Science.gov

Sample records for solar flare occurrence

  1. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  2. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  3. A 154-day periodicity in the occurrence of hard solar flares?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieger, E.; Kanbach, G.; Reppin, C.; Share, G. H.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the temporal distribution of 139 solar flares monitored by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer aboard the Solar Maximum Mission is reported. It is found that, instead of being randomly distributed in time, these events have a tendency to occur in groups with a mean spacing of about 154 days (75 nHz) over the observing interval. A larger sample of flares with an X-ray classification of M 2.5 or larger recorded by the GOES satellite showed a similar regularity.

  4. Towards understanding solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1982-01-01

    Instrumentation and spacecraft payloads developed at Lockheed for solar flare studies are reviewed, noting the significance of the observations for adding to a data base for eventual prediction of the occurrence of flares and subsequent radiation hazards to people in space. Developmental work on the two solar telescopes on board the Skylab pallet was performed at a Lockheed facility, as was the fabrication of very-large-area proportional counter for flights on the Aerobee rocket in 1967. The rocket work led to the fabrication of the Mapping X Ray Heliometer on the Orbiting Solar Observatory and the X Ray Polychromator for the Solar Maximum Mission. The Polychromator consists of a bent crystal spectrometer for high time resolution flare studies over a wide field of view, and a flat crystal spectrometer for simultaneous polychromatic imaging at 7 different X ray wavelengths.

  5. Classification of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Sturrock, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    The historical background of solar flare classification before the SMM launch is reviewed along with recent developments made by observations with SMM, Hinotori, and other contemporary satellite and ground-based observations. Based on these recent findings, solar flares are grouped into five classes: thermal hard X-ray flares, nonthermal hard X-ray flares, impulsive gamma-ray/proton flares, gradual gamma-ray/proton flares, and quiescent filament-eruption flares. The roles of filament eruptions in flare development are examined, and theoretical ideas related to processes occurring in different flare classes are discussed.

  6. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

  7. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of the variation can be accounted for with the linear fits. A statistically significant Northern Hemisphere flare excess (P less than 1 percent) was found, as was a Western Hemisphere excess (P approx 3 percent). Subflares were more prolific within 45 deg of central meridian (P less than 1 percent), while flares of H alpha importance or = 1 were more prolific near the limbs greater than 45 deg from central meridian; P approx 2 percent). Two-ribbon flares were more frequent within 45 deg of central meridian (P less than 1 percent). Slow rise time flares occurred more frequently in the western hemisphere (P approx 2 percent), as did short-lived duration flares (P approx 9 percent), but fast rise time flares were not preferentially distributed (in terms of east-west or limb-disk). Long-lived duration flares occurred more often within 45 deg 0 central meridian (P approx 7 percent). Mean durations for subflares and flares of H alpha importance or + 1, found within 45 deg of central meridian, are 14 percent and 70 percent, respectively, longer than those found for flares closer to the limb. As compared to flares occurring near cycle maximum, the flares of 1975 (near solar minimum) have mean values of rise time, decay time, and duration that are significantly shorter. A flare near solar maximum, on average, is about 1.6 times longer than one occurring near solar minimum.

  8. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  9. Towards Predicting Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Lisa; Balasubramaniam, Karatholuvu S.

    2015-04-01

    We present a statistical study of solar X-ray flares observed using GOES X-ray observations of the ~50,000 fares that occurred from 1986 - mid-2014. Observed X-ray parameters are computed for each of the flares, including the 24-hour non-flare X-ray background in the 1-8 A band and the maximum ratio of the short (0.5 - 4 A) to long band (1-8 A) during flares. These parameters, which are linked to the amount of active coronal heating and maximum flare temperature, reveal a separation between the X-, M-, C-, and B- class fares. The separation was quantified and verified through machine-learning algorithms (k nearest neighbor; nearest centroid). Using the solar flare parameters learned from solar cycles 22-23, we apply the models to predict flare categories of solar cycle 24. Skill scores are then used to assess the success of our models, yielding correct predictions for ~80% of M-, C-, and B-class flares and 100% correct predictions for X-flares. We present details of the analysis along with the potential uses of our model in flare forecasting.

  10. Flare models: Chapter 9 of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A. (editor)

    1979-01-01

    By reviewing the properties of solar flares analyzed by each of the seven teams of the Skylab workshop, a set of primary and secondary requirements of flare models are derived. A number of flare models are described briefly and their properties compared with the primary requirements. It appears that, at this time, each flare model has some strong points and some weak points. It has not yet been demonstrated that any one flare model meets all the proposed requirements.

  11. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  12. THE 22-YEAR SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE. II. FLARE ACTIVITY

    E-print Network

    to the longest radio waves. Their occurrence follows the 11-year solar activity cycle, being more numerous duringTHE 22-YEAR SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE. II. FLARE ACTIVITY G. MARI, M. D. POPESCU, A. C. DONEA, M. MIERLA cycle, a cycle that had an unexpected behaviour. Here we analyze the occurrence of the solar flares

  13. Parameterization of solar flare dose 

    E-print Network

    Lamarche, Anne Helene

    1995-01-01

    A critical aspect of missions to the Moon or Mars is the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare ...

  14. Solar Flares and particle acceleration

    E-print Network

    Solar Flares and particle acceleration Eduard Kontar School of Physics and Astronomy University and accelerated particles #12;Solar flares and accelerated particles From Emslie et al., 2004, 2005 Free magnetic Spectroscopic Imager RHESSI is designed to investigate particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares

  15. Electron beams in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1994-01-01

    A list of publications resulting from this program includes 'The Timing of Electron Beam Signatures in Hard X-Ray and Radio: Solar Flare Observations by BATSE/Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and PHOENIX'; 'Coherent-Phase or Random-Phase Acceleration of Electron Beams in Solar Flares'; 'Particle Acceleration in Flares'; 'Chromospheric Evaporation and Decimetric Radio Emission in Solar Flares'; 'Sequences of Correlated Hard X-Ray and Type 3 Bursts During Solar Flares'; and 'Solar Electron Beams Detected in Hard X-Rays and Radiowaves.' Abstracts and reprints of each are attached to this report.

  16. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past year we have been working with the HESSI (High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) team in preparation for launch in early 2001. HESSI has as its primary scientific goal photometric imaging and spectroscopy of solar flares in hard X-rays and gamma-rays with an approx. 2 sec angular resolution, approx. keV energy resolution and approx. 2 s time resolution over the 6 keV to 15 MeV energy range. We have performed tests of the imager using a specially designed experiment which exploits the second-harmonic response of HESSI's sub-collimators to an artificial X-ray source at a distance of 1550 cm from its front grids. Figures show the response to X-rays at energies in the range where HESSI is expected to image solar flares. To prepare the team and the solar user community for imaging flares with HESSI, we have written a description of the major imaging concepts. This paper will be submitted for publication in a referred journal.

  17. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1994-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane-parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of nonthermal electrons and X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick H I, Ca II and Mg II transitions using the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from X-ray photoionization and collisional ionization by nonthermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in the pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring. We have computed the chromospheric radiation that results from a range of coronal heating rates, with particular emphasis on the widely observed diagnostic H(alpha). Our conclusion is that the H(alpha) fluxes and profiles actually observed in flares can only be produced under conditions of a low-pressure corona with strong beam heating. Therefore we suggest that H(alpha) in flares is produced primarily at the footprints of newly heated loops where significant evaporation has not yet occurred. As a single loop evolves in time, no matter how strong the heating rate may become, the H(alpha) flux will diminish as the corona becomes denser and hence more effective at stopping the beam. This prediction leads to several observable consequences regarding the spatial and temporal signatures of the X-ray and H(alpha) radiation during flares.

  18. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  19. Avalanches and the distribution of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.

    1991-01-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is proposed to be in a self-organized critical state, thus explaining the observed power-law dependence of solar-flare-occurrence rate on flare size which extends over more than five orders of magnitude in peak flux. The physical picture that arises is that solar flares are avalanches of many small reconnection events, analogous to avalanches of sand in the models published by Bak and colleagues in 1987 and 1988. Flares of all sizes are manifestations of the same physical processes, where the size of a given flare is determined by the number of elementary reconnection events. The relation between small-scale processes and the statistics of global-flare properties which follows from the self-organized magnetic-field configuration provides a way to learn about the physics of the unobservable small-scale reconnection processes. A simple lattice-reconnection model is presented which is consistent with the observed flare statistics. The implications for coronal heating are discussed and some observational tests of this picture are given.

  20. Solar Chromosphere Flare Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    This paper describes develop of a two channel echelle spectrograph, Solar Chromospheric Flare Spectreograph (SCFC), to observe the optical spectra at the locations of ares and explosive events on the Sun. The SCFS is designed to record spectra in two channels in the wavelength range of 350-890 nm, which has several chromospheric spectral lines. The SCFS will have a multi-fiber based slit capable of observing at 100 locations of the active region magnetic field polarity inversion lines. The field of view of SCFS will be 80 x 80 arc sec with spatial resolution of 8 arc sec. The spectral resolution of 60,000 will be adequate for measuring Doppler velocities of about 5 km/s. The instrument is designed using off-the-shelves optical and mechanical parts with minimum fabrication at an in-house machine shop. We propose to integrate the SCFS with the full-disk Halpha telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory that is operating semi-automatically a round the year except for weather interruptions. The SCFS observations will also be mainly used to study the physics of ares, but part of the time will be devoted to classroom educational activities.

  1. Solar Flares and the Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-08-01

    During a solar flare, the chromosphere emits across a large fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum, providing diagnostic information on heating, dynamics and flare energy transport by both thermal and non-thermal means. The evolution of chromospheric ribbons and footpoints also traces the progress of coronal reconnection, and links radiation output with magnetic evolution. Since the chromosphere emits the majority of a flare's radiation, the current emphasis on chromospheric observations by missions such as IRIS, and future large facilities such as the DKIST, is very beneficial to flare research. In this talk I will overview recent developments in observations and theory of flaring chromospheres and make some suggestions about profitable future avenues for research.

  2. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  3. Radiation hydrodynamics in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.H.

    1985-10-18

    Solar flares are rather violent and extremely complicated phenomena, and it should be made clear at the outset that a physically complete picture describing all aspects of flares does not exist. From the wealth of data which is available, it is apparent that many different types of physical processes are involved during flares: energetic particle acceleration, rapid magnetohydrodynamic motion of complex field structures, magnetic reconnection, violent mass motion along magnetic field lines, and the heating of plasma to tens of millions of degrees, to name a few. The goal of this paper is to explore just one aspect of solar flares, namely, the interaction of hydrodynamics and radiation processes in fluid being rapidly heated along closed magnetic field lines. The models discussed are therefore necessarily restrictive, and will address only a few of the observed or observable phenomena. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Scattering Polarization in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Št?pán, Ji?í; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-01

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  5. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Št?pán, Ji?í; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  6. Biggest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    View an animation from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). At 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001, the sun unleashed the biggest solar flare ever recorded, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The flare was definitely more powerful than the famous solar flare on March 6, 1989, which was related to the disruption of power grids in Canada. This recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Solar flares, among the solar system's mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. Solar ejections are often associated with flares and sometimes occur shortly after the flare explosion. Coronal mass ejections are clouds of electrified, magnetic gas weighing billions of tons ejected from the Sun and hurled into space with speeds ranging from 12 to 1,250 miles per second. Depending on the orientation of the magnetic fields carried by the ejection cloud, Earth-directed coronal mass ejections cause magnetic storms by interacting with the Earth's magnetic field, distorting its shape, and accelerating electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) trapped within. Severe solar weather is often heralded by dramatic auroral displays, northern and southern lights, and magnetic storms that occasionally affect satellites, radio communications and power systems. The flare and solar ejection has also generated a storm of high-velocity particles, and the number of particles with ten million electron-volts of energy in the space near Earth is now 10,000 times greater than normal. The increase of particles at this energy level still poses no appreciable hazard to air travelers, astronauts or satellites, and the NOAA SEC rates this radiation storm as a moderate S2 to S3, on a scale that goes to S5. Monday's solar flare produced an R4 radio blackout on the sunlit side of the Earth. An R4 blackout, rated by the NOAA SEC, is second to the most severe R5 classification. The classification measures the disruption in radio communications. X-ray and ultraviolet light from the flare changed the structure of the Earth's electrically charged upper atmosphere (ionosphere). This affected radio communication frequencies that either pass through the ionosphere to satellites or are reflected by it to traverse the globe. The SOHO mission is being conducted collaboratively between the European Space Agency and NASA. Images courtesy SOHO Project, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

  7. Turbulence, Complexity, and Solar Flares

    E-print Network

    McAteer, R T James; Conlon, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    The issue of predicting solar flares is one of the most fundamental in physics, addressing issues of plasma physics, high-energy physics, and modelling of complex systems. It also poses societal consequences, with our ever-increasing need for accurate space weather forecasts. Solar flares arise naturally as a competition between an input (flux emergence and rearrangement) in the photosphere and an output (electrical current build up and resistive dissipation) in the corona. Although initially localised, this redistribution affects neighbouring regions and an avalanche occurs resulting in large scale eruptions of plasma, particles, and magnetic field. As flares are powered from the stressed field rooted in the photosphere, a study of the photospheric magnetic complexity can be used to both predict activity and understand the physics of the magnetic field. The magnetic energy spectrum and multifractal spectrum are highlighted as two possible approaches to this.

  8. Magnetic reconnection in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic energy stored in the corona is the only plausible source for the energy released during large solar flares. During the last 20 years most theoretical work has concentrated on models which store magnetic energy in the corona in the form of electrical currents, and a major goal of present day research is to understand how these currents are created, and then later dissipated during a flare. Another important goal is to find a flare model which can eject magnetic flux into interplanetary space. Although many flares do not eject magnetic flux, those which do are of special importance for solar-terrestrial relations since the ejected flux can have dramatic effects if it hits the Earth's magnetosphere. Three flare models which have been extensively investigated are the emerging-flux model, the sheared-arcade model, and the magnetic-flux-rope model. All of these models can store and release magnetic energy efficiently provided that rapid magnetic reconnection occurs. However, only the magnetic-flux-rope model appears to provide a plausible mechanism for ejecting magnetic flux into interplanetary space.

  9. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  10. Solar flares and energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, Nicole

    2012-07-13

    Solar flares are now observed at all wavelengths from ?-rays to decametre radio waves. They are commonly associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. These particles play a major role in the active Sun because they contain a large amount of the energy released during flares. Energetic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere and produce high-energy X-rays and ?-rays. Energetic particles can also escape to the corona and interplanetary medium, produce radio emissions (electrons) and may eventually reach the Earth's orbit. I shall review here the available information on energetic particles provided by X-ray/?-ray observations, with particular emphasis on the results obtained recently by the mission Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. I shall also illustrate how radio observations contribute to our understanding of the electron acceleration sites and to our knowledge on the origin and propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium. I shall finally briefly review some recent progress in the theories of particle acceleration in solar flares and comment on the still challenging issue of connecting particle acceleration processes to the topology of the complex magnetic structures present in the corona. PMID:22665901

  11. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Weir, Sue B.

    1996-01-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic and interesting phenomena in the Solar system, releasing up to 1032 ergs of energy on timescales of several tens of seconds to several tens of minutes. Much of this energy is in the form of suprathermal electrons and ions, which remain trapped at the Sun and produce a wide variety of radiations, as well as escape into interplanetary space, where they can be directly observed. The radiation from trapped particles consists in general of (1) continuum emission; (2) narrow gamma-ray nuclear deexcitation lines; and (3) high-energy neutrons observed in space or by ground-based neutron monitors. The particles that escape into space consist of both electrons and ions, which often have compositions quite different than that of the ambient solar atmosphere. Flares thus present many diagnostics of the particle acceleration mechanism(s), the identification of which is the ultimate goal of flare research. Moreover, flares in fact offer the only opportunity in astrophysics to study the simultaneous energization of both electrons and ions. Hopefully, an understanding of flares with their wealth of diagnostic data will lead to a better understanding of particle acceleration at other sites in the Universe. It is now generally accepted that flares are roughly divided into two classes: impulsive and gradual. Gradual events are large, occur high in the corona, have long-duration soft and hard X-rays and gamma rays, are electron poor, are associated with Type II radio emission and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and produce energetic ions with coronal abundance ratios. Impulsive events are more compact, occur lower in the corona, produce short-duration radiation, and exhibit dramatic abundance enhancements in the energetic ions. Their He-3/He-4 ratio is - 1, which is a huge increase over the coronal value of about 5 x 10(exp -4), and they also posses smaller but still significant enhancements of Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe relative to He-4, C, N, and O. Specifically, above about 1 MeV nucleon(exp -1), the ratio of Fe to O is about 8 times larger than in the corona or in gradual flares, while the ratio of Ne, Mg, and Si to O is about 3 times higher; He-4, C, N, and 0 are not enchanced with respect to each other. In addition to these elemental enhancements, Ne and Mg have isotopic enhancements as well. The general scenario that has emerged from these (and other) observations is that energetic particles in gradual events are accelerated by a CME-driven shock, while those particles in impulsive events are accelerated by another mechanism(s).

  12. Solar flares induced D-region ionospheric and geomagnetic perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvakumaran, R.; Maurya, Ajeet K.; Gokani, Sneha A.; Veenadhari, B.; Kumar, Sushil; Venkatesham, K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Singh, Abhay K.; Siingh, Devendraa; Singh, Rajesh

    2015-02-01

    The D-region ionospheric perturbations caused by solar flares which occurred during January 2010-February 2011, a low solar activity period of current solar cycle 24, have been examined on NWC transmitter signal (19.8 kHz) recorded at an Indian low latitude station, Allahabad (Geographic lat. 25.75°N, long. 81.85°E). A total of 41 solar flares, including 21 C-class, 19 M-class and 01 X-class, occurred during the daylight part of the NWC-Allahabad transmitter receiver great circle path. The local time dependence of solar flare effects on the change in the VLF amplitude, time delay between VLF peak amplitude and X-ray flux peak have been studied during morning, noon and evening periods of local daytime. Using the Long Wave Propagation Capability code V 2.1 the D-region reference height (H/) and sharpness factor (?) for each class of solar flare (C, M and X) have been estimated. It is found that D-region ionospheric parameters (H/, ?) strongly depend on the local time of flare's occurrence and their classes. The flare time electron density estimated by using H/ and ? shows maximum increase in the electron density of the order of ~80 times as compared to the normal day values. The electron density was found to increase exponentially with increase in the solar flux intensity. The solar flare effect on horizontal component (H) of the Earth's magnetic field over an equatorial station, Tirunelveli (Geographic lat., 8.7°N, long., 77.8°E, dip lat., 0.4°N), shows a maximum increase in H of ~8.5% for M class solar flares. The increase in H is due to the additional magnetic field produced by the ionospheric electrojet over the equatorial station.

  13. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Ding, Feng; Ning, Baiqi; Wan, Weixing; Yu, You; Hu, Lianhuan

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 elm-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008. Owing to the high sensitivity and temporal resolution, ISFAI can be utilized as a solar flare detection parameter to monitor space weather.

  14. Solar flares controlled by helicity conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliner, Erast B.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy release in a class of solar flares is studied on the assumption that during burst events in highly conducting plasma the magnetic helicity of plasma is approximately conserved. The available energy release under a solar flare controlled by the helicity conservation is shown to be defined by the magnetic structure of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominences; the discontinuation of the reconnection of magnetic lines long before the complete reconnection of participated fields occurs; the existence of quiet prominences which, in spite of their usual optical appearance, do not initiate any flare events; the small energy release under a solar flare in comparison with the stockpile of magnetic energy in surrounding fields. The predicted scale of the energy release is in a fair agreement with observations.

  15. Solar and Stellar Flares and Their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari

    2015-08-01

    Recent space observations of the Sun revealed that the solar atmosphere is full of explosions, such as flares and flare-like phenomena. These flares generate not only strong electromagnetic emissions but also nonthermal particles and bulk plasma ejections, which sometimes lead to geomagnetic storms and affect terrestrial environment and our civilization, damaging satellite, power-grids, radio communication etc. Solar flares are prototype of various explosions in our universe, and hence are important not only for geophysics and environmental science but also for astrophysics. The energy source of solar flares is now established to be magnetic energy stored near sunspots. There is now increasing observational evidence that solar flares are caused by magnetic reconnection, merging of anti-parallel magnetic field lines and associated magneto-plasma dynamics (Shibata and Magara 2011, Living Review). It has also been known that many stars show flares similar to solar flares, and often such stellar flares are much more energetic than solar flares. The total energy of a solar flare is typically 10^29 - 10^32 erg. On the other hand, there are much more energetic flares (10^33 - 10^38 erg) in stars, especially in young stars. These are called superflares. We argue that these superflares on stars can also be understood in a unified way based on the reconnection mechanism. Finally we show evidence of occurrence of superflares on Sun-like stars according to recent stellar observations (Maehara et al. 2012, Nature, Shibayama et al. 2013), which revealed that superflares with energy of 10^34 - 10^35 erg (100 - 1000 times of the largest solar flares) occur with frequency of once in 800 - 5000 years on Sun-like stars which are very similar to our Sun. Against the previous belief, these new observations as well as theory (Shibata et al. 2013) suggest that we cannot deny the possibility of superflares on the present Sun. Finally, we shall discuss possible impacts of these superflares on the Earth as well as exoplanets around these superflare stars.

  16. Geomagnetic Solar Flare Effect Associated with the Most Powerful X-Class Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwudi Okpala, Kingsley

    2015-08-01

    The variation in the Earth’s magnetic field associated with X class solar flares have been studied. Thirty (30) most powerful X-class solar flares that occurred between 1976 and the end of the last solar cycle have been investigated with a view to understanding the effect of this class of flares on the geomagnetic field. The geomagnetic solar flare effect (sfe) associated with these solar flares, as observed in fifteen geomagnetic station with data resolution of minutes have been computed. We obtained a good correlation (r >0.73) between the normalized H component amplitude of the solar flare effect (Hsfe) and the intensity of the solar flare especially for the solar flares that occurred within 45o of the central meridian of the solar disk at. Stations within the mid latitude generally showed better correlation than those at higher latitudes. The Z component amplitude of the solar flare effect (Zsfe) generally showed weaker correlation (r>4.6) with the solar flare intensity, and this correlation was better for high latitude stations. The results from this study have important implications for our present understanding of the nature of- and complexities in- the ionizations that lead to the geomagnetic solar flare effect.

  17. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  18. Electron acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droge, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul; Moses, Dan

    1989-01-01

    For the period Spetember 1978 to December 1982, 55 solar flare particle events for which the instruments on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft detected electrons above 10 MeV. Combining data with those from the ULEWAT spectrometer electron spectra in the range from 0.1 to 100 MeV were obtained. The observed spectral shapes can be divided into two classes. The spectra of the one class can be fit by a single power law in rigidity over the entire observed range. The spectra of the other class deviate from a power law, instead exhibiting a steepening at low rigidities and a flattening at high rigidities. Events with power-law spectra are associated with impulsive (less than 1 hr duration) soft X-ray emission, whereas events with hardening spectra are associated with long-duration (more than 1 hr) soft X-ray emission. The characteristics of long-duration events are consistent with diffusive shock acceleration taking place high in the corona. Electron spectra of short-duration flares are well reproduced by the distribution functions derived from a model assuming simultaneous second-order Fermi acceleration and Coulomb losses operating in closed flare loops.

  19. Solar gamma rays. [in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of gamma ray production in solar flares is treated in detail. Both lines and continuum are produced. Results show that the strongest line predicted at 2.225 MeV with a width of less than 100 eV and detected at 2.24 + or - 2.02 MeV, is due to neutron capture by protons in the photosphere. Its intensity is dependent on the photospheric He-3 abundance. The neutrons are produced in nuclear reactions of flare accelerated particles which also produce positrons and prompt nuclear deexcitation lines. The strongest prompt lines are at 4.43 MeV from c-12 and at approximately 6.2 from 0-16 and N-15. The gamma ray continuum, produced by electron bremsstrahlung, allows the determination of the spectrum and number of accelerated electrons in the MeV region. From the comparison of the line and continuum intensities a proton-to-electron ratio of about 10 to 100 at the same energy for the 1972, August 4 flare. For the same flare the protons above 2.5 MeV which are responsible for the gamma ray emission produce a few percent of the heat generated by the electrons which make the hard X rays above 20 keV.

  20. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic energy, and produce X-rays, microwaves and a shock wave that heats the solar surface. Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that predicts the nature and magnitude of the shock waves that this beam of energetic electrons should create when they slam down into the solar atmosphere. Although their theory directed them to the right area to search for the seismic waves, the waves that they found were 10 times stronger than they had predicted. "They were so strong that you can see them in the raw data," Kosovichev says. The solar seismic waves appear to be compression waves like the "P" waves generated by an earthquake. They travel throughout the Sun's interior. In fact, the waves should recombine on the opposite side of the Sun from the location of the flare to create a faint duplicate of the original ripple pattern, Kosovichev predicts. Now that they know how to find them, the SOHO scientists say that the seismic waves generated by solar flares should allow them to verify independently some of the conditions in the solar interior that they have inferred from studying the pattern of waves that are continually ruffling the Sun's surface. SOHO is part of the International Solar-Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program, a global effort to observe and understand our star and its effects on our environment. The ISTP mission includes more than 20 satellites, coupled with with ground-based observatories and modeling centers, that allow scientists to study the Sun, the Earth, and the space between them in unprecedented detail. ISTP is a joint program of NASA, ESA, Japan's Institute for Astronautical Science, and Russia's Space Research Institute. Still images of the solar quake can be found at the following internet address: FTP://PAO.GSFC.NASA.GOV/newsmedia/QUAKE/ For further information, please contact : ESA Public Relations Division Tel:+33(0)1.53.69.71.55 Fax: +33(0)1.53.69.76.90 3

  1. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Wan, Weixing; Ning, Baiqi; Ding, Feng; Hu, Lianhuan; Yu, You

    2014-01-01

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, the statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008.

  2. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  3. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES TRIGGERING SOLAR FLARES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, K.; Bamba, Y.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Iida, Y.; Toriumi, S.; Asai, A.

    2012-11-20

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections, the most catastrophic eruptions in our solar system, have been known to affect terrestrial environments and infrastructure. However, because their triggering mechanism is still not sufficiently understood, our capacity to predict the occurrence of solar eruptions and to forecast space weather is substantially hindered. Even though various models have been proposed to determine the onset of solar eruptions, the types of magnetic structures capable of triggering these eruptions are still unclear. In this study, we solved this problem by systematically surveying the nonlinear dynamics caused by a wide variety of magnetic structures in terms of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. As a result, we determined that two different types of small magnetic structures favor the onset of solar eruptions. These structures, which should appear near the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), include magnetic fluxes reversed to the potential component or the nonpotential component of major field on the PIL. In addition, we analyzed two large flares, the X-class flare on 2006 December 13 and the M-class flare on 2011 February 13, using imaging data provided by the Hinode satellite, and we demonstrated that they conform to the simulation predictions. These results suggest that forecasting of solar eruptions is possible with sophisticated observation of a solar magnetic field, although the lead time must be limited by the timescale of changes in the small magnetic structures.

  4. Energetic neutral atoms from solar flares

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Hugh

    Energetic neutral atoms from solar flares H. S. Hudson SSL, UC Berkeley #12;Berkeley April 9, 2009 9, 2009 Where do flare ENAs come from? Neutralization and re-ionization on open field lines: Mikic & Lee, 2006 Neutralization and re-ionization on closed field lines: Dennis & Schwartz, 1989 http

  5. Role of solar flare index in long term modulation of cosmic ray intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, P. K.; Jain, A. K.; Shrivastava, P. K.; Pathak, S. P.; Agrawal, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, the importance of the occurrence of solar flares in the long-term modulation of cosmic ray intensity has been re-emphasized. For this purpose, the data of solar flares have been used from various publications, such as Solar Geophysical Data books, U.A.G. reports and Quarterly Bulletin Of Solar Activity. Research very clearly reveals that even the periodic changes in the solar flare observations, obtained from the four different data sources, for the same interval, differ significantly from one another; this is evidenced even on an average basis. Hence, in any study using solar flares, the importance of selecting a single compilation of the solar-flare data for the entire period of investigation is stressed.

  6. Soliton and strong Langmuir turbulence in solar flare processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, M. T.; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, M.

    1989-01-01

    The occurrence of modulational instability in the current sheet of a solar flare is investigated. Special attention is given to the plasma microinstability in this sheet and its relation to the flare process. It is found that solitons or strong Langmuir turbulence are likely to occur in the diffusion region under solar flare conditions in which the electric resistivity could be enhanced by several orders of magnitude in the region, resulting in significant heating and stochastic acceleration of particles. A numerical example is used to demonstrate the transition of the magnetic field velocity and plasma density from the outer MHD region into the diffusive region and then back out again with the completion of the energy conversion process. This is all made possible by an increase in resistivity of four to five orders of magnitude over the classical value.

  7. Distant Suns: Solar Flares as Proxies for Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Vinay; Reeves, Kathy; Wargelin, Brad

    2009-09-01

    The solar corona has been a Rosetta stone directing our knowledge and understanding of stellar coronae. Because of its proximity, the Sun can be observed in great detail, and detailed physical models derived from such observations are often used to explain stellar phenomena. Large stellar flares are traditionally modeled as a single coronal loop evolving hydrodynamically. However, such a picture has no counterpart on the Sun, where flares are observed to be complex events, generally affecting large areas of an active region and resulting in post-flare loop arcades that have a different magnetic topology compared to the pre-flare region. Here we discuss a large flare on a dM3.5Ve dwarf, Ross 154, that was observed with Chandra. The flare shows a pronounced dual-decay structure. We model the event as a set of cascading loops in an arcade that are sequentially energized, leading to predicted light curves that also exhibit similar behavior. This work was supported by CXC NASA contract NAS8-39073 (VLK, BW) and XRT NASA contract NNM07AB07C (KR).

  8. Solar Flares and their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward Francis; Engle, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are discussed. The strong X-ray - UV radiation and high plasma fluxes from flares can strongly effect solar system planets even as far out as the Jovian planets and their moons. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These data imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles in the development and evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestiral planets. These strong X-UV fluxes from flares can greatly effect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also briefly discussed are effects of large flares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though strong solar flares are rarer and less powerful than from the youthful Sun, they can cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space.This research is supported by grants from NASA (HST and Chandra) and NSF. We gratefully acknowledge this support

  9. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  10. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  11. Reverse Current in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. W., III

    1978-01-01

    An idealized steady state model of a stream of energetic electrons neutralized by a reverse current in the pre-flare solar plasma was developed. These calculations indicate that, in some cases, a significant fraction of the beam energy may be dissipated by the reverse current. Joule heating by the reverse current is a more effective mechanism for heating the plasma than collisional losses from the energetic electrons because the Ohmic losses are caused by thermal electrons in the reverse current which have much shorter mean free paths than the energetic electrons. The heating due to reverse currents is calculated for two injected energetic electron fluxes. For the smaller injected flux, the temperature of the coronal plasma is raised by about a factor of two. The larger flux causes the reverse current drift velocity to exceed the critical velocity for the onset of ion cyclotron turbulence, producing anomalous resistivity and an order of magnitude increase in the temperature. The heating is so rapid that the lack of ionization equilibrium may produce a soft X-ray and EUV pulse from the corona.

  12. 2 Solar flare signatures of the ionospheric GPS total electron content 3 J. Y. Liu,1,2

    E-print Network

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    2 Solar flare signatures of the ionospheric GPS total electron content 3 J. Y. Liu,1,2 C. H. Lin,1, ionospheric solar flare effects on the total electron content (TEC) and 7 associated time rate of change (r. The occurrence times and 9 locations of 11 solar flares are isolated from the 1­8 A° X-ray radiations of the 10

  13. The Solar Flare Myth in solar-terrestrial physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1993-07-01

    Early observations of associations between solar flares and large non- recurrent geomagnetic storms, large {open_quote}solar{close_quote} energetic particle events, and transient shock wave disturbances in the solar wind led to a paradigm of cause and effect that gave flares a central position in the chain of events leading from solar activity to major transient disturbances in the near-earth space environment. However, research in the last two decades shows that this emphasis on flares is misplaced. In this paper the author outlines briefly the rationale for a different paradigm of cause and effect in solar- terrestrial physics that removes solar flares from their central position as the {open_quote}cause{close_quote} of major disturbances in the near-earth space environment. Instead, this central role of {open_quote}cause{close_quote} is played by events now known as coronal mass ejections, or CMEs.

  14. Magnetic reconnection configurations and particle acceleration in solar flares

    E-print Network

    Chen, P. F.

    Magnetic reconnection configurations and particle acceleration in solar flares P. F. Chen, W. J for various particle acceleration mechanisms to work. This paper reviews recent test particle simulations space under different magnetic configurations. Key words: solar flares, magnetic reconnection, particle

  15. Carbon-poor solar flare events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1979-01-01

    Energetic particle flux enhancements over the period October 1973 - December 1977 were surveyed using ULET sensor on the IMP-8 spacecraft. During the four year period the most extreme periods of Fe enrichment compared to oxygen were during solar flare events in February 1974 and May 1974. In these same events, the carbon abundance with respect to oxygen was significantly depleted when compared with a value C:0 is approximately 0.45:1 for typical solar flares. These observations, taken together with previously reported He-3 enrichment in these events, give strong evidence for the importance of a wave-particle interaction in the pre-injection heating of the ambient matter.

  16. On Solar Flares and Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, Vladimir; Le Mouël, Jean-Louis; Courtillot, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    The anomalous character of Solar Cycle 23, which ended in the Summer of 2009, has been pointed out by many authors. It has even been proposed that the solar dynamo is undergoing a transition from a state of “grand maximum” to one of “regular oscillations”. We analyze the temporal distribution of the number and energy of solar flares, and the duration of intervals between them, over Cycles 21 to 23. We consider 32 355 flares of class C2 and larger (C2+) from the GOES catalogue. Daily values of X-ray flux (wavelengths 1 to 8 Å) have been computed by summing the energy proxies of the events. The series of daily numbers of C2+ solar flares are strongly correlated with their daily energy flux. The long duration of Cycle 23 (12.8 years based on sunspots, 13.2 years based on flares) and the long interval with no C2+ flare between the end of Cycle 23, and the start of Cycle 24 (466 days) are remarkable compared to the two earlier cycles. The amplitudes of extreme flares increase when the mean flux decreases. We have calculated running averages of energy flux over intervals going from 7 to 365 days. The singular shape of Cycle 23 is increasingly striking with increasing interval: in the first ? 70% of the cycle (displayed on a logarithmic scale) we see linearly rising maxima, whereas minima are aligned along a descending slope for the latter part of the cycle. The energy flux oscillates between these and takes the shape of a bifurcation, starting near 2002 (a time when it is suggested that photospheric fields were abruptly reduced). Inter-event intervals between successive C2+ flares undergo quasi-periodic (? 11 years) oscillations between two distinct states, which we call “active” and “quiet”, with extremely sharp onset and termination. The ratio of time spent in the active vs. quiet states ranges from 1.8 to 1.4 for Cycles 21 to 23, Cycle 23 having the longest quiet period. It has been proposed that anomalous Cycle 23 resembles Cycle 4, which was followed by reduced Cycles 5 and 6 at the time of the Dalton minimum in solar activity, often associated with a cooler global climate. It will be interesting to monitor the evolution of solar flares in Cycle 24, in order to further our understanding of solar activity during a sequence of possibly weak and decreasing cycles, but also of its potential relation to climate change.

  17. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Low, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures that are mainly observed as a prominence activity. Aims: We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. Methods: High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303) and their EUV waves with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195 Å are analysed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171 Å. Results: Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within ten hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with the accelerating tornado motion after the third flare. Conclusions: Flares in the neighbouring active region may have affected the cavity prominence system and triggered the solar tornado. A plausible mechanism is that the active-region coronal field contracted by the "Hudson effect" through the loss of magnetic energy as flares. Subsequently, the cavity expanded by its magnetic pressure to fill the surrounding low corona. We suggest that the tornado is the dynamical response of the helical prominence field to the cavity expansion. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Solar flares in the extreme ultraviolet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, L. A.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements of flare-related impulsive enhancements in solar emission lines in the extreme ultraviolet, observed from the satellite OSO-III, are reported. The enhancement of a line, expressed in percent of the total disk intensity in the line, is of the same order of magnitude as the flare area, expressed in heliocentric square degrees. Rise-times and decay-times of impulsive enhancements average about 2 min and 5 min, respectively. The maximum enhancements of radiation from ions in the chromosphere-corona transition region precede the H-alpha maximum by an average of 2 min, and occur in the same period of time as the hard component of solar X rays and the impulsive microwave bursts. Coronal lines in the extreme ultraviolet are less impulsive than the transition region lines in flare-related enhancements and their maxima follow the H-alpha maximum.

  19. Predicting large solar flares with data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, Antoine; Charbonneau, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Solar and stellar flares are magnetically-driven, scale-invariant energy release events spanning over 8 orders of magnitude in energy. The prediction of the largest solar flares, of class X, is a particularly hard task due the scarcity of such events. The detailed 3D modelling of flaring active regions still requires today too much numerical resources to be routinely used for near real-time predictions. Alternative, empirical models hence have to be designed to perform such predictions. Among the models that adequately reproduce the power-law distribution in flare sizes, avalanche models have the advantage of being numerically cheap to operate. However, they usually rely on a stochastic driver, which can be expected to degrade their predictive capabilities. Building on the pioneering work of Lu and Hamilton, we develop a class of avalanche models which succeed in minimizing the built-in stochastic ingredients while retaining the solar flares power-law distribution. We show that the largest avalanches occurring in these models are robust with respect to the stochastic realization, which opens new perspectives for the prediction of the largest (and most dangerous) solar flares.We further combine data assimilation of the GOES X-ray flux with our avalanche models to carry out actual predictions. The GOES X-ray flux is transformed into a series of peaks that is fed to the model, which automatically finds an initial condition that is compatible with the observed series of events. We then test our prediction model against past GOES large events and discuss the possibility to use our data assimilation package in near real-time applications.

  20. The energy spectra of solar flare electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Meyer, P.; Moses, D.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of 50 electron energy spectra from .1 to 100 MeV originating from solar flares was made by the combination of data from two spectrometers onboard the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 spacecraft. The observed spectral shapes of flare events can be divided into two classes through the criteria of fit to an acceleration model. This standard two step acceleration model, which fits the spectral shape of the first class of flares, involves an impulsive step that accelerates particles up to 100 keV and a second step that further accelerates these particles up to 100 MeV by a single shock. This fit fails for the second class of flares that can be characterized as having excessively hard spectra above 1 MeV relative to the predictions of the model. Correlations with soft X-ray and meter radio observations imply that the acceleration of the high energy particles in the second class of flares is dominated by the impulsive phase of the flares.

  1. On Solar Flares and Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, V. G.; Le Mouel, J.; Courtillot, V.

    2011-12-01

    The anomalous character of solar cycle 23 has been pointed out. It is proposed that the solar dynamo is undergoing a transition from a state of "grand maximum" to one of "regular oscillations". In this study, we analyze the time distribution of the number and energy of solar flares, and the duration of intervals between them, from cycle 21 to 23. We consider 32355 flares of class C2 and larger (C2+) from the GOES catalogue. Daily values of X-ray flux (wavelengths 1-8Å) have been computed by summing the energy proxies of the events. The series of daily numbers of C2+ solar flares are strongly correlated to their daily energy flux. The long duration of cycle 23 (~13 years), the long interval with no C2+ flare between the end of cycle 23 and the start of cycle 24 (466 days) are remarkable compared to the two earlier cycles. Amplitudes of extreme flares increase when mean flux decreases. We have calculated running averages of energy flux over intervals going from 7 to 365 days: the singular shape of cycle 23 is increasingly striking with increasing interval: the first ~70% of the cycle display (in logarithmic scale) linearly rising maxima, whereas minima are aligned along a descending slope for the latter part of the cycle. Energy flux oscillates between these and takes the shape of a bifurcation, starting near 2002. Durations of inter-event intervals between successive C2+ flares undergo quasi-periodic (~11yr) oscillations between two distinct states, which we call "active" and "quiet", with sharp onset and termination. The ratio of time spent in the active vs quiet states ranges from 1.8 to 1.4 for cycles 21 to 23, cycle 23 having the longest quiet period. It has been proposed that anomalous cycle 23 resembles cycle 4, which was followed by reduced cycles 5 and 6 at the time of the Dalton-minimum in solar activity, often associated with a cooler global climate. It will be interesting to monitor the evolution of solar flares in cycle 24, in order to further our understanding of solar activity during a sequence of possibly weak and decreasing cycles.

  2. Solar Flare Impacts on Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2012-01-01

    The sudden increase of X-ray and extreme ultra-violet irradiance during flares increases the density of the ionosphere through enhanced photoionization. In this paper, we use model simulations to investigate possible additional contributions from electrodynamics, finding that the vertical E X B drift in the magnetic equatorial region plays a significant role in the ionosphere response to solar flares. During the initial stage of flares, upward E X B drifts weaken in the magnetic equatorial region, causing a weakened equatorial fountain effect, which in turn causes lowering of the peak height of the F2 region and depletion of the peak electron density of the F2 region. In this initial stage, total electron content (TEC) enhancement is predominantly determined by solar zenith angle control of photoionization. As flares decay, upward E X B drifts are enhanced in the magnetic equatorial region, causing increases of the peak height and density of the F2 region. This process lasts for several hours, causing a prolonged F2-region disturbance and TEC enhancement in the magnetic equator region in the aftermath of flares. During this stage, the global morphology of the TEC enhancement becomes predominantly determined by these perturbations to the electrodynamics of the ionosphere.

  3. Coronal Magnetic Storms: a New Perspective on Flares and the `Solar Flare Myth' Debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard A.

    1996-07-01

    Recently Gosling (1993) examined the interplanetary consequences of solar activity, and suggested that the coronal mass ejection (CME) was the prime driver of most disturbances (i.e., interplanetary shocks, high-energy particles, geomagnetic storms, etc.) and that the solar flare was relatively unimportant in this context. He coined the phrase ‘Solar Flare Myth’. Since that paper there has been much debate on the origin of interplanetary disturbances - most people sitting squarely in the flare or CME camp. Švestka (1995) has attacked Gosling's conclusions on the grounds that it is misleading to ignore the flare, and that past flare classifications were perfectly adequate for explaining the observations described by Gosling. This paper is a comment on Švestka's report and an attempt to put the Solar Flare Myth into perspective - indeed it is an attempt to view the solar flare/CME phenomena in a more constructive light.

  4. High energy observations of June 1980 solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokanadham, B.; Subramanian, P. K.; Kiplinger, A. L.; Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed study of the high energy X-ray observations of the most unusual solar events observed on 4 and 7 June, 1980 with the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) on Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite. The hard X-ray data of the events are also compared with the radio microwave fluxes. The X-ray time profiles of these flares are characterized by the occurrence of impulsive phase superposed with a number of narrow spikes before the occurrence of the main energetic events. Studies of the temporal and spectral properties of these events indicated a quasi-oscillatory nature of the sources. Various models for explaining the evolution of the events are considered and the sequential firing loop model seems to be consistent with the observations of the events.

  5. Spatial Scaling Law in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus

    How do the observed macroscopic scales observed in solar flares relate to the theoretically implied microscopic scales of energy release and particle acceleration processes. We approach this question by investigating the fast milli-second time scales observed during the impulsive flare phase in hard X-ray and radio wavelengths and their relation to the spatial scales observed in hard and soft X-ray images. Previous studies with Yohkoh and CGRO data established a scaling law between the temporal and spatial scales. We investigate also the fractal spatial patterns of flares observed at arc-second spatial resolution with TRACE and deduce the fractal dimension in 2D and filling factors in 3D. We discuss the implications of these observational results for the spatial scaling of the underlying magnetic reconnection processes.

  6. Observations of particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar flares provide several examples of nonthermal particle acceleration. The paper reviews the information gained about these processes via X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy, which can presently distinguish among three separate particle-acceleration processes at the sun: an impulsive accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, a gradual accelerator of more than 20 keV electrons, and a gradual accelerator of more than 10 MeV ions. The acceleration energy efficiency (total particle energy divided by total flare energy) of any of these mechanisms cannot be less than about 0.1%, although the gradual acceleration does not occur in every flare. The observational material suggests that both the impulsive and gradual accelerations take place preferentially in closed magnetic-field structures, but that the electrons decay in these traps before they can escape. The ions escape very efficiently.

  7. Characteristics of energetic solar flare electron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Dan; Droege, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul

    1989-01-01

    A 55 event survey of energy spectra of 0.1-100 MeV interplanetary electrons originating from solar flares as measured by two spectrometers onboard the ISEE 3 (ICE) spacecraft for the years 1978-1982 has been completed. Spectra generated using the maximum flux of a given event in each energy channel were restricted to events with a well-defined flux rise time. Two broad groups of electron spectra are considered. In one group, the spectra are well represented by a single power law in rigidity with spectral index in the range 3-4.5. The spectra in the other group deviate from a power law in rigidity systematically in that they harden with increasing rigidity. Events with near power-law spectra are found to be correlated with long-duration soft X-ray events, whereas those with hardening spectra are correlated with short-duration events. The possible variation of acceleration and propagation processes with the properties of the flare site is discussed, using the duration of the soft X-ray flare emission as an indicator of the physical parameters of the flare site (flare volume, density, coronal height, and magnetic field geometry).

  8. TESTING AUTOMATED SOLAR FLARE FORECASTING WITH 13 YEARS OF MICHELSON DOPPLER IMAGER MAGNETOGRAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J. P.; Hoeksema, J. T. E-mail: JTHoeksema@sun.stanford.ed

    2010-11-01

    Flare occurrence is statistically associated with changes in several characteristics of the line-of-sight magnetic field in solar active regions (ARs). We calculated magnetic measures throughout the disk passage of 1075 ARs spanning solar cycle 23 to find a statistical relationship between the solar magnetic field and flares. This expansive study of over 71,000 magnetograms and 6000 flares uses superposed epoch (SPE) analysis to investigate changes in several magnetic measures surrounding flares and ARs completely lacking associated flares. The results were used to seek any flare associated signatures with the capability to recover weak systematic signals with SPE analysis. SPE analysis is a method of combining large sets of data series in a manner that yields concise information. This is achieved by aligning the temporal location of a specified flare in each time series, then calculating the statistical moments of the 'overlapping' data. The best-calculated parameter, the gradient-weighted inversion-line length (GWILL), combines the primary polarity inversion line (PIL) length and the gradient across it. Therefore, GWILL is sensitive to complex field structures via the length of the PIL and shearing via the gradient. GWILL shows an average 35% increase during the 40 hr prior to X-class flares, a 16% increase before M-class flares, and 17% increase prior to B-C-class flares. ARs not associated with flares tend to decrease in GWILL during their disk passage. Gilbert and Heidke skill scores are also calculated and show that even GWILL is not a reliable parameter for predicting solar flares in real time.

  9. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  10. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    E-print Network

    Panesar, N K; Tiwari, S K; Low, B C

    2012-01-01

    Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures mainly observed as a prominence activity. We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303), and their EUV waves, with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195\\AA\\ are analyzed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171\\AA. Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within 10 hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with acceleration of tornado motion after the ...

  11. Soft X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-05-01

    The soft X-ray emissions (h?>1.5 keV) of solar flares mainly come from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the overwhelming bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. (Astrophys. J. Lett. 749, L16, 2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. In this article we analyse the suitability of the GOES data for this type of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after September, 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend the result of Dolla et al. to a complete list of X-class flares from Cycle 24 and show that most of them (80 %) display QPPs in the impulsive phase. The pulsations show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES data, making use of time-series of irradiance differences (the digital time derivative on the 2-s sampling). We deploy different techniques to characterise the periodicity of GOES pulsations, considering the red-noise properties of the flare signals, finding a range of characteristic time scales of the QPPs for each event, but usually with no strong signature of a single period dominating in the power spectrum. The QPP may also appear on somewhat longer time scales during the later gradual phase, possibly with a greater tendency towards coherence, but the sampling noise in GOES difference data for high irradiance values (X-class flares) makes these more uncertain. We show that there is minimal phase difference between the differenced GOES energy channels, or between them and the hard X-ray variations on short time scales. During the impulsive phase, the footpoints of the newly forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations.

  12. Prediction of Solar Flare Size and Time-to-Flare Using Support Vector Machine Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, Laura E.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, R. T. James

    2015-10-01

    We study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using 38 features describing magnetic complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. This work uses support vector regression to formulate a mapping from the 38-dimensional feature space to a continuous-valued label vector representing flare size or time-to-flare. When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average error of approximately three-fourths a GOES class. We also consider thresholding the regressed flare size for the experiment containing both flaring and non-flaring regions and find a true positive rate of 0.69 and a true negative rate of 0.86 for flare prediction. The results for both of these size regression experiments are consistent across a wide range of predictive time windows, indicating that the magnetic complexity features may be persistent in appearance long before flare activity. This is supported by our larger error rates of some 40 hr in the time-to-flare regression problem. The 38 magnetic complexity features considered here appear to have discriminative potential for flare size, but their persistence in time makes them less discriminative for the time-to-flare problem.

  13. Carbon-poor solar flare events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of energetic particle flux enhancements over the period from October 1973 to December 1977 has been performed by using the University of Maryland/Max-Planck-Institut ULET sensor on the IMP 8 spacecraft. During the four-year period of the study, it is found that the most extreme periods of Fe enrichment compared with oxygen were during solar flare events in February 1974 and May 1974. In these same events, the carbon abundance with respect to oxygen was significantly depleted when compared with a value C:O of about 0.45:1 for typical solar flares. These observations, taken together with previously reported He-3 enrichment in these events, give strong evidence for the importance of a wave-particle interaction in the preinjection heating of the ambient matter.

  14. A phenomenological model of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    The energy of solar flares is derived from the magnetic energy of fields convected to the sun's surface and subsequently converted to heat and energetic particles within the chromosphere. The circumstances of this conversion in most current models is magnetic flux annihilation at a neutral sheet. An analysis is conducted of the constraints of flux annihilation. It is shown that the present evidence of solar cosmic rays, X-rays, gamma-rays, and total energy suggests a choice of annihilation not at a neutral point, but by an enhanced dissipation of a field-aligned current. The field configuration is related both to its origin and to the extensive theory and laboratory experiments concerned with this configuration in magnetic fusion. The magnetic field model is applied to the August 4 flare. It is shown how the plasma heating in the annihilation region balanced by thermal conduction leads to a plasma temperature of about 20 million deg K.

  15. Ion Acceleration and Transport in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the work proposed for this grant was to develop a promising model for ion acceleration in impulsive solar flares. Solar flares are among the most energetic and interesting phenomena in the solar system, releasing up to 10(exp 32) ergs of energy over timescales ranging from a few tens of seconds to a few tens of minutes. Much of this energy appears as energetic electrons and ions, which produce a wide range of observable radiations. These radiations, in turn, are valuable diagnostics of the acceleration mechanism, the identification of which is the fundamental goal of solar flare research. The specific mechanism we proposed to investigate was based on cascading Alfven waves, the essence of which was as follows: During the primary flare energy release, it is widely believed that magnetic free energy is made available through the large-scale restructuring of the flare magnetic field. Any perturbation of a magnetic field will lead to the formation of MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) waves of wavelength comparable to the initial scale of the perturbation. Since the scalesize of a flare energy release region will likely be 10(exp 8)-10(exp 9) cm, the MHD waves will be of very long wavelength. However, it is well known that wave steepening will lead to a cascade of wave energy to smaller wavelengths. Now, MHD waves consist of two specific modes-the Alfven wave and the fast mode wave, and it is the Alfven wave which can interact with the ambient ions and accelerate them via cyclotron resonance. As the Alfven waves cascade to smaller wavenumbers, they can resonate with ions of progressively lower energy, until they eventually (actually, this is less than approx. 1 s) can resonate with ions in the thermal distribution. These ions are then energized out of the thermal background and, since lower-frequency waves are already present as a result of the cascading, to relativistic energies. Hence, cascading Alfven waves naturally accelerate ions from thermal to relativistic energies in one step with one basic mechanism.

  16. Explosive plasma flows in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.; Canfield, Richard C.; Metcalf, Thomas R.; Strong, Keith T.

    1988-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission soft X-ray data and Sacramento Peak Observatory H-alpha observations are combined in a study of the impulsive phase of a solar flare. A blue asymmetry, indicative of upflows, was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft X-ray rise phase. A red asymmetry, indicative of downflows, was observed simultaneously in chromospheric H-alpha emitted from bright flare kernels during the period of hard X-ray emission. Combining the velocity data with a measurement of coronal electron density, it is shown that the impulsive phase momentum of upflowing soft X-ray-emitting plasma equalled that of the downflowing H-alpha-emitting plasma to within one order of magnitude. In particular, the momentum of the upflowing plasma was 2 x 10 to the 21st g cm/s while that of the downflowing plasma was 7 x 10 to the 21st g cm/s, with a factor of 2 uncertainty on each value. This equality supports the explosive chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares, in which a sudden pressure increase at the footprint of a coronal loop produces oppositely directed flows in the heated plasma.

  17. SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-09-10

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast ({>=}1000 km s{sup -1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes ({alpha} values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 A fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes {>=}1 pr cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}) and (b) fast CMEs were {approx}1.3-1.4 compared to {approx}1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and {approx}2 for the peak 1-8 A fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of {approx}0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  18. Size Distributions of Solar Flares and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Ling, A. G.; Belov, A.; Yashiro, S.

    2012-01-01

    We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast (much > 1000 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes (alpha values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes much > 1 pr/sq cm/s/sr) and (b) fast CMEs were approx 1.3-1.4 compared to approx 1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and approx 2 for the peak 1-8 Angs fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of approx 0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

  19. Influence of solar flares on the X-ray corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Batchelor, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Sequences of X-ray images of solar flares, obtained with the Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer on the SMM spacecraft, reveal many dynamical phenomena. Movies of 20 flares recorded with 6-sec time resolution were examined. A preliminary analysis of the events as a group are presented, and some new aspects of the well-studied May 21, 1980 flare and a November 6, 1980 flare are discussed.

  20. A slingshot model for solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Gregory

    1991-01-01

    Recent observations of intense, impulsive gamma-ray and X-ray-emitting solar flares underline the suddenness of these events. The simultaneous emission of X-rays greater than 40 keV from electron bremsstrahlung and gamma-rays requiring several MeV protons shows that all particles must be accelerated in less than 5 s. This paper proposes a simple model to explain such events, using the energy stored in the stretched field lines of a coronal arch. When reconnection occurs at the top of the arch, field lines retract like stretched rubber bands, sweeping up plasma and acting like a piston or slingshot. When the slug of plasma caught in the magnetic fields strikes the photosphere, it deposits its considerable kinetic energy, heating and compressing the intruding slug. Ten slugs of 100 km radius striking the photosphere may account for the 10 to the 29th ergs radiation from loop flares.

  1. High-energy processes in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Dermer, C. D.; Ramaty, R.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed study of high-energy processes in solar flares is reported, including the production of neutrons and pions, and incorporating isobaric and scaling models and a recent compilation of pion production data (Dermer, 1986). The broad-band gamma-ray spectrum resulting from the decay of neutral pions, the bremsstrahlung of positrons and electrons from the decay of charged pions, and the annihilation in flight of positrons is evaluated. Also evaluated is the 0.511 MeV gamma-ray line resulting from the annihilation of the positrons which survive annihilation in flight. Calculations were based on an isotropic, thick-target model using the best available nuclear data and models. Results are compared with extensive observation of the June 3, 1982 flare (10-120 MeV gamma rays), 0.511 and 2.2 MeV line emission, nuclear line emission, high-energy neutrons, and interplanetary charged particles.

  2. The impulsive flux transfer solar flare model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, P. J.; Bratenahl, A.

    A revised impulsive-flux-transfer solar-flare model is proposed in which magnetic reconnection and an electric double layer are combined and interact. The model requires a single stage of acceleration and several stages of deceleration and thermalization. The time development of flare parameters is calculated using a circuit analog that treats the double layer as an effective resistance, which is computed from the ultrarelativistic Child-Langmuir law. The model indicates that: (1) accelerated particles are quasi-thermalized at the ends of the double layer; (2) the electrons generate thermal X-rays, and the protons produce neutrons by spallation reactions with heavy nuclei; and (3) the neutrons travel to the photosphere, capturing protons to produce nuclear gamma-ray emission.

  3. Nonlocal thermal transport in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Devore, C. Richard

    1987-01-01

    A flaring solar atmosphere is modeled assuming classical thermal transport, locally limited thermal transport, and nonlocal thermal transport. The classical, local, and nonlocal expressions for the heat flux yield significantly different temperature, density, and velocity profiles throughout the rise phase of the flare. Evaporation of chromospheric material begins earlier in the nonlocal case than in the classical or local calculations, but reaches much lower upward velocities. Much higher coronal temperatures are achieved in the nonlocal calculations owing to the combined effects of delocalization and flux limiting. The peak velocity and momentum are roughly the same in all three cases. A more impulsive energy release influences the evolution of the nonlocal model more than the classical and locally limited cases.

  4. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  5. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-03-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  6. GEOMAGNETIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE SOLAR FLARES DURING THE LAST HALE SOLAR CYCLE (II)

    E-print Network

    is the solar plasma that may originate from solar eruptive phenomena that take their energy from magnetic field magnetosphere; this is in the form of high-energy solar particles that may originate from solar flares, eruptiveGEOMAGNETIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE SOLAR FLARES DURING THE LAST HALE SOLAR CYCLE (II) Georgeta Maris

  7. Magnetic reconnection and solar flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    Reconnection models of the main phase of large solar flares are used to explain the energetics and the motions of the large flare loops that occur during this phase. Correct predictions for the density and temperature of the X-ray emitting loops are obtained by coupling magnetic reconnection with chromospheric ablation. In the reconnection models the ablation is driven by the thermal conduction of heat along magnetic field lines connecting the reconnection shocks in the corona with the flare ribbons in the chromosphere. Combining the compressible reconnection theory of Soward and Priest (1982) with the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) subshock criteria of Coroniti (1970) shows that the Petschek-type slow-mode shocks in the vicinity of the x-line always dissociate into pairs of isothermal slow-mode subshocks and thermal conduction fronts. The rate of expansion of the loops is a function of the reconnection rate, and loops can be evolving self-similarly in time with their height increasing as sq root t and the reconnection rate decreasing as t to the minus 1.

  8. Gamma ray emission and solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    Solar gamma ray line and continuum emission provide information about particle acceleration and its temporal behavior; the energy spectrum, composition and directivity of the accelerated particles; and the composition, density and temperatures of the ambient medium. These data, coupled with the comprehensive photon and particle observations available for the sun, give a detailed picture of the particle acceleration and flare energy release processes. Additional information on elemental and isotopic abundances, surface nuclear reactions and coronal heating mechanisms can be obtained. Implications of present observations and the potential return from future observational are discussed.

  9. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic X-ray spectra of two simple, impulsive solar flares are examined together with H alpha, microwave and meter wave radio observations. X-ray spectra of both events were characteristic of thermal bremsstrahlung from single temperature plasmas. The symmetry between rise and fall was found to hold for the temperature and emission measure. The relationship between temperature and emission measure was that of an adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion; the adiabatic index of 5/3 indicated that the electron distribution remained isotropic. Observations in H alpha provided further evidence for compressive energy transfer.

  10. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  11. Evolution of electron energy spectrum during solar flares

    E-print Network

    Chen, P. F.

    : magnetic fields PACS: 96.60.qe, 96.50.Pw, 96.60.Hv 1 Introduction Particle acceleration in solar flares center approximation, Wood and Neukirch (2005) found 2.6 for electrons. Full orbit test-particle evolution of the electron energy spectrum in solar flares. In this paper test particle simulations

  12. Study of the Influences of the Ionospheric Responses to the Solar Flares by the Solar Flare Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Electron densities in the ionosphere increase during solar flares due to the sudden increase in the solar irradiance at soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelengths. In this study, we perform simulations for a list of solar flares with different classes and locations on the solar disk (center-to-limb variations) using the Global Ionosphere and Thermosphere Model (GITM). First, we make an analysis of magnitudes and distribution of the TEC perturbations due to different solar flares. Solar flares occurring in different seasons are chosen from the list in order to examine how perturbations of electron densities depend on altitudes (E and F regions), latitudes (seasonal variations) and longitudes (sunrise, dayside and sunset), as well as the time dependences of the increasing and decaying of the electron densities around the flares. Also, we investigate the TEC data by the global GPS network from the Madrigal database for the solar flares on the list, determining the characteristics of solar flare that would allow them to be detected by the ground-based GPS observations. The TEC data by GPS and by GITM are compared to determine how well the modeling and observations match each other during different solar flares.

  13. Prediction of Solar Flare Size and Time-to-Flare Using Support Vector Machine Regression

    E-print Network

    Boucheron, Laura E; McAteer, R T James

    2015-01-01

    We study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using 38 features describing magnetic complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. This work uses support vector regression to formulate a mapping from the 38-dimensional feature space to a continuous-valued label vector representing flare size or time-to-flare. When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a \\emph{geostationary operational environmental satellite} (\\emph{GOES}) class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average error of approximately 3/4 a \\emph{GOES} class. We also consider thresholding the regressed flare size for the experiment containing both flaring and non-flaring regions and find a true positive rate of 0.69 and a true negative rate of 0.86 for flare prediction. The results for both of these size regression experiments are consistent across a wide range of predictive time windows, indicating that the magnetic complexity fe...

  14. An interacting loop model of solar flare bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    As a result of the strong heating produced at chromospheric levels during a solar flare burst, the local gas pressure can transiently attain very large values in certain regions. The effectiveness of the surrounding magnetic field at confining this high pressure plasma is therefore reduced and the flaring loop becomes free to expand laterally. In so doing it may drive magnetic field lines into neighboring, nonflaring, loops in the same active region, causing magnetic reconnection to take place and triggering another flare burst. The features of this interacting loop model are found to be in good agreement with the energetics and time structure of flare associated solar hard X-ray bursts.

  15. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the H? observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped H? fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the H? fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging H? fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  16. The Conundrum of the Solar Pre-Flare Photospheric State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, KD; Barnes, Graham; Wagner, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Knowledge of the state of the solar photospheric magnetic field at a single instant in time does not appear sufficient to predict the size and timing of impending solar flares. Such knowledge may provide necessary conditions, such as the free magnetic energy needed for a flare to occur. Given the necessary conditions, it is often assumed that the evolution of the field, possibly by only a small amount, may trigger the onset of a flare. We present the results of a study using time series of photospheric vector field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to quantitatively parameterize both the state and evolution of solar active regions - their complexity, magnetic topology and energy - as related to solar flare events. We examine both extensive and intensive parameters and their temporal behavior, in the context of both large and small flaring episodes. Statistical tests based on nonparametric Discriminant Analysis are used to compare pre-flare epochs to a control group of flare-quiet epochs and active regions. Results regarding the type of photospheric signature examined and the efficacy of using the present state vs. temporal evolution to predict solar flares is quantified by standard skill scores.This work is made possible by contracts NASA NNH12CG10C and NOAA/SBIR WC-133R-13-CN-0079.

  17. Solar Flare Superevents: When they Occur and the Energy Limits of their Realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, V. N.

    2014-10-01

    Statistics reliable series of relative sunspot numbers (timeline in 164 - 14 solar cycles - SC) to give a consistent picture of the solar cyclicity. This pattern provides for regular changes of magnetic field generation in the solar convection zone in the transition from the epoch of the "higher" solar activity (SC 7-11 and 18-22) to the epoch of the "lower" solar activity (SC 12-16) and vice versa - from the epoch of the "lower" to "higher" solar activity. Before each such epoch occurs a change of the magnetic field generation regime in the solar convective zone, which occurs during approximate one physical 22-year cycle of solar activity. The reconstruction of the sunspot-forming regime, apparently, could be observed in the SC 10-11 and SC 22-23, when the magnetic field of the solar convection zone having been converted to the "lower" solar activity. In SC 17-18 was a similar restructuring of magnetic fields to the era of the "higher" solar activity. On this statistics the most powerful solar flare super events (1859, VIII-IX - SC 10; 1991, VI - SC 22; 2003, X - XI - SC 23) were observed precisely in these periods of magnetic field reconstruction. They all were occurrence in the anomalously large solar sunspot groups with the areas of ? 2300 mvh. Since solar flare events are the consequence of interaction of new magnetic flux with the already existing magnetic field of active region, are examined the cases of the observations, which lead to the solar flare superevents. The attempt to estimate maximally possible amounts of intensity and power of solar flare super-events is made.

  18. Investigations of turbulent and directed motions in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemen, J. R.; Fludra, A.; Jakimiec, J.

    1988-01-01

    A method is presented for fitting asymmetric line profiles from spectrally resolved observations of solar flares obtained during the past solar maximum. The method is applied to more than 40 flares observed with the Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission. Correlations between turbulent and directed motions are discussed. From ratios of Ca XIX and Fe XXV line intensities, the temperature of the upflowing component is inferred separately from the stationary component.

  19. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of adiabatic heating in two impulsive solar flares on the basis of dynamic X-ray spectra in the 28-254 keV range, H-alpha, microwave, and meter-wave radio observations. It is found that the X-ray spectra of the events are like those of thermal bremsstrahlung from single-temperature plasmas in the 10-60 keV range if photospheric albedo is taken into account. The temperature-emission correlation indicates adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion and that the electron distribution remains isotropic. H-alpha data suggest compressive energy transfer. The projected areas and volumes of the flares are estimated assuming that X-ray and microwave emissions are produced in a single thermal plasma. Electron densities of about 10 to the 9th/cu cm are found for homogeneous, spherically symmetric sources. It is noted that the strong self-absorption of hot-plasma gyrosynchrotron radiation reveals low magnetic field strengths.

  20. Testing Solar Flare Models with BATSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.

    1995-01-01

    We propose to use high-sensitivity Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) hard X-ray observations to test the thick-target and electric field acceleration models of solar flares. We will compare the predictions made by these models with hard X-ray spectral observations obtained with BATSE and simultaneous soft X-ray Ca XIX emission observed with the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). The increased sensitivities of the BATSE and BCS (relative to previous detectors) permits a renewed study of the relationship between heating and dynamical motions during the crucial rise phase of flares. With these observations, we will: (1) investigate the ability of the thick-target model to explain the temporal evolution of hard X-ray emission relative to the soft X-ray blueshift during the earliest stages of the impulsive phase; and (2) search for evidence of electric-field acceleration as implied by temporal correlations between hard X-ray spectral breaks and the Ca XIX blueshift. The proposed study will utilize hard X-ray lightcurve and spectral measurements in the 10-100 keV energy range obtained with the BATSE Large Area Detectors (LAD). The DISCLA and CONT data will be the primary data products used in this analysis.

  1. SPE in Solar Cycle 24 : Flare and CME characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neflia, Neflia

    SPE is one of the most severe hazards in the space environment. Such events, tend to occur during periods of intense solar activity, and can lead to high radiation doses in short time intervals. The proton enhancements produced by these solar events may last several days and are very hard to predict in advance and they also can cause harm to both satellite and human in space. The most significant sources of proton in the interplanetary medium are both solar flares and interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In this study, I try to find the characteristic of Flare and CME that can cause the proton events in interplanetary medium. For my preliminary study, I will search flare characteristic such as class and position as an SPE causes. I also did the research with CME characteristic such as Angular Width (AW) and linier velocity. During solar cycle 24, the solar activity remain very low with several large flare and Halo CME. This low activity also occur on solar proton events in interplanetary medium. From January 2009 to May 2013, there are 25 SPEs with flux range from 12 - 6530 sfu (10 MeV). The solar flare during these events varies from C to X- class flare. From 27 X-class flare that occur during 2009 - May 2013, only 7 flares cause the SPE. Most of active region location are at solar Western Hemisphere (16/25). only 24 from 139 halo CME (AW=360) cause SPE. Although the probability of SPE from all flare and CME during this range of time is small but they have 3 common characteristics, ie, most of the SPE have active region position at Solar Western Hemisphere, the CME have AW=360 and they have a high linier velocity.

  2. Development of Daily Solar Maximum Flare Flux Forecast Models for Strong Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seulki; Chu, Hyoungseok

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a set of daily solar maximum flare flux forecast models for strong flares using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods. We consider input parameters as solar activity data from January 1996 to December 2013 such as sunspot area, X-ray maximum flare flux and weighted total flux of the previous day, and mean flare rates of McIntosh sunspot group (Zpc) and Mount Wilson magnetic classification. For a training data set, we use the same number of 61 events for each C-, M-, and X-class from Jan. 1996 to Dec. 2004, while other previous models use all flares. For a testing data set, we use all flares from Jan. 2005 to Nov. 2013. The statistical parameters from contingency tables show that the ANN models are better for maximum flare flux forecasting than the MLR models. A comparison between our maximum flare flux models and the previous ones based on Heidke Skill Score (HSS) shows that our all models for X-class flare are much better than the other models. According to the Hitting Fraction (HF), which is defined as a fraction of events satisfying that the absolute differences of predicted and observed flare flux in logarithm scale are less than equal to 0.5, our models successfully forecast the maximum flare flux of about two-third events for strong flares. Since all input parameters for our models are easily available, the models can be operated steadily and automatically on daily basis for space weather service.

  3. White-light continuum in solar and stellar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam Francis

    2015-08-01

    During solar and stellar flares, the majority of the radiated energy from the lower atmosphere escapes as white-light continuum emission in the near-ultraviolet and optical wavelength regimes. The time-dependent spectral energy distribution of white-light emission is important for assessing biomarkers in planetary atmospheres around M dwarfs and for constraining models of heating at the highest densities in flares. I will discuss the observational characteristics of white-light emission from recent spectroscopic observations of M dwarf flares, and I will describe a new interpretation of these spectra as revealed in a radiative-hydrodynamic model of an extreme chromospheric condensation. I will give an overview of the properties of white-light emission in solar flares and the new information obtained for the brightest solar flare kernels observed with IRIS.

  4. Ultraheavy element enrichment in impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David

    2014-10-10

    Particle acceleration by cascading Alfvén wave turbulence was suggested as being responsible for energetic particle populations in {sup 3}He-rich solar flares. In particular, it was noted that the damping of the turbulence by the tail of the particle distribution in rigidity naturally leads to the dramatic enhancement of a pre-accelerated species—as {sup 3}He is posited to be—and superheavy elements. The subsequent detection of large enrichment of ultraheavies, relative to iron, has apparently confirmed this prediction, lending support to the original idea. It is shown here that this picture could be somewhat sharpened by progress in understanding the three-dimensional geometrical details of cascading Alfvén turbulence. The mechanism may be relevant in other astrophysical environments where the source of turbulence is nonmagnetic, such as clusters of galaxies.

  5. Particle Acceleration by a Solar Flare Termination Shock

    E-print Network

    Chen, Bin; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Sam; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares - the most powerful explosions in the solar system - are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well-reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares.

  6. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S.; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E.; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares—the most powerful explosions in the solar system—are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares.

  7. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF SPECTRAL HARDENING IN SOLAR FLARES AND RELATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    A STATISTICAL STUDY OF SPECTRAL HARDENING IN SOLAR FLARES AND RELATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE of Contents and more related content is available Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My OF SPECTRAL HARDENING IN SOLAR FLARES AND RELATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS James A. Grayson, S

  8. A common stochastic process in solar and stellar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Fang, Cheng

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares, with energies of 1027 - 1032 ergs, are believed to be powered by sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the corona. Stellar flares, observationally 102 - 106 more intense than solar flares, are generally assumed to release energy through the same underlying mechanism: magnetic reconnection. It is thus expected similar statistical properties between two groups of flares. The selected candidates are 23400 solar flares observed over one solar cycle by GOES spacecraft and 3140 stellar flares from Kepler data adapted from the catalog of Balona (MNRAS, 447, 2714, 2015). We examine the flare frequency as a function of duration, energy, and waiting time. The distributions of flare duration and energy can be well understood in the context of the avalanche model of a self-organized criticality (SOC) system (Aschwanden, A&A, 539, 2, 2012). The waiting time distribution of the SOC system can be explained by a non-stationary Poisson process (Li et al. ApJ Letters, 792, 26, 2014).

  9. Directionality of bremsstrahlung from relativistic electrons in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermer, C. D.; Ramaty, R.

    1985-01-01

    Angular and energy spectra of bremsstrahlung have been calculated from anisotropic electron distributions in solar flares. Results have been compared to observations of gamma-ray limb-brightening and to data on the variation of the gamma-ray spectrum with flare position on the sun.

  10. Stochastic Particle Acceleration in Impulsive Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.

    2001-01-01

    The acceleration of a huge number of electrons and ions to relativistic energies over timescales ranging from several seconds to several tens of seconds is the fundamental problem in high-energy solar physics. The cascading turbulence model we have developed has been shown previously (e.g., Miller 2000; Miller & Roberts 1995; Miner, LaRosa, & Moore 1996) to account for all the bulk features (such as acceleration timescales, fluxes, total number of energetic particles, and maximum energies) of electron and proton acceleration in impulsive solar flares. While the simulation of this acceleration process is involved, the essential idea of the model is quite simple, and consists of just a few parts: 1. During the primary flare energy release phase, we assume that low-amplitude MHD Alfven and fast mode waves are excited at long wavelengths, say comparable to the size of the event (although the results are actually insensitive to this initial wavelength). While an assumption, this appears reasonable in light of the likely highly turbulent nature of the flare. 2. These waves then cascade in a Kolmogorov-like fashion to smaller wavelengths (e.g., Verma et al. 1996), forming a power-law spectral density in wavenumber space through the inertial range. 3. When the mean wavenumber of the fast mode waves has increased sufficiently, the transit-time acceleration rate (Miller 1997) for superAlfvenic electrons can overcome Coulomb energy losses, and these electrons are accelerated out of the thermal distribution and to relativistic energies (Miller et al. 1996). As the Alfven waves cascade to higher wavenumbers, they can cyclotron resonate with progressively lower energy protons. Eventually, they will resonate with protons in the tail of the thermal distribution, which will then be accelerated to relativistic energies as well (Miller & Roberts 1995). Hence, both ions and electrons are stochastically accelerated, albeit by different mechanisms and different waves. 4. When the protons become superAlfvenic (above about 1 MeV/nucleon), they too can suffer transit-time acceleration by the fast mode waves and will receive an extra acceleration "kick." The basic overall objective of this 1 year effort was to construct a spatially-dependent version of this acceleration model and this has been realized.

  11. CONSTRAINING SOLAR FLARE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURES WITH EVE AND RHESSI

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M.; Warren, Harry P.

    2014-06-20

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from ?2 to ?50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ?2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to ?10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ?0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  12. C3-class Solar Flare Eruption - Duration: 13 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Just as sunspot 1105 was turning away from Earth on Sept. 8, the active region erupted, producing a C3-class solar flare (peak @ 2330 UT) and a fantastic prominence. This is a three color closeup o...

  13. SDO Sees Late Phase in Solar Flares - Duration: 20 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 5, 2010, shortly after the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) began normal operation, the sun erupted with numerous coronal loops and flares. Many of these showed a previously unseen "late pha...

  14. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  15. Solar flare gamma-ray spectroscopy with CGRO-COMPTEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher Alex

    2001-08-01

    The X-ray and ?-ray emission from solar flares provides important information about high-energy particles in solar flares. Energetic protons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere, giving rise to nuclear line emission at MeV energies and higher energy photons from the decay of neutral and charged pions. Electrons interact with the solar atmosphere producing a bremsstrahlung continuum. The solar flare spectrum is generally a superposition of these spectra with nuclear line emission dominating from ~1-8 MeV and the bremsstrahlung at lower and higher energies. The main goal of this thesis has been to explain a small part of a ?-ray flare observed by COMPTEL in June 1991. A difficult interval to explain in the 11 June 1991 solar flare is the Intermediate (Rank 1997) or Interphase (Murphy and Share 1999; Dunphy et al. 1999) immediately following the peak of the impulsive phase. All three analyses of this flare using COMPTEL, OSSE and EGRET data yielded a hard proton spectrum with a power law index around 2 using the 2.2 to 4.44 MeV fluence ratio. This hard of a spectrum would indicate the presence of a high- energy component above eight MeV and emission due to spallation products. However, none of the three instruments observed such a component. We discuss the standard techniques used in solar flare spectral deconvolution and introduce a new technique we use with the COMPTEL observations. This work presented the explanation that the proton spectrum is soft during this interval of the 11 June 1991 solar flare based on this new analysis of the COMPTEL observations. This means that the region of 2.223/4-7 MeV fluence space is largely unexplored for soft proton spectra. The use of this ratio must be reexamined for proton spectra with indices greater than 5 or 6. We then applied a model we developed for the transport of neutrons created from a soft proton spectrum to determine the photospheric 3He abundance during this flare. We calculated a 3He/H ratio of 8.7e-05 with a 1 a range of 1.96e-04 to 1.75e-05 for this flare using this new model. This is larger than all previous values reported. In addition, we presented an additional flare observation from COMPTEL. In response to a BACODINE cosmic gamma-ray burst alert, COMPTEL on the CGRO recorded gamma rays above 1 MeV from the C4 flare at 0221 UT 20 January 2000. This event, though at the limits of COMPTEL's sensitivity, clearly shows a nuclear line excess above the continuum. Using new spectroscopy techniques we were able to resolve individual lines. This allowed us to make a basic comparison of this event with the GRL (gamma ray line) flare distribution from SMM and also compare this flare with a well-observed large GRL flare seen by OSSE. We showed this flare is normal, i.e., it is a natural extension of the SMM distribution of flares. The analysis of this flare means there is no evidence for a lower flare size for proton acceleration. Protons even in small flares contain a large part of the accelerated particle energy.

  16. EVIDENCE FOR HOT FAST FLOW ABOVE A SOLAR FLARE ARCADE

    SciTech Connect

    Imada, S.; Aoki, K.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Harra, L. K.; Shimizu, T.

    2013-10-10

    Solar flares are one of the main forces behind space weather events. However, the mechanism that drives such energetic phenomena is not fully understood. The standard eruptive flare model predicts that magnetic reconnection occurs high in the corona where hot fast flows are created. Some imaging or spectroscopic observations have indicated the presence of these hot fast flows, but there have been no spectroscopic scanning observations to date to measure the two-dimensional structure quantitatively. We analyzed a flare that occurred on the west solar limb on 2012 January 27 observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and found that the hot (?30MK) fast (>500 km s{sup –1}) component was located above the flare loop. This is consistent with magnetic reconnection taking place above the flare loop.

  17. Energetic electrons in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    A new analysis was made of a thermal flare model proposed by Brown, Melrose, and Spicer (1979) and Smith and Lilliequist (1979). They assumed the source of impulsive hard X-rays to be a plasma at a temperature of order 10 to the 8th power K, initially located at the apex of a coronal arch, and confined by ion-acoustic turbulence in a collisionless conduction front. Such a source would expand at approximately the ion-sound speed, C sub S = square root of (k T sub e/m sub i), until it filled the arch. Brown, Melrose, and Spicer and Smith and Brown (1980) argued that the source assumed in this model would not explain the simultaneous impulsive microwave emission. In contrast, the new results presented herein suggest that this model leads to the development of a quasi-Maxwellian distribution of electrons that explains both the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. This implies that the source sizes can be determined from observations of the optically-thick portions of microwave spectra and the temperatures obtained from associated hard X-ray observations. In this model, the burst emission would rise to a maximum in a time, t sub r, approximately equal to L/c sub s, where L is the half-length of the arch. New observations of these impulsive flare emissions were analyzed herein to test this prediction of the model. Observations made with the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft and the Bern Radio Observatory are in good agreement with the model.

  18. Statistical characterization of Strong and Mid Solar Flares and Sun EUV rate monitoring with GNSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte-Moreno, Enric; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Garcia-Rigo, Alberto; Beniguel, Yannick; Orus-Perez, Raul; Prieto-Cerdeira, Roberto; Schlueter, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The global network of permanent Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers has become an useful and affordable way of monitoring the Solar EUV flux rate, especially -for the time being- in the context of Major and Mid geoeffective intensity Solar Flares (M. Hernandez-Pajares et al., Space Weather, doi:10.1029/2012SW000826, 2012). In fact the maturity of this technique (GNSS Solar FLAre Indicator, GSFLAI) has allowed to incorporate it in operational real-time (RT) conditions, thanks to the availability of global GNSS datastreams from the RT International GNSS Network (M. Caissy et al, GPS World, June 1, 2012), and performed in the context of the MONITOR and MONITOR2 ESA-funded projects (Y. Beniguel et al., NAVITEC Proc., 978-1-4673-2011-5 IEEE, 2012). The main goal of this presentation is to summarize a detailed recent study of the statistical properties of Solar Flares (E. Monte and M. Hernandez-Pajares, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2014JA020206, 2014) by considering the GNSS proxy of EUV rate (GSFLAI parameter) computed independently each 30 seconds during the whole last solar cycle. An statistical model has been characterized that explains the empirical results such as (a) the persistence and presence of bursts of solar flares and (b) their long tail peak values of the solar flux variation, which can be characterized by: (1) A fractional Brownian model for the long-term dependence, and (2), a power law distribution for the time series extreme values. Finally, an update of the Solar Flares' occurrence during the recent months of Solar Activity, gathered in RT within MONITOR2 project, will close the paper.

  19. Studying the thermal/non-thermal crossover in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes work performed under contract NAS5-32584 for Phase 3 of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) from 1 November 1993 through 1 November 1994. We have made spectral observations of the hard x-ray and gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emissions from solar flares using the Burst and Transit Source Experiment (BASTE) on CGRO. These measurements of their spectrum and time profile provided valuable information on the fundamental flare processes of energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport. Our scientific objective was to study both the thermal and non-thermal sources of solar flare hard x-ray and gamma-ray emission.

  20. Nonlocal thermal transport in solar flares. II - Spectroscopic diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, Judith T.; Cheng, Chung-Chieh; Doschek, George A.; Devore, C. Richard

    1989-01-01

    Physical parameters obtained for a flaring solar atmosphere in an earlier paper are used here to predict time-dependent emission-line profiles and integrated intensities as a function of position for two spectral lines commonly observed during solar flares: the X-ray resonance lines of Ca XIX and Mg XI. Considerations of ionization nonequilibrium during the rise phase of the flare are addressed, and the effects on the predicted spectral-line characteristics are discussed. It is concluded that some spectroscopic diagnostics favor the nonlocal model, but other long-standing discrepancies between the numerical models and the observations remain unresolved.

  1. Hinode magnetic-field observations of solar flares for exploring the energy storage and trigger mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawabata, Yusuke

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares abruptly release the free energy stored as a non-potential magnetic field in the corona and may be accompanied by eruptions of the coronal plasma. Magnetic reconnection is considered as a physical process in which the magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy, thermal energy, and particle acceleration, but the location of magnetic reconnection is difficult to identify directly because of low emission measure at the reconnection region. We are still lack of observational knowledge on the 3D magnetic configuration and physical conditions for leading to flare trigger. Accurate measurements of vector magnetic fields at the solar photosphere, provided by the Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode, help us in exploring how the free energy is stored in the solar atmosphere and how the release of the energy is triggered. This presentation will review the magnetic field configuration and possible candidates for flare trigger primarily based on Hinode observations of some large flare events, which may include X5.4/X1.3 flares on 7 March 2012, X1.2 flare on 7 January 2014 and two M-class flares on 2 February 2014. The 7 March 2012 events were observed in an active region with delta-type sunspots, showing a strong shear in the entire magnetic system. For the sheared magnetic structure, the inclusion of a small-scale trigger field was identified near the polarity inversion line with excitation of a high-speed material flow in the horizontally oriented magnetic field formed nearly in parallel to the polarity inversion line. The observations suggest that gas dynamics at the solar surface play a vital role of leading to the onset of flares. The 7 January 2014 event is an exceptional event which most scientists would not be able to predict its occurrence. The flare unexpectedly happened apart from the sheared magnetic field region. The M-class flares on 2 February 2014 were observed in the magnetic field configuration, in which four magnetic domains were distributed on the solar surface and a null point might be formed in the coronal magnetic field originating from the four magnetic domains.

  2. High-energy particles associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.; Klimas, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    High-energy particles, the so-called solar cosmic rays, are often generated in association with solar flares, and then emitted into interplanetary space. These particles, consisting of electrons, protons, and other heavier nuclei, including the iron-group, are accelerated in the vicinity of the flare. By studying the temporal and spatial varation of these particles near the earth's orbit, their storage and release mechanisms in the solar corona and their propagation mechanism can be understood. The details of the nuclear composition and the rigidity spectrum for each nuclear component of the solar cosmic rays are important for investigating the acceleration mechanism in solar flares. The timing and efficiency of the acceleration process can also be investigated by using this information. These problems are described in some detail by using observational results on solar cosmic rays and associated phenomena.

  3. An operational integrated short-term warning solution for solar radiation storms: introducing the Forecasting Solar Particle Events and Flares (FORSPEF) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Sandberg, Ingmar; Papaioannou, Athanasios; Georgoulis, Manolis; Tziotziou, Kostas; Jiggens, Piers; Hilgers, Alain

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel integrated prediction system, of both solar flares and solar energetic particle (SEP) events, which is in place to provide short-term warnings for hazardous solar radiation storms. FORSPEF system provides forecasting of solar eruptive events, such as solar flares with a projection to coronal mass ejections (CMEs) (occurrence and velocity) and the likelihood of occurrence of a SEP event. It also provides nowcasting of SEP events based on actual solar flare and CME near real-time alerts, as well as SEP characteristics (peak flux, fluence, rise time, duration) per parent solar event. The prediction of solar flares relies on a morphological method which is based on the sophisticated derivation of the effective connected magnetic field strength (Beff) of potentially flaring active-region (AR) magnetic configurations and it utilizes analysis of a large number of AR magnetograms. For the prediction of SEP events a new reductive statistical method has been implemented based on a newly constructed database of solar flares, CMEs and SEP events that covers a large time span from 1984-2013. The method is based on flare location (longitude), flare size (maximum soft X-ray intensity), and the occurrence (or not) of a CME. Warnings are issued for all > C1.0 soft X-ray flares. The warning time in the forecasting scheme extends to 24 hours with a refresh rate of 3 hours while the respective warning time for the nowcasting scheme depends on the availability of the near real-time data and falls between 15-20 minutes. We discuss the modules of the FORSPEF system, their interconnection and the operational set up. The dual approach in the development of FORPSEF (i.e. forecasting and nowcasting scheme) permits the refinement of predictions upon the availability of new data that characterize changes on the Sun and the interplanetary space, while the combined usage of solar flare and SEP forecasting methods upgrades FORSPEF to an integrated forecasting solution. This work has been funded through the "FORSPEF: FORecasting Solar Particle Events and Flares", ESA Contract No. 4000109641/13/NL/AK

  4. Relationship of solar flare accelerated particles to solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in the interplanetary medium

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    to be similar to those accelerated in flares. The Ramaty high energy solar spectroscopic imager (RHESSI) mission with the solar atmosphere (Lin et al., 2003). HXR/c-ray con- tinuum emissions, produced by bremsstrahlung colli are associated with enormous transient releases of energy, >$1032 ergs, by the Sun. For large solar flares

  5. MAGNETIC NONPOTENTIALITY IN PHOTOSPHERIC ACTIVE REGIONS AS A PREDICTOR OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiao; Lin Ganghua; Zhang Hongqi; Mao Xinjie

    2013-09-10

    Based on several magnetic nonpotentiality parameters obtained from the vector photospheric active region magnetograms obtained with the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at the Huairou Solar Observing Station over two solar cycles, a machine learning model has been constructed to predict the occurrence of flares in the corresponding active region within a certain time window. The Support Vector Classifier, a widely used general classifier, is applied to build and test the prediction models. Several classical verification measures are adopted to assess the quality of the predictions. We investigate different flare levels within various time windows, and thus it is possible to estimate the rough classes and erupting times of flares for particular active regions. Several combinations of predictors have been tested in the experiments. The True Skill Statistics are higher than 0.36 in 97% of cases and the Heidke Skill Scores range from 0.23 to 0.48. The predictors derived from longitudinal magnetic fields do perform well, however, they are less sensitive in predicting large flares. Employing the nonpotentiality predictors from vector fields improves the performance of predicting large flares of magnitude {>=}M5.0 and {>=}X1.0.

  6. Imaging X-Ray Polarimeter for Solar Flares (IXPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosack, Michael; Black, J. Kevin; Deines-Jones, Philip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hill, Joanne E.; Jahoda, Keith; Shih, Albert Y.; Urba, Christian E.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design of a balloon-borne Imaging X-ray Polarimeter for Solar flares (IX PS). This novel instrument, a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for photoelectric polarimetry, will be capable of measuring polarization at the few percent level in the 20-50 keV energy range during an M- or X class flare, and will provide imaging information at the approx.10 arcsec level. The primary objective of such observations is to determine the directivity of nonthermal high-energy electrons producing solar hard X-rays, and hence to learn about the particle acceleration and energy release processes in solar flares. Secondary objectives include the separation of the thermal and nonthermal components of the flare X-ray emissions and the separation of photospheric albedo fluxes from direct emissions.

  7. Evolutionary aspects and north-south asymmetry of soft X-ray flare index during solar cycles 21, 22, and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, B.; Bhattacharyya, R.; Pandey, K. K.; Kushwaha, U.; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2015-10-01

    Aims: In this paper, we investigate the temporal evolution and north-south (N-S) asymmetry in the occurrence of solar flares during cycle 21, 22, and 23, and compare the results with traditional solar activity indices. Methods: The flare activity is characterized by a soft X-ray (SXR) flare index, which incorporates information about flare occurrences during a selected interval along with the peak intensity of individual events. Results: The SXR flare index correlates well with other conventional parameters of solar activity. Further, it exhibits a significantly higher correlation with sunspot area over sunspot number, which suggests the variations in sunspot area to be more closely linked with the transient energy release in the solar corona. The cumulative plots of the flare index indicate a slight excess of activity in the northern hemisphere during cycle 21, while a southern excess clearly prevails for cycles 22 and 23. The study reveals a significant N-S asymmetry, which exhibits variations with the phases of solar cycle. The reliability and persistency of this asymmetry significantly increases when the data is averaged over longer periods, while an optimal level is achieved when data is binned for 13 Carrington rotations. The time evolution of the flare index further confirms evolution of dual peaks in solar cycles during the solar maxima and violation of Gnevyshev-Ohl rule for the pair of solar cycles 22 and 23. Conclusions: The SXR flare index in the northern and the southern hemispheres of the Sun exhibits significant asymmetry during the evolutionary phases of the solar cycle, which implies that N-S asymmetry of solar flares is manifested in terms of the flare counts as well as the intensity of flare events.

  8. Solar flares and avalanches in driven dissipative systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.; Mctiernan, J. M.; Bromund, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    The contention of Lu and Hamilton (1991) that the energy release process in solar flares can be understood as avalanches of many small reconnection events is further developed. The dynamics of the complex magnetized plasma of solar active regions is modeled with a simple driven dissipative system, consisting of a vector field with local instabilities that cause rapid diffusion of the field. It is argued that the avalanches in this model are analogous to solar flares. The distributions of avalanches in this model are compared with the solar flare frequency distributions obtained from ISEE 3/ICE satellite observations. Quantitative agreement is found with the energy, peak luminosity, and duration distributions over four orders of magnitude in flare energy, from the largest flares down to the completeness limit of the observations. It is predicted that the power-law solar flare frequency distributions will be found to continue downward with the same logarithmic slopes to an energy of about 3 x 10 exp 25 ergs and duration of about 0.3 s, with deviations from power-law behavior below these values.

  9. Small Solar Flares: A C4 gamma-ray line flare observed by the COMPTEL CGRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C.; de Nolfo, G. A.; Ryan, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Small flares have been identified mainly through X-ray data and have been shown to be prodigious during solar maximum periods (~1000/year during solar maximum). Current instruments capable of high-energy gamma-ray observations operate above the sensitivity threshold for observing gamma-ray emission from small flares (C-class and smaller). COMPtonTELescope (COMPTEL) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) is not only sensitive to small C-class flares (well below that of Solar Maximum Mission (SMM)) but also registered unambiguous 2.2 MeV nuclear-line emission, suggesting the presence of an accelerated ion population. In response to a BACODINE cosmic gamma-ray burst alert, COMPTEL on the CGRO recorded gamma rays above 1 MeV from the C4 flare at 0221 UT 20 January 2000. This event, though at the limits of COMPTEL's sensitivity, clearly shows a nuclear line excess above the continuum. Using new spectroscopy techniques we were able to resolve individual lines. We compare this C-class event with the gamma-ray line (GRL) flare distribution SMM and from Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) as well as with the well-observed large "standard" GRL flare observed by Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) aboard CGRO.

  10. Implications of RHESSI Observations for Solar Flare Models and Energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2006-01-01

    Observations of solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays provide the most direct information about the hottest plasma and energetic electrons and ions accelerated in flares. The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has observed over 18000 solar flares in X-rays and gamma-rays since its launch in February of 2002. RHESSI observes the full Sun at photon energies from as low as 3 keV to as high as 17 MeV with a spectral resolution on the order of 1 keV. It also provides images in arbitrary bands within this energy range with spatial resolution as good as 3 seconds of arc. Full images are typically produced every 4 seconds, although higher time resolution is possible. This unprecedented combination of spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution, spectral range and flexibility has led to fundamental advances in our understanding of flares. I will show RHESSI and coordinated observations that confirm coronal magnetic reconnection models for eruptive flares and coronal mass ejections, but also present new puzzles for these models. I will demonstrate how the analysis of RHESSI spectra has led to a better determination of the energy flux and total energy in accelerated electrons, and of the energy in the hot, thermal flare plasma. I will discuss how these energies compare with each other and with the energy contained in other flare-related phenomena such as interplanetary particles and coronal mass ejections.

  11. Another giant solar explosion follows Tuesday's enormous solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-10-01

    The activity started on Tuesday with a giant solar flare - the second biggest ever seen by SOHO, the ESA-NASA solar observatory that maintains a constant watch on the Sun, monitoring these events as they happen. A few minutes later, spacecraft circling the Earth began to detect high levels of energetic radiation, capable of blinding satellites and causing increased radiation levels down to normal aircraft cruising altitudes. About 24 hours after the solar flare was observed, an accompanying coronal mass ejection - a giant cloud of magnetised plasma - reached the Earth, causing rapid changes in the Earth's magnetic field and what is known as a geomagnetic storm. This storm caused widespread disruption to communications; both satellite-based and HF radio. These events are truly sporadic and extremely difficult to predict. On Wednesday it appeared that radiation levels were decreasing. However, a second flare overnight has caused a further sharp increase in radiation levels. Here on Earth, the disruption continues today with a further coronal mass ejection expected to reach the Earth tomorrow in time for Halloween. Solar eruptions of this type together with the associated increased radiation levels and electromagnetic disturbances around the Earth have real immediate and long-term economic impacts. During the last few days, space weather related problems have been detected on spacecraft operated by a range of agencies across the globe and operations teams are on alert. On Earth, telecommunication links have been disrupted and steps have been taken to safeguard aircraft, which including some changes in scheduling. Effects have also been detected in high latitude power grids and are being carefully monitored. The increased dependency of our society on systems which are directly or indirectly influenced by solar and other events seen in space raises concerns about our ability to monitor and anticipate these events and the resulting changes collectively referred to as space weather. At the European Space Agency these issues are being handled jointly in the Electromagnetics and Space Environment Division by Dr Eamonn Daly’s group for the specifications of spacecraft protection and in the spacecraft operations teams. In addition, Europe-wide coordination is currently being set up together with the European Union via its COST (Coordination in Science and Technology) programme and ESA’s General Studies Programme. This coordination aims to optimise our existing resources (together with our international partners) in order to develop an operational resource which will enable society to respond effectively to immediate as well as long-term changes in our space weather. Websites on space weather: http://www.esa.int/spaceweather/

  12. Spectral Hardening of Large Solar Flares

    E-print Network

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2008-05-01

    RHESSI observations are used to quantitatively study the hard X-ray evolution in 5 large solar flares selected for spectral hardening in the course of the event. The X-ray bremsstrahlung emission from non-thermal electrons is characterized by two spectroscopically distinct phases: impulsive and gradual. The impulsive phase usually consists of several emission spikes following a soft-hard-soft spectral pattern, whereas the gradual stage manifests itself as spectral hardening while the flux slowly decreases. Both the soft-hard-soft (impulsive) phase and the hardening (gradual) phase are well described by piecewise linear dependence of the photon spectral index on the logarithm of the hard X-ray flux. The different linear parts of this relation correspond to different rise and decay phases of emission spikes. The temporal evolution of the spectra is compared with the configuration and motion of the hard X-ray sources in RHESSI images. These observations reveal that the two stages of electron acceleration causing these two different behaviors are closely related in space and time. The transition between the impulsive and gradual phase is found to be smooth and progressive rather than abrupt. This suggests that they arise because of a slow change in a common accelerator rather than being caused by two independent and distinct acceleration processes. We propose that the hardening during the decay phase is caused by continuing particle acceleration with longer trapping in the accelerator before escape.

  13. Solar flare nuclear gamma rays and interplanetary proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Forrest, D. J.; Mcguire, R. E.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.; Reames, D. V.; Cane, H. V.; Kane, S. R.

    1987-01-01

    We compared flare gamma ray line (GRL) events and solar energetic proton (SEP) events for the period from Feb. 1980 - Jan. 1985 and substantiated earlier results showing a lack of correlation between gamma-ray-producing ions and interplanetary protons. This poor correlation results primarily from several large SEP events that originated in flares without detectable gamma ray emission. The converse case of GRL events unassociated with SEP events is rare. We present evidence which suggests that the ratio of trapped to escaping protons in GRL/SEP flares depends on the spatial scale size of the flare. We affirm the result of Bai and Dennis (1985) that GRL flares are generally accompanied (75 percent) by metric Type 2 bursts.

  14. A COLD, TENUOUS SOLAR FLARE: ACCELERATION WITHOUT HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2011-04-10

    We report the observation of an unusual cold, tenuous solar flare, which reveals itself via numerous and prominent non-thermal manifestations, while lacking any noticeable thermal emission signature. RHESSI hard X-rays and 0.1-18 GHz radio data from OVSA and Phoenix-2 show copious electron acceleration (10{sup 35} electrons s{sup -1} above 10 keV) typical for GOES M-class flares with electrons energies up to 100 keV, but GOES temperatures not exceeding 6.1 MK. The imaging, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the flare have led us to a firm conclusion that the bulk of the microwave continuum emission from this flare was produced directly in the acceleration region. The implications of this finding for the flaring energy release and particle acceleration are discussed.

  15. Signatures of Accelerated Electrons in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2015-08-01

    Flares energize electrons (and ions) to supra-thermal energies. In most cases the final distribution in momentum or energy space is non-Maxwellian. The non-thermal part of the energy can be the source for various emissions, including hard X-rays, synchrotron radiation and coherent radio emission. Such non-thermal emissions may contain information on the acceleration process. Several acceleration scenarios have been proposed: electric DC field, stochastic, and shock acceleration. There is observational evidence for all three scenarios. The new data come from SDO, X-ray (RHESSI), radio observations (Nobeyama, VLA and e-Callisto). Solar energetic particles are an additional channel of information.Tiny solar microflares and huge stellar flares in binary systems (RS CVns) and dMe dwarfs differ by more than 10 orders of magnitude in released energy. Yet the relation between peak luminosity in thermal (soft) X-ray and non-thermal synchrotron (radio) emission is surprisingly constant. This observational fact indicates that flare acceleration scales with energy release over a large range. Electron acceleration in flares seems to be a universal process. The constraint on simultaneous thermal X-rays and non-thermal (radio) synchrotron emission seems to select on particular kind of flare. In this subset, there seems to be only one type of acceleration.Yet, small deviations are noted: Small solar flares are softer in hard X-rays. Solar nanoflares are relatively weak in synchrotron emission. The recently noted case of radio-poor preflares will also be presented. The deviations suggest that the acceleration is less efficient in small flares and in the early phase of flares. Larger deviations are reported occasionally for solar flares and more often from stellar flares, where either thermal or non-thermal emission seems to be missing completely.The location of the acceleration in solar flares remains disputed. Observations suggesting acceleration in the soft X-ray top-tops, above top-tops and near the loop footpoints are presented. Whereas reconnection is well understood in MHD, acceleration of electrons (and ions) is not.

  16. X-ray spectra of solar flares obtained with a high-resolution bent crystal spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culhane, J. L.; Rapley, C. G.; Bentley, R. D.; Gabriel, A. H.; Phillips, K. J.; Acton, L. W.; Wolfson, C. J.; Catura, R. C.; Jordan, C.; Antonucci, E.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary results obtained for three solar flares with the bent crystal spectrometer on the SMM are presented. Resonance and satellite lines of Ca XIX and XVIII and Fe XXV and XXIV are observed together with the Fe XXVI Lyman-alpha line. Plasma properties are deduced from line ratios and evidence is presented for changes of line widths coincident with the occurrence of a hard X-ray impulsive burst. Fe K-alpha spectra from a disk center and a limb flare agree with the predictions of a fluorescence excitation model. However, a transient Fe K-alpha burst observed in a third flare may be explained by the collisional ionization of cool iron by energetic electrons.

  17. The energetics of chromospheric evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Gabriel, A. H.; Dennis, B. R.

    1984-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft has provided high time resolution observational data regarding the soft X-ray emission from solar-flare plasma during 1980. The present investigation is concerned with the characteristics of a soft X-ray flare and the energetics of the impulsive phase on the basis of the data collected with the aid of two of the instruments on board the SMM, taking into account the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) and the Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). Attention is given to an analysis of soft X-ray flare spectra, the relative motion of the soft X-ray sources, the phenomenology of the soft X-ray flare, energy and mass transport during the impulsive phase, and energy deposition in the chromosphere during evaporation.

  18. Particle kinematics in solar flares: observations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marina

    2008-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of particle acceleration and propagation processes in solar flares. Solar flares are amongst the most powerful and energetic activity phenomena our Sun exhibits. They release energy of the order of 10(32) erg in seconds to minutes. In the process, electrons and protons are accelerated to relativistic energies, making flares very efficient particle accelerators. The most compelling observational signatures of flares can be found in X-rays and extreme ultra-violet wavelengths. Due to atmospheric absorption, those wavelengths can only be studied from space. Since the beginning of the space age, countless flares have been observed by satellites. The present work is largely based on observations by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), an X-ray satellite which has been observing the Sun since February 2002. It is a NASA mission with substantial Swiss hardware and software contribution. Using RHESSI observations of flares of different intensity, a deeper understanding of the particle transport and energy transport processes in flare loops, as well as the acceleration site and acceleration mechanism is sought. The time evolution of images and spectra is studied along with the quantitative relations between X-ray sources observed in the corona (coronal sources) and from the chromosphere (footpoints). The spectral relations found between coronal sources and footpoints are compared to the so-called ``intermediate thin-thick target model'', which was based on observations by the satellite Yohkoh. We show that the spectral relations between coronal sources and footpoints observed with RHESSI cannot be explained by the intermediate thin-thick target model. In a next step, return currents in the flare loop were considered. With this extension to the existing model, the spectra of the coronal source and the footpoints, as well as the relations between them can be explained, indicating the importance of return currents in flare loops. In a second part, observations of so-called ``pre-flares'' are presented. This earliest phase of a flare cannot be explained by the standard flare model of chromospheric evaporation which involves energy transport and deposition in the chromosphere by beams of accelerated electrons. In pre-flares, an increase in density and emission measure is observed, indicating that chromospheric evaporation is occurring. However, no observational signatures of fast electrons are found. We show that if energy is transported by means of thermal conduction instead of an electron beam, the observations can explained.

  19. Excitation of Resonant Helioseimic Modes by Solar Flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibacher, John W.; Baudin, Frédéric; Rabello Soares,, Maria Cristina

    2015-08-01

    Flares are known to excite propagating sound waves in the solar atmosphere, and Maurya et al. (2009), using a local analysis (ring diagrams) of the 2003 Halloween flare, showed that they excite resonant p-modes as well. We confirm and extend here these results by:-applying the same analysis to other locations on the Sun at the time of the Halloween flare-analyzing other events also showing a signature of p-mode excitation-looking in detail at the results of the ring diagrams analysis in terms of noise fitting and the center-to-limb variation of ring-diagram power.

  20. Non-Relativistic Electron Beam Stability in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, A. G.; Alexander, D.; Metcalf, T. R.

    2004-05-01

    The thick-target electron beam model has been used for decades as a viable description for the production of solar flare hard X-ray emission. The required very rapid transport of energy to the footpoints during solar flares is achieved in this model by fast electrons traversing the loop to deposit their energy in the dense chromosphere. For some of the largest flares the currents (up to 1017 Amps or 1036 electrons/sec) inferred can significantly exceed the Alfven-Lawson limit suggesting that the assumed electron beam is inherently unstable. In this paper, we use the spectral and spatial resolution of RHESSI to explore whether the conditions for a stable non-thermal electron beam exist in large solar flares. The incident electron spectra at flaring footpoints are derived from the RHESSI photon spectra while an upper limit to the footpoint area is detremined form the hard X-ray images. We determine the electron beam density needed to produce the hard X-ray emission for two large flares, July 17, 2002 (M8.5) and October 28, 2003 (X17.2) and determine whether such beams are viable in these cases. We gratefully acknowledge support from NASA (NAS5-02048).

  1. The Relation between Solar Eruption Topologies and Observed Flare Features. I. Flare Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savcheva, A.; Pariat, E.; McKillop, S.; McCauley, P.; Hanson, E.; Su, Y.; Werner, E.; DeLuca, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a topological magnetic field investigation of seven two-ribbon flares in sigmoidal active regions observed with Hinode, STEREO, and Solar Dynamics Observatory. We first derive the 3D coronal magnetic field structure of all regions using marginally unstable 3D coronal magnetic field models created with the flux rope insertion method. The unstable models have been shown to be a good model of the flaring magnetic field configurations. Regions are selected based on their pre-flare configurations along with the appearance and observational coverage of flare ribbons, and the model is constrained using pre-flare features observed in extreme ultraviolet and X-ray passbands. We perform a topology analysis of the models by computing the squashing factor, Q, in order to determine the locations of prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). QSLs from these maps are compared to flare ribbons at their full extents. We show that in all cases the straight segments of the two J-shaped ribbons are matched very well by the flux-rope-related QSLs, and the matches to the hooked segments are less consistent but still good for most cases. In addition, we show that these QSLs overlay ridges in the electric current density maps. This study is the largest sample of regions with QSLs derived from 3D coronal magnetic field models, and it shows that the magnetofrictional modeling technique that we employ gives a very good representation of flaring regions, with the power to predict flare ribbon locations in the event of a flare following the time of the model.

  2. X1.6 Class Solar Flare on Sept. 10, 2014 - Duration: 37 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    An X1.6 class solar flare flashes in the middle of the sun on Sept. 10, 2014. These images were captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. It first shows the flare in the 171 Angstrom wavelengt...

  3. Fermi Solar Flare Observations We propose to continue and expand our work over the last three years to make Fermi solar flare

    E-print Network

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    1 Fermi Solar Flare Observations 1. Summary We propose to continue and expand our work over the last three years to make Fermi solar flare data readily available for analysis by the international solar physics community. The two-year time frame of the proposed effort is extremely important for solar

  4. Lunar surface cosmic ray experiment. [including solar flare studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, P. B.

    1974-01-01

    The galactic cosmic ray and solar flare experiment on Apollo 16 is reported. The published papers presented describe the experiment, equipment, data processing techniques, and operational history. The principle findings include: (1) The composition of heavy ions in interplanetary space at energies between approximately 30 and 130 MeV/nucleon is the same, within experimental errors. (2) The ability of a Lexan stack to determine simultaneously the energy spectra of major elements from He up to Fe in the energy interval 0.2 to 30 MeV/nucleon revealed systematic changes in the composition of solar flare particles as a function of energy. (3) Heavy ions emitted in a solar flare appear to be completely stripped of electrons, and are not in charge equilibrium at the time of acceleration and releases from the sun.

  5. Conduction-driven chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.; Lemen, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of gentle chromospheric evaporation during the cooling phase of a solar flare are presented. Line profiles of the low-temperature (T of about 6 x 10 to the 6th K) coronal Mg XI line, observed with the X-Ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission, show a blueshift that persisted for several minutes after the impulsive heating phase. This result represents the first detection of an evaporation signature in a soft X-ray line formed at this low temperature. By combining the Mg XI blueshift velocity data with simultaneous measurements of the flare temperature derived from Ca XIX observations, it is demonstrated that the upward flux of enthalpy transported by this gently evaporating plasma varies linearly with the downward flux of thermal energy conducted from the corona. This relationship is consistent with models of solar flares in which thermal conduction drives chromospheric evaporation during the early part of the cooling phase.

  6. White-light continuum emission from solar flare and plages: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Heinzel, Petr

    2015-08-01

    Observations of flares in optical continuum emission are very rare. Therefore, the analysis of such observations is very useful and may contribute to our understanding of the flaring chromosphere. We study the white-light continuum emission observed during the X6.9 flare observed on August 09, 2011. This emission comes not only from the flare ribbons but also form the nearby plage area observed within the active region. The main aim of this work is to disentangle the flare and plage emission and to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the production of white-light continuum.There are two main mechanisms which can be responsible for the optical continuum emission of the solar atmosphere: enhanced photospheric H- continuum due to the temperature increase below the temperature minimum region, or hydrogen recombination continua (Balmer, Paschen) formed in solar chromosphere. In our work we analyse the physical conditions in solar active atmosphere in order to obtain the contribution from these two mechanisms to the whole continuum emission of the flare and plage.We analyzed the spatial, spectral and temporal evolution study of the flare and plage parameters by analyzing multi-wavelength observations obtained from ground and space based solar observatories. We study the morphological correlation of the white-light continuum emission observed with different instruments. Moreover, we also explore the non-thermal electron beam properties by forward fitting the observed X-ray spectra.The unique opportunity of an intense X6.9 flare occurrence close to the limb enabled us to explore the origin of white-light continuum with better visibility. The analysis of multi-wavelength data revealed the origin of this emission from the foot-points of the loops. Spatial association of HXR foot-points synthesized from RHESSI observations confirmed this finding. In addition, we found a good temporal correlation of hard (>30 keV) X-ray with the white-light emission. However, some active region areas which produce the continuum emission correspond rather to plages than to the flare kernels.

  7. Common SphinX and RHESSI observations of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, T.; Gburek, S.; Siarkowski, M.; Sylwester, B.; Sylwester, J.; Gryciuk, M.

    The Polish X-ray spectrofotometer SphinX has observed a great number of solar flares in the year 2009 - during the most quiet solar minimum almost over the last 100 years. Hundreds of flares have been recorded due to excellent sensitivity of SphinX's detectors. The Si-PIN diodes are about 100 times more sensitive to X-rays than GOES X-ray Monitors. SphinX detectors were absolutely calibrated on Earth with a use of the BESSY synchrotron. In space observations were made in the range 1.2-15~keV with 480~eV energy resolution. SphinX data overlap with the low-energy end of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) data. RHESSI detectors are quite old (7 years in 2009), but still sensitive enough to provide us with observations of extremely weak solar flares such as those which occurred in 2009. We have selected a group of flares simultaneously observed by RHESSI and SphinX and performed a spectroscopic analysis of the data. Moreover, we compared the physical parameters of these flares plasma. Preliminary results of the comparison show very good agreement between both instruments.

  8. Distinguishing Between Different Types of Prominences Associated with Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Sara F.; Engvold, Oddbjorn; Lin, Yong

    2015-08-01

    In the early days of solar astronomy, any feature that extended above the solar limb was called a prominence. However, many such coronal features have been sufficiently studied to justify more specific names such as flare loops, surges, and flaring arches. Each of these named phenomena has different properties and involves different physical processes from other solar prominences. If we exclude these well-identified phenomena, we find that the majority of the remaining prominences can be grouped into only two categories that are distinctly different from each other. The main two types are (1) channel prominences or channel filaments when seen against the solar disk and (2) coronal cloud prominences, including narrow, down-flows named coronal rain. We illustrate the many significant differences between channel prominences and coronal cloud prominences. One of the fundamental differences is that channel prominences often have patterns of mass motions useful in anticipating many flares while coronal cloud prominences tend to occur hours after major solar flares. We also raise the question of whether the much taller coronal cloud prominences could have a counterpart in prominences on solar-like stars with magnetic fields of greater magnitude than the Sun.

  9. Solar flare nuclear gamma-rays and interplanetary proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Forrest, D. J.; Cane, H. V.; Reames, D. V.; Mcguire, R. E.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1989-01-01

    Gamma-ray line (GRL) and solar energetic proton (SEP) events observed from February 1980 through January 1985 are compared in order to substantiate and better characterize the lack of correlation between GRL fluences and SEP event peak fluxes. The scatter plot of SEP event peak flux vs. GRL fluence is presented, and the ratio of 'solar' to 'interplanetary', about 10 MeV protons, is presented. It is shown that, while even large SEP events can originate in flares lacking detectable GRL emission, the converse case of flares with a significant GRL line fluence by lacking protons in space is rare. The ratio R of the number of about 10 MeV protons that produce GRL emission at the flare site to the number of about 10 MeV protons detected in space can vary from event to event by four orders of magnitude. There is a clear tendency for impulsive flares to have larger values of R than long-duration flares, where the flare time scale is given by the e-folding decay time of the associated soft X-ray emission.

  10. Protons from the decay of solar flare neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P.; Meyer, P.; Pyle, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    Fluxes of energetic protons in interplanetary space are observed which are interpreted as the decay products of neutrons generated in a solar flare on 1982 June 3 at 11:42 UT. Because of the particular geometry of this event the spectrum of neutrons escaping from the sun can be constructed with great accuracy in the kinetic energy range 10-100 MeV. The resulting spectrum places stringent constraints on the free parameters used in previously published calculations of neutron production in solar flares. An estimate is made of the diffusion mean free path of charged particles in the interplanetary medium in a new way.

  11. The acceleration and propagation of solar flare energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.; Ramaty, R.; Zweibel, E. G.; Holzer, T. E. (editor); Mihalas, D. (editor); Sturrock, P. A. (editor); Ulrich, R. K. (editor)

    1982-01-01

    Observations and theories of particle acceleration in solar flares are reviewed. The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are gamma rays, X-rays and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere and energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth's atmosphere. The implication of these observations are discussed. Stochastic and shock acceleration as well as acceleration in direct electric fields are considered. Interplanetary particle propagation is discussed and an overview of the highlights of both current and promising future research is presented.

  12. The Power-Law Distribution of Flare Kernels and Fractal Current Sheets in a Solar Flare

    E-print Network

    Nishizuka, N; Takasaki, H; Kurokawa, H; Shibata, K; 10.1088/0004-637X/694/1/L74

    2013-01-01

    We report a detailed examination of the fine structure inside flare ribbons and the temporal evolution of this fine structure during the X2.5 solar flare that occurred on 2004 November 10. We examine elementary bursts of the C IV (1550{\\AA}) emission lines seen as local transient brightenings inside the flare ribbons in the ultraviolet (1600{\\AA}) images taken with Transition Region and Coronal Explorer, and we call them C IV kernels. This flare was also observed in Ha with the Sartorius 18 cm Refractor telescope at Kwasan observatory, Kyoto University, and in hard X-rays (HXR) with Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. Many C IV kernels, whose sizes were comparable to or less than 2", were found to brighten successively during the evolution of the flare ribbon. The majority of them were well correlated with the Ha kernels in both space and time, while some of them were associated with the HXR emission. These kernels were thought to be caused by the precipitation of nonthermal particles at the...

  13. CELLULAR AUTOMATA MODELS AND MHD APPROACH IN THE CONTEXT OF SOLAR FLARES 1

    E-print Network

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    of the system can affect the evolution of the whole system. A complex dynamical system can be defined approaches that can be used for the description of the dynamical evolution of solar flares. A qualitative Solar flares as complex dynamical systems Solar flares are the manifestation of an energy release

  14. Modeling the effects of solar flares on the ionosphere of Mars

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    Modeling the effects of solar flares on the ionosphere of Mars Paul Withers, Joei Wroten, Michael:00 EGU Meeting 2007, Vienna, Austria #12;A Typical Mars Ionospheric Profile Outline of talk: Observations of Mars ionosphere during a solar flare Model description Models of Mars ionosphere during a solar flare

  15. Space weather effects on the Mars ionosphere due to solar flares and meteors

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    Space weather effects on the Mars ionosphere due to solar flares and meteors P. Withers (1), M observed two aspects of space weather at Mars. Following solar flares of both moderate to strong magnitude the simultaneous responses of the ionospheres of Earth and Mars to solar flares, highlighting the importance

  16. Automatic Solar Flare Detection Using MLP, RBF and SVM , Frank Y. Shih1

    E-print Network

    Jersey Institute of Technology. Automatic solar flare detection is the key to space weather monitoring1 Automatic Solar Flare Detection Using MLP, RBF and SVM Ming Qu1 , Frank Y. Shih1 , Ju Jing2. The focus of the automatic solar flare detection is on the development of efficient feature

  17. Fractal behavior of ionospheric TEC during solar X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Montes, R.; Rodriguez-Martinez, M.; Perez-Enriquez, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth's ionosphere is generated by the ionization produced by the solar ultraviolet radiation upon arriving to the top of the atmosphere. However, the variations of the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere is mainly associated with geomagnetic storms occurring with the arrival of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the Earth's environment. In spite of the fact that the high energy electromagnetic radiations like ultraviolet and X-rays intensifies during intense solar flares, their impact on the diurnal variation of TEC is of little importance. Therefore, the purpose of this work is to carry out a fractal analysis of the TEC time series during several days around the time of occurrence of 75 X-ray flares from 2000 to the present, in order to show that the impact of the electromagnetic radiation on the ionosphere is given more in a change of the "rugosity" of the time series than in an increase in the amplitude of the variation.

  18. A thermal/nonthermal approach to solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benka, Stephen G.

    1991-01-01

    An approach for modeling solar flare high-energy emissions is developed in which both thermal and nonthermal particles coexist and contribute to the radiation. The thermal/nonthermal distribution function is interpreted physically by postulating the existence of DC sheets in the flare region. The currents then provide both primary plasma heating through Joule dissipation, and runaway electron acceleration. The physics of runaway acceleration is discussed. Several methods are presented for obtaining approximations to the thermal/nonthermal distribution function, both within the current sheets and outside of them. Theoretical hard x ray spectra are calculated, allowing for thermal bremsstrahlung from the heated plasma electrons impinging on the chromosphere. A simple model for hard x ray images of two-ribbon flares is presented. Theoretical microwave gyrosynchrotron spectra are calculated and analyzed, uncovering important new effects caused by the interplay of thermal and nonthermal particles. The theoretical spectra are compared with observed high resolution spectra of solar flares, and excellent agreement is found, in both hard x rays and microwaves. The future detailed application of this approach to solar flares is discussed, as are possible refinements to this theory.

  19. Energetic Correlation Between Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Medlin, Drew A.; Haga, Leah; Schwartz, Richard a.; Tolbert, A. Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    We find a strong correlation between the kinetic energies (KEs) of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the radiated energies of the associated solar flares for the events that occurred during the period of intense solar activity between 18 October and 08 November 2003. CME start times, speeds, mass and KEs were taken from Gopalswamy et al. (2005), who used SOHO/LASCO observations. The GOES observations of the associated flares were analyzed to find the peak soft X-ray (SXR) flux, the radiated energy in SXRs (L(sub sxR)), and the radiated energy from the emitting plasma across all wavelengths (L(sub hot)). RHESSI observations were also used to find the energy in non-thermal electrons, ions, and the plasma thermal energy for some events. For two events, SORCE/TIM observations of the total solar irradiance during a flare were also available to give the total radiated flare energy (L(sub total)).W e find that the total flare energies of the larger events are of the same order of magnitude as the CME KE with a stronger correlation than has been found in the past for other time intervals.

  20. Variability of Thermosphere and Ionosphere Responses to Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Chamberlin, Philip C.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated how the rise rate and decay rate of solar flares affect the thermosphere and ionosphere responses to them. Model simulations and data analysis were conducted for two flares of similar magnitude (X6.2 and X5.4) that had the same location on the solar limb, but the X6.2 flare had longer rise and decay times. Simulated total electron content (TEC) enhancements from the X6.2 and X5.4 flares were 6 total electron content units (TECU) and approximately 2 TECU, and the simulated neutral density enhancements were approximately 15% -20% and approximately 5%, respectively, in reasonable agreement with observations. Additional model simulations showed that for idealized flares with the same magnitude and location, the thermosphere and ionosphere responses changed significantly as a function of rise and decay rates. The Neupert Effect, which predicts that a faster flare rise rate leads to a larger EUV enhancement during the impulsive phase, caused a larger maximum ion production enhancement. In addition, model simulations showed that increased E x B plasma transport due to conductivity increases during the flares caused a significant equatorial anomaly feature in the electron density enhancement in the F region but a relatively weaker equatorial anomaly feature in TEC enhancement, owing to dominant contributions by photochemical production and loss processes. The latitude dependence of the thermosphere response correlated well with the solar zenith angle effect, whereas the latitude dependence of the ionosphere response was more complex, owing to plasma transport and the winter anomaly.

  1. EVIDENCE THAT TEMPORAL CHANGES IN SOLAR SUBSURFACE HELICITY PRECEDE ACTIVE REGION FLARING

    SciTech Connect

    Reinard, A. A.; Komm, R.; Hill, F.

    2010-02-20

    We report on the analysis of subsurface vorticity/helicity measurements for flare producing and quiet active regions. We have developed a parameter to investigate whether large, decreasing kinetic helicity density commonly occurs prior to active region flaring. This new parameter is effective at separating flaring and non-flaring active regions and even separates among C-, M-, and X-class flare producing regions. In addition, this parameter provides advance notice of flare occurrence, as it increases 2-3 days before the flare occurs. These results are striking on an average basis, though on an individual basis there is still considerable overlap between flare associated and non-flare associated values. We propose the following qualitative scenario for flare production: subsurface rotational kinetic energy twists the magnetic field lines into an unstable configuration, resulting in explosive reconnection and a flare.

  2. High Energy Gamma Ray Lines from Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, Carol Jo

    2000-01-01

    A number of nuclear states have been identified as possible candidates for producing high-energy gamma-ray line emission in solar flares. For one high-energy line, resulting from the decay of C-12 (15.11 MeV), the excitation cross sections and branching radios have been studied extensively. In a solar flare, the ratio of the flux of 15. 11 -MeV gamma rays to the flux of 4.44-MeV gamma rays depends critically on the spectral index of the flare-accelerated protons. Prospects for being able to determine that spectral index using results from HESSI observations together with the analytic results of Crannell, Crannell, and Ramaty (1979) will be presented.

  3. A RECONNECTING CURRENT SHEET IMAGED IN A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Rui; Liu Chang; Wang Haimin; Lee, Jeongwoo; Wang, Tongjiang; Stenborg, Guillermo

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection changes the magnetic field topology and powers explosive events in astrophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas. For flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the solar atmosphere, the standard model predicts the presence of a reconnecting current sheet, which has been the subject of considerable theoretical and numerical modeling over the last 50 years, yet direct, unambiguous observational verification has been absent. In this Letter, we show a bright sheet structure of global length (>0.25 R {sub sun}) and macroscopic width ((5-10)x10{sup 3} km) distinctly above the cusp-shaped flaring loop, imaged during the flare rising phase in EUV. The sheet formed due to the stretch of a transequatorial loop system and was accompanied by various reconnection signatures. This unique event provides a comprehensive view of the reconnection geometry and dynamics in the solar corona.

  4. Simulations of the response of the Mars ionosphere to solar flares

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    V gives best results #12;Final results for 15 April 2001 flare #12;Final results for 26 April 2001 flare spectrum changes in a flare #12;Solar spectrum on 15 April 2001 #12;Unusual behaviour of CO2 at 1-5 nm #12 #12;Large changes in electron density profile during the 15 April flare M1 densities increase a lot M2

  5. Substorm occurrence during quiet solar wind driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, T. I.; Partamies, N.; Kilpua, E. K. J.

    2014-04-01

    We examine the OMNI database and International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects (IMAGE) magnetometer chain records to study the substorm occurrence and characteristics during quiet solar driving periods, especially during the solar minimum period in 2009. We define substorm-like activations as periods where the hourly average AL is below -200 nT. Using the OMNI data set, we demonstrate that there are limiting solar wind speed, interplanetary magnetic field magnitude, and driving electric field values below which substorm-like activations (AL < 200 nT, intensification and decay of the electrojet) do not occur. These minimum parameter values are V < 266 km/s, B < 1.4 nT, and E < 0.025 mV/m such low values are observed less than 1% of the time. We also show that for the same level of driving solar wind electric field, the electrojet intensity is smaller (by few tens of nT), and the electrojet resides farther poleward (by over 1°) during extended quiet solar driving in 2009 than during average solar activity conditions. During the solar minimum period in 2009, we demonstrate that substorm-like activations can be identified from the IMAGE magnetometer chain observations during periods when the hourly average IL index is below -100 nT. When the hourly IL activity is smaller than that, which covers 87% of the nighttime observations, the electrojet does not show coherent behavior. We thus conclude that substorm recurrence time during very quiet solar wind driving conditions is about 5-8 h, which is almost double that of the average solar activity conditions.

  6. Solar and Stellar Flares over Time: Effects on Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; DeWarf, Laurence E.; Engle, Scott G.; Gropp, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are presented. Also discussed are the flare properties of cooler, commonplace main-sequence K-M stars. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These studies are based on ground-based observations, UV and X-ray space missions (IUE & HST, ROSAT & Chandra) as well as a wealth of data from the Kepler Mission. The ultra-high precision photometry available from the Kepler Mission (and K2) has made it possible to study starspots, flare properties, and rotations of thousands of G, K, M stars. Superflares (defined as E > 10+33 ergs ~X-100 flares) on hundreds of mostly G and K stars have been found. (See e.g. Shibayama et al. 2013; Maehara et al. 2015; Notsu et al. 2013/15; Saar et al. 2015; Guinan et al. 2015). Using our Age-Rotation relations, we determine correlations of flares properties of the Sun and solar-type over a wide range of ages. We also compare these flare histories with the cooler, more common K- and M-type stars. The analysis of these datasets imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles the evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestrial planets. The strong X-UV fluxes and proton fluences from flares and associated plasmas from coronal mass ejection events can greatly affect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also discussed are the effects of superflares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though solar superflares are rarer (~1 per 300-500 yrs) than from the young Sun (> 1-2 per year), they could cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space..This research is supported by grants from NSF/RUI and NASA: NSF, AST 1009903; Chandra GO2-13020X, HST GO-13020.01. We are very grateful for this support

  7. Filament eruptions and the impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Moore, R. L.; Kane, S. R.; Zirin, H.

    1988-01-01

    Filament motion during the onset of the solar flare impulsive phase is examined. The impulsive phase onset is established from profiles of about 30 keV X-ray fluxes and the rapid flare brightenings characteristic of the H-alpha flash phase. The filament motion begins several minutes before the impulsive or flash phase of the flare. No new accleration is observed in the motion of the filament during the onset of the impulsive phase for at least two of the four flares. The most common H-alpha brightenings associated with the impulsive phase lie near the magnetic inversion line roughly centered under the erupting filament. Filament speeds at the onset of the impulsive or flash phase lie in the range 30-180 km/s. These characteristics indicate that the filament eruption is not driven by the flare plasma pressure, but instead marks an eruption of magnetic field driven by a global MHD instability of the field configuration in the region of the flare.

  8. Low energy particle composition. [energy spectra, particle emission - solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    The energy spectra and composition of the steady or 'quiet-time' particle flux, whose origin is unknown was studied. Particles and photons which are associated with solar flares or active regions on the sun were also studied. Various detection techniques used to measure the composition and energy spectra of low energy particles are discussed. Graphs of elemental abundance and energy spectra are given.

  9. Fuzzy forecast of flood disaster caused by solar proton flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhengzhong; Tang, Yuhua

    1999-01-01

    The flood disaster caused by solar proton flares is forecasted using the theory of fuzzy mathematics. The index system and standards of fuzzy evaluation, as well as the membership function are proposed. A practical software of computer data processing for forecasting flood disaster is given.

  10. The Solar Flare: A Strongly Turbulent Particle Accelerator

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Chapter 5 The Solar Flare: A Strongly Turbulent Particle Accelerator L. Vlahos, S. Krucker, and P) and particle acceleration during such an event are rarely discussed together in the same article. Many the topic of particle acceleration is often presented as an addi- tional complication to be addressed

  11. Solar neutrinos, solar flares, solar activity cycle and the proton decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raychaudhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that there may be a correlation between the galactic cosmic rays and the solar neutrino data, but it appears that the neutrino flux which may be generated during the large solar cosmic ray events cannot in any way effect the solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. Only initial stage of mixing between the solar core and solar outer layers after the sunspot maximum in the solar activity cycle can explain the higher (run number 27 and 71) of solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. But solar flare induced atmospheric neutrino flux may have effect in the nucleon decay detector on the underground. The neutrino flux from solar cosmic rays may be a useful guide to understand the background of nucleon decay, magnetic monopole search, and the detection of neutrino flux in sea water experiment.

  12. NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Warren, Harry; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent

    2011-10-01

    New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

  13. Impulsive Heating of Solar Flare Ribbons Above 10 MK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, P. J. A.; Graham, D. R.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-06-01

    The chromospheric response to the input of flare energy is marked by extended extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ribbons and hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints. These are usually explained as the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from accelerated electrons colliding in the dense chromospheric plasma. We present evidence of impulsive heating of flare ribbons above 10 MK in a two-ribbon flare. We analyse the impulsive phase of SOL2013-11-09T06:38, a C2.6 class event using data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to derive the temperature, emission measure and differential emission measure of the flaring regions and investigate the evolution of the plasma in the flaring ribbons. The ribbons were visible at all SDO/AIA EUV/UV wavelengths, in particular, at 94 and 131 Å filters, sensitive to temperatures of 8 MK and 12 MK. The time evolution of the emission measure of the plasma above 10 MK at the ribbons has a peak near the HXR peak time. The presence of hot plasma in the lower atmosphere is further confirmed by a RHESSI imaging spectroscopy analysis, which shows resolved sources at 11 - 13 MK that are associated with at least one ribbon. We found that collisional beam-heating can only marginally explain the power necessary to heat the 10 MK plasma at the ribbons.

  14. Driving major solar flares and eruptions: a review

    E-print Network

    C. J. Schrijver

    2008-11-05

    This review focuses on the processes that energize and trigger major solar flares and flux-rope destabilizations. Numerical modeling of specific solar regions is hampered by uncertain coronal-field reconstructions and by poorly understood magnetic re- connection; these limitations result in uncertain estimates of field topology, energy, and helicity. The primary advances in understanding field destabilizations therefore come from the combination of generic numerical experiments with interpretation of sets of observations. These suggest a critical role for the emergence of twisted flux ropes into pre-existing strong field for many, if not all, of the active regions that pro- duce M- or X-class flares. The flux and internal twist of the emerging ropes appear to play as important a role in determining whether an eruption will develop predom- inantly as flare, confined eruption, or CME, as do the properties of the embedding field. Based on reviewed literature, I outline a scenario for major flares and erup- tions that combines flux-rope emergence, mass draining, near-surface reconnection, and the interaction with the surrounding field. Whether deterministic forecasting is in principle possible remains to be seen: to date no reliable such forecasts can be made. Large-sample studies based on long-duration, comprehensive observations of active regions from their emergence through their flaring phase are needed to help us better understand these complex phenomena.

  15. Statistical properties of super-hot solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, Amir; Krucker, Säm; Lin, R. P.

    2014-01-20

    We use Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy observations from ?6 to 100 keV to determine the statistical relationships between measured parameters (temperature, emission measure, etc.) of hot, thermal plasma in 37 intense (GOES M- and X-class) solar flares. The RHESSI data, most sensitive to the hottest flare plasmas, reveal a strong correlation between the maximum achieved temperature and the flare GOES class, such that 'super-hot' temperatures >30 MK are achieved almost exclusively by X-class events; the observed correlation differs significantly from that of GOES-derived temperatures, and from previous studies. A nearly ubiquitous association with high emission measures, electron densities, and instantaneous thermal energies suggests that super-hot plasmas are physically distinct from cooler, ?10-20 MK GOES plasmas, and that they require substantially greater energy input during the flare. High thermal energy densities suggest that super-hot flares require strong coronal magnetic fields, exceeding ?100 G, and that both the plasma ? and volume filling factor f cannot be much less than unity in the super-hot region.

  16. Max '91: Flare research at the next solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Canfield, Richard; Bruner, Marilyn; Emslie, Gordon; Hildner, Ernest; Hudson, Hugh; Hurford, Gordon; Lin, Robert; Novick, Robert; Tarbell, Ted

    1988-01-01

    To address the central scientific questions surrounding solar flares, coordinated observations of electromagnetic radiation and energetic particles must be made from spacecraft, balloons, rockets, and ground-based observatories. A program to enhance capabilities in these areas in preparation for the next solar maximum in 1991 is recommended. The major scientific issues are described, and required observations and coordination of observations and analyses are detailed. A program plan and conceptual budgets are provided.

  17. Theoretical studies on rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, Loukas

    1986-01-01

    Rapid fluctuations in the emission of solar bursts may have many different origins e.g., the acceleration process can have a pulsating structure, the propagation of energetic electrons and ions can be interrupted from plasma instabilities and finally the electromagnetic radiation produced by the interaction of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves may have a pulsating behavior in time. In two separate studies the conditions for rapid fluctuations in solar flare driven emission were analyzed.

  18. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  19. Solar Flare Impulsive Phase Observations from SDO and Other Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Woods, Thomas N.; Schrijver, Karel; Warren, Harry; Milligan, Ryan; Christe, Steven; Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    With the start of normal operations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory in May 2010, the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) have been returning the most accurate solar XUV and EUV measurements every 10 and 12 seconds, respectively, at almost 100% duty cycle. The focus of the presentation will be the solar flare impulsive phase observations provided by EVE and AIA and what these observations can tell us about the evolution of the initial phase of solar flares. Also emphasized throughout is how simultaneous observations with other instruments, such as RHESSI, SOHO-CDS, and HINODE-EIS, will help provide a more complete characterization of the solar flares and the evolution and energetics during the impulsive phase. These co-temporal observations from the other solar instruments can provide information such as extending the high temperature range spectra and images beyond that provided by the EUV and XUV wavelengths, provide electron density input into the lower atmosphere at the footpoints, and provide plasma flows of chromospheric evaporation, among other characteristics.

  20. Acceleration of runaway electrons and Joule heating in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The electric field acceleration of electrons out of a thermal plasma and the simultaneous Joule heating of the plasma are studied. Acceleration and heating timescales are derived and compared, and upper limits are obtained on the acceleration volume and the rate at which electrons can be accelerated. These upper limits, determined by the maximum magnetic field strength observed in flaring regions, place stringent restrictions upon the acceleration process. The role of the plasma resistivity in these processes is examined, and possible sources of anomalous resistivity are summarized. The implications of these results for the microwave and hard X-ray emission from solar flares are examined.

  1. The development and cooling of a solar limb-flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veck, N. J.; Strong, K. T.; Jordan, C.; Simnett, G. M.; Cargill, P. J.; Priest, E. R.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of a flare that began in soft X-rays at 20:37 UT on April 12, 1980 at the west limb of the sun are discussed. The observations of the flare and postflare loops are first described, and the Solar Maximum Mission data are interpreted in terms of the temperature, density, and geometry of the emitting regions. The observed postflare cooling time is compared with that expected from radiation, conduction, and enthalpy flux. The loop model is discussed, and the observed events are compared with other proposed models.

  2. Effects of solar flares on the ionosphere of Mars.

    PubMed

    Mendillo, Michael; Withers, Paul; Hinson, David; Rishbeth, Henry; Reinisch, Bodo

    2006-02-24

    All planetary atmospheres respond to the enhanced x-rays and ultraviolet (UV) light emitted from the Sun during a flare. Yet only on Earth are observations so continuous that the consequences of these essentially unpredictable events can be measured reliably. Here, we report observations of solar flares, causing up to 200% enhancements to the ionosphere of Mars, as recorded by the Mars Global Surveyor in April 2001. Modeling the altitude dependence of these effects requires that relative enhancements in the soft x-ray fluxes far exceed those in the UV. PMID:16497929

  3. Measurements and Modeling of Total Solar Irradiance in X-class Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Chamberlin, Phillip Clyde; Hock, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment can detect changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-class solar flares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar flares presented in Woods et al., as well as an additional flare measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five flares are then compared to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-class flares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar flares analyzed in the Emslie et al. study.

  4. Measurements and modeling of total solar irradiance in X-class solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Christopher Samuel; Chamberlin, Phillip Clyde; Hock, Rachel

    2014-05-20

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment can detect changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-class solar flares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar flares presented in Woods et al., as well as an additional flare measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five flares are then compared to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-class flares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar flares analyzed in the Emslie et al. study.

  5. Flare Particle Escape in 3D Solar Eruptive Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Masson, Sophie; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Among the most important, but least understood forms of space weather are the so-called Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events, which can be especially hazardous to deep-space astronauts. These energetic particles are generally believed to be produced by the flare reconnection that is the primary driver of solar eruptive events (SEE). A key point is that in the standard model of SEEs, the particles should remain trapped in the coronal flare loops and in the ejected plasmoid, the CME. However, flare-accelerated particles frequently reach the Earth long before the CME does. In previous 2.5D calculations we showed how the external reconnection that is an essential element of the breakout model for CME initiation could lead to the escape of flare-accelerated particles. The problem, however, is that in 2.5D this reconnection also tends to destroy the plasmoid, which disagrees with the observation that SEP events are often associated with well-defined plasmoids at 1 AU known as “magnetic clouds”. Consequently, we have extended our model to a fully 3D topology that includes a multi-polar coronal field suitable for a breakout SEE near a coronal hole region. We performed high-resolution 3D MHD numerical simulations with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS). Our results demonstrate that the model allows for the effective escape of energetic particles from deep within an ejecting well-defined plasmoid. We show how the complex interactions between the flare and breakout reconnection reproduce all the main observational features of SEEs and SEPs. We discuss the implications of our calculations for the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions, which will measure SEEs and SEPs near the Sun, thereby, mitigating propagation effects.This research was supported, in part, by the NASA SR&T and TR&T Programs.

  6. On the Origin of Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibadov, Subhon

    2015-08-01

    Physical processes connected with falls of comets and evaporating bodies, FEBs, onto stars with cosmic velocities, around 600 km/s, are considered. The processes include aerodynamic crushing of comet nucleus and transversal expansion of crushed mass within the solar chromosphere as well as sharp deceleration of the flattening structure in a relatively very thin layer near the solar/stellar photosphere. Fast thermalization of the body's kinetic energy will be accompanied by impulse generation of a high temperature plasma in the thin layer, i.e., "explosion" and strong "blast" shock wave as well as eruption of the layer ionized material into space above the chromosphere. Impact mechanism is capable to lead to generation of solar/stellar super-flares. Some similarities of this phenomenon with flare activity by magnetic reconnection are also revealed.

  7. Upper limits on the total radiant energy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Willson, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Limits on the total radiant energy of solar flares during the period February-November 1980 are established using data collected by the solar-constant monitor (ACRIM) on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Results show typical limits of 6 x 10 to the 29th erg/sec for a 32-second integration time, with 5-sigma statistical significance, for an impulsive emission. For a gradual component, about 4 x 10 to the 32nd ergs total radiant energy is found. The limits are determined to lie about an order of magnitude higher than the total radiant energy estimated from the various known emission components, which indicates the presence of a heretofore unknown dominant component of flare radiation.

  8. An extended superhot solar flare X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Ohki, K. I.; Tsuneta, S.

    1985-01-01

    A superhot hard X-ray source in a solar flare occulted by the solar limb was identified. Its hard X-ray image was found to show great horizontal extent but little vertical extent. An H alpha brightening at the same limb position about an hour later suggests a multi-component loop prominence system, so that it appears that a superhot source can evolve in the same manner as a normal solar soft X-ray source. The assignment of plausiable values to physical parameters in the source suggests (from the simplest form of classical thermal-conduction theory) that either new physics will be required to suppress conduction, or else that gradual energy release well after the impulsive phase of the flare must occur. In this respect too, the superhot source appears to resemble ordinary soft X-ray sources, except of course that its temperature is higher.

  9. Statistical analysis of solar H-alpha flares

    E-print Network

    M. Temmer; A. Veronig; A. Hanslmeier; W. Otruba; M. Messerotti

    2002-07-11

    A statistical analysis of a large data set of H-alpha flares comprising almost 100000 single events that occurred during the period January 1975 to December 1999 is presented. We analyzed the flares evolution steps, i.e. duration, rise times, decay times and event asymmetries. Moreover, these parameters characterizing the temporal behavior of flares, as well as the spatial distribution on the solar disk, i.e. N-S and E-W asymmetries, are analyzed in terms of their dependency on the solar cycle. The main results are: 1) The duration, rise and decay times increase with increasing importance class. The increase is more pronounced for the decay times than for the rise times. The same relation is valid with regard to the brightness classes but in a weaker manner. 2) The event asymmetry indices, which characterize the proportion of the decay to the rise time of an event, are predominantly positive (90%). For about 50% of the events the decay time is even more than 4 times as long as the rise time. 3) The event asymmetries increase with the importance class. 4) The flare duration and decay times vary in phase with the solar cycle; the rise times do not. 5) The event asymmetries do not reveal a distinct correlation with the solar cycle. However, they drop during times of solar minima, which can be explained by the shorter decay times found during minimum activity. 6) There exists a significant N-S asymmetry over longer periods, and the dominance of one hemisphere over the other can persist for more than one cycle. 7) For certain cycles there may be evidence that the N-S asymmetry evolves with the solar cycle, but in general this is not the case. 8) There exists a slight but significant E-W asymmetry with a prolonged eastern excess.

  10. X-Class: A Guide to Solar Flares - Duration: 3 minutes, 2 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar flares are classified according to their strength. The smallest ones are B-class, followed by C, M and X, the largest. A powerful X-class flare can create long lasting radiation storms, which...

  11. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Joel; Kowalski, Adam; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-04-01

    We describe a unified computational framework which can be used to model impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models are constructed assuming that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles (primarily electrons and protons) that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and emission to dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how these flare-accelerated particles propagate down one dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere, and these effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  12. Elemental abundances of flaring solar plasma - Enhanced neon and sulfur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental abundances of two flares observed with the SMM Flat Crystal Spectrometer are compared and contrasted. The first had a gradual rise and a slow decay, while the second was much more impulsive. Simultaneous spectra of seven bright soft X-ray resonance lines provide information over a broad temperature range and are available throughout both flares, making these events unique in the SMM data base. For the first flare, the plasma seemed to be characterized by coronal abundances but, for the second, the plasma composition could not be coronal, photospheric, or a linear combination of both. A good differential emission measure fit required enhanced neon such that Ne/O = 0.32 +/- 0.02, a value which is inconsistent with the current models of coronal abundances based on the elemental first-ionization potential. Similar values of enhanced neon are found for flaring plasma observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, in (He-3)-rich solar energetic particle events, and in the decay phase of several long duration soft X-ray events. Sulfur is also enhanced in the impulsive flare, but not as dramatically as neon. These events are compared with two models which attempt to explain the enhanced values of neon and sulfur.

  13. Temporal Variability of Ion Acceleration and Abundances in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their X-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions greater than approximately 20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons greater than 300 keV, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances. We also discuss possible explanations for changing abundances.

  14. Temporal Variability of Ion Acceleration and Abundances in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2012-01-01

    solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their x-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions > approx 20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons >300 kev, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances. We also discuss possible explanations for changing abundances.

  15. Automatic Solar Flare Tracking Using Image Processing Qu Ming and Shih Frank (shih@njit.edu)

    E-print Network

    Automatic solar flare detection plays a key role in real-time space weather monitoring. It is veryAutomatic Solar Flare Tracking Using Image Processing Techniques Qu Ming and Shih Frank (shih Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark, NJ 07102 Big Bear Solar

  16. Extreme Ultra-Violet Spectroscopy of the Flaring Solar Chromosphere

    E-print Network

    Milligan, Ryan O

    2015-01-01

    The extreme ultraviolet portion of the solar spectrum contains a wealth of diagnostic tools for probing the lower solar atmosphere in response to an injection of energy, particularly during the impulsive phase of solar flares. These include temperature and density sensitive line ratios, Doppler shifted emission lines and nonthermal broadening, abundance measurements, differential emission measure profiles, and continuum temperatures and energetics, among others. In this paper I shall review some of the advances made in recent years using these techniques, focusing primarily on studies that have utilized data from Hinode/EIS and SDO/EVE, while also providing some historical background and a summary of future spectroscopic instrumentation.

  17. HMI Observations of Solar Flares in Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeksema, J. Todd; Bobra, Monica; Couvidat, Sebastien; Sun, Xudong

    2015-08-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has continuously measured the vector magnetic field, intensity, and Doppler velocity in solar flares and over the entire solar disk since May 2010. The regular cadence of 45 seconds for line-of-sight and 12 minutes for vector measurements enables reliable investigations of photospheric conditions before, during, and after events both locally and globally. Active region indices can be tracked and conditions in the overlying corona can be modeled. A few examples show the utility of the data and demonstrate that some care must be exercised when the HMI data are used to investigate time variations.

  18. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    Solar flares are one of the most energetic events in solar atmosphere, which last minutes to tens of minutes. The eruption of a solar flare involves energy release, plasma heating, particle acceleration, mass flows, waves, etc. A solar flare releases a large amount of energy, and its emission spans a wide wavelength range. Solar flares are usually accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs); therefore they could significantly affect the space environments between the Earth and the Sun. At present, we do not fully understand the whole flare process. There are still many important questions to be resolved, such as when and where is the energy released? How long does the energy release last? What are the main ways of energy release? And how does the solar atmosphere respond to the energy release? To address these questions, we study in detail the flare heating and dynamic evolution. We first give a brief review of previous flare studies (Chapter 1), and introduce the observing instruments (Chapter 2) and the modeling method (Chapter 3) related to this thesis work. Then we use spectral data to investigate the chromospheric evaporation (Chapter 4). Based on the results, we further explore the flare heating problem. With observationally inferred heating functions, we model two flare loops, and compare the results with observations (Chapter 5). A consistency is achieved between modeling and observations. In addition, we model two different sets of flare loop systems with quite different heating profiles and dynamic evolutions (Chapter 6). The details are described as below. Firstly, we investigate the chromospheric evaporation in the flare on 2007 January 16 using line profiles observed by the Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode. Three points with different magnetic polarities at flare ribbons are analyzed in detail. We find that the three points show different patterns of upflows and downflows in the impulsive phase of the flare. The spectral lines at the first point are mostly blueshifted, with the hotter lines showing a dominant blueshifted component over the stationary one. At the second point, however, only weak upflows are detected; instead, notable downflows appear at high temperatures (up to 2.5-5.0 MK). The third point is similar to the second one except that it shows evidence of multi-component downflows. While the evaporated plasma falling back down as warm rain is a possible cause of the redshifts at the second and third points, the different patterns of chromospheric evaporation at the three points imply the existence of different heating mechanisms in the flaring region. Then, we study the flare heating and dynamics using the ``enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops'' (EBTEL) model. We analyze an M1.0 flare on 2011 February 16. This flare is composed of two distinctive loop systems observed in EUV images. The UV 1600 Å emission at the feet of these loops exhibits a rapid rise, followed by enhanced emission in different EUV channels observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Such a behavior is indicative of impulsive energy deposit, and the subsequent response of overlying coronal loops. Using the method recently developed, we infer empirical heating functions from the rapid rise of the UV light curves for the two loop systems, respectively, treated as two big loops with cross-sectional area of 5'' by 5'', and compute the plasma evolution in the loops using the EBTEL model. We further compute the synthetic EUV light curves, which, with the limitation of the model, agree reasonably with the observed light curves obtained in multiple AIA channels and EIS lines: they show the same evolution trend, and their magnitudes are comparable within a factor of two. We also compare the computed mean enthalpy flow velocity with the Doppler shifts of EIS lines during the decay phase of the two loops. Our results suggest that the two different loops with different heating functions as inferred from their footpoint UV emission, combined wit

  19. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  20. SHORT-TERM SOLAR FLARE PREDICTION USING MULTIRESOLUTION PREDICTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Daren; Huang Xin; Hu Qinghua; Zhou Rui; Wang Huaning; Cui Yanmei

    2010-01-20

    Multiresolution predictors of solar flares are constructed by a wavelet transform and sequential feature extraction method. Three predictors-the maximum horizontal gradient, the length of neutral line, and the number of singular points-are extracted from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager longitudinal magnetograms. A maximal overlap discrete wavelet transform is used to decompose the sequence of predictors into four frequency bands. In each band, four sequential features-the maximum, the mean, the standard deviation, and the root mean square-are extracted. The multiresolution predictors in the low-frequency band reflect trends in the evolution of newly emerging fluxes. The multiresolution predictors in the high-frequency band reflect the changing rates in emerging flux regions. The variation of emerging fluxes is decoupled by wavelet transform in different frequency bands. The information amount of these multiresolution predictors is evaluated by the information gain ratio. It is found that the multiresolution predictors in the lowest and highest frequency bands contain the most information. Based on these predictors, a C4.5 decision tree algorithm is used to build the short-term solar flare prediction model. It is found that the performance of the short-term solar flare prediction model based on the multiresolution predictors is greatly improved.

  1. THz photometers for solar flare observations from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Pierre; Marcon, Rogério; Abrantes, André; Bortolucci, Emilio C.; T. Fernandes, Luis Olavo; Kropotov, Grigory I.; Kudaka, Amauri S.; Machado, Nelson; Marun, Adolfo; Nikolaev, Valery; Silva, Alexandre; da Silva, Claudemir S.; Timofeevsky, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The search for the still unrevealed spectral shape of the mysterious THz solar flare emissions is one of the current most challenging research issues. The concept, fabrication and performance of a double THz photometer system, named SOLAR-T, is presented. Its innovative optical setup allows observations of the full solar disk and the detection of small burst transients at the same time. The detecting system was constructed to observe solar flare THz emissions on board of stratospheric balloons. The system has been integrated to data acquisition and telemetry modules for this application. SOLAR-T uses two Golay cell detectors preceded by low-pass filters made of rough surface primary mirrors and membranes, 3 and 7 THz band-pass filters, and choppers. Its photometers can detect small solar bursts (tens of solar flux units) with sub second time resolution. Tests have been conducted to confirm the entire system performance, on ambient and low pressure and temperature conditions. An artificial Sun setup was developed to simulate performance on actual observations. The experiment is planned to be on board of two long-duration stratospheric balloon flights over Antarctica and Russia in 2014-2016.

  2. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF SPECTRAL HARDENING IN SOLAR FLARES AND RELATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Grayson, James A.; Krucker, Saem; Lin, R. P. E-mail: krucker@ssl.berkeley.ed

    2009-12-20

    Using hard X-ray observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we investigate the reliability of spectral hardening during solar flares as an indicator of related solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth. All RHESSI data are analyzed, from 2002 February through the end of Solar Cycle 23, thereby expanding upon recent work on a smaller sample of flares. Previous investigations have found very high success when associating soft-hard-harder (SHH) spectral behavior with energetic proton events, and confirmation of this link would suggest a correlation between electron acceleration in solar flares and SEPs seen in interplanetary space. In agreement with these past findings, we find that of 37 magnetically well-connected flares (W30-W90), 12 of 18 flares with SHH behavior produced SEP events and none of 19 flares without SHH behavior produced SEPs. This demonstrates a statistically significant dependence of SHH and SEP observations, a link that is unexplained in the standard scenario of SEP acceleration at the shock front of coronal mass ejections and encourages further investigation of the mechanisms which could be responsible.

  3. Particle Acceleration by Fast Modes in Solar Flares

    E-print Network

    Huirong Yan; A. Lazarian; V. Petrosian

    2008-05-08

    We address the problem of particle acceleration in solar flares by fast modes which may be excited during the reconnection and undergo cascade and are subjected to damping. We extend the calculations beyond quasilinear approximation and compare the acceleration and scattering by transit time damping and gyroresonance interactions. We find that the acceleration is dominated by the so called transit time damping mechanism. We estimate the total energy transferred into particles, and show that our approach provides sufficiently accurate results We compare this rate with energy loss rate. Scattering by fast modes appears to be sufficient to prevent the protons from escaping the system during the acceleration. Confinement of electrons, on the other hand, requires the existence of plasma waves. Electrons can be accelerated to GeV energies through the process described here for solar flare conditions.

  4. DOES A SCALING LAW EXIST BETWEEN SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS AND SOLAR FLARES?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, S. W.

    2013-05-20

    Among many other natural processes, the size distributions of solar X-ray flares and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are scale-invariant power laws. The measured distributions of SEP events prove to be distinctly flatter, i.e., have smaller power-law slopes, than those of the flares. This has led to speculation that the two distributions are related through a scaling law, first suggested by Hudson, which implies a direct nonlinear physical connection between the processes producing the flares and those producing the SEP events. We present four arguments against this interpretation. First, a true scaling must relate SEP events to all flare X-ray events, and not to a small subset of the X-ray event population. We also show that the assumed scaling law is not mathematically valid and that although the flare X-ray and SEP event data are correlated, they are highly scattered and not necessarily related through an assumed scaling of the two phenomena. An interpretation of SEP events within the context of a recent model of fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality by Aschwanden provides a physical basis for why the SEP distributions should be flatter than those of solar flares. These arguments provide evidence against a close physical connection of flares with SEP production.

  5. The beam-driven chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares - A model not supported by observations from nonimpulsive large flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.

    1990-01-01

    Most large solar flares exhibit hard X-ray emission which is usually impulsive, as well as thermal soft X-ray emission, which is gradual. The beam-driven chromospheric evaporation model of solar flares was proposed to explain the origin of the soft X-ray emitting flare plasma. A careful evaluation of the issue under discussion reveals contradictions between predictions from the theoretical chromospheric evaporation model and actual observations from a set of large X- and M-type flares. It is shown that although the soft X-ray and hard X-ray emissions are a result of the same flare, one is not a result of the other.

  6. Internal and External Reconnection Series Homologous Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    Using data from the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) on SOHO and the soft X-ray telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh, we examine a series of morphologically homologous solar flares occurring in National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) active region 8210 over May 1-2, 1998. An emerging flux region (EFR) impacted against a sunspot to the west and next to a coronal hole to the east is the source of the repeated flaring. An SXT sigmoid parallels the EFR's neutral line at the site of the initial flaring in soft X rays. In EIT each flaring episode begins with the formation of a crinkle pattern external to the EFR. These EIT crinkles move out from, and then in toward, the EFR with velocities approx. 20 km/ s. A shrinking and expansion of the width of the coronal hole coincides with the crinkle activity, and generation and evolution of a postflare loop system begins near the time of crinkle formation. Using a schematic based on magnetograms of the region, we suggest that these observations are consistent with the standard reconnection-based model for solar eruptions but are modified by the presence of the additional magnetic fields of the sunspot and coronal hole. In the schematic, internal reconnection begins inside of the EFR-associated fields, unleashing a flare, postflare loops, and a coronal mass ejection (CME). External reconnection, first occurring between the escaping CME and the coronal hole field and second occurring between fields formed as a result of the first external reconnection, results in the EIT crinkles and changes in the coronal hole boundary. By the end of the second external reconnection, the initial setup is reinstated; thus the sequence can repeat, resulting in morphologically homologous eruptions. Our inferred magnetic topology is similar to that suggested in the "breakout model" of eruptions although we cannot determine if our eruptions are released primarily by the breakout mechanism (external reconnection) or, alternatively, primarily by the internal reconnection.

  7. Solar Flares, Type III Radio Bursts, CMEs, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the fact that it has been well known since the earliest observations that solar energetic particle events are well associated with solar flares it is often considered that the association is not physically significant. Instead, in large events, the particles are considered to be only accelerated at a shock driven by the coronal mass ejection (CME) that is also always present. If particles are accelerated in the associated flare, it is claimed that such particles do not find access to open field lines and therefore do not escape from the low corona. However recent work has established that long lasting type III radio bursts extending to low frequencies are associated with all prompt solar particle events. Such bursts establish the presence of open field lines. Furthermore, tracing the radio bursts to the lowest frequencies, generated near the observer, shows that the radio producing electrons gain access to a region of large angular extent. It is likely that the electrons undergo cross field transport and it seems reasonable that ions do also. Such observations indicate that particle propagation in the inner heliosphere is not yet fully understood. They also imply that the contribution of flare particles in major particle events needs to be properly addressed.

  8. Solar flare impulsive phase emission observed with SDO/EVE

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P.

    2013-12-10

    Differential emission measures (DEMs) during the impulsive phase of solar flares were constructed using observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo method. Emission lines from ions formed over the temperature range log T{sub e} = 5.8-7.2 allow the evolution of the DEM to be studied over a wide temperature range at 10 s cadence. The technique was applied to several M- and X-class flares, where impulsive phase EUV emission is observable in the disk-integrated EVE spectra from emission lines formed up to 3-4 MK and we use spatially unresolved EVE observations to infer the thermal structure of the emitting region. For the nine events studied, the DEMs exhibited a two-component distribution during the impulsive phase, a low-temperature component with peak temperature of 1-2 MK, and a broad high-temperature component from 7 to 30 MK. A bimodal high-temperature component is also found for several events, with peaks at 8 and 25 MK during the impulsive phase. The origin of the emission was verified using Atmospheric Imaging Assembly images to be the flare ribbons and footpoints, indicating that the constructed DEMs represent the spatially average thermal structure of the chromospheric flare emission during the impulsive phase.

  9. The impulsive hard X-rays from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, J.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for determining the physical arrangement of a solar flare during the impulsive phase was developed based upon a nonthermal model interpretation of the emitted hard X-rays. Accurate values are obtained for the flare parameters, including those which describe the magnetic field structure and the beaming of the energetic electrons, parameters which have hitherto been mostly inaccessible. The X-ray intensity height structure can be described readily with a single expression based upon a semi-empirical fit to the results from many models. Results show that the degree of linear polarization of the X-rays from a flaring loop does not exceed 25 percent and can easily and naturally be as low as the polarization expected from a thermal model. This is a highly significant result in that it supersedes those based upon less thorough calculations of the electron beam dynamics and requires that a reevaluation of hopes of using polarization measurements to discriminate between categories of flare models.

  10. The isotopic composition of solar flare accelerated neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The individual isotopes of neon in energetic solar-flare particles have been clearly resolved with a rms mass resolution of 0.20 amu. The ratios found are Ne-20/Ne-22 = 7.6 (+2.0, -1.8) and Ne-21/Ne-22 of no more than about 0.11 in the 11-26 MeV per nucleon interval. This isotopic composition is essentially the same as that of meteoritic planetary neon-A and is significantly different from that of the solar wind.

  11. A Novel Forecasting System for Solar Particle Events and Flares (FORSPEF)

    E-print Network

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    A Novel Forecasting System for Solar Particle Events and Flares (FORSPEF) A Papaioannou1. In this work, we present FORSPEF (Forecasting Solar Particle Events and Flares), a novel dual system, designed, European Research and Technology Center, The Netherlands E-mail: atpapaio@astro.noa.gr Abstract. Solar

  12. HARD X-RAY EMISSIONS FROM PARTIALLY OCCULTED SOLAR FLARES Sam Krucker1

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    HARD X-RAY EMISSIONS FROM PARTIALLY OCCULTED SOLAR FLARES Sa¨m Krucker1 and R. P. Lin1,2 krucker occulted by the solar limb provide diagnostics of coronal hard X-ray (HXR) emissions in the absence of 55 partially occulted flares observed by the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager

  13. Solar flare protection for manned lunar missions - Analysis of the October 1989 proton flare event

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsen, L.C.; Nealy, J.E.; Townsend, L.W.; Sauer, H.H. NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, CL )

    1991-07-01

    Several large solar proton events occurred in the latter half of 1989. For a moderately shielded spacecraft in free space, the potential exposure would have been greatest for the flare which occurred between October 19 to 27, 1989. The temporal variations of the proton energy spectra at approximately 1 AU were monitored by the GOES-7 satellite. These data, recorded and processed at the NOAA-Boulder Space Environment Laboratory, provide the opportunity to analyze dose rates and cumulative doses which might be incurred by astronauts in transit to, or on, the moon. Of particular importance in such an event is the time development of exposure in the early phases of the flare, for which dose rates may range over many orders of magnitude in the first few hours. The cumulative dose as a function of time for the entire event is also predicted. In addition to basic shield calculations, dose rate contours are constructed for flare shelters in free-space and on the lunar surface. 14 refs.

  14. Solar flares as avalanches in driven dissipative systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, E.T.; Hamilton, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    We further develop the idea that the energy release process in solar flares can be understood as avalanches of many small reconnection events. We consider a generalized model of a vector field with local instabilities that cause rapid diffusion of the field. The distributions of energy release events in this system are in general given by power laws. We make a detailed comparison of the distributions of relaxation events in this system with the distribution of solar flares observed by the ISEE-3/ICE satellite. We find excellent quantitative agreement with the energy, peak luminosity, and duration distributions over four orders of magnitude in flare energy. The elementary reconnection events are found to have energy [approximately]10[sup 25] ergs, duration [approximately]0.3s, and typical length scale [approximately]400 km. This approach represents a new method of understanding the dynamics of a highly complex magnetized plasma. We will present a video showing how the energy release process proceeds in such a geometry.

  15. Turbulent and directed plasma motions in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fludra, A.; Bentley, R. D.; Lemen, J. R.; Jakimiec, J.; Sylwester, J.

    1989-01-01

    An improved method for fitting asymmetric soft X-ray line profiles from solar flares is presented. A two-component model is used where one component represents the total emission from directed upflow plasma and the other the emission from the plasma at rest. Unlike previous methods, the width of the moving component is independent from that of the stationary component. Time variations of flare plasma characteristics (i.e., temperature, emission measure of moving and stationary plasma, upflow and turbulent velocities) are derived from the Ca XIX and Fe XXV spectra recorded by the Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission. The fitting technique provides a statistical estimation for the uncertainties in the fitting parameters. The relationship between the directed and turbulent motions has been studied, and a correlation of the random and directed motions has been found in some flares with intensive plasma upflows. Mean temperatures of the upflowing and stationary plasmas are compared for the first time from ratios of calcium to iron X-ray line intensities. Finally, evidence for turbulent motions and the possibility of plasma upflow late into the decay phase is presented and discussed.

  16. Energetic particles in solar flares. Chapter 4 in the proceedings of the 2nd Skylab Workshop on Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Colgate, S. A.; Dulk, G. A.; Hoyng, P.; Knight, J. W., III; Lin, R. P.; Melrose, D. B.; Paizis, C.; Orrall, F.; Shapiro, P. R.

    1978-01-01

    The recent direct observational evidence for the acceleration of particles in solar flares, i.e. radio emission, bremsstrahlung X-ray emission, gamma-ray line and continuum emission, as well as direct observations of energetic electrons and ions, are discussed and intercorrelated. At least two distinct phases of acceleration of solar particles exist that can be distinguished in terms of temporal behavior, type and energy of particles accelerated and the acceleration mechanism. Bulk energization seems the likely acceleration mechanism for the first phase while Fermi mechanism is a viable candidate for the second one.

  17. STUDIES OF SOLAR WHITE-LIGHT FLARES AND SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC STRUCTURES OBSERVED IN THE NEAR INFRARED

    E-print Network

    of near infrared (NIR) solar physics: (1) the first detection and understanding of white-light flares for comparison. For flare study, the very first near-infrared observations of two white-light flares;STUDIES OF SOLAR WHITE-LIGHT FLARES AND SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC STRUCTURES OBSERVED IN THE NEAR INFRARED

  18. Max 1991: Flare Research at the Next Solar Maximum. Workshop 1: Scientific Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the Max 1991 program is to gather coordinated sets of solar flare and active region data and to perform interpretive and theoretical research aimed at understanding flare energy storage and release, particle acceleration, flare energy transport, and the propagation of flare effects to Earth. The workshop was divided into four areas of concern: energy storage, energy release, particle acceleration, and energy transport.

  19. GENERIC MODEL FOR MAGNETIC EXPLOSIONS APPLIED TO SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Melrose, D. B.

    2012-04-10

    An accepted model for magnetospheric substorms is proposed as the basis for a generic model for magnetic explosions and is applied to solar flares. The model involves widely separated energy-release and particle-acceleration regions, with energy transported Alfvenically between them. On a global scale, these regions are coupled by a large-scale current that is set up during the explosion by redirection of pre-existing current associated with the stored magnetic energy. The explosion-related current is driven by an electromotive force (EMF) due to the changing magnetic flux enclosed by this current. The current path and the EMF are identified for an idealized quadrupolar model for a flare.

  20. A mechanism for deep chromospheric heating during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.; Emslie, A. G.; Mauas, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the negative hydrogen ion, H(-), in the energy balance of the deep solar chromosphere is reexamined and it is found, in contrast with earlier authors, that H(-) is a source of heating at these levels. The response of this region to an ionizing flux of flare-associated UV radiation (1500 to 1900 A) is then addressed: it is found that the excess ionization of Si to Si(+) increases the local electron number density considerably, since most species are largely neutral at deep chromospheric levels. This in turn increases the electron-hydrogen atom association rate, the H(-) abundance, and the rate of absorption of photospheric radiation by this ion. It is found that the excess absorption by this process may lead to a substantial temperature enhancement at temperature minimum levels during flares.

  1. Singly charged energetic helium emitted in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovestadt, D.; Hoefner, H.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    First direct charge state measurements of 0.41-1.05 MeV per nucleon helium accelerated at the sun reveal surprisingly large abundances of singly ionized helium, with typical He(+)/He(++) ratios between 0.04 and 0.21. This unexpected overabundance of He(+) was observed in each of the three large solar-flare particle events which occurred between 1978 August and 1979 October. The data were obtained with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland Experiment on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft. The observations suggest either strong coronal temperature inhomogeneities including cool regions of approximately 100,000 K or injection of 'cold' chromospheric/photospheric material into the flare acceleration region.

  2. SUB-THz RADIATION MECHANISMS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2010-02-01

    Observations in the sub-THz range of large solar flares have revealed a mysterious spectral component increasing with frequency and hence distinct from the microwave component commonly accepted to be produced by gyrosynchrotron (GS) emission from accelerated electrons. Evidently, having a distinct sub-THz component requires either a distinct emission mechanism (compared to the GS one), or different properties of electrons and location, or both. We find, however, that the list of possible emission mechanisms is incomplete. This Letter proposes a more complete list of emission mechanisms, capable of producing a sub-THz component, both well known and new in this context, and calculates a representative set of their spectra produced by (1) free-free emission, (2) GS emission, (3) synchrotron emission from relativistic positrons/electrons, (4) diffusive radiation, and (5) Cherenkov emission. We discuss the possible role of the mechanisms in forming the sub-THz emission and emphasize their diagnostics potential for flares.

  3. A Novel Forecasting System for Solar Particle Events and Flares (FORSPEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Sandberg, I.; Georgoulis, M. K.; Tsiropoula, G.; Tziotziou, K.; Jiggens, P.; Hilgers, A.

    2015-08-01

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) result from intense solar eruptive events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and pose a significant threat for both personnel and infrastructure in space conditions. In this work, we present FORSPEF (Forecasting Solar Particle Events and Flares), a novel dual system, designed to perform forecasting of SEPs based on forecasting of solar flares, as well as independent SEP nowcasting. An overview of flare and SEP forecasting methods of choice is presented. Concerning SEP events, we make use for the first time of the newly re-calibrated GOES proton data within the energy range 6.0-243 MeV and we build our statistics on an extensive time interval that includes roughly 3 solar cycles (1984-2013). A new comprehensive catalogue of SEP events based on these data has been compiled including solar associations in terms of flare (magnitude, location) and CME (width, velocity) characteristics.

  4. The Soft X-Ray/Microwave Ratio of Solar and Stellar Flares and Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, A. O.; Guedel, M.

    1994-01-01

    We have carried out plasma diagnostics of solar flares using soft X-ray (SXR) and simultaneous microwave observations and have compared the ratio of X-ray to microwave luminosities of solar flares with various active late-type stars available in the published literature. Both the SXR low-level ('quiescent') emission from stellar coronae and the flaring emission from the Sun and stars are generally interpreted as thermal radiations of coronal plasmas. On the other hand, the microwave emission of stars and solar flares is generally attributed to an extremely hot or nonthermal population of electrons. Solar flare SXR are conventionally measured in a narrower and harder passband than the stellar sources. Observations of the GOES-2 satellite in two energy channels have been used to estimate the luminosity of solar flares as it would appear in the ROSAT satellite passband. The solar and stellar flare luminosities fit well at the lower end of the active stellar coronae. The flare SXR/microwave ratio is similar to the ratio for stellar coronae. The average ratio follows a power-law relation L(sub X) varies as L(sub R)(sup 0.73 +/- 0.03) over 10 orders of magnitude from solar microflares to RS CVn and FK Com-type coronae. Dwarf Me and Ke stars, and RS CVn stars are also compatible with a linear SXR/microwave relation, but the ratio is slightly different for each type of star. Considering the differences between solar flares, stellar flares and the various active stellar coronae, the similarity of the SXR/microwave ratios is surprising. It suggests that the energetic electrons in low-level stellar coronae observed in microwaves are related in a similar way to the coronal thermal plasma as flare electrons to the flare thermal plasma, and, consequently, that the heating mechanism of active stellar coronae is a flare-like process.

  5. On the Generation of Hydrodynamic Shocks by Mixed Beams and Occurrence of Sunquakes in Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Zharkov, Sergei

    2015-11-01

    Observations of solar flares with sunquakes by space- and ground-based instruments reveal essentially different dynamics of seismic events in different flares. Some sunquakes are found to be closely associated with the locations of hard X-ray (HXR) and white-light (WL) emission, while others are located outside either of them. In this article we investigate possible sources causing a seismic response in a form of hydrodynamic shocks produced by the injection of mixed (electron plus proton) beams, discuss the velocities of these shocks, and the depths where they deposit the bulk of their energy and momentum. The simulation of hydrodynamic shocks in flaring atmospheres induced by electron-rich and proton-rich beams reveals that the linear depth of the shock termination is shifted beneath the level of the quiet solar photosphere on a distance from 200 to 5000 km. The parameters of these atmospheric hydrodynamic shocks are used as initial condition for another hydrodynamic model developed for acoustic-wave propagation in the solar interior (Zharkov, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 431, 3414, 2013). The model reveals that the depth of energy and momentum deposition by the atmospheric shocks strongly affects the propagation velocity of the acoustic-wave packet in the interior. The locations of the first bounces from the photosphere of acoustic waves generated in the vicinity of a flare are seen as ripples on the solar surface, or sunquakes. Mixed proton-dominated beams are found to produce a strong supersonic shock at depths 200 - 300 km under the level of the quiet-Sun photosphere and in this way produce well-observable acoustic waves, while electron-dominated beams create a slightly supersonic shock propagating down to 5000 km under the photosphere. This shock can only generate acoustic waves at the top layers beneath the photosphere since the shock velocity very quickly drops below the local sound speed. The distance ? of the first bounce of the generated acoustic waves is discussed in relation to the minimal phase velocities of wave packets defined by the acoustic cutoff frequency and the parameters of atmospheric shock termination beneath the photosphere.

  6. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE MICROWAVE EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Shibasaki, K.

    2012-09-10

    Analysis of the microwave data, obtained in the 17 GHz channel of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph during the M1.6 flare on 2010 November 4, revealed the presence of 12.6 minute oscillations of the emitting plasma density. The oscillations decayed with the characteristic time of about 15 minutes. Similar oscillations with the period of about 13.8 minutes and the decay time of 25 minutes are also detected in the variation of EUV emission intensity measured in the 335 A channel of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed properties of the oscillations are consistent with the oscillations of hot loops observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) in the EUV spectra in the form of periodic Doppler shift. Our analysis presents the first direct observations of the slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the microwave emission of a solar flare, complementing accepted interpretations of SUMER hot loop oscillations as standing slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  7. On the Importance of the Flare's Late Phase for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Hock, Rachel; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Warren, Harry

    2011-01-01

    The new solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed a new class of solar flares that are referred to as late phase flares. These flares are characterized by the hot 2-5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) showing large secondary peaks that appear many minutes to hours after an eruptive flare event. In contrast, the cool 0.7-1.5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe IX 17.1 nm) usually dim immediately after the flare onset and do not recover until after the delayed second peak of the hot coronal emissions. We refer to this period of 1-5 hours after the fl amrea sin phase as the late phase, and this late phase is uniquely different than long duration flares associated with 2-ribbon flares or large filament eruptions. Our analysis of the late phase flare events indicates that the late phase involves hot coronal loops near the flaring region, not directly related to the original flaring loop system but rather with the higher post-eruption fields. Another finding is that space weather applications concerning Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere need to consider these late phase flares because they can enhance the total EUV irradiance flare variation by a factor of 2 when the late phase contribution is included.

  8. Subionospheric VLF Propagation Modelling During a solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akel, A. F.

    2013-05-01

    This work aims to present a preliminary study of the behavior of the lower ionosphere under transient regimes of ionization through the technique of wave propagation of VLF (Very Low Frequency). For this, we characterized the lower ionosphere by two traditional (wait) parameters H' and ? which are found by VLF radio modelling using the computational code of subionospheric radio propagation LWPC(Long Wave Propagation Capability). The main effects and behaviors investigated in this study was due to a solar flare 2M class near solar minimum at 03/25/2008. We changed Solar zenith angle dependence of the ionospheric parameters H' and ? for diurnal time by a polynomial equation. For this study we used the available data the South America VLF Network (SAVNET) and show the results between modeling and data

  9. The isotopic composition of solar flare accelerated magnesium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Spalding, J. D.; Stone, E. C.; Vogt, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the abundances of three isotopes of magnesium in solar energetic particles are reported. Data were obtained from the Heavy Isotope Spectrometer Telescope on board the ISEE 3 spacecraft during a large solar particle event following the 2B solar flare of September 23, 1978. A two-dimensional maximum likelihood analysis of the mass determinations for each event, which were taken with a resolution of 0.23 amu, indicates a Mg-25/Mg-24 ratio of 0.14 (+0.05, -0.02) and a Mg-26/Mg-24 ratio of 0.15 (+0.04, -0.03) in the energy interval 12-36 MeV/n. The results are consistent with terrestrial magnesium isotope abundances.

  10. An upper limit on the hardness of the nonthermal electron spectra produced during the flash phase of solar flares.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1971-01-01

    The observations of impulsive solar-flare X-rays above 10 keV made with OGO-5 satellite have been analyzed in order to study the variation of the nonthermal electron spectrum from one flare to another. The X-ray spectrum at the maxima of 129 impulsive X-ray bursts is represented by KE to the minus-gamma power photons per sq cm per sec per keV, and the frequency of occurrence of bursts with different values of gamma is studied. It is found that for gamma less than 4.0 the frequency of bursts rapidly decreases with the decrease in the value of gamma. The probability of occurrence of a burst with gamma less than 2.3 is extremely small.

  11. Coronal mass ejection and solar flare initiation processes without appreciable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovsky, I.

    TRACE and SOHO/EIT movies clearly show the cases of the coronal mass ejection and solar flare initiations without noticeable large-scale topology modifications in observed features. Instead of this, the appearance of new intermediate scales is often omnipresent in the erupting region structures when the overall configuration is preserved. Examples of this kind are presented and discussed in the light of the existing magnetic field reconnection paradigms. It is demonstrated that spurious large-scale reconnections and detachments are often produced due to the projection effects in poorly resolved images of twisted loops and sheared arcades especially when deformed parts of them are underexposed and not seen in the images only because of this reason. Other parts, which are normally exposed or overexposed, can make the illusion of "islands" or detached elements in these situations though in reality they preserve the initial magnetic connectivity. Spurious "islands" of this kind could be wrongly interpreted as signatures of topological transitions in the large-scale magnetic fields in many instances described in the vast literature in the past based mainly on fuzzy YOHKOH images, which resulted in the myth about universal solar flare models and the scenario of detached magnetic island formations with new null points in the large scale magnetic field. The better visualization with higher resolution and sensitivity limits allowed to clarify this confusion and to avoid this unjustified interpretation. It is concluded that topological changes obviously can happen in the coronal magnetic fields, but these changes are not always necessary ingredients at least of all coronal mass ejections and solar flares. The scenario of the magnetic field opening is not universal for all ejections. Otherwise, expanding ejections with closed magnetic configurations can be produced by the fast E cross B drifts in strong inductive electric fields, which appear due to the emergence of the new magnetic flux. Corresponding theoretical models are presented and discussed.

  12. Measuring and Modeling Solar Flares with SDO EVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Woods, Thomas N.; Wilson, Anne; Lindholm, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) currently provides estimations of the solar Vacuum Ultra-Violet (VUV; 0.1-190 nm) irradiance from 1947 to present at 1 nm bins and 60 second temporal resolution. The accuracy of FISM is limited to 1nm because the TIMED SEE Level 3 and Level 3A measurement, for which the FISM relationships were based on, were at Inm. With the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in Feb 2010, the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) will provide more accurate, increased spectral resolution (0.1 nm) measurements from 6 nm to 106 nm every 10-seconds and almost 100% duty cycle. EVE also observes additional broadband measurements for 0.1-7 nm, some EUV bands from 16 nm to 40 nm, and Hydrogen Lyman alpha at 121.6 nm. Along with the better spectral resolution of EVE leading to similar spectral resolution improvements in FISM, other significant improvements provide by SDO/EVE measurements will be multi-thermal gradual phase decay, impulsive phase center-to-limb variation characterization, non-flare sub-daily variations, and multi-thermal proxies. SDO/EVE observations of various solar flares with different characteristics will be presented, with the discussion theme focused on how EVE observations will help improve the accuracy of the FISM in the future. The final topic will present the updated FISM website that now has easier access to the FISM results and produce real-time updates that are useful for Space Weather studies.

  13. Reconnection in substorms and solar flares: analogies and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is the crucial process in the release of magnetic energy associated with magnetospheric substorms and with solar flares. On the basis of three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations we investigate similarities and differences between the two scenarios. We address in particular mechanisms that lead to the onset of reconnection and on energy release, transport, and conversion mechanisms. Analogous processes might exist in the motion of field line footpoints on the sun and in magnetic flux addition to the magnetotail. In both cases such processes might lead to a loss of neighboring equilibrium, characterized by the formation of very thin embedded current sheet, which acts as trigger for reconnection. We find that Joule (or ohmic) dissipation plays only a minor role in the overall energy transfer associated with reconnection. The dominant transfer of released magnetic energy occurs to electromagnetic energy (Poynting) flux and to thermal energy transport as enthalpy flux. The former dominates in low-beta, specifically initially force-free current sheets expected for the solar corona, while the latter dominates in high-beta current sheets, such as the magnetotail. In both cases the outflow from the reconnection site becomes bursty, i.e. spatially and temporally localized, yet carrying most of the outflow energy. Hence an analogy might exist between bursty bulk flows (BBFs) in the magnetotail and pulses of Poynting flux in solar flares.

  14. Space radiation dose analysis for solar flare of August 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Nealy, J.E.; Simonsen, L.C.; Sauer, H.H.; Wilson, J.W.; Townsend, L.W.

    1990-12-01

    Potential dose and dose rate levels to astronauts in deep space are predicted for the solar flare event which occurred during the week of August 13, 1989. The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-7) monitored the temporal development and energy characteristics of the protons emitted during this event. From these data, differential fluence as a function of energy was obtained in order to analyze the flare using the Langley baryon transport code, BRYNTRN, which describes the interactions of incident protons in matter. Dose equivalent estimates for the skin, ocular lens, and vital organs for 0.5 to 20 g/sq cm of aluminum shielding were predicted. For relatively light shielding (less than 2 g/sq cm), the skin and ocular lens 30-day exposure limits are exceeded within several hours of flare onset. The vital organ (5 cm depth) dose equivalent is exceeded only for the thinnest shield (0.5 g/sq cm). Dose rates (rem/hr) for the skin, ocular lens, and vital organs are also computed.

  15. The spectral evolution of impulsive solar X-ray flares

    E-print Network

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2004-07-20

    The time evolution of the spectral index and the non-thermal flux in 24 impulsive solar hard X-ray flares of GOES class M was studied in RHESSI observations. The high spectral resolution allows for a clean separation of thermal and non-thermal components in the 10-30 keV range, where most of the non-thermal photons are emitted. Spectral index and flux can thus be determined with much better accuracy than before. The spectral soft-hard-soft behavior in rise-peak-decay phases is discovered not only in the general flare development, but even more pronounced in subpeaks. An empirically found power-law dependence between the spectral index and the normalization of the non-thermal flux holds during the rise and decay phases of the emission peaks. It is still present in the combined set of all flares. We find an asymmetry in this dependence between rise and decay phases of the non-thermal emission. There is no delay between flux peak and spectral index minimum. The soft-hard-soft behavior appears to be an intrinsic signature of the elementary electron acceleration process.

  16. Energetic-particle abundances in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Cane, H. V.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1990-01-01

    The abundances of elements and of He-3 in 90 solar electron events have been examined. It is found that the events fall into two distinct groups based upon their F/C ratio. Events in the F-rich group frequently have high He-3/He-4 ratios and are associated with type III and type V radio bursts in the parent flare. The F-poor events are associated with type IV bursts. These results on individual events support the conclusions of earlier work done with daily-averaged abundances.

  17. The reason for magnetospheric substorms and solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    It has been proposed that magnetospheric substorms and solar flares are a result of the same mechanism. It is suggested that this mechanism is connected with the escape, or attempted escape, of energized plasma from a region of closed magnetic field lines bounded by a magnetic bottle. In the case of the earth, it must be plasma that is able to maintain a discrete auroral arc, and it is proposed that the cross-tail current connected to the arc is filamentary in nature to provide the field-aligned current sheet above the arc.

  18. A Two-ribbon White-light Flare Associated with a Failed Solar Eruption Observed by ONSET, SDO, and IRIS

    E-print Network

    Cheng, X; Ding, M D; Liu, K; Chen, P F; Fang, C; Liu, Y D

    2015-01-01

    Two-ribbon brightenings are one of the most remarkable characteristics of an eruptive solar flare and are often used for predicting the occurrence of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Nevertheless, it was called in question recently whether all two-ribbon flares are eruptive. In this paper, we investigate a two ribbon-like white-light (WL) flare that is associated with a failed magnetic flux rope (MFR) eruption on 2015 January 13, which has no accompanying CME in the WL coronagraph. Observations by \\textit{Optical and Near-infrared Solar Eruption Tracer} and \\textit{Solar Dynamics Observatory} reveal that, with the increase of the flare emission and the acceleration of the unsuccessfully erupting MFR, two isolated kernels appear at the WL 3600 {\\AA} passband and quickly develop into two elongated ribbon-like structures. The evolution of the WL continuum enhancement is completely coincident in time with the variation of \\textit{Fermi} hard X-ray 26--50 keV flux. Increase of continuum emission is also clearly visi...

  19. MAGNETIC STRUCTURE PRODUCING X- AND M-CLASS SOLAR FLARES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, S.; Magara, T.; Choe, G. S.; Hayashi, K.; Shiota, D.

    2013-06-10

    We study the three-dimensional magnetic structure of the solar active region 11158, which produced one X-class and several M-class flares on 2011 February 13-16. We focus on the magnetic twist in four flare events, M6.6, X2.2, M1.0, and M1.1. The magnetic twist is estimated from the nonlinear force-free field extrapolated from the vector fields obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory using the magnetohydrodynamic relaxation method developed by Inoue et al. We found that strongly twisted lines ranging from half-turn to one-turn twists were built up just before the M6.6 and X2.2 flares and disappeared after that. Because most of the twists remaining after these flares were less than a half-turn twist, this result suggests that the buildup of magnetic twist over the half-turn twist is a key process in the production of large flares. On the other hand, even though these strong twists were also built up just before the M1.0 and M1.1 flares, most of them remained afterward. Careful topological analysis before the M1.0 and M1.1 flares shows that the strongly twisted lines were surrounded mostly by the weakly twisted lines formed in accordance with the clockwise motion of the positive sunspot, whose footpoints are rooted in strong magnetic flux regions. These results imply that these weakly twisted lines might suppress the activity of the strongly twisted lines in the last two M-class flares.

  20. Global energetics of solar flares. I. Magnetic energies

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju E-mail: yan.xu@njit.edu

    2014-12-10

    We present the first part of a project on the global energetics of solar flares and coronal mass ejections that includes about 400 M- and X-class flares observed with Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We calculate the potential (E{sub p} ), the nonpotential (E {sub np}) or free energies (E {sub free} = E {sub np} – E{sub p} ), and the flare-dissipated magnetic energies (E {sub diss}). We calculate these magnetic parameters using two different NLFFF codes: the COR-NLFFF code uses the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub z} from HMI to define the potential field, and the two-dimensional (2D) coordinates of automatically detected coronal loops in six coronal wavelengths from AIA to measure the helical twist of coronal loops caused by vertical currents, while the PHOT-NLFFF code extrapolates the photospheric three-dimensional (3D) vector fields. We find agreement between the two codes in the measurement of free energies and dissipated energies within a factor of ? 3. The size distributions of magnetic parameters exhibit powerlaw slopes that are approximately consistent with the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model. The magnetic parameters exhibit scaling laws for the nonpotential energy, E{sub np}?E{sub p}{sup 1.02}, for the free energy, E{sub free}?E{sub p}{sup 1.7} and E{sub free}?B{sub ?}{sup 1.0}L{sup 1.5}, for the dissipated energy, E{sub diss}?E{sub p}{sup 1.6} and E{sub diss}?E{sub free}{sup 0.9}, and the energy dissipation volume, V?E{sub diss}{sup 1.2}. The potential energies vary in the range of E{sub p} = 1 × 10{sup 31}-4 × 10{sup 33} erg, while the free energy has a ratio of E {sub free}/E{sub p} ? 1%-25%. The Poynting flux amounts to F {sub flare} ? 5 × 10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} during flares, which averages to F {sub AR} ? 6 × 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} during the entire observation period and is comparable with the coronal heating rate requirement in active regions.

  1. MEASUREMENTS OF THE CORONAL ACCELERATION REGION OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Krucker, Saem; Hudson, H. S.; Glesener, L.; Lin, R. P.; White, S. M.; Masuda, S.; Wuelser, J.-P.

    2010-05-10

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) are used to investigate coronal hard X-ray and microwave emissions in the partially disk-occulted solar flare of 2007 December 31. The STEREO mission provides EUV images of the flare site at different viewing angles, establishing a two-ribbon flare geometry and occultation heights of the RHESSI and NoRH observations of {approx}16 Mm and {approx}25 Mm, respectively. Despite the occultation, intense hard X-ray emission up to {approx}80 keV occurs during the impulsive phase from a coronal source that is also seen in microwaves. The hard X-ray and microwave source during the impulsive phase is located {approx}6 Mm above thermal flare loops seen later at the soft X-ray peak time, similar in location to the above-the-loop-top source in the Masuda flare. A single non-thermal electron population with a power-law distribution (with spectral index of {approx}3.7 from {approx}16 keV up to the MeV range) radiating in both bremsstrahlung and gyrosynchrotron emission can explain the observed hard X-ray and microwave spectrum, respectively. This clearly establishes the non-thermal nature of the above-the-loop-top source. The large hard X-ray intensity requires a very large number (>5 x 10{sup 35} above 16 keV for the derived upper limit of the ambient density of {approx}8 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) of suprathermal electrons to be present in this above-the-loop-top source. This is of the same order of magnitude as the number of ambient thermal electrons. We show that collisional losses of these accelerated electrons would heat all ambient electrons to superhot temperatures (tens of keV) within seconds. Hence, the standard scenario, with hard X-rays produced by a beam comprising the tail of a dominant thermal core plasma, does not work. Instead, all electrons in the above-the-loop-top source seem to be accelerated, suggesting that the above-the-loop-top source is itself the electron acceleration region.

  2. Global Energetics of Solar Flares. I. Magnetic Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju

    2014-12-01

    We present the first part of a project on the global energetics of solar flares and coronal mass ejections that includes about 400 M- and X-class flares observed with Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). We calculate the potential (Ep ), the nonpotential (E np) or free energies (E free = E np - Ep ), and the flare-dissipated magnetic energies (E diss). We calculate these magnetic parameters using two different NLFFF codes: the COR-NLFFF code uses the line-of-sight magnetic field component Bz from HMI to define the potential field, and the two-dimensional (2D) coordinates of automatically detected coronal loops in six coronal wavelengths from AIA to measure the helical twist of coronal loops caused by vertical currents, while the PHOT-NLFFF code extrapolates the photospheric three-dimensional (3D) vector fields. We find agreement between the two codes in the measurement of free energies and dissipated energies within a factor of <~ 3. The size distributions of magnetic parameters exhibit powerlaw slopes that are approximately consistent with the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model. The magnetic parameters exhibit scaling laws for the nonpotential energy, Enp \\propto E_p1.02, for the free energy, Efree \\propto E_p1.7 and Efree \\propto B\\varphi 1.0 L1.5, for the dissipated energy, Ediss \\propto E_p1.6 and Ediss \\propto Efree0.9, and the energy dissipation volume, V \\propto Ediss1.2. The potential energies vary in the range of Ep = 1 × 1031-4 × 1033 erg, while the free energy has a ratio of E free/Ep ? 1%-25%. The Poynting flux amounts to F flare ? 5 × 108-1010 erg cm-2 s-1 during flares, which averages to F AR ? 6 × 106 erg cm-2 s-1 during the entire observation period and is comparable with the coronal heating rate requirement in active regions.

  3. Extreme Ultra-Violet Spectroscopy of the Lower Solar Atmosphere During Solar Flares (Invited Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, Ryan O.

    2015-08-01

    The extreme ultra-violet (EUV) portion of the solar spectrum contains a wealth of diagnostic tools for probing the lower solar atmosphere in response to an injection of energy, particularly during the impulsive phase of solar flares. These include temperature- and density-sensitive line ratios, Doppler-shifted emission lines, nonthermal broadening, abundance measurements, differential emission measure profiles, continuum temperatures and energetics, among others. In this article I review some of the recent advances that have been made using these techniques to infer physical properties of heated plasma at footpoint and ribbon locations during the initial stages of solar flares. I primarily focus on studies that have utilised spectroscopic EUV data from Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar Dynamics Observatory/EUV Variability Experiment (SDO/EVE), and I also provide some historical background and a summary of future spectroscopic instrumentation.

  4. PPPL-3450 PPPL-3450 Solar Flare Mechanism Based on Magnetic Arcade

    E-print Network

    PPPL-3450 PPPL-3450 UC-70 Solar Flare Mechanism Based on Magnetic Arcade Reconnection and Island Physics Laboratory Publications and Reports web site in Calendar Year 2000. The home page for PPPL Reports, 00, 000­000, 2000 Solar Flare Mechanism Based on Magnetic Arcade Reconnection and Island Merging C. Z

  5. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE FLUX SPECTRA OF THE 2 NOVEMBER 1991 SOLAR FLARE

    E-print Network

    HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE FLUX SPECTRA OF THE 2 NOVEMBER 1991 SOLAR FLARE CHIK-YIN LEE1,2 and HAIMIN analysed the hard X-ray and microwave flux spectra of the solar flare (BATSE No. 1791) on 2 November 1991/LAD hard X-ray and 45-frequency OVRO microwave database. We quantitatively compare the time variations

  6. Solar Flares at 10 with a Warm Bolometer Hugh Hudson, Eduard Kontar, and Hugh Potts

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Hugh

    features identifed with faculae (if bright) or sunspots (if dark). the SNR one can see in Fig. 1 (fromSolar Flares at 10µ with a Warm Bolometer Hugh Hudson, Eduard Kontar, and Hugh Potts Abstract-30µ) is almost unknown in research on solar flares. Early work in France [Lena1970], [Koutchmy

  7. Solar Flares at 10~ with a Warm Bolometer Hugh Hudson, Eduard Kontar, and Hugh Potts

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Hugh

    of the scan show repeatable features identifed with faculae (if bright) or sunspots (if dark). the SNR one Solar Flares at 10~ with a Warm Bolometer Hugh Hudson, Eduard Kontar infrared (here taken to be 5-30~) is almost unknown in research on solar flares. Early work in France [Lena

  8. Solar flares and solar wind helium enrichments - July 1965-July 1967.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirshberg, J.; Bame, S. J.; Robbins, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    It has previously been suggested that the very high relative abundances of helium occasionally observed in the solar wind mark the plasma accelerated by major solar flares. To confirm this hypothesis, we have studied the 43 spectra with He/H greater than 15% that were observed among 10,300 spectra collected by Vela 3 between July 1965-July 1967. Six new flare-enhancement events are discussed in this paper. It is concluded that the association of helium enhancements with major flares is real, nonrandom, and very strong. With this study, there are 12 cases of reliable associations between helium enhancements and flares reported in the literature. The general characteristics of these events are discussed. It is found that the flares are typically large and bright (2B or 3B), often they produce cosmic ray protons, and they are widely distributed in solar longitude. A qualitative discussion of some of the possibilities for the source of helium enhanced plasma is presented. It is suggested that the helium enriched plasma may be the piston producing the shock causing the Type II radio emission.

  9. Observable Parameters of Solar Microwave Pulsating Structure and Their Implications for Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Baolin

    2008-12-01

    From the observations with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radiospectrometer (SBRS/Huairou) in the frequency range of 1.10 - 2.06 GHz and 2.60 - 3.80 GHz during 2004 - 2006, we select 14 flare events which were associated with numerous fast microwave subsecond pulsating structures (period: P<0.5 s). In order to describe these subsecond pulsating structures comprehensively, we defined a set of observable parameters including emission frequency ( f 0), bandwidth ( b w), polarization degree ( r), period ( P), duration ( D), modulation depth ( M), quality factor ( Q), single pulse frequency drifting rate ( R spfd), global frequency drifting rate ( R gfd), and symmetrical factor of the pulse profile ( S). Then based on a detailed analysis of the spectrograms of the fast pulsations which occurred in one of these flares (an X3.4 flare/CME event occurred on 13 Dec. 2006), we discuss the possible relations among these observable parameters and their physical implications for the dynamical processes of solar eruptive events, and applied them to interpret the nature of the pulsations in the flare/CME event. Such study of microwave periodic pulsations provides us with a useful tool to probe the details of the flare kernels, and understand the physical mechanism of solar eruptive processes.

  10. SDO's View of May 5, 2010 Solar Flare - With Timeline - Duration: 11 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a composite view of the solar flare on May 5, 2010, taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) cameras in multiple wavelengths (211, 193, 17...

  11. 01.22.12: SDO's View of M8.7 Solar Flare - Duration: 8 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar Dynamics Observatory captured the flare, shown here in teal as that is the color typically used to show light in the 131 Angstrom wavelength, a wavelength in which it is easy to view solar fl...

  12. SOHO Captures CME From X5.4 Solar Flare - Duration: 5 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) captured this movie of the sun's coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with an X5.4 solar flare on the evening of March 6, 2012. The extremely fast and en...

  13. Impulsiveness and energetics in solar flares with and without type II radio bursts - A comparison of hard X-ray characteristics for over 2500 solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Douglas H.; Nelson, Robert; Kojoian, Gabriel; Seal, James

    1989-01-01

    The hard X-ray characteristics of more than 2500 solar flares are used to study the relative size, impulsiveness, and energetics of flares with and without type II radio bursts. A quantitative definition of the hard X-ray impulsiveness is introduced, which may be applied to a large number of events unambiguously. It is found that the flares with type II bursts are generally not significantly larger, more impulsive, or more energetic than those without type II bursts. Also, no evidence is found to suggest a simple classification of the flares as either 'impulsive' or 'gradual'. Because type II bursts are present even in small flares with relatively unimpulsive energy releases, it is concluded that changes in the ambient conditions of the solar atmosphere causing an unusually low Alfven speed may be important in the generation of the shock wave that produces type II radio bursts.

  14. The Human Impact of Solar Flares and Magnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joselyn, Jo Ann

    1998-01-01

    The Sun shines, and Earth and its inhabitants benefit. But the Sun radiates more than light, and these radiations are variable over time scales of seconds to days to years. The consequences for people range from glorious celestial displays-auroras-to subtle but potentially damaging effects on the technological systems that are increasingly important for daily living. For example, electric power transmission systems and communication links have proven vulnerable to solar phenomena. And outside of Earth's protective atmosphere and magnetic shield, there is a small but genuine risk of a solar energetic particle burst that would be lethal to satellite sensors and command and control systems and astronauts. It has been known since the time of Galileo that the Sun is neither featureless nor steady. Besides ordinary sunlight, there are three classes of solar emanations that can be directly associated with effects at Earth-photon radiation from solar flares, solar energetic particles, and inhomogeneties in the solar wind that drive magnetic storms. Below, the emanations are summarized and their effects are described.

  15. ON THE MECHANICAL ENERGY AVAILABLE TO DRIVE SOLAR FLARES A. N. McClymont and G. H. Fisher

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ON THE MECHANICAL ENERGY AVAILABLE TO DRIVE SOLAR FLARES A. N. McClymont and G. H. Fisher Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 Abstract. Where does solar flare energy come from? More, generated in the solar interior, can carry sufficient free energy to power even the largest flares ever

  16. The Observed Spectral Evolution of Solar Flare Hard X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, Elizabeth; Giblin, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    The spectral evolution of flare emission may be characterized using color-color diagrams (CCDs), a technique which has been widely employed by the astrophysics community, but not yet by the solar flare community. CCDs are constructed for a sample of flares observed simultaneously by CGRO/BATSE and Yohkoh/HXT. It is found that flare spectral evolution follows one of only a few patterns, which generally evolve differently than the soft-hard-soft pattern put forth as the norm in previous work. The implications for the nature of flare energy release and acceleration/propagation models are discussed

  17. Statistics and classification of the microwave zebra patterns associated with solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Baolin; Tan, Chengming; Zhang, Yin; Mészárosová, H.; Karlický, M.

    2014-01-10

    The microwave zebra pattern (ZP) is the most interesting, intriguing, and complex spectral structure frequently observed in solar flares. A comprehensive statistical study will certainly help us to understand the formation mechanism, which is not exactly clear now. This work presents a comprehensive statistical analysis of a big sample with 202 ZP events collected from observations at the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at Huairou and the Ond?ejov Radiospectrograph in the Czech Republic at frequencies of 1.00-7.60 GHz from 2000 to 2013. After investigating the parameter properties of ZPs, such as the occurrence in flare phase, frequency range, polarization degree, duration, etc., we find that the variation of zebra stripe frequency separation with respect to frequency is the best indicator for a physical classification of ZPs. Microwave ZPs can be classified into three types: equidistant ZPs, variable-distant ZPs, and growing-distant ZPs, possibly corresponding to mechanisms of the Bernstein wave model, whistler wave model, and double plasma resonance model, respectively. This statistical classification may help us to clarify the controversies between the existing various theoretical models and understand the physical processes in the source regions.

  18. Solar flare proton spectrum averaged over the last 5000 years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. P., Jr.; Walker, R. M.; Zimmerman, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    The solar flare differential energy spectrum and integral proton flux above 10 MeV averaged over the last several thousand years are derived from thermoluminescence (TL) data. The dose-rate depth profile is obtained using a new TL equilibrium technique which is independent of the TL decay kinetics. The dose-rate depth profile produced by solar flare protons with a differential energy spectrum of the form dJ/dE = KE to the minus gamma power is calculated for arbitrary gamma. The best fit to the TL data in rock 14310 is obtained for gamma = 2.3 plus or minus 0.2 and an omnidirectional (4 pi) integral flux above 10 MeV of 40 to 80 prot/sq cm/sec. The TL half-life is determined to be 2000 yr. These results are compared to those for Na-22 (half-life of. 2.6 yr) and Al-26 (half-life of 740,000 yr) obtained by Wahlen et al. (1972) and Rancitelli et al. (1972), and it is concluded that the spectral shape and flux of protons in the interval from 25 to 100 MeV is the same within experimental errors when averaged over these three very different time periods.

  19. Multispacecraft Observations of Solar Flare Particles in the Inner Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wibberenz, G.; Cane, H. V.

    2007-01-01

    For a number of impulsive solar particle events we examine variations of maximum intensities and times to maximum intensity as a function of longitude, using observations from the two Helios spacecraft and near the Earth. We find that electrons in the MeV range can be detected more than 80 deg. from the flare longitude, corresponding to a considerably wider "well connected" region than that (approx. 20 deg. half width) reported for He-3-rich impulsive solar events. This wide range and the decrease of peak intensities with increasing connection angle revive the concept of some propagation process in the low corona that has a diffusive nature. Delays to the intensity maximum are not systematically correlated with connection angles. We argue that interplanetary scattering parallel to the average interplanetary magnetic field, that varies with position in space, plays an important role in flare particle events. In a specific case variations of the time profiles with radial distance and with particle rigidity are used to quantitatively confirm spatial diffusion. For a few cases near the edges of the well connected region the very long times to maximum intensity might result from interplanetary lateral transport.

  20. The debate on protons and electrons in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    The series of articles in Eos (September 10, 1996) on particles in solar flares caught my eye. As I am not directly working in, but certainly am interested in, the field of particle acceleration in solar flares, I expected comprehensive, easy to understand summaries of two conflicting points of view I had read about before. The introduction by Peter Cargill set the stage perfectly for such a discussion.Too bad the debate did not fulfill my expectations. It became very clear as I read the articles that [the authors of the debate] were not dealing with the subject on an equal basis. Clearly, the article by George M. Simnett about protons had been written without prior insight into the opposing view. Unfortunately, the case for the electrons by A. Gordon Emslie was basically a reply to the proton case, sometimes specifically citing parts of the article. This would have been appropriate if Simnett had had the chance to reply, but unfortunately no such reply was added to the series.

  1. Solar Energy-An Everyday Occurrence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keister, Carole; Cornell, Lu Beth

    1978-01-01

    Describes a solar energy research project sponsored by the Energy Research and Development Administration and conducted at Timonium School in Maryland. Elementary student involvement in solar energy studies resulting from the project is noted. (MDR)

  2. The 3-D description of vertical current sheets with application to solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, Juan M.; Davis, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Following a brief review of the processes which have been suggested for explaining the occurrence of solar flares we suggest a new scenario which builds on the achievements of the previous suggestion that the current sheets, which develop naturally in 3-D cases with gravity from impacting independent magnetic structures (i.e., approaching current systems), do not consist of horizontal currents but are instead predominantly vertical current systems. This suggestion is based on the fact that as the subphotospheric sources of the magnetic field displace the upper photosphere and lower chromosphere regions, where plasma beta is near unity, will experience predominantly horizontal mass motions which will lead to a distorted 3-D configurations of the magnetic field having stored free energy. In our scenario, a vertically flowing current sheet separates the plasma regions associated with either of the subphotospheric sources. This reflects the balanced tension of the two stressed fields which twist around each other. This leads naturally to a metastable or unstable situation as the twisted field emerges into a low beta region where vertical motions are not inhibited by gravity. In our flare scenario the impulsive energy release occurs, initially, not by reconnection but mainly by the rapid change of the magnetic field which has become unstable. During the impulsive phase the field lines contort in such way as to realign the electric current sheet into a minimum energy horizontal flow. This contortion produces very large electric fields which will accelerate particles. As the current evolves to a horizontal configuration the magnetic field expands vertically, which can be accompanied by eruptions of material. The instability of a horizontal current is well known and causes the magnetic field to undergo a rapid outward expansion. In our scenario, fast reconnection is not necessary to trigger the flare, however, slow reconnection would occur continuously in the current layer at the locations of potential flaring. During the initial rearrangement of the field strong plasma turbulence develops. Following the impulsive phase, the final current sheet will experience faster reconnection which we believe responsible for the gradual phase of the flare. The reconnection will dissipate part of the current and will produce sustained and extended heating in the flare region and in the postflare loops.

  3. Sunspot Rotation and the M-Class Flare in Solar Active Region NOAA 11158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Alexander; Liu, Yang

    2015-08-01

    We measure the rotation of a sunspot in solar active region NOAA 11158 (Solar Target Identifier SOL2011-02-15) that was associated with an M-class flare. The flare occurred when the rotation rate of the sunspot reached its maximum. We also calculate the energy in the corona produced by the sunspot rotation. The energy accumulated in the corona before the flare reached 5.5×10 ^{32} erg, which is sufficient to meet the energy requirements for a moderately strong solar eruption. This suggests that sunspot rotation, which is often observed in solar active regions, is an effective mechanism for building up magnetic energy in the corona.

  4. Magnetic field changes associated with three successive M-class solar flares on 2002 July 26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pu; Ding, Ming-De; Ji, Hai-Sheng; Wang, Hai-Min

    2011-06-01

    With an extensive analysis, we study the temporal evolution of magnetic flux during three successive M-class flares in two adjacent active regions: NOAA 10039 and 10044. The primary data are full disk longitudinal magnetograms observed by SOHO/MDI. All three flares are observed to be accompanied by magnetic flux changes. The changes occurred immediately or within 1 ~ 10 minutes after the starting time of the flares, indicating that the changes are obvious consequences of the solar flares. Although changes in many points are intrinsic in magnetic flux, for some sites, it is caused by a rapid expansion motion of magnetic flux. For the second flare, the associated change is more gradual compared with the ‘step-function’ reported in literature. Furthermore, we use the data observed by the Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) at Mees Solar Observatory to check possible line profile changes during the flares. The results from the IVM data confirm the flux changes obtained from the MDI data. A series of line profiles were obtained from the IVM's observations and analyzed for flux change sites. We find that the fluctuations in the width, depth and central wavelength of the lines are less than 5.0% even at the flare's core. No line profile change is observed during or after the flare. We conclude that the magnetic field changes associated with the three solar flares are not caused by flare emission.

  5. Pre-flare Activity and Magnetic Reconnection during the Evolutionary Stages of Energy Release in a Solar Eruptive Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Veronig, Astrid M.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Bong, Su-Chan; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive white-light M3.2 flare that occurred in active region NOAA 10486 on 2003 November 1. The excellent set of high-resolution observations made by RHESSI and the TRACE provides clear evidence of significant pre-flare activities for ~9 minutes in the form of an initiation phase observed at EUV/UV wavelengths followed by an X-ray precursor phase. During the initiation phase, we observed localized brightenings in the highly sheared core region close to the filament and interactions among short EUV loops overlying the filament, which led to the opening of magnetic field lines. The X-ray precursor phase is manifested in RHESSI measurements below ~30 keV and coincided with the beginning of flux emergence at the flaring location along with early signatures of the eruption. The RHESSI observations reveal that both plasma heating and electron acceleration occurred during the precursor phase. The main flare is consistent with the standard flare model. However, after the impulsive phase, an intense hard X-ray (HXR) looptop source was observed without significant footpoint emission. More intriguingly, for a brief period, the looptop source exhibited strong HXR emission with energies up to ~50-100 keV and significant non-thermal characteristics. The present study indicates a causal relation between the activities in the pre-flare and the main flare. We also conclude that pre-flare activities, occurring in the form of subtle magnetic reorganization along with localized magnetic reconnection, played a crucial role in destabilizing the active region filament, leading to a solar eruptive flare and associated large-scale phenomena.

  6. Large solar flare radiation shielding requirements for manned interplanetary missions.

    PubMed

    Townsend, L W; Nealy, J E; Wilson, J W; Atwell, W

    1989-01-01

    As the 21st century approaches, there is an ever-increasing interest in launching manned missions to Mars. A major concern to mission planners is exposure of the flight crews to highly penetrating and damaging space radiations. Beyond the protective covering of the Earth's magnetosphere, the two main sources of these radiations are galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. Preliminary analyses of potential exposures from galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) were presented elsewhere. In this Note, estimates of shielding thicknesses required to protect astronauts on interplanetary missions from the effects of large solar flare events are presented. The calculations use integral proton fluences for the February 1956, November 1960, and August 1972 solar particle events as inputs into the NASA Langley Research Center nucleon transport code BRYNTRN. This deterministic computer code transports primary protons and secondary protons and neutrons through any number of layers of target material of arbitrary thickness and composition. Contributions from target nucleus breakup (fragmentation) and recoil are also included. The results for each flare are presented as estimates of dose equivalent [in units of roentgen equivalent man (rem)] to the skin, eye, and bloodforming organs (BFO) behind various thicknesses of aluminum shielding. These results indicate that the February 1956 event was the most penetrating; however, the August 1972 event, the largest ever recorded, could have been mission- or life-threatening for thinly shielded (< or = 5 g/cm2) spacecraft. Also presented are estimates of the thicknesses of water shielding required to reduce the BFO dose equivalent to currently recommended astronaut exposure limits. These latter results suggest that organic polymers, similar to water, appear to be a much more desirable shielding material than aluminum. PMID:11537157

  7. Terahertz photometers to observe solar flares from space (SOLAR-T project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre

    The space experiment SOLAR-T designed to observe solar flares at THz frequencies was completed. We present the concept, fabrication and performance of a double THz photometers system. An innovative optical setup allows observations of the full solar disk and the detection of small burst transients at the same time. It is the first detecting system conceived to observe solar flare THz emissions on board of stratospheric balloons. The system has been integrated to data acquisition and telemetry modules for this application. SOLAR-T uses two Golay cell detectors preceded by low-pass filters made of rough surface primary mirrors and membranes, 3 and 7 THz band-pass filters, and choppers. Its photometers can detect small solar bursts (tens of solar flux units) with sub second time resolution. One artificial Sun setup was developed to simulate actual observations. Tests comprised the whole system performance, on ambient and low pressure and temperature conditions. It is intended to provide data on the still unrevealed spectral shape of the mysterious THz solar flares emissions. The experiment is planned to be on board of two long-duration stratospheric balloon flights over Antarctica and Russia in 2014-2016. The SOLAR-T development, fabrication and tests has been accomplished by engineering and research teams from Mackenzie, Unicamp and Bernard Lyot Solar Observatory; Propertech Ltda.; Neuron Ltda.; and Samsung, Brazil; Tydex LCC, Russia; CONICET, Argentina; the stratospheric balloon missions will be carried in cooperation with teams from University of California, Berkeley, USA (flight over Antarctica), and Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia (flight over Russia).

  8. Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Kundu, Mukul R.; Kane, Sharad R.

    1989-01-01

    The hard and soft x ray and microwave emissions from a solar flare (May 14, 1980) were analyzed and interpreted in terms of Joule heating and runaway electron acceleration in one or more current sheets. It is found that all three emissions can be generated with sub-Dreicer electric fields. The soft x ray emitting plasma can only be heated by a single current sheet if the resistivity in the sheet is well above the classical, collisional resistivity of 10(exp 7) K, 10(exp 11)/cu cm plasma. If the hard x ray emission is from thermal electrons, anomalous resistivity or densities exceeding 3 x 10(exp 12)/cu cm are required. If the hard x ray emission is from nonthermal electrons, the emissions can be produced with classical resistivity in the current sheets if the heating rate is approximately 4 times greater than that deduced from the soft x ray data (with a density of 10(exp 10)/cu cm in the soft x ray emitting region), if there are at least 10(exp 4) current sheets, and if the plasma properties in the sheets are characteristic of the superhot plasma observed in some flares by Lin et al., and with Hinotori. Most of the released energy goes directly into bulk heating, rather than accelerated particles.

  9. RETURN CURRENTS AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOLAR FLARING ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Codispoti, Anna; Torre, Gabriele; Piana, Michele; Pinamonti, Nicola

    2013-08-20

    According to the standard Ohmic perspective, the injection of accelerated electrons into the flaring region violates local charge equilibrium and therefore, in response, return currents are driven by an electric field to equilibrate such charge violation. In this framework, the energy loss rate associated with these local currents has an Ohmic nature and significantly shortens the accelerated electron path. In the present paper, we adopt a different viewpoint and, specifically, we study the impact of the background drift velocity on the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons in solar flares. We first utilize the Rutherford cross-section to derive the formula of the energy loss rate when the collisional target has a finite temperature and the background instantaneously and coherently moves up to equilibrate the electron injection. We then use the continuity equation for electrons and imaging spectroscopy data provided by RHESSI to validate this model. We show that this new formula for the energy loss rate provides a better fit of the experimental data with respect to the model based on the effects of standard Ohmic return currents.

  10. The Magnetic Field Distribution in Active Regions in the Quiet Time and during Large Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Podgorny, A. I; Meshalkina, N. S.

    2014-03-01

    Many controversial results about magnetic field behavior in active regions during solar flares are published. The magnetic field dynamics of active regions that produce large (X class) flares are investigated in this paper. The magnetic flux is obtained by using the results of calculations of the normal magnetic component in the active region. It is shown that the main condition for appearance of an X clas s flare is the big magnetic flux (' > 1022Mx) of active region. This condition is necessary but not a sufficient. The large flare appears above an active region, if the magnetic field distribution is very complex. A simple active region with the bipolar magnetic field distribution does not produce a flare. There are no singular magnetic lines above a bipolar region, which can be responsible for a current sheet creation before the flare. During a solar flare, when the accumulated energy is fast released, the conservation of the magnetic field distribution in the active region during the majority of flares takes place. This surprising fact follows from the analysis of the array data obtained with the SOHO and SDO space crafts. The presented results support the flare theory based on the slow magnetic energy accumulation in the coronal current sheet before a flare and its explosive realize due to current sheet instability. The scheme of the current sheet creation is discussed, which explains the magnetic field dissipation in the corona without perturbations of magnetic field distribution on the Sun surface during

  11. Improving the performance of solar flare prediction using active longitudes information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Zhang, L.; Wang, H.; Li, L.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar flare prediction models normally depend on properties of active regions, such as sunspot area, McIntosh classifications, Mount Wilson classifications, and various measures of the magnetic field. Nevertheless, the positional information of active regions has not been used. Aims: We define a metric, DARAL (distance between active regions and predicted active longitudes), to depict the positional relationship between active regions and predicted active longitudes and add DARAL to our solar flare prediction model to improve its performance. Methods: Combining DARAL with other solar magnetic field parameters, we build a solar flare prediction model with the instance-based learning method, which is a simple and effective algorithm in machine learning. We extracted 70 078 active region instances from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) magnetograms containing 1055 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) active regions within 30° of the solar disk center from 1996 to 2007 and used them to train and test the solar flare prediction model. Results: Using four performance measures (true positive rate, true negative rate, true skill statistic, and Heidke skill score), we compare performances of the solar flare prediction model with and without DARAL. True positive rate, true negative rate, true skill statistic, and Heidke skill score increase by 6.7% ± 1.3%, 4.2% ± 0.5%, 10.8% ± 1.4% and 8.7% ± 1.0%, respectively. Conclusions: The comparison indicates that the metric DARAL is beneficial to performances of the solar flare prediction model.

  12. Observations and Magnetic Field Modeling of the Solar Flare/CME Event on 2010 April 8

    E-print Network

    Su, Yingna

    solar eclipse. The outermost region of the sun, the corona, extends from about 20,000 km above the sun a total solar eclipse or with special instruments. 1.1. Solar Eruptions We refer to three different typesObservations and Magnetic Field Modeling of the Solar Flare/CME Event on 2010 April 8 Vincent

  13. U.S.-Japan Seminar on Recent Advances in the Understanding of Solar Flares, 2nd, Honolulu, HI, Apr. 7-10, 1987, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H.; Kai, K.

    Papers are presented on solar flare discovery, solar flares and magnetic topology, impulsive and hot thermal solar flares, and plasma dynamics at the very initial phases of flares. Also considered are a magnetodynamic mechanism for loop flares, the propagation and confinement of energetic electrons in solar flares, nuclear processes and accelerated particles in solar flares, and optical observations of solar flares. Other topics include delta spots and great flares, chromospheric downflow velocities as a diagnostic in solar flares, and subphotospheric current systems and flares. Papers are also presented on a long-duration balloon payload for hard X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the sun, the derivation of vector magnetic fields from Stokes profiles, and the Solar-A mission.

  14. Thermal Structure of Supra-Arcade Plasma in Two Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina; McKenzie, David E.; Weber, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we use Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA data to determine the thermal structure of supra-arcade plasma in two solar flares. The first flare is a Ml.2 flare that occurred on November 5, 2010 on the east limb. This flare was one of a series of flares from AR 11121, published in Reeves & Golub (2011). The second flare is an XI.7 flare that occurred on January 27, 2012 on the west limb. This flare exhibits visible supra-arcade downflows (SADs), where the November 2010 flare does not. For these two flares we combine XRT and AlA data to calculate DEMs of each pixel in the supra-arcade plasma, giving insight into the temperature and density structures in the fan of plasma above the post-flare arcade. We find in each case that the supra-arcade plasma is around 10 MK, and there is a marked decrease in the emission measure in the SADs. We also compare the DEMs calculated with the combined AIA/XRT dataset to those calculated using AIA alone.

  15. A Model of Solar Flares Based on Arcade Field Reconnection and Merging of Magnetic Islands

    SciTech Connect

    G.S. Choe; C.Z. Cheng

    2001-12-12

    Solar flares are intense, abrupt releases of energy in the solar corona. In the impulsive phase of a flare, the intensity of hard X-ray emission reaches a sharp peak indicating the highest reconnection rate. It is often observed that an X-ray emitting plasma ejecta (plasmoid) is launched before the impulsive phase and accelerated throughout the phase. Thus, the plasmoid ejection may not be an effect of fast magnetic reconnection as conventionally assumed, but a cause of fast reconnection. Based on resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, a solar flare model is presented, which can explain these observational characteristics of flares. In the model, merging of a newly generated magnetic island and a pre-existing island results in stretching and thinning of a current sheet, in which fast magnetic reconnection is induced. Recurrence of homologous flares naturally arises in this model. Mechanisms of magnetic island formation are also discussed.

  16. A Very Small and Super Strong Zebra Pattern Burst at the Beginning of a Solar Flare

    E-print Network

    Tan, Baolin; Zhang, Yin; Huang, Jing; Meszarosova, Hana; Karlicky, Marian; Yan, Yihua

    2014-01-01

    Microwave emission with spectral zebra pattern structures (ZPs) is observed frequently in solar flares and the Crab pulsar. The previous observations show that ZP is only a structure overlapped on the underlying broadband continuum with slight increments and decrements. This work reports an extremely unusual strong ZP burst occurring just at the beginning of a solar flare observed simultaneously by two radio telescopes located in China and Czech Republic and by the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescope on board NASA's satellite Solar Dynamics Observatory on 2013 April 11. It is a very short and super strong explosion whose intensity exceeds several times that of the underlying flaring broadband continuum emission, lasting for just 18 s. EUV images show that the flare starts from several small flare bursting points (FBPs). There is a sudden EUV flash with extra enhancement in one of these FBPs during the ZP burst. Analysis indicates that the ZP burst accompanying EUV flash is an unusual explosion revealing a str...

  17. Neutrino Solar Flare detection for a saving alert system of satellites and astronauts

    E-print Network

    Fargion, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Largest Solar Neutrino Flare may be soon detectable by Deep Core neutrino detector immediately and comunicate to satellites or astronauts. Its detection is the fastest manifestation of a later (tens minutes,hours) dangerous cosmic shower. The precursor trigger maybe saving satellites and even long flight astronauts lives. We shall suggest how. Moreover their detection may probe the inner solar flare acceleration place as well as the neutrino flavor mixing in a new different parameter windows. We show the updated expected rate and signature of neutrinos and antineutrinos in largest solar flare for present tens Megaton Deep Core telescope at tens Gev range. Speculation for additional Icecube gigaton array signals are also considered.

  18. Neutrino Solar Flare detection for a saving alert system of satellites and astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    Largest Solar Neutrino Flare may be soon detectable by Deep Core neutrino detector immediately and comunicate to satellites or astronauts. Its detection is the fastest manifestation of a later (tens minutes,hours) dangerous cosmic shower. The precursor trigger maybe saving satellites and even long flight astronauts lives. We shall suggest how. Moreover their detection may probe the inner solar flare acceleration place as well as the neutrino flavor mixing in a new different parameter windows. We show the updated expected rate and signature of neutrinos and antineutrinos in largest solar flare for present tens Megaton Deep Core telescope at tens Gev range. Speculation for additional Icecube gigaton array signals are also considered.

  19. Neutrino Solar Flare detection for a saving alert system of satellites and astronauts

    E-print Network

    Daniele Fargion

    2011-06-19

    Largest Solar Neutrino Flare may be soon detectable by Deep Core neutrino detector immediately and comunicate to satellites or astronauts. Its detection is the fastest manifestation of a later (tens minutes,hours) dangerous cosmic shower. The precursor trigger maybe saving satellites and even long flight astronauts lives. We shall suggest how. Moreover their detection may probe the inner solar flare acceleration place as well as the neutrino flavor mixing in a new different parameter windows. We show the updated expected rate and signature of neutrinos and antineutrinos in largest solar flare for present tens Megaton Deep Core telescope at tens Gev range. Speculation for additional Icecube gigaton array signals are also considered.

  20. Numerical modeling of the energy storage and release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Weng, F. S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on investigation of the photospheric magnetic field-line footpoint motion (usually referred to as shear motion) and magnetic flux emerging from below the surface in relation to energy storage in a solar flare. These causality relationships are demonstrated by using numerical magnetohydrodynamic simulations. From these results, one may conclude that the energy stored in solar flares is in the form of currents. The dynamic process through which these currents reach a critical value is discussed as well as how these currents lead to energy release, such as the explosive events of solar flares.

  1. Regularized energy-dependent solar flare hard x-ray spectral index

    E-print Network

    Eduard P. Kontar; Alexander L. MacKinnon

    2005-06-05

    The deduction from solar flare X-ray photon spectroscopic data of the energy dependent model-independent spectral index is considered as an inverse problem. Using the well developed regularization approach we analyze the energy dependency of spectral index for a high resolution energy spectrum provided by Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The regularization technique produces much smoother derivatives while avoiding additional errors typical of finite differences. It is shown that observations imply a spectral index varying significantly with energy, in a way that also varies with time as the flare progresses. The implications of these findings are discussed in the solar flare context.

  2. Optimal Electron Energies for Driving Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    E-print Network

    Reep, Jeffrey; Alexander, David

    2015-01-01

    In the standard model of solar flares, energy deposition by a beam of electrons drives strong chromospheric evaporation leading to a significantly denser corona and much brighter emission across the spectrum. Chromospheric evaporation was examined in great detail by Fisher, Canfield, & McClymont (1985a,b,c), who described a distinction between two different regimes, termed explosive and gentle evaporation. In this work, we examine the importance of electron energy and stopping depths on the two regimes and on the atmospheric response. We find that with explosive evaporation, the atmospheric response does not depend strongly on electron energy. In the case of gentle evaporation, lower energy electrons are significantly more efficient at heating the atmosphere and driving up-flows sooner than higher energy electrons. We also find that the threshold between explosive and gentle evaporation is not fixed at a given beam energy flux, but also depends strongly on the electron energy and duration of heating. Furt...

  3. Time extended production of neutrons during a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Dubrunner, H.; Flueckiger, E. O.; Cooper, J. F.; Kanbach, G.; Reppin, C.; Share, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    The most energetic neutral emissions expected from solar flares are gamma rays (10 MeV) from relativistic primary and secondary electron bremsstrahlung,from approx 0 meson decay, and from neutrons ( 50 MeV). Bremsstrahlung photon energies extend to that of the highest energy electron present, but the shape of the pi sup 0 gamma ray spectrum, peaking at 69 MeV, does not depend strongly on the proton spectrum above threshold, which is approx. 292 MeV for meson production on protons. The highest energy neutrons observed indicate directly the highest energy ions which interact at the Sun, and the presence or absence of anergy cutoff in the acceleration process. The high-energy proton spectrum shape can be determined from the neutron spectrum.

  4. Evidence for delayed second phase acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willett, J. B.; Ling, J. C.; Mahoney, W. A.; Riegler, G. R.; Jacobson, A. S.

    1982-01-01

    Data gathered on solar gamma-ray events by the gamma-ray spectrometer on board the HEAO-3 satellite are discussed. Measurements were made of both hard X-ray and gamma-ray events. A total of 37 flare-like incidences were detected from October 1979 to July 1980. Power law spectra were fitted to the flux energies exceeding 420 keV. The appearance of two events with a 30 sec interval between radiation peaks, a slow rise and quick decay of the high energy component, and the softening of the low energy component are taken for evidence of two acceleration processes, one boosting electrons to hundreds of keV for the X ray bursts, the other producing gamma rays through ions accelerated to tens of MeV.

  5. Solar Physics with Radio Observations, Proceedings of Nobeyama Symposium 1998, NRO Report Millimeter Interferometer Observations of Flares

    E-print Network

    White, Stephen

    in the energy range below 500 keV which can dominate microwave emission. This fact results from the combination observations of flares is the acceleration of electrons to high energies in solar flares. It is well established that in the impulsive phase of solar flares, energy is converted from a form stored as magnetic

  6. DETERMINATION OF STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION MODEL CHARACTERISTICS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qingrong; Petrosian, Vahé

    2013-11-01

    Following our recent paper, we have developed an inversion method to determine the basic characteristics of the particle acceleration mechanism directly and non-parametrically from observations under the leaky box framework. Earlier, we demonstrated this method for obtaining the energy dependences of the escape time and pitch angle scattering time. Here, by converting the Fokker-Planck equation to its integral form, we derive the energy dependences of the energy diffusion coefficient and direct acceleration rate for stochastic acceleration in terms of the accelerated and escaping particle spectra. Combining the regularized inversion method of Piana et al. and our procedure, we relate the acceleration characteristics in solar flares directly to the count visibility data from RHESSI. We determine the timescales for electron escape, pitch angle scattering, energy diffusion, and direct acceleration at the loop top acceleration region for two intense solar flares based on the regularized electron flux spectral images. The X3.9 class event shows dramatically different energy dependences for the acceleration and scattering timescales, while the M2.1 class event shows a milder difference. The discrepancy between the M2.1 class event and the stochastic acceleration model could be alleviated by a turbulence spectrum that is much steeper than the Kolmogorov-type spectrum. A likely explanation of the X3.9 class event could be that the escape of electrons from the acceleration region is not governed by a random walk process, but instead is affected by magnetic mirroring, in which the scattering time is proportional to the escape time and has an energy dependence similar to the energy diffusion time.

  7. Particle densities within the acceleration region of a solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The limb flare SOL2012-07-19T05:58 (M7.7) provides the best example of a non-thermal above-the-loop-top hard X-ray source with simultaneous observations by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. By combining the two sets of observations, we present the first direct measurement of the thermal proton density and non-thermal electron density within the above-the-loop-top source where particle acceleration occurs. We find that both densities are of the same order of magnitude of a few times 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}, about 30 times lower than the density in the underlying thermal flare loops. The equal densities indicate that the entire electron population within the above-the-loop-top source is energized. While the derived densities depend on the unknown source depth and filling factor, the ratio of these two densities does not. Within the uncertainties, the ratio is one for a low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electron spectrum between 10 and 15 keV. RHESSI observations only constrain the cutoff energy to below ?15 keV, leaving the spectral shape of the electrons within the above-the-loop-top source at lower energies unknown. Nevertheless, these robust results strongly corroborate earlier findings that the above-the-loop-top source is the acceleration region where a bulk energization process acts on all electrons.

  8. Multi-wavelength analysis of high energy electrons in solar flares: a case study of August 20, 2002 flare

    E-print Network

    J. Kasparova; M. Karlicky; E. P. Kontar; R. A. Schwartz; B. R. Dennis

    2005-08-30

    A multi-wavelength spatial and temporal analysis of solar high energy electrons is conducted using the August 20, 2002 flare of an unusually flat (gamma=1.8) hard X-ray spectrum. The flare is studied using RHESSI, Halpha, radio, TRACE, and MDI observations with advanced methods and techniques never previously applied in the solar flare context. A new method to account for X-ray Compton backscattering in the photosphere (photospheric albedo) has been used to deduce the primary X-ray flare spectra. The mean electron flux distribution has been analysed using both forward fitting and model independent inversion methods of spectral analysis. We show that the contribution of the photospheric albedo to the photon spectrum modifies the calculated mean electron flux distribution, mainly at energies below 100 keV. The positions of the Halpha emission and hard X-ray sources with respect to the current-free extrapolation of the MDI photospheric magnetic field and the characteristics of the radio emission provide evidence of the closed geometry of the magnetic field structure and the flare process in low altitude magnetic loops. In agreement with the predictions of some solar flare models, the hard X-ray sources are located on the external edges of the Halpha emission and show chromospheric plasma heated by the non-thermal electrons. The fast changes of Halpha intensities are located not only inside the hard X-ray sources, as expected if they are the signatures of the chromospheric response to the electron bombardment, but also away from them.

  9. Proton versus electron heating in solar flares M. Gordovskyy a,*, V.V. Zharkova a

    E-print Network

    Zharkova, Valentina V.

    heating of the atmosphere and its resulting microwave (MW), hard and soft X-ray (HXR and SXR) emissionProton versus electron heating in solar flares M. Gordovskyy a,*, V.V. Zharkova a , Yu.M. Voitenko heating of a flaring atmosphere is compared in a kinetic approach for the particles ejected from a non

  10. Longrange magnetic couplings between solar flares and coronal mass ejections observed by SDO

    E-print Network

    Schrijver, Karel

    of substantial coronal activity, including those where flares and eruptions initiate, are connected by a system, doi:10.1029/2010JA016224. 1. Introduction [2] The notion of "sympathetic" events in the solar et al. [2002] find strong evi- dence favoring sympathetic flaring (even when no direct evidence

  11. Reply. [to comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    In replying to a comment by Hudson et. al. (1995) in regards to Gosling (1993), Gosling (1995) holds that solar flares do not play a major role in geomagnetic storms. According to Gosling, Hudson et. al. has done nothing to demonstrate that flares either produce coronal mass ejections (CMEs) or cause major disturbances in the near-Earth space environment.

  12. GNSS measurement of EUV photons flux rate during strong and mid solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HernáNdez-Pajares, M.; GarcíA-Rigo, A.; Juan, J. M.; Sanz, J.; Monte, E.; Aragón-ÀNgel, A.

    2012-12-01

    A new GNSS Solar Flare Activity Indicator (GSFLAI) is presented, given by the gradient of the ionospheric Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) rate, in terms of the solar-zenithal angle, measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. It is highly correlated with the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) photons flux rate at the 26-34 nm spectral band, which is geo-effective in the ionization of the mono-atomic oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere. The results are supported by the comparison of GSFLAI with direct EUV observations provided by SEM instrument of SOHO spacecraft, for all the X-class solar flares occurring between 2001 and 2011 (more than 1000 direct comparisons at the 15 s SEM EUV sampling rate). The GSFLAI sensitivity enables detection of not only extreme X-class flares, but also of variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for M-class flares). Moreover, an optimal detection algorithm (SISTED), sharing the same physical fundamentals as GSFLAI, is also presented, providing 100% successful detection for all the X-class solar flares during 2000-2006 with registered location outside of the solar limb (i.e., detection of 94% of all of X-class solar-flares) and about 65% for M-class ones. As a final conclusion, GSFLAI is proposed as a new potential proxy of solar EUV photons flux rate for strong and mid solar flares, presenting high sensitivity with high temporal resolution (1 Hz, greater than previous solar EUV irradiance instruments), using existing ground GNSS facilities, and with the potential use as a solar flare detection parameter.

  13. Solar-wind and solar-flare maturation of the lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibring, J. P.; Borg, J.; Vassent, B.; Burlingame, A. L.; Langevin, Y.; Maurette, M.

    1975-01-01

    Detailed predictions concerning the depth and time-dependent accumulation of solar-wind effects and solar-flare tracks in lunar dust grains were obtained by use of an adaptation of a Monte Carlo soil-mixing computer code described by Duraud et al. (1975). The predictions are compared to experimental measurements obtained by analyzing lunar dust grains as well as artificially irradiated minerals by a variety of techniques. A study of amorphous coatings of solar-wind radiation-damaged material on certain lunar grains sets limits on the integrated residence time of these grains in the ancient solar wind. Other topics discussed include solar wind maturation, the peculiar shape of the experimental distribution of central track densities in 50-micron grains, and the interpretation of both track gradients in 50-micron feldspars and the relatively 'low' concentration of solar-wind species implanted in ilmenite grains.

  14. OSO-8 observations of the impulsive phase of solar flares in the transition-zone and corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lites, B. W.; Bruner, E. C., Jr.; Wolfson, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    Several solar flares were observed from their onset in C IV 1548.2 A and 1-8 A X-rays using instruments on OSO-8. It is found that impulsive brightening in C IV is often accompanied by redshifts, interpreted as downflows, of the order of 80 km/s. The maximum soft X-ray intensity usually arrives several minutes after the maximum C IV intensity. The most energetic C IV event observed shows a small blueshift just before reaching maximum intensity; estimates of the mass flux associated with this upflow through the transition zone are consistent with the increase of mass in the coronal loops as observed in soft X-rays. Finally, it is suggested that the frequent occurrence of violent dynamical processes at the onset of the flare is associated with the initial energy release mechanism.

  15. Observations of interplanetary energetic charged particles from gamma-ray line solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Hovestadt, D.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of interplanetary energetic ions from the 7 June, 21 June and 1 July 1980 gamma ray line solar flares are presented. The observations are from the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland Ultra Low Energy Wide Angle Telescope aboard the ISEE-3 spacecraft. Both June flares produced relatively low intensity proton events at earth with peak intensities at 10-20 MeV approximately 5 x .01 protons square cm sec sr MeV)-1. Neither flare showed evidence of being enriched in either 3He or Fe at approximately 1 MeV/nucleon. The 1 July flare produced no observable ion or electron enhancements.

  16. Upper limits on the solar-neutron flux at the Yangbajing neutron monitor from BATSE-detected solar flares

    E-print Network

    H. Tsuchiya; H. Miyasaka; E. Takahashi; S. Shimoda; Y. Yamada; I. Kondo; K. Makishima; F. Zhu; Y. Tan; H. Hu; Y. Tang; J. Zhang; H. Lu; X. Meng

    2007-03-16

    The purpose of this work is to search the Yangbajing neutron monitor data obtained between 1998 October and 2000 June for solar neutrons associated with solar flares. Using the onset times of 166 BATSE-detected flares with the GOES peak flux (1 -- 8 \\AA) higher than $1.0 \\times 10^{-5}$ $\\mathrm{Wm^{-2}}$, we prepare for each flare a light curve of the Yangbajing neutron monitor, spanning $\\pm$ 1.5 hours from the BATSE onset time. Based on the light curves, a systematic search for solar neutrons in energies above 100 MeV from the 166 flares was performed. No statistically significant signals due to solar neutrons were found in the present work. Therefore, we put upper limits on the $>$ 100 MeV solar-neutron flux for 18 events consisting of 2 X and 16 M class flares. The calculation assumed a power-law shaped neutron energy spectrum and three types of neutron emission profiles at the Sun. Compared with the other positive neutron detections associated with X-class flares, typical 95% confidence level upper limits for the two X-class flares are found to be comparable to the lowest and second lowest neutron fluxes at the top of the atmosphere.In addition, the upper limits for M-class flares scatter in the range of $10^{-2}$ to 1 neutrons $\\mathrm{cm^{-2}s^{-1}}$. This provides the first upper limits on the solar-neutron flux from M-class solar flares, using space observatories as well as ground-based neutron monitors.

  17. The H-alpha/H-beta ratio in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Liggett, M.; Patterson, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation involves the study of an extensive body of data accumulated of simultaneous H-alpha and H-beta cinematography of flares. The data were obtained with two telescopes simultaneously photographing flares in H-alpha and H-beta. The results of measurements in a number of flares are presented in a table. The flares were selected purely by optical quality of the data. That the measured ratios are not too different from those in stellar flares is suggested by the last two columns of the table. These columns show that a variety of possible line width ratios could give an integrated intensity ratio of less than unity.

  18. A mechanism for the abundance enhancements of heavy nuclei in solar flare particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, B. G.; Mogro-Campero, A.

    1973-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed to account for the recently reported abundance enhancements of heavy nuclei in solar flares. The mechanism requires two acceleration stages for its operation: First, fully stripped ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies, and subsequently, a fraction of these ions are Fermi accelerated to higher energies. It is shown that because injection into Fermi acceleration is rigidity dependent and the ions may pick up electrons during transport to the Fermi acceleration region, an enhancement of the abundances of heavy nuclei can occur. The degree of the enhancement depends on a number of factors particular to each flare, so that the degree of enhancement may be variable from flare to flare, or may be a function of time within a given flare. In some flares, conditions may be such that no enhancement would be expected.

  19. SDO Captures Release of X1.2 Class Solar Flare - Duration: 15 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows imagery from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory as the sun emitted an X-class flare on Jan. 7, 2014. The movie shows light in the 1600 Angstrom wavelength showing both sunspots visi...

  20. Multiple Views of X1.4 Solar Flare on July 12, 2012 - Duration: 60 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the July 12, 2012 X1.4 class solar flare in a variety of wavelength; 131- Teal colored, 335 - blue colored, 171 - yellow colored and finally a combined wavelength view. All video w...

  1. Solar flare X-ray polarimeter utilizing a large area thin beryllium scattering disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gotthelf, E.; Hamilton, T.; Novick, R.; Chanan, G.; Emslie, A.; Weisskopf, M.

    1989-01-01

    A model of a solar flare X-ray polarimeter utilizing a large-area thin beryllium scattering disk was developed using Monte Carlo techniques for several classes of solar flares. The solar-flare polarimeter consists of a 30-cm-diam Be disk of about 1/3 of a scattering length thickness, which is surrounded by a cylindrical detector composed of six segmented panels of NaI scintillators, each coupled to 15 photomultiplier tubes. The instrument is sensitive to X-rays from 10 to 100 keV. For a class-M-2 solar flare observed for 10 sec from a balloon at an altitude of 150,000 ft, the minimum detectable polarization at the 99 percent statistical confidence level was found to be 1-6 percent over the energy range 20-100 keV.

  2. Heavy solar cosmic rays in the January 25, 1971 solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerin, C. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed study of the charge composition of heavy solar cosmic rays measured in the January 25, 1971 solar flare including differential fluxes for the even charged nuclei from carbon through argon is presented. The measurements are obtained for varying energy intervals for each nuclear species in the energy range from 10 to 35 MeV/nucleon. In addition, abundances relative to oxygen are computed for all the above nuclei in the single energy interval from 15 to 25 MeV/nucleon. This interval contains measurements for all of the species and as a result requires no spectral extrapolations. An upper limit for the abundance of calcium nuclei is also presented. These measurements, when combined with other experimental results, enable the energy dependence of abundance measurements as a function of nuclear charge to be discussed. It is seen that at energies above about 10 MeV/nucleon, the variations of abundance ratios are limited to about a factor of 3 from flare to flare, in spite of large variations in other characteristics of these solar events.

  3. Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare

    E-print Network

    J. C. Martinez-Oliveros; H. Moradi; A-C. Donea

    2008-01-09

    On 10 March 2001 the active region NOAA 9368 produced an unusually impulsive solar flare in close proximity to the solar limb. This flare has previously been studied in great detail, with observations classifying it as a type 1 white-light flare with a very hard spectrum in hard X-rays. The flare was also associated with a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejection. The flare emission characteristics appeared to closely correspond with previous instances of seismic emission from acoustically active flares. Using standard local helioseismic methods, we identified the seismic signatures produced by the flare that, to date, is the least energetic (in soft X-rays) of the flares known to have generated a detectable acoustic transient. Holographic analysis of the flare shows a compact acoustic source strongly correlated with the impulsive hard X-ray, visible continuum, and radio emission. Time-distance diagrams of the seismic waves emanating from the flare region also show faint signatures, mainly in the eastern sector of the active region. The strong spatial coincidence between the seismic source and the impulsive visible continuum emission reinforces the theory that a substantial component of the seismic emission seen is a result of sudden heating of the low photosphere associated with the observed visible continuum emission. Furthermore, the low-altitude magnetic loop structure inferred from potential--field extrapolations in the flaring region suggests that there is a significant inverse correlation between the seismicity of a flare and the height of the magnetic loops that conduct the particle beams from the corona.

  4. From coronal observations to MHD simulations, the building blocks for 3D models of solar flares

    E-print Network

    Janvier, Miho; Demoulin, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares are energetic events taking place in the Sun's atmosphere, and their effects can greatly impact the environment of the surrounding planets. In particular, eruptive flares, as opposed to confined flares, launch coronal mass ejections into the interplanetary medium, and as such, are one of the main drivers of space weather. After briefly reviewing the main characteristics of solar flares, we summarize the processes that can account for the build up and release of energy during their evolution. In particular, we focus on the development of recent 3D numerical simulations that explain many of the observed flare features. These simulations can also provide predictions of the dynamical evolution of coronal and photospheric magnetic field. Here we present a few observational examples that, together with numerical modelling, point to the underlying physical mechanisms of the eruptions.

  5. Gamma-ray and microwave evidence for two phases of acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1976-01-01

    Relativistic electrons in large solar flares produce gamma ray continuum by bremsstrahlung and microwave emission by gyrosynchrotron radiation. Using observations of the 1972, August 4 flare, the electron spectrum and the physical properties of the common emitting region of these radiations were evaluated. Information was also obtained on energetic protons in this flare by using gamma ray lines. From the electron spectrum, the proton-to-electron ratio, and the time dependences of the microwave emission, the 2.2 MeV line and the gamma ray continuum, it was concluded that in large solar flares relativistic electrons and energetic nuclei are accelerated by a mechanism which is different from the mechanism which accelerates approximately less than 100 keV electrons in flares.

  6. High-temperature phase transition in a plasma and the mechanism of powerful solar flares

    E-print Network

    Fedor V. Prigara

    2006-05-04

    It is shown that the high- temperature phase transition in a plasma gives the mechanism of transition from the highly conductive state to the highly resistive state of a plasma in the `electric circuit' model of solar flares which was first introduced by H.Alfven and P.Carlqvist in 1967. With this addendum, the modern version of the electric circuit model can explain both the fast dissipation of energy and the acceleration of particles in a solar flare.

  7. High-temperature phase transition in a plasma and the mechanism of powerful solar flares

    E-print Network

    Prigara, F V

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the high- temperature phase transition in a plasma gives the mechanism of transition from the highly conductive state to the highly resistive state of a plasma in the `electric circuit' model of solar flares which was first introduced by H.Alfven and P.Carlqvist in 1967. With this addendum, the modern version of the electric circuit model can explain both the fast dissipation of energy and the acceleration of particles in a solar flare.

  8. Transient ionization and solar flare X-ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; Tanaka, K.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the effects of a transiently ionizing solar flare plasma on the X-ray spectrum of iron between 1.85 and 1.92 A are considered. The atomic physics of the nonequilibrium spectrum is discussed, and reasons for differences in appearance from ionization equilibrium spectra are explained. The effect of spectral resolution on the ability to detect transient ionization in the iron X-ray spectrum is illustrated by synthetic spectra. A synthetic transiently ionizing spectrum is applied to the interpretation of spectra obtained from the SOX 1 spectrometer on the Japanese Hinotori spacecraft. Some indications of transient ionization are found, although counting statistics negate a strong conclusion. A hypothetical spectrometer with about one order of magnitude more sensitivity than the SOX 1 Hinotori or the bent crystal spectrometer flown on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) is also considered. The ranges of plasma parameters such as plasma emission measure and density that are necessary for transient ionization to be detected by such an instrument are discussed.

  9. THE SOLAR FLARE SULFUR ABUNDANCE FROM RESIK OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Kuznetsov, V. D. E-mail: bs@cbk.pan.wroc.pl E-mail: kvd@izmiran.ru

    2012-06-01

    The RESIK instrument on CORONAS-F spacecraft observed several sulfur X-ray lines in three of its four channels covering the wavelength range 3.8-6.1 A during solar flares. The fluxes are analyzed to give the sulfur abundance. Data are chosen for when the instrument parameters were optimized. The measured fluxes of the S XV 1s{sup 2}-1s4p (w4) line at 4.089 A gives A(S) = 7.16 {+-} 0.17 (abundances on a logarithmic scale with A(H) = 12) which we consider to be the most reliable. Estimates from other lines range from 7.13 to 7.24. The preferred S abundance estimate is very close to recent photospheric abundance estimates and to quiet-Sun solar wind and meteoritic abundances. This implies no fractionation of sulfur by processes tending to enhance the coronal abundance from the photospheric that depend on the first ionization potential (FIP), or that sulfur, though its FIP has an intermediate value of 10.36 eV, acts like a 'high-FIP' element.

  10. Acceleration, containment, and emission of very low energy solar flare particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Mcguire, R. E.; Anderson, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    We present the first observations of protons down to 44 keV and electrons down to less than about 2 keV emitted in an impulsive solar particle event. The observations are from the Apollo 15 Subsatellite during a flare event which began on September 1, 1971. We obtain a lower limit estimate of the energy contained in protons above about 0.05 MeV in the flare. The effects of adiabatic deceleration in the interplanetary medium and dE/dx energy loss in the corona are discussed. We conclude that energetic protons may constitute a major energy release in large solar flares.

  11. Stereoscopic observations of hard x ray sources in solar flares made with GRO and other spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.; Hurley, K.; Mctiernan, J. M.; Laros, J. G.

    1992-01-01

    Since the launch of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) in Apr. 1991, the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument on GRO has recorded a large number of solar flares. Some of these flares have also been observed by the Gamma-Ray Burst Detector on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) and/or by the Solar X-Ray/Cosmic Gamma-Ray Burst Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft. A preliminary list of common flares observed during the period May-Jun. 1991 is presented and the possible joint studies are indicated.

  12. Observations of solar-flare ionization in the mesosphere using coherent-scatter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. W.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of solar-flare ionization in the mesosphere can be made using coherent-scatter radar systems. The scattered power profiles they measure in the 60-90 km altitude region is a function of the ion concentration gradient and the intensity of turbulent mixing at each altitude. By comparing the power profiles before, during and after a solar flare, it is possible to estimate the ion production rate during the flare as a function of altitude and time. This analysis is used to compare the ion production rates with generally accepted ion-chemical models. Comparisons are made with ion production rates estimated from the solar X-ray flux for the same flare made by geostationary satellites.

  13. Observations of solar-flare ionization in the mesosphere using coherent-scatter radar

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.W.; Bowhill, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of solar-flare ionization in the mesosphere can be made using coherent-scatter radar systems. The scattered power profiles they measure in the 60-90 km altitude region is a function of the ion concentration gradient and the intensity of turbulent mixing at each altitude. By comparing the power profiles before, during and after a solar flare, it is possible to estimate the ion production rate during the flare as a function of altitude and time. This analysis is used to compare the ion production rates with generally accepted ion-chemical models. Comparisons are made with ion production rates estimated from the solar X-ray flux for the same flare made by geostationary satellites. 6 references.

  14. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C

    2015-01-01

    SDO/EVE provide rich information of the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly of solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. Reading from the charts, we are able to easily recognize if there is a late phase following a main phase of a flare, and able to learn the begin, peak and end times of the flare as well as the drift of the temperature, i.e., the cooling rate, of the heated plasma during the flare. Through four M-class flares of different types, we illustrate which thermodynamic information can be revealed from the TDS charts. Further, we investigate the TDS charts of all the flares greater than M5.0, and some interesting results are achieved. First, there are two distinct drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperture, whereas for Type II flares, the drift is somewhat reversed, suggesting a more violent and durable heating during Type I...

  15. Implications of X-Ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Aurass, H.; Battaglia, M.; Grigis, P. C.; Kontar, E. P.; Liu, W.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general flare models, and for future flare studies are discussed.

  16. The evidence of magnetic energy accumulation in the solar corona before a flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, Igor; Meshalkina, Natalia; Podgorny, Alexander

    The magnetic field dynamics of active regions that produce large (X-class) flares are investigated. The active region magnetic flux is obtained by using the results of calculations of the normal magnetic component in the real active regions. It is shown that the main condition for appearance of an X-class flare is the big magnetic flux ( Phi > 10(22) Mx) of the active region. This condition is necessary but not a sufficient. The large flare appears above an active region, if the magnetic field distribution is very complex. The coronal magnetic field above such active region contains magnetic singular lines of X-type. In the vicinity of singular lines current sheets can be formed. There are no magnetic singular lines of X-type above a simple bipolar active region. The bipolar active regions do not produce solar flares. During a solar flare, when the accumulated energy is fast released, the conservation of the magnetic field distribution in the active region during the majority of flares takes place. The presented results support the flare theory based on the slow magnetic energy accumulation in the coronal current sheet before a flare and its explosive realize during this flare. The 3D MHD numerical simulations show that magnetic energy is accumulated in the magnetic field that created above an active region before the flare. The decay of the coronal current sheet does not produce some strong magnetic field disturbance on the photosphere. The calculations have been carried out for the real observed active regions. The results of the numerical simulation demonstrate most of flare phenomena including the relativistic proton (˜ 10 GeV) generation.

  17. Trigger of a Blowout Jet in a Solar Coronal Mass Ejection Associated with a Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Shuhong; Chen, Huadong; Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Using the multi-wavelength images and the photospheric magnetograms from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we study the flare that was associated with the only coronal mass ejection (CME) in active region (AR) 12192. The eruption of a filament caused a blowout jet, and then an M4.0 class flare occurred. This flare was located at the edge of the AR instead of in the core region. The flare was close to the apparently “open” fields, appearing as extreme-ultraviolet structures that fan out rapidly. Due to the interaction between flare materials and “open” fields, the flare became an eruptive flare, leading to the CME. Then, at the same site of the first eruption, another small filament erupted. With the high spatial and temporal resolution H? data from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we investigate the interaction between the second filament and the nearby “open” lines. The filament reconnected with the “open” lines, forming a new system. To our knowledge, the detailed process of this kind of interaction is reported for the first time. Then the new system rotated due to the untwisting motion of the filament, implying that the twist was transferred from the closed filament system to the “open” system. In addition, the twist seemed to propagate from the lower atmosphere to the upper layers and was eventually spread by the CME to the interplanetary space.

  18. New observational facts about particle acceleration and transport during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trottel, G.

    1996-01-01

    Extensive hard X-ray (HXR)/gamma-ray (GR) observations of solar flares, performed during solar cycles 21 and 22 have led to important new discoveries. These data, combined with observations obtained in other parts of the electromagnetic spectrum (soft X-ray, Hard X-ray, optical, and radio) largley contributed to get a better understanding and to develop new ideas on particle acceleration and transport during solar flares. This review presents new observational facts relevant to hard X-ray/gamma-ray producing flares. Among these are the frequent presence of sub-second time structure in the hard X-ray emission, the variability in hard X-ray and radio spatial distributions during a flare and from flare to flare, the evidence for strong gamma-ray line emission from the Corona and the existence of extended phases of the gamma-ray emission lasting for several hours after the flare onset. This ensemble of observations indicates that particle acceleration takes place at different sites in a complex and dynamic magnetic field environment.

  19. Thermal Evolution and Radiative Output of Solar Flares Observed by the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, P. C.; Milligan, R. O.; Woods, T. N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to obtain the thermal evolution and radiative output during solar flares as observed by the Extreme u ltraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Ob servatory (SDO). Presented and discussed in detail are how EVE measur ements, due to its temporal cadence, spectral resolution and spectral range, can be used to determine how the thermal plasma radiates at v arious temperatures throughout the impulsive and gradual phase of fla res. EVE can very accurately determine the radiative output of flares due to pre- and in-flight calibrations. Events are presented that sh ow the total radiated output of flares depends more on the flare duration than the typical GOES X-ray peak magnitude classification. With S DO observing every flare throughout its entire duration and over a la rge temperature range, new insights into flare heating and cooling as well as the radiative energy release in EUV wavelengths support exis ting research into understanding the evolution of solar flares.

  20. Solar flare accelerated isotopes of hydrogen and helium. [observed by IMP-4 and IMP-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anglin, J. D.; Dietrich, W. F.; Simpson, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of solar flare hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, helium-3, and helium-4 in the energy range approximately 10 to 50 MeV per nucleon obtained with instrumentation on the IMP-4 and IMP-5 satellites are reported and studies based on these results which place several constraints on theories of solar flare particle acceleration are discussed. A brief review of previous work and the difficulties in studying the rare isotopes of hydrogen and helium is also included. Particular emphasis is placed on the fact that the information to be obtained from the solar flare products of high energy interactions is not available through either solar wind observations where both the acceleration mechanism and the coronal source of the nuclear species are different, or optical measurements of solar active regions.

  1. Optimal Electron Energies for Driving Chromospheric Evaporation in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reep, J. W.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Alexander, D.

    2015-08-01

    In the standard model of solar flares, energy deposition by a beam of electrons drives strong chromospheric evaporation leading to a significantly denser corona and much brighter emission across the spectrum. Chromospheric evaporation was examined in great detail by Fisher et al., who described a distinction between two different regimes, termed explosive and gentle evaporation. In this work, we examine the importance of electron energy and stopping depths on the two regimes and on the atmospheric response. We find that with explosive evaporation, the atmospheric response does not depend strongly on electron energy. In the case of gentle evaporation, lower energy electrons are significantly more efficient at heating the atmosphere and driving up-flows sooner than higher energy electrons. We also find that the threshold between explosive and gentle evaporation is not fixed at a given beam energy flux, but also depends strongly on the electron energy and duration of heating. Further, at low electron energies, a much weaker beam flux is required to drive explosive evaporation.

  2. Magnetic shielding of interplanetary spacecraft against solar flare radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cocks, Franklin H.; Watkins, Seth

    1993-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this work is to design, build, and fly a dual-purpose, piggyback payload whose function is to produce a large volume, low intensity magnetic field and to test the concept of using such a magnetic field (1) to protect spacecraft against solar flare protons, (2) to produce a thrust of sufficient magnitude to stabilize low satellite orbits against orbital decay from atmospheric drag, and (3) to test the magsail concept. These all appear to be capable of being tested using the same deployed high temperature superconducting coil. In certain orbits, high temperature superconducting wire, which has now been developed to the point where silver-sheathed high T sub c wires one mm in diameter are commercially available, can be used to produce the magnetic moments required for shielding without requiring any mechanical cooling system. The potential benefits of this concept apply directly to both earth-orbital and interplanetary missions. The usefulness of a protective shield for manned missions needs scarcely to be emphasized. Similarly, the usefulness of increasing orbit perigee without expenditure of propellant is obvious. This payload would be a first step in assessing the true potential of large volume magnetic fields in the US space program. The objective of this design research is to develop an innovative, prototype deployed high temperature superconducting coil (DHTSC) system.

  3. Bulk Energization of Electrons in Solar Flares by Alfvén Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, D. B.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2014-03-01

    Bulk energization of electrons to 10 - 20 keV in solar flares is attributed to dissipation of Alfvén waves that transport energy and potential downward to an acceleration region near the chromosphere. The acceleration involves the parallel electric field that develops in the limit of inertial Alfvén waves (IAWs). A two-potential model for IAWs is used to relate the parallel potential to the cross-field potential transported by the waves. We identify a maximum parallel potential in terms of a maximum current density that corresponds to the threshold for the onset of anomalous resistivity. This maximum is of order 10 kV when the threshold is that for the Buneman instability. We argue that this restricts the cross-field potential in an Alfvén wave to about 10 kV. Effective dissipation requires a large number of up- and down-current paths associated with multiple Alfvén waves. The electron acceleration occurs in localized, transient, anomalously conducting regions (LTACRs) and is associated with the parallel electric field determined by Ohm's law with an anomalous resistivity. We introduce an idealized model in which the LTACRs are (upward-)current sheets, a few skin depths in thickness, separated by much larger regions of weaker return current. We show that this model can account semi-quantitatively for bulk energization.

  4. Solar Flare Abundances of Potassium, Argon, and Sulphur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor); Phillips, K. J. H.; Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B.; Landi, E.

    2003-01-01

    The absolute coronal abundances of potassium has been determined for the first time from X-ray solar flare line and continuous spectra together with absolute and relative abundances of Ar and S. Potassium is of importance in the continuing debate concerning the nature of the coronal/photospheric element abundance ratios which are widely considered to depend on first ionization potential since it has the lowest FIP of any common element in the Sun. The measurements were obtained with the RESIK crystal spectrometer on the Coronas-F spacecraft. A differential emission measure DEM = const. x exp (-(beta)T(sub e) was found to be the most consistent with the data out of three models considered. We find that the coronal ratio [K/H] = 3.7 x 10(exp - 7), a factor 3 times photospheric, in agreement with other observations using line-to-line ratios. Our measured value for the coronal ratio [Ar/H] = 1.5 x 10(exp -6) is significantly less than photospheric, indicating that there is a slight depletion of this high-FIP element in the corona. For S (an intermediate-FIP element) we obtained [S/H] = 2.2 x 10(exp - 5), approximately the same as in previous work.

  5. A CLASSIFICATION SCHEME FOR TURBULENT ACCELERATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Nicolas; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon E-mail: eduard@astro.gla.ac.uk

    2012-08-01

    We establish a classification scheme for stochastic acceleration models involving low-frequency plasma turbulence in a strongly magnetized plasma. This classification takes into account both the properties of the accelerating electromagnetic field, and the nature of the transport of charged particles in the acceleration region. We group the acceleration processes as either resonant, non-resonant, or resonant-broadened, depending on whether the particle motion is free-streaming along the magnetic field, diffusive, or a combination of the two. Stochastic acceleration by moving magnetic mirrors and adiabatic compressions are addressed as illustrative examples. We obtain expressions for the momentum-dependent diffusion coefficient D(p), both for general forms of the accelerating force and for the situation when the electromagnetic force is wave-like, with a specified dispersion relation {omega} = {omega}(k). Finally, for models considered, we calculate the energy-dependent acceleration time, a quantity that can be directly compared with observations of the time profile of the radiation field produced by the accelerated particles, such as those occuring during solar flares.

  6. A CRITICAL EXAMINATION OF THE FUNDAMENTAL ASSUMPTIONS OF SOLAR FLARE AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, D. S.; Bingham, R.; Harrison, R.

    2013-05-01

    The fundamental assumptions of conventional solar flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) theory are re-examined. In particular, the common theoretical assumption that magnetic energy that drives flares and CMEs can be stored in situ in the corona with sufficient energy density is found wanting. In addition, the observational constraint that flares and CMEs produce non-thermal electrons with fluxes of order 10{sup 34}-10{sup 36} electrons s{sup -1}, with energies of order 10-20 keV, must also be explained. This constraint when imposed on the ''standard model'' for flares and CMEs is found to miss the mark by many orders of magnitude. We suggest, in conclusion, there are really only two possible ways to explain the requirements of observations and theory: flares and CMEs are caused by mass-loaded prominences or driven directly by emerging magnetized flux.

  7. High-energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi Large Area Telescope Detections and Analysis of Two M-class Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, Q.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Murphy, R.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Ritz, S.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2014-05-01

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy ?-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying ?-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by ?-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the ?-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of ?-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and ?-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  8. High-energy gamma-ray emission from solar flares: Summary of Fermi large area telescope detections and analysis of two M-class flares

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; and others

    2014-05-20

    We present the detections of 18 solar flares detected in high-energy ?-rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first 4 yr of operation. This work suggests that particle acceleration up to very high energies in solar flares is more common than previously thought, occurring even in modest flares, and for longer durations. Interestingly, all these flares are associated with fairly fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial, and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying ?-ray emission over 13 hr, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by ?-ray emission lasting for 2 hr. We compare the Fermi LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that the ?-rays are more likely produced through pion decay than electron bremsstrahlung, and we find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens during the extended emission of the 2011 March 7 flare. This would disfavor a trapping scenario for particles accelerated during the impulsive phase of the flare and point to a continuous acceleration process at play for the duration of the flares. CME shocks are known for accelerating the solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in situ on similar timescales, but it might be challenging to explain the production of ?-rays at the surface of the Sun while the CME is halfway to the Earth. A stochastic turbulence acceleration process occurring in the solar corona is another likely scenario. Detailed comparison of characteristics of SEPs and ?-ray-emitting particles for several flares will be helpful to distinguish between these two possibilities.

  9. Skylab ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer observations versus solar flare activity: An event compilation. [tables (data)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    An event compilation is presented which correlates ATM/S-056 X-ray event analyzer solar observations with solar flare activity. Approximately 1,070 h of pulse height analyzed X-ray proportional counter data were obtained with the X-ray event analyzer during Skylab. During its operation, 449 flares (including 343 flare peaks) were observed. Seventy events of peak X-ray emission or = Cl were simultaneously observed by ground based telescopes, SOLRAD 9 and/or Vela, and the X-ray event analyzer. These events were observed from preflare through flare rise to peak and through flare decline.

  10. Statistical study of free magnetic energy and flare productivity of solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Su, J. T.; Jing, J.; Wang, S.; Wang, H. M.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2014-06-20

    Photospheric vector magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory are utilized as the boundary conditions to extrapolate both nonlinear force-free and potential magnetic fields in solar corona. Based on the extrapolations, we are able to determine the free magnetic energy (FME) stored in active regions (ARs). Over 3000 vector magnetograms in 61 ARs were analyzed. We compare FME with the ARs' flare index (FI) and find that there is a weak correlation (<60%) between FME and FI. FME shows slightly improved flare predictability relative to the total unsigned magnetic flux of ARs in the following two aspects: (1) the flare productivity predicted by FME is higher than that predicted by magnetic flux and (2) the correlation between FI and FME is higher than that between FI and magnetic flux. However, this improvement is not significant enough to make a substantial difference in time-accumulated FI, rather than individual flare, predictions.

  11. Energetic solar particle fluxes out to 3 AU during the 7 May 1978 flare event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; Debrunner, H.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous solar proton flux measurements on IMP 7 and by the world wide neutron monitor network during the May 7, 1978 flare event led to conclusions that in the energy range from 50 MeV to 10 GeV: (1) the propagation of the flare particles in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) between the Sun and the Earth was nearly scatter free; and (2) therefore, the intensity time (IT) profiles of the solar proton fluxes observed at Earth for about one hour after onset represent the solar injection profiles even to energies as low as 50 MeV. Observations of the IMF at Helios A indicate that the IMF was undisturbed between the Sun and Helios A at the time of the May 7, 1978 flare event; and, therefore, the solar particle propagation was also scatter free from the Sun to Helios A.

  12. Solar Flare Predictions Using Time Series of SDO/HMI Observations and Machine Learning Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilonidis, Stathis; Bobra, Monica; Couvidat, Sebastien

    2015-08-01

    Solar active regions are dynamic systems that can rapidly evolve in time and produce flare eruptions. The temporal evolution of an active region can provide important information about its potential to produce major flares. In this study, we build a flare forecasting model using supervised machine learning methods and time series of SDO/HMI data for all the flaring regions with magnitude M1.0 or higher that have been observed with HMI and several thousand non-flaring regions. We define and compute hundreds of features that characterize the temporal evolution of physical properties related to the size, non-potentiality, and complexity of the active region, as well as its flaring history, for several days before the flare eruption. Using these features, we implement and test the performance of several machine learning algorithms, including support vector machines, neural networks, decision trees, discriminant analysis, and others. We also apply feature selection algorithms that aim to discard features with low predictive power and improve the performance of the machine learning methods. Our results show that support vector machines provide the best forecasts for the next 24 hours, achieving a True Skill Statistic of 0.923, an accuracy of 0.985, and a Heidke skill score of 0.861, which improve the scores obtained by Bobra and Couvidat (2015). The results of this study contribute to the development of a more reliable and fully automated data-driven flare forecasting system.

  13. Comparing Solar-Flare Acceleration of >-20 MeV Protons and Electrons Above Various Energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.

    2010-01-01

    A large fraction (up to tens of percent) of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerated ions and electrons, and studies indicate that these two populations have comparable energy content. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation between the 2.223 MeV neutron-capture gamma-ray line and electron bremsstrahlung emission >300 keV, indicating that the flare acceleration of >^20 MeV protons and >300 keV electrons is roughly proportional over >3 orders of magnitude in fluence. We show that the correlations of neutron-capture line fluence with GOES class or with bremsstrahlung emission at lower energies show deviations from proportionality, primarily for flares with lower fluences. From analyzing thirteen flares, we demonstrate that there appear to be two classes of flares with high-energy acceleration: flares that exhibit only proportional acceleration of ions and electrons down to 50 keV and flares that have an additional soft, low-energy bremsstrahlung component, suggesting two separate populations of accelerated electrons. We use RHESSI spectroscopy and imaging to investigate a number of these flares in detail.

  14. Fermi Large Area Telescope observation of high-energy solar flares: constraining emission scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omodei, Nicola; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Petrosian, Vahe; Liu, Wei; Rubio da Costa, Fatima

    2015-08-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the most sensitive instrument ever deployed in space for observing gamma-ray emission >100 MeV. This has also been demonstrated by its detection of quiescent gamma-ray emission from pions produced by cosmic-ray protons interacting in the solar atmosphere, and from cosmic-ray electron interactions with solar optical photons. The Fermi LAT has also detected high-energy gamma-ray emission associated with GOES M-class and X-class X-ray flares, each accompanied by a coronal mass ejection and a solar energetic particle event increasing the number of detected solar flares by almost a factor of 10 with respect to previous space observations. During the impulsive phase, gamma rays with energies up to several hundreds of MeV have been recorded by the LAT. Emission up to GeV energies lasting several hours after the flare has also been recorded by the LAT. Of particular interest are the recent detections of two solar flares whose position behind the limb was confirmed by the STEREO-B satellite. While gamma-ray emission up to tens of MeV resulting from proton interactions has been detected before from occulted solar flares, the significance of these particular events lies in the fact that these are the first detections of >100 MeV gamma-ray emission from footpoint-occulted flares. We will present the Fermi-LAT, RHESSI and STEREO observations of these flares and discuss the various emission scenarios for these sources.

  15. RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS OF THE OPTICAL AND ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES

    E-print Network

    Abbett, Bill

    RADIATIVE HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS OF THE OPTICAL AND ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES Joel C soft X-ray, extreme ultraviolet, and ultraviolet (XEUV) emission. The equations of radiative transfer 2005 May 10 ABSTRACT We report on radiative hydrodynamic simulations of moderate and strong solar

  16. High energy neutron and gamma-radiation generated during the solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kocharov, G. E.; Mandzhavidze, N. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of high energy neutrons and gamma rays generation in the solar conditions is considered. It is shown that due to a peculiarity of generation and propagation of neutrons corresponding solar flares should be localized at high helio-longitudes.

  17. Simulations of the effects of extreme solar flares on technological systems

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    Simulations of the effects of extreme solar flares on technological systems at Mars Paul Withers Weather Events in the Solar System" Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Florida #12;Summary and future navigations/communications systems · Effects ­ Range error in GPS-like systems ­ D

  18. A MODEL FOR THE ESCAPE OF SOLAR-FLARE-ACCELERATED PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Masson, S.; Antiochos, S. K.; DeVore, C. R.

    2013-07-10

    We address the problem of how particles are accelerated by solar flares can escape into the heliosphere on timescales of an hour or less. Impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) bursts are generally observed in association with so-called eruptive flares consisting of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and a flare. These fast SEPs are believed to be accelerated directly by the flare, rather than by the CME shock. However, the precise mechanism by which the particles are accelerated remains controversial. Regardless of the origin of the acceleration, the particles should remain trapped in the closed magnetic fields of the coronal flare loops and the ejected flux rope, given the magnetic geometry of the standard eruptive-flare model. In this case, the particles would reach the Earth only after a delay of many hours to a few days (coincident with the bulk ejecta arriving at Earth). We propose that the external magnetic reconnection intrinsic to the breakout model for CME initiation can naturally account for the prompt escape of flare-accelerated energetic particles onto open interplanetary magnetic flux tubes. We present detailed 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a breakout CME/flare event with a background isothermal solar wind. Our calculations demonstrate that if the event occurs sufficiently near a coronal-hole boundary, interchange reconnection between open and closed fields can occur. This process allows particles from deep inside the ejected flux rope to access solar wind field lines soon after eruption. We compare these results to standard observations of impulsive SEPs and discuss the implications of the model on further observations and calculations.

  19. Spectral lines observed in solar flares between 171 and 630 angstroms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dere, K. P.

    1978-01-01

    Several hundred spectral lines emitted in solar flares between 171 and 630 A have been recorded by the Naval Research Laboratory spectroheliograph aboard Skylab. The wavelengths, identifications, and intensity estimates of these lines are presented, based on measurements of all of the suitable flare plates. Nearly 100 new and unidentified lines have been observed. Identifications of three Fe XXI and two Fe XVII lines are suggested.

  20. Effect of enhanced x-ray flux on the ionosphere over Cyprus during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Md. Golam; Haralambous, Haris

    2015-06-01

    In this work we study the effect of solar flares on the ionosphere over Cyprus. Solar flares are impulsive solar activity events usually coupled with Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). The arrival and the subsequent impact of solar flares on geospace, following an eruption on the Sun's surface is almost immediate (around 9 min) whereas the impact of CMEs is rather delayed (2-3 days) as the former is based on X-ray radiation whereas the latter phenomenon is related with particles and magnetic fields travelling at lower speeds via the Solar Wind. The penetration of X-rays down to the Dregion following such an event enhances the electron density. This increase can be monitored by ionosondes, which measure the electron density up to the maximum electron density NmF2. The significance of this increase lies on the increase of signal absorption causing limited window of operating frequencies for HF communications. In this study the effect of enhanced X-ray flux on the ionosphere over Cyprus during solar flares has been investigated. To establish the correlation and extent of impact on different layers, data of X-ray intensity from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and ionospheric characteristics (D & F layer) over Nicosia station (35° N, 33° E) were examined for all solar flares during the period 2011-2014. The analysis revealed a positive and good correlation between frequency of minimum reflection, fmin and X-ray intensity for D layer demonstrating that X-rays play a dominant role in the ionization of lower ionosphere. Hence, X-ray flux can be used as a good proxy for studying the solar flare effects on lower ionosphere. The correlation coefficient between maximum electron density of F layer, NmF2 and X-ray intensity was found to be poor.

  1. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event reported by Mewaldt et al. (2009). The observations were made during the 5 December 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV particles arriving from the Sun. The derived solar emission profile, arrival directions, and energy spectrum all show that the <5 MeV particles were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. CME-driven shock acceleration is also considered. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances .2 solar radii.

  2. Solar modulation of cosmic ray intensity and solar flare events inferred from (14)C contents in dated tree rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, C. Y.; Chen, T. M.; Yun, S. X.; Dai, K. M.

    1985-01-01

    The delta 14C values in 42 rings of a white spruce grown in Mackenzie Delta was measured as a continuing effort of tracing the history of solar modulation of cosmic ray intensity. The delta 14C values in six rings were measured, in search of a 14C increase due to two large solar flares that occurred in 1942. The results are presented.

  3. A very small and super strong zebra pattern burst at the beginning of a solar flare

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Baolin; Tan, Chengming; Zhang, Yin; Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian

    2014-08-01

    Microwave emission with spectral zebra pattern structures (ZPs) is frequently observed in solar flares and the Crab pulsar. The previous observations show that ZP is a structure only overlapped on the underlying broadband continuum with slight increments and decrements. This work reports an unusually strong ZP burst occurring at the beginning of a solar flare observed simultaneously by two radio telescopes located in China and the Czech Republic and by the EUV telescope on board NASA's satellite Solar Dynamics Observatory on 2013 April 11. It is a very short and super strong explosion whose intensity exceeds several times that of the underlying flaring broadband continuum emission, lasting for just 18 s. EUV images show that the flare starts from several small flare bursting points (FBPs). There is a sudden EUV flash with extra enhancement in one of these FBPs during the ZP burst. Analysis indicates that the ZP burst accompanying an EUV flash is an unusual explosion revealing a strong coherent process with rapid particle acceleration, violent energy release, and fast plasma heating simultaneously in a small region with a short duration just at the beginning of the flare.

  4. Acceleration of solar cosmic rays in a flare current sheet and their propagation in interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, A. I.; Podgorny, I. M.

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of GOES spacecraft data show that the prompt component of high-energy protons arrive at the Earth after a time corresponding to their generation in flares in the western part of the solar disk, while the delayed component is detected several hours later. All protons in flares are accelerated by a single mechanism. The particles of the prompt component propagate along magnetic lines of the Archimedean spiral connectng the flare with the Earth. The prompt component generated by flares in the eastern part of the solar disk is not observed at the Earth, since particles accelerated by these flares do not intersect magnetic-field lines connecting the flare with the Earth. These particles arrive at the Earth via their motion across the interplanetary magnetic field. These particles are trapped by the magnetic field and transported by the solar wind, since the interplanetary magnetic field is frozen in the wind plasma, and these particles also diffuse across the field. The duration of the delay reaches several days.

  5. A Very Small and Super Strong Zebra Pattern Burst at the Beginning of a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Baolin; Tan, Chengming; Zhang, Yin; Huang, Jing; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian; Yan, Yihua

    2014-08-01

    Microwave emission with spectral zebra pattern structures (ZPs) is frequently observed in solar flares and the Crab pulsar. The previous observations show that ZP is a structure only overlapped on the underlying broadband continuum with slight increments and decrements. This work reports an unusually strong ZP burst occurring at the beginning of a solar flare observed simultaneously by two radio telescopes located in China and the Czech Republic and by the EUV telescope on board NASA's satellite Solar Dynamics Observatory on 2013 April 11. It is a very short and super strong explosion whose intensity exceeds several times that of the underlying flaring broadband continuum emission, lasting for just 18 s. EUV images show that the flare starts from several small flare bursting points (FBPs). There is a sudden EUV flash with extra enhancement in one of these FBPs during the ZP burst. Analysis indicates that the ZP burst accompanying an EUV flash is an unusual explosion revealing a strong coherent process with rapid particle acceleration, violent energy release, and fast plasma heating simultaneously in a small region with a short duration just at the beginning of the flare.

  6. Directivity of 100 keV-1 MeV photon sources in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Klebesadel, R. W.; Laros, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    Stereoscopic observations of 0.1-1.0 MeV photon sources in solar flares made with spectrometers aboard the ISEE 3 and PVO (Pioneer Venus Orbiter) have been analyzed to determine the directivity of the photon sources and its possible dependence on photon energy. During the period October 1, 1978-October 31, 1980, a total of 44 solar flares were observed simultaneously by the two instruments. Of these, 39 flares were in full view of both the instruments, the remaining five being partially occulted by the photosphere from the line of sight of at least one instrument. The view angles theta(P) and theta(I) of the PVO and ISEE 3 instruments with respect to the outward solar radius at the flare site varied from one flare to another and were in the range 9-88 deg. The difference between the two view angles varied from 1 deg to 66 deg. The observations of differential photon energy spectra averaged over more than about 16 s do not indicate any systematic directivity. In most flares the directivity of 0.1-1.0 MeV photon sources is found to be less than about 2.5.

  7. Mining spatiotemporal co-occurrence patterns in solar datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, B.; Kempton, D.; Akkineni, V.; Angryk, R.; Pillai, K. G.

    2015-11-01

    We address the problem of mining spatiotemporal co-occurrence patterns (STCOPs) in solar datasets with extended polygon-based geometric representations. Specifically designed spatiotemporal indexing techniques are used in the mining of STCOPs. These include versions of two well-known spatiotemporal trajectory indexing techniques: the scalable and efficient trajectory index and Chebyshev polynomial indexing. We present a framework, STCOP-MINER, implementing a filter-and-refine STCOP mining algorithm, with the indexing techniques mentioned for efficiently performing data analysis.

  8. Thermal Evolution of Solar Flares During the First Year of SDO as Seen by the EVE Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Woods, Thomas N.

    2011-01-01

    It is very evident during the first year of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) that the Sun awoke from its prolonged minimum and is well into solar cycle 24. There has been tens of moderate M-class flares and a large X-class event (as of abstract submission), with more surely to come as the solar cycle activity increases. With SDO's 24/7 observations, every single flare has been observed through their entire evolution, providing new insights in the thermal evolution of every flare. It is evident that this evolution is extremely different for many of the flares, even for flares with similar X-ray magnitude classifications. Presented and discussed will be these different flares with their varying thermal evolution profiles as observed by the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO).

  9. Energy partitions and evolution in a purely thermal solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.

    2015-04-01

    A conventional way of producing a hot plasma in the flaring loops is via the impact of the nonthermal particles accelerated in flares due to release of the excessive magnetic energy, which has come to be known as the Neupert effect. We know, however, that in many events the heating starts clearly before the particle acceleration, which implies that no accelerated particles may be required for this heating. To this end, we present here a flare whose microwave emission is consistent with a purely thermal distribution of electrons, based on the gyro- and free-free emission it produced. An advantage of analyzing thermal gyro emission is its unique ability to precisely yield the magnetic field in the radiating volume. When combined with observationally-deduced plasma density and temperature, these magnetic field measurements offer a straightforward way of tracking evolution of the magnetic and thermal energies in the flare. For the event described here, the magnetic energy density in the radio-emitting volume declines over the flare rise phase, then stays roughly constant during the extended peak phase, but recovers to the original level over the decay phase. At the stage where the magnetic energy density decreases, the thermal energy density increases; however, this increase is insufficient, by roughly an order of magnitude, to compensate for the magnetic energy decrease. We conclude that the apparent decrease of the magnetic field in the radio source over the rise phase of the flare requires an upward propagating magnetic reconnection/plasma heating process, such as in the standard flare scenario, but with one remarkable difference: the absence of any significant nonthermal electron generation. We expect that the study of these rare thermal flares will better clarify the origin of such purely thermal events, characterized by significant energy release observed through the plasma heating, but without any measurable acceleration of the charged particles.This work was partially supported by NSF grants AGS-1250374 and AGS-1262772, and NASA grant NNX14AC87G.

  10. Estimating Flaring Probability from High-Cadence Images of the Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norquist, Donald C.; Balasubramaniam, K.

    2011-05-01

    We applied principal component analysis to 8-10 hour sequences of chromospheric H? images of selected solar active regions as observed by the U. S. Air Force Improved Solar Optical Observation Network (ISOON) telescope at Sacramento Peak, NM at one-minute intervals. A covariance matrix of all combinations of image time pairs was computed from the picture element H? intensities from each image sequence, and eigenvalues and eigenvectors were computed. Computation of explained variance from the eigenvalues indicated that 99.9% of the characteristics were represented by the first 50 eigenvectors or so. The leading eigenvectors were matched at each image time with a flare category indicator deduced from coincident active region area-average H? intensity and 1-8 Å GOES X-ray flux measurements at one-minute intervals. Multivariate discriminant analysis (MVDA) was applied to the eigenvector elements and flaring indicators from a training set of image sequences to compute a vector of coefficients whose linear combination with the eigenvector predictors maximizes the distinction among flaring groups. The discriminant function, computed from the dot product of the coefficients with the eigenvectors of an independent ISOON case, is used to compute the probability of each flaring group at each measurement time. Flare category indicators from independent case times are used to assess the flaring probability estimates. Multivariate logistic regression (MVLR) was also applied to the subset of eigenvectors in the training data, and the derived coefficients were also dotted with the independent eigenvalues to generate a separate flaring probability estimate. A total of 47 ISOON image sequences were available for training and flaring probability estimation. Preliminary results showed that the MVLR was competitive with MVDA in skill of diagnosing flaring probability. If this approach shows promise in a diagnostic mode, efforts will be made to extend it to short-term (1-3 hour) prognostic mode.

  11. Radiative hydrodynamic modelling and observations of the X-class solar flare on 2011 March 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Michael B.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Allred, Joel C.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigated the response of the solar atmosphere to non-thermal electron beam heating using the radiative transfer and hydrodynamics modelling code RADYN. The temporal evolution of the parameters that describe the non-thermal electron energy distribution were derived from hard X-ray observations of a particular flare, and we compared the modelled and observed parameters. Methods: The evolution of the non-thermal electron beam parameters during the X1.5 solar flare on 2011 March 9 were obtained from analysis of RHESSI X-ray spectra. The RADYN flare model was allowed to evolve for 110 s, after which the electron beam heating was ended, and was then allowed to continue evolving for a further 300 s. The modelled flare parameters were compared to the observed parameters determined from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy. Results: The model produced a hotter and denser flare loop than that observed and also cooled more rapidly, suggesting that additional energy input in the decay phase of the flare is required. In the explosive evaporation phase a region of high-density cool material propagated upward through the corona. This material underwent a rapid increase in temperature as it was unable to radiate away all of the energy deposited across it by the non-thermal electron beam and via thermal conduction. A narrow and high-density (ne ? 1015 cm-3) region at the base of the flare transition region was the source of optical line emission in the model atmosphere. The collision-stopping depth of electrons was calculated throughout the evolution of the flare, and it was found that the compression of the lower atmosphere may permit electrons to penetrate farther into a flaring atmosphere compared to a quiet Sun atmosphere.

  12. Characteristics of the photospheric magnetic field associated with solar flare initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ya-Hui; Chen, P. F.; Hsieh, Min-Shiu; Wu, S. T.; He, Han; Tsai, Tsung-Che E-mail: chenpf@nju.edu.cn E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: tctsai@narlabs.org.tw

    2014-05-01

    The physical environment governing the solar flare initiation is not fully understood, although there are significant efforts to address the relationship between magnetic non-potential parameters and early flare signatures. In this study, we attempt to characterize the flare initiation based on the processed Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 1600 Å, and RHESSI hard X-ray observations. Three flare events, the M6.6 flare on 2011 February 13, the X2.2 flare on 2011 February 15, and the X2.1 flare on 2011 September 6, in two active regions AR 11158 and AR 11283 are investigated. We analyze the source field strength in the photosphere, which is defined as the magnitude of the observed magnetic field deviation from the potential field. It is found that one of the strong source field regions above the magnetic polarity inversion line well connects the initial bright kernels of two conjugate ribbons. The results imply that the distribution of the photospheric source field strength can be used to locate the initiation site of flaring loops regardless of the configuration of pre-flare magnetic fields or the evolution of active regions. Moreover, the field configuration in the strong source field regions tends to become more inclined after flares, which is consistent with the coronal implosion scenario. We also employ a fast method to derive the total current density from the photospheric vector magnetogram in the framework of force-free field. This method can provide fast estimation of photospheric current density within a reasonable accuracy without appealing for the more accurate calculation from a model extrapolation.

  13. The interpretation of hard X-ray polarization measurements in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, J.; Emslie, A. G.; Petrosian, V.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of polarization of moderately hard X-rays in solar flares are reviewed and compared with the predictions of recent detailed modeling of hard X-ray bremsstrahlung production by non-thermal electrons. The recent advances in the complexity of the modeling lead to substantially lower predicted polarizations than in earlier models and more fully highlight how various parameters play a role in determining the polarization of the radiation field. The new predicted polarizations are comparable to those predicted by thermal modeling of solar flare hard X-ray production, and both are in agreement with the observations. In the light of these results, new polarization observations with current generation instruments are proposed which could be used to discriminate between non-thermal and thermal models of hard X-ray production in solar flares.

  14. A Catalog of Suzaku/WAM Hard X-Ray Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Akira; Minoshima, Takashi; Morigami, Kouichi; Suzuki, Masanobu; Shimamori, Atsushi; Sato, Yumi; Terada, Yukikatsu; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Urata, Yuji; Sonoda, Eri; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Sugita, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kyoko

    2010-10-01

    We developed a catalog of solar flares in the hard X-ray band observed with the Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) onboard the Suzaku satellite between 2005 July and 2009 November. During this period, 105 solar flares (GOES class X: 13, M: 29, C: 47, B: 16) were detected with WAM, including 10% of GOES-class C events reported during the same period. The observed photon flux ranged between 9 × 10-5 and 9 × 10-1 photons s-1 cm-2 keV-2 at 100 keV. The averaged hard X-ray spectrum for each solar flare was evaluated for 70 of the 105 events, and 43 of them were well fitted with a single power-law model with a photon index ranging between -7 and -3. We observed a weak trend where events with longer durations exhibited harder spectral slopes.

  15. The super-hot thermal component in the decay phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H.-A.; Lin, R. P.; Kane, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Solar X-ray observations from balloons and from the SMM and Hinotori spacecraft have revealed evidence for a superhot thermal component with a temperature of more than about 3 x 10 to the 7th K in many solar flares, in addition to the usual 10-20 x 10 to the 6th K soft X-ray flare plasma. The decay phase of 35 solar flare X-ray events observed by ISEE-3 during 1980 was systematically studied. Based on fits to the continuum X-ray spectrum in the 4.8-14 keV range and to the intensity of the 1.9 A feature of iron lines, it was found that 15 (about 43) of the analyzed events have a superhot thermla component in the decay phase of the flare. In this paper, the important properties of the superhot thermal component in the decay phase are summarized. It is found that an additional input of energy is required to maintain the superhot thermal components. Finally, it is suggested that the superhot thermal component in the decay phase is created through the reconnection of the magnetic field during the decay phase of solar flares.

  16. Using the Maximum X-ray Flux Ratio and X-ray Background to Predict Solar Flare Class

    E-print Network

    Winter, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of a relationship between the maximum ratio of the flare flux (namely, 0.5-4 Ang to the 1-8 Ang flux) and non-flare background (namely, the 1-8 Ang background flux), which clearly separates flares into classes by peak flux level. We established this relationship based on an analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray observations of ~ 50,000 X, M, C, and B flares derived from the NOAA/SWPC flares catalog. Employing a combination of machine learning techniques (K-nearest neighbors and nearest-centroid algorithms) we show a separation of the observed parameters for the different peak flaring energies. This analysis is validated by successfully predicting the flare classes for 100% of the X-class flares, 76% of the M-class flares, 80% of the C-class flares and 81% of the B-class flares for solar cycle 24, based on the training of the parametric extracts for solar flares in cycles 22-23.

  17. X-class Flares at the Maximum of Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Richard R.; Rock, Kristine A.

    2015-04-01

    17 instruments on 7 spacecraft were used to examine NOAA GOES X-class solar flares. This data set has unique spatial and temporal coverage of solar activity occurring from 15 February 2011 to 10 September 2014 and includes 32 X-class flare events.In 32 of 32 cases EUV running difference sequences of Fe XII disk images show the initiation of an LCPF (Nitta et al., 2013) at or near the time of flare onset. These features are generally seen moving upward and away from the X-flare site. In 28 of 32 cases the SWAVES instruments on the STEREO A & B spacecraft detected Type III radio bursts coincident in time with the flare initiation. The four flares that are exceptions are characterized as brief peaks in integrated X-ray flux.In 31 of 32 of the X-class flare events Cor1 imagers (1.04-4.0 Ro) initially show a rising arch followed by a cavity. In 27of 32 cases at increased heights from three vantage points STEREO and SOHO time sequences follow the development of the outward expansion of structure from 4.0-20 Ro.It is concluded from the imagery that the LCPF is a shock front (likely MHD fast mode) that surrounds CME and prominence material as structures rise and expand. Using measurements from the CME on 20110307, X5.4, mach number estimates of the shock strength range from 1.7-3.2 over the combined fields of view.For 25 of 32 events the CMEs detected were either characterized as halo events or demonstrated latitudinal and longitudinal expansion characteristics that would have created a halo for an observer located along the axis between the flare and the nose of the expanding shock. This configuration of a CME can be characterized as a bubble. It is concluded that bubble CMEs were associated with 78% of X-class flares during the maximum of solar cycle 24.In 6 of 32 cases all NASA proton detectors located at 1 AU distance from the sun were impacted by flare generated protons.Nitta, N. V., C. J. Schrijver, A. M. Title, W. Liu (2013) Large-scale Coronal Propagating Fronts in Solar Eruptions as Observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on Board the Solar Dynamics Observatory--an Ensemble Study, ApJ, 776:58 (13pp).

  18. Sensing the Earth’s low ionosphere during solar flares using VLF signals and goes solar X-ray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolarski, Aleksandra; Grubor, Davorka

    2014-06-01

    An analysis of D-region electron density height profile variations, induced by four isolated solar X-ray flares during period from September 2005 to December 2006, based on the amplitude and the phase delay perturbation of 22.1 kHz signal trace from Skelton (54.72 N, 2.88 W) to Belgrade (44.85 N, 20.38 E), coded GQD, was carried out. Solar flare data were taken from NOAA GOES12 satellite one-minute listings. For VLF data acquisition and recordings at the Institute of Physics, Belgrade, Serbia, the AbsPAL system was used. Starting from LWPCv21 code (Ferguson, 1998), the variations of the Earth-ionosphere waveguide characteristic parameters, sharpness and reflection height, were estimated during the flare conditions. It was found that solar flare events affected the VLF wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide by changing the lower ionosphere electron density height profile, in a different way, for different solar flare events.

  19. The Solar Flare 4: 10 keV X-ray Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The 4-10 keV solar flare spectrum includes highly excited lines of stripped Ca, Fe, and Ni ions as well as a continuum steeply falling with energy. Groups of lines at approximately 7 keV and approximately 8 keV, observed during flares by the broad-band RHESSI spectrometer and called here the Fe-line and Fe/Ni-line features, are formed mostly of Fe lines but with Ni lines contributing to the approximately 8 keV feature. Possible temperature indicators of these line features are discussed - the peak or centroid energies of the Fe-line feature, the line ratio of the Fe-line to the Fe/Ni-line features, and the equivalent width of the Fe-line feature. The equivalent width is by far the most sensitive to temperature. However, results will be confused if, as is commonly believed, the abundance of Fe varies from flare to flare, even during the course of a single flare. With temperature determined from the thermal continuum, the Fe-line feature becomes a diagnostic of the Fe abundance in flare plasmas. These results are of interest for other hot plasmas in coronal ionization equilibrium such as stellar flare plasmas, hot gas in galaxies, and older supernova remnants.

  20. High-temperature solar flare plasma behaviour from crystal spectrometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwester, Barbara; Sylwester, Janusz; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.; Kepa, Anna; Mrozek, Tomasz

    2015-08-01

    We discuss an analysis of spectra obtained from the Polish RESIK instrument flown on the CORONAS-F satellite. RESIK was a bent crystal spectrometer operating in the 3.3—6.1 Å range at high spectral and time resolution during flares over the 2002—2003 period, at the peak of the last solar cycle. Unlike many previous spectrometers, RESIK was accurately (20%) calibrated and crystal fluorescence was either eliminated or reduced to a minimum. The emission lines and continuum observed are formed at high temperatures (T > 3 MK) that are commonly present in active regions and flares. The spectra were observed during flares ranging in GOES importance from B and C up to multiples of X and with durations that were short and impulsive up to several hours. An analysis of absolute and relative intensities of lines and continuum that we performed for 33 flare events allowed the determination of the plasma composition (abundances of Si, S, Ar, K, and even the low-abundance element Cl) as well as a detailed study of the time evolution of the flare temperature structure from the differential emission measure (DEM). We will present the typical DEM evolutionary patterns of the flares seen and discuss their thermodynamics which helps our understanding of flares.

  1. Survey on Solar X-ray Flares and Associated Coherent Radio Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Grigis, Paolo C.; Csillaghy, André; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    The radio emission during 201 selected X-ray solar flares was surveyed from 100 MHz to 4 GHz with the Phoenix-2 spectrometer of ETH Zürich. The selection includes all RHESSI flares larger than C5.0 jointly observed from launch until June 30, 2003. Detailed association rates of radio emission during X-ray flares are reported. In the decimeter wavelength range, type III bursts and the genuinely decimetric emissions (pulsations, continua, and narrowband spikes) were found equally frequently. Both occur predominantly in the peak phase of hard X-ray (HXR) emission, but are less in tune with HXRs than the high-frequency continuum exceeding 4 GHz, attributed to gyrosynchrotron radiation. In 10% of the HXR flares, an intense radiation of the above genuine decimetric types followed in the decay phase or later. Classic meter-wave type III bursts are associated in 33% of all HXR flares, but only in 4% are they the exclusive radio emission. Noise storms were the only radio emission in 5% of the HXR flares, some of them with extended duration. Despite the spatial association (same active region), the noise storm variations are found to be only loosely correlated in time with the X-ray flux. In a surprising 17% of the HXR flares, no coherent radio emission was found in the extremely broad band surveyed. The association but loose correlation between HXR and coherent radio emission is interpreted by multiple reconnection sites connected by common field lines.

  2. Statistical relationship between the succeeding solar flares detected by the RHESSI satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs, L. G.; Gyenge, N.; Korsós, M. B.; Baranyi, T.; Forgács-Dajka, E.; Ballai, I.

    2014-06-01

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager has observed more than 80 000 solar energetic events since its launch on 2002 February 12. Using this large sample of observed flares, we studied the spatiotemporal relationship between succeeding flares. Our results show that the statistical relationship between the temporal and spatial differences of succeeding flares can be described as a power law of the form R(t) ˜ tp with p = 0.327 ± 0.007. We discuss the possible interpretations of this result as a characteristic function of a supposed underlying physics. Different scenarios are considered to explain this relation, including the case where the connectivity between succeeding events is realized through a shock wave in the post Sedov-Taylor phase or where the spatial and temporal relationship between flares is supposed to be provided by an expanding flare area in the sub-diffusive regime. Furthermore, we cannot exclude the possibility that the physical process behind the statistical relationship is the reordering of the magnetic field by the flare or it is due to some unknown processes.

  3. On the origin of the Extreme-Ultraviolet late phase of solar flares

    E-print Network

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Yuming; Cheng, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares typically have an impulsive phase that followed by a gradual phase as best seen in soft X-ray emissions. A recent discovery based on the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) observations onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) reveals that some flares exhibit a second large peak separated from the first main phase peak by tens of minutes to hours, which is coined as the flare's EUV late phase. In this paper, we address the origin of the EUV late phase by analyzing in detail two late phase flares, an M2.9 flare on 2010 October 16 and an M1.4 flare on 2011 February 18, using multi-passband imaging observations from the Atmospheric Imaing Assembly (AIA) onboard SDO. We find that: (1) the late phase emission originates from a different magnetic loop system, which is much larger and higher than the main phase loop system. (2) The two loop systems have different thermal evolution. While the late phase loop arcade reaches its peak brightness progressively at a later time spanning for more than one hour...

  4. Measurements and Modeling of Total Solar Irradiance in X-Class Solar Flares

    E-print Network

    Moore, Christopher Samuel; Hock, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) can detect changes in the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-Class solar ares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar ares presented in Woods et al. (2006), as well as an additional are measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five ares are then compared to the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-Class ares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar ares analyzed in the Emslie et al. (2012) study.

  5. Solar Demon: near real-time Flare, Dimming and EUV wave monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaikamp, Emil; Verbeeck, Cis

    Dimmings and EUV waves have been observed routinely in EUV images since 1996. They are closely associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and therefore provide useful information for early space weather alerts. On the one hand, automatic detection and characterization of dimmings and EUV waves can be used to gain better understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms. On the other hand, every dimming and EUV wave provides extra information on the associated front side CME, and can improve estimates of the geo-effectiveness and arrival time of the CME. Solar Demon has been designed to detect and characterize dimmings, EUV waves, as well as solar flares in near real-time on Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) data. The detection modules are running continuously at the Royal Observatory of Belgium on both quick-look data, as well as synoptic science data. The output of Solar Demon can be accessed in near real-time on the Solar Demon website, and includes images, movies, light curves, and the numerical evolution of several parameters. Solar Demon is the result of collaboration between the FP7 projects AFFECTS and COMESEP. Flare detections of Solar Demon are integrated into the COMESEP alert system. Here we present the Solar Demon detection algorithms and their output. We will show several interesting flare, dimming and EUV wave events, and present general statistics of the detections made so far during solar cycle 24.

  6. Search for correlations between solar flares and decay rate of radioactive nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, E.; Broggini, C.; Di Carlo, G.; Laubenstein, M.; Menegazzo, R.

    2013-03-01

    The decay rate of three different radioactive sources (40K, 137Cs and natTh) has been measured with NaI and Ge detectors. Data have been analyzed to search for possible variations in coincidence with the two strongest solar flares of the years 2011 and 2012. No significant deviations from standard expectation have been observed, with a few 10-4 sensitivity. As a consequence, we could not find any effect like that recently reported by Jenkins and Fischbach: a few per mil decrease in the decay rate of 54Mn during solar flares in December 2006.

  7. Search for correlations between solar flares and decay rate of radioactive nuclei

    E-print Network

    E. Bellotti; C. Broggini; G. Di Carlo; M. Laubenstein; R. Menegazzo

    2013-02-05

    The deacay rate of three different radioactive sources 40K, 137Cs and natTh has been measured with NaI and Ge detectors. Data have been analyzed to search for possible variations in coincidence with the two strongest solar flares of the years 2011 and 2012. No significant deviations from standard expectation have been observed, with a few 10-4 sensitivity. As a consequence, we could not find any effect like that recently reported by Jenkins and Fischbach: a few per mil decrease in the decay rate of 54Mn during solar flares in December 2006.

  8. About 3He Ions Predominant Acceleration During the January 20, 2005 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, E. V.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.

    We have studied some properties of the powerful solar flare of January 20, 2005 by methods of nuclear lines analysis. The results of temporal profiles investigation in corresponding to neutron capture energy bands allow the supposition about predominant acceleration of 3He ions in the corona, their subsequent propagation to the low chromosphere and the photosphere where the area of 2.223 MeV ?-line effective productions is located. The characteristics of accelerated 3He ions propagation processes and the basic explanation of observable properties of this solar flare due to the variations of 3He content are discussed in the presented article.

  9. Fluorescent excitation of photospheric Fe K-alpha emission during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, A. N.; Culhane, J. L.; Rapley, C. G.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Wolfson, C. J.; Acton, L. W.; Dennis, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    The Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the NASA Solar Maximum Mission satellite provides high spectral and temporal resolution observations of the Fe K-alpha lines. Analyses have been conducted of spectra from almost 50 solar flares that occurred during 1980. These data strongly support fluorescent excitation of photospheric iron by photons of E greater than 7.11 keV emitted by the hot coronal plasma produced during the flare. After comparison of the data with a model, the observed K-alpha line widths are discussed along with estimates of the size of the emitting region, the height of the coronal source and the photospheric iron abundance.

  10. High-energy particle production in solar flares (SEP, gamma-ray and neutron emissions). [solar energetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1987-01-01

    Electrons and ions, over a wide range of energies, are produced in association with solar flares. Solar energetic particles (SEPs), observed in space and near earth, consist of electrons and ions that range in energy from 10 keV to about 100 MeV and from 1 MeV to 20 GeV, respectively. SEPs are directly recorded by charged particle detectors, while X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron detectors indicate the properties of the accelerated particles (electrons and ions) which have interacted in the solar atmosphere. A major problem of solar physics is to understand the relationship between these two groups of charged particles; in particular whether they are accelerated by the same mechanism. The paper reviews the physics of gamma-rays and neutron production in the solar atmosphere and the method by which properties of the primary charged particles produced in the solar flare can be deduced. Recent observations of energetic photons and neutrons in space and at the earth are used to present a current picture of the properties of impulsively flare accelerated electrons and ions. Some important properties discussed are time scale of production, composition, energy spectra, accelerator geometry. Particular attention is given to energetic particle production in the large flare on June 3, 1982.

  11. Observations of Unresolved Photospheric Magnetic Fields in Solar Flares Using Fe i and Cr i Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordovskyy, M.; Lozitsky, V. G.

    2014-10-01

    The structure of the photospheric magnetic field during solar flares is examined using echelle spectropolarimetric observations. The study is based on several Fe i and Cr i lines observed at locations corresponding to brightest H? emission during thermal phase of flares. The analysis is performed by comparing magnetic-field values deduced from lines with different magnetic sensitivities, as well as by examining the fine structure of I± V Stokes-profiles' splitting. It is shown that the field has at least two components, with stronger unresolved flux tubes embedded in weaker ambient field. Based on a two-component magnetic-field model, we compare observed and synthetic line profiles and show that the field strength in small-scale flux tubes is about 2 - 3 kG. Furthermore, we find that the small-scale flux tubes are associated with flare emission, which may have implications for flare phenomenology.

  12. Gamma rays from pion decay - Evidence for long-term trapping of particles in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandzhavidze, Natalie; Ramaty, Reuven

    1992-01-01

    The energy spectrum and time dependence of the 50 MeV to 2 GeV gamma rays observed from the 1991 June 11 solar flare are analyzed. It is shown that the emission detected at the late phase of this flare with EGRET on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory can be explained by a model in which the bulk of the particles were accelerated during the impulsive phase and subsequently trapped in coronal magnetic loops. The observed spectrum was fit with a combination of pion decay radiation and primary electron bremsstrahlung. The 1991 June 11 data are compared with data for the 1982 June 3 and 1991 June 15 flares from which pion decay emission was also observed. The fact that the fluxes from these three flares are ordered in time in accordance with the predicted time dependence of emission produced by trapped particles provides support for the model.

  13. Observations of solar flare photon energy spectra from 20 keV to 7 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimori, M.; Watanabe, H.; Nitta, N.

    1985-01-01

    Solar flare photon energy spectra in the 20 keV to 7 MeV range are derived from the Apr. 1, Apr. 4, apr. 27 and May 13, 1981 flares. The flares were observed with a hard X-ray and a gamma-ray spectrometers on board the Hinotori satellite. The results show that the spectral shape varies from flare to flare and the spectra harden in energies above about 400 keV. Effects of nuclear line emission on the continuum and of higher energy electron bremsstrahlung are considered to explain the spectral hardening.

  14. The solar minimum X2.6/1B flare and CME of 9 July 1996. Pt. 1; Solar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, M. D.; Dryer, M.; Aurass, H.; DeForest, C.; Kiplinger, A. L.; Meisner, R.; Paswaters, S. E.; Smith, Z.; Tappin, S. J.; Thompson, B. J.; Watari, S.-I.; Lamy, P.; Mann, G.; Schwenn, R.; Michels, D. J.; Brueckner, G. E.; Howard, R. A.; Koomen, M.

    1997-01-01

    The solar observations from GOES-8, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Yohkoh satellite concerning the events of the X-class flare are discussed. The Michelson Doppler imager (MDI) magnetometer shows a new region of magnetic activity in AR 7978. The rapid development and evolution of this region is shown by the MDI and the extreme-ultraviolet Doppler telescope (EDT) data. The coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed using coronagraphs are presented. The possible association between the CME and the X-flare is considered.

  15. Two types of electron events in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daibog, E. I.; Kurt, V. G.; Logachev, Y. I.; Stolpovsky, V. G.

    1985-01-01

    The fluxes and spectra of the flare electrons measured on board Venera-I3 and I4 space probes are compared with the parameters of the hard (E sub x approximately 55 keV) and thermal X-ray bursts. The electron flux amplitude has been found to correlate with flare importance in the thermal X-ray range (r approximately 0.8). The following two types of flare events have been found in the electron component of SCR. The electron flux increase is accompanied by a hard X-ray burst and the electron spectrum index in the approximately 25 to 200 keV energy range is gamma approximately 2 to 3. The electron flux increase is not accompanied by a hard X-ray burst and the electron spectrum is softer (Delta gamma approximately 0.7 to 1.0).

  16. The relationship between energetic particles and flare properties for impulsive solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Reames, D. V.

    1990-01-01

    The impulsive mode of particle acceleration is studied by searching for 0.2-2 MeV electron increases associated with intense type III/V bursts. It is found that the presence of a type III/V burst in association with a relatively intense flare event indicates the acceleration and escape of greater than 100 KeV electrons. A list of type III/V electron events is compiled, showing that the majority included greater than 10 MeV proton increases, although they were not followed by a type II burst. The results suggest that there are two different modes of proton acceleration with the second mode becoming significant only for larger, gradual flares.

  17. IRIS observations of the Mg ii h and k lines during a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, G. S.; Simões, P. J. A.; Qiu, J.; Fletcher, L.

    2015-10-01

    The bulk of the radiative output of a solar flare is emitted from the chromosphere, which produces enhancements in the optical and UV continuum, and in many lines, both optically thick and thin. We have, until very recently, lacked observations of two of the strongest of these lines: the Mg ii h and k resonance lines. We present a detailed study of the response of these lines to a solar flare. The spatial and temporal behaviour of the integrated intensities, k/h line ratios, line of sight velocities, line widths and line asymmetries were investigated during an M class flare (SOL2014-02-13T01:40). Very intense, spatially localised energy input at the outer edge of the ribbon is observed, resulting in redshifts equivalent to velocities of ~15-26 km s-1, line broadenings, and a blue asymmetry in the most intense sources. The characteristic central reversal feature that is ubiquitous in quiet Sun observations is absent in flaring profiles, indicating that the source function increases with height during the flare. Despite the absence of the central reversal feature, the k/h line ratio indicates that the lines remain optically thick during the flare. Subordinate lines in the Mg ii passband are observed to be in emission in flaring sources, brightening and cooling with similar timescales to the resonance lines. This work represents a first analysis of potential diagnostic information of the flaring atmosphere using these lines, and provides observations to which synthetic spectra from advanced radiative transfer codes can be compared.

  18. Helioseismic analysis of the solar flare-induced sunquake of 2005 January 15

    E-print Network

    H. Moradi; A. -C. Donea; C. Lindsey; D. Besliu-Ionescu; P. S. Cally

    2007-04-26

    We report the discovery of one of the most powerful sunquakes detected to date, produced by an X1.2-class solar flare in active region 10720 on 2005 January 15. We used helioseismic holography to image the source of seismic waves emitted into the solar interior from the site of the flare. Acoustic egression power maps at 3 and 6 mHz with a 2 mHz bandpass reveal a compact acoustic source strongly correlated with impulsive hard X-ray and visible-continuum emission along the penumbral neutral line separating the two major opposing umbrae in the $\\delta$-configuration sunspot that predominates AR10720. The acoustic emission signatures were directly aligned with both hard X-ray and visible continuum emission that emanated during the flare. The visible continuum emission is estimated at $2.0 \\times 10^{23}$ J, approximately 500 times the seismic emission of $\\sim 4 \\times 10^{20}$ J. The flare of 2005 January 15 exhibits the same close spatial alignment between the sources of the seismic emission and impulsive visible continuum emission as previous flares, reinforcing the hypothesis that the acoustic emission may be driven by heating of the low photosphere. However, it is a major exception in that there was no signature to indicate the inclusion of protons in the particle beams thought to supply the energy radiated by the flare. The continued strong coincidence between the sources of seismic emission and impulsive visible continuum emission in the case of a proton-deficient white-light flare lends substantial support to the ``back -- warming'' hypothesis, that the low photosphere is significantly heated by intense Balmer and Paschen continuum-edge radiation from the overlying chromosphere in white-light flares.

  19. IMPLOSION OF CORONAL LOOPS DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, P. J. A.; Fletcher, L.; Hudson, H. S.; Russell, A. J. B. E-mail: lyndsay.fletcher@glasgow.ac.uk E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2013-11-10

    We study the relationship between implosive motions in a solar flare, and the energy redistribution in the form of oscillatory structures and particle acceleration. The flare SOL2012-03-09T03:53 (M6.4) shows clear evidence for an irreversible (stepwise) coronal implosion. Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images show at least four groups of coronal loops at different heights overlying the flaring core undergoing fast contraction during the impulsive phase of the flare. These contractions start around a minute after the flare onset, and the rate of contraction is closely associated with the intensity of the hard X-ray and microwave emissions. They also seem to have a close relationship with the dimming associated with the formation of the coronal mass ejection and a global EUV wave. Several studies now have detected contracting motions in the corona during solar flares that can be interpreted as the implosion necessary to release energy. Our results confirm this, and tighten the association with the flare impulsive phase. We add to the phenomenology by noting the presence of oscillatory variations revealed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite soft X-rays (SXR) and spatially integrated EUV emission at 94 and 335 Å. We identify pulsations of ?60 s in SXR and EUV data, which we interpret as persistent, semi-regular compressions of the flaring core region which modulate the plasma temperature and emission measure. The loop oscillations, observed over a large region, also allow us to provide rough estimates of the energy temporarily stored in the eigenmodes of the active-region structure as it approaches its new equilibrium.

  20. Study of Two Successive Three-ribbon Solar Flares on 2012 July 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Zeng, Zhicheng; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Cao, Wenda

    2014-01-01

    This Letter reports two rarely observed three-ribbon flares (M1.9 and C9.2) on 2012 July 6 in NOAA AR 11515, which we found using H? observations of 0.''1 resolution from the New Solar Telescope and Ca II H images from Hinode. The flaring site is characterized by an intriguing "fish-bone-like" morphology evidenced by both H? images and a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation, where two semi-parallel rows of low-lying, sheared loops connect an elongated, parasitic negative field with the sandwiching positive fields. The NLFFF model also shows that the two rows of loops are asymmetric in height and have opposite twists, and are enveloped by large-scale field lines including open fields. The two flares occurred in succession within half an hour and are located at the two ends of the flaring region. The three ribbons of each flare run parallel to the magnetic polarity inversion line, with the outer two lying in the positive field and the central one in the negative field. Both flares show surge-like flows in H? apparently toward the remote region, while the C9.2 flare is also accompanied by EUV jets possibly along the open field lines. Interestingly, the 12-25 keV hard X-ray sources of the C9.2 flare first line up with the central ribbon then shift to concentrate on the top of the higher branch of loops. These results are discussed in favor of reconnection along the coronal null line, producing the three flare ribbons and the associated ejections.

  1. Study of Two Successive Three-ribbon Solar Flares Using BBSO/NST Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Zeng, Zhicheng; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Cao, Wenda

    2014-06-01

    We studied two rarely observed three-ribbon flares (M1.9 and C9.2) on 2012 July 6 in NOAA AR 11515, which we found using H? observations of 0.1 arcsec resolution from the New Solar Telescope and Ca II H images from Hinode. The flaring site is characterized by an intriguing "fish-bone-like" morphology evidenced by both Halpha images and a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation, where two semi-parallel rows of low-lying, sheared loops connect an elongated, parasitic negative field with the sandwiching positive fields. The NLFFF model also shows that the two rows of loops are asymmetric in height and have opposite twists, and are enveloped by large-scale field lines including open fields. The two flares occurred in succession within half an hour and are located at the two ends of the flaring region. The three ribbons of each flare run parallel to the magnetic polarity inversion line, with the outer two lying in the positive field and the central one in the negative field. Both flares show surge-like flows in Halpha apparently toward the remote region, while the C9.2 flare is also accompanied by EUV jets possibly along the open field lines. Interestingly, the 12-25 keV hard X-ray sources of the C9.2 flare first line up with the central ribbon then shift to concentrate on the top of the higher branch of loops. These results are discussed in favor of reconnection along the coronal null line, producing the three flare ribbons and the associated ejections.

  2. STUDY OF TWO SUCCESSIVE THREE-RIBBON SOLAR FLARES ON 2012 JULY 6

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haimin; Liu, Chang; Deng, Na; Xu, Yan; Jing, Ju; Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda

    2014-01-20

    This Letter reports two rarely observed three-ribbon flares (M1.9 and C9.2) on 2012 July 6 in NOAA AR 11515, which we found using H? observations of 0.''1 resolution from the New Solar Telescope and Ca II H images from Hinode. The flaring site is characterized by an intriguing ''fish-bone-like'' morphology evidenced by both H? images and a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation, where two semi-parallel rows of low-lying, sheared loops connect an elongated, parasitic negative field with the sandwiching positive fields. The NLFFF model also shows that the two rows of loops are asymmetric in height and have opposite twists, and are enveloped by large-scale field lines including open fields. The two flares occurred in succession within half an hour and are located at the two ends of the flaring region. The three ribbons of each flare run parallel to the magnetic polarity inversion line, with the outer two lying in the positive field and the central one in the negative field. Both flares show surge-like flows in H? apparently toward the remote region, while the C9.2 flare is also accompanied by EUV jets possibly along the open field lines. Interestingly, the 12-25 keV hard X-ray sources of the C9.2 flare first line up with the central ribbon then shift to concentrate on the top of the higher branch of loops. These results are discussed in favor of reconnection along the coronal null line, producing the three flare ribbons and the associated ejections.

  3. The structure, stability and flaring of solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of recent progress in the theory of the magnetohydrodynamic behavior of coronal loops, beginning with a brief characterization of thy observations. The equilibrium magnetic field is described, along with the consequences of the empirical requirement for short-term, or infinite-conductivity, stability which is shown to be dominated by the end-effect influence of thy quasi-rigid photosphere. A new loop-flare model is then developed, which takes account of the finite loop length. The primary resistive-sausage-mode instability exhibits the necessary threshold behavior, and produces a number of spatially and energetically distinct flare-release manifestations.

  4. Modeling Solar Flare Hard X-ray Images and Spectra Observed with RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui

    2005-01-01

    Observations obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) of a flare on February 20, 2002 indicate a hard X-ray (HXR) coronal source at or near the top of a flare loop (called a HXR looptop source). The existence of the HXR looptop source suggests that magnetic reconnection, which is believed to power flares, occurs above the loop. In order to explain this HXR looptop source, I created a steady-state particle transport model, in which high-energy electrons are continuously injected at the top of a semicircular flare loop. Based on the simulation results, I find that the model predictions are consistent with the RHESSI observations in many respects, but the spectrum of the looptop source obtained from the model is steeper than that from the RHESSI data. This suggests that, instead of being accelerated above the loop as generally believed, the particles might be accelerated in the looptop itself. RHESSI-observations of three other homologous flares that occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002, provide strong evidence for the presence of a large scale current sheet above a flare loop, which is the basis of standard flare models. The most convincing finding is the presence of the temperature distribution of a separate coronal source above the flare loops: the hotter part of the coronal source was located lower in altitude the cooler part. Together with the fact that the hotter flare loops are higher than the cooler loops, the observations support the existence of a large-scale current sheet between the top of the flare loops and the coronal source above. Blob-Like sources along a line above the loop in the decay phase of the April 15, 2002, flare, which are suggestive of magnetic islands initiated by the tearing-mode instability, and the observation of a cusp structure in microwaves, further support the presence of the current sheet. The observations of the three homologous flares reveal two other features which are beyond the predictions of the standard flare models: the downward motion of flare loops in the early impulsive phase of each flare, and an initially stationary coronal source above the loops. These features me believed to be related to the formation and development of a current sheet. In particular, the downward loop motion seem to be a common phenomenon in flares, suggesting the necessity for modifications to the existing standard flare. models. Finally, thanks to the broad energy coverage of the RHESSI spectra, a low-energy cutoff of 28 (plus or minus 2) keV in the nonthermal electron distribution was determined for the April 15, 2002, flare. As a result, the energy carried by the nonthermal electrons is found to be comparable to the thermal energy of the flare, but one order of magnitude larger than the kinetic energy of the associated coronal mass ejection. The method used to deduce the electron low-energy cutoff will be useful in the analyses of similar events.

  5. Global thermospheric disturbances induced by a solar flare: a modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Huijun; Ren, Zhipeng; Liu, Libo; Chen, Yiding; Zhang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the global thermosphere disturbances during a solar flare by a theoretical model of thermosphere and ionosphere. The simulated results show significant enhancements in thermospheric density and temperature in dayside hemisphere. The greatest thermospheric response occurs at the subsolar point, which shows the important effect of solar zenith angle. The results show that there are also significant enhancements in nightside hemisphere. The sudden heating due to the solar flare disturbs the global thermosphere circulation, which results in the significant change in horizontal wind. There is a significant convergence process to the antisolar point and thus the strong disturbances in the nightside occur at the antisolar point. The peak enhancements of the neutral density around antisolar point occur at about 4 h after solar flare onset. The simulated results show that thermospheric response to a solar flare mainly depends on the total integrated energy into the thermosphere, not the peak value of EUV flux. The simulated results are basically consistent with the observations derived from the CHAMP satellite, which verified the results of this modeling study.

  6. The Temporal Behaviour of Lyman-alpha Emission During Solar Flares From SDO/EVE

    E-print Network

    Milligan, Ryan O

    2015-01-01

    Despite being the most prominent emission line in the solar spectrum, there has been a notable lack of studies devoted to variations in Lyman-alpha (Ly$\\alpha$) emission during solar flares in recent years. The few examples that do exist, however, have shown Ly$\\alpha$ emission to be a substantial radiator of the total energy budget of solar flares (on the order of 10%). It is also a known driver of fluctuations in earth's ionosphere. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory now provides broadband, photometric Ly$\\alpha$ data at 10 s cadence, and has observed scores of solar flares in the 5 years since it was launched. However, the time profiles appear to display a rise time of tens of minutes around the time of the flare onset. This is in stark contrast to the rapid, impulsive increase observed in other intrinsically chromospheric features (H$\\alpha$, Ly$\\beta$, LyC, C III, etc.). Furthermore, the Ly$\\alpha$ emission peaks around the time of the peak of thermal soft X-ray e...

  7. New RHESSI Results on Particle Acceleration and Energy Release in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    The primary scientific objective of NASA RHESSI mission (launched February 2002) is to investigate the physics of particle acceleration and energy release in solar flares, through imaging and spectroscopy of X-ray gamma-ray continuum and gamma-ray lines emitted by accelerated electrons and ions, respectively. Here I summarize the new solar observations, including the first hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy, the first high resolution spectroscopy of solar gamma ray lines, the first imaging of solar gamma ray lines and continuum, and the highest sensitivity hard X-ray observations of microflares and type III solar radio bursts.

  8. Properties of Chromospheric Evaporation and Plasma Dynamics of a Solar Flare from Iris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, Viacheslav M.; Vargas Dominguez, Santiago; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Sharykin, Ivan N.; Struminsky, Alexei B.; Zimovets, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of hot chromospheric plasma of solar flares is a key to understanding the mechanisms of flare energy release and particle acceleration. A moderate M1.0 class flare of 2014 June 12, (SOL2014-06-12T21:12) was simultaneously observed by NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and other spacecraft, and also by the New Solar Telescope at the BBSO. This paper presents the first part of our investigation focused on analysis of the IRIS data. Our analysis of the IRIS data in different spectral lines reveals a strong redshifted jet-like flow with a speed of ˜100 km s-1 of the chromospheric material before the flare. Strong nonthermal emission of the C ii k 1334.5 Å line, formed in the chromosphere-corona transition region, is observed at the beginning of the impulsive phase in several small (with a size of ˜1?) points. It is also found that the C ii k line is redshifted across the flaring region before, during, and after the impulsive phase. A peak of integrated emission of the hot (1.1 · 107 K) plasma in the Fe xxi 1354.1 Å line is detected approximately five minutes after the integrated emission peak of the lower temperature C ii k. A strong blueshift of the Fe xxi line across the flaring region corresponds to evaporation flows of the hot chromospheric plasma with a speed of 50 km s-1. Additional analysis of the RHESSI data supports the idea that the upper chromospheric dynamics observed by IRIS has features of “gentle” evaporation driven by heating of the solar chromosphere by accelerated electrons and by a heat flux from the flare energy release site.

  9. QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS IN SOLAR AND STELLAR FLARES: RE-EVALUATING THEIR NATURE IN THE CONTEXT OF POWER-LAW FLARE FOURIER SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Inglis, A. R.; Ireland, J.; Dominique, M.

    2015-01-10

    The nature of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar and stellar flares remains debated. Recent work has shown that power-law-like Fourier power spectra are an intrinsic property of solar and stellar flare signals, a property that many previous studies of this phenomenon have not accounted for. Hence a re-evaluation of the existing interpretations and assumptions regarding QPPs is needed. We adopt a Bayesian method for investigating this phenomenon, fully considering the Fourier power-law properties of flare signals. Using data from the PROBA2/Large Yield Radiometer, Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and Yohkoh/HXT instruments, we study a selection of flares from the literature identified as QPP events. Additionally, we examine optical data from a recent stellar flare that appears to exhibit oscillatory properties. We find that, for all but one event tested, an explicit oscillation is not required to explain the observations. Instead, the flare signals are adequately described as a manifestation of a power law in the Fourier power spectrum. However, for the flare of 1998 May 8, strong evidence for an explicit oscillation with P ? 14-16 s is found in the 17 GHz radio data and the 13-23 keV Yohkoh/HXT data. We conclude that, most likely, many previously analyzed events in the literature may be similarly described by power laws in the flare Fourier power spectrum, without invoking a narrowband, oscillatory component. Hence the prevalence of oscillatory signatures in solar and stellar flares may be less than previously believed. The physical mechanism behind the appearance of the observed power laws is discussed.

  10. Quasi-periodic Pulsations in Solar and Stellar Flares: Re-evaluating their Nature in the Context of Power-law Flare Fourier Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, A. R.; Ireland, J.; Dominique, M.

    2015-01-01

    The nature of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) in solar and stellar flares remains debated. Recent work has shown that power-law-like Fourier power spectra are an intrinsic property of solar and stellar flare signals, a property that many previous studies of this phenomenon have not accounted for. Hence a re-evaluation of the existing interpretations and assumptions regarding QPPs is needed. We adopt a Bayesian method for investigating this phenomenon, fully considering the Fourier power-law properties of flare signals. Using data from the PROBA2/Large Yield Radiometer, Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and Yohkoh/HXT instruments, we study a selection of flares from the literature identified as QPP events. Additionally, we examine optical data from a recent stellar flare that appears to exhibit oscillatory properties. We find that, for all but one event tested, an explicit oscillation is not required to explain the observations. Instead, the flare signals are adequately described as a manifestation of a power law in the Fourier power spectrum. However, for the flare of 1998 May 8, strong evidence for an explicit oscillation with P ? 14-16 s is found in the 17 GHz radio data and the 13-23 keV Yohkoh/HXT data. We conclude that, most likely, many previously analyzed events in the literature may be similarly described by power laws in the flare Fourier power spectrum, without invoking a narrowband, oscillatory component. Hence the prevalence of oscillatory signatures in solar and stellar flares may be less than previously believed. The physical mechanism behind the appearance of the observed power laws is discussed.

  11. Comparison between Hinode/SOT and SDO/HMI, AIA data for the study of the solar flare trigger process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Yumi; Kusano, Kanya; Imada, Shinsuke; Iida, Yusuke

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the mechanism that produces solar flares is important not only from the scientific point of view but also for improving space weather predictability. There are numerous observational and computational studies that have attempted to reveal the onset mechanism of solar flares. However, the underlying mechanism of flare onset remains elusive. To elucidate the flare trigger mechanism, we analyzed several flare events which were observed by Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) in our previous study. Because of the limitation of the SOT field of view, however, only four events in the Hinode data sets have been usable. Therefore, increasing the number of events is required for evaluating the flare trigger models. We investigated the applicability of data obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to increase the data sample for a statistical analysis of the flare trigger process. SDO regularly observes the full disk of the sun and all flares, although its spatial resolution is lower than that of Hinode. We investigated the M6.6 flare which occurred on 2011 February 13, and compared the analyzed data of SDO with the results of our previous study using Hinode/SOT data. Filter and vector magnetograms obtained by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and filtergrams from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 1600 Å were employed. From the comparison of small-scale magnetic configurations and chromospheric emission prior to the flare onset, we confirmed that the trigger region is detectable with the SDO data. We also measured the magnetic shear angles of the active region and the azimuth and strength of the flare trigger field. The results were consistent with our previous study. We concluded that statistical studies of the flare trigger process are feasible with SDO as well as Hinode data. We also investigated the temporal evolution of the magnetic field before the flare onset with SDO.

  12. High temporal resolution measurements of linear polarization in solar flare's H? line.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotr?, P.

    Since the summer season 1998 a system consisting of a Wollaston prism and ?/2 plate is experimentally tested in the complex of video cameras used both in the image and in the spectral data acquisition of the Ond?ejov Multichannel Flare Spectrograph. In addition to the slit-jaw camera and to the three other video cameras working in H?, H? (resp. in He D3) and in the Ca II 854.2 nm another CCD video camera for measurements of linear polarization in H? spectral line has been added. The main purpose of this set of fast detectors is to observe solar flare spectra and images and to detect fast variations of intensity and linear polarization expected at the beginning and during initial phases of solar flares. Main advantages and limitations of the system are briefly described from the points of view of its scientific philosophy, intends and outputs. Some obtained results, experience and future prospects are discussed.

  13. Interrelation of soft and hard X-ray emissions during solar flares. I - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Kiplinger, A. L.; Zarro, D. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Lemen, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The interrelation between the acceleration and heating of electrons and ions during impulsive solar flares is determined on the basis of simulataneous observations of hard and soft X-ray emission from the Solar Maximum Mission at high time resolution (6 s). For all the flares, the hard X-rays are found to have a power-law spectrum which breaks down during the rise phase and beginning of the decay phase. After that, the spectrum changes to either a single power law or a power law that breaks up at high energies. The characteristics of the soft X-ray are found to depend on the flare position. It is suggested that small-scale quasi-static electric fields are important for determining the acceleration of the X-ray-producing electrons and the outflowing chromospheric ions.

  14. Evidence for gentle chromospheric evaporation during the gradual phase of large solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmieder, B.; Forbes, T. G.; Malherbe, J. M.; Machado, M. E.

    1987-01-01

    The Multichannel Subtractive Double Pass Spectrograph of the Meudon solar tower is used to obtain high spatial resolution H-alpha line profiles during the gradual phase of three solar flares. In all cases, small blueshifts lasting for several hours are observed in the flare ribbons. By contrast, the region between the two ribbons exhibits large redshifts that are typical of H-alpha post flare loops. The blueshifts in the ribbons is interpreted as upward chromospheric flows of 0.5-10 km/s, and the possible ambiguities of the interpretation are discussed. A preliminary analysis indicates that such upflows are sufficient to supply the greater than 10 to the 16th g of mass needed to maintain a dense H-alpha postflare loop system in the corona.

  15. Observations with the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer - The impulsive solar flares of 1980 March 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Reppin, C.; Rieger, E.; Pinkau, K.; Kanbach, G.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma-ray continuum emission from 0.3 to 1 MeV was observed with the gamma-ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite during two impulsive solar flares on 1980 March 29, from active region 2363 at 0918 UT and from active region 2357 at 0955 UT. Evidence is presented for a hardening of the spectrum during the impulsive phase of the flares. The photon intensity greater than 100 keV appears to decay at a slower rate than that at lower energies. Time-integrated photon spectra for both flares are incompatible with a single-temperature thermal-bremsstrahlung model. Upper limits for prompt and delayed gamma-ray lines are presented.

  16. Ionization effects due to solar flare on terrestrial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Tan, A.

    1976-01-01

    Sudden frequency deviation ionospheric disturbances related to the flares of May 18 and 19, 1973 were observed from the NASA/MSFC high frequency Doppler sounder array system in Huntsville, Alabama. The results are compared with those observed at Table Mountain near Boulder, Colorado and at the University of Hawaii.

  17. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Klopf, J. Michael; Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sergio

    2014-07-01

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed "double spectra." Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  18. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Klopf, J.; Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sérgio

    2014-08-10

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-terahertz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the gigahertz range. Suggested interpretations explain the terahertz spectral component but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed 'double spectra'. Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at a higher frequency, thus producing a double-peaked spectrum. Successful CSR simulations are shown to fit actual burst spectral observations, using typical flaring physical parameters and power-law energy distributions for the accelerated electrons. The simulations consider an energy threshold below which microbunching is not possible because of Coulomb repulsion. Only a small fraction of the radiating charges accelerated to energies above the threshold is required to produce the microwave component observed for several events. The ISR/CSR mechanism can occur together with other emission processes producing the microwave component. It may bring an important contribution to microwaves, at least for certain events where physical conditions for the occurrence of the ISR/CSR microbunching mechanism are possible.

  19. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Imada, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

  20. Plasma heating in solar flares and their soft and hard X-ray emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the energy budgets of two single-loop-like flares observed in X-ray are analyzed under the assumption that nonthermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 February 20 and June 2, respectively. Using a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic code for both flares, the energy deposited in the chromosphere was derived applying RHESSI observational data. The use of the Fokker-Planck formalism permits the calculation of distributions of the NTEs in flaring loops and thus spatial distributions of the X-ray nonthermal emissions and integral fluxes for the selected energy ranges that were compared with the observed ones. Additionally, a comparative analysis of the spatial distributions of the signals in the RHESSI images was conducted for the footpoints and for all the flare loops in selected energy ranges with these quantities' fluxes obtained from the models. The best compatibility of the model and observations was obtained for the 2002 June 2 event in the 0.5-4 Å GOES range and total fluxes in the 6-12 keV, 12-25 keV, 20-25 keV, and 50-100 keV energy bands. Results of photometry of the individual flaring structures in a high energy range show that the best compliance occurred for the 2002 June 2 flare, where the synthesized emissions were at least 30% higher than the observed emissions. For the 2002 February 20 flare, synthesized emission is about four times lower than the observed one. However, in the low energy range the best conformity was obtained for the 2002 February 20 flare, where emission from the model is about 11% lower than the observed one. The larger inconsistency occurs for the 2002 June 2 solar flare, where synthesized emission is about 12 times greater or even more than the observed emission. Some part of these differences may be caused by inevitable flaws of the applied methodology, like by an assumption that the model of the flare is symmetric and there are no differences in the emissions originating from the feet of the flares loop and by relative simplicity of the applied numerical 1D code and procedures. No doubt a significant refinement of the applied numerical models and more sophisticated implementation of the various physical mechanisms involved are required to achieve a better agreement. Despite these problems, a collation of modeled results with observations shows that soft and hard X-ray emissions observed for analyzed single-loop-like events may be fully explained by electron-beam-driven evaporation only.

  1. HELIOSEISMIC RESPONSE TO THE X2.2 SOLAR FLARE OF 2011 FEBRUARY 15

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovichev, A. G.

    2011-06-10

    The X2.2-class solar flare of 2011 February 15 produced a powerful 'sunquake' event, representing a helioseismic response to the flare impact in the solar photosphere, which was observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The impulsively excited acoustic waves formed a compact wave packet traveling through the solar interior and appearing on the surface as expanding wave ripples. The initial flare impacts were observed in the form of compact and rapid variations of the Doppler velocity, line-of-sight magnetic field, and continuum intensity. These variations formed a typical two-ribbon flare structure, and are believed to be associated with thermal and hydrodynamic effects of high-energy particles heating the lower atmosphere. The analysis of the SDO/HMI and X-ray data from RHESSI shows that the helioseismic waves were initiated by the photospheric impact in the early impulsive phase, observed prior to the hard X-ray (50-100 keV) impulse, and were probably associated with atmospheric heating by relatively low-energy electrons ({approx}6-50 keV) and heat flux transport. The impact caused a short motion in the sunspot penumbra prior to the appearance of the helioseismic wave. It is found that the helioseismic wave front traveling through a sunspot had a lower amplitude and was significantly delayed relative to the front traveling outside the spot. These observations open new perspectives for studying the flare photospheric impacts and for using the flare-excited waves for sunspot seismology.

  2. Imaging solar flares in hard X-rays using Fourier telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jonathan W.; Davis, John M.; Emslie, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    The sun emits hard X-rays (above 10 keV) during solar flares. Imaging hard X-ray sources on the sun with spatial resolutions on the order of 1-5 arcsec and integration times of 1 sec will provide greater insight into the energy release processes during a solar flare. In these events, tremendous amounts of energy stored in the solar magnetic field are rapidly released leading to emission across the electromagnetic spectrum. Two Fourier telescope designs, a spatial modulation collimator and a rotating modulation collimator, were developed to image the full sun in hard X-rays (10-100 keV) in an end-to-end simulation. Emission profiles were derived for two hard X-ray solar flare models taken from the current solar theoretical literature and used as brightness distributions for the telescope simulations. Both our telescope models, tailored to image solar sources, were found to perform equally well, thus offering the designer significant flexibility in developing systems for space-based platforms. Given sufficient sensitive areas, Fourier telescopes are promising concepts for imaging solar hard X-rays.

  3. Plasma Heating to Super-Hot Temperatures (>30 MK) in the August 9, 2011 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, Ivan; Struminsky, Alexei; Zimovets, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the August 9, 2011 solar flare of X-ray class X6.9, the "hottest" flare from 2000 to 2012, with a peak plasma temperature according to GOES data of 33 MK. Our goal is to determine the cause of such an anomalously high plasma temperature and to investigate the energy balance in the flare region with allowance made for the presence of a super-hot plasma (>30 MK). We analyze the RHESSI, GOES, AIA/SDO, and EVE/SDO data and discuss the spatial structure of the flare region and the results of our spectral analysis of its X-ray emission. Our analysis of the RHESSI X-ray spectra is performed in the one-temperature and two-temperature approximations by taking into account the emission of hot (20 MK) and super-hot (45 MK) plasmas. The hard X-ray spectrum in both models is fitted by power laws. The observed peculiarities of the flare are shown to be better explained in terms of the two-temperature model, in which the super-hot plasma is located at the flare loop tops (or in the magnetic cusp region). The formation of the super-hot plasma can be associated with its heating through primary energy release and with the suppression of thermal conduction.

  4. Multiwavelength Study of M8.9/3B Solar Flare from AR NOAA 10960

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Pankaj; Filippov, B; Uddin, Wahab

    2010-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of a long duration white-light solar flare (M8.9/3B) event that occurred on 4 June 2007 from NOAA AR 10960. The flare was observed by several spaceborne instruments, namely SOHO/MDI, Hinode/SOT, TRACE and STEREO/SECCHI. The flare was initiated near a small, positive-polarity, satellite sunspot at the centre of the AR, surrounded by opposite-polarity field regions. MDI images of the AR show considerable amount of changes in a small positive-polarity sunspot of delta configuration during the flare event. SOT/G-band (4305 A) images of the sunspot also suggest the rapid evolution of the positive-polarity sunspot with highly twisted penumbral filaments before the flare event, which were oriented in the counterclockwise direction. It shows the change in orientation and also remarkable disappearance of twisted penumbral filaments (~35-40%) and enhancement in umbral area (~45-50%) during the decay phase of the flare. TRACE and SECCHI observations reveal the successive activation...

  5. Solar Flare Tracking Using Image Processing Techniques , Frank Y. Shih1

    E-print Network

    images. The classification rate is more than 95%, and running time is less than 0.3 second using our by comparing differences between consecutive images. In the first step, we filter noises and align the centerSolar Flare Tracking Using Image Processing Techniques Ming Qu1 , Frank Y. Shih1 , Ju Jing2

  6. Modeling the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere response to an intense X-class solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, P.; Souza, J.; Abdu, M. A.; Paes, R. D. R.; Santos, J. S.; Marques, M. S.; Bailey, G. J.; Cueva, R.; De Nardin, C. M.; Takahashi, H.; Batista, I. S.; Chen, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the ionospheric response close to the subsolar point due to the strong solar flare (X2.8) that occurred on May 13th, 2013. The present work discusses the sudden disturbances observed in the major ionospheric parameters, such as in the E-region current system as obtained from ground based magnetometer observations near magnetic equator, and at low and mid-latitude stations. A strong intensification of the eastward Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ) was observed over Peru. The dayside ionosphere showed an abrupt increase of the Total Electron Content (TEC) over South America, especially over the low latitude region, due to the flare enhanced ionizing solar radiation flux. In this work we have used the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model (SUPIM) to model the TEC enhancement as arising from the flare enhanced solar EUV flux and soft X-rays. The simulation results are compared with the observational data to validate our results. The overall results can significantly advance our knowledge of ionospheric photochemistry and dynamics to improve our predictive capability on the low latitude ionospheric response to solar flares.

  7. SolarSoft Desat Package for the Recovery of Saturated AIA Flare Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Richard Alan; Torre, Gabriele; Piana, Michele; Massone, AnnaMaria

    2015-04-01

    The dynamic range of EUV images has been limited by the problem of CCD saturation as seen countless times in movies of solare flares made using the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO AIA). Concurrent with the saturation are the eight rays emanating from the saturation locus which are the result of diffraction off the wire meshes that support the EUV passband filters. This is the problem and its solution in a nutshell. By utilizing techniques similar to those used for making images from the rotating modulation collimators on the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) we have developed a software package that can be used to make images of the EUV flare kernels in a highly automated way as described in Schwartz et al. (2014). Starting from cutouts centered around a flaring region, the software uses the point-spread-function (PSF) of the diffraction pattern to identify and reconstruct the region of the primary saturation. The software also uses the best information available to reconstruct the general scene obscured from overflow saturation and subtracts away the diffraction fringes. It is not a total correction for the PSF but is meant to provide the flare images above all. The software is freely available and distributed within the DESAT package of Solar Software.(Schwartz, R. A., Torre, G., & Piana, M. (2014), Astrophysical Journal Letters, 793, LL23 )

  8. Effect of radioactivity decrease. Is there a link with solar flares?

    E-print Network

    A. G. Parkhomov

    2010-05-15

    Results obtained with multichannel installation created for long-term studies of various processes, are collated with the data published by J.H. Jenkins and E.Fischbach, who found a decrease of 54Mn radioactivity near the time of series of solar flares between 5 and 17 December 2006. Analysis of the data from our installation in December 2006 has not revealed any deviations from the usual behaviour of the count rates for 90Sr-90Y, 60Co and 239Pu sources. The same can be said of the data collected during the period of highly powerful solar flares between 19 October and 4 November 2003. Apparent drops in the count rate were detected between 10 and 12 May 2002 while registering the activity of 60Co and on 19 and 20 June 2004 for 90Sr-90Y source. Around the time of these events, no observations of large solar flares were reported. Thus, proposed link between the drop in the rates of radioactive decay and appearance of solar flares could not be confirmed. From obtained outcomes follows, that the radioactivity drop effect, if it really exists, is rather rare, and that the reason calling this effect unequally influences various radioactive sources.

  9. ELECTROMAGNETIC AND CORPUSCULAR EMISSION FROM THE SOLAR FLARE OF 1991 JUNE 15: CONTINUOUS ACCELERATON OF

    E-print Network

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    and radio emission from the 1991 June 15 solar flare are considered. We have calculated the spectrum additional pulses of energy release occurred and the time profiles of cm-radio emission and 7-rays in the 0V was observed by the GAMMA-1 telescope (Akimov et al., 1991; Leikov et al., 1993). This emission is a signature

  10. NST and IRIS multi-wavelength observations of an M1.0 class solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Domínguez, Santiago; Sadykov, Viacheslav; Kosovichev, Alexander; Sharykin, Ivan; Struminsky, Alexei; Zimovets, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    Although solar flares are the most energetic events in the Solar System and have direct impact in the interplanetary space and ultimately in our planet, there are still many unresolved issues concerning their generation, the underlying processes of particle acceleration involved, the effect at different layer in the solar atmosphere, among others. This work presents new coordinated observations from the New Solar Telescope (NST) and the space telescope IRIS that acquired simultaneous observations of an M1.0 class flare occurred on 12 June, 2014 in active region NOAA 12087. NST filtergrams using the TiO filter, together with chromospheric data from the Halpha line allow us to study the evolution of the event from the first signs of the intensification of the intensity in the region. We focused on a small portion where the intensity enhancement in Halpha (blue and red wings) seems to be triggered, and discovered a rapid expansion of a flux-rope structure near the magnetic neutral line, in the sequence of high-resolution photospheric images. IRIS observations evidenced strong emission of the chromospheric and transition region lines during the flare. Jet-like structures are detected before the initiation of the flare in chromospheric lines and strong non-thermal emission in the transition region at the beginning of the impulsive phase. Evaporation flows with velocities up to 50 km/s occurred in the hot chromospheric plasma. We interpreted the result in terms of the “gentle” evaporation that occurs after accelerated particles heat the chromosphere.

  11. Solar flares observed simultaneously with SphinX, GOES and RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozek, Tomasz; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Sylwester, Barbara; Sylwester, Janusz; K?pa, Anna; Gryciuk, Magdalena

    2013-07-01

    In February 2009, during recent deepest solar minimum, Polish Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) begun observations of the Sun in the energy range of 1.2-15 keV. SphinX was almost 100 times more sensitive than GOES X-ray Sensors. The silicon PIN diode detectors used in the experiment were carefully calibrated on the ground using Synchrotron Radiation Source BESSY II. The SphinX energy range overlaps with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) energy range. The instrument provided us with observations of hundreds of very small flares and X-ray brightenings. We have chosen a group of solar flares observed simultaneously with GOES, SphinX and RHESSI and performed spectroscopic analysis of observations wherever possible. The analysis of thermal part of the spectra showed that SphinX is a very sensitive complementary observatory for RHESSI and GOES.

  12. The isotopic and elemental abundances of neon nuclei accelerated in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, W. F.; Simpson, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The relative isotopic abundances of Ne-20 and Ne-22 in seven solar flares were determined from measurements of the satellite IMP 8, yielding the ratio Ne-20/Ne-22 = 7.7 (+2.3, -1.5) for solar chromospheric matter. This value is in agreement with the ratio for the component neon-A (the 'primordial' component) found in carbonaceous chondrites. An elemental abundance ratio Ne/O = 0.14 + or - 0.01 also has been obtained which agrees closely with earlier reported measurements. It is shown that the effects of preferential acceleration relative to solar-system abundances with increasing charge number observed for some solar flares - though biasing the elemental ratio - does not appear to influence the neon isotopic abundances.

  13. Longitudinal dependence of the interplanetary perturbation produced by energetic type 4 solar flares and of the associated cosmic ray modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Storini, M.; Villoresi, G.; Pinter, S.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most significant features of the flare-associated Forbush decreases (Fds) in the galatctic cosmic ray (c.r.) is the so-called East-West asymmetry: the solar flares (Sfs) observed in the Eastern or central region of the solar disk exhibit a higher probability to cause large Fds than the Sfs occurring in the Western portion of the disk. In particular the interplanetary perturbations generated by Type IV Sfs depress the c.r. intensity in a vast spiral cone-like region (modulated region) which extends along the interplanetary magnetic field from the neighborhood of the active region to the advancing perturbation, and that, immediately after the flare-generated perturbation, the maximum c.r. modulation is observed between 0 and 40 deg. W of the meridian plane crossings the flare site at time of flare (flare's meridian plane).

  14. CONTINUUM CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE SDO/AIA PASSBANDS DURING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Milligan, Ryan O.; McElroy, Sarah A.

    2013-11-01

    Data from the Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph component of the Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used to quantify the contribution of continuum emission to each of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), also on SDO, during an X-class solar flare that occurred on 2011 February 15. Both the pre-flare-subtracted EVE spectra and fits to the associated free-free continuum were convolved with the AIA response functions of the seven EUV passbands at 10 s cadence throughout the course of the flare. It was found that 10%-25% of the total emission in the 94 Å, 131 Å, 193 Å, and 335 Å passbands throughout the main phase of the flare was due to free-free emission. Reliable measurements could not be made for the 171 Å channel, while the continuum contribution to the 304 Å channel was negligible due to the presence of the strong He II emission line. Up to 50% of the emission in the 211 Å channel was found to be due to free-free emission around the peak of the flare, while an additional 20% was due to the recombination continuum of He II. The analysis was extended to a number of M- and X-class flares and it was found that the level of free-free emission contributing to both the 171 Å and 211 Å passbands increased with increasing GOES class. These results suggest that the amount of continuum emission that contributes to AIA observations during flares is more significant than stated in previous studies which used synthetic, rather than observed, spectra. These findings highlight the importance of spectroscopic observations carried out in conjunction with those from imaging instruments so that the data are interpreted correctly.

  15. RADIOACTIVE POSITRON EMITTER PRODUCTION BY ENERGETIC ALPHA PARTICLES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R. J.; Kozlovsky, B.; Share, G. H. E-mail: benz@wise.tau.ac.il

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the 0.511 MeV positron-annihilation line from solar flares are used to explore the flare process in general and ion acceleration in particular. In flares, positrons are produced primarily by the decay of radioactive positron-emitting isotopes resulting from nuclear interactions of flare-accelerated ions with ambient solar material. Kozlovsky et al. provided ion-energy-dependent production cross sections for 67 positron emitters evaluated from their threshold energies (some <1 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) to a GeV nucleon{sup –1}, incorporating them into a computer code for calculating positron-emitter production. Adequate cross-section measurements were available for proton reactions, but not for ?-particle reactions where only crude estimates were possible. Here we re-evaluate the ?-particle cross sections using new measurements and nuclear reaction codes. In typical large gamma-ray line flares, proton reactions dominate positron production, but ?-particle reactions will dominate for steeper accelerated-ion spectra because of their relatively low threshold energies. With the accelerated-{sup 3}He reactions added previously, the code is now reliable for calculating positron production from any distribution of accelerated-ion energies, not just those of typical flares. We have made the code available in the online version of the Journal. We investigate which reactions, projectiles, and ion energies contribute to positron production. We calculate ratios of the annihilation-line fluence to fluences of other gamma-ray lines. Such ratios can be used in interpreting flare data and in determining which nuclear radiation is most sensitive for revealing acceleration of low-energy ions at the Sun.

  16. Semiempirical photospheric models of a solar flare on May 28, 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriets, E. S.; Kondrashova, N. N.

    2015-02-01

    The variation of the photosphere physical state during the decay phase of SF/B6.8-class solar flare on May 28, 2012 in active region NOAA 11490 is studied. We used the data of the spectropolarimetric observations with the French-Italian solar telescope THEMIS (Tenerife, Spain). Semi-empirical model atmospheres are derived from the inversion with SIR (Stokes Inversion based on Response functions) code. The inversion was based on Stokes profiles of six photospheric lines. Each model atmosphere has a two-component structure: a magnetic flux tube and non-magnetic surroundings. The Harvard Smithsonian Reference Atmosphere (HSRA) has been adopted for the surroundings. The macroturbulent velocity and the filling factor were assumed to be constant with the depth. The optical depth dependences of the temperature, magnetic field strength, and line-of-sight velocity are obtained from inversion. According to the received model atmospheres, the parameters of the magnetic field and the thermodynamical parameters changed during the decay phase of the flare. The model atmospheres showed that the photosphere remained in a disturbed state during observations after the maximum of the flare. There are temporal changes in the temperature and the magnetic field strength optical depth dependences. The temperature enhancement in the upper photospheric layers is found in the flaring atmospheres relative to the quiet-Sun model. The downflows are found in the low and upper photosphere at the decay phase of the flare.

  17. IRIS Observations of the Mg II h & k Lines During a Solar Flare

    E-print Network

    Kerr, Graham S; Qiu, Jiong; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    The bulk of the radiative output of a solar flare is emitted from the chromosphere, which produces enhancements in the optical and UV continuum, and in many lines, both optically thick and thin. We have, until very recently, lacked observations of two of the strongest of these lines: the Mg II h & k resonance lines. We present a detailed study of the response of these lines to a solar flare. The spatial and temporal behaviour of the integrated intensities, k/h line ratios, line of sight velocities, line widths and line asymmetries were investigated during an M class flare (SOL2014-02-13T01:40). Very intense, spatially localised energy input at the outer edge of the ribbon is observed, resulting in redshifts equivalent to velocities of ~15-26km/s, line broadenings, and a blue asymmetry in the most intense sources. The characteristic central reversal feature that is ubiquitous in quiet Sun observations is absent in flaring profiles, indicating that the source function increases with height during the flare....

  18. Oblique Bernstein Mode Generation Near the Upper-hybrid Frequency in Solar Pre-flare Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryshtal, A.; Fedun, V.; Gerasimenko, S.; Voitsekhovska, A.

    2015-11-01

    We study analytically the generation process of the first harmonics of the pure electron weakly oblique Bernstein modes. This mode can appear as a result of the rise and development of a corresponding instability in a solar active region. We assume that this wave mode is modified by the influence of pair Coulomb collisions and a weak large-scale sub-Dreicer electric field in the pre-flare chromosphere near the footpoints of a flare loop. To describe the pre-flare plasma we used the model of the solar atmosphere developed by Fontenla, Avrett, and Loeser ( Astrophys. J. 406, 319, 1993). We show that the generated first harmonic is close to the upper-hybrid frequency. This generation process begins at the very low threshold values of the sub-Dreicer electric field and well before the beginning of the preheating phase of a flare. We investigate the necessary conditions for the existence of non-damped first harmonics of oblique Bernstein waves with small amplitudes in the flare area.

  19. Oblique Bernstein Mode Generation Near the Upper-hybrid Frequency in Solar Pre-flare Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryshtal, A.; Fedun, V.; Gerasimenko, S.; Voitsekhovska, A.

    2015-10-01

    We study analytically the generation process of the first harmonics of the pure electron weakly oblique Bernstein modes. This mode can appear as a result of the rise and development of a corresponding instability in a solar active region. We assume that this wave mode is modified by the influence of pair Coulomb collisions and a weak large-scale sub-Dreicer electric field in the pre-flare chromosphere near the footpoints of a flare loop. To describe the pre-flare plasma we used the model of the solar atmosphere developed by Fontenla, Avrett, and Loeser (Astrophys. J. 406, 319, 1993). We show that the generated first harmonic is close to the upper-hybrid frequency. This generation process begins at the very low threshold values of the sub-Dreicer electric field and well before the beginning of the preheating phase of a flare. We investigate the necessary conditions for the existence of non-damped first harmonics of oblique Bernstein waves with small amplitudes in the flare area.

  20. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M.; Krucker, Säm; Lin, Robert P.

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ?11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (?100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  1. Correlation of hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares

    E-print Network

    Kuhar, Matej; Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martínez; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego; Hudson, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from RHESSI (Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) and HMI (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager). We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 \\r{A} summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 seconds around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ~50 keV. At higher electron energies the co...

  2. HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES

    SciTech Connect

    Kawate, T.; Nishizuka, N.; Oi, A.; Ohyama, M.; Nakajima, H.

    2012-03-10

    We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

  3. The isotropic condition of energetic particles emitted from a large solar flare. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalding, J.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope abundance ratios for 5 to 50 MeV/nuc nuclei from a large solar flare were measured. The measurements were made by the heavy isotope spectrometer telescope (HIST) on the ISEE-3 satellite orbiting the Sun near an Earth-Sun liberation point approximately one million miles sunward of the Earth. Finite values for the isotope abundance ratios C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, O-18/O-16, Ne-22/Ne-20, Mg-25/Mg-24, and Mg-26/Mg-24, and upper limits for the isotope abundance ratios He-3/He-4, C-14/C-12, O-17/O-16 and Ne-21/Ne-20 were reported. Element abundances and spectra were measured to compare the flare with other reported flares. The flare is a typical large flare with low Fe/O abundance or = to 0.1). For C-13/C-12, N-15/N-14, O-18/O-16, Mg-25/Mg-24 and Mg-26/Mg-24 isotope abundance ratios agree with the solar system abundance ratios. Measurement for Ne-22/Ne-20 agree with the isotopic composition of the meteoritic component neon-A.

  4. The evolution of energetic particles and the emitted radiation in solar flares. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward Tsang

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of accelerated particle distributions in a magnetized plasma and the resulting radiation are calculated, and the results are applied to solar flares. To study the radiation on timescales of order the particle lifetimes, the evolution of the particle distribution is determined by the use of the Fokker-Planck equation including Coulomb collisions and magnetic mirroring. Analytic solution to the equations are obtained for limiting cases such as homogeneous injection in a homogeneous plasma, and for small pitch angle. These analytic solutions are then used to place constraints on flare parameters such as density, loop length, and the injection timescale for very short implusive solar flares. For general particle distributions in arbitrary magnetic field and background density, the equation is solved numerically. The relative timing of microwaves and X-rays during individual flares is investigated. A number of possible sources for excessive microwave flux are discussed including a flattening in the electron spectrum above hard X-ray energies, thermal synchrotron emission, and trapping of electron by converging magnetic fields. Over shorter timescales, the Fokker-Planck equation is solved numerically to calculate the temporal evolution of microwaves and X-rays from nonthermal thick target models. It is shown that magnetic trapping will not account for the observed correlation of microwaves of approximately 0.15 seconds behind X-rays in flares with rapid time variation, and thus higher energy electrons must be accelerated later than lower energy electrons.

  5. 1980 to 1989 Observations of Nuclear Gamma-Rays from Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Share, G. H.; Murphy, R. J.; MacKinnon, R. J.

    1992-05-01

    We present a study of background-corrected spectra, 0.3 <= E_? <=8.5 MeV, observed by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite from 1980 to 1989. A total of 192 spectra covering the impulsive phases of these flares were fit by a model containing a power-law electron bremsstrahlung component and a nuclear component. The nuclear model was derived from the 1981 April 27 flare (Murphy et al. 1990). About 60\\ the flares exhibit evidence for a nuclear component in addition to bremsstrahlung. We have summed spectra from flares into 16 groups according to their observed bremsstrahlung flux, extending over a dynamic range of 100. These summed spectra were fit once again with the two component model to compare average nuclear and bremsstrahlung emissions. The average nuclear and bremstrahlung fluxes are strongly correlated over the full range of study. On average we find evidence for nuclear emission even for the lowest range of bremsstrahlung fluxes observable >=300 keV ( ~ 5 times 10(-2) gamma cm(-2) s(-1) ). We also find that the average nuclear/bremsstrahlung ratio decreases and the average bremsstrahlung spectrum hardens with increasing heliocentric angle. This is consistent with earlier studies suggesting that the electrons producing the bremsstrahlung are not isotropically distributed. On the other hand the nuclear/bremsstrahlung ratio exhibits large scatter from flare to flare. A study of the temporal variations of the prompt nuclear and bremsstrahlung emissions, and of the delayed lines at 0.511 and 2.223 MeV, within individual flares is in progress. The nuclear/bremsstrahlung ratio exhibits significant variation during some of the flares. This work is supported under NASA DPR's W-17,972 and W-17,973. Murphy, R.J., et al. 1990, Ap. J., 358, 298.

  6. Solar flare hard and soft x ray relationship determined from SMM HXRBS and BCS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toot, G. David

    1989-01-01

    The exact nature of the solar flare process is still somewhat a mystery. A key element to understanding flares if the relationship between the hard x rays emitted by the most energetic portions of the flare and the soft x rays from other areas and times. This relationship was studied by comparing hard x ray light curved from the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) with the soft x ray light curve and its derivation from the Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) which is part of the X-Ray Polychrometer (XRP), these instruments being on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft (SMM). Data sample was taken from flares observed with the above instruments during 1980, the peak of the previous maximum of solar activity. Flares were chosen based on complete coverage of the event by several instruments. The HXRBS data covers the x ray spectrum from about 25 keV to about 440 keV in 15 spectral channels, while the BCS data used covers a region of the Spectrum around 3 angstroms including emission from the Ca XIX ion. Both sets of data were summed over their spectral ranges and plotted against time at a maximum time resolution of around 3 seconds. The most popular theory of flares holds that a beam of electrons produces the hard x rays by bremsstrahlung while the soft x rays are the thermal response to this energy deposition. The question is whether the rate of change of soft x ray emission might reflect the variability of the electron beam and hence the variability of the hard x rays. To address this, we took the time derivative of the soft x ray light curve and compared it to the hard flares, 12 of them showed very closed agreement between the soft x ray derivative and the hard x ray light curve. The other five did not show this behavior but were similar to each other in general soft x ray behavior. Efforts to determine basic differences between the two kinds of flares continue. In addition the behavior of soft x ray temperature of flares was examined.

  7. Runaway electron acceleration by DC electric fields in impulsive solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, James Clarence

    2002-09-01

    Impulsive solar flares occupy a unique position in the realm of energetic transient astrophysical phenomena, releasing up to 1032 ergs of energy over times that range from a few minutes to a few hours. A large fraction of the energy is contained in suprathermal particles that remain trapped at the sun or escape into the corona. A major signature of a solar flare is the hard X-ray emission generated by ˜100 keV electrons which interact with the ambient plasma to produce continuum radiation that ranges from radio, to microwave, soft X-rays and occasionally gamma-rays. We investigate time-dependent solar flare electron acceleration by large-scale sub-Dreicer fields, taking into account spatial transport, current closure, Coulomb collisions, and plasma waves. In this process, the particles are energized directly out of the thermal coronal plasma, where they can produce hard X-rays. We show that a bump-on-tail distribution readily develops if the current closure is localized near the ends of the current channel and we study the resultant wave-particle interactions. We then incorporate Joule heating and thermal conduction to explore the temperature evolution of the electron distribution. We study the conditions under which electric fields can produce the hard X-ray inferred fluxes of >20 keV electrons. We are able to successfully fit the high-energy hard X-ray spectrum from the 1980 June 27 solar flare using the numerically calculated hard X-ray spectrum generated from a solar flare that contained a superpositioning of filaments with different lengths and densities.

  8. MAGNETIC RECONNECTION DURING THE TWO-PHASE EVOLUTION OF A SOLAR ERUPTIVE FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Cho, K.-S.; Bong, S.-C.; Kim, Y.-H.; Veronig, Astrid; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Manoharan, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed multi-wavelength analysis and interpretation of the evolution of an M7.6 flare that occurred near the southeast limb on 2003 October 24. Pre-flare images at TRACE 195 A show that the bright and complex system of coronal loops already existed at the flaring site. The X-ray observations of the flare taken from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft reveal two phases of the flare evolution. The first phase is characterized by the altitude decrease of the X-ray looptop (LT) source for approx11 minutes. Such a long duration of the descending LT source motion is reported for the first time. The EUV loops, located below the X-ray LT source, also undergo contraction with similar speed (approx15 km s{sup -1}) in this interval. During the second phase the two distinct hard X-ray footpoint (FP) sources are observed which correlate well with UV and Halpha flare ribbons. The X-ray LT source now exhibits upward motion as anticipated from the standard flare model. The RHESSI spectra during the first phase are soft and indicative of hot thermal emission from flaring loops with temperatures T > 25 MK at the early stage. On the other hand, the spectra at high energies (epsilon approx> 25 keV) follow hard power laws during the second phase (gamma = 2.6-2.8). We show that the observed motion of the LT and FP sources can be understood as a consequence of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection at a separator in the corona. During the first phase of the flare, the reconnection releases an excess of magnetic energy related to the magnetic tensions generated before a flare by the shear flows in the photosphere. The relaxation of the associated magnetic shear in the corona by the reconnection process explains the descending motion of the LT source. During the second phase, the ordinary reconnection process dominates describing the energy release in terms of the standard model of large eruptive flares with increasing FP separation and upward motion of the LT source.

  9. The role of magnetic separators in solar flare particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D.; Metcalf, T. R.

    2003-05-01

    In recent years, the development of theoretical models of separatrices, separators, and quasi-separatrix layers, coupled to observations of flare brightenings, have led to the notion that these topological structures are the natural locations for current sheets to form and magnetic reconnection to occur. We report on correlated hard X-ray and vector magnetic field data from RHESSI and Mees IVM which show the detailed spatial and temporal relationships between the magnetic topology and the expected sites of reconnection.

  10. Factors Affecting the Occurrence of Large Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Yashiro, S.; Akiyama, S.; Xie, H.; Makela, P. A.; Thakur, N.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand the paucity of high-energy solar energetic particle (SEP) events in solar cycle 24, we examined all major eruptions (soft X-ray flare size ?M5.0) on the front side of the Sun during the period from December 1, 2008 to January 31, 2014. There were 59 such eruptions that were associated with CMEs. When a flux rope was fitted to the white-light CMEs observed by SOHO and STEREO it was found that the CME sources were on the disk only for 55 eruptions. There were 16 large SEP events (proton intensity ?10 pfu in the >10 MeV channel) detected by GOES and 4 by STEREO-B in association with these eruptions. When the CMEs were grouped according to their speeds (<1500 km/s and ? 1500 km/s) it was found that only three of the <1500 km/s CMEs (or 11%) were associated with large SEP events compared to 17 or (61%) of the ? 1500 km/s CMEs. This result confirms the importance of CME speed for SEP association. In fact there were ten other large SEP events with flare size flare size does not determine SEP association. In order to narrow down the properties of CMEs that produce GLE events, we divided the SEP-associated CMEs into a different speed range: ?2000 km/s and 1500-1999 km/s. We also required that the CMEs originated from the longitudinal range of W20 to W90 (traditional GLE longitudes). There were sixteen such events, 6 with speed in the range 1500-1999 km/s and 10 with ?2000 km/s. When we further applied the criterion that the latitudinal distance of the CME sources from the ecliptic must be within ±13o (Gopalswamy et al. 2013 ApJL 765, L30), we found that there were only four CMEs that met this criterion. One of the four was the GLE event of 2012 May 17 whose CME speed was only slightly less than 2000 km/s. The 2011 August 9 CME was ejected into a tenuous medium, which means the shock was likely weak due to higher ambient Alfven speed, even though the CME speed was well above 2000 km/s. The speed of the 2011 June 7 CME (1680 km/s) was well below the typical speed of GLE CMEs. The last one, the 2013 May 22 event was an interacting CME event, but the speed of the primary CME was only 1880 km/s. Thus we conclude that the CME speed, the ecliptic distance of the CME source, and the ambient conditions are all important in deciding whether an SEP event would have GLE particles. Work supported by NASA's Living with a Star Program.

  11. Observations of X-ray and EUV fluxes during X-class solar flares and response of upper ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, K. K.; Lodhi, Neelesh K.; Upadhayaya, Arun K.

    2010-12-01

    Most studies dealing with solar flare effects in the upper ionosphere, where ionization is caused by EUV photons, have been based upon X-ray fluxes measured by the SOLRAD and GOES series of satellites. To check the validity of such studies, we compare simultaneous observations of GOES X-ray fluxes and SOHO EUV fluxes for 10 X-class solar flares which occurred during the maximum phase of sunspot cycle 23. These include the greatest flare of 4 November 2003, the fourth greatest flare of 28 October 2003 and the 14 July 2000 Bastille Day flare. We find that the peak intensities of the X-ray and EUV fluxes for these flares are poorly correlated, and this poor correlation is again seen when larger data containing 70 X-class flares, which occurred during the period January 1996 to December 2006, are examined. However, this correlation improves vastly when the central meridian distance (CMD) of the flare location is taken into account. We also study the response of the upper ionosphere to these fluxes by using the midday total electron content (TEC), observed for these flares by Liu et al. (2006). We find that peak enhancement in TEC is highly correlated with peak enhancement in EUV flux. The correlation, though poor with the X-ray flux, improves greatly when the CMD of flare location is considered.

  12. Can we explain non-typical solar flares?

    E-print Network

    Dalmasse, K; Schmieder, B; Aulanier, G

    2014-01-01

    We used multi-wavelength high-resolution data from ARIES, THEMIS, and SDO instruments, to analyze a non-standard, C3.3 class flare produced within the active region NOAA 11589 on 2012 October 16. Magnetic flux emergence and cancellation were continuously detected within the active region, the latter leading to the formation of two filaments. Our aim is to identify the origins of the flare taking into account the complex dynamics of its close surroundings. We analyzed the magnetic topology of the active region using a linear force-free field extrapolation to derive its 3D magnetic configuration and the location of quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) which are preferential sites for flaring activity. Because the active region's magnetic field was nonlinear force-free, we completed a parametric study using different linear force-free field extrapolations to demonstrate the robustness of the derived QSLs. The topological analysis shows that the active region presented a complex magnetic configuration comprising severa...

  13. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 15 AUGUST 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1741 The effect of flares on total solar irradiance

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    they generate is not precisely known, and their potential con- tribution to variations in the total solar from relatively moderate solar flares in total solar irradiance data. We find that the total energy solar irradiance Matthieu Kretzschmar1 *, Thierry Dudok de Wit1 , Werner Schmutz2 , Sabri Mekaoui3

  14. A search for low-energy protons in a solar flare from October 1992: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalf, T.; Mickey, D.; Canfield, R.; Wülser, J.-P.

    1994-12-01

    We give preliminary results from the first use of the University of Hawaii's new Imaging Vector Magnetograph (IVM) to search for linear polarization in the H-alpha spectral line during solar flares. Such polarization has previously been interpreted as impact polarization from 100 keV protons impacting the chromosphere. The new data set has several advantages over previous data. First, the field of view is substantially larger than that used by Metcalf et al., and, second, the temporal resolution (16 s) is a factor of two better than that previously obtained. We show a preliminary comparison between the flare H? polarization and hard X-rays observed with the Compton Observatory.

  15. Evidence for explosive chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare observed with SMM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, D. M.; Saba, J. L. R.; Strong, K. T.; Canfield, R. C.; Metcalf, T.

    1986-01-01

    SMM soft X-ray data and Sacramento Peak Observatory H-alpha observations are combined in a study of the impulsive phase of a solar flare. A blue asymmetry, indicative of upflow motions, was observed in the coronal Ca XIX line during the soft X-ray rise phase. H-alpha redshifts, indicative of downward motions, were observed simultaneously in bright flare kernels during the period of hard X-ray emission. It is shown that, to within observational errors, the impulsive phase momentum transported by the upflowing soft X-ray plasma is equivalent to that of the downward moving chromospheric material.

  16. Comparison of solar flare emission measures from broadband soft X-ray and ultraviolet spectrograph observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J. W.; Waljeski, K.; Moses, D.; Bruechner, G. E.

    Joint observations of a solar flare were obtained by the American Science & Engineering (AS&E) Imaging X-ray Telescope and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS). We compare emission measurements from soft X-ray and HRTS data. A small isolated X-ray loop close to the HRTS slit position has an emission meausure ne(squared) Delta L of (3.5 x 1029/cm5, compared to an emssion measure of 2.7 x 1029/cm5 obtained from the intensity of flaring Fe XXI 1354 A plasma along the HRTS slit.

  17. Response of the low ionosphere to X-ray and Lyman-? solar flare emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Trottet, GéRard; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Macotela, Edith L.; Pacini, Alessandra; Bertoni, Fernando C. P.; Dammasch, Ingolf E.

    2013-01-01

    Using soft X-ray measurements from detectors onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and simultaneous high-cadence Lyman-? observations from the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA) onboard the Project for On-Board Autonomy 2 (PROBA2) ESA spacecraft, we study the response of the lower part of the ionosphere, the D region, to seven moderate to medium-size solar flares that occurred in February and March of 2010. The ionospheric disturbances are analyzed by monitoring the resulting sub-ionospheric wave propagation anomalies detected by the South America Very Low Frequency (VLF) Network (SAVNET). We find that the ionospheric disturbances, which are characterized by changes of the VLF wave phase, do not depend on the presence of Lyman-? radiation excesses during the flares. Indeed, Lyman-? excesses associated with flares do not produce measurable phase changes. Our results are in agreement with what is expected in terms of forcing of the lower ionosphere by quiescent Lyman-? emission along the solar activity cycle. Therefore, while phase changes using the VLF technique may be a good indicator of quiescent Lyman-? variations along the solar cycle, they cannot be used to scale explosive Lyman-? emission during flares.

  18. Collisional Relaxation of Electrons in a Warm Plasma and Accelerated Nonthermal Electron Spectra in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontar, Eduard P.; Jeffrey, Natasha L. S.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Bian, N. H.

    2015-08-01

    Extending previous studies of nonthermal electron transport in solar flares, which include the effects of collisional energy diffusion and thermalization of fast electrons, we present an analytic method to infer more accurate estimates of the accelerated electron spectrum in solar flares from observations of the hard X-ray spectrum. Unlike for the standard cold-target model, the spatial characteristics of the flaring region, especially the necessity to consider a finite volume of hot plasma in the source, need to be taken into account in order to correctly obtain the injected electron spectrum from the source-integrated electron flux spectrum (a quantity straightforwardly obtained from hard X-ray observations). We show that the effect of electron thermalization can be significant enough to nullify the need to introduce an ad hoc low-energy cutoff to the injected electron spectrum in order to keep the injected power in non-thermal electrons at a reasonable value. Rather, the suppression of the inferred low-energy end of the injected spectrum compared to that deduced from a cold-target analysis allows the inference from hard X-ray observations of a more realistic energy in injected non-thermal electrons in solar flares.

  19. Sequences of correlated hard X-ray and type III bursts during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Montello, Maria L.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1995-01-01

    Acceleration and injection of electron beams in solar flares can be traced from radio type III (or type U) bursts and correlated hard X-ray pulses with similar timescales and nonthermal spectra. We perform a systematic survey of such correlated radio and hard X-ray (HXR) pulses with timescales of less than or approximately 2 s in flares simultaneously observed with the radio spectrometer Ikarus and the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) on solar maximum mission (SMM). We applied an epoch-folding technique to enhance correlated time patterns in burst sequences at the two wavelengths. We present the results from the strongest (10) flares with a HXRBS count rate greater than or = 3000 counts/s, which have a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio for subsecond pulses. The major findings of this study are presented. These observations strongly suggest that particle acceleration in solar flares occurs in a pulsed mode where electron beams are simultaneously injected in upward and downward directions. Since the sequences of correlated HXR and radio bursts show identical durations and intervals at the two wavelengths, they are believed to reflect most directly the temporal dynamics of the underlying common accelerator. As a consequence, thick-target models should be reconsidered under the aspect of electron injection with pulse durations of 0.2-2.0 s and duty cycles of approximately = 50%.

  20. Deexcitation gamma-ray line emission from solar flare magnetic loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, X.-M.; Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation that follows individual ions throughout a solar flare magnetic loop is developed. Included are energy losses due to Coulomb collisions, removal by nuclear reactions, magnetic mirroring in the convergent flux tubes, and MHD pitch-angle scattering in the corona. Calculations are made of the depth distribution of nuclear deexcitation line production, the time dependence of the production of the lines, and the escape probability of the line photons from the solar atmosphere. It is found that the inclusion of mirroring and pitch-angle scattering leads to time profiles which are in good agreement with observations. This suggests that the decaying portions of the time profiles of gamma-ray emission observed from solar flares could be governed by transport and not by acceleration.

  1. Solar Flare Hard X-ray Spectra Possibly Inconsistent with the Collisional Thick Target Model

    E-print Network

    Eduard P. Kontar; John C. Brown

    2005-08-19

    Recent progress in solar Hard X-ray (HXR) observations with RHESSI data and methods for spectral inversion allow us to study model-independent mean electron flux spectra in solar flares. We report several hard X-ray events observed by RHESSI in which the photon spectra $I(\\epsilon)$ are such that the inferred source mean electron spectra are not consistent with the standard model of collisional transport in solar flares. The observed photon spectra are so flat locally that the recovered mean electron flux spectra show a dip around 17-31 keV. While we note that alternative explanations, unrelated to electron transport, have not been ruled out, we focus on the physical implications of this tentative result for the collisional thick-target model.

  2. Stereoscopic electron spectroscopy of solar hard X-ray flares with a single spacecraft

    E-print Network

    Eduard P. Kontar; John C. Brown

    2006-11-06

    Hard X-ray (HXR) spectroscopy is the most direct method of diagnosing energetic electrons in solar flares. Here we present a technique which allows us to use a single HXR spectrum to determine an effectively stereoscopic electron energy distribution. Considering the Sun's surface to act as a 'Compton mirror' allows us to look at emitting electrons also from behind the source, providing vital information on downward-propagating particles. Using this technique we determine simultaneously the electron spectra of downward and upward directed electrons for two solar flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The results reveal surprisingly near-isotropic electron distributions, which contrast strongly with the expectations from the standard model which invokes strong downward beaming, including collisional thick-target model.

  3. Solar Demon - an approach to detecting flares, dimmings, and EUV waves on SDO/AIA images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaikamp, Emil; Verbeeck, Cis

    2015-06-01

    Flares, dimmings, and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves are three types of eruptive phenomena on the Sun, which are main drivers of space weather. Fast and reliable detection of these phenomena helps augment space weather predictions. In the current paper, we introduce Solar Demon, the first software that detects all three phenomena, using a modular design to exploit synergies. While Solar Demon runs in near real-time on SDO/AIA synoptic quick-look images to provide fast detections of flares, dimmings, and EUV waves for space weather purposes, it also processes new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) synoptic science images on a regular basis to build dedicated science quality catalogs. An overview of Solar Demon is given, with a focus on the algorithms for EUV wave detection and characterization. Several first results, such as flare and dimming butterfly diagrams for the rising part of Solar Cycle 24, are presented. The main advantages, challenges, and future prospects for Solar Demon are outlined in the Section 5.

  4. An equation for the evolution of solar and stellar flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    1990-01-01

    An ordinary differential equation describing the evolution of a coronal loop subjected to a spatially uniform but time-varying heating rate is discussed. It is assumed that the duration of heating is long compared to the sound transit time through the loop, which is assumed to have uniform cross section area. The form of the equation changes as the loop evolves through three states: 'strong evaporation', 'scaling law behavior', and 'strong condensation'. Solutions to the equation may be used to compute the time dependence of the average coronal temperature and emission measure for an assumed temporal variation of the flare heating rate. The results computed from the model agree reasonably well with recent published numerical simulations and may be obtained with far less computational effort. The model is then used to study the May 21, 1980, solar flare observed by SMM and the giant April 12, 1985, flare observed on the star AD Leo.

  5. Arcade Structure and Dynamics in the 20-Jan-99 M5 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, D. E.; Hudson, H. S.

    1999-05-01

    We present observations of a remarkable solar flare which was observed by Yohkoh on 20-Jan-99. This long duration event is notable because the Yohkoh images show not only the formation of the arcade associated with the coronal mass ejection, but also a considerable amount of structure and motion in the current sheet above the arcade. Though not unique, the structure of this arcade is different from the majority of flare arcades observed by Yohkoh. The motions indicate field line shrinkage during the rise phase of the flare, and downward flow above the arcade during the decay phase. The late-phase downward motion suggests the possibility either of a high-Beta regime in the current sheet, or of shrinkage of evacuated flux tubes downward through the current sheet. This research is supported by NASA under MSFC contract NAS8-40801.

  6. The flare origin of Forbush decreases not associated with solar flares on the visible hemisphere of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iucci, N.; Parisi, M.; Signorini, C.; Storini, M.; Villoresi, G.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations have shown that Forbush decreases (Fds) are produced by the propagation into the interplanetary space of a strong perturbation originating from a solar flare (Sf) accompanied by Type IV radioemission. As the front of the perturbation propagates into the interplanetary space, the region in which the galactic cosmic rays are modulated (Fd-modulated region) rotates westward with the Sun and is generally included between two boundary streams; therefore the Fds not associated with observed type IV Sfs (N.Ass.Fds) are likely to be produced by type IV Sfs occurred on the Sun's backside: these vents can be observed when the Earth crosses the corotating Western boundary of the modulated region.

  7. A Lumped Element Thermal Model of Solar Flare Gradual Phase EUV Emissions for Planetary Atmosphere Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiemann, Edward; Eparvier, Francis G.

    2015-04-01

    Gradual phase solar flare EUV emissions show a time dependence related to the cooling of the flare plasma where emission lines with higher formation temperatures peak earlier than cooler emission lines. Because photon absorption height in a planetary atmosphere is wavelength dependent, being able to spectrally model this time dependence using available wavelengths is necessary to accurately characterize the temporal response of an atmosphere to a flare when high time cadence measurements of the EUV spectrum are unavailable. Furthermore, both the spectral and wavelength dependent temporal behavior of a flare impact where the total flare energy is absorbed in an atmosphere.To address this challenge, we have developed a Lumped Element Thermal Model (LETM) which can accurately model the flare gradual phase time evolution for emission lines with peak formation temperatures above 106 K based on a cooling rate derived from only two emission lines. We will show that the 13.3 nm Fe XX and 9.4 nm Fe XVIII emission lines can be used to determine a cooling rate. This cooling rate can then be used to calculate a time constant, ?i, associated with a ith EUV emission; and the ith emission’s time-response can then be modeled by passing the measured Fe XX time-series through a digital low pass filter with time constant ?i. An implication of the LETM, is that it constrains the time evolution of the volume integrated flare irradiance which is directly related to the flare emission measure. Detailed analysis suggests that the LETM provides a method to measure the flare thermal conductance and specific heat, and constrains the flare cooling rate and differential emission measure.To broaden the utility of the LETM, correlations between the emission line derived cooling rate and broadband measurements made by MAVEN EUV or other commonly available Earth assets must be found. Therefore, in addition to introducing the LETM, we will review progress towards finding correlations with properties of broadband soft x-ray measurements, as well as relevant multi-channel instruments.

  8. Optical Spectral Observations of a Flickering White-light Kernel in a C1 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 Å to 4550 Å acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, <=0.''5 (1015 cm2) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a "blue continuum bump" in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  9. Electron Densities in Solar Flare Loops, Chromospheric Evaporation Upflows, and Acceleration Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1996-01-01

    We compare electron densities measured at three different locations in solar flares: (1) in Soft X-Ray (SXR) loops, determined from SXR emission measures and loop diameters from Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope maps (n(sub e, sup SXR) = (0.2-2.5) x 10(exp 11)/ cu cm); (2) in chromospheric evaporation upflows, inferred from plasma frequency cutoffs of decimetric radio bursts detected with the 0.1-3 GHz spectrometer Phoenix of ETH Zuerich (n(sub e, sup upflow) = (0.3-11) x 10(exp 10)/cu cm; and (3) in acceleration sites, inferred from the plasma frequency at the separatrix between upward-accelerated (type III bursts) and downward-accelerated (reverse-drift bursts) electron beams [n(sub e, sup acc) = (0.6-10) x 10(exp 9)/cu cm]. The comparison of these density measurements, obtained from 44 flare episodes (during 14 different flares), demonstrates the compatibility of flare plasma density diagnostics with SXR and radio methods. The density in the upflowing plasma is found to be somewhat lower than in the filled loops, having ratios in a range n(sub e, sup upflow)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.02-1.3, and a factor of 3.6 higher behind the upflow front. The acceleration sites are found to have a much lower density than the SXR-bright flare loops, i.e., n(sub e, sup acc)/n(sub e, sup SXR) = 0.005- 0.13, and thus must be physically displaced from the SXR-bright flare loops. The scaling law between electron time-of-flight distances l' and loop half-lengths s, l'/s = 1.4 +/- 0.3, recently established by Aschwanden et al. suggests that the centroid of the acceleration region is located above the SXR-bright flare loop, as envisioned in cusp geometries (e.g., in magnetic reconnection models).

  10. Plasma heating to super-hot temperatures (>30 MK) in the August 9, 2011 solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Struminskii, A. B.; Zimovets, I. V.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the August 9, 2011 solar flare of X-ray class X6.9, the "hottest" flare from 2000 to 2012, with a peak plasma temperature according to GOES data of ?32.5 MK. Our goal is to determine the cause of such an anomalously high plasma temperature and to investigate the energy balance in the flare region with allowance made for the presence of a super-hot plasma (>30 MK). We analyze the RHESSI, GOES, AIA/SDO, and EVE/SDO data and discuss the spatial structure of the flare region and the results of our spectral analysis of its X-ray emission. Our analysis of the RHESSI X-ray spectra is performed in the one-temperature and two-temperature approximations by taking into account the emission of hot (˜20 MK) and super-hot (˜45 MK) plasmas. The hard X-ray spectrum in both models is fitted by power laws. The observed peculiarities of the flare are shown to be better explained in terms of the two-temperature model, in which the super-hot plasma is located at the flare loop tops (or in the magnetic cusp region). The formation of the super-hot plasma can be associated with its heating through primary energy release and with the suppression of thermal conduction. The anomalously high temperature (33 MK according to GOES) is most likely to be an artefact of the method for calculating the temperature based on two-channel GOES measurements in the one-temperature approximation applied to the emission of a multi-temperature flare plasma with a minor contribution from the low-temperature part of the differential emission measure.

  11. Differential emission measure analysis of a limb solar flare on 2012 July 19

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. Q.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D. E-mail: xincheng@nju.edu.cn

    2014-05-01

    We perform Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis of an M7.7 flare that occurred on 2012 July 19 and was well observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. Using the observational data with unprecedented high temporal and spatial resolution from six AIA coronal passbands, we calculate the DEM of the flare and derive the time series of maps of DEM-weighted temperature and emission measure (EM). It is found that, during the flare, the highest EM region is located in the flare loop top with a value varying between ?8.4 × 10{sup 28} cm{sup –5} and ?2.5 × 10{sup 30} cm{sup –5}. The temperature there rises from ?8 MK at about 04:40 UT (the initial rise phase) to a maximum value of ?13 MK at about 05:20 UT (the hard X-ray peak). Moreover, we find a hot region that is above the flare loop top with a temperature even up to ?16 MK. We also analyze the DEM properties of the reconnection site. The temperature and density there are not as high as that in the loop top and the flux rope, indicating that the main heating may not take place inside the reconnection site. In the end, we examine the dynamic behavior of the flare loops. Along the flare loop, both the temperature and the EM are the highest in the loop top and gradually decrease toward the footpoints. In the northern footpoint, an upward force appears with a biggest value in the impulsive phase, which we conjecture originates from chromospheric evaporation.

  12. OPTICAL SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF A FLICKERING WHITE-LIGHT KERNEL IN A C1 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-10

    We analyze optical spectra of a two-ribbon, long-duration C1.1 flare that occurred on 2011 August 18 within AR 11271 (SOL2011-08-18T15:15). The impulsive phase of the flare was observed with a comprehensive set of space-borne and ground-based instruments, which provide a range of unique diagnostics of the lower flaring atmosphere. Here we report the detection of enhanced continuum emission, observed in low-resolution spectra from 3600 Å to 4550 Å acquired with the Horizontal Spectrograph at the Dunn Solar Telescope. A small, ?0.''5 (10{sup 15} cm{sup 2}) penumbral/umbral kernel brightens repeatedly in the optical continuum and chromospheric emission lines, similar to the temporal characteristics of the hard X-ray variation as detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi spacecraft. Radiative-hydrodynamic flare models that employ a nonthermal electron beam energy flux high enough to produce the optical contrast in our flare spectra would predict a large Balmer jump in emission, indicative of hydrogen recombination radiation from the upper flare chromosphere. However, we find no evidence of such a Balmer jump in the bluemost spectral region of the continuum excess. Just redward of the expected Balmer jump, we find evidence of a ''blue continuum bump'' in the excess emission which may be indicative of the merging of the higher order Balmer lines. The large number of observational constraints provides a springboard for modeling the blue/optical emission for this particular flare with radiative-hydrodynamic codes, which are necessary to understand the opacity effects for the continuum and emission line radiation at these wavelengths.

  13. Thermal and Nonthermal Contributions to the Solar Flare X-Ray Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, A. Kimberley

    2004-01-01

    The relative thermal and nonthermal contributions to the total energy budget of a solar flare are being determined through analysis of RHESSI X-ray imaging and spectral observations in the energy range from approx. 5 to approx. 50 keV. The classic ways of differentiating between the thermal and nonthermal components - exponential vs. sources - can now be combined for individual flares. In addition, RHESSI's sensitivity down to approx. 4 keV and energy resolution of approx. 1 keV FWHM allow the intensities and equivalent widths of the complex of highly ionized iron lines at approx. 6.7 keV and the complex of highly ionized iron and nickel lines at approx. 8 keV to be measured as a function of time. Using the spectral line and continuum intensities from the Chianti (version 4.2) atomic code, the thermal component of the total flare emission can be more reliably separated from the nonthermal component in the measured X-ray spectrum. The abundance of iron can also be determined from RHESSI line-to-continuum measurements as a function of time during larger flares. Results will be shown of the intensity and equivalent widths of these line complexes for several flares and the temperatures, emission measures, and iron abundances derived from them. Comparisons will be made with 6.7-keV Fe-line fluxes measured with the RESIK bent crystal spectrometer on the Coronas-F spacecraft operating in third order during the peak times of three flares (2002 May 31 at 00:12 UT, 2002 December 2 at 19:26 UT, and 2003 April 26 at 03:OO UT). During the rise and decay of these flares, RESIK was operating in first order allowing the continuum flux to be measured between 2.9 and 3.7 keV for comparison with RHESSI fluxes at its low-energy end.

  14. A new solar flare heavy ion model and its implementation through MACREE, an improved modeling tool to calculate single event effect rates in space

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, P.P.; Normand, E.; Oberg, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    A new solar flare heavy ion model has been developed to support Space Station Single Event Effects (SEE) evaluations. It shows good agreement with previous flare data, and is implemented through an improved version of the CREME code.

  15. A new approach to model particle acceleration and energy transfer in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio Da Costa, Fatima; Zuccarello, F.; Fletcher, L.; Labrosse, N.; Kasparova, J.; Prosecký, T.; Carlsson, M.; Petrosian, V.; Liu, W.

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by available observations of two different flares in Ly? and H?, we model the conditions of the solar atmosphere using a radiation hydrodynamics code (RADYN, Carlsson & Stein, 1992) and analyze the energy transport carried by a beam of non-thermal electrons injected at the top of a 1D coronal loop. The numerical Ly? and H? intensities match with the observations. The electron energy distribution is assumed to follow a power law of the form (E/Ec )-? for energies greater than a cutoff value of Ec. Abbett & Hawley (1999) and Allred et al. (2005) assumed that the non-thermal electrons flux injected at the top of a flaring loop, the cut-off energy and the power law index are constant over time. An improvement was achieved by Allred & Hawley (2006), who modified the RADYN code in such a way that the input parameters were time dependent. Their inputs were based on observations of a flare obtained with RHESSI. By combining RADYN with the “flare” code from Stanford University which models the acceleration and transport of particles and radiation of solar flares in non-LTE regime, we can calculate the non-thermal electrons flux, the cut-off energy and the power law index at every simulated time step. The atmospheric parameters calculated by RADYN could in turn be used as updated inputs for "flare", providing several advantages over the results from Liu et al. (2009), who combined the particle acceleration code with a 1-D hydrodynamic code, improving the atmospheric conditions.

  16. SMALL-SCALE MICROWAVE BURSTS IN LONG-DURATION SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Baolin

    2013-08-20

    Solar small-scale microwave bursts (SMBs), including microwave dot, spike, and narrow-band type III bursts, are characterized by very short timescales, narrow frequency bandwidth, and very high brightness temperatures. Based on observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at Huairou with superhigh cadence and frequency resolution, this work presents an intensive investigation of SMBs in several flares that occurred in active region NOAA 10720 during 2005 January 14-21. Especially for long-duration flares, the SMBs occurred not only in the early rising and impulsive phase, but also in the flare decay phase and even after the end of the flare. These SMBs are strong bursts with inferred brightness temperatures of at least 8.18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11}-1.92 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} K, very short lifetimes of 5-18 ms, relative frequency bandwidths of 0.7%-3.5%, and superhigh frequency drifting rates. Together with their obviously different polarizations from background emission (the quiet Sun, and the underlying flaring broadband continuum), such SMBs should be individual, independent strong coherent bursts related to some non-thermal energy release and the production of energetic particles in a small-scale source region. These facts show the existence of small-scale strong non-thermal energy releasing activities after the flare maxima, which is meaningful for predicting space weather. Physical analysis indicates that a plasma mechanism may be the most favorable candidate for the formation of SMBs. From the plasma mechanism, the velocities and kinetic energy of fast electrons can be deduced and the region of electron acceleration can also be tracked.

  17. He I D3 Observation of the 1984 May 22 M6.3 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Y.; Deng, N.; Lee, J.; Zhang, J.; Choudhary, D. P.; Wang, H.

    2013-07-01

    He I D3 line has a unique response to the flare impact on the low solar atmosphere and can be a powerful diagnostic tool for energy transport processes. Using high-resolution and high-cadence images obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report D3 observation of the M6.3 flare on 1984 May 22, which occurred in an active region with a circular magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL). The impulsive phase of the flare starts with a main elongated source that darkens in D3, inside of which bright emission kernels appear at the time of the initial small peak in hard X-rays (HXRs). These flare cores subsequently evolve into a sharp emission strand lying within the dark halo simultaneously with the main peak in HXRs, reversing the overall source contrast from -5% to 5%. The radiated energy in D3 during the main peak is estimated to be about 10^30 ergs, which is comparable to that carried by nonthermal electrons above 20 keV. Afterwards the flare proceeds along the circular PIL in the counterclockwise direction to form a dark circular ribbon in D3, which apparently mirrors the bright ribbons in Halpha and He I 10830 A. All these ribbons last for over one hour in the late gradual phase. We suggest that the present event resembles the so-called black-light flare that is proposed based on continuum images, and that D3 darkening and brightening features herein may be due to, respectively, the thermal conduction heating and the direct precipitation of high-energy electrons.

  18. He I D3 Observations of the 1984 May 22 M6.3 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Deng, Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Zhang, Jifeng; Prasad Choudhary, Debi; Wang, Haimin

    2013-09-01

    The He I D3 line has a unique response to a flare impact on the low solar atmosphere and can be a powerful diagnostic tool for energy transport processes. Using images obtained from the recently digitized films of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report D3 observations of the M6.3 flare on 1984 May 22, which occurred in an active region with a circular magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL). The impulsive phase of the flare starts with a main elongated source that darkens in D3, inside of which bright emission kernels appear at the time of the initial small peak in hard X-rays (HXRs). These flare cores subsequently evolve into a sharp emission strand lying within the dark halo; this evolution occurs at the same time as the main peak in HXRs, reversing the overall source contrast from -5% to 5%. The radiated energy in D3 during the main peak is estimated to be about 1030 erg, which is comparable to that carried by nonthermal electrons above 20 keV. Afterward, the flare proceeds along the circular PIL in the counterclockwise direction to form a dark circular ribbon in D3, which apparently mirrors the bright ribbons in H? and He I 10830 Å. All of these ribbons last for over one hour in the late gradual phase. We suggest that the present event resembles the so-called black-light flare that was proposed based on continuum images, and that D3 darkening and brightening features herein may be due to thermal conduction heating and the direct precipitation of high-energy electrons, respectively.

  19. He I D3 OBSERVATIONS OF THE 1984 MAY 22 M6.3 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chang; Xu Yan; Deng Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Zhang Jifeng; Wang Haimin; Prasad Choudhary, Debi

    2013-09-01

    The He I D3 line has a unique response to a flare impact on the low solar atmosphere and can be a powerful diagnostic tool for energy transport processes. Using images obtained from the recently digitized films of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report D3 observations of the M6.3 flare on 1984 May 22, which occurred in an active region with a circular magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL). The impulsive phase of the flare starts with a main elongated source that darkens in D3, inside of which bright emission kernels appear at the time of the initial small peak in hard X-rays (HXRs). These flare cores subsequently evolve into a sharp emission strand lying within the dark halo; this evolution occurs at the same time as the main peak in HXRs, reversing the overall source contrast from -5% to 5%. The radiated energy in D3 during the main peak is estimated to be about 10{sup 30} erg, which is comparable to that carried by nonthermal electrons above 20 keV. Afterward, the flare proceeds along the circular PIL in the counterclockwise direction to form a dark circular ribbon in D3, which apparently mirrors the bright ribbons in H{alpha} and He I 10830 A. All of these ribbons last for over one hour in the late gradual phase. We suggest that the present event resembles the so-called black-light flare that was proposed based on continuum images, and that D3 darkening and brightening features herein may be due to thermal conduction heating and the direct precipitation of high-energy electrons, respectively.

  20. Solar observations during Skylab April 1973-February 1974. I. Coronal x-ray structure. II. Solar flare activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J.M.; Roelof, E.C.; Gold, R.E.

    1980-12-01

    Part I: Large-scale emission features visible in soft X-ray photographs from the spectrographic telescope S-054 on Skylab have been superposed on Ha Synoptic Charts for Carrington Rotations 1601 through 1610. The charts identify loop arcades and loop complexes associated with strong magnetic fields, as well as coronal holes and areas devoid of emission loops. Although not adequate for the study of the geometry of individual features, the charts convey a global sense of coronal structure which is often difficult to obtain from individual (disk) images. Part II: Charts of time versus longitude for each of Carrington Rotations 1600 to 1611 depict: (1) Ha importance, brightness, and location of confirmed flares; (2) peak flare x-ray flux 1-8 A; (3) peak flare decimetric radio intensity; and (4) flux of 1.8 to 4.5 MeV protons plotted at their high coronal emission longitude estimated from simultaneously measured solar wind velocity.

  1. Observations of the ionospheric impact of M-class solar flares on local and hemispheric scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmboldt, J. F.; Kassim, N. E.; Teare, S. W.

    2015-10-01

    The ionospheric impact of a series of M-class solar flares that occurred on 12 March 2015 is described. A combination of data sets from GPS receivers and two different colocated radio telescopes, the very large array (VLA) and the long wavelength array (LWA), was used to detect and characterize flare-induced irregularities. The data demonstrate that each flare causes a rapid step-like increase in total electron content (TEC) of about 0.2 total electron content units (TECU), 1 TECU = 1016 el m-2. The rise times of these steps are on the order of 1-3 min. The GPS data show signs of traveling ionospheric disturbances likely associated with gravity waves whose magnitudes were temporarily enhanced by the impact of two of the flares. Increased activity within the horizontal TEC gradients observed with the VLA was apparent for several minutes following the flare X-ray peak. The properties of these VLA-detected disturbances are strongly indicative of field-aligned irregularities within the plasmasphere. They initially form at two altitudes, approximately 2600 and 5600 km. Those that form higher quickly disappear, whereas those that form lower appear to descend over a period of ˜7 min to an altitude of roughly 1450 km before disappearing. LWA observations of ionospheric reflections of the HF radio station WWV show a significant and brief (˜few minutes) Doppler frequency disturbance near the onset of TEC enhancement, followed by a ˜5 min drop in received power, indicating increased ionization in the D region.

  2. Reconciliation of Waiting Time Statistics of Solar Flares Observed in Hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; McTiernan, James M.

    2010-07-01

    We study the waiting time distributions of solar flares observed in hard X-rays with ISEE-3/ICE, HXRBS/SMM, WATCH/GRANAT, BATSE/CGRO, and RHESSI. Although discordant results and interpretations have been published earlier, based on relatively small ranges (<2 decades) of waiting times, we find that all observed distributions, spanning over 6 decades of waiting times (?t ? 10-3-103 hr), can be reconciled with a single distribution function, N(?t) vprop ?0(1 + ?0?t)-2, which has a power-law slope of p ? 2.0 at large waiting times (?t ? 1-1000 hr) and flattens out at short waiting times ?t <~ ?t 0 = 1/?0. We find a consistent breakpoint at ?t 0 = 1/?0 = 0.80 ± 0.14 hr from the WATCH, HXRBS, BATSE, and RHESSI data. The distribution of waiting times is invariant for sampling with different flux thresholds, while the mean waiting time scales reciprocically with the number of detected events, ?t 0 vprop 1/n det. This waiting time distribution can be modeled with a nonstationary Poisson process with a flare rate ? = 1/?t that varies as f(?) vprop ?-1exp - (?/?0). This flare rate distribution requires a highly intermittent flare productivity in short clusters with high rates, separated by relatively long quiescent intervals with very low flare rates.

  3. Quasi-periodic pulsations in solar hard X-ray and microwave flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosugi, Takeo; Kiplinger, Alan L.

    1986-01-01

    For more than a decade, various studies have pointed out that hard X-ray and microwave time profiles of some solar flares show quasi-periodic fluctuations or pulsations. Nevertheless, it was not until recently that a flare displaying large amplitude quasi-periodic pulsations in X-rays and microwaves was observed with good spectral coverage and with a sufficient time resolution. The event occurred on June 7, 1980, at approximately 0312 UT, and exhibits seven intense pulses with a quasi-periodicity of approximately 8 seconds in microwaves, hard X-rays, and gamma-ray lines. On May 12, 1983, at approximately 0253 UT, another good example of this type of flare was observed both in hard X-rays and in microwaves. Temporal and spectral characteristics of this flare are compared with the event of June 7, 1980. In order to further explore these observational results and theoretical scenarios, a study of nine additional quasi-periodic events were incorporated with the results from the two flares described. Analysis of these events are briefly summarized.

  4. Observational Evidence of Electron-driven Evaporation in Two Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2015-11-01

    We have explored the relationship between hard X-ray (HXR) emissions and Doppler velocities caused by the chromospheric evaporation in two X1.6 class solar flares on 2014 September 10 and October 22, respectively. Both events display double ribbons and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit is fixed on one of their ribbons from the flare onset. The explosive evaporations are detected in these two flares. The coronal line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å shows blueshifts, but the chromospheric line of C i 1354.29 Å shows redshifts during the impulsive phase. The chromospheric evaporation tends to appear at the front of the flare ribbon. Both Fe xxi and C i display their Doppler velocities with an “increase-peak-decrease” pattern that is well related to the “rising-maximum-decay” phase of HXR emissions. Such anti-correlation between HXR emissions and Fe xxi Doppler shifts and correlation with C i Doppler shifts indicate the electron-driven evaporation in these two flares.

  5. Contrasting behavior of the thermosphere and ionosphere in response to the 28 October 2003 solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huixin; Lühr, Hermann; Watanabe, Shigeto; KöHler, Wolfgang; Manoj, C.

    2007-07-01

    We examined the thermospheric and ionospheric responses to the solar flare on 28 October 2003, utilizing simultaneous observations of the electron and neutral density from the CHAMP satellite. Rapid thermospheric response within a few minutes was observed. In addition, the neutral and plasma perturbations contrasted each other remarkably. First, their temporal development differed. Though started nearly simultaneously, the plasma perturbation developed much faster and to a larger amplitude than its neutral counterpart. Second, their latitudinal distributions differed. At the initial stage of the response, the neutral density was enhanced by 20% almost homogeneously at all latitudes below 50°N/S. In comparison, the plasma disturbance exhibited a distinctive latitudinal structure, with largest density enhancements of 68% at the dip equator, moderate increase of ˜20% at midlatitudes, and depression up to 35% around 15°N/S. This suggests a decoupling between the neutral and plasma disturbances during this stage. The plasma-neutral coupling via ion drag was found to become important about 2-3 hours after the flare bursts. Another interesting feature is that the equatorial ionization anomaly was significantly weakened during the flare. The observations demonstrated that electrodynamics related to the equatorial fountain dominated the photochemistry in controlling the flare-induced plasma density disturbances on 28 October 2003. This differs considerably from the nearly linear cos(SZA) dependence of flare-induced total electron content enhancements.

  6. Observational Evidences of Electron-driven Evaporation in two Solar Flares

    E-print Network

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    We have explored the relationship between hard X-ray (HXR) emissions and Doppler velocities caused by the chromospheric evaporation in two X1.6 class solar flares on 2014 September 10 and October 22, respectively. Both events display double ribbons and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) slit is fixed on one of their ribbons from the flare onset. The explosive evaporations are detected in these two flares. The coronal line of Fe XXI 1354.09 A shows blue shifts, but chromospheric line of C I 1354.29 A shows red shifts during the impulsive phase. The chromospheric evaporation tends to appear at the front of flare ribbon. Both Fe XXI and C I display their Doppler velocities with a `increase-peak-decrease' pattern which is well related to the `rising-maximum- decay' phase of HXR emissions. Such anti-correlation between HXR emissions and Fe XXI Doppler shifts, and correlation with C I Doppler shifts indicate the electron-driven evaporation in these two flares.

  7. Statistical analysis of solar EUV and X-ray flux enhancements induced by solar flares and its implication to upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Huijun; Liu, Libo; He, Han; Wan, Weixing

    2011-11-01

    The 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux data and 26-34 nm EUV flux data are used to statistically analyze the relationship between enhancement in X-ray flux and that in EUV flux during solar flares in 1996-2006. The EUV enhancement does not linearly increase with X-ray flux from C-class to X-class flares. Its uprising amplitude decreases with X-ray flux. The correlation coefficients between enhancements in EUV and X-ray flux for X, M and C-class flares are only 0.66, 0.58 and 0.54, respectively, which suggests that X-ray flux is not a good index for EUV flux during solar flares. Thus, for studying more accurately solar flare effect on the ionosphere/thermosphere system, one needs to use directly EUV flux measurements. One of important reasons for depressing relationship between X-ray and EUV is that the central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location can significantly affect EUV flux variation particularly for X-class flares: the larger value of CMD results in the smaller EUV enhancement. However, there are much smaller CMD effects on EUV enhancement for M and C-class flares. The solar disc images from SOHO/EIT are utilized to estimate the percentage contribution to total EUV enhancement from the flare region and from other region. The results show the larger percentage contribution from other region for the weaker flares, which would reduce the loss of EUV radiation due to limb location of flare and then weaken the CMD effect for weaker flares like M and C-class.

  8. Helium emission from model flare layers. [of outer solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulander, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    The emission of visible and UV He I and He II line radiation from a plane-parallel model flare layer characterized by electron temperatures of 10,000 to 50,000 K and electron densities of 10 to the 10th power to 10 to the 15th power per cu cm is analyzed by solving the statistical-equilibrium equations for a 30-level He I-II-III system, using parametric representations of the line and continuum radiation fields. The atomic model was chosen to provide accurate solutions for the first two resonance lines of He I and He II as well as for the D3 and 10,830-A lines of He I. Reaction rates are discussed, and sample solutions to the steady-state population equations are given for a generally optically thin gas assumed to be irradiated over 2pi sr by a blackbody spectrum at 6000 K. Specific results are examined for ionization equilibrium, level populations, approximate optical depths of a 1000-km-thick flare layer, line intensities, and upper-level population rates.

  9. Cooling of solar flares plasmas. 1: Theoretical considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, Peter J.; Mariska, John T.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical models of the cooling of flare plasma are reexamined. By assuming that the cooling occurs in two separate phase where conduction and radiation, respectively, dominate, a simple analytic formula for the cooling time of a flare plasma is derived. Unlike earlier order-of-magnitude scalings, this result accounts for the effect of the evolution of the loop plasma parameters on the cooling time. When the conductive cooling leads to an 'evaporation' of chromospheric material, the cooling time scales L(exp 5/6)/p(exp 1/6), where the coronal phase (defined as the time maximum temperature). When the conductive cooling is static, the cooling time scales as L(exp 3/4)n(exp 1/4). In deriving these results, use was made of an important scaling law (T proportional to n(exp 2)) during the radiative cooling phase that was forst noted in one-dimensional hydrodynamic numerical simulations (Serio et al. 1991; Jakimiec et al. 1992). Our own simulations show that this result is restricted to approximately the radiative loss function of Rosner, Tucker, & Vaiana (1978). for different radiative loss functions, other scaling result, with T and n scaling almost linearly when the radiative loss falls off as T(exp -2). It is shown that these scaling laws are part of a class of analytic solutions developed by Antiocos (1980).

  10. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert Y.; Lin, Robert P.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Duncan, Nicole A.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Bain, Hazel M.; Boggs, Steven E.; Zoglauer, Andreas C.; Smith, David M.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark S.; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2012-01-01

    The balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from approximately 20 keV to greater than approximately 10 MeV. GRIPS will address questions raised by recent solar flare observations regarding particle acceleration and energy release, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution of less than 0.1 cubic millimeter. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-centimeter thick tungsten alloy slit/slat grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 millimeters. The MPRM is situated 8 meters from the spectrometer to provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e., as an active scatterer), with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare. GRIPS is scheduled for a continental-US engineering test flight in fall 2013, followed by long or ultra-long duration balloon flights in Antarctica.

  11. CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, H. S.; Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Woods, T. N.

    2012-06-20

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

  12. Correlative analysis of hard and soft x ray observations of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.

    1994-01-01

    We have developed a promising new technique for jointly analyzing BATSE hard X-ray observations of solar flares with simultaneous soft X-ray observations. The technique is based upon a model in which electric currents and associated electric fields are responsible for the respective heating and particle acceleration that occur in solar flares. A useful by-product of this technique is the strength and evolution of the coronal electric field. The latter permits one to derive important flare parameters such as the current density, the number of current filaments composing the loop, and ultimately the hard X-ray spectrum produced by the runaway electrons. We are continuing to explore the technique by applying it to additional flares for which we have joint BATSE/Yohkoh observations. A central assumption of our analysis is the constant of proportionality alpha relating the hard X-ray flux above 50 keV and the rate of electron acceleration. For a thick-target model of hard X-ray production, it can be shown that cv is in fact related to the spectral index and low-energy cutoff of precipitating electrons. The next step in our analysis is to place observational constraints on the latter parameters using the joint BATSE/Yohkoh data.

  13. Gamma-ray and optical observations of the 1979 November 8 solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riegler, G. R.; Ling, J. C.; Mahoney, W. A.; Wheaton, W. A.; Willett, J. B.; Jacobson, A. S.; Prince, T. A.; Zirin, H.

    1982-01-01

    The solar flare on 1979 November 8 11h 21m 28s UT was observed by the Tel Aviv telescope of the Big Bear Solar Observatory and the High Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometer on the High Energy Astronomy Observatory HEAO 3. Photographs in alpha hydrogen show the development of the flare and a subsequent Moreton wave. Although the flare was not detected with the high spectral resolution germanium detectors, the HEAO C-1 CsI shield detected a statistically significant signal above 80 keV, from 420 to 585 keV, and above 3.8 MeV. The temporal structure of microwave, optical, X-ray, and gamma-ray emission is consistent to within about 1 s with a simultaneous flare response at all energies. There is no evidence for either second-stage acceleration of charged particles (Bai and Ramaty, 1979) or a delay between gamma-ray and X-ray continuum emission due to energy-dependent electron energy loss times (Bai and Ramaty).

  14. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF THE SPECTRAL HARDENING OF CONTINUUM EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, X.; Chen, Y.; Li, G. E-mail: gang.li@uah.edu

    2013-09-10

    The observed hard X-ray and {gamma}-ray continuum in solar flares is interpreted as Bremsstrahlung emission of accelerated non-thermal electrons. It has been noted for a long time that in many flares the energy spectra show hardening at energies around or above 300 keV. In this paper, we first conduct a survey of spectral hardening events that were previously studied in the literature. We then perform a systematic examination of 185 flares from the Solar Maximum Mission. We identify 23 electron-dominated events whose energy spectra show clear double power laws. A statistical study of these events shows that the spectral index below the break ({gamma}{sub 1}) anti-correlates with the break energy ({epsilon}{sub b}). Furthermore, {gamma}{sub 1} also anti-correlates with Fr, the fraction of photons above the break compared to the total photons. A hardening spectrum, as well as the correlations between ({gamma}{sub 1}, {epsilon}{sub b}) and ({gamma}{sub 1}, Fr), provide stringent constraints on the underlying electron acceleration mechanism. Our results support a recent proposal that electrons are being accelerated diffusively at a flare termination shock with a width of the order of an ion inertial length scale.

  15. COMBINED STEREO/RHESSI STUDY OF CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Temmer, M.; Veronig, A. M.; Krucker, S.; Vrsnak, B. E-mail: asv@igam.uni-graz.a E-mail: krucker@ssl.berkeley.ed

    2010-04-01

    Using the potential of two unprecedented missions, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we study three well-observed fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred close to the limb together with their associated high-energy flare emissions in terms of RHESSI hard X-ray (HXR) spectra and flux evolution. From STEREO/EUVI and STEREO/COR1 data, the full CME kinematics of the impulsive acceleration phase up to {approx}4 R{sub sun} is measured with a high time cadence of <=2.5 minutes. For deriving CME velocity and acceleration, we apply and test a new algorithm based on regularization methods. The CME maximum acceleration is achieved at heights h <= 0.4 R{sub sun}, and the peak velocity at h <= 2.1 R{sub sun} (in one case, as small as 0.5 R{sub sun}). We find that the CME acceleration profile and the flare energy release as evidenced in the RHESSI HXR flux evolve in a synchronized manner. These results support the 'standard' flare/CME model which is characterized by a feedback relationship between the large-scale CME acceleration process and the energy release in the associated flare.

  16. Summary of completed project. [Particle acceleration during solar flares: Particle interactions with ambient plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    1991-01-01

    The primary goal of the work in this proposal has been the determination of the requirement for acceleration of particles, especially electrons, during solar flares. This is one of the important and yet unsolved problems in solar flares and other astronomical objects. This is done by detailed theoretical investigation of interaction of accelerated particles with ambient plasma including interaction with particles, waves, and large scale magnetic fields. Comparison with observed impulsive phase radiation such as X-rays, gamma-rays, microwaves, and type III radiation is used for constraining the models and for determination of the characteristics of the accelerated particles. Steady state and time-dependent numerical codes have been developed based on the Fokker-Planck method for study of the particle acceleration and transport during a flare. Using these, the correlation between characteristics of radiation at various wavelengths have been investigated and some constraints have been set on the model parameters. During the last three year period of this grant, dissertation research of three graduate students have been partially supported by this grant. Each of these theses has dealt with various observed properties of flare emission with particular emphasis on the interrelationship between radiation in at least two energy bands: X-rays and gamma-rays, X-rays and microwaves, and X-rays and type III radiation. This has allowed considerable tightening of constraints on models, and inclusion of wave particle interaction has allowed direct calculations of acceleration processes.

  17. Study of latitudinal response of solar x-ray flares associated with strong radio bursts using multi-technique observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, M.; Astafyeva, E.

    2013-12-01

    The ionospheric effects due to solar flares (SF) have been intensively studied for several decades. It is now known that the SF effects can be observed from pre-dawn to post-dusk regions, with most pronounced signatures in the noon region (solar zenith angle is close to zero). It is generally demonstrated that enhancements in X-ray or EUV during solar flares cause an abrupt increase of the ionospheric electron density throughout the whole sunlit hemisphere. However, investigations of the ionospheric response to solar flares suggest that their impact on the ionosphere varies from event to event. The solar radio bursts (SRBs), a source of radio frequency interference are also generally associated with x-ray solar flare and acts as a threat to the trans-ionospheric signals. Considering this, we examined the SRBs using Nobeyama observations and found 34 radio burst events (>1000 sfu at 1GHz) to be closely associated with x-ray flares and CMEs during 2000-2012. We found 2 C-, 18 M- and 14 X-class solar flares are associated with these events. The 8 events out of these are very strong radio events (>10,000 sfu) and occurred with X-class of solar flares. The response of these flares on the ionosphere is investigated by using the data of vertical total electron content (TEC) measured by satellite altimeters TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason-2. The preliminary results of observations from satellite altimeters show that the sudden enhancement in TEC is not simultaneous at the same time at all regions when the flare occurs and this also varies with the strength of the flare. In most of M and C- class flare events, we found an increase in TEC at most of the latitudes and time during the flare. We found that some of the X-class solar events weaken the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) moving equator ward and then disappears with the decrease in TEC. Other X-class events, on the contrary, showed a tendency to increase the EIA. To understand and support our results, multi-technique observations using ground-based GPS-receivers located world-wide and TEC data from the GPS-receiver onboard CHAMP satellite will be investigated which may provide more information about the peculiarities of the longitudinal and latitudinal response of the ionosphere

  18. Results of one year of observations of Solar Flares made by "Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)" Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, R.; Dave, H.; Kumar, S.; Deshpande, M. R.

    The first space borne solar astronomy experiment of India namely ``Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) mission has completed one year of its successful operation in geostationary orbit. The SOXS mission onboard GSAT-2 Indian spacecraft was launched successfully by GSLV-D2 rocket on 08 May 2003 to study the energy release and particle acceleration in solar flares. We briefly present the scientific objectives and instrumentation of the SOXS mission. The SOXS is composed of two independent payloads viz. SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload, and SOXS High Energy Detector (SHD) payload. We restrict our presentation to SLD payload that designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) in collaboration with Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad and ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). The SLD payload employs the state-of-the-art solid state detectors viz. Si PIN and Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) devices that operate at near room temperature (-20 ^0 C). The dynamic energy range of Si PIN and CZT detectors are 4-25 and 4-56 keV. The Si PIN provides sub-keV energy resolution while CZT reveals ˜ 2 keV energy resolution throughout the dynamic range. The instrument has onboard flare triggering logic software and 5 MB-memory bank. The data is transmitted to Master Control Facility (MCF), Hasan with 8 kbps telemetry rate. The observations are made in fixed energy windows (temporal) mode and in spectral mode with 100ms cadence during the flare. The SLD has observed more than 140 flares of C and M class since its commissioning in the orbit. We present the preliminary results and the X-ray emission characteristics of these flares, and a detailed study of a few typical solar flares, which are impulsive but associated with CMEs, in view of energy release and particle emission by them. The high sensitivity of the SLD and sub-keV energy resolution of Si PIN detector allows the intensity and mean energy of the Fe-line complex at approximately 6.7 keV to be measured as a function of time in all class of flares. The centroid energy and width of the iron-line complex at ˜ 6.7 keV, the intensity of the Fe/Ni line complex at ˜ 8 keV, and the line-to-continuum ratio enabled to estimate the plasma temperature and other plasma parameters. We also present how SLD is a potential instrument for the study of microflares.

  19. Overview of open issues in the physics of large solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somov, B. V.; Bezrodnykh, S. I.; Ledentsov, L. S.

    A broad variety of observational methods allows us to see the effect of magnetic reconnection in high-temperature strongly-magnetized plasma of the solar corona. Some specific features of the large-scale reconnection in large solar flares are summarized in this review but they are not investigated in detail yet. For example, an analysis of the topological peculiarities of magnetic field in active regions clearly shows that the so-called topological trigger phenomenon is necessary to allow for in order to construct realistic models for large solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs). However this is not a simple task. We discuss also some new analytical models of magnetic reconnection in a current layer with attached MHD discontinuities. These models take into account the possibility of a current layer rupture in the region of anomalous plasma resistivity. In the context of the numerical simulations of reconnection, a question of their interpretation is considered. Some new results obtained recently are briefly reviewed together with new questions of the solar flare physics to be studied.

  20. The Solar Flare of the 14th of July 2000 (L3+C detector results)

    E-print Network

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Van den Akker, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bähr, J; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chiarusi, T; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Dela Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; De Asmundis, R; Dglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Ding, L K; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Durán, I; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Faber, G; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grabosch, H J; Grimm, O; Groenstege, H; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S K; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Haller, C; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Herv, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, A; Hou, S R; Huo, A X; Ito, N; Jin, B N; Jindal, P; Jing, C L; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kantserov, V A; Kaur, M; Kawakami, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kok, E; Korn, A; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kraber, M; Kuang, H H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kuijpers, J; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Li, L; Li, Z C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Meng, X W; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Parriaud, J F; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Qing, C R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Ravindran, K C; Razis, P; Rembeczki, S; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Rewiersma, P A M; Riemann, S; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schöneich, B; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shen, C Q; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Trowitzsch, G; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Unger, M; Valente, E; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, G; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Van Wijk, R; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Y P; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yang, X F; Yao, Z G; Yeh, S C; Yu, Z Q; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, C; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z P

    2006-01-01

    Several experiments have reported observations on possible correlations between the flux of high energy muons and intense solar flares. If confirmed, these observations would have significant implications for acceleration processes in the heliosphere able to accelerate protons and other ions to energies of at least tens of GeV. The solar flare of the 14 July 2000 offers a unique opportunity for the L3+C experiment to search for a correlated enhancement in the flux of muons using the L3 precision muon spectrometer. Its capabilities for observing a directional excess in the flux of muons above 15 GeV (corresponding to primary proton energies above 40 GeV) are presented along with observations made on the 14th of July 2000. We report an excess which appeared at a time coincident with the peak increase of solar protons observed at lower energies. The probability that the excess is a background fluctuation is estimated to be 1%. No similar excess of the muon flux was observed up to 1.5 hours after the solar flare ...

  1. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  2. U.S.-Japan Seminar on the Recent Advances in the Understanding of Solar Flares, Tokyo, Japan, October 5-8, 1982, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, S. R.; Uchida, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Hudson, H. S.

    1983-07-01

    Papers are presented on recent research concerning the understanding of solar flares, including the general characteristics of flares; energy transport, and chromospheric heating and evaporation; emission processes and source structure; and high energy photons, nuclear processes, and particle acceleration. Topics addressed include magnetic theories of solar flares, nonthermal and nonequilibrium effects in soft X-ray flare spectra, the thermal evolution of flare plasmas, upper limits on the total radiant energy of solar flares, energetic electrons as an energy transport mechanism in solar flares, the spatial characteristics of microwave bursts, and the relation between hard X-ray spectra and electron energy spectra. Also examined are the pre-flare and post-flare X-ray variations in active regions, the imaging of impulsive solar flare phenomena, the vertical structure of hard X-ray flares, the spatial structure of high energy photon sources, gamma-ray lines and neutrons from solar flares, and a dynamical interpretation of the very hot region appearing at the top of a loop. For individual items see A83-47659 to A83-47701

  3. Solar-flare-implanted [sup 4]He/[sup 3]He and solar-proton-produced Ne and Ar concentration profiles preserved in lunar rock 61016

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.N. ); Garrison, D.H. NASA, Houston, TX ); Bogard, D.D. ); Reedy, R.C. )

    1993-05-01

    The authors report on isotopic measurements made on lunar rock 61016, which is one of the limited number with a known orientation history. They measure solar flare implanted [sup 4]He/[sup 3]He ratios and the depth profiles of [sup 21]Ne, [sup 22]Ne, and [sup 38]Ar isotopes produced from in situ nuclear reactions of solar flare protons with the silicate rock. They are able to distinguish solar flare from galactic cosmic ray sources of these isotopes. They find that the helium isotope ratios are energy dependent, reporting measurements for solar wind nuclei, with energies down to keV amu[sup [minus]1], and for solar flare nuclei with energies above 1 and 4 MeV amu[sup [minus]1]. Respective ratios are 2695[-+]81, 3450[-+]725, and 770[-+]316.

  4. Search for solar neutrons at Mount Chacaltaya associated with M- and X-class flares during the rising period of solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Diego; Matsubara, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the acceleration mechanism of high-energy particles that are driven by solar flares, we examined solar neutron signals. We have performed a statistical analysis by reviewing the data collected by a neutron monitor during the period of January 2010 to August 2013. This detector operates at Mount Chacaltaya in Bolivia at 5,200 m above sea level. Our aim is to search for solar neutron events in association with large solar flares observed by the GOES satellite. We report that our analysis did not yield any positive excess due to solar neutrons that are statistically significant. Hence, we calculated the upper limit of the number of solar neutrons for the X2.8-class solar flare which occurred on 13 May 2013. We performed a similar calculation with a solar neutron event that occurred on 7 September 2005. Our upper limit is seven times less than the one produced by the real signal.

  5. Chromospheric Evaporation and Decimetric Radio Emission in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1995-01-01

    We have discovered decimetric signatures of the chromospheric evaporation process. Evidence for the radio detection of chromospheric evaporation is based on the radio-inferred values of (1) the electron density, (2) the propagation speed, and (3) the timing, which are found to be in good agreement with statistical values inferred from the blueshifted Ca xix soft X-ray line. The physical basis of our model is that free-free absorption of plasma emission is strongly modified by the steep density gradient and the large temperature increase in the upflowing flare plasma. The steplike density increase at the chromospheric evaporation front causes a local discontinuity in the plasma frequency, manifested as almost infinite drift rate in decimetric type III bursts. The large temperature increase of the upflowing plasma considerably reduces the local free-free opacity (due to the T-(exp -3/2) dependence) and thus enhances the brightness of radio bursts emitted at the local plasma frequency near the chromospheric evaporation front, while a high-frequency cutoff is expected in the high-density regions behind the front, which can be used to infer the velocity of the upflowing plasma. From model calculations we find strong evidence that decimetric bursts with a slowly drifting high-frequency cutoff are produced by fundamental plasma emission, contrary to the widespread belief that decimetric bursts are preferentially emitted at the harmonic plasma level. We analyzed 21 flare episodes from 1991-1993 for which broadband (100-3000 MHz) radio dynamic spectra from Phoenix, hard X-ray data from BATSE/CGRO, and soft X-ray data from GOES were available. We detected slowly drifting high-frequency cutoffs between 1.1 and 3.0 GHz, with drift rates of -41 +/- 32 MHz/s, extending over time intervals of 24 +/- 23 s. Developing a density model for type III-emitting flare loops based on the statistically observed drift rate of type III bursts by Alvarez & Haddock, we infer velocities of up to 360 km/s for the upflowing plasma, with an average of v(sub CE) = 236 +/- 130 km /s for episodes with 5-15 s duration. The mean electron density of the upflowing plasma is n(sub e) = 5.2(+/-3.1) x 10(exp 10) /cu cm when it is first detected in radio, at coronal altitudes of h(sub 0) = 9.2 +/- 2.3 Mm.

  6. Recent Developments: The Gamma Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) Imaging and Detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Nicole; Shih, A. Y.; Hurford, G. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H.; Zoglauer, A.; Lin, R. P.; Boggs, S. E.

    2013-07-01

    In two of the best-observed flares of the last cycle, the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite found the centroids of ion and relativistic electron emission to have a significant displacement. This result is surprising; co-spatially accelerated ions and electrons are thought to be transported along the same field lines, implying they would enter the chromosphere together and have similar emission locations. The Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar Flares (GRIPS) balloon instrument will investigate particle transport in solar flares by providing enhanced imaging, spectroscopy and polarimetry of gamma/HXR flare emission (20keV - 10MeV). GRIPS’ key technological improvements over the solar state of the art in HXR/gamma ray energies (RHESSI) include three-dimensional position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs) and a single-grid modulating collimator, the multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM). The 3D-GeDs allow GRIPS to Compton track energy deposition within the crystal. This capability (1) enables the MPRM design by acting as a second modulation grid, (2) provides significant background rejection and (3) makes solar polarization measurements possible. The MPRM imager provides quasi-continuous resolution from 12.5 - 162 arcsecs with 2x the throughput of a dual grid collimator system like RHESSI. This spatial resolution can resolve the separate footpoints of many flare sizes. In comparison, RHESSI images with a minimum of 35 arcsecs for gamma-rays, making these footpoints resolvable in only the largest flares. Here, we present the intial calibration of GRIPS’ 3D-GED detectors using laboratory radioactive sources. We evaluate charge sharing between adjacent strips, the detection of coincidences and preliminary depth measurements. The detectors have been shown to have a linear response and resolve line emission. The MPRM modulation grid is constructed and we present initial results from calibration. GRIPS is scheduled for a test flight from Fort Sumner , and two Antarctic long-duration balloon flights (LDBFs).

  7. Fermi Solar Flare Observations Submitted in response to NASA Solicitation NNH08ZDA001N-FERMI

    E-print Network

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    the three years of the proposed effort as Solar Cycle 24 begins. Predictions made by a NOAA panel in 20081 Fermi Solar Flare Observations Submitted in response to NASA Solicitation NNH08ZDA001N-FERMI Fermi Guest Investigator - Cycle 2 (Phase 1) PI: Brian R. Dennis, Solar Physics Laboratory, NASA/GSFC Co

  8. Chromospheric evaporation and decimetric radio emission in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1995-01-01

    We have discovered decimetric signatures of the chromospheric evaporation process. Evidence for the radio detection of chromospheric evaporation is based on the radio-inferred values of (1) the electron density, (2) the propagation speed, and (3) the timing, which are found to be in good agreement with statistical values inferred from the blueshifted Ca XIX soft X-ray line. The physical basis of our model is that free-free absorption of plasma emission is strongly modified by the steep density gradient and the large temperature increase in the upflowing flare plasma. The steplike density increase at the chromospheric evaporation front causes a local discontinuity in the plasma frequency, manifested as almost infinite drift rate in decimetric type III bursts. The large temperature increase of the upflowing plasma considerably reduces the local free-free opacity (due to the T(exp -3/2) dependence) and thus enhances the brightness of radio bursts emitted at the local plasma frequency near the chromospheric evaporation front, while a high-frequency cutoff is expected in the high-density regions behind the front, which can be used to infer the velocity of the upflowing plasma. From model calculations we find strong evidence that decimetric bursts with a slowly drifting high-frequency cutoff are produced by fundamental plasma emission, contrary to the widespread belief that decimetric bursts are preferentially emitted at the harmonic plasma level. We analyze 21 flare episodes from 1991-1993 for which broadband (100-3000 MHz) radio dynamic spectra from Pheonix, hard X-ray data from (BATSE/CGRO) and soft X-ray data from Burst and Transient Source Experiment/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GOES) were available.

  9. The solar flare of 18 August 1979: Incoherent scatter radar data and photochemical model comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.; Fenimore, E.E.; Ganguly, S.

    1988-04-01

    Measurements of electron density at seven D-region altidues were made with the Arecibo radar during a Class-X solar flare on 18 August 1979. Measurements of solar x-ray fluxes during the same period were available from the GOES-2 satellite (0.5 to 4 /angstrom/ and 1 to 8 /angstrom/) and from ISEE-3 (in four bands between 26 and 400 keV). From the x-ray flux data we computed ionization rates in the D-region and the associated chemical changes, using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and diffusion model (with 836 chemical reactions and 19 vertical levels). The computed electron densities matched the data fairly well after we had adjusted the rate coefficients of two reactions. We discuss the hierarchies among the many flare-induced chemical reactions in two altitude ranges within the D-region and the effects of adjusting several other rate coefficients. 51 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Quasi-periodic Wiggles of Microwave Zebra Structures in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sijie; Nakariakov, V. M.; Selzer, L. A.; Tan, Baolin; Yan, Yihua

    2013-11-01

    Quasi-periodic wiggles of microwave zebra pattern (ZP) structures with periods ranging from about 0.5 s to 1.5 s are found in an X-class solar flare on 2006 December 13 at the 2.6-3.8 GHz with the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer (SBRS/Huairou). Periodogram and correlation analysis show that the wiggles have two to three significant periodicities and are almost in phase between stripes at different frequencies. The Alfvén speed estimated from the ZP structures is about 700 km s-1. We find the spatial size of the wave-guiding plasma structure to be about 1 Mm with a detected period of about 1 s. This suggests that the ZP wiggles can be associated with the fast magnetoacoustic oscillations in the flaring active region. The lack of a significant phase shift between wiggles of different stripes suggests that the ZP wiggles are caused by a standing sausage oscillation.

  11. Response of the auroral lower ionosphere to solar flares in March 2012 according to ELF observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed', O. M.; Fedorenko, Yu. V.; Larchenko, A. V.; Pil'gaev, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    The response of the lower ionosphere to the solar flares that occurred in March 2012 is considered. Measurements of the propagation velocity and wave impedance of ELF electromagnetic pulses (atmospherics) performed at Lovozero and Barentsburg high-latitude observatories were used to estimate this response. It was shown that the daily average propagation velocity of atmospherics decreased by 20-30 thousand km/s under disturbed heliogeophysical conditions as compared to the velocity measured under quiet conditions. This is related to a decrease in the effective waveguide height that results from the change in the ionospheric conductivity profile during a solar flare. It was detected that pronounced bursts of wave impedance, the maximums of which exceed the impedance average value by a factor of more than 2, are observed during strong heliogeophysical disturbances. This fact cannot be explained in the scope of a spherically layered model; consequently, such deviations indicate an increase in the D-layer conductivity inhomogeneities.

  12. Power Laws in Solar Flares: Self-Organized Criticality or Turbulence?

    E-print Network

    Guido Boffetta; Vincenzo Carbone; Paolo Giuliani; Pierluigi Veltri; Angelo Vulpiani

    1999-04-23

    We study the time evolution of Solar Flares activity by looking at the statistics of quiescent times $\\tau_{L}$ between successive bursts. The analysis of 20 years of data reveals a power law distribution with exponent $\\alpha \\simeq 2.4$ which is an indication of complex dynamics with long correlation times. The observed scaling behavior is in contradiction with the Self-Organized Criticality models of Solar Flares which predict Poisson-like statistics. Chaotic models, including the destabilization of the laminar phases and subsequent restabilization due to nonlinear dynamics, are able to reproduce the power law for the quiescent times. In the case of the more realistic Shell Model of MHD turbulence we are able to reproduce all the observed distributions.

  13. Solar flare ionization in the mesosphere observed by coherent-scatter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. W.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    The coherent-scatter technique, as used with the Urbana radar, is able to measure relative changes in electron density at one altitude during the progress of a solar flare when that altitude contains a statistically steady turbulent layer. This work describes the analysis of Urbana coherent-scatter data from the times of 13 solar flares in the period from 1978 to 1983. Previous methods of measuring electron density changes in the D-region are summarized. Models of X-ray spectra, photoionization rates, and ion-recombination reaction schemes are reviewed. The coherent-scatter technique is briefly described, and a model is developed which relates changes in scattered power to changes in electron density. An analysis technique is developed using X-ray flux data from geostationary satellites and coherent scatter data from the Urbana radar which empirically distinguishes between proposed D-region ion-chemical schemes, and estimates the nonflare ion-pair production rate.

  14. Electron density diagnostics in the 10-100 A interval for a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.; Mason, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    Electron density measurements from spectral-line diagnostics are reported for a solar flare on July 13, 1982, 1627 UT. The spectrogram, covering the 10-95 A interval, contained usable lines of helium-like ions C V, N VI, O VII, and Ne IX which are formed over the temperature interval 0.7-3.5 x 10 to the 6th K. In addition, spectral-line ratios of Si IX, Fe XIV, and Ca XV were compared with new theoretical estimates of their electron density sensitivity to obtain additional electron density diagnostics. An electron density of 3 x 10 to the 10th/cu cm was obtained. The comparison of these results from helium-like and other ions gives confidence in the utility of these tools for solar coronal analysis and will lead to a fuller understanding of the phenomena observed in this flare.

  15. The Calculation and Observation of Gamma-Rays from Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear reactions, due to the interactions of the flare-accelerated particles with the ambient solar atmosphere, produce a wealth of gamma-ray line, neutron, positron, and ?-meson emissions. Such emissions have been observed in many solar flares. The principal mechanisms for the production of solar gamma-ray lines are nuclear deexcitation, neutron capture by proton, and positron-electron annihilation. The nuclear deexcitation spectrum consists of narrow lines resulting from the accelerated light-weight ions (protons and ?-particles) interacting with the ambient heavy nuclei, broad lines resulting from the accelerated heavy nuclei interacting with ambient H and He atoms, and nuclear continuum which includes a series of unresolved weak lines, compound continuum, and pre-equilibrium continuum. The solar gamma-rays are the most direct diagnostic tool for studying the acceleration and transportation of energetic particles in solar flares, especially for protons and heavy ions. They provide a wealth of information about the nature of accelerated particles, as well as the physical properties of ambient medium. TALYS is an efficient code for simulating nuclear reactions, and it can provide detailed calculations for all the information, including cross sections. Based on TALYS, we develop a new program of gamma-ray production, which improves the completeness and accuracy of the previous calculations. The theoretical frame of gamma-ray production in solar flares is treated in detail in the first half of the thesis. In addition, we take the 4.438 MeV line as an example to calculate the shapes of strong gamma-ray lines under different conditions. By comparison, we find that the shapes of gamma-ray lines (including Doppler width and shift) are closely related to the energy spectrum and angular distribution of accelerated ions, the solar atmospheric element abundance, and flare location, etc. As a result, the observation and analysis of spectral line shape will help us to obtain these physical parameters. In the latter part of the thesis, we employ a Monte Carlo simulation toolkit named GEANT4 to simulate the transport of neutron capture line in the solar atmosphere, and study the effect of Compton scattering on the gamma-ray spectrum by combing the theoretical calculation with observational data. By analyzing the flare which occurred on 2005 January 20 (X7.1/2B), we find that the vertical depth for neutron capture on hydrogen is about 8 g\\cdot cm^{-2} on average and higher than 15 g\\cdot cm^{-2} during the early phase of the flare. It is suggested that Compton scattering has a significant effect on the propagation of the neutron capture lines, especially during the early phase of the flare. Furthermore, by using the Compton-scattered continuum to correct the neutron capture line flux, we also find that the time evolution, not only the intensity but also the peak time of the flux, can be changed considerably compared with the values before the correction. This result demonstrates that the Compton effect of 2.223 MeV photons plays a significant role in a gamma-ray spectrum.

  16. Drift-Kinetic Modeling of Particle Acceleration and Transport in Solar Flares

    E-print Network

    Minoshima, T; Miyoshi, Y

    2010-01-01

    Based on the drift-kinetic theory, we develop a model for particle acceleration and transport in solar flares. The model describes the evolution of the particle distribution function by means of a numerical simulation of the drift-kinetic Vlasov equation, which allows us to directly compare simulation results with observations within an actual parameter range of the solar corona. Using this model, we investigate the time evolution of the electron distribution in a flaring region. The simulation identifies two dominant mechanisms of electron acceleration. One is the betatron acceleration at the top of closed loops, which enhances the electron velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field line. The other is the inertia drift acceleration in open magnetic field lines, which produces antisunward electrons. The resulting velocity space distribution significantly deviates from an isotropic distribution. The former acceleration can be a generation mechanism of electrons that radiate loop-top nonthermal emissions, and...

  17. Collective plasma effects associated with the continuous injection model of solar flare particle streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1979-01-01

    A modified continuous injection model for impulsive solar flares that includes self-consistent plasma nonlinearities based on the concept of marginal stability is presented. A quasi-stationary state is established, composed of a hot truncated electron Maxwellian distribution confined by acoustic turbulence on the top of the loop and energetic electron beams precipitating in the chromosphere. It is shown that the radiation properties of the model are in accordance with observations.

  18. Enrichment of heavy nuclei in the April 17, 1972 solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, R. L.; Hart, H. R., Jr.; Renshaw, A.; Woods, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    Cosmic ray nuclei from the April 17, 1972 solar flare were recorded in polycarbonate plastic and phosphate glass track detectors exposed on the Apollo 16 flight. The energy spectra of iron group nuclei and of carbon and heavier nuclei were measured down to about 0.02 MeV/nucleon, revealing that the enrichment of iron relative to carbon and heavier nuclei increases markedly in this very low energy region.

  19. SOLAR WIND DENSITY TURBULENCE AND SOLAR FLARE ELECTRON TRANSPORT FROM THE SUN TO THE EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Hamish A. S.; Kontar, Eduard P. E-mail: eduard@astro.gla.ac.u

    2010-09-20

    Solar flare accelerated electron beams propagating away from the Sun can interact with the turbulent interplanetary media, producing plasma waves and Type III radio emission. These electron beams are detected near the Earth with a double power-law energy spectrum. We simulate electron beam propagation from the Sun to the Earth in the weak turbulent regime taking into account the self-consistent generation of plasma waves and subsequent wave interaction with density fluctuations from low-frequency MHD turbulence. The rate at which plasma waves are induced by an unstable electron beam is reduced by background density fluctuations, most acutely when fluctuations have large amplitudes or small wavelengths. This suppression of plasma waves alters the wave distribution which changes the electron beam transport. Assuming a 5/3 Kolmogorov-type power-density spectrum of fluctuations often observed near the Earth, we investigate the corresponding energy spectrum of the electron beam after it has propagated 1 AU. We find a direct correlation between the spectrum of the double power-law below the break energy and the turbulent intensity of the background plasma. For an initial spectral index of 3.5, we find a range of spectra below the break energy between 1.6 and 2.1, with higher levels of turbulence corresponding to higher spectral indices.

  20. Internal and External reconnection in a Series of Homologous Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Using data from the Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope (EIT) on SOHO and the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT) on Yohkoh, we examine a series of morphologically homologous solar flares occurring in NOAA AR 8210 over May 1-2, 1998. An emerging flux region (EFR) impacted against a sunspot to the west and next to a coronal hole to the east is the source of the repeated flaring. An SXT sigmoid parallels the EFR's neutral line at the site of the initial flaring in soft X-rays. In EIT, each flaring episode begins with the formation of a crinkle pattern external to the EFR. These EIT crinkles move out from, and then in toward, the EFR with velocities approximately 20 km/s. A shrinking and expansion of the width of the coronal hole coincides with the crinkle activity, and generation and evolution of a postflare loop system begins near the. time of crinkle formation. Using a schematic based on magnetograms of the region, we suggest that these observations are consistent with the standard reconnection-based model for solar eruptions, but modified by the presence of the additional magnetic fields of the sunspot and coronal hole. In the schematic, internal reconnection begins inside of the EFR-associated fields, unleashing a flare, postflare loops, and a CME. External reconnection, first occurring between the escaping CME and the coronal hole field, and second occurring between fields formed as a result of the first external reconnection, results in the EIT crinkles and changes in the coronal hole boundary. By the end of the second external reconnection, the initial setup is reinstated; thus the sequence can repeat, resulting in morphologically homologous eruptions. Our inferred magnetic topology is similar to that suggested in the "breakout model" of eruptions [Antiochos, 1998], although we cannot determine if our eruptions are released primarily by the breakout mechanism (external reconnection) or, alternatively, are released primarily by the internal reconnection.