveals low magnetic field strengths.

  5. Development of Daily Solar Maximum Flare Flux Forecast Models for Strong Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seulki; Chu, Hyoungseok

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a set of daily solar maximum flare flux forecast models for strong flares using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods. We consider input parameters as solar activity data from January 1996 to December 2013 such as sunspot area, X-ray maximum flare flux and weighted total flux of the previous day, and mean flare rates of McIntosh sunspot group (Zpc) and Mount Wilson magnetic classification. For a training data set, we use the same number of 61 events for each C-, M-, and X-class from Jan. 1996 to Dec. 2004, while other previous models use all flares. For a testing data set, we use all flares from Jan. 2005 to Nov. 2013. The statistical parameters from contingency tables show that the ANN models are better for maximum flare flux forecasting than the MLR models. A comparison between our maximum flare flux models and the previous ones based on Heidke Skill Score (HSS) shows that our all models for X-class flare are much better than the other models. According to the Hitting Fraction (HF), which is defined as a fraction of events satisfying that the absolute differences of predicted and observed flare flux in logarithm scale are less than equal to 0.5, our models successfully forecast the maximum flare flux of about two-third events for strong flares. Since all input parameters for our models are easily available, the models can be operated steadily and automatically on daily basis for space weather service.

  6. Ultraheavy element enrichment in impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David

    2014-10-10

    Particle acceleration by cascading Alfvén wave turbulence was suggested as being responsible for energetic particle populations in {sup 3}He-rich solar flares. In particular, it was noted that the damping of the turbulence by the tail of the particle distribution in rigidity naturally leads to the dramatic enhancement of a pre-accelerated species—as {sup 3}He is posited to be—and superheavy elements. The subsequent detection of large enrichment of ultraheavies, relative to iron, has apparently confirmed this prediction, lending support to the original idea. It is shown here that this picture could be somewhat sharpened by progress in understanding the three-dimensional geometrical details of cascading Alfvén turbulence. The mechanism may be relevant in other astrophysical environments where the source of turbulence is nonmagnetic, such as clusters of galaxies.

  7. Stochastic acceleration of solar flare protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The acceleration of solar flare protons is considered by cyclotron damping of intense Alfven wave turbulence in a magnetic trap. The energy diffusion coefficient is computed for a near-isotropic distribution of super-Alfvenic protons and a steady-state solution for the particle spectrum is found for both transit-time and diffusive losses out of the ends of the trap. The acceleration time to a characteristic energy approximately 20 Mev/nucl can be as short as 10 sec. On the basis of phenomenological arguments an omega/2 frequency dependence for the Alfven wave spectrum is inferred. The correlation time of the turbulence lies in the range .0005 less than tau/corr less than .05s.

  8. Long-period geomagnetic pulsations as solar flare precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhatov, N. A.; Obridko, V. N.; Revunov, S. E.; Snegirev, S. D.; Shadrukov, D. V.; Sheiner, O. A.

    2016-03-01

    We compare long-period pulsations of the horizontal component of the geomagnetic field at intervals that precede extreme solar flares. To this end, we use the wavelet-skeleton technique to process the geomagnetic field disturbances recorded at magnetic stations over a wide geographical range. The synchronization times of wavelet-skeleton spectral distributions of long-period pulsations of geomagnetic oscillations over all magnetic stations are shown as normalized histograms. A few days before an intense solar flare, the histograms show extremes. This means that these extremes can be regarded as flare precursors. The same technique is used to analyze the parameters of near-Earth space. The histograms obtained in this case are free of the aforementioned extrema and, therefore, cannot point to an upcoming flare. The goal of this study is to construct a correlation-spectral method for the short-term prediction of solar flare activity.

  9. Insights Into Categorization Of Solar Flares Using Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Norquist, D. C.

    2012-05-01

    Using time sequences of solar chromospheric images acquired using the USAF/NSO Improved Solar Observing Network (ISOON) prototype telescope, we have applied principal component analysis (PCA) to time-series of both erupting and non-erupting active regions. Our primary purpose is to develop an advanced data driven model for solar flare prediction using machine learning algorithms, with principal components as the input. Using the principal components we show a clear separation in the Eigen vectors. Eigen vectors fall into three major flaring categories: weak flares (GOES peak intensity < C4.0; intermediary flares (GOES peak intensity between C4.0 and C8.0) and, strong flares (GOES peak intensity > C8.0). In this paper, we will provide insights into implications for the underlying physical mechanisms that describe these three distinct categories. This work funded by the U. S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  10. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares. PMID:26785486

  11. CREAM Observation of January 20th Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Y.; Ahn, H. S.; Allison, P.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Beatty, J. J.; Bigongiari, G.; Boyle, P.; Childers, J. T.; Conklin, N. B.; Coutu, S.; Duvernois, M. A.; Ganel, O.; Han, J. H.; Hyun, H. J.; Jeon, J. A.; Kim, K. C.; Lee, J. K.; Lee, M. H.; Lutz, L.; Maestro, P.; Malinine, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Minnick, S.; Mognet, S. I.; Nam, S. W.; Nutter, S.; Park, H.; Park, I. H.; Park, N. H.; Seo, E. S.; Sina, R.; Swordy, S.; Wakely, S.; Wu, J.; Yang, J.; Zei, R.; Zinn, S. Y.

    2005-12-01

    The Cosmic Ray Energetics and Mass (CREAM) balloon instrument, designed to detect and measure the composition and spectra of high energy galactic cosmic ray particles, had its maiden flight on December 16 2004 and was afloat and taking data during the January 20th solar flare. The CREAM instrument consists of a finely segmented silicon charge detector, a timing charge detector, and several layers of scintillating fiber hodoscopes, as well as a calorimeter and transition radiation detectors to measure cosmic-ray energies above several hundred GeV. While the latter were not designed to be triggered by solar particles, signals were seen in the silicon charge detector and several layers of hodoscopes at the onset of the giant solar flare, indicating that solar flare particles were passing through the instrument. We will review our measurements and analysis of the data recorded during the solar flare.

  12. Understanding flaring solar-type stars seen by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David

    2012-02-01

    The early Kepler data show unambiguous and dramatic evidence of large-scale, massive white-light stellar flares on G and early-K dwarfs. The energies released in these flares are at least 103?104 times that of the largest solar flares ever seen, meaning that they put substantial energy into their circumstellar environments, and much of that energy may be in hard x-rays. At the same time, it is not clear from the Kepler data alone why these particular stars flare because there are many other stars with no evident flares that have similar rotation periods and amplitudes of variation. Are bouts of massive flaring episodic? Do the flaring stars have other properties (activity, v sin i, lithium, inter alia) that distinguish them? Are the flaring stars in close binaries? Keck HIRES spectra can address all these questions and more, and help us to more fully understand this important phenomenon that has critical implications for the formation and evolution of planets and, e! specially, for chemistry and astrobiology in those regions. These stars are also of potential great importance for understanding the flaring behavior of the Sun because white-light flares have not been seen on G stars before, and it is crucial to understand if these flaring stars are unusually young, in close pairs, or if they represent a broader phenomenon that has not yet been appreciated.

  13. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    2001-01-01

    The acceleration of a huge number of electrons and ions to relativistic energies over timescales ranging from several seconds to several tens of seconds is the fundamental problem in high-energy solar physics. The cascading turbulence model we have developed has been shown previously (e.g., Miller 2000; Miller & Roberts 1995; Miner, LaRosa, & Moore 1996) to account for all the bulk features (such as acceleration timescales, fluxes, total number of energetic particles, and maximum energies) of electron and proton acceleration in impulsive solar flares. While the simulation of this acceleration process is involved, the essential idea of the model is quite simple, and consists of just a few parts: 1. During the primary flare energy release phase, we assume that low-amplitude MHD Alfven and fast mode waves are excited at long wavelengths, say comparable to the size of the event (although the results are actually insensitive to this initial wavelength). While an assumption, this appears reasonable in light of the likely highly turbulent nature of the flare. 2. These waves then cascade in a Kolmogorov-like fashion to smaller wavelengths (e.g., Verma et al. 1996), forming a power-law spectral density in wavenumber space through the inertial range. 3. When the mean wavenumber of the fast mode waves has increased sufficiently, the transit-time acceleration rate (Miller 1997) for superAlfvenic electrons can overcome Coulomb energy losses, and these electrons are accelerated out of the thermal distribution and to relativistic energies (Miller et al. 1996). As the Alfven waves cascade to higher wavenumbers, they can cyclotron resonate with progressively lower energy protons. Eventually, they will resonate with protons in the tail of the thermal distribution, which will then be accelerated to relativistic energies as well (Miller & Roberts 1995). Hence, both ions and electrons are stochastically accelerated, albeit by different mechanisms and different waves. 4. When the

  14. The double solar flare of October 6, 1977

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valnichek, B.; Vedrenne, G.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Likin, O. B.; Morozova, E. I.; Niel, M.; Pisarenko, N. F.; Farnik, F.; Hurley, K.; Chambon, G.

    Prognoz-6 data are used to examine the energetic and temporal characteristics of the 1N double solar flare of October 6, 1977. The energetic characteristics are determined on the basis of an analysis of the parameters of charged-particle propagation in interplanetary space. The energy yield of the flare in the region of thermal and bremsstrahlung X-rays is calculated.

  15. Directionality of bremsstrahlung from relativistic electrons in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Ramaty, R.

    1985-01-01

    Angular and energy spectra of bremsstrahlung have been calculated from anisotropic electron distributions in solar flares. Results have been compared to observations of gamma-ray limb-brightening and to data on the variation of the gamma-ray spectrum with flare position on the sun.

  16. Solar Flare Probability depending on Sunspot Characteristics and Their Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Hong, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.; Lee, J.; Moon, Y.; Lee, D.

    2012-12-01

    Solar flare prediction has been at the core of space weather research and a number of different approaches have been developed since THEO (McIntosh, 1990) system was introduced. However, many of space weather operation centers, i.e. International Space Environment Service's Regional Warning Centers, still rely on traditional flare prediction methods like THEO. THEO uses the McIntosh classification as the knowledge base for flare prediction and also, rules of thumb are incorporated by a human forecaster, including spot growth, magnetic topology inferred from sunspot structure and previous flare activity. The method is apparently somewhat subjective, because the forecast decision depends on the expertise of an operator and it has not been evaluated statistically. In this study, we have investigated solar flare probability depending on several sunspot characteristics (McIntosh classification, Mt. Wilson magnetic classification, sunspot area and previous flare activity) and their changes for the past three days. For this, we used NOAA sunspot and flare catalog from August 1996 to February 2011. A new index, WFP(Weighted Flare Probability), which includes solar flare strength and its historical probability, is introduced to quantify the effective contribution of flare activity. We found several interesting results as follows. First, WFP index increases not only when the sunspot magnetic complexity increases but also when the magnetic complexity decreases with almost the same proportion. Second, the index also increases for both cases of sunspot area increase and decrease. This result might be the evidence that the change (flux emergence or flux cancelation) of magnetic flux may trigger a flare since sunspot area can be a good proxy of magnetic flux. Third, active regions having significant flare activity history are much more active than those without. We are applying the multi-dimensional regression method to these data and automating the process of THEO. We have a

  17. Development of Daily Maximum Flare-Flux Forecast Models for Strong Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seulki; Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Chu, Hyoungseok; Park, Jongyeob

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a set of daily maximum flare-flux forecast models for strong flares (M- and X-class) using multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) methods. Our input parameters are solar-activity data from January 1996 to December 2013 such as sunspot area, X-ray maximum, and weighted total flare flux of the previous day, as well as mean flare rates of McIntosh sunspot group (Zpc) and Mount Wilson magnetic classifications. For a training dataset, we used 61 events each of C-, M-, and X-class from January 1996 to December 2004. For a testing dataset, we used all events from January 2005 to November 2013. A comparison between our maximum flare-flux models and NOAA model based on true skill statistics (TSS) shows that the MLR model for X-class and the average of all flares (M{+}X-class) are much better than the NOAA model. According to the hitting fraction (HF), which is defined as a fraction of events satisfying the condition that the absolute differences of predicted and observed flare flux on a logarithm scale are smaller than or equal to 0.5, our models successfully forecast the maximum flare flux of about two-thirds of the events for strong flares. Since all input parameters for our models are easily available, the models can be operated steadily and automatically on a daily basis for space-weather services.

  18. CONSTRAINING SOLAR FLARE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURES WITH EVE AND RHESSI

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-06-20

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from ≲2 to ≳50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ∼2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to ≳10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ∼0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  19. Solar flare count periodicities in different X-ray flare classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng-Xin; Xu, Jing-Chen

    2016-04-01

    Using the Morlet wavelet transform and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), we investigate the periodic behaviours of C, M and X-class flare counts, respectively, recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) from 1983 May to 2014 December, which cover the two complete solar cycles (SCs) 22 and 23 as well as the part of declining phase of SC 21 and rise and maximum phases of SC 24. Analyses show that the periodic behaviours of various class flare counts are different. (1) Not all periods of various class flare counts appear dominant during the cycle maxima. For C-class flares, during SC 23, periods appear dominant during the maximum phase, however, compared to those during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase of SC 22; for M-class flares, during SCs 22 and 23, periods appear dominant during the cycle maxima; for X-class flares, during SC 22, almost all periods appear during the maximum phase; however, during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase compared to those during SC 22. (2) For C-class flares, the appearance of periods do not follow the amplitude of C-class flare cycles; while, for M and X-class flares, the appearance of periods follows the amplitude of the investigated corresponding class flare cycles. (3) From the overall trends, the 10 yr and longer time-scale trends of the monthly numbers of M and X-class flares, we can infer that the maximum values of the monthly M and X-class flare numbers would increase during SC 25.

  20. TOWARD RELIABLE BENCHMARKING OF SOLAR FLARE FORECASTING METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, D. Shaun; Higgins, Paul A.; Gallagher, Peter T.; McAteer, R. T. James

    2012-03-10

    Solar flares occur in complex sunspot groups, but it remains unclear how the probability of producing a flare of a given magnitude relates to the characteristics of the sunspot group. Here, we use Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite X-ray flares and McIntosh group classifications from solar cycles 21 and 22 to calculate average flare rates for each McIntosh class and use these to determine Poisson probabilities for different flare magnitudes. Forecast verification measures are studied to find optimum thresholds to convert Poisson flare probabilities into yes/no predictions of cycle 23 flares. A case is presented to adopt the true skill statistic (TSS) as a standard for forecast comparison over the commonly used Heidke skill score (HSS). In predicting flares over 24 hr, the maximum values of TSS achieved are 0.44 (C-class), 0.53 (M-class), 0.74 (X-class), 0.54 ({>=}M1.0), and 0.46 ({>=}C1.0). The maximum values of HSS are 0.38 (C-class), 0.27 (M-class), 0.14 (X-class), 0.28 ({>=}M1.0), and 0.41 ({>=}C1.0). These show that Poisson probabilities perform comparably to some more complex prediction systems, but the overall inaccuracy highlights the problem with using average values to represent flaring rate distributions.

  1. Study of 1991 November 02 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. Y.; Wang, H.

    1996-05-01

    We analyzed hard X-ray and microwave data for the solar flare BATSE #1791, which started at 1611UT and ended at 1656UT, on 2 November 1991. Data are available simultaneously from BATSE/LAD X-ray and OVRA microwave data base. This flare was particularly interesting, because of the deep cyclic intensity variation. We quantitatively compare the time variations in X-ray photon index and microwave spectral index (both high and low frequency), as well as microwave peak frequency at which the gyro-synchrotron radiation transits from optically-thin to optically thick. Using the time profile of the BASTE/LAD 25-50 KeV flux as a reference, the X-ray photon index profile is out of phase with it as expected; in addition, the microwave peak frequency profile and the low frequency slope profile are observed to be correlated with it. Interesting enough, the high frequency slope profile correlated with X-ray flux before the main peak and anti-correlated with it after the main peak. The relationship between X-ray photon peak counts and microwave peak fluxes is also studied. A plot of microwave peak flux versus X-ray photon peak count produces a curve tracing a tilted ellipse counter-clockwisely. This indicates that the X-ray peak counts arrive earlier than the corresponding microwave peak fluxes. Finally, we studied the time delays between X-ray and microwave flux peak as a function of frequency and found that delay increases as the frequency increases. The maximum delay time is found for the main peak, it is of about 72 seconds. Shorter delays are found for the other five sub-peaks.

  2. Energetic electrons in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new analysis was made of a thermal flare model proposed by Brown, Melrose, and Spicer (1979) and Smith and Lilliequist (1979). They assumed the source of impulsive hard X-rays to be a plasma at a temperature of order 10 to the 8th power K, initially located at the apex of a coronal arch, and confined by ion-acoustic turbulence in a collisionless conduction front. Such a source would expand at approximately the ion-sound speed, C sub S = square root of (k T sub e/m sub i), until it filled the arch. Brown, Melrose, and Spicer and Smith and Brown (1980) argued that the source assumed in this model would not explain the simultaneous impulsive microwave emission. In contrast, the new results presented herein suggest that this model leads to the development of a quasi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons that explains both the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. This implies that the source sizes can be determined from observations of the optically-thick portions of microwave spectra and the temperatures obtained from associated hard X-ray observations. In this model, the burst emission would rise to a maximum in a time, t sub r, approximately equal to L/c sub s, where L is the half-length of the arch. New observations of these impulsive flare emissions were analyzed herein to test this prediction of the model. Observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft and the Bern Radio Observatory are in good agreement with the model.

  3. The Efficiency of Solar Flares With Gamma-ray Emission of Solar Cosmic Rays Production.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, A. V.; Kurt, V. G.; Mavromichalaki, H.

    A statistical analysis of solar flares with gamma-ray emission measured by SMM (W.T. Westrand, at al.,1999, Ap.J, Suppl. Series, 409) and proton events occurrence based on the proton events catalog (A.Belov, at al.2001, Proc. 27th ICRC 2001, Ham- burg, 3465) was performed. We obtained the probabilities of the appearence of pro- ton fluxes near the Earth from the different fluence values of gamma-line emission, bremsstrahlung emissions and soft X-ray emission of the parent flares. This statisti- cal approach allows us to obtain if not precise than at least proper quantitative ratios than relate the flares with obvious evidences for proton production with the escaped from the Sun viciniy. We than look at the available data of soft X-ray flares time behaviour and show the exact timing of proton acceleration and probably shock for- mation comparing the soft X-ray injection function. The shock wave influence on the proton escaping process is shortly discussed.

  4. Signatures of the coalescence instability in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, H.; Tajima, T.; Brunel, F.

    1984-11-01

    Double sub-peak structures in the quasi periodic oscillations in the time profiles of solar flares in 1980 and 1982 are discussed. Computer simulations of the coalescence instability of two current loops agree with observations of the (widely differing) flares. The simultaneous accelerations of electrons and ions, and the double sub-peak structure in quasi periodic pulses are well explained. The double sub-peak structure is more pronounced when the currents in the two loops are sufficient for fast coalescence to occur. This corresponds to the 1980 flare. When the currents are insufficient for fast coalescence, the double sub-peak structure is less pronounced, as in the 1982 flare. Observations suggest the collision of the two microwave sources for the 1982 event. It is argued that this mechanism is a plausible particle acceleration mechanism in solar flares. (ESA)

  5. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  6. EVIDENCE FOR HOT FAST FLOW ABOVE A SOLAR FLARE ARCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Aoki, K.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Harra, L. K.; Shimizu, T.

    2013-10-10

    Solar flares are one of the main forces behind space weather events. However, the mechanism that drives such energetic phenomena is not fully understood. The standard eruptive flare model predicts that magnetic reconnection occurs high in the corona where hot fast flows are created. Some imaging or spectroscopic observations have indicated the presence of these hot fast flows, but there have been no spectroscopic scanning observations to date to measure the two-dimensional structure quantitatively. We analyzed a flare that occurred on the west solar limb on 2012 January 27 observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and found that the hot (∼30MK) fast (>500 km s{sup –1}) component was located above the flare loop. This is consistent with magnetic reconnection taking place above the flare loop.

  7. Studying the thermal/non-thermal crossover in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes work performed under contract NAS5-32584 for Phase 3 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 1 November 1993 through 1 November 1994. We have made spectral observations of the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emissions from solar flares using the Burst and Transit Source Experiment (BASTE) on CGRO. These measurements of their spectrum and time profile provided valuable information on the fundamental flare processes of energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport. Our scientific objective was to study both the thermal and non-thermal sources of solar flare hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  8. Studying the thermal/non-thermal crossover in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes work performed under contract NAS5-32584 for Phase 3 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 1 November 1993 through 1 November 1994. We have made spectral observations of the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emissions from solar flares using the Burst and Transit Source Experiment (BASTE) on CGRO. These measurements of their spectrum and time profile provided valuable information on the fundamental flare processes of energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport. Our scientific objective was to study both the thermal and non-thermal sources of solar flare hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  9. The Carrington solar flares of 1859: consequences on life.

    PubMed

    Muller, C

    2014-09-01

    The beginning of September 1859 was the occasion of the first and unique observation of a giant solar white light flare, auroral displays were observed at low latitudes and geomagnetic observatories recorded exceptional storms. This paper reviews the impact of the event on the earth system with a special emphasis on living processes using the historical record and current scientific analysis. The data used includes reports from the telegraph operators, mortality and morbidity records, proxies as agricultural production. Comparisons with later solar flare events will be attempted on the basis of the record and the consequences of an event of comparable magnitude to the 1859 set of flares will be discussed. PMID:25351684

  10. High-energy particles associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.; Klimas, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    High-energy particles, the so-called solar cosmic rays, are often generated in association with solar flares, and then emitted into interplanetary space. These particles, consisting of electrons, protons, and other heavier nuclei, including the iron-group, are accelerated in the vicinity of the flare. By studying the temporal and spatial varation of these particles near the earth's orbit, their storage and release mechanisms in the solar corona and their propagation mechanism can be understood. The details of the nuclear composition and the rigidity spectrum for each nuclear component of the solar cosmic rays are important for investigating the acceleration mechanism in solar flares. The timing and efficiency of the acceleration process can also be investigated by using this information. These problems are described in some detail by using observational results on solar cosmic rays and associated phenomena.

  11. On reflecting boundary behind the Earth's orbit at propagation of fast particles from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishkovskikh, A. S.; Filippov, A. T.

    1985-01-01

    The flares of solar cosmic rays (SCR) associated with the presence of shocks in interplanetary magnetic field and with their propagation at significant heliocentric distances were always of great interest. Some events and problems concerning the peculiarities of propagation of flare CR in the interplanetary medium are considered. The distinguishing feature of such events is the presence of shock front behind the Earth's orbit having formed either directly in the process of shock generation on the Sun or at large heliocentric distances as a result of the interaction of fast and slow quasistationary recurrent solar wind (SW) streams. Based on the experimental material it is shown that the significant nonlinear disturbances in IMF behind the Earth's orbit can yield the occurrence of the additional SCR flux from shock front region as a result of the interaction of flare flux with shock and a partial reflection from it.

  12. Solar Flare Hard X-ray Spikes Observed by RHESSI: a Statistical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianxia; Qiu, J.; Ding, M.; Wang, H.

    2013-07-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) spikes refer to fine time structures on timescales of seconds to milliseconds in high-energy HXR emission profiles during solar flare eruptions. We present a preliminary statistical investigation of temporal and spectral properties of HXR spikes. Using a three-sigma spike selection rule, we detected 184 spikes in 94 out of 322 flares with significant counts at given photon energies, which were detected from demodulated HXR light curves obtained by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). About one fifth of these spikes are also detected at photon energies higher than 100 keV. The statistical properties of the spikes are as follows. (1) HXR spikes are produced in both impulsive flares and long-duration flares with nearly the same occurrence rates. Ninety percent of the spikes occur during the rise phase of the flares, and about 70% occur around the peak times of the flares. (2) The time durations of the spikes vary from 0.2 to 2 s, with the mean being 1.0 s, which is not dependent on photon energies. The spikes exhibit symmetric time profiles with no significant difference between rise and decay times.(3) Among the most energetic spikes, nearly all of them have harder count spectra than their underlying slow-varying components. There is also a weak indication that spikes exhibiting time lags in high-energy emissions tend to have harder spectra than spikes with time lags in low-energy emissions.

  13. The dark side of the Solar Flare Myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, D. V.

    Gosling [1993, 1994] reviewed the growing observational evidence that traveling interplanetary shocks, large solar energetic particle (SEP) events, and large nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms are produced by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), not by solar flares. The growing evidence for CMEs as the cause of these phenomena constituted a declaration of independence from the flare community, and certainly squelched the attitude of benign neglect that had beset interplanetary phenomena and observations. In one case it produced hostile dismay that [Jack Gosling and a few other revisionists] would [wage an assault on the last 30 years of solar-flare research] based on the [low-grade optical data that the CME people use] [Zirin, 1994]. Calmer objections were raised by Hudson, Haisch, and Strong [1995], who accept the interplanetary consequences of CMEs but suggest that [it is shortsighted to distinguish CMEs and flares.

  14. Imaging X-Ray Polarimeter for Solar Flares (IXPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosack, Michael; Black, J. Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Shih, Albert Y.; Urba, Christian E.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of a balloon-borne Imaging X-ray Polarimeter for Solar flares (IX PS). This novel instrument, a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for photoelectric polarimetry, will be capable of measuring polarization at the few percent level in the 20-50 keV energy range during an M- or X class flare, and will provide imaging information at the approx.10 arcsec level. The primary objective of such observations is to determine the directivity of nonthermal high-energy electrons producing solar hard X-rays, and hence to learn about the particle acceleration and energy release processes in solar flares. Secondary objectives include the separation of the thermal and nonthermal components of the flare X-ray emissions and the separation of photospheric albedo fluxes from direct emissions.

  15. Statistical characterization of Strong and Mid Solar Flares and Sun EUV rate monitoring with GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte-Moreno, Enric; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Garcia-Rigo, Alberto; Beniguel, Yannick; Orus-Perez, Raul; Prieto-Cerdeira, Roberto; Schlueter, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The global network of permanent Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers has become an useful and affordable way of monitoring the Solar EUV flux rate, especially -for the time being- in the context of Major and Mid geoeffective intensity Solar Flares (M. Hernandez-Pajares et al., Space Weather, doi:10.1029/2012SW000826, 2012). In fact the maturity of this technique (GNSS Solar FLAre Indicator, GSFLAI) has allowed to incorporate it in operational real-time (RT) conditions, thanks to the availability of global GNSS datastreams from the RT International GNSS Network (M. Caissy et al, GPS World, June 1, 2012), and performed in the context of the MONITOR and MONITOR2 ESA-funded projects (Y. Beniguel et al., NAVITEC Proc., 978-1-4673-2011-5 IEEE, 2012). The main goal of this presentation is to summarize a detailed recent study of the statistical properties of Solar Flares (E. Monte and M. Hernandez-Pajares, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2014JA020206, 2014) by considering the GNSS proxy of EUV rate (GSFLAI parameter) computed independently each 30 seconds during the whole last solar cycle. An statistical model has been characterized that explains the empirical results such as (a) the persistence and presence of bursts of solar flares and (b) their long tail peak values of the solar flux variation, which can be characterized by: (1) A fractional Brownian model for the long-term dependence, and (2), a power law distribution for the time series extreme values. Finally, an update of the Solar Flares' occurrence during the recent months of Solar Activity, gathered in RT within MONITOR2 project, will close the paper.

  16. Unique solar flare of September 22, 2011: The suction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'ev, A. A.; Kirichek, E. A.; Ganiev, V. V.

    2013-12-01

    The specific features in the development of an X1 solar flare, which occurred on September 22, 2011, and was registered with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) device onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in the UV line (λ = 304 Å, He II), are analyzed. During the flare, which lasted about 12 h, cold plasma was sucked up with an increasing velocity from a very distant region into the low-lying hot region of flare energy release along a flat helical trajectory. This phenomenon fundamentally differs from a surge ejection, when matter previously ejected from the flare region returns to the flare hot zone under the action of gravity. Suction of cold plasma "from outside" into the hot flare region is interpreted in the scope of the rope flare mechanism, according to which an extremely inhomogeneous plasma density distribution in the cross-section originates in an emerging magnetic rope. In the region with a sharply decreased density (which is the suction region), the drift velocity in the current chanel can reach the ion thermal velocity, which inevitably results in the excitation of plasma turbulence and anomalous resistance, i.e., in the development of a flare.

  17. Solar flares and avalanches in driven dissipative systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.; Mctiernan, J. M.; Bromund, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    The contention of Lu and Hamilton (1991) that the energy release process in solar flares can be understood as avalanches of many small reconnection events is further developed. The dynamics of the complex magnetized plasma of solar active regions is modeled with a simple driven dissipative system, consisting of a vector field with local instabilities that cause rapid diffusion of the field. It is argued that the avalanches in this model are analogous to solar flares. The distributions of avalanches in this model are compared with the solar flare frequency distributions obtained from ISEE 3/ICE satellite observations. Quantitative agreement is found with the energy, peak luminosity, and duration distributions over four orders of magnitude in flare energy, from the largest flares down to the completeness limit of the observations. It is predicted that the power-law solar flare frequency distributions will be found to continue downward with the same logarithmic slopes to an energy of about 3 x 10 exp 25 ergs and duration of about 0.3 s, with deviations from power-law behavior below these values.

  18. Solar flare acceleration of solar wind - Influence of active region magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundstedt, H.; Wilcox, J. M.; Scherrer, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    The direction of the photospheric magnetic field at the site of a solar flare is a good predictor of whether the flare will accelerate solar wind plasma. If the field has a southward component, high-speed solar wind plasma is usually observed near the earth about 4 days later. If the field has a northward component, such high-speed solar wind is almost never observed. Southward-field flares may then be expected to have much larger terrestrial effects than northward flares.

  19. Hinode magnetic-field observations of solar flares for exploring the energy storage and trigger mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawabata, Yusuke

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares abruptly release the free energy stored as a non-potential magnetic field in the corona and may be accompanied by eruptions of the coronal plasma. Magnetic reconnection is considered as a physical process in which the magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy, thermal energy, and particle acceleration, but the location of magnetic reconnection is difficult to identify directly because of low emission measure at the reconnection region. We are still lack of observational knowledge on the 3D magnetic configuration and physical conditions for leading to flare trigger. Accurate measurements of vector magnetic fields at the solar photosphere, provided by the Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode, help us in exploring how the free energy is stored in the solar atmosphere and how the release of the energy is triggered. This presentation will review the magnetic field configuration and possible candidates for flare trigger primarily based on Hinode observations of some large flare events, which may include X5.4/X1.3 flares on 7 March 2012, X1.2 flare on 7 January 2014 and two M-class flares on 2 February 2014. The 7 March 2012 events were observed in an active region with delta-type sunspots, showing a strong shear in the entire magnetic system. For the sheared magnetic structure, the inclusion of a small-scale trigger field was identified near the polarity inversion line with excitation of a high-speed material flow in the horizontally oriented magnetic field formed nearly in parallel to the polarity inversion line. The observations suggest that gas dynamics at the solar surface play a vital role of leading to the onset of flares. The 7 January 2014 event is an exceptional event which most scientists would not be able to predict its occurrence. The flare unexpectedly happened apart from the sheared magnetic field region. The M-class flares on 2 February 2014 were observed in the magnetic field configuration, in which four magnetic domains were

  20. Implications of RHESSI Observations for Solar Flare Models and Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2006-01-01

    Observations of solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays provide the most direct information about the hottest plasma and energetic electrons and ions accelerated in flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has observed over 18000 solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays since its launch in February of 2002. RHESSI observes the full Sun at photon energies from as low as 3 keV to as high as 17 MeV with a spectral resolution on the order of 1 keV. It also provides images in arbitrary bands within this energy range with spatial resolution as good as 3 seconds of arc. Full images are typically produced every 4 seconds, although higher time resolution is possible. This unprecedented combination of spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution, spectral range and flexibility has led to fundamental advances in our understanding of flares. I will show RHESSI and coordinated observations that confirm coronal magnetic reconnection models for eruptive flares and coronal mass ejections, but also present new puzzles for these models. I will demonstrate how the analysis of RHESSI spectra has led to a better determination of the energy flux and total energy in accelerated electrons, and of the energy in the hot, thermal flare plasma. I will discuss how these energies compare with each other and with the energy contained in other flare-related phenomena such as interplanetary particles and coronal mass ejections.

  1. Electron cyclotron maser emission from double footpoints in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, A. J.; Willes, A. J.

    2000-03-01

    It is now known from Yohkoh Hard X-ray Telescope observations that double (or even multiple) hard X-ray sources in flares are a common occurrence. These sources, which are positioned at the feet of coronal soft X-ray loops, are synchronised to within 0.1s and have similar spectra, strongly suggesting that they are produced by a single population of electrons accelerated/injected at some point in the loop. As this electron population is reflected from the converging footpoint magnetic fields, it develops a loss cone and an electron-cyclotron maser instability may ensue. The frequency and intensity of such emission depends on the relative strengths and orientations of the footpoint magnetic fields. In this paper, we investigate the case of an almost symmetric loop to assess whether observable maser emission from both footpoints can result. In particular, we relate this theory to existing observations of solar microwave spike bursts which have two distinct frequency bands that are of non-integer ratio and comparable intensities. We conclude that differing footpoint magnetic field inclinations cannot explain the observations (specifically the comparable intensities), but that it is possible for slightly differing footpoint magnetic field strengths to explain the observations. The pros and cons of this `geometric' model are then compared with a previous model of these events, which explained them in terms of the growth and then coalescence of Bernstein waves. We conclude that both interpretations seem plausible given current observations, but present a list of observable features that might be used discriminate between them in flare observations of the next solar maximum.

  2. MAGNETIC NONPOTENTIALITY IN PHOTOSPHERIC ACTIVE REGIONS AS A PREDICTOR OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiao; Lin Ganghua; Zhang Hongqi; Mao Xinjie

    2013-09-10

    Based on several magnetic nonpotentiality parameters obtained from the vector photospheric active region magnetograms obtained with the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at the Huairou Solar Observing Station over two solar cycles, a machine learning model has been constructed to predict the occurrence of flares in the corresponding active region within a certain time window. The Support Vector Classifier, a widely used general classifier, is applied to build and test the prediction models. Several classical verification measures are adopted to assess the quality of the predictions. We investigate different flare levels within various time windows, and thus it is possible to estimate the rough classes and erupting times of flares for particular active regions. Several combinations of predictors have been tested in the experiments. The True Skill Statistics are higher than 0.36 in 97% of cases and the Heidke Skill Scores range from 0.23 to 0.48. The predictors derived from longitudinal magnetic fields do perform well, however, they are less sensitive in predicting large flares. Employing the nonpotentiality predictors from vector fields improves the performance of predicting large flares of magnitude {>=}M5.0 and {>=}X1.0.

  3. Longitudinal distribution of major solar flares during 1975 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. Y.; Cui, Y. M.; He, Y. L.; He, H.; Du, Z. L.; Li, R.; Wang, H. N.

    We have analyzed the coordinates of optical flares associated with the X-ray flares of class X observed by GOES satellite during the period from January 1975 through September 2005. The results can be summarized as follows. The latitude distribution of X-ray flares of class X displays the Maunder butterfly diagram pattern. The longitude distribution suggests that the place where X-ray flares of class X preferentially occur migrates in Carrington longitude. In the new dynamic reference frame inferred from the differential rotation law on the Sun, the longitude distribution diagram shows that there are two persistent preferred longitudes of strong X-ray flare occurrence separated by about 180°. This suggests that strong X-ray flare active longitudes exist indeed for tens of years. The strength of the two active longitudes alternates similarly to the "flip-flop" phenomenon. The non-axisymmetry of the X-ray flare distribution is found to be highly significant 42.5% (43.0%) for Northern (Southern) hemisphere for the peak intensity and 55% (49%) for Northern (Southern) hemisphere for the flare number.

  4. A COLD, TENUOUS SOLAR FLARE: ACCELERATION WITHOUT HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2011-04-10

    We report the observation of an unusual cold, tenuous solar flare, which reveals itself via numerous and prominent non-thermal manifestations, while lacking any noticeable thermal emission signature. RHESSI hard X-rays and 0.1-18 GHz radio data from OVSA and Phoenix-2 show copious electron acceleration (10{sup 35} electrons s{sup -1} above 10 keV) typical for GOES M-class flares with electrons energies up to 100 keV, but GOES temperatures not exceeding 6.1 MK. The imaging, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the flare have led us to a firm conclusion that the bulk of the microwave continuum emission from this flare was produced directly in the acceleration region. The implications of this finding for the flaring energy release and particle acceleration are discussed.

  5. An operational integrated short-term warning solution for solar radiation storms: introducing the Forecasting Solar Particle Events and Flares (FORSPEF) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Sandberg, Ingmar; Papaioannou, Athanasios; Georgoulis, Manolis; Tziotziou, Kostas; Jiggens, Piers; Hilgers, Alain

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel integrated prediction system, of both solar flares and solar energetic particle (SEP) events, which is in place to provide short-term warnings for hazardous solar radiation storms. FORSPEF system provides forecasting of solar eruptive events, such as solar flares with a projection to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) (occurrence and velocity) and the likelihood of occurrence of a SEP event. It also provides nowcasting of SEP events based on actual solar flare and CME near real-time alerts, as well as SEP characteristics (peak flux, fluence, rise time, duration) per parent solar event. The prediction of solar flares relies on a morphological method which is based on the sophisticated derivation of the effective connected magnetic field strength (Beff) of potentially flaring active-region (AR) magnetic configurations and it utilizes analysis of a large number of AR magnetograms. For the prediction of SEP events a new reductive statistical method has been implemented based on a newly constructed database of solar flares, CMEs and SEP events that covers a large time span from 1984-2013. The method is based on flare location (longitude), flare size (maximum soft X-ray intensity), and the occurrence (or not) of a CME. Warnings are issued for all > C1.0 soft X-ray flares. The warning time in the forecasting scheme extends to 24 hours with a refresh rate of 3 hours while the respective warning time for the nowcasting scheme depends on the availability of the near real-time data and falls between 15-20 minutes. We discuss the modules of the FORSPEF system, their interconnection and the operational set up. The dual approach in the development of FORPSEF (i.e. forecasting and nowcasting scheme) permits the refinement of predictions upon the availability of new data that characterize changes on the Sun and the interplanetary space, while the combined usage of solar flare and SEP forecasting methods upgrades FORSPEF to an integrated forecasting solution. This

  6. Statistics of Multi-Wavelength Solar Flare Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, Ryan O.

    2016-05-01

    Our current fleet of space-based solar observatories offer us a wealth of opportunities to study solar flares over a range of wavelengths, and the greatest advances in our understanding of flare physics often come from coordinated observations between different instruments. However, despite considerable effort to try and coordinate this armada of instruments over the years (e.g. through the Max Millennium Program of Solar Flare Research), there are frustratingly few solar flares that have been well and truly observed by most or all instruments simultaneously. This is due to a range of factors such as instruments having a limited field of view, satellites in low-Earth orbit going into eclipse, and observing schedules being uploaded days in advance. I shall describe a new technique to retrospectively search archival databases for flares jointly observed by RHESSI, SDO/EVE, Hinode/EIS+SOT, and IRIS. I shall also present a summary of how many flares have been observed by different configurations of these instruments since the launch of SDO.

  7. Signatures of Accelerated Electrons in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2015-08-01

    Flares energize electrons (and ions) to supra-thermal energies. In most cases the final distribution in momentum or energy space is non-Maxwellian. The non-thermal part of the energy can be the source for various emissions, including hard X-rays, synchrotron radiation and coherent radio emission. Such non-thermal emissions may contain information on the acceleration process. Several acceleration scenarios have been proposed: electric DC field, stochastic, and shock acceleration. There is observational evidence for all three scenarios. The new data come from SDO, X-ray (RHESSI), radio observations (Nobeyama, VLA and e-Callisto). Solar energetic particles are an additional channel of information.Tiny solar microflares and huge stellar flares in binary systems (RS CVns) and dMe dwarfs differ by more than 10 orders of magnitude in released energy. Yet the relation between peak luminosity in thermal (soft) X-ray and non-thermal synchrotron (radio) emission is surprisingly constant. This observational fact indicates that flare acceleration scales with energy release over a large range. Electron acceleration in flares seems to be a universal process. The constraint on simultaneous thermal X-rays and non-thermal (radio) synchrotron emission seems to select on particular kind of flare. In this subset, there seems to be only one type of acceleration.Yet, small deviations are noted: Small solar flares are softer in hard X-rays. Solar nanoflares are relatively weak in synchrotron emission. The recently noted case of radio-poor preflares will also be presented. The deviations suggest that the acceleration is less efficient in small flares and in the early phase of flares. Larger deviations are reported occasionally for solar flares and more often from stellar flares, where either thermal or non-thermal emission seems to be missing completely.The location of the acceleration in solar flares remains disputed. Observations suggesting acceleration in the soft X-ray top-tops, above

  8. Solar flares, proton showers, and the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Attention is given the hazards posed to Space Shuttle crews by energetic proton radiation from inherently unpredictable solar flares, such as that of April 10-13, 1981, which was experienced by the Space Shuttle Columbia. The most energetic protons from this flare reached the earth's atmosphere an hour after flare onset, and would have posed a potentially lethal threat to astronauts engaged in extravehicular activity in a polar or geosynchronous orbit rather than the low-latitude, low-altitude orbit of this mission. It is shown that proton-producing flares are associated with energization in shocks, many of which are driven by coronal mass ejections. Insights gained from the Solar Maximum Year programs allow reconsideration of proton shower forecasting, which will be essential in the prediction of the weather that Space Shuttle astronauts will encounter during extravehicular activities.

  9. High flare activity and redistribution of solar global magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumba, V.; Hejna, L.; Gesztelyi, L.

    It is demonstrated that, both on the global scale and on the scale of large and complex active regions, high flare activity is closely related to changes in the whole background magnetic-field distribution. It is found that the disturbances of the normal course of magnetic active longitudes (MAL) during the years 1965-1980 correlated with the maxima of flare activity, while the mode of the MAL distribution correlated with the mean level of solar flare numbers. The development of activity during the last two submaxima of the 21st cycle, especially the formation of the white-light flare region of April 1984, were parts of global processes in the solar atmosphere. They were accompanied by a complete reorganization of the MAL patterns, background field sector structure, and coronal holes.

  10. Recent observations of energetic electrons in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    The impulsive solar X-ray burst observed by the ISEE 3 X-ray spectrometer experiment on October 5, 1978 is discussed with consideration of energetic electrons in solar flares. The X-ray spectrum is consistent with a power law electron spectrum with no apparent low energy cut-off up to energies of around 5 keV. Although an explanation of the observed X-ray spectrum in terms of the emission from a multi-thermal electron spectrum cannot be ruled out, the observations lend support to the existence of nonthermal electron spectra during the impulsive phase of solar flares.

  11. Solar flare particles - Energy-dependent composition and relationship to solar composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, H. J.; Price, P. B.; Cartwright, B. G.; Sullivan, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Plastic and glass track detectors on rockets and Apollo spacecraft have been used to determine the composition of particles from He to Ni at energies from 0.1 to 50 MeV per nucleon in several solar flares of widely varying intensities. At low energies the composition of solar particles is enriched in heavy elements by an amount, relative to the asymptotic high-energy composition, that increases with atomic number from Z = 2 up to at least Z = 50, that decreases with energy, and that varies from flare to flare. At high energies (usually beyond an energy of 5 to 20 MeV per nucleon) the composition becomes independent of energy and, though somewhat variable from flare to flare, approximates the composition of the solar atmosphere. A table of abundances of the even-Z elements from He to Ni (plus N) in solar particles is constructed by averaging the asymptotic high-energy abundances in several flares.

  12. Particle kinematics in solar flares: observations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marina

    2008-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of particle acceleration and propagation processes in solar flares. Solar flares are amongst the most powerful and energetic activity phenomena our Sun exhibits. They release energy of the order of 10(32) erg in seconds to minutes. In the process, electrons and protons are accelerated to relativistic energies, making flares very efficient particle accelerators. The most compelling observational signatures of flares can be found in X-rays and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths. Due to atmospheric absorption, those wavelengths can only be studied from space. Since the beginning of the space age, countless flares have been observed by satellites. The present work is largely based on observations by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), an X-ray satellite which has been observing the Sun since February 2002. It is a NASA mission with substantial Swiss hardware and software contribution. Using RHESSI observations of flares of different intensity, a deeper understanding of the particle transport and energy transport processes in flare loops, as well as the acceleration site and acceleration mechanism is sought. The time evolution of images and spectra is studied along with the quantitative relations between X-ray sources observed in the corona (coronal sources) and from the chromosphere (footpoints). The spectral relations found between coronal sources and footpoints are compared to the so-called ``intermediate thin-thick target model'', which was based on observations by the satellite Yohkoh. We show that the spectral relations between coronal sources and footpoints observed with RHESSI cannot be explained by the intermediate thin-thick target model. In a next step, return currents in the flare loop were considered. With this extension to the existing model, the spectra of the coronal source and the footpoints, as well as the relations between them can be explained, indicating the importance of return currents in

  13. Abundances from solar-flare gamma-ray line spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Ramaty, R.; Forrest, D. J.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1985-01-01

    Elemental abundances of the ambient gas at the site of gamma ray line production inthe solar atmosphere are deduced using gamma ray line observations from a solar flare. The resultant abundances are different from local galactic abundances which are thought to be similar to photospheric abundances.

  14. STATISTICAL ANALYSES ON THERMAL ASPECTS OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. P.; Gan, W. Q.; Feng, L.

    2012-03-10

    The frequency distribution of flare energies provides a crucial diagnostic to calculate the overall energy residing in flares and to estimate the role of flares in coronal heating. It often takes a power law as its functional form. We have analyzed various variables, including the thermal energies E{sub th} of 1843 flares at their peak time. They were recorded by both Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the time period from 2002 to 2009 and are classified as flares greater than C 1.0. The relationship between different flare parameters is investigated. It is found that fitting the frequency distribution of E{sub th} to a power law results in an index of -2.38. We also investigate the corrected thermal energy E{sub cth}, which represents the flare total thermal energy including the energy loss in the rising phase. Its corresponding power-law slope is -2.35. Compilation of the frequency distributions of the thermal energies from nanoflares, microflares, and flares in the present work and from other authors shows that power-law indices below -2.0 have covered the range from 10{sup 24} to 10{sup 32} erg. Whether this frequency distribution can provide sufficient energy to coronal heatings in active regions and the quiet Sun is discussed.

  15. Coronal propagation of solar flare particles observed by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohno, T.; Nitta, N.; Wada, M.; Suda, T.

    1985-01-01

    Propagation of solar flare particles in corona was studied using the satellite data at the geostationary orbit. by selecting very fast rise time events only, the interplanetary propagation were assumed to be scatter free arrival. The results show that the propagation in corona does not depend on particle energy in 4 to 500 MeV protons, and the time delays from optical flare do not depend on the distance between the flare site and the base of the interplanetary magnetic field which connects to the Earth.

  16. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  17. Solar He-3: Information from nuclear reactions in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1974-01-01

    Information on solar He-3 from nuclear reactions in flares was considered. Consideration was also given to the development of models for these reactions as well as the abundance of He-3 in the photosphere. Data show that abundances may be explained by nuclear reactions of flare acceleration protons and alpha particles with the ambient atmosphere, provided that various assumptions are made on the directionality of the interacting beams and acceleration of the particles after production.

  18. Solar Flare Effects on the Thermosphere and Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S.; Qian, L.; Rodgers, E.; Bailey, S.

    The Solar Extreme-ultraviolet Experiment SEE on the TIMED satellite and by the X-ray Photometer System XPS on the SORCE satellite provide the first comprehensive irradiance measurements of the complete solar spectrum during large solar flares However the soft X-ray portion of these observations are performed using silicon photodiodes coated with metallic filters to provide photometric measurements with multiple band passes which leads to complexities in obtaining spectral information A new analysis technique developed specifically for flare conditions is used to infer flare spectra in this region These are combined with spectrographic measurements in the extreme ultraviolet and far ultraviolet and applied to the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model TIE-GCM The electron content neutral density and airglow response to large flares during the declining phase of solar cycle 23 are calculated using this model and compared to several measurement sets obtaining good agreement This supports both the validity of the solar X-ray analysis and the modeling methodology showing that although flare-driven effects in the upper atmosphere are significant they are shorter and of much smaller magnitude than geomagnetic disturbances

  19. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flare in Megaton and km3 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele; di Giacomo, Paola

    2009-03-01

    To foresee a solar flare neutrino signal we infer its upper and lower bound. The upper bound was derived since a few years by general energy equipartition arguments on observed solar particle flare. The lower bound, the most compelling one for any guarantee neutrino signal, is derived by most recent records of hard Gamma bump due to solar flare on January 2005 (by neutral pion decay). Because neutral and charged pions (made by hadron scattering in the flare) are born on the same foot, their link is compelling: the observed gamma flux [Grechnev V.V. et al., arXiv:0806.4424, Solar Physics, Vol. 1, October, (2008), 252] reflects into a corresponding one for the neutrinos, almost one to one. Moreover while gamma photons might be absorbed (in deep corona) or at least reduced inside the flaring plasma, the secondaries neutrino are not. So pion neutrinos should be even more abundant than gamma ones. Tens-hundred MeV neutrinos may cross undisturbed the whole Sun, doubling at least their rate respect a unique solar-side for gamma flare. Therefore we obtain minimal bounds opening a windows for neutrino astronomy, already at the edge of present but quite within near future Megaton neutrino detectors. Such detectors are considered mostly to reveal cosmic supernova background or rare Local Group (few Mpc) Supernovas events [Matthew D. Kistler et al. 0810.1959v1]. However rarest (once a decade), brief (a few minutes) powerful solar neutrino “flare” may shine and they may overcome by two to three order of magnitude the corresponding steady atmospheric neutrino noise on the Earth, leading in largest Neutrino detector at least to one or to meaning-full few events clustered signals. The voice of such a solar anti-neutrino flare component at a few tens MeVs may induce an inverse beta decay over a vanishing anti-neutrino solar background. Megaton or even inner ten Megaton Ice Cube detector at ten GeV threshold may also reveal traces in hardest energy of solar flares. Icecube

  20. TRANSITION REGION EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.; Raymond, J. C.; Murphy, N. A.; Suleiman, R.; Giordano, S.; Ko, Y.-K.; Ciaravella, A.

    2011-07-10

    There are relatively few observations of UV emission during the impulsive phases of solar flares, so the nature of that emission is poorly known. Photons produced by solar flares can resonantly scatter off atoms and ions in the corona. Based on off-limb measurements by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, we derive the O VI {lambda}1032 luminosities for 29 flares during the impulsive phase and the Ly{alpha} luminosities of 5 flares, and we compare them with X-ray luminosities from GOES measurements. The upper transition region and lower transition region luminosities of the events observed are comparable. They are also comparable to the luminosity of the X-ray emitting gas at the beginning of the flare, but after 10-15 minutes the X-ray luminosity usually dominates. In some cases, we can use Doppler dimming to estimate flow speeds of the O VI emitting gas, and five events show speeds in the 40-80 km s{sup -1} range. The O VI emission could originate in gas evaporating to fill the X-ray flare loops, in heated chromospheric gas at the footpoints, or in heated prominence material in the coronal mass ejection. All three sources may contribute in different events or even in a single event, and the relative timing of UV and X-ray brightness peaks, the flow speeds, and the total O VI luminosity favor each source in one or more events.

  1. Contributions of the Solar Ultraviolet Irradiance to the Total Solar Irradiance During Large Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, T. N.; Kopp, G.

    2005-12-01

    The TIMED satellite was launched in December 2001 and the SORCE satellite was launched in January 2003. Since then the solar activity has evolved from solar maximum conditions to moderately low activity in 2005. The XUV Photometer System (XPS), aboard both TIMED and SORCE, is measuring the solar soft X-ray (XUV) irradiance shortward of 34 nm with 7-10 nm spectral resolution and the bright hydrogen emission at 121.5 nm. The XPS instrument is best known for observing over 200 flares during the TIMED mission with its 3% solar observing duty cycle and over 800 flares during the SORCE mission with its 70% duty cycle. The XUV radiation, being mostly from coronal emissions, varies more than other wavelengths in the solar spectrum during a flare event, with each flare lasting from minutes to hours. The XPS measurements indicate variations by a factor of 50 for the largest flares during the October-November 2003 solar storm period and that the XUV variations can be as much as 20% of the total flare energy as determined from the total solar irradiance (TSI) measurements by the SORCE Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM). The flare variations of the solar XUV irradiance and TSI will be discussed in the context of the TIMED and SORCE missions and their relationship to the GOES X-ray flare measurements.

  2. Investigation of relationships between parameters of solar nano-flares and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Hossein; Javaherian, Mohsen; Kaki, Bardia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares are one of the important coronal events which are originated in solar magnetic activity. They release lots of energy during the interstellar medium, right after the trigger. Flare prediction can play main role in avoiding eventual damages on the Earth. Here, to interpret solar large-scale events (e.g., flares), we investigate relationships between small-scale events (nano-flares) and large-scale events (e.g., flares). In our method, by using simulations of nano-flares based on Monte Carlo method, the intensity time series of nano-flares are simulated. Then, the solar full disk images taken at 171 angstrom recorded by SDO/AIA are employed. Some parts of the solar disk (quiet Sun (QS), coronal holes (CHs), and active regions (ARs)) are cropped and the time series of these regions are extracted. To compare the simulated intensity time series of nano-flares with the intensity time series of real data extracted from different parts of the Sun, the artificial neural networks is employed. Therefore, we are able to extract physical parameters of nano-flares like both kick and decay rate lifetime, and the power of their power-law distributions. The procedure of variations in the power value of power-law distributions within QS, CH is similar to AR. Thus, by observing the small part of the Sun, we can follow the procedure of solar activity.

  3. X1.6 Class Solar Flare on Sept. 10, 2014

    NASA Video Gallery

    An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun on Sept. 10, 2014. These images were captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. It first shows the flare in the 171 Angstrom wavelengt...

  4. Observations and modeling of plasma flows driven by solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Sean Robert

    One of the fundamental statements that can be made about the solar atmosphere is that it is structured. This structuring is generally believed to be the result of both the arrangement of the magnetic field in the corona and the distribution of plasma along magnetic loops. The standard model of solar flares involves plasma transported into coronal loops via a process known as chromospheric evaporation, and the resulting evolution of the flare loops is believed to be sensitive to the physical mechanism of energy input into the chromosphere by the flare. We present here the results of three investigations into chromospheric plasma flows driven by solar flare energy release and transport. First, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamic code to simulate the response of a simplified model chromosphere to energy input via thermal conduction from reconnection-driven shocks. We use the results from a set of simulations spanning a parameter space in both shock speed and chromospheric-to-coronal temperature ratio to infer power-law relationships between these quantities and observable evaporation properties. Second, we use imaging and spectral observations of a quasi-periodic oscillation of a flare ribbon to determine the phase relationship between Doppler shifts of the ribbon plasma and the oscillation. The phase difference we find leads us to suggest an origin in a current sheet instability. Finally, we use imaging and spectral data of an on-disk flare event and resulting flare loop plasma flows to generally validate the standard picture of flare loop evolution, including evaporation, cooling time, and draining downflows, and we use a simple free-fall model to produce the first direct comparison between observed and synthetic downflow spectra.

  5. Conduction-driven chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.; Lemen, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of gentle chromospheric evaporation during the cooling phase of a solar flare are presented. Line profiles of the low-temperature (T of about 6 x 10 to the 6th K) coronal Mg XI line, observed with the X-Ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission, show a blueshift that persisted for several minutes after the impulsive heating phase. This result represents the first detection of an evaporation signature in a soft X-ray line formed at this low temperature. By combining the Mg XI blueshift velocity data with simultaneous measurements of the flare temperature derived from Ca XIX observations, it is demonstrated that the upward flux of enthalpy transported by this gently evaporating plasma varies linearly with the downward flux of thermal energy conducted from the corona. This relationship is consistent with models of solar flares in which thermal conduction drives chromospheric evaporation during the early part of the cooling phase.

  6. Lunar surface cosmic ray experiment. [including solar flare studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    The galactic cosmic ray and solar flare experiment on Apollo 16 is reported. The published papers presented describe the experiment, equipment, data processing techniques, and operational history. The principle findings include: (1) The composition of heavy ions in interplanetary space at energies between approximately 30 and 130 MeV/nucleon is the same, within experimental errors. (2) The ability of a Lexan stack to determine simultaneously the energy spectra of major elements from He up to Fe in the energy interval 0.2 to 30 MeV/nucleon revealed systematic changes in the composition of solar flare particles as a function of energy. (3) Heavy ions emitted in a solar flare appear to be completely stripped of electrons, and are not in charge equilibrium at the time of acceleration and releases from the sun.

  7. Collisionless Three-dimensional Reconnection In Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somov, Boris V.; Kosugi, Takeo; Sakao, Taro

    1998-04-01

    Two subclasses of impulsive solar flares, observed with the Hard X-Ray Telescope (HXT) onboard Yohkoh, have been discovered by Sakao et al. The two subclasses can be characterized as more impulsive (MI) and less impulsive (LI) flares, the former having a shorter total duration of the impulsive phase in the hard X-ray emission than the latter. We assume that in both subclasses, the collisionless three-dimensional reconnection process occurs at the separator with a longitudinal magnetic field. The high-temperature turbulent-current sheet (HTTCS), located along the separator, generates accelerated particles and fast outflows of ``superhot'' (T >= 30 MK) plasma. Powerful anomalous heat-conductive fluxes along the reconnected field lines maintain a high temperature in the superhot plasma. The difference between the LI and MI flares presumably appears because the footpoint separation (the distance between two brightest hard X-ray sources) increases in time in the LI flares, but decreases in the MI flares. According to our model, in the LI flares the three-dimensional reconnection process accompanies an increase in the longitudinal magnetic field at the separator. In contrast, in the MI flares the reconnection proceeds with a decrease of the longitudinal field; hence, the reconnection rate is higher in the MI flares. Since reconnection in the MI flares proceeds with a decrease of the longitudinal field, the reconnected field lines become shorter in this process. As the reconnected lines become shorter, accelerated electron beams arrive at the upper chromosphere faster. So, in the MI flares chromospheric evaporation begins earlier than in the LI flares. The evaporation process driven by accelerated electron beams generates upflows of ``warm'' (T <= 10 MK) plasma that interacts with downflows of superhot plasma and can switch off the accumulation of superhot plasma in the MI flares during the impulsive phase. In the LI flares, however, an observable amount of superhot

  8. Common SphinX and RHESSI observations of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, T.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J.; Gryciuk, M.

    The Polish X-ray spectrofotometer SphinX has observed a great number of solar flares in the year 2009 - during the most quiet solar minimum almost over the last 100 years. Hundreds of flares have been recorded due to excellent sensitivity of SphinX's detectors. The Si-PIN diodes are about 100 times more sensitive to X-rays than GOES X-ray Monitors. SphinX detectors were absolutely calibrated on Earth with a use of the BESSY synchrotron. In space observations were made in the range 1.2-15~keV with 480~eV energy resolution. SphinX data overlap with the low-energy end of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data. RHESSI detectors are quite old (7 years in 2009), but still sensitive enough to provide us with observations of extremely weak solar flares such as those which occurred in 2009. We have selected a group of flares simultaneously observed by RHESSI and SphinX and performed a spectroscopic analysis of the data. Moreover, we compared the physical parameters of these flares plasma. Preliminary results of the comparison show very good agreement between both instruments.

  9. Solar flares detection and warning by space network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkonian, G.; Boschat, J.; Lantos, P.; Bourrieau, J.

    1991-10-01

    The solar flares produce magnetic storms and charged particle bursts which induce ground and space systems damage with heavy economic consequences. In order to apply countermeasures in due time, an early detection network is proposed. The paper presents an overview of the solar activity, the earth-sun relation, and the present knowledge about the propagation of solar protons in space medium. The proposed network is based on the utilization of several satellites measuring proton fluxes and transmitting corresponding data to the earth.

  10. Microwave Type III Pair Bursts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Baolin; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian; Huang, Guangli; Tan, Chengming

    2016-03-01

    A solar microwave type III pair burst is composed of normal and reverse-sloped (RS) burst branches with oppositely fast frequency drifts. It is the most sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in flares. This work reports 11 microwave type III pair events in 9 flares observed by radio spectrometers in China and the Czech Republic at a frequency of 0.80-7.60 GHz during 1994-2014. These type III pairs occurred in flare impulsive and postflare phases with separate frequencies in the range of 1.08-3.42 GHz and a frequency gap of 10-1700 MHz. The frequency drift increases with the separate frequency (fx), the lifetime of each burst is anti-correlated to fx, while the frequency gap is independent of fx. In most events, the normal branches are drifting obviously faster than the RS branches. The type III pairs occurring in flare impulsive phase have lower separate frequencies, longer lifetimes, wider frequency gaps, and slower frequency drifts than that occurring in postflare phase. Also, the latter always has strong circular polarization. Further analysis indicates that near the flare energy release sites the plasma density is about {10}10{--}{10}11 cm-3 and the temperature is higher than 107 K. These results provide new constraints to the acceleration mechanism in solar flares.

  11. Solar flare nuclear gamma-rays and interplanetary proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Forrest, D. J.; Cane, H. V.; Reames, D. V.; Mcguire, R. E.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray line (GRL) and solar energetic proton (SEP) events observed from February 1980 through January 1985 are compared in order to substantiate and better characterize the lack of correlation between GRL fluences and SEP event peak fluxes. The scatter plot of SEP event peak flux vs. GRL fluence is presented, and the ratio of 'solar' to 'interplanetary', about 10 MeV protons, is presented. It is shown that, while even large SEP events can originate in flares lacking detectable GRL emission, the converse case of flares with a significant GRL line fluence by lacking protons in space is rare. The ratio R of the number of about 10 MeV protons that produce GRL emission at the flare site to the number of about 10 MeV protons detected in space can vary from event to event by four orders of magnitude. There is a clear tendency for impulsive flares to have larger values of R than long-duration flares, where the flare time scale is given by the e-folding decay time of the associated soft X-ray emission.

  12. On the threshold of proton acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, L. I.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the reconnection theory of a flare and on recent observational and statistical findings, the problem of the initial acceleration of solar cosmic rays (SCR) is discussed. Simple estimates of the electric fields required to start the electron acceleration are obtained and the problem of proton ionization losses for overcoming the Coulomb barrier is considered. We take into account also the possible differences between proton and electron spectra from the very beginning of the acceleration process. Special attention is paid to the distribution functions of solar flare events in various parameters (peak fluxes and/or energy fluences in X-ray and radio wave bursts, in proton and electron emissions, etc.). It is shown that the distribution functions allow the interpretation of some scale and time flare parameters in terms of expected threshold effects. However, these functions are still insuffienet to evaluate the relative share of different emissions in the global energy budget of a flare. In this context, a more promising approach is to derive the direct ratio between the number of accelerated protons, Np, and total flare energy, Wf, within the frame of a certain acceleration model. It is argued that an absolute threshold for proton production (in Hudson's formulation) does not exist. Meanwhile, the flux and threshold energy of accelerated protons overcoming the Coulomb loss maximum, in fact, may depend heavily on the global output of flare energy.

  13. The acceleration and propagation of solar flare energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Ramaty, R.; Zweibel, E. G.; Holzer, T. E. (Editor); Mihalas, D. (Editor); Sturrock, P. A. (Editor); Ulrich, R. K. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Observations and theories of particle acceleration in solar flares are reviewed. The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are gamma rays, X-rays and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere and energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth's atmosphere. The implication of these observations are discussed. Stochastic and shock acceleration as well as acceleration in direct electric fields are considered. Interplanetary particle propagation is discussed and an overview of the highlights of both current and promising future research is presented.

  14. Protons from the decay of solar flare neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P.; Meyer, P.; Pyle, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    Fluxes of energetic protons in interplanetary space are observed which are interpreted as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1982 June 3 at 11:42 UT. Because of the particular geometry of this event the spectrum of neutrons escaping from the sun can be constructed with great accuracy in the kinetic energy range 10-100 MeV. The resulting spectrum places stringent constraints on the free parameters used in previously published calculations of neutron production in solar flares. An estimate is made of the diffusion mean free path of charged particles in the interplanetary medium in a new way.

  15. Solar flares as cascades of reconnecting magnetic loops.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D; Paczuski, M; Dendy, R O; Helander, P; McClements, K G

    2003-04-01

    A model for the solar coronal magnetic field is proposed where multiple directed loops evolve in space and time. Loops injected at small scales are anchored by footpoints of opposite polarity moving randomly on a surface. Nearby footpoints of the same polarity aggregate, and loops can reconnect when they collide. This may trigger a cascade of further reconnection, representing a solar flare. Numerical simulations show that a power law distribution of flare energies emerges, associated with a scale-free network of loops, indicating self-organized criticality. PMID:12689272

  16. Multifractality as a Measure of Complexity in Solar Flare Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Asok K.

    2007-03-01

    In this paper we use the notion of multifractality to describe the complexity in H α flare activity during the solar cycles 21, 22, and 23. Both northern and southern hemisphere flare indices are analyzed. Multifractal behavior of the flare activity is characterized by calculating the singularity spectrum of the daily flare index time series in terms of the Hölder exponent. The broadness of the singularity spectrum gives a measure of the degree of multifractality or complexity in the flare index data. The broader the spectrum, the richer and more complex is the structure with a higher degree of multifractality. Using this broadness measure, complexity in the flare index data is compared between the northern and southern hemispheres in each of the three cycles, and among the three cycles in each of the two hemispheres. Other parameters of the singularity spectrum can also provide information about the fractal properties of the flare index data. For instance, an asymmetry to the left or right in the singularity spectrum indicates a dominance of high or low fractal exponents, respectively, reflecting a relative abundance of large or small fluctuations in the total energy emitted by the flares. Our results reveal that in the even (22nd) cycle the singularity spectra are very similar for the northern and southern hemispheres, whereas in the odd cycles (21st and 23rd) they differ significantly. In particular, we find that in cycle 21, the northern hemisphere flare index data have higher complexity than its southern counterpart, with an opposite pattern prevailing in cycle 23. Furthermore, small-scale fluctuations in the flare index time series are predominant in the northern hemisphere in the 21st cycle and are predominant in the southern hemisphere in the 23rd cycle. Based on these findings one might suggest that, from cycle to cycle, there exists a smooth switching between the northern and southern hemispheres in the multifractality of the flaring process. This new

  17. Modelling the effects of a solar flare on INTEGRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfect, C. L.; Bird, A. J.; Dean, A. J.; Diallo, N.; Ferguson, C.; Lei, F.; Lockley, J. J.

    2001-09-01

    The delayed effects of a large solar flare proton flux on the γ-ray instruments on-board INTEGRAL have been modelled. We simulated exposing INTEGRAL to a varying flux over a period of five days. The total integrated input proton flux for the flare chosen was 1.5×1014 protons. The induced count rates due to this proton flux over an energy range of 30 MeV - 2 GeV one minute after the end of the flare are 345.9+/-0.5 c/s for IBIS (the imager) and 10.03+/-0.06 c/s for SPI (the spectrometer). Spectra one minute after the end of the flare are shown for each instrument. The most significant spectral lines have been identified and the isotopic half-lives compared to the half-lives of the total count rates.

  18. A static model of chromospheric heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricchiazzi, P. J.; Canfield, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The response of the solar chromosphere to flare processes, namely nonthermal electrons, thermal conduction, and coronal pressure, is modeled. Finite difference methods employing linearization and iteration are used in obtaining simultaneous solutions to the equations of steady-state energy balance, hydrostatic equilibrium, radiative transfer, and atomic statistical equilibrium. The atmospheric response is assumed to be confined to one dimension by a strong vertical magnetic field. A solution is obtained to the radiative transfer equation for the most important optically thick transitions of hydrogen, magnesium, and calcium. The theoretical atmospheres discussed here are seen as elucidating the role of various physical processes in establishing the structure of flare chromospheres. At low coronal pressures, conduction is found to be more important than nonthermal electrons in establishing the position of the transition region. Only thermal conduction can adequately account for the chromospheric evaporation in compact flares. Of the mechanisms considered, only nonthermal electrons bring about significant heating below the flare transition region.

  19. Global analysis of active longitudes of solar X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Mursula, K.; Usoskin, I.; Wang, H.

    2011-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that various manifestations of solar activity are non-axisymmetric and mainly occur in two preferred longitude ranges, so called active longitudes. We have earlier analyzed the longitudinal occurrence of solar X-ray flares observed by GOES satellites using a specially developed dynamic, differentially rotating coordinate system. In this frame, the longitude distribution shows two persistent preferred longitudes separated by about 180 degrees whose strength alternates in time according to the so called flip-flop phenomenon. Here we make the first global statistical analysis to find the best fitting values for parameters describing the differential rotation of active longitudes of X-ray flares. We find that the new analysis greatly improves the earlier values for the rotation parameters, making them consistent between the three different classes of X-ray flares. The improved parameters also yield a systematically higher level of non-axisymmetry for the longitudinal distribution, thus increasing the statistical significance of the existence of active longitudes. Accordingly, a significant amount of X-ray flares of different classes are produced by the same two active longitudes. We also find a significant difference between the rotation rates in the two solar hemispheres, with active longitudes rotating faster than the Carrington rate in the northern hemisphere and slower than the Carrington rate in the southern hemisphere.

  20. A thermal/nonthermal approach to solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benka, Stephen G.

    1991-01-01

    An approach for modeling solar flare high-energy emissions is developed in which both thermal and nonthermal particles coexist and contribute to the radiation. The thermal/nonthermal distribution function is interpreted physically by postulating the existence of DC sheets in the flare region. The currents then provide both primary plasma heating through Joule dissipation, and runaway electron acceleration. The physics of runaway acceleration is discussed. Several methods are presented for obtaining approximations to the thermal/nonthermal distribution function, both within the current sheets and outside of them. Theoretical hard x ray spectra are calculated, allowing for thermal bremsstrahlung from the heated plasma electrons impinging on the chromosphere. A simple model for hard x ray images of two-ribbon flares is presented. Theoretical microwave gyrosynchrotron spectra are calculated and analyzed, uncovering important new effects caused by the interplay of thermal and nonthermal particles. The theoretical spectra are compared with observed high resolution spectra of solar flares, and excellent agreement is found, in both hard x rays and microwaves. The future detailed application of this approach to solar flares is discussed, as are possible refinements to this theory.

  1. Energetic Correlation Between Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Medlin, Drew A.; Haga, Leah; Schwartz, Richard a.; Tolbert, A. Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    We find a strong correlation between the kinetic energies (KEs) of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the radiated energies of the associated solar flares for the events that occurred during the period of intense solar activity between 18 October and 08 November 2003. CME start times, speeds, mass and KEs were taken from Gopalswamy et al. (2005), who used SOHO/LASCO observations. The GOES observations of the associated flares were analyzed to find the peak soft X-ray (SXR) flux, the radiated energy in SXRs (L(sub sxR)), and the radiated energy from the emitting plasma across all wavelengths (L(sub hot)). RHESSI observations were also used to find the energy in non-thermal electrons, ions, and the plasma thermal energy for some events. For two events, SORCE/TIM observations of the total solar irradiance during a flare were also available to give the total radiated flare energy (L(sub total)).W e find that the total flare energies of the larger events are of the same order of magnitude as the CME KE with a stronger correlation than has been found in the past for other time intervals.

  2. Soft X-ray flare spectra. [existence of high temperature plasmas in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Meekins, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Large solar flares produce intense soft X-ray emission, indicating the existence of high temperature plasmas that coexist in time with the plasmas responsible for the normally observed brightenings in H-alpha. The time behavior of the X-ray flux, as revealed, for example, by ion chamber detectors on the series of Solrad monitoring satellites, appears to roughly mimic the intensity-time behavior of the H-alpha flare, insofar as start times, times of maximum flux, and approximate decay times are concerned. In recent years, soft X-ray spectra of both active regions and solar flares have been obtained by instruments flown on spacecraft such as the Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO) series. The disbursing elements used were Bragg crystals, and in the 8 Angstrom region the resolution is typically approximately 1200. This paper discusses the observed characteristics of X-ray flare spectra and spectroscopic diagnostics for determining electron temperatures, electron densities, and departures from ionization equilibrium within the soft X-ray emitting plasma.

  3. Variability of Thermosphere and Ionosphere Responses to Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Chamberlin, Philip C.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated how the rise rate and decay rate of solar flares affect the thermosphere and ionosphere responses to them. Model simulations and data analysis were conducted for two flares of similar magnitude (X6.2 and X5.4) that had the same location on the solar limb, but the X6.2 flare had longer rise and decay times. Simulated total electron content (TEC) enhancements from the X6.2 and X5.4 flares were 6 total electron content units (TECU) and approximately 2 TECU, and the simulated neutral density enhancements were approximately 15% -20% and approximately 5%, respectively, in reasonable agreement with observations. Additional model simulations showed that for idealized flares with the same magnitude and location, the thermosphere and ionosphere responses changed significantly as a function of rise and decay rates. The Neupert Effect, which predicts that a faster flare rise rate leads to a larger EUV enhancement during the impulsive phase, caused a larger maximum ion production enhancement. In addition, model simulations showed that increased E x B plasma transport due to conductivity increases during the flares caused a significant equatorial anomaly feature in the electron density enhancement in the F region but a relatively weaker equatorial anomaly feature in TEC enhancement, owing to dominant contributions by photochemical production and loss processes. The latitude dependence of the thermosphere response correlated well with the solar zenith angle effect, whereas the latitude dependence of the ionosphere response was more complex, owing to plasma transport and the winter anomaly.

  4. Soft X-ray spectroscopy of solar flares - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the current status of high spectral resolution soft X-ray observations of solar flares is given. The review concentrates primarily on recent results and interpretations of results obtained from orbiting Bragg crystal spectrometers flow during the last solar maximum on the US DoD P78-1 spacecraft, the NASA SMM, and the ISAS Hinotori spacecraft. Results and several key issues regarding interpretation of the spectra are presented. Specifically, the dynamics of coronal flare plasmas as revealed by X-ray line profiles and wavelength shifts are discussed. Recent results concerning the theory of chromospheric evaporation are given. The temperature of coronal flare plasma is discussed within the context of a differential mission measure. Results concerning electron density measurements, nonequilibrium processes, and relative element abundances are also reviewed.

  5. Solar flare activity changes and global magnetic field disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumba, V.; Hejna, L.

    1988-01-01

    Published observational data on solar-flare activity in the period 1965-1980 are analyzed statistically and related to changes in the magnetic active longitudes (MALs) identified and studied by Bumba and Hejna (1986). MALs are long strips of single-polarity fields which may persist for about 8-30 rotations and display internal structure. The data sets employed are briefly characterized, and the results are presented graphically. Flare maxima are found to correlate well with MAL disturbances, especially during the ascending phase of the solar cycle and with MALs of negative polarity. The possible implications of these findings for the interplanetary magnetic field and for theoretical models of flare generation are indicated.

  6. A RECONNECTING CURRENT SHEET IMAGED IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Liu Chang; Wang Haimin; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wang, Tongjiang; Stenborg, Guillermo

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection changes the magnetic field topology and powers explosive events in astrophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas. For flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar atmosphere, the standard model predicts the presence of a reconnecting current sheet, which has been the subject of considerable theoretical and numerical modeling over the last 50 years, yet direct, unambiguous observational verification has been absent. In this Letter, we show a bright sheet structure of global length (>0.25 R {sub sun}) and macroscopic width ((5-10)x10{sup 3} km) distinctly above the cusp-shaped flaring loop, imaged during the flare rising phase in EUV. The sheet formed due to the stretch of a transequatorial loop system and was accompanied by various reconnection signatures. This unique event provides a comprehensive view of the reconnection geometry and dynamics in the solar corona.

  7. The acceleration of heavy nuclei in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The overabundance of heavy nuclei in solar cosmic rays of energy approximately 5 Mev/nucleon is explained by taking into account the pre-flare ionization states of these nuclei in the region where they are accelerated. A model is proposed which considers two-step accelerations associated with the initial development of solar flares. The first step is closely related to the triggering process of flares, while the second one starts with the development of the explosive phase. Further ionization of medium and heavy nuclei occurs through their interaction with Kev electrons accelerated by the first-step acceleration. It is suggested that the role of these electrons is important in producing fully ionized atoms in the acceleration regions.

  8. The acceleration of heavy nuclei in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1975-01-01

    The overabundance of heavy nuclei in solar cosmic rays of energy below about 10 MeV/nucleon is explained by taking into account the pre-flare ionization states of these nuclei in the region where they are accelerated. A model is proposed which considers two-step accelerations associated with the initial development of solar flares. The first step is closely related to the triggering process of flares, while the second one starts with the development of the explosive phase. Further ionization of medium and heavy nuclei occurs through their interaction with keV electrons accelerated by the first-step acceleration. It is suggested that the role of these electrons is important in producing fully ionized atoms in the acceleration regions.

  9. Solar and Stellar Flares over Time: Effects on Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; DeWarf, Laurence E.; Engle, Scott G.; Gropp, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are presented. Also discussed are the flare properties of cooler, commonplace main-sequence K-M stars. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These studies are based on ground-based observations, UV and X-ray space missions (IUE & HST, ROSAT & Chandra) as well as a wealth of data from the Kepler Mission. The ultra-high precision photometry available from the Kepler Mission (and K2) has made it possible to study starspots, flare properties, and rotations of thousands of G, K, M stars. Superflares (defined as E > 10+33 ergs ~X-100 flares) on hundreds of mostly G and K stars have been found. (See e.g. Shibayama et al. 2013; Maehara et al. 2015; Notsu et al. 2013/15; Saar et al. 2015; Guinan et al. 2015). Using our Age-Rotation relations, we determine correlations of flares properties of the Sun and solar-type over a wide range of ages. We also compare these flare histories with the cooler, more common K- and M-type stars. The analysis of these datasets imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles the evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestrial planets. The strong X-UV fluxes and proton fluences from flares and associated plasmas from coronal mass ejection events can greatly affect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also discussed are the effects of superflares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though solar superflares are rarer (~1 per 300-500 yrs) than from the young Sun (> 1-2 per year), they could cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space..This research is supported by grants from NSF/RUI and NASA: NSF, AST 1009903; Chandra GO2-13020X, HST GO

  10. Slipping Magnetic Reconnections with Multiple Flare Ribbons during an X-class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Chen, Yao; Wang, Bing

    2016-06-01

    With the observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present the slipping magnetic reconnections with multiple flare ribbons (FRs) during an X1.2 eruptive flare on 2014 January 7. A center negative polarity was surrounded by several positive ones, and three FRs appeared. The three FRs showed apparent slipping motions, and hook structures formed at their ends. Due to the moving footpoints of the erupting structures, one tight semi-circular hook disappeared after the slippage along its inner and outer edges, and coronal dimmings formed within the hook. The east hook also faded as a result of the magnetic reconnection between the arcades of a remote filament and a hot loop that was impulsively heated by the under flare loops. Our results are accordant with the slipping magnetic reconnection regime in three-dimensional standard model for eruptive flares. We suggest that the complex structures of the flare are likely a consequence of the more complex flux distribution in the photosphere, and the eruption involves at least two magnetic reconnections.

  11. Sunspot 1520 Releases Strong (X1.4) Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows the sun July 10-12, ending with the X1.4 class flare on July 12, 2012. It was captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory in the 131 Angstrom wavelength - a wavelength that is...

  12. Fe XXI as an electron density diagnostic in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, H. E.; Doschek, G. A.; Feldman, U.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1979-01-01

    Atomic data have been calculated for Fe XXI, and the theoretical intensity ratios for many transitions are tabulated. Fe XXI lines in wavelength regions 1-25 A, 90-200 A, and 300-2500 A are discussed with reference to presently available solar and laboratory spectra. It is found that Fe XXI is an excellent density diagnostic for solar-flare and tokamak plasmas, when densities are in the range from 10 to the 11th to 10 to the 15th per cu cm. The theoretical calculations are applied to flare spectra obtained from OSO 5, and an electron density of less than 10 to the 13th per cu cm is deduced for a temperature of 10,000,000 K. The results are somewhat ambiguous in several cases because of the limited spectral and temporal resolution of these earlier spectrometers. However, the calculations will be important for forthcoming solar projects, such as the Solar Maximum Mission.

  13. Statistical properties of super-hot solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; Krucker, Säm; Lin, R. P.

    2014-01-20

    We use Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy observations from ∼6 to 100 keV to determine the statistical relationships between measured parameters (temperature, emission measure, etc.) of hot, thermal plasma in 37 intense (GOES M- and X-class) solar flares. The RHESSI data, most sensitive to the hottest flare plasmas, reveal a strong correlation between the maximum achieved temperature and the flare GOES class, such that 'super-hot' temperatures >30 MK are achieved almost exclusively by X-class events; the observed correlation differs significantly from that of GOES-derived temperatures, and from previous studies. A nearly ubiquitous association with high emission measures, electron densities, and instantaneous thermal energies suggests that super-hot plasmas are physically distinct from cooler, ∼10-20 MK GOES plasmas, and that they require substantially greater energy input during the flare. High thermal energy densities suggest that super-hot flares require strong coronal magnetic fields, exceeding ∼100 G, and that both the plasma β and volume filling factor f cannot be much less than unity in the super-hot region.

  14. Impulsive Heating of Solar Flare Ribbons Above 10 MK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Graham, D. R.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-12-01

    The chromospheric response to the input of flare energy is marked by extended extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ribbons and hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints. These are usually explained as the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from accelerated electrons colliding in the dense chromospheric plasma. We present evidence of impulsive heating of flare ribbons above 10 MK in a two-ribbon flare. We analyse the impulsive phase of SOL2013-11-09T06:38, a C2.6 class event using data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to derive the temperature, emission measure and differential emission measure of the flaring regions and investigate the evolution of the plasma in the flaring ribbons. The ribbons were visible at all SDO/AIA EUV/UV wavelengths, in particular, at 94 and 131 Å filters, sensitive to temperatures of 8 MK and 12 MK. The time evolution of the emission measure of the plasma above 10 MK at the ribbons has a peak near the HXR peak time. The presence of hot plasma in the lower atmosphere is further confirmed by a RHESSI imaging spectroscopy analysis, which shows resolved sources at 11 - 13 MK that are associated with at least one ribbon. We found that collisional beam-heating can only marginally explain the power necessary to heat the 10 MK plasma at the ribbons.

  15. NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Warren, Harry; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent

    2011-10-01

    New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

  16. Theoretical studies on rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, Loukas

    1986-01-01

    Rapid fluctuations in the emission of solar bursts may have many different origins e.g., the acceleration process can have a pulsating structure, the propagation of energetic electrons and ions can be interrupted from plasma instabilities and finally the electromagnetic radiation produced by the interaction of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves may have a pulsating behavior in time. In two separate studies the conditions for rapid fluctuations in solar flare driven emission were analyzed.

  17. Max '91: Flare research at the next solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Canfield, Richard; Bruner, Marilyn; Emslie, Gordon; Hildner, Ernest; Hudson, Hugh; Hurford, Gordon; Lin, Robert; Novick, Robert; Tarbell, Ted

    1988-01-01

    To address the central scientific questions surrounding solar flares, coordinated observations of electromagnetic radiation and energetic particles must be made from spacecraft, balloons, rockets, and ground-based observatories. A program to enhance capabilities in these areas in preparation for the next solar maximum in 1991 is recommended. The major scientific issues are described, and required observations and coordination of observations and analyses are detailed. A program plan and conceptual budgets are provided.

  18. Solar neutrinos, solar flares, solar activity cycle and the proton decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raychaudhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that there may be a correlation between the galactic cosmic rays and the solar neutrino data, but it appears that the neutrino flux which may be generated during the large solar cosmic ray events cannot in any way effect the solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. Only initial stage of mixing between the solar core and solar outer layers after the sunspot maximum in the solar activity cycle can explain the higher (run number 27 and 71) of solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. But solar flare induced atmospheric neutrino flux may have effect in the nucleon decay detector on the underground. The neutrino flux from solar cosmic rays may be a useful guide to understand the background of nucleon decay, magnetic monopole search, and the detection of neutrino flux in sea water experiment.

  19. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  20. Solar Flare Impulsive Phase Observations from SDO and Other Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Woods, Thomas N.; Schrijver, Karel; Warren, Harry; Milligan, Ryan; Christe, Steven; Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    With the start of normal operations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory in May 2010, the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) have been returning the most accurate solar XUV and EUV measurements every 10 and 12 seconds, respectively, at almost 100% duty cycle. The focus of the presentation will be the solar flare impulsive phase observations provided by EVE and AIA and what these observations can tell us about the evolution of the initial phase of solar flares. Also emphasized throughout is how simultaneous observations with other instruments, such as RHESSI, SOHO-CDS, and HINODE-EIS, will help provide a more complete characterization of the solar flares and the evolution and energetics during the impulsive phase. These co-temporal observations from the other solar instruments can provide information such as extending the high temperature range spectra and images beyond that provided by the EUV and XUV wavelengths, provide electron density input into the lower atmosphere at the footpoints, and provide plasma flows of chromospheric evaporation, among other characteristics.

  1. Automatic Tracking of Active Regions and Detection of Solar Flares in Solar EUV Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, C.; Aranda, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    Solar catalogs are frequently handmade by experts using a manual approach or semi-automated approach. The appearance of new tools is very useful because the work is automated. Nowadays it is impossible to produce solar catalogs using these methods, because of the emergence of new spacecraft that provide a huge amount of information. In this article an automated system for detecting and tracking active regions and solar flares throughout their evolution using the Extreme UV Imaging Telescope (EIT) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft is presented. The system is quite complex and consists of different phases: i) acquisition and preprocessing; ii) segmentation of regions of interest; iii) clustering of these regions to form candidate active regions which can become active regions; iv) tracking of active regions; v) detection of solar flares. This article describes all phases, but focuses on the phases of tracking and detection of active regions and solar flares. The system relies on consecutive solar images using a rotation law to track the active regions. Also, graphs of the evolution of a region and solar evolution are presented to detect solar flares. The procedure developed has been tested on 3500 full-disk solar images (corresponding to 35 days) taken from the spacecraft. More than 75 % of the active regions are tracked and more than 85 % of the solar flares are detected.

  2. Solar Flares Observed with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2004-01-01

    Solar flares are impressive examples of explosive energy release in unconfined, magnetized plasma. It is generally believed that the flare energy is derived from the coronal magnetic field. However, we have not been able to establish the specific energy release mechanism(s) or the relative partitioning of the released energy between heating, particle acceleration (electrons and ions), and mass motions. NASA's RHESSI Mission was designed to study the acceleration and evolution of electrons and ions in flares by observing the X-ray and gamma-ray emissions these energetic particles produce. This is accomplished through the combination of high-resolution spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging, including the first images of flares in gamma rays. RHESSI has observed over 12,000 solar flares since its launch on February 5, 2002. I will demonstrate how we use the RHESSI spectra to deduce physical properties of accelerated electrons and hot plasma in flares. Using images to estimate volumes, w e typically find that the total energy in accelerated electrons is comparable to that in the thermal plasma. I will also present flare observations that provide strong support for the presence of magnetic reconnection in a large-scale, vertical current sheet in the solar corona. RHESSI observations such as these are allowing us to probe more deeply into the physics of solar flares.

  3. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  4. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  5. The development and cooling of a solar limb-flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veck, N. J.; Strong, K. T.; Jordan, C.; Simnett, G. M.; Cargill, P. J.; Priest, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of a flare that began in soft X-rays at 20:37 UT on April 12, 1980 at the west limb of the sun are discussed. The observations of the flare and postflare loops are first described, and the Solar Maximum Mission data are interpreted in terms of the temperature, density, and geometry of the emitting regions. The observed postflare cooling time is compared with that expected from radiation, conduction, and enthalpy flux. The loop model is discussed, and the observed events are compared with other proposed models.

  6. Effects of solar flares on the ionosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Mendillo, Michael; Withers, Paul; Hinson, David; Rishbeth, Henry; Reinisch, Bodo

    2006-02-24

    All planetary atmospheres respond to the enhanced x-rays and ultraviolet (UV) light emitted from the Sun during a flare. Yet only on Earth are observations so continuous that the consequences of these essentially unpredictable events can be measured reliably. Here, we report observations of solar flares, causing up to 200% enhancements to the ionosphere of Mars, as recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor in April 2001. Modeling the altitude dependence of these effects requires that relative enhancements in the soft x-ray fluxes far exceed those in the UV. PMID:16497929

  7. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection, Chromospheric Evaporation, Implosion, and Precursors in the 2014 September 10 X1.6-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Polito, Vanessa; Janvier, Miho; Mulay, Sargam M.; Karlický, Marian; Aulanier, Guillaume; Del Zanna, Giulio; Dzifčáková, Elena; Mason, Helen E.; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the occurrence of slipping magnetic reconnection, chromospheric evaporation, and coronal loop dynamics in the 2014 September 10 X-class flare. Slipping reconnection is found to be present throughout the flare from its early phase. Flare loops are seen to slip in opposite directions toward both ends of the ribbons. Velocities of 20–40 km s‑1 are found within time windows where the slipping is well resolved. The warm coronal loops exhibit expanding and contracting motions that are interpreted as displacements due to the growing flux rope that subsequently erupts. This flux rope existed and erupted before the onset of apparent coronal implosion. This indicates that the energy release proceeds by slipping reconnection and not via coronal implosion. The slipping reconnection leads to changes in the geometry of the observed structures at the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit position, from flare loop top to the footpoints in the ribbons. This results in variations of the observed velocities of chromospheric evaporation in the early flare phase. Finally, it is found that the precursor signatures, including localized EUV brightenings as well as nonthermal X-ray emission, are signatures of the flare itself, progressing from the early phase toward the impulsive phase, with the tether-cutting being provided by the slipping reconnection. The dynamics of both the flare and outlying coronal loops is found to be consistent with the predictions of the standard solar flare model in three dimensions.

  8. Low-latitude Ionospheric Heating during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klenzing, J.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Qian, L.; Haaser, R. A.; Burrell, A. G.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A.; Simoes, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    The advent of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) represents a leap forward in our capability to measure rapidly changing transient events on the sun. SDO measurements are paired with the comprehensive low latitude measurements of the ionosphere and thermosphere provided by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite and state-of-the-art general circulation models to discuss the coupling between the terrestrial upper atmosphere and solar radiation. Here we discuss ionospheric heating as detected by the Coupled Ion-Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) instrument suite on the C/NOFS satellite during solar flares. Also discusses is the necessity of decoupling the heating due to increased EUV irradiance and that due to geomagnetic storms, which sometimes occur with flares. Increases in both the ion temperature and ion density in the subsolar topside ionosphere are detected within 77 minutes of the 23 Jan 2012 M-class flare, and the observed results are compared with the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) using the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) as an input.

  9. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The

  10. Measurements and modeling of total solar irradiance in X-class solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Christopher Samuel; Chamberlin, Phillip Clyde; Hock, Rachel

    2014-05-20

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment can detect changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-class solar flares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar flares presented in Woods et al., as well as an additional flare measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five flares are then compared to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-class flares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar flares analyzed in the Emslie et al. study.