Science.gov

Sample records for solar structural facets

  1. Sandwich Construction Solar Structural Facets

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, R. B.; Grossman, J.W.

    1998-12-22

    Silver/glass mirrors have excellent optical properties but need a method of support in order to be used in concentrating solar thermal systems. In collaboration with the Cummins dish/Stirling development program, they started investigating sandwich construction as a way to integrate silver/glass mirrors into solar optical elements. In sandwich construction, membranes such as sheet metal or plastic are bonded to the front and back of a core (like a sandwich). For solar optical elements, a glass mirror is bonded to one of the membranes. This type of construction has the advantages of a high strength-to-weight ratio, and reasonable material and manufacturing cost. The inherent stiffness of sandwich construction mirror panels also facilitates large panels. This can have cost advantages for both the amount of hardware required as well as reduced installation and alignment costs. In addition, by incorporating the panels into the support structure reductions in the amount of structural support required are potentially possible.

  2. Perovskite solar cells: Different facets of performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eperon, Giles E.; Ginger, David S.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of halide perovskites vary significantly between crystalline grains, but the impact of this heterogeneity on solar cell performance is unclear. Now, this variability is shown to limit the photovoltaic properties of solar cells, and its origins are linked to differing properties between crystal facets.

  3. Changing Facets of Nuclear Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covello, Aldo

    2008-04-01

    Section I. Exotic nuclear structure. Radioactive beams at TRIUMF / A. C. Shotter. Status of RI-beam factory project at RIKEN / H. Ueno. Population of neutron unbound states via two-proton knockout reactions / N. Frank ... [et al.]. Studies of neutron-rich nuclei using ISOL facilities at CERN and Jyväskylä / J. Äystö. Shell structure evolution far from stability: recent results from GANIL / F. Azaiez. Magnetic moment meaurements: pushing the limits / N. Benczer-Koller. Technique for measuring angular correlations and g-factors of excited states with large multi-detector arrays: an application to neutron rich nuclei produced in spontaneous fission / A. V. Ramayya ... [et al.]. Isospin symmetry and proton decay: identification of the 10+ isomer in [symbol]Ni / C. Fahlander ... [et al.]. Exploring the evolution of the shell structure by means of deep inelastic reactions / G. de Angelis. Studies on the exotic structure of [symbol]Al by measurements of [symbol] and P[symbol] / D. Q. Fang ... [et al.]. Extended cluster model for light and medium nuclei / M. Tomaselli ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure studies on exotic nuclei with radioactive beams - present status and future perspectives at FAIR / P. Egelhof. The SPES direct target project at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro / G. Prete ... [et al.] -- Section II. Nuclear structure and nuclear forces. Modern aspects of nuclear structure theory / J. Wambach. Correlations in nuclei: a review / R. Schiavilla. Correlated nucleons in k- and r-space / I. Sick. Roles of all-order core polarizations and Brown-Rho scaling in nucleon effective interactions / T. T. S. Kuo ... [et al.]. Ab initio and ab exitu no core shell model / J. P. Vary ... [et al.]. Ab-initio coupled cluster theory for open quantum systems / G. Hagen ... [et al.]. Symplectic no-core shell model / J. P. Draayer ... [et al.]. Role of deformed symplectic configurations in ab initio no-core shell model results / T. Dytrych ... [et al.]. Nuclear structure

  4. Shell structure in faceted metal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavloff, Nicolas; Creagh, Stephen C.

    1993-12-01

    We study the quantized electronic energy levels in a three-dimensional icosahedral billiard modeling a faceted metal cluster. The first 2000 levels are determined numerically. The magic numbers are compared with experimental data and with the results for a spherical model. We discuss the supershell structure and propose its study as a test of cluster sphericity. We compare our results with the predictions of the semiclassical trace formula and point out the relevance of diffractive orbits.

  5. Facet development for a faceted stretched-membrane dish by Solar Kinetics, Inc

    SciTech Connect

    Schertz, P.T.; Brown, D.C.; Konnerth, A. III )

    1991-07-01

    A 3.6-meter diameter stretched-membrane optical facet for a parabolic dish has been successfully designed and demonstrated under contract with Sandia National Laboratories. Twelve facets identical to them will be used to make the lightweight reflector of the dish. The project goal of 2.5-mrad surface accuracy was met with each of the two full-sized prototypes, and accuracies of as low as 1.1 mrad were achieved. The facet weight is 11.7 kg/m{sup 2} (2.4lbs/ft{sup 2}). The facet is similar in construction to the successful stretched-membrane heliostat; it has two thin metal membranes attached to a ring. However, the front membrane for this facet is plastically formed at the factor in order to achieve a shorter facet f/D (approximately 3.0). A passive tether restrains the from membrane when not in operation, that is, when the stabilizing vacuum is off. The optical surface is achieved with a silvered-acrylic film laminated to the metal membrane. The facet is expected to cost $55.40/m{sup 2} at a production rate of 10,000 facets per year and $115, 000/m{sup 2}-at a production rate of 500 facets a year. Several key issues have been resolved. Stress concentrations due to seams in the reflective laminate did not cause membrane rupture during forming as they have for dishes with lower focal length-to-diameter ratios. The laminate survived the forming process and simulated operation without deterioration. The optical effect of the tether on the membrane was tested and found to be very small. Most important, highly accurate shapes were obtained using a simple forming procedure. Additional tests are needed to demonstrate process repeatablility and facet performance in typical operating conditions. 18 refs., 36 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Hierarchical structures of rutile exposing high-index facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Quang Duc; Kato, Hideki; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kakihana, Masato

    2015-05-01

    Recently, shape-controlled synthesis of crystals exposing high-index facets has attracted much research interest due to their importance for both fundamental studies and technological applications. Herein, crystals of rutile-type TiO2 with hierarchical structures exposing high-index facets have been synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method using water-soluble titanium complex as a precursor and picolinic acid as structure-directing and shape-controlling agents. The synthesized particles were composed of several branches of pyramidal crystals with relatively smooth surface. On the basis of investigation results, it was speculated that the mutual π-stacking and selective adsorption of picolinic acid on specific {111} facets resulted in the formation of rutile crystals bound by high-index surfaces such as {331}.

  7. Structural Equation Modelling of Multiple Facet Data: Extending Models for Multitrait-Multimethod Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bechger, Timo M.; Maris, Gunter

    2004-01-01

    This paper is about the structural equation modelling of quantitative measures that are obtained from a multiple facet design. A facet is simply a set consisting of a finite number of elements. It is assumed that measures are obtained by combining each element of each facet. Methods and traits are two such facets, and a multitrait-multimethod…

  8. Faceting and commensurability in crystal structures of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Ramiro-Manzano, F; Meseguer, F; Bonet, E; Rodriguez, I

    2006-07-14

    This Letter investigates the influence of finite size effects on the particle arrangement of thin film colloidal crystals. A rich variety of crystallographic faceting with large single domain microcrystallites is shown. Optical reflectance experiments together with scanning electron microscopy permit the identification of the crystal symmetry and the facet orientation, as well as the exact number of monolayers. When the cell thickness is not commensurable with a high symmetry layering, particles arrange themselves in a periodic distribution of (111)- and (100)-orientated face centered cubic (fcc) microcrystallites separated by planar defects. These structures can be described as a fcc ordering orientated along a vicinal surface, modified by a periodic distribution of fcc (111) stacking faults. PMID:16907485

  9. Facet-dependent solar ammonia synthesis of BiOCl nanosheets via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Shang, Jian; Shi, Jingu; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-01-01

    Under the pressure of a fossil fuels shortage and global climate change, solar ammonia synthesis and the need to develop N2 fixation under mild conditions is becoming more urgent need; however, their intrinsic mechanisms still remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the kinetic inertia of N2 can be overcome using oxygen vacancies (OVs) of BiOCl as the catalytic centers to create lower energy molecular steps, which are amendable for the solar light driven N-N triple bond cleavage via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway. Moreover, the distinct structures of OVs on different BiOCl facets strongly determine the N2 fixation pathways by influencing both the adsorption structure and the activation level of N2. The fixation of terminal end-on bound N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {001} facets follows an asymmetric distal mode by selectively generating NH3, while the reduction of side-on bridging N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {010} facets is more energetically favorable in a symmetric alternating mode to produce N2H4 as the main intermediate.Under the pressure of a fossil fuels shortage and global climate change, solar ammonia synthesis and the need to develop N2 fixation under mild conditions is becoming more urgent need; however, their intrinsic mechanisms still remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the kinetic inertia of N2 can be overcome using oxygen vacancies (OVs) of BiOCl as the catalytic centers to create lower energy molecular steps, which are amendable for the solar light driven N-N triple bond cleavage via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway. Moreover, the distinct structures of OVs on different BiOCl facets strongly determine the N2 fixation pathways by influencing both the adsorption structure and the activation level of N2. The fixation of terminal end-on bound N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {001} facets follows an asymmetric distal mode by selectively generating NH3, while the reduction of side-on bridging N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {010} facets is more

  10. Multi-facet concentrator of solar setup for irradiating the objects placed in a target plane with solar light

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Yampolskiy, Vladislav; Alekseev, Valerie; Son, Valentin

    2001-01-01

    According to the proposed invention, this technical result is achieved so that many-facet concentrator of a solar setup for exposure of objects, placed in a target plane, to the action of solar radiation containing a supporting frame and facets differing by that the facets of the concentrator are chosen with spherical focusing reflective surfaces of equal focal lengths and with selective coatings reflecting a desired spectral fraction of solar radiation, and are arranged on the supporting frame symmetrically with respect to the common axis of the concentrator, their optical axes being directed to the single point on the optical axis of the concentrator located before the nominal focus point of the concentrator and determining the position of arranging the target plane.

  11. Facet-dependent solar ammonia synthesis of BiOCl nanosheets via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Shang, Jian; Shi, Jingu; Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-01-28

    Under the pressure of a fossil fuels shortage and global climate change, solar ammonia synthesis and the need to develop N2 fixation under mild conditions is becoming more urgent need; however, their intrinsic mechanisms still remain unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that the kinetic inertia of N2 can be overcome using oxygen vacancies (OVs) of BiOCl as the catalytic centers to create lower energy molecular steps, which are amendable for the solar light driven N-N triple bond cleavage via a proton-assisted electron transfer pathway. Moreover, the distinct structures of OVs on different BiOCl facets strongly determine the N2 fixation pathways by influencing both the adsorption structure and the activation level of N2. The fixation of terminal end-on bound N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {001} facets follows an asymmetric distal mode by selectively generating NH3, while the reduction of side-on bridging N2 on the OVs of BiOCl {010} facets is more energetically favorable in a symmetric alternating mode to produce N2H4 as the main intermediate. PMID:26701815

  12. Crystal facet effect on structural stability and electronic properties of wurtzite InP nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Shu, Haibo; Jin, Mengting; Liang, Pei; Cao, Dan; Li, Can; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2014-06-01

    The crystal-facet effect on the structural stability and electronic properties of wurtzite InP nanowires (NWs) with different side-facets are investigated by using first-principles calculation within density-function theory. The surface-energy calculation suggests that side-facet structures of InP NWs are unreconstructed due to the fact that the low-index {11¯00} and {112¯0} facets with paired In-P dimers satisfy the electron counting rule. The calculated formation energies indicate that the structural stability of InP NWs strongly depends on their side-facets. Among considered InP NWs with different side-facets, the {11¯00} faceted NWs present the highest stability due to the relative low surface atom ratio, which is in good agreement with experimental observations where wurtzite InP NWs prefer to be surrounded by {11¯00} facets. The size dependence of NW band gap indicates that the band gap (Eg) of uniform-sized InP NWs with different side-facets follows the trend, Eg -{112¯0} > Eg -{11¯00}-{112¯0} > Eg -{11¯00}, when NW diameter is larger than 3 nm and a reverse trend is found in the smaller sized NWs (d < 3 nm). Our result opens the possibility to engineer the band gap of wurtzite InP NWs by controlling their side-facets.

  13. Simulation and optimization of faceted structure for illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihong; Engel, Thierry; Flury, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    The re-direction of incoherent light using a surface containing only facets with specific angular values is proposed. A new photometric approach is adopted since the size of each facet is large in comparison with the wavelength. A reflective configuration is employed to avoid the dispersion problems of materials. The irradiance distribution of the reflected beam is determined by the angular position of each facet. In order to obtain the specific irradiance distribution, the angular position of each facet is optimized using Zemax OpticStudio 15 software. A detector is placed in the direction which is perpendicular to the reflected beam. According to the incoherent irradiance distribution on the detector, a merit function needs to be defined to pilot the optimization process. The two dimensional angular position of each facet is defined as a variable which is optimized within a specified varying range. Because the merit function needs to be updated, a macro program is carried out to update this function within Zemax. In order to reduce the complexity of the manual operation, an automatic optimization approach is established. Zemax is in charge of performing the optimization task and sending back the irradiance data to Matlab for further analysis. Several simulation results are given for the verification of the optimization method. The simulation results are compared to those obtained with the LightTools software in order to verify our optimization method.

  14. Porous (001)-faceted anatase TiO2 nanorice thin film for efficient dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Athar Ali; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Mat Salleh, Muhamad

    2016-01-01

    Anatase TiO2 structures with nanorice-like morphology and high exposure of (001) facet has been successfully synthesized on an ITO surface using ammonium Hexafluoro Titanate and Hexamethylenetetramine as precursor and capping agent, respectively, under a microwave-assisted liquid-phase deposition method. These anatase TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared within five minutes of reaction time by utilizing an inverter microwave system at a normal atmospheric pressure. The morphology and the size (approximately from 6 to 70 nm) of these nanostructures can be controlled. Homogenous, porous, 5.64 ± 0.002 μm thick layer of spongy-nanorice with facets (101) and (001) was grown on ITO substrate and used as a photo-anode in a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). This solar cell device has emerged out with 4.05 ± 0.10% power conversion efficiency (PCE) and 72% of incident photon-to-current efficiency (IPCE) under AM1.5 G illumination.

  15. Facet-Dependent Catalytic Activity of Platinum Nanocrystals for Triiodide Reduction in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Dong; Hou, Yu; Yang, Shuang; Yang, Xiao Hua; Zhong, Ju Hua; Liu, Jian; Wang, Hai Feng; Hu, P.; Zhao, Hui Jun; Yang, Hua Gui

    2013-01-01

    Platinum (Pt) nanocrystals have demonstrated to be an effective catalyst in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. However, pioneer facets with highest activity have been reported differently for various reaction systems. Although Pt has been the most important counter electrode material for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), suitable atomic arrangement on the exposed crystal facet of Pt for triiodide reduction is still inexplicable. Using density functional theory, we have investigated the catalytic reaction processes of triiodide reduction over {100}, {111} and {411} facets, indicating that the activity follows the order of Pt(111) > Pt(411) > Pt(100). Further, Pt nanocrystals mainly bounded by {100}, {111} and {411} facets were synthesized and used as counter electrode materials for DSCs. The highest photovoltaic conversion efficiency of Pt(111) in DSCs confirms the predictions of the theoretical study. These findings have deepened the understanding of the mechanism of triiodide reduction at Pt surfaces and further screened the best facet for DSCs successfully. PMID:23670438

  16. Monoclinic Tungsten Oxide with {100} Facet Orientation and Tuned Electronic Band Structure for Enhanced Photocatalytic Oxidations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Chen, Chen; Mei, Zongwei; Liu, Xiaohe; Qu, Xiaolei; Li, Yunxiang; Li, Siqi; Qi, Weihong; Zhang, Yuanjian; Ye, Jinhua; Roy, Vellaisamy A L; Ma, Renzhi

    2016-04-27

    Exploring surface-exposed highly active crystal facets for photocatalytic oxidations is promising in utilizing monoclinic WO3 semiconductor. However, the previously reported highly active facets for monoclinic WO3 were mainly toward enhancing photocatalytic reductions. Here we report that the WO3 with {100} facet orientation and tuned surface electronic band structure can effectively enhance photocatalytic oxidation properties. The {100} faceted WO3 single crystals are synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method. The UV-visible diffuse reflectance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy valence band spectra, and photoelectrochemical measurements suggest that the {100} faceted WO3 has a much higher energy level of valence band maximum compared with the normal WO3 crystals without preferred orientation of the crystal face. The density functional theory calculations reveal that the shift of O 2p and W 5d states in {100} face induce a unique band structure. In comparison with the normal WO3, the {100} faceted WO3 exhibits an O2 evolution rate about 5.1 times in water splitting, and also shows an acetone evolution rate of 4.2 times as well as CO2 evolution rate of 3.8 times in gaseous degradation of 2-propanol. This study demonstrates an efficient crystal face engineering route to tune the surface electronic band structure for enhanced photocatalytic oxidations. PMID:27045790

  17. Cross-cultural evidence for the two-facet structure of pride

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Chung, Joanne M.; Cheng, Joey T.; Tracy, Jessica L.; Robins, Richard W.; Chen, Xiao; Zheng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Across six studies conducted in Mainland China and South Korea, the present research extended prior findings showing that pride is comprised of two distinct conceptual and experiential facets in the U.S.: a pro-social, achievement-oriented “authentic pride”, and an arrogant, self-aggrandizing “hubristic pride”. This same two-facet structure emerged in Chinese participants’ semantic conceptualizations of pride (Study 1), Chinese and Koreans’ dispositional tendencies to experience pride (Studies 2, 3a, and 3b), Chinese and Koreans’ momentary pride experiences (Studies 3a, 3b, and 5), and Americans’ pride experiences using descriptors derived indigenously in Korea (Study 4). Together, these studies provide the first evidence that the two-facet structure of pride generalizes to cultures with highly divergent views of pride and self-enhancement processes from North America. PMID:27158171

  18. Allophycocyanin and phycocyanin crystal structures reveal facets of phycobilisome assembly.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2013-03-01

    X-ray crystal structures of the isolated phycobiliprotein components of the phycobilisome have provided high resolution details to the description of this light harvesting complex at different levels of complexity and detail. The linker-independent assembly of trimers into hexamers in crystal lattices of previously determined structures has been observed in almost all of the phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) structures available in the Protein Data Bank. In this paper we describe the X-ray crystal structures of PC and APC from Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942, PC from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and PC from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus crystallized in the presence of urea. All five structures are highly similar to other PC and APC structures on the levels of subunits, monomers and trimers. The Synechococcus APC forms a unique loose hexamer that may show the structural requirements for core assembly and rod attachment. While the Synechococcus PC assembles into the canonical hexamer, it does not further assemble into rods. Unlike most PC structures, the Synechocystis PC fails to form hexamers. Addition of low concentrations of urea to T. vulcanus PC inhibits this proteins propensity to form hexamers, resulting in a crystal lattice composed of trimers. The molecular source of these differences in assembly and their relevance to the phycobilisome structure is discussed. PMID:23201474

  19. Nanocrystalline Anatase Titania Supported Vanadia Catalysts: Facet-dependent Structure of Vanadia

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Zhen; Gao, Feng; Li, Yan; Walter, Eric D.; Liu, Jun; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

    2015-07-09

    Titania supported vanadia, a classic heterogeneous catalyst for redox reactions, typically has nonhomogeneous vanadia species on various titania facets, making it challenging not only to determine and quantify each species but also to decouple their catalytic contributions. We prepared truncated tetragonal bipyramidal (TiO2-TTB) and rod-like (TiO2-Rod) anatase titania with only {101} and {001} facets at ratios of about 80:20 and 93:7, respectively, and used them as supports of sub-monolayer vanadia. The structure and redox properties of supported vanadia were determined by XRD, TEM, XPS, EPR, Raman, FTIR and TPR, etc. It was found that vanadia preferentially occupy TiO2 {001} facets and form isolated O=V4+(O-Ti)2 species, and with further increase in vanadia surface coverage, isolated O=V5+(O-Ti)3 and oligomerized O=V5+(O-M)3 (M = Ti or V) species form on TiO2 {101} facets. The discovery on support facet-dependent structure of vanadia on anatase titania is expected to enable the elucidation of structure-function correlations on high surface area TiO2 supported vanadia catalysts. This work was supported by U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. The research was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for DOE by Battelle.

  20. Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles with Exposed {001} Facets for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liang; Qin, Zhengfei; Yang, Jianping; Li, Xing’ao

    2015-01-01

    Anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets were synthesized from Ti powder via a sequential hydrothermal reaction process. At the first-step hydrothermal reaction, H-titanate nanowires were obtained in NaOH solution with Ti powder, and at second-step hydrothermal reaction, anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets were formed in NH4F solution. If the second-step hydrothermal reaction was carried out in pure water, the H-titanate nanowires were decomposed into random shape anatase-TiO2 nanostructures, as well as few impurity of H2Ti8O17 phase and rutile TiO2 phase. Then, the as-prepared TiO2 nanostructures synthesized in NH4F solution and pure water were applied to the photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), which exhibited power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.06% (VOC of 0.756 V, JSC of 14.80 mA/cm2, FF of 0.631) and 3.47% (VOC of 0.764 V, JSC of 6.86 mA/cm2, FF of 0.662), respectively. The outstanding performance of DSSCs based on anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets was attributed to the high activity and large special surface area for excellent capacity of dye adsorption. PMID:26190140

  1. Anatase TiO2 Nanoparticles with Exposed {001} Facets for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Liang; Qin, Zhengfei; Yang, Jianping; Li, Xing'Ao

    2015-07-01

    Anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets were synthesized from Ti powder via a sequential hydrothermal reaction process. At the first-step hydrothermal reaction, H-titanate nanowires were obtained in NaOH solution with Ti powder, and at second-step hydrothermal reaction, anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets were formed in NH4F solution. If the second-step hydrothermal reaction was carried out in pure water, the H-titanate nanowires were decomposed into random shape anatase-TiO2 nanostructures, as well as few impurity of H2Ti8O17 phase and rutile TiO2 phase. Then, the as-prepared TiO2 nanostructures synthesized in NH4F solution and pure water were applied to the photoanodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), which exhibited power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.06% (VOC of 0.756 V, JSC of 14.80 mA/cm2, FF of 0.631) and 3.47% (VOC of 0.764 V, JSC of 6.86 mA/cm2, FF of 0.662), respectively. The outstanding performance of DSSCs based on anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with exposed {001} facets was attributed to the high activity and large special surface area for excellent capacity of dye adsorption.

  2. Mamillo-accessory notch and foramen: distribution patterns and correlation with superior lumbar facet structure.

    PubMed

    Mahato, N K

    2014-12-01

    The mamillary (MP) and the accessory (AP) processes are two important anatomical landmarks in the lumbar vertebral morphology. These two processes form the mamillo-accessory notch (MAN) between them. In the living, the MP and the AP are connected together by the mamillo-accessory ligament (MAL). The medial branches of lumbar dorsal rami pass underneath the MAL. The MAL often undergoes varied degrees of ossification with diverse notching at the junction of these two processes, often with formation of a discrete foramen (MAF). Reports on the distribution of these notches (MAN) and foramina (MAF) are very few and most of them do not discuss such ossification in context of morphology of adjoining structures in the vertebrae. Lumbar vertebral and sacral specimens were screened for three different categories of narrowing at the mamillo-accessory junction: firstly >1/2 notch, secondly ¾ notch, and thirdly MAF and their distribution patterns were mapped along the lumbar spine. Transverse dimensions of superior facet articulating surfaces [length (a)] and widths of MPs [length (b)] were recorded. Relative widths of the MPs were calculated as index M (a/b). Results suggest associations between the degrees of assimilation of the MPs into the facet joints, the index M values, and the different types of mamillo-accessory junctional anatomy. This study may help to understand if MAN and MAF related dorsal rami entrapment neuropathies arise merely due to osteoarthritic ossification of the MAL or could also be accounted for by facet dimensions or degree of MP-facet fusions that abut close to the mamillo-accessory junctions. PMID:24889272

  3. Solar Sector Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.; Svalgaard, Leif; Hannah, Iain G.

    2014-12-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field near 1 AU has a characteristic "sector" structure that reflects its polarity relative to the solar direction. Typically we observe large-scale coherence in these directions, with two or four "away" or "towards" sectors per solar rotation, from any platform in deep space and near the ecliptic plane. In a simple picture, this morphology simply reflects the idea that the sources of the interplanetary field lie mainly in or near the Sun, and that the solar-wind flow enforces a radial component in this field. The sector boundaries are sharply defined in the interplanetary field near one AU, but have more complicated sources within the Sun itself. Recent evidence confirms that the origins of this pattern also appear statistically at the level of the photosphere, with signatures found in the highly concentrated fields of sunspots and even solar flares. This complements the associations already known between the interplanetary sectors and large-scale coronal structures (i.e., the streamers). This association with small-scale fields strengthens at the Hale sector boundary, defining the Hale boundary as the one for which the polarity switch matches that of the leading-to-following polarity alternation in the sunspots of a given hemisphere. Surface features that appear 4.5 days prior to the sector crossings observed at 1 AU correlate with this sense of polarity reversal.

  4. The Structural Validity of the Perceived Traits of the "Ideal Student" Multi-Faceted Theory among Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslovaty, Nava; Cohen, Arie; Furman, Sari

    2008-01-01

    The article presents a multi-faceted theory of "ideal high school student" traits. The trait system, as defined by several theories, is a translation of the teachers' belief system into educational objectives. The study focused on Bloom's taxonomies and the structural validity of its principles, using Similarity Structure Analysis. Aware of the…

  5. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Nitta, Nariaki; Harvey, Karen

    1997-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is the study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and groundbased data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of the solar atmosphere from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the rocket flights. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. Highlights of this initial year of the contract included compilation, scaling and co-alignment of image sets, substantial progress on the Bright Point study, initial work on the Active Region and Large Scale Structure studies, DRSC slit-aspect determination work and calibration activities. One paper was presented at the 1997 Annual Meeting of the AAS/SPD in Bozeman, Montana. An initial set of calibrated spectra were placed into the public domain via the World Wide Web. Three Quarterly Progress Reports have been submitted; progress for the fourth quarter of the contract is summarized in this Final Contract Report. The intent of the investigation is to compare the physics of small- and medium-scale structure with that of large-scale structures with weak fields. A study has been identified in each size domain. The calibration of the rocket data forms an important element of the work. Of equal importance is the slit-aspect solution, which determines the correspondence between locations along the spectrograph slit and points on the solar disk.

  6. Surface Structure Dependence of SO2 Interaction with Ceria Nanocrystals with Well-defined Surface Facets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tumuluri, Uma; Li, Meijun; Cook, Brandon G.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Dai, Sheng; Wu, Zili

    2015-12-02

    The effects of the surface structure of ceria (CeO2) on the nature, strength, and amount of species resulting from SO2 adsorption were studied using in situ IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled with mass spectrometry, along with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). CeO2 nanocrystals with different morphologies, namely, rods (representing a defective structure), cubes (100 facet), and octahedra (111 facet), were used to represent different CeO2 surface structures. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the structure and binding strength of adsorbed species from SO2 depend on the shape of the CeO2 nanocrystals. SO2 adsorbs mainly as surfacemore » sulfites and sulfates at room temperature on CeO2 rods, cubes, and octahedra that were either oxidatively or reductively pretreated. The formation of sulfites is more evident on CeO2 octahedra, whereas surface sulfates are more prominent on CeO2 rods and cubes. This is explained by the increasing reducibility of the surface oxygen in the order octahedra < cubes < rods. Bulk sulfites are also formed during SO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 rods. The formation of surface sulfites and sulfates on CeO2 cubes is in good agreement with our DFT results of SO2 interactions with the CeO2(100) surface. CeO2 rods desorb SO2 at higher temperatures than cubes and octahedra nanocrystals, but bulk sulfates are formed on CeO2 rods and cubes after high-temperature desorption whereas only some surface sulfates/sulfites are left on octahedra. This difference is rationalized by the fact that CeO2 rods have the highest surface basicity and largest amount of defects among the three nanocrystals, so they bind and react with SO2 strongly and are the most degraded after SO2 adsorption cycles. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work on the effects of the surface structure and defects on the interaction of SO2 with CeO2 provides insights for the design of more sulfur-resistant CeO2-based catalysts.« less

  7. Examining the factor structures of the five facet mindfulness questionnaire and the self-compassion scale.

    PubMed

    Williams, Matthew J; Dalgleish, Tim; Karl, Anke; Kuyken, Willem

    2014-06-01

    The five facet mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ; Baer, Smith, Hopkins, Krietemeyer, & Toney, 2006) and the self-compassion scale (SCS; Neff, 2003) are widely used measures of mindfulness and self-compassion in mindfulness-based intervention research. The psychometric properties of the FFMQ and the SCS need to be independently replicated in community samples and relevant clinical samples to support their use. Our primary aim was to establish the factor structures of the FFMQ and SCS in individuals with recurrent depression in remission, since mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) was developed as a treatment for preventing depressive relapse. In order to determine the consistency across populations, we examined the factor structures of the FFMQ and SCS in 3 samples: (1) a convenience sample of adults, (2) a sample of adults who practice meditation, and (3) a sample of adults who suffer from recurrent depression and were recruited to take part in a trial of MBCT. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) showed that a 4-factor hierarchical model of the FFMQ best fits the community sample and the clinical sample but that a 5-factor hierarchical model of the FFMQ best fits the meditator sample. CFA did not endorse the SCS 6-factor hierarchical structure in any of the 3 samples. Clinicians and researchers should be aware of the psychometric properties of the FFMQ to measure mindfulness when comparing meditators and nonmeditators. Further research is needed to develop a more psychometrically robust measure of self-compassion. PMID:24490681

  8. Modeling solar magnetic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, B. C.

    1985-01-01

    Some ideas in the theoretical study of force-free magnetic fields and magnetostatic fields, which are relevant to the effort of using magnetograph data as inputs to model the quasi-static, large-scale magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere are discussed. Basic physical principles will be emphasized. An attempt will be made to assess what we may learn, physically, from the models based on these ideas. There is prospect for learning useful physics and this ought to be an incentive for intensifying the efforts to improve vector magnetograph technology and to solve the basic radiative-transfer problems encountered in the interpretation of magnetograph raw data.

  9. Solar Coronal Structure Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bruner, Marilyn E.; Saba, Julia; Strong, Keith; Harvey, Karen

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this investigation is to study the physics of the solar corona through the analysis of the EUV and UV data produced by two flights (12 May 1992 and 25 April 1994) of the Lockheed Solar Plasma Diagnostics Experiment (SPDE) sounding rocket payload, in combination with Yohkoh and ground-based data. Each rocket flight produced both spectral and imaging data. These joint datasets are useful for understanding the physical state of various features in the solar atmosphere at different heights ranging from the photosphere to the corona at the time of the, rocket flights, which took place during the declining phase of a solar cycle, 2-4 years before the minimum. The investigation is narrowly focused on comparing the physics of small- and medium-scale strong-field structures with that of large-scale, weak fields. As we close th is investigation, we have to recall that our present position in the understanding of basic solar physics problems (such as coronal heating) is much different from that in 1995 (when we proposed this investigation), due largely to the great success of SOHO and TRACE. In other words, several topics and techniques we proposed can now be better realized with data from these missions. For this reason, at some point of our work, we started concentrating on the 1992 data, which are more unique and have more supporting data. As a result, we discontinued the investigation on small-scale structures, i.e., bright points, since high-resolution TRACE images have addressed more important physics than SPDE EUV images could do. In the final year, we still spent long time calibrating the 1992 data. The work was complicated because of the old-fashioned film, which had problems not encountered with more modern CCD detectors. After our considerable effort on calibration, we were able to focus on several scientific topics, relying heavily on the SPDE UV images. They include the relation between filaments and filament channels, the identification of hot

  10. A Structural Study of Facet and Off-Facet Parts of Rare-Earth Garnets, Gd 3Sc 2Al 3O 12, Gd 3Sc 2Ga 3O 12, and La 3Lu 2Ga 3O 12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Satoru; Marumo, Fumiyuki; Tanaka, Kiyoaki; Morikawa, Hideki; Kodama, Nobuhiro; Kitamura, Kenji; Miyazawa, Yasuto

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structures of facet and off-facet parts of rare-earth garnets Gd 3Sc 2Al 3O 12 (GSAG), Gd 3Sc 2Ga 3O 12 (GSGG), and La 3Lu 2Ga 3O 12 (LLGG) have been refined with the single-crystal X-ray diffraction method. The crystals are cubic with the space group Ia3 d, containing eight formula units in a unit cell. The final weighted reliability factors are 0.014, 0.017, and 0.020 for 1786, 2318, and 2331 reflections of the facet parts of GSAG, GSGG, and LLGG, respectively, and 0.014, 0.017, and 0.019 for 2143, 2190, and 2420 reflections of the off-facet parts of the respective crystals. The bond lengths between the tetrahedral cations ( T) and the oxygen atoms in GSAG and GSGG as well as those between the dodecahedral cations ( M viii) and oxygen atoms in all the examined crystals are in accordance with the sums of ionic radii both in facet and off-facet parts, whereas the octahedral cations ( M vi) in all the crystals and the tetrahedral cation in LLGG have bond lengths longer than the sums of the ionic radii. A cation replacement at the T sites was not observed, whereas the M vi and M viii sites were revealed to be partly replaced by cations with smaller ionic radii.

  11. Solar efficient structure

    SciTech Connect

    Arenas, F.B.

    1985-02-12

    A solar efficient structure is disclosed which comprises a central chase positioned vertically within the structure and connected in fluid communication with a duct network positioned in thermal contact with the ground and with the attic of the structure. A fan is provided for circulating air through a perforated attic duct, through the various rooms of the structure, and through the duct network and the chase. In one embodiment, the fan is reversible so as to circulate the air in one direction, or in the other direction. When operating in the heating mode, the ground acts as a heat source to heat the air circulating through the duct network. Conversely, when operating in the cooling mode, the ground acts as a heat sink to cool the airflow circulating therethrough. A dehumidifier, and a heating or cooling means is provided for assisting in the conditioning of the circulating airflow. In one embodiment, the heating means comprises a greenhouse room which permits ultraviolet radiation to enter and heat the air contained therein, and a damper means for controlling the flow rate of the air circulating through the greenhouse room. The structure is fully insulated and includes a vent skin positioned about the exterior walls and the roof thereof. A method is disclosed for insulating the roof line with loose insulation.

  12. Development of composite facets for the surface of a space-based solar dynamic concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, Schuyler R.; Morel, Donald E.; Sanborn, James A.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the composite fabrication techniques envisioned for the production of mirror-quality substrates furnishing the specular reflectance required for the NASA Space Station's solar dynamic concentrator energy system. The candidate materials were graphite fiber-reinforced glass, aluminum, and polymer matrices whose surfaces would be coated with thin metal layers and with atomic oxygen degradation-inhibiting protective coatings to obtain the desired mirror surface. Graphite-epoxy mirror substrate samples have been found to perform satisfactorily for the required concentrator lifetime.

  13. Selective Growth and Structural Analysis of Regular MnO Nanooctapods Bearing Multiple High-Index Surface Facets.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongwoo; Kim, Mijong; Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-08-01

    Although numerous morphologies of MnO nanostructures have been reported, an exact structural analysis and mechanistic study has been lacking. In the present study, the formation of regular MnO octapods was demonstrated in a simple procedure, comprising the thermal decomposition of manganese oleate. Because of their structural uniformity, an ideal three-dimensional model was successfully constructed. The eight arms protruded from the cubic center with tip angles of 38° and surface facets of {311} and {533} with rounded edges. The concentrations of oleate and chloride ions were the determining factors for the octapod formation. Selective coordination of the oleate ions to the {100} faces led to edge growth along the <111> direction, which was then limited by the chloride ions bound to the high-index surface facets. These structural and mechanistic analyses should be helpful for understanding the complex nanostructures and for tuning their structure-related properties. PMID:26096978

  14. Structure of Solar Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, G.; Cantó, J.; Lara, A.; González, R.; Schwenn, R.

    Solar Ejecta (SE) have been of interest in the last years, especially those which may reach Earth environment. It is possible to observe the SE early evolution, when they are in the field of view of coronagraphs. There are few indirect observations, as the case of interplanetary scintillation, of SEs in the interplanetary medium. Finally, we observe SEs in situ when they arrive at 1 AU.The SEs structure and evolution are important to understand the origin of these phenomena but to predict the possible effects in the space weather. It is of general acceptance that SEs are "Erupting Flux Ropes" traveling trough the Solar Wind. The "shapes" have been modeled as cylinders or as "ice cream cones" in order to represent the many different projections observed on Coronagraphs.We present a model of the SE evolution based on purely Hydrodynamic considerations. This model reproduces in good approximation some of the features observed in the images and in the measures of the shocks near Earth.

  15. Layer-by-layer self-assembly of TiO2 hierarchical nanosheets with exposed {001} facets as an effective bifunctional layer for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weiwei; Peng, Tao; Liu, Yumin; Yu, Wenjing; Zhang, Kun; Mehnane, Hadja Fatima; Bu, Chenghao; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2014-06-25

    Layer-by-layer self-assembled TiO2 hierarchical nanosheets with exposed {001} facets have been successfully fabricated via a simple one-step solvothermal reaction. The anatase TiO2 layer-by-layer hierarchical nanosheets (TiO2 LHNs) exhibit favorable light scattering effect and large surface area, owing to their layer-by-layer hierarchical structure. When applied to the dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), the layer-by-layer hierarchical structure with exposed {001} facet could effectively enhance light harvesting and dye adsorption, followed by increasing the photocurrent of DSSCs. As a result, the photoelectric conversion efficiency (η) of 7.70% has been achieved for the DSSCs using TiO2 LHNs as the bifunctional layer, indicating 21% improvement compared to the pure Degussa P25 (6.37%) as photoanode. Such enhancement can be mainly ascribed to the better light scattering capability of TiO2 LHNs, higher dye adsorption on TiO2 LHN {001} facets, and longer lifetime of the injected electrons in TiO2 LHNs compared to P25, which are examined by UV-vis spectrophotometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy under the same conditions. These remarkable properties of TiO2 LHNs make it a promising candidate as a bifunctional scattering material for DSSCs. PMID:24881671

  16. Implementation of a PMN-PT piezocrystal-based focused array with geodesic faceted structure.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhen; Qiu, Yongqiang; Demore, Christine E M; Cochran, Sandy

    2016-07-01

    The higher performance of relaxor-based piezocrystals compared with piezoceramics is now well established, notably including improved gain-bandwidth product, and these materials have been adopted widely for biomedical ultrasound imaging. However, their use in other applications, for example as a source of focused ultrasound for targeted drug delivery, is hindered in several ways. One of the issues, which we consider here, is in shaping the material into the spherical geometries used widely in focused ultrasound. Unlike isotropic unpoled piezoceramics that can be shaped into a monolithic bowl then poled through the thickness, the anisotropic structure of piezocrystals make it impossible to machine the bulk crystalline material into a bowl without sacrificing performance. Instead, we report a novel faceted array, inspired by the geodesic dome structure in architecture, which utilizes flat piezocrystal material and maximizes fill factor. Aided by 3D printing, a prototype with f#≈ 1.2, containing 96 individually addressable elements was manufactured using 1-3 connectivity PMN-PT piezocrystal-epoxy composite. The fabrication process is presented and the array was connected to a 32-channel controller to shape and steer the beam for preliminary performance demonstration. At an operating frequency of 1MHz, a focusing gain around 30 was achieved and the side lobe intensities were all at levels below -12dB compared to main beam. We conclude that, by taking advantage of contemporary fabrication techniques and driving instrumentation, the geodesic array configuration is suitable for focused ultrasound devices made with piezocrystal. PMID:27104921

  17. Structurally integrated steel solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Moore, S.W.

    1975-06-03

    Herein is disclosed a flate plate solar heat collector unit. The solar collector is integrated as a structural unit so that the collector also functions as the building roof. The functions of efficient heat collection, liquid coolant flow passages, roof structural support, and building insulation are combined into one unit.

  18. Structurally integrated steel solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Stanley W.

    1977-03-08

    Herein is disclosed a flat plate solar heat collector unit. The solar collector is integrated as a structural unit so that the collector also functions as the building roof. The functions of efficient heat collection, liquid coolant flow passages, roof structural support and building insulation are combined into one unit.

  19. Reduced electron recombination of dye-sensitized solar cells based on TiO2 spheres consisting of ultrathin nanosheets with [001] facet exposed

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meinan; Yan, Cheng; Bell, John

    2012-01-01

    Summary An anatase TiO2 material with hierarchically structured spheres consisting of ultrathin nanosheets with 100% of the [001] facet exposed was employed to fabricate dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Investigation of the electron transport and back reaction of the DSCs by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that the spheres had a threefold lower electron recombination rate compared to the conventional TiO2 nanoparticles. In contrast, the effective electron diffusion coefficient, D n, was not sensitive to the variation of the TiO2 morphology. The TiO2 spheres showed the same D n as that of the nanoparticles. The influence of TiCl4 post-treatment on the conduction band of the TiO2 spheres and on the kinetics of electron transport and back reactions was also investigated. It was found that the TiCl4 post-treatment caused a downward shift of the TiO2 conduction band edge by 30 meV. Meanwhile, a fourfold increase of the effective electron lifetime of the DSC was also observed after TiCl4 treatment. The synergistic effect of the variation of the TiO2 conduction band and the electron recombination determined the open-circuit voltage of the DSC. PMID:23016142

  20. Facet Theory and the Mapping Sentence As Hermeneutically Consistent Structured Meta-Ontology and Structured Meta-Mereology

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Paul M. W.

    2016-01-01

    When behavior is interpreted in a reliable manner (i.e., robustly across different situations and times) its explained meaning may be seen to possess hermeneutic consistency. In this essay I present an evaluation of the hermeneutic consistency that I propose may be present when the research tool known as the mapping sentence is used to create generic structural ontologies. I also claim that theoretical and empirical validity is a likely result of employing the mapping sentence in research design and interpretation. These claims are non-contentious within the realm of quantitative psychological and behavioral research. However, I extend the scope of both facet theory based research and claims for its structural utility, reliability and validity to philosophical and qualitative investigations. I assert that the hermeneutic consistency of a structural ontology is a product of a structural representation's ontological components and the mereological relationships between these ontological sub-units: the mapping sentence seminally allows for the depiction of such structure. PMID:27065932

  1. NUBEAM Sources in FACETS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletzer, A.; McCune, D.; Indireshkumar, K.; Morris, A.; Pankin, A.; Cary, J. R.

    2009-05-01

    The SciDAC project for the development of a Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS) aims at producing tokamak core-to-wall transport simulations on massively parallel architectures. Here, we report on the progress of integrating the new parallel, PlasmaState based, Monte-Carlo NUBEAM module into the FACETS framework to provide neutral beam and fusion source terms in the plasma core diffusion equations. NUBEAM has recently been improved to facilitate invocation from third party software (e.g. SWIM). This was achieved by consolidating 100s of input variables into separate structures according to machine specificity, shot specificity, or time-slice specificity. Thanks to a combination of auto-generated code and a newly developed methodology for exposing Fortran90 derived types to C, all derived type members of NUBEAM structures have become in-memory accessible to FACETS's C++ infrastructure. NUBEAM, which is the first volumetric-coupling component in FACETS, has been wrapped with methods complying to the FACETS standard interface definition for easy interchangeability of modules at run time. Examples of neutral beam computations instrumented with TAU/Paratools on leadership class machines will be presented, as well as first coupled core-source FACETS simulations.

  2. Preparation of superparamagnetic Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O nanoparticles from low-index-facet cubes to high-index-facet concave structures and their catalytic performance in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pei-Ying; Teng, His-Sheng; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2013-08-21

    We report the synthesis of concave magnetic Mn(x)Fe(1-x)O nanoparticles with high-index facet structures by a thermal decomposition approach. The particle morphology varies from cubic shape under pure Ar, to star-like shapes with exposure to air during the reaction. The oxidative etching in the presence of air (O2) strongly affects the exposed facets on the surface. These concave nanoparticles are transferred from the organic phase to aqueous solution and show distinct catalytic activity toward the degradation of xylenol orange in aqueous solution. PMID:23836257

  3. Psychometric and Structural Analysis of the MMPI-2 Personality Psychopathology Five (PSY-5) Facet Subscales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilty, Lena C.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Personality Psychopathology Five (PSY-5) is a model of personality psychopathology assessed in adult populations with a set of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) scales. The authors examine the reliability and validity of recently developed lower-order facet subscales for each of these five domains, with an emphasis on…

  4. High detectivity solar-blind high-temperature deep-ultraviolet photodetector based on multi-layered (l00) facet-oriented β-Ga₂O₃ nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Zhang, Zhenyu; Liu, Qian; Hu, Junqing; Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Zhang, Wenjun

    2014-05-14

    Fabrication of a high-temperature deep-ultraviolet photodetector working in the solar-blind spectrum range (190-280 nm) is a challenge due to the degradation in the dark current and photoresponse properties. Herein, β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelts with (l00) facet-oriented were synthesized, and were demonstrated for the first time to possess excellent mechanical, electrical properties and stability at a high temperature inside a TEM studies. As-fabricated DUV solar-blind photodetectors using (l00) facet-oriented β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelts demonstrated enhanced photodetective performances, that is, high sensitivity, high signal-to-noise ratio, high spectral selectivity, high speed, and high stability, importantly, at a temperature as high as 433 K, which are comparable to other reported semiconducting nanomaterial photodetectors. In particular, the characteristics of the photoresponsivity of the β-Ga2O3 nanobelt devices include a high photoexcited current (>21 nA), an ultralow dark current (below the detection limit of 10(-14) A), a fast time response (<0.3 s), a high R(λ) (≈851 A/W), and a high EQE (~4.2 × 10(3)). The present fabricated facet-oriented β-Ga2O3 multi-layered nanobelt based devices will find practical applications in photodetectors or optical switches for high-temperature environment. PMID:24520013

  5. Preparation of superparamagnetic MnxFe1-xO nanoparticles from low-index-facet cubes to high-index-facet concave structures and their catalytic performance in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Pei-Ying; Teng, His-Sheng; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2013-07-01

    We report the synthesis of concave magnetic MnxFe1-xO nanoparticles with high-index facet structures by a thermal decomposition approach. The particle morphology varies from cubic shape under pure Ar, to star-like shapes with exposure to air during the reaction. The oxidative etching in the presence of air (O2) strongly affects the exposed facets on the surface. These concave nanoparticles are transferred from the organic phase to aqueous solution and show distinct catalytic activity toward the degradation of xylenol orange in aqueous solution.We report the synthesis of concave magnetic MnxFe1-xO nanoparticles with high-index facet structures by a thermal decomposition approach. The particle morphology varies from cubic shape under pure Ar, to star-like shapes with exposure to air during the reaction. The oxidative etching in the presence of air (O2) strongly affects the exposed facets on the surface. These concave nanoparticles are transferred from the organic phase to aqueous solution and show distinct catalytic activity toward the degradation of xylenol orange in aqueous solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01865b

  6. AHF: Array-Based Half-Facet Data Structure for Mixed-Dimensional and Non-Manifold Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Dyedov, Volodymyr; Ray, Navamita; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jiao, Xiangmin; Tautges, T.

    2014-08-31

    We present an Array-based Half-Facet mesh data structure, or AHF, for efficient mesh query and modification operations. The AHF extends the compact array-based half-edge and half-face data structures (T.J. Alumbaugh and X. Jiao, Compact array-based mesh data structures, IMR, 2005) to support mixed-dimensional and non-manifold meshes. The design goals of our data structure include generality to support such meshes, efficiency of neighborhood queries and mesh modification, compactness of memory footprint, and facilitation of interoperability of mesh-based application codes. To accomplish these goals, our data structure uses sibling half-facets as a core abstraction, coupled with other explicit and implicit representations of entities. A unique feature of our data structure is a comprehensive implementation in MATLAB, which allows rapid prototyping, debugging, testing, and deployment of meshing algorithms and other mesh-based numerical methods. We have also developed C++ implementation built on top of MOAB (T.J. Tautges, R. Meyers, and K. Merkley, MOAB: A Mesh-Oriented Database, Sandia National Laboratories, 2004). We present some comparisons of the memory requirements and computational costs, and also demonstrate its effectiveness with a few sample applications.

  7. Solar heating shingle roof structure

    SciTech Connect

    Straza, G.T.

    1984-01-31

    A solar heating roof shingle roof structure which combines the functions of a roof and a fluid conducting solar heating panel. Each shingle is a hollow body of the general size and configuration of a conventional shingle, and is provided with a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet. Shingles are assembled in a normal overlapping array to cover a roof structure, with interconnections between the inlets and outlets of successive shingles to provide a fluid path through the complete array. An inlet manifold is contained in a cap used at the peak of the roof and an outlet manifold is connected to the lowest row of shingles.

  8. Facets: Ersatz, Resource and Tag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frické, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Faceted classification appears to be of utmost importance. Ersatz facets, resource faceting and tag faceting: The distinctions are drawn between facets and ersatz facets, and between faceted resources and faceted tags. Single tag resource faceting and multiple tag information object faceting: The basic features are explored of single…

  9. Graphene-induced Ge (001) surface faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElhinny, Kyle M.; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Zaug, Alexander J.; Arnold, Michael S.; Evans, Paul G.

    2016-05-01

    Faceted Ge surfaces result from the growth of a graphene overlayer on Ge (001) by chemical vapor deposition. The surface exhibits four-fold symmetry after faceting, with the surface normal of the facets tilted towards [100] from the average surface normal. X-ray reflectivity measurements allow the facet angles, directions, and symmetry to be measured precisely as a function of deposition conditions. Graphene grown from a CH4 precursor in a H2/Ar carrier atmosphere at temperatures from 870 to 920 °C yields facets on the Ge surface with an average facet angle of 7.70° ± 0.07°. Additionally, a distribution of facet angles is observed with an angular spread of approximately ± 1°. The facet pattern has four-fold symmetry over a large area with no indication of the formation of competing facets from reflectivity measurements. The facet angle tends toward the {107} facet of Ge with slight variation as a function of temperature indicating that the facet angles are dominated by surface energetics. The slight dependence on temperature is accompanied by a reconstruction of the surface into {001} facets under slow-cooling conditions, suggesting that the surface diffusion kinetics and temperature dependence have an important role in the formation of the faceted surface structure at lower temperatures.

  10. Solar wind and coronal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withbroe, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Spectroscopic diagnostic techniques used to determine the coronal source region of the solar wind, and results of preliminary applications are examined. The topics reviewed are magnetic fields, coronal mass ejections, coronal holes, flow velocities, coronal temperatures, fine spatial structure, and future observational programs. The physical mechanisms responsible for plasma heating, solar-wind acceleration, the transport of mass momentum and energy, and the spatial differentiation of chemical abundances are also discussed. Among the data presented are Skylab's white-light coronagraph photograph of a coronal transient, X-ray photographs of the corona, and spectroheliograms showing bright points overlying polar plumes, and macrospicules.

  11. Testing of the SAIC facets on the stretched-membrane dish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, J. W.; Erdman, W. W.; Houser, R. M.; Davenport, R.

    1994-04-01

    A dish structure sized for a 25 kW electric dish/generator system has been installed at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). The dish is used as an optical test bed for prototype stretched-membrane facets. Sandia procured twelve (12) stretched-membrane facets from Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) for installation on the dish structure. Individual facet optical performance was measured using the 2f test method under development at Sandia. Four facets were tested on-sun using the test truss at the NSTTF prior to installation on the dish structure. During the final stages of the structure assembly, the facets were installed for testing. A distant light source alignment technique was used to align the facets to a 9 meter focal length. The alignment and focus were optimized with on-sun measurements of individual facet characteristics. On-sun flux maps of the image were made using the Beam Characterization System. Calorimetry tests were performed using a cold water calorimeter. This data was used to create a power intercept curve and predict the power inside apertures of different sizes. The focal plane was moved to 9.95 meters and the alignment, optimization, and on-sun tests repeated. This paper presents the results of the testing on the individual facets as well as the results of testing the dish system. The effects of the change in focal length on the optical performance of the dish are shown in the results.

  12. Solar heating shingle roof structure

    SciTech Connect

    Straza, G.T.

    1981-01-13

    A solar heating roof shingle roof structure which combines the functions of a roof and a fluid conducting solar heating panel. Each shingle is a hollow body of the general size and configuration of a conventional shingle, and is provided with a fluid inlet socket at the upper end and a fluid outlet plug at the lower end with a skirt at the lower end overlapping the plug. Shingles are assembled in an overlapping array to cover a roof structure, with interconnections between the inlets and outlets of successive longitudinally positioned shingles to provide fluid paths through the complete array. An inlet manifold is positioned at the upper end of the array or in the alternative contained in a cap used at the peak of the roof and an outlet manifold is connected to the outlet of the lowest row of shingles.

  13. Facet Control of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Han, Lili; Jing, Hao; Blom, Douglas A; Lin, Ye; Xin, Huolin L; Wang, Hui

    2016-02-23

    While great success has been achieved in fine-tuning the aspect ratios and thereby the plasmon resonances of cylindrical Au nanorods, facet control with atomic level precision on the highly curved nanorod surfaces has long been a significantly more challenging task. The intrinsic structural complexity and lack of precise facet control of the nanorod surfaces remain the major obstacles for the atomic-level elucidation of the structure-property relationships that underpin the intriguing catalytic performance of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that the facets of single-crystalline Au nanorods can be precisely tailored using cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a unique pair of surface capping competitors to guide the particle geometry evolution during nanorod overgrowth. By deliberately maneuvering the competition between cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we have been able to create, in a highly controllable and selective manner, an entire family of nanorod-derived anisotropic multifaceted geometries whose surfaces are enclosed by specific types of well-defined high-index and low-index facets. This facet-controlled nanorod overgrowth approach also allows us to fine-tune the particle aspect ratios while well-preserving all the characteristic facets and geometric features of the faceted Au nanorods. Taking full advantage of the combined structural and plasmonic tunability, we have further studied the facet-dependent heterogeneous catalysis on well-faceted Au nanorods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as an ultrasensitive spectroscopic tool with unique time-resolving and molecular finger-printing capabilities. PMID:26795706

  14. An Initial Facet Analysis of the FYCSP Word Attack Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besel, Ronald

    The concepts "facet analysis,""facet design," and "facet structure" are defined. The FYCSP (First Year Communication Skills Program) Word Attack Test is analyzed in terms of two related facet structures. Stepwise linear regression is used to predict distractor attractiveness. Hypotheses suggested by Guttman relating distractor attractiveness to…

  15. One-pot synthesis of high-index faceted AgCl nanocrystals with trapezohedral, concave hexoctahedral structures and their photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Yonggang; Liu, Hong; Fang, Jingzhong

    2015-07-01

    AgCl semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with trapezohedral (TPH) and concave hexoctahedral (HOH) structures have been successfully synthesized for the first time in high yield by a direct one-pot solvothermal method. The as-prepared TPH, concave HOH AgCl NCs with unconventional polyhedral shapes and smooth surfaces were enclosed by 24 high-index {311} facets and 48 high-index {15 5 2} facets, respectively. A specific ionic liquid poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDDA) acted as both a Cl- ion precursor and a morphology-controlled stabilizer, which was indispensable for the formation of these high-index faceted AgCl polyhedra and the derived uniform octahedral AgCl in an appropriate concentration of hot AgNO3 and ethylene glycol (EG) solution. With high-index facets exposed, both TPH and concave HOH AgCl NCs exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity than octahedral AgCl NCs that have mainly {111} faces exposed, with lower surface areas and surface energies, for the degradation of organics under sunlight. It is expected that the use of polyhedral AgCl NCs with high-index facets is an effective approach for the design of alternative semiconductor photocatalysts with a high performance, which may find potential applications such as in photochromics and environmental management.

  16. One-pot synthesis of high-index faceted AgCl nanocrystals with trapezohedral, concave hexoctahedral structures and their photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibin; Lu, Yonggang; Liu, Hong; Fang, Jingzhong

    2015-07-21

    AgCl semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with trapezohedral (TPH) and concave hexoctahedral (HOH) structures have been successfully synthesized for the first time in high yield by a direct one-pot solvothermal method. The as-prepared TPH, concave HOH AgCl NCs with unconventional polyhedral shapes and smooth surfaces were enclosed by 24 high-index {311} facets and 48 high-index {15 5 2} facets, respectively. A specific ionic liquid poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDDA) acted as both a Cl(-) ion precursor and a morphology-controlled stabilizer, which was indispensable for the formation of these high-index faceted AgCl polyhedra and the derived uniform octahedral AgCl in an appropriate concentration of hot AgNO3 and ethylene glycol (EG) solution. With high-index facets exposed, both TPH and concave HOH AgCl NCs exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity than octahedral AgCl NCs that have mainly {111} faces exposed, with lower surface areas and surface energies, for the degradation of organics under sunlight. It is expected that the use of polyhedral AgCl NCs with high-index facets is an effective approach for the design of alternative semiconductor photocatalysts with a high performance, which may find potential applications such as in photochromics and environmental management. PMID:26088365

  17. Surface Structure Dependence of SO2 Interaction with Ceria Nanocrystals with Well-defined Surface Facets

    SciTech Connect

    Tumuluri, Uma; Li, Meijun; Cook, Brandon G.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Dai, Sheng; Wu, Zili

    2015-12-02

    The effects of the surface structure of ceria (CeO2) on the nature, strength, and amount of species resulting from SO2 adsorption were studied using in situ IR and Raman spectroscopies coupled with mass spectrometry, along with first-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). CeO2 nanocrystals with different morphologies, namely, rods (representing a defective structure), cubes (100 facet), and octahedra (111 facet), were used to represent different CeO2 surface structures. IR and Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the structure and binding strength of adsorbed species from SO2 depend on the shape of the CeO2 nanocrystals. SO2 adsorbs mainly as surface sulfites and sulfates at room temperature on CeO2 rods, cubes, and octahedra that were either oxidatively or reductively pretreated. The formation of sulfites is more evident on CeO2 octahedra, whereas surface sulfates are more prominent on CeO2 rods and cubes. This is explained by the increasing reducibility of the surface oxygen in the order octahedra < cubes < rods. Bulk sulfites are also formed during SO2 adsorption on reduced CeO2 rods. The formation of surface sulfites and sulfates on CeO2 cubes is in good agreement with our DFT results of SO2 interactions with the CeO2(100) surface. CeO2 rods desorb SO2 at higher temperatures than cubes and octahedra nanocrystals, but bulk sulfates are formed on CeO2 rods and cubes after high-temperature desorption whereas only some surface sulfates/sulfites are left on octahedra. This difference is rationalized by the fact that CeO2 rods have the highest surface basicity and largest amount of defects among the three nanocrystals, so they bind and react with SO2 strongly and are the most degraded after SO2 adsorption cycles. The

  18. Facet control of gold nanorods

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Han, Lili; Jing, Hao; Blom, Douglas A.; Lin, Ye; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-21

    While great success has been achieved in fine-tuning the aspect ratios and thereby the plasmon resonances of cylindrical Au nanorods, facet control with atomic level precision on the highly curved nanorod surfaces has long been a significantly more challenging task. The intrinsic structural complexity and lack of precise facet control of the nanorod surfaces remain the major obstacles for the atomic-level elucidation of the structure–property relationships that underpin the intriguing catalytic performance of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that the facets of single-crystalline Au nanorods can be precisely tailored using cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a unique pair ofmore » surface capping competitors to guide the particle geometry evolution during nanorod overgrowth. By deliberately maneuvering the competition between cuprous ions and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we have been able to create, in a highly controllable and selective manner, an entire family of nanorod-derived anisotropic multifaceted geometries whose surfaces are enclosed by specific types of well-defined high-index and low-index facets. This facet-controlled nanorod overgrowth approach also allows us to fine-tune the particle aspect ratios while well-preserving all the characteristic facets and geometric features of the faceted Au nanorods. Furthermore, taking full advantage of the combined structural and plasmonic tunability, we have further studied the facet-dependent heterogeneous catalysis on well-faceted Au nanorods using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy as an ultrasensitive spectroscopic tool with unique time-resolving and molecular finger-printing capabilities.« less

  19. Giant reversible, facet-dependent, structural changes in a correlated-electron insulator induced by ionic liquid gating.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaewoo; Aetukuri, Nagaphani B; Passarello, Donata; Conradson, Steven D; Samant, Mahesh G; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2015-01-27

    The use of electric fields to alter the conductivity of correlated electron oxides is a powerful tool to probe their fundamental nature as well as for the possibility of developing novel electronic devices. Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is an archetypical correlated electron system that displays a temperature-controlled insulating to metal phase transition near room temperature. Recently, ionic liquid gating, which allows for very high electric fields, has been shown to induce a metallic state to low temperatures in the insulating phase of epitaxially grown thin films of VO2. Surprisingly, the entire film becomes electrically conducting. Here, we show, from in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and absorption experiments, that the whole film undergoes giant, structural changes on gating in which the lattice expands by up to ∼3% near room temperature, in contrast to the 10 times smaller (∼0.3%) contraction when the system is thermally metallized. Remarkably, these structural changes are fully reversible on reverse gating. Moreover, we find these structural changes and the concomitant metallization are highly dependent on the VO2 crystal facet, which we relate to the ease of electric-field-induced motion of oxygen ions along chains of edge-sharing VO6 octahedra that exist along the (rutile) c axis. PMID:25583517

  20. Hydration layer structures on calcite facets and their roles in selective adsorptions of biomolecules: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Beibei; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2013-12-21

    The selective adsorptions of biomolecules onto crystal faces are the key issues in the studies of biomineralization. Frequently, the adsorption processes are understood by using the direct binding model between organic compounds and inorganic crystals during the molecular dynamic studies. However, water molecules near crystals always exhibit intense ordering and preferential orientation to form structured hydration layer. By using the adsorption of poly acrylic acid oligomer, acrylic acid (AA) dimer, onto calcite as an example, we demonstrate that the induced hydration layers contribute significant effects on the organic-inorganic interactions. In particular, on calcite (104) plane, two carboxyl groups of AA dimer both interact with the crystal but the molecule has to compete with water due to the well-structured hydration layer. On (110) plane, although only one carboxyl group of AA dimer interacts with this surface, the water layer is relatively loose so that the molecule can easily replace water. With a consideration of the hydration layer, our free energy analysis indicates that AA dimer has a stronger interaction with (110) face than with (104) face, which is consistent with the experimental observations. The study follows that the attachment of organic additive onto inorganic crystal facet is greatly mediated by near-surface hydration layers, and therefore, the critical role of structured water layers must be taken into account in the understanding of biomineralization interfaces. PMID:24359384

  1. Hydration layer structures on calcite facets and their roles in selective adsorptions of biomolecules: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Beibei; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2013-12-01

    The selective adsorptions of biomolecules onto crystal faces are the key issues in the studies of biomineralization. Frequently, the adsorption processes are understood by using the direct binding model between organic compounds and inorganic crystals during the molecular dynamic studies. However, water molecules near crystals always exhibit intense ordering and preferential orientation to form structured hydration layer. By using the adsorption of poly acrylic acid oligomer, acrylic acid (AA) dimer, onto calcite as an example, we demonstrate that the induced hydration layers contribute significant effects on the organic-inorganic interactions. In particular, on calcite (104) plane, two carboxyl groups of AA dimer both interact with the crystal but the molecule has to compete with water due to the well-structured hydration layer. On (110) plane, although only one carboxyl group of AA dimer interacts with this surface, the water layer is relatively loose so that the molecule can easily replace water. With a consideration of the hydration layer, our free energy analysis indicates that AA dimer has a stronger interaction with (110) face than with (104) face, which is consistent with the experimental observations. The study follows that the attachment of organic additive onto inorganic crystal facet is greatly mediated by near-surface hydration layers, and therefore, the critical role of structured water layers must be taken into account in the understanding of biomineralization interfaces.

  2. Giant reversible, facet-dependent, structural changes in a correlated-electron insulator induced by ionic liquid gating

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaewoo; Aetukuri, Nagaphani B.; Passarello, Donata; Conradson, Steven D.; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of electric fields to alter the conductivity of correlated electron oxides is a powerful tool to probe their fundamental nature as well as for the possibility of developing novel electronic devices. Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is an archetypical correlated electron system that displays a temperature-controlled insulating to metal phase transition near room temperature. Recently, ionic liquid gating, which allows for very high electric fields, has been shown to induce a metallic state to low temperatures in the insulating phase of epitaxially grown thin films of VO2. Surprisingly, the entire film becomes electrically conducting. Here, we show, from in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and absorption experiments, that the whole film undergoes giant, structural changes on gating in which the lattice expands by up to ∼3% near room temperature, in contrast to the 10 times smaller (∼0.3%) contraction when the system is thermally metallized. Remarkably, these structural changes are fully reversible on reverse gating. Moreover, we find these structural changes and the concomitant metallization are highly dependent on the VO2 crystal facet, which we relate to the ease of electric-field–induced motion of oxygen ions along chains of edge-sharing VO6 octahedra that exist along the (rutile) c axis. PMID:25583517

  3. A Multi-faceted Secondary Structure Mimic Based On Piperidine-piperidinones

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Dongyue; Perez, Lisa M.; Ioerger, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Minimalist secondary structure mimics are typically made to resemble one interface in a protein-protein interaction (PPI), and thus perturb it. We recently proposed suitable chemotypes can be matched with interface regions directly, without regard for secondary structures. This communication describes a modular synthesis of a new chemotype 1, simulation of its solution-state conformational ensemble, and correlation of that with ideal secondary structures and real interface regions in PPIs. Scaffold 1 presents amino acid side-chains that are quite separated from each other, in orientations that closely resemble ideal sheet or helical structures, similar non-ideal structures at PPI interfaces, and regions of other PPI interfaces where the mimic conformation does not resemble any secondary structure. Sixty-eight different PPIs where conformations of 1 matched well were identified. A new method is also presented to determine the relevance of a minimalist mimic crystal structure to its solution conformations. Thus DLD-1faf crystallized in a conformation that is estimated to be 0.91 kcal•mol−1 above the minimum energy solution state. PMID:24591004

  4. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures. PMID:10859129

  5. JPL tests of a LaJet concentrator facet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, E. W.; Argoud, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    A LaJet Energy Company (LEC) concentrator facet, 60 in. in diameter, was tested for imaging quality. The following two methods were used: (1) autofocus tests with a point source of light at the facet's radius of curvature; and (2) tests with the Sun close to the horizon as a distant source. The tests of the LaJet facet indicate that all of the solar image reflected by an LEC 460 solar concentrator made of like facets should fall within a 9-in. aperture if the outer facets are carefully adjusted. Such a concentrator would have acceptable performance, but complete evaluation must be made with an assembled concentrator.

  6. Solar structure: Models and inferences from helioseismology

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    In this review the author summarizes results published during approximately the least three years concerning the state of one-dimensional solar interior modeling. She discusses the effects of refinements to the input physics, motivated by improving the agreement between calculated and observed solar oscillation frequencies, or between calculated and inferred solar structure. She has omitted two- and three-dimensional aspects of the solar structure, such as the rotation profile, detailed modeling of turbulent convection, and magnetic fields, although further progress in refining solar interior models may require including such two- and three-dimensional dynamical effects.

  7. Commission 12: Solar Radiation and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauzzi, Gianna; Shchukina, Nataliya; Kosovichev, Alexander; Bianda, Michele; Brandenburg, Axel; Chou, Dean-Yi; Dasso, Sergio; Ding, Ming-De; Jefferies, Stuart; Krivova, Natalie; Kuznetsov, Vladimir D.; Moreno-Insertis, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Commission 12 of the International Astronomical Union encompasses investigations of the internal structure and dynamics of the Sun, the quiet solar atmosphere, solar radiation and its variability, and the nature of relatively stable magnetic structures like sunspots, faculae and the magnetic network. The Commission sees participation of over 300 scientists worldwide.

  8. Tracing Heliospheric Structures to Their Solar Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    The solar wind creates a giant plasma bubble in our immediate, very local interstellar medium (VLISM), the heliosphere. As is true for every physical system, its structure is determined by dynamic processes and by the boundary conditions at the Sun and in the VLISM. Because of the supersonic expansion of the solar wind the structure of the inner (several AU) heliosphere is (nearly) exclusively determined by the Sun. As simple as this may all appear, the problem of linking heliospheric structure to solar features is remarkably complex and has so far eluded satisfactory solutions. ESA and NASA have implemented the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions to tackle and solve the mystery of how the Sun creates and controls the heliosphere. Previous missions, especially the twin Helios mission, lacked two crucial elements, remote-sensing of solar features and their dynamics, and composition measurements of the solar plasma, wind, and energetic particles. Solar Orbiter has both elements in its highly sophisticated payload and will allow us to link solar features to the solar wind sampled in situ by using composition and energetic particles as tracers. The composition of the solar wind is altered from its photospheric origin by two processes very probably acting at different altitudes in the solar atmosphere. Elemental composition of the solar wind appears to be fractionated by its First Ionization Potential (FIP) or time (FIT), indicating that some mechanism separates neutral atoms from ions. This requires temperatures low enough to allow a substantial neutral fraction of the solar plasma and therefore the FIP-effect is believed to act primarily in the chromosphere. Charge states on the other hand are determined by the expansion and acceleration of the solar wind and the electron temperature high in the corona. Solar Orbiter will allow remote-sensing measurements of the elemental composition of solar features and comparison with that measured in situ after the solar

  9. Selective MOVPE of InGaN-based LED structures on non-planar Si (111) facets of patterned Si (100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuters, B.; Strate, J.; Hahn, H.; Finken, M.; Wille, A.; Heuken, M.; Kalisch, H.; Vescan, A.

    2014-04-01

    The growing interest in modern energy-saving illuminants for general lighting, multimedia applications and automotive industry demands for alternative low-cost substrates for MOVPE LED growth. Nitride MOVPE growth is possible on the Si (111) plane, which makes Si substrates attractive as an alternative to sapphire substrates. A novel technology is presented using patterned Si (100) substrates, in which MOVPE-grown LED structures are fabricated on Si {111} facets tilted by 54.7°. Structural and optical properties are discussed and correlated to epitaxial growth conditions. It is shown that crystal quality reaches already a reasonable level for preliminary LED operation.

  10. Structural Code Considerations for Solar Rooftop Installations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Sanchez, Alfred

    2014-12-01

    Residential rooftop solar panel installations are limited in part by the high cost of structural related code requirements for field installation. Permitting solar installations is difficult because there is a belief among residential permitting authorities that typical residential rooftops may be structurally inadequate to support the additional load associated with a photovoltaic (PV) solar installation. Typical engineering methods utilized to calculate stresses on a roof structure involve simplifying assumptions that render a complex non-linear structure to a basic determinate beam. This method of analysis neglects the composite action of the entire roof structure, yielding a conservative analysis based on a rafter or top chord of a truss. Consequently, the analysis can result in an overly conservative structural analysis. A literature review was conducted to gain a better understanding of the conservative nature of the regulations and codes governing residential construction and the associated structural system calculations.

  11. Faceting of Re (1121) induced by oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Wenhua; Madey, Theodore E.

    2006-03-01

    The oxygen-induced nanoscale faceting of Re (1121) has been studied by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES); the results are compared with recent STM and LEED studies of O-induced faceting of Re(1231). The evolution of surface morphology depends on oxygen exposures and deposition temperatures. Re(1121) remains planar after oxygen deposition at 300K. Annealing O-covered Re(1121) between 800K-1200K leads to the formation of (0110) and (1010) facets that coexist with the (1121) surface. Under oxidation conditions, i.e. dosing a large amount of oxygen at high temperatures (900-1000K), the (1121) surface is completely covered by 4-sided nanoscale pyramidal structures whose facets are identified as (0110), (1010), (0111) and (1011). The fact that the (1121) surface becomes completely faceted only after oxidation is consistent with our previous data for O-induced faceting of Re(1231), where one facet has the (1121) orientation and is unstable against oxidation. The faceted O/Re surfaces may be potential templates to grow nano-structures with narrow size distribution, and may also be substrates to study structural sensitivity in catalytic reactions.

  12. Design of the support structure, drive pedestal, and controls for a solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, V.R.; Ford, J.L.; Anderson, A.E. )

    1991-08-01

    The glass/metal McDonnell-Douglas dish is the state-of-the-art of parabolic dish concentrators. Because of the perceived high production cost of this concentrator, the Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Program is developing stretch-membrane technology for large (75 kWt) solar concentrators for integration with receivers and engines in 25 kWe dish-Stirling systems. The objective of this development effort is to reduce the cost of the concentrator while maintaining the high levels of performance characteristic of glass-metal dishes. Under contract to Sandia National Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation, Solar Kinetics Inc. and WG Associates are developing a faceted stretched-membrane heliostat technology. This design will result in a low-risk, near-term concentrator for dish-Stirling systems. WG Associates has designed the support structure, drives and tracking controls for this dish. The structure is configured to support 12 stretched-membrane, 3.5-meter diameter facets in a shaped dish configuration. The dish design is sized to power a dish-Stirling system capable of producing 25 kW (electric). In the design of the structure, trade-off studies were conducted to determine the best'' facet arrangement, dish contour, dish focal length, tracking control and walk-off protection. As part of the design, in-depth analyses were performed to evaluate pointing accuracy, compliance with AISC steel design codes, and the economics of fabrication and installation. Detailed fabrication and installation drawings were produced, and initial production cost estimates for the dish were developed. These issues, and the final dish design, are presented in this report. 7 refs., 33 figs., 18 tabs.

  13. Ethyl Cellulose and Cetrimonium Bromide Assisted Synthesis of Mesoporous, Hexagon Shaped ZnO Nanodisks with Exposed ±{0001} Polar Facets for Enhanced Photovoltaic Performance in Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chetia, Tridip Ranjan; Ansari, Mohammad Shaad; Qureshi, Mohammad

    2015-06-24

    Hexagon shaped mesoporous zinc oxide nanodisks (ZnO NDs) with exposed ±{0001} polar facets have been synthesized by using ethyl cellulose (EC) and cetrimonium bromide (CTAB) as the capping and structure directing agents. We have characterized ZnO NDs using analytical techniques, such as powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), diffuse reflectance UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis and proposed a plausible mechanism for the formation of ZnO NDs. EC molecules form a colloidal solution in a 1-butanol:water (3:1) solvent system having a negative zeta potential (ζ ≈ -32 mV) value which can inhibit CTAB assisted c-axis growth of ZnO crystal and encourage the formation of ZnO NDs. In the control reactions carried out in presence of only CTAB and only EC, formation of hexagonal ZnO nanorods (NRs) and ZnO nanosheets (NSs) composed of numerous ZnO nanoparticles are observed, respectively. Photovoltaic properties of ZnO NDs as compared to ZnO NRs, ZnO NSs, and conventional ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) are investigated by co-sensitizing with CdS/CdSe quantum dots (QDs). An ∼35% increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE, η) is observed in ZnO NDs (η ≈ 4.86%) as compared to ZnO NPs (η ≈ 3.14%) while the values of PCE for ZnO NR and ZnO NS based devices are found to be ∼2.52% and ∼1.64%, respectively. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of the ZnO NDs based solar cell is attributed to an efficient charge separation and collection, boosted by the exposed ±(0001) facets apart from the single crystalline nature, better light-scattering effects, and high BET surface area for sensitizer particle adsorption. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis further reveals that the charge recombination resistance and photoinduced electron lifetime are substantially higher in the ZnO ND based

  14. Facets of the balanced minimal evolution polytope.

    PubMed

    Forcey, Stefan; Keefe, Logan; Sands, William

    2016-08-01

    The balanced minimal evolution (BME) method of creating phylogenetic trees can be formulated as a linear programming problem, minimizing an inner product over the vertices of the BME polytope. In this paper we undertake the project of describing the facets of this polytope. We classify and identify the combinatorial structure and geometry (facet inequalities) of all the facets in dimensions up to five, and classify even more facets in all dimensions. A full set of facet inequalities would allow a full implementation of the simplex method for finding the BME tree-although there are reasons to think this an unreachable goal. However, our results provide the crucial first steps for a more likely-to-be-successful program: finding efficient relaxations of the BME polytope. PMID:26714816

  15. Evaluation of structural and microscopic properties of tetragonal ZrO2 for the facet coating of 980 nm semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, V. K.; Marathe, A.; Bhatt, G.; Khamari, S. K.; Rajiv, K.; Kumar, R.; Mukherjee, C.; Panchal, C. J.; Sharma, T. K.; Oak, S. M.

    2015-03-01

    ZrO2 based antireflection coatings are expected to show a high laser induced damage threshold in the facet coating applications of laser diodes. A single layer of undoped ZrO2 and multilayers of ZrO2/SiO2 are deposited at 80 °C by an e-beam evaporation technique on GaAs and Si substrates. ZrO2 layers deposited under the optimized conditions are of a tetragonal nature and the grain size increases with reduced atomistic configuration mismatch between the surfaces of the layer and substrate. The electron/optical density profiles of the tetragonal ZrO2 single layer and multilayers of ZrO2/SiO2 are obtained from x-ray reflectivity measurements which confirm a uniform surface without any evidence of interfacial diffusion. The refractive index spectrum of tetragonal ZrO2 is found to be different from its other stable monoclinic allotropes. This is due to the possible differences in the atomistic structure of tetragonal ZrO2 that might be caused by oxygen vacancies and impurities. The measured values of refractive index, surface and interface roughness are used to engineer the layer structures for achieving 2 and 90% reflectivity at 980 nm at the front and the rear facets of laser diodes. The slope efficiency of the facet coated laser diode increases from 0.5 to 0.91 W A-1 without any measurable difference in the threshold current density.

  16. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    PubMed Central

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  17. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within +/-1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  18. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  19. Microsphere assembly of TiO2 mesoporous nanosheets with highly exposed (101) facets and application in a light-trapping quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xiyun; Ruan, Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Hongxia; Zhou, Xingfu

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of nano-titania has a significant effect on the photoelectric properties of dye-sensitized solar cells. In this study, microsphere assembly of a TiO2 mesoporous nanosheet constructed by nanocuboids was conducted via a simple hydrothermal process. The XRD pattern indicated that the hierarchical mesoporous microspheres are anatase phase with decreased (004) peaks. Raman spectrum shows enhanced Eg peaks at 143 and 638 cm-1 caused by the symmetric stretching vibration of O-Ti-O of the (101) crystalline facet in anatase TiO2. FESEM and TEM images show that well monodispersed TiO2 microspheres with a diameter of 2 μm are assembled by TiO2 mesoporous nanosheets with exposed (101) facets. The oriented attachment of TiO2 nanocuboids along the (101) direction leads to the formation of mesoporous titania nanosheets. The UV-Vis spectrum shows that the mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets have high scattering ability and light absorption by dye. Quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells that incorporate these microspheres into the top scattering layers exhibit a prominent improvement in the power conversion efficiency of 7.51%, which shows a 45.8% increase in the overall conversion efficiency when compared with the spine hierarchical TiO2 microspheres (5.15%). There is the potential application for microsphere assembly of mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets in quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells with excellent stability.

  20. Solar photovoltaic reflective trough collection structure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin J.; Sweatt, William C.; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2015-11-19

    A photovoltaic (PV) solar concentration structure having at least two troughs encapsulated in a rectangular parallelepiped optical plastic structure, with the troughs filled with an optical plastic material, the troughs each having a reflective internal surface and approximately parabolic geometry, and the troughs each including photovoltaic cells situated so that light impinging on the optical plastic material will be concentrated onto the photovoltaic cells. Multiple structures can be connected to provide a solar photovoltaic collection system that provides portable, efficient, low-cost electrical power.

  1. Ultraviolet observations of solar fine structure.

    PubMed

    Dere, K P; Bartoe, J D; Brueckner, G E; Cook, J W; Socker, D G

    1987-11-27

    The High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph was flown on the Spacelab-2 shuttle mission to perform extended observations of the solar chromosphere and transition zone at high spatial and temporal resolution. Ultraviolet spectroheliograms show the temporal development of macrospicules at the solar limb. The C IV transition zone emission is produced in discrete emission elements that must be composed of exceedingly fine (less than 70 kilometers) subresolution structures. PMID:17744366

  2. Green synthesis of Pt-doped TiO2 nanocrystals with exposed (001) facets and mesoscopic void space for photo-splitting of water under solar irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Biplab; Amoli, Vipin; Maurya, Abhayankar; Sinha, Anil Kumar; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-06-01

    We report a non-trivial facile chemical approach using ionic liquid ([bmim][Cl]) as a porogen for the synthesis of (001) faceted TiO2 nanocrystals having mesoscopic void space. This faceted TiO2 nanomaterial has been doped with Pt nanoclusters through chemical impregnation. The resulting Pt-doped TiO2 nanomaterials are thoroughly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultra high resolution transmission electron microscopy (UHR-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and N2 sorption studies. These Pt/TiO2 nanocrystals with (001) exposed facets are employed as efficient and benign catalysts for hydrogen production from pure water and methanol-water systems under one AM 1.5G sunlight illumination. The effect of platinum loading and methanol-water ratio on the photocatalytic activity of the faceted TiO2 nanocrystals are investigated and it is found that hydrogen evolution rates have been enhanced significantly upon Pt loading. Under optimized reaction conditions the highest photocatalytic activity of 11.2 mmol h-1 g-1 has been achieved over ca. 1.0 wt% Pt loaded Pt/TiO2 nanocrystals with (001) exposed facets, which is one of the highest hydrogen evolution rates over the noble metal/TiO2 system reported to date in the literature.We report a non-trivial facile chemical approach using ionic liquid ([bmim][Cl]) as a porogen for the synthesis of (001) faceted TiO2 nanocrystals having mesoscopic void space. This faceted TiO2 nanomaterial has been doped with Pt nanoclusters through chemical impregnation. The resulting Pt-doped TiO2 nanomaterials are thoroughly characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultra high resolution transmission electron microscopy (UHR-TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), UV-vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS) and

  3. Structural evaluation of concepts for a solar energy concentrator for Space Station advanced development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenner, Winfred S.; Rhodes, Marvin D.

    1994-01-01

    Solar dynamic power systems have a higher thermodynamic efficiency than conventional photovoltaic systems; therefore they are attractive for long-term space missions with high electrical power demands. In an investigation conducted in support of a preliminary concept for Space Station Freedom, an approach for a solar dynamic power system was developed and a number of the components for the solar concentrator were fabricated for experimental evaluation. The concentrator consists of hexagonal panels comprised of triangular reflective facets which are supported by a truss. Structural analyses of the solar concentrator and the support truss were conducted using finite-element models. A number of potential component failure scenarios were postulated and the resulting structural performance was assessed. The solar concentrator and support truss were found to be adequate to meet a 1.0-Hz structural dynamics design requirement in pristine condition. However, for some of the simulated component failure conditions, the fundamental frequency dropped below the 1.0-Hz design requirement. As a result, two alternative concepts were developed and assessed. One concept incorporated a tetrahedral ring truss support for the hexagonal panels: the second incorporated a full tetrahedral truss support for the panels. The results indicate that significant improvements in stiffness can be obtained by attaching the panels to a tetrahedral truss, and that this concentrator and support truss will meet the 1.0-Hz design requirement with any of the simulated failure conditions.

  4. Faceting of Re (1121) induced by ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Wenhua; Madey, Theodore E.; Jacob, Timo

    2007-03-01

    The ammonia-induced nanoscale faceting of Re (1121) has been studied by LEED and STM; the results are compared with recent studies of O-induced faceting of Re(1121). After exposure to ammonia at 700K, the Re(1121) surface only shows a (1x2) reconstruction and remains planar (ammonia dissociates on Re, and only N remains on the surface at T>700K). By exposure to ammonia at 900K, Re(1121) becomes completely faceted, forming 2-sided ridge-like structures with (1342) and (3142) facets. However, this morphology is different from that in O-induced faceting of Re(1121). The two ridge sides, (1342) and (3142), are vicinal surfaces of closed-packed (0110) and (1010) respectively; these latter two surfaces appear as facets in O-induced faceting of Re(1121). DFT calculations are implemented to understand the origin of the different morphologies. Our work demonstrates that it is possible to tailor the surface morphology by choosing appropriate adsorbate and annealing conditions, which in turn provides model systems to study structural sensitivity in catalytic reactions as well as potential templates to grow nanostructures.

  5. Lightweight solar concentrator structures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Kaplan, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of the program conducted by Ultramet under SBIR Phase 2 Contract NAS3-25418. The objective of this program was to develop lightweight materials and processes for advanced high accuracy Space Solar Concentrators using rigidized foam for the substrate structure with an integral optical surface.

  6. Photon management structures for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bläsi, Benedikt; Hauser, Hubert; Walk, Christian; Michl, Bernhard; Guttowski, Aron; Mellor, Alexander; Benick, Jan; Peters, Marius; Jüchter, Sabrina; Wellens, Christine; Kübler, Volker; Hermle, Martin; Wolf, Andreas J.

    2012-06-01

    Since micro- and nanostructures for photon management are of increasing importance in novel high-efficiency solar cell concepts, structuring techniques with up-scaling potential play a key role in their realization. Interference lithography and nanoimprint processes are presented as technologies for origination and replication of fine-tailored photonic structures on large areas. At first, these structure origination and replication technologies are presented in detail: With the interference pattern of two or more coherent waves, a wide variety of structures with feature sizes ranging from 100 nm to 100 μm can be generated in photoresist by interference lithography. Examples are linear gratings, crossed gratings, hexagonal structures, three dimensional photonic crystals or surface-relief diffusers. The strength of this technology is that homogeneous structures can be originated on areas of up to 1.2 x 1.2 m2. The structures in photoresist, the so-called master structures, can serve as an etching mask for a pattern transfer, as a template for infiltration with different materials or they can be replicated via electroplating and subsequent replication processes. Especially in combination with replication steps, the industrially feasible production of elaborate structures is possible. As a particularly interesting process, nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is described in detail. As a way towards industrial production, a roller NIL tool is presented. After the description of the basic technologies, three application examples for solar cells are presented with details about the design of the structures, the structuring processes, sample characterization and evaluation: (1) honeycomb structures for the front side texturization of multicrystalline silicon wafer solar cells, (2) diffractive rear side gratings for absorption enhancement in the spectral region near the band gap of silicon, and (3) plasmonic metal nanoparticle arrays manufactured by combined imprint and lift off

  7. Microsphere assembly of TiO2 mesoporous nanosheets with highly exposed (101) facets and application in a light-trapping quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xiyun; Ruan, Peng; Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Hongxia; Zhou, Xingfu

    2015-02-28

    The morphology of nano-titania has a significant effect on the photoelectric properties of dye-sensitized solar cells. In this study, microsphere assembly of a TiO2 mesoporous nanosheet constructed by nanocuboids was conducted via a simple hydrothermal process. The XRD pattern indicated that the hierarchical mesoporous microspheres are anatase phase with decreased (004) peaks. Raman spectrum shows enhanced Eg peaks at 143 and 638 cm(-1) caused by the symmetric stretching vibration of O-Ti-O of the (101) crystalline facet in anatase TiO2. FESEM and TEM images show that well monodispersed TiO2 microspheres with a diameter of 2 μm are assembled by TiO2 mesoporous nanosheets with exposed (101) facets. The oriented attachment of TiO2 nanocuboids along the (101) direction leads to the formation of mesoporous titania nanosheets. The UV-Vis spectrum shows that the mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets have high scattering ability and light absorption by dye. Quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells that incorporate these microspheres into the top scattering layers exhibit a prominent improvement in the power conversion efficiency of 7.51%, which shows a 45.8% increase in the overall conversion efficiency when compared with the spine hierarchical TiO2 microspheres (5.15%). There is the potential application for microsphere assembly of mesoporous TiO2 nanosheets in quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells with excellent stability. PMID:25631573

  8. Solar cyclicity: fine structure and forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khramova, M.; Kononovich, E.; Krasotkin, S.

    2002-12-01

    The principal components of the solar activity indices time-series were obtained by the Singular Spectrum Analysis method and identified with the centennial cycle, 11-yr variation and quasi-biennial oscillations (QBO). The amplitudes of the QBO and 11-yr cycle were found to be modulated by the centennial cycle. The following properties of the centennial cycle were settled: the maximum phase has the double-peak structure; the rising part of the centennial cycle (including the first maximum) as a rule covers three solar cycles; the first and the second maximum of the centennial cycle are separated by one small or medium 11-yr cycle; the second maximum consists of just one 11-yr cycle; the fall-down part of the centennial cycle includes four 11-yr cycles. The centennial cycle was found to consists of nine 11-yr cycles and its duration was calculated to be 100±5 years. The double-peak structure was found to be an essential property of the solar cycle maximum phase. The forecast of the Wolf numbers for the solar cycle 24 was obtained.

  9. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  10. Nucleation-mediated synthesis and enhanced catalytic properties of Au-Pd bimetallic tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures and high-energy facets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiaoli; Wang, Xue; Jiang, Zhiyuan

    2016-02-01

    The Au-Pd alloy has been proved to be an excellent catalyst in many applications, such as the electro-oxidation of formic acid, CO oxidation and oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes. However, most of the research has been focused on the shape-controlled Au-Pd alloy NCs with a single-crystal structure. Due to the existence of high-energy atoms on the twin defects, twinned structures usually will further increase their catalytic activities. It is necessary to develop a method to prepare the Au-Pd alloy with twinned structures and investigate their catalytic properties. Herein, we successfully synthesized Au-Pd alloy tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures by the cooperation of cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The tripods contain one twin plane, while the bipyramids consist of a fivefold-twinned structure. In addition, the tripods and bipyramids are both exposed by high-energy facets. We proposed that the tripods and bipyramids are evolved from bipyramid seeds and fivefold twinned seeds, respectively. The as-prepared Au-Pd tripods and bipyramids performed better activity for electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid compared to the cubic Au-Pd nanoparticles. PMID:26763593

  11. SLAC All Access: FACET

    ScienceCinema

    Hogan, Mark

    2014-09-15

    SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, or FACET, is a test-bed where researchers are developing the technologies required for particle accelerators of the future. Scientists from all over the world come to explore ways of improving the power and efficiency of the particle accelerators used in basic research, medicine, industry and other areas important to society. In this video, Mark Hogan, head of SLAC's Advanced Accelerator Research Department, offers a glimpse into FACET, which uses part of SLAC's historic two-mile-long linear accelerator.

  12. SLAC All Access: FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Mark

    2012-07-05

    SLAC's Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests, or FACET, is a test-bed where researchers are developing the technologies required for particle accelerators of the future. Scientists from all over the world come to explore ways of improving the power and efficiency of the particle accelerators used in basic research, medicine, industry and other areas important to society. In this video, Mark Hogan, head of SLAC's Advanced Accelerator Research Department, offers a glimpse into FACET, which uses part of SLAC's historic two-mile-long linear accelerator.

  13. Development of a Conceptual Structure for Architectural Solar Energy Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringel, Robert F.

    Solar subsystems and components were identified and conceptual structure was developed for architectural solar energy heating and cooling systems. Recent literature related to solar energy systems was reviewed and analyzed. Solar heating and cooling system, subsystem, and component data were compared for agreement and completeness. Significant…

  14. Efficiently Enhancing Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity of Faceted TiO2 Nanocrystals by Synergistic Effects of Core-Shell Structured Au@CdS Nanoparticles and Their Selective Deposition.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ruifeng; Liu, Chang; Xu, Zhenkai; Kuang, Qin; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2016-08-24

    Integrating wide bandgap semiconductor photocatalysts with visible-light-active inorganic nanoparticles (such as Au and CdS) as sensitizers is one of the most efficient methods to improve their photocatalytic activity in the visible light region. However, as for all such composite photocatalysts, a rational design and precise control over their architecture is often required to achieve optimal performance. Herein, a new TiO2-based ternary composite photocatalyst with superior visible light activity was designed and synthesized. In this composite photocatalyst, the location of the visible light sensitizers was engineered according to the intrinsic facet-induced effect of well-faceted TiO2 nanocrystals on the spatial separation of photogenerated carriers. Experimentally, core-shell structured Au@CdS nanoparticles acting as visible light sensitizers were selectively deposited onto photoreductive {101} facets of well-faceted anatase TiO2 nanocrystals through a two-step in situ photodeposition route. Because the combination of Au@CdS and specific {101} facets of TiO2 nanocrystals facilitates the transport of charges photogenerated under visible light irradiation, this well-designed ternary composite photocatalyst exhibited superior activity in visible-light-driven photocatalytic H2 evolution, as expected. PMID:27479634

  15. Development of an improved mirror facet for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schertz, Paul; Saifee, Shabbar; Lammert, Luke

    1991-01-01

    A fabrication technique was successfully developed for a metallic aluminum honeycomb, high-accuracy, lightweight, and long-life solar concentrator (mirror) for Advanced Solar Dynamic Space Power Systems. The program scope was limited to the development, fabrication, evaluation, and delivery of a solar concentrator facet (petal) that was sized for a 2-meter deployable solar concentrator. A surface accuracy of 1.0 mrad was achieved. The development incorporated tooling design, material selection, facet forming, adhesive selection, testing, and analysis. Techniques for applying levelizing, reflective, and protective optical coatings were also developed.

  16. Facets of Subjectification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visconti, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Subjectification, as the diachronic facet of subjectivity, has raised in the last two decades a number of interesting questions in grammaticalization and semantic change theory. In this paper I shall reflect on the nature and construal of subjectification, focusing on the question, formulated by Traugott (2010a, p. 58), "whether it is possible to…

  17. Beam Diagnostics for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

  18. Bimodal Structure of the Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Z. L.

    2015-05-01

    Some properties of the 11 yr solar cycle can be explained by the current solar dynamo models. However, some other features remain not well understood such as the asymmetry of the cycle, the double-peaked structure, and the “Waldmeier effect” that a stronger cycle tends to have less rise time and a shorter cycle length. We speculate that the solar cycle is governed by a bi-dynamo model forming two stochastic processes depicted by a bimodal Gaussian function with a time gap of about 2 yr, from which the above features can be reasonably explained. The first one describes the main properties of the cycle dominated by the current solar dynamo models, and the second one occurs either in the rising phase as a short weak explosive perturbation or in the declining phase as a long stochastic perturbation. The above function is the best one selected from several in terms of the Akaike information criterion. Through analyzing different distributions, one might speculate about the dominant physical process inside the convection zone. The secondary (main) process is found to be closely associated with complicated (simple) active ranges. In effect, the bi-dynamo model is a reduced form of a multi-dynamo model, which could occur from the base of the convection zone through its envelope and from low to high heliographic latitude, reflecting the active belts in the convection zone. These results are insensitive to the hemispheric asymmetry, smoothing filters, and distribution functions selected and are expected to be helpful in understanding the formation of solar and stellar cycles.

  19. Solar cycle variations of coronal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loucif, M. L.; Koutchmy, S.

    1989-01-01

    Using eclipse pictures of the solar corona, properly scaled drawings have been prepared to constitute a short atlas of coronal structures. These drawings have been used to extract 2 parameters which are further considered with respect to the sunspot number and the sunspot cycle: the extension of polar regions free of coronal streamers and the average radial deviation of large streamers. The flattening index deduced from the photometric analysis of a larger number of eclipse pictures is also considered. The out-of-phase behavior of several coronal parameters is confirmed. The results are discussed in the light of the analysis of the green-line activity as observed during 30 years at the Pic du Midi Observatory. The N-S asymmetric behavior of the activity in different solar hemispheres and the occurrence of a powerful secondary maximum of coronal activity are discussed.

  20. New Packing Structure of Concentration Solar Receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Shang-Yu; Lee, Yueh-Mu; Shih, Zun-Hao; Hong, Hwen-Fen; Shin, Hwa-Yuh; Kuo, Cherng-Tsong

    2010-10-14

    This paper presents a solution to the temperature issue in High Concentration Photovoltaic (HCPV) module device by using different thermal conductive material and packing structure. In general, the open-circuited voltage of a device reduces with the increase of temperature and therefore degrades its efficiency. The thermal conductive material we use in this paper, silicon, has a high thermal conductive coefficient (149 W/m{center_dot}K) and steady semiconductor properties which are suitable for the application of solar receiver in HCPV module. Solar cell was soldered on a metal-plated Si substrate with a thicker SiO{sub 2} film which acts as an insulating layer. Then it was mounted on an Al-based plate to obtain a better heat dissipating result.

  1. Solar Prominence Fine Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review recent observational and theoretical results on the fine structure and dynamics of solar prominences, beginning with an overview of prominence classifications, the proposal of possible new ``funnel prominence'' classification, and a discussion of the recent ``solar tornado'' findings. We then focus on quiescent prominences to review formation, down-flow dynamics, and the ``prominence bubble'' phenomena. We show new observations of the prominence bubble Rayleigh-Taylor instability triggered by a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear flow instability occurring along the bubble boundary. Finally we review recent studies on plasma composition of bubbles, emphasizing that differential emission measure (DEM) analysis offers a more quantitative analysis than photometric comparisons. In conclusion, we discuss the relation of prominences to coronal magnetic flux ropes, proposing that prominences can be understood as partially ionized condensations of plasma forming the return flow of a general magneto-thermal convection in the corona.

  2. On the Relationship Between Sunspot Structure and Magnetic Field Changes Associated with Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. L.; Zhang, M.

    2016-08-01

    Many previous studies have shown that magnetic fields and sunspot structures present rapid and irreversible changes associated with solar flares. In this paper, we first use five X-class flares observed by Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager to show that not only do magnetic fields and sunspot structures show rapid, irreversible changes, but also that these changes are closely related both spatially and temporally. The magnitudes of the correlation coefficients between the temporal variations of the horizontal magnetic field and sunspot intensity are all larger than 0.90, with a maximum value of 0.99 and an average value of 0.96. Then, using four active regions during quiescent periods, three observed and one simulated, we show that in sunspot penumbra regions there also exists a close correlation between sunspot intensity and horizontal magnetic field strength in addition to the well-known correlation between sunspot intensity and the normal magnetic field strength. By connecting these two observational phenomena, we show that the sunspot structure change and magnetic field change are two facets of the same phenomena of solar flares; one change might be induced by the change of the other due to a linear correlation between sunspot intensity and magnetic field strength out of a local force balance.

  3. Nucleation-mediated synthesis and enhanced catalytic properties of Au-Pd bimetallic tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures and high-energy facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiaoli; Wang, Xue; Jiang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    The Au-Pd alloy has been proved to be an excellent catalyst in many applications, such as the electro-oxidation of formic acid, CO oxidation and oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes. However, most of the research has been focused on the shape-controlled Au-Pd alloy NCs with a single-crystal structure. Due to the existence of high-energy atoms on the twin defects, twinned structures usually will further increase their catalytic activities. It is necessary to develop a method to prepare the Au-Pd alloy with twinned structures and investigate their catalytic properties. Herein, we successfully synthesized Au-Pd alloy tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures by the cooperation of cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The tripods contain one twin plane, while the bipyramids consist of a fivefold-twinned structure. In addition, the tripods and bipyramids are both exposed by high-energy facets. We proposed that the tripods and bipyramids are evolved from bipyramid seeds and fivefold twinned seeds, respectively. The as-prepared Au-Pd tripods and bipyramids performed better activity for electrocatalytic oxidation of formic acid compared to the cubic Au-Pd nanoparticles.The Au-Pd alloy has been proved to be an excellent catalyst in many applications, such as the electro-oxidation of formic acid, CO oxidation and oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes. However, most of the research has been focused on the shape-controlled Au-Pd alloy NCs with a single-crystal structure. Due to the existence of high-energy atoms on the twin defects, twinned structures usually will further increase their catalytic activities. It is necessary to develop a method to prepare the Au-Pd alloy with twinned structures and investigate their catalytic properties. Herein, we successfully synthesized Au-Pd alloy tripods and bipyramids with twinned structures by the cooperation of cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (CTAC) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB

  4. Green corona and solar sector structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Svalgaard, L.

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of the green-line corona for the interval 1947-1970 suggests the existence of large-scale organization of the emission. The green-line emission at high northern latitudes (approximately 40 to 60 deg) is correlated with the emission at high southern latitudes 6, 15, and 24 days later, while the low-latitude green corona seems to be correlated on both sides of the equator with no time lag. These coronal features are recurrent with a 27-day period at all latitudes between plus or minus 60 deg, and these large-scale structures are believed to be associated with the solar magnetic sector structure. The high correlation between northern and southern high-latitude emission at 15 days time lag is explained as a signature of a two-sector structure, while four sectors are associated with the 6- and 24-day peaks.

  5. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Miller, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    Solar collectors for space use are examined, including both early designs and current concepts. In particular, attention is given to stiff sandwich panels and aluminum dishes as well as inflated and umbrella-type membrane configurations. The Sunflower concentrator is described as an example of a high-efficiency collector. It is concluded that stiff reflector panels are most likely to provide the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation. A new configuration consisting of a Pactruss backup structure, with identical panels installed after deployment in space, is presented. It is estimated that concentration ratios in excess of 2000 can be achieved with this concept.

  6. Faint solar radio structures from decametric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briand, C.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Rucker, H. O.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Melnik, V. N.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: Decameter radio observations of the solar corona reveal the presence of numerous faint frequency drifting emissions, similar to “solar S bursts” which are reported in the literature. We present a statistical analysis of the characteristics of these emissions and propose a mechanism to excite the Langmuir waves thought to be at the origin of these emissions. Methods: The observations were performed between 1998 and 2002 with the Digital Spectro Polarimeter (DSP) receivers operated at the UTR-2 and Nançay decameter radio telescopes in the frequency range 15-30 MHz. Our theoretical explanation is based on Vlasov-Ampère simulations. Results: Based on the frequency drift rate, three populations of structures can be identified. The largest population presents an average negative frequency drift of -0.9 MHz s-1 and a lifetime up to 11 s (median value of 2.72 s). A second population shows a very small frequency drift of -0.1 MHz s-1 and a short lifetime of about 1 s. The third population presents an average positive frequency drift of +0.95 MHz s-1 and a lifetime of up to 3 s. Also, the frequency drift as a function of frequency is consistent with the former results, which present results in higher frequency range. No specific relationship was found between the occurrence of these emissions and the solar cycle or presence of flares. Assuming that these emissions are produced by “electron clouds” propagating the solar corona, we deduce electron velocities of about 3-5 times the electron thermal velocity. As previously shown, a localized, time-dependent modulation of the electron distribution function (heating) leads to low velocity electron clouds (consistent with observations), which, in turn, can generate Langmuir waves and electromagnetic signals by nonlinear processes.

  7. FACET Emittance Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, J; Hogan, M.J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Litos, M.D.; Raubenheimer, T.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The FACET beamline consists of a chicane and final focus system to compress the 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron bunches to {approx}20 {micro}m long and {approx}10 {micro}m wide. Simulations of the FACET beamline indicate the short-duration and large, 1.5% rms energy spread beams may suffer a factor of four emittance growth from a combination of chromaticity, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Emittance growth is directly correlated to head erosion in plasma wakefield acceleration and is a limiting factor in single stage performance. Studies of the geometric, CSR, and ISR components are presented. Numerical calculation of the rms emittance can be overwhelmed by long tails in the simulated phase space distributions; more useful definitions of emittance are given. A complete simulation of the beamline is presented as well, which agrees with design specifications.

  8. LOFAR Facet Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Weeren, R. J.; Williams, W. L.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Shimwell, T. W.; Rafferty, D. A.; Sabater, J.; Heald, G.; Sridhar, S. S.; Dijkema, T. J.; Brunetti, G.; Brüggen, M.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Ogrean, G. A.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Dawson, W. A.; Forman, W. R.; de Gasperin, F.; Jones, C.; Miley, G. K.; Rudnick, L.; Sarazin, C. L.; Bonafede, A.; Best, P. N.; Bîrzan, L.; Cassano, R.; Chyży, K. T.; Croston, J. H.; Ensslin, T.; Ferrari, C.; Hoeft, M.; Horellou, C.; Jarvis, M. J.; Kraft, R. P.; Mevius, M.; Intema, H. T.; Murray, S. S.; Orrú, E.; Pizzo, R.; Simionescu, A.; Stroe, A.; van der Tol, S.; White, G. J.

    2016-03-01

    LOFAR, the Low-Frequency Array, is a powerful new radio telescope operating between 10 and 240 MHz. LOFAR allows detailed sensitive high-resolution studies of the low-frequency radio sky. At the same time LOFAR also provides excellent short baseline coverage to map diffuse extended emission. However, producing high-quality deep images is challenging due to the presence of direction-dependent calibration errors, caused by imperfect knowledge of the station beam shapes and the ionosphere. Furthermore, the large data volume and presence of station clock errors present additional difficulties. In this paper we present a new calibration scheme, which we name facet calibration, to obtain deep high-resolution LOFAR High Band Antenna images using the Dutch part of the array. This scheme solves and corrects the direction-dependent errors in a number of facets that cover the observed field of view. Facet calibration provides close to thermal noise limited images for a typical 8 hr observing run at ∼ 5\\prime\\prime resolution, meeting the specifications of the LOFAR Tier-1 northern survey.

  9. Synthesis of [111]- and {010}-faceted anatase TiO2 nanocrystals from tri-titanate nanosheets and their photocatalytic and DSSC performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changdong; Ikeuchi, Yasushi; Xu, Linfeng; Sewvandi, Galhenage A.; Kusunose, Takafumi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Shunsuke; Wen, Puhong; Feng, Qi

    2015-04-01

    [111]- and {010}-faceted anatase nanocrystals with controllable crystal size and morphology were synthesized from tri-titanate H2Ti3O7 nanosheets by hydrothermal reaction. The nanostructures and the formation reaction mechanism of the obtained TiO2 nanocrystals were investigated using XRD, FE-SEM, and TEM. Furthermore, the photocatalytic and dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) performances of the synthesized anatase nanocrystals were also characterized. Two types of reactions occur in the formation process of the anatase nanocrystals. One is an in situ topochemical conversion reaction of the layered titanate structure to an anatase structure, and another is the dissolution-deposition reaction on the particle surface, which splits the formed nanosheet-like particles into small TiO2 nanocrystals. The surface photocatalytic activity and the DSSC performance of the anatase nanocrystals are dependent on the crystal facet exposed on the particle surface, which increases in the order of non-facet < [111]-facet < {010}-facet. The increasing order corresponds to the increasing order of the bandgap and energy level of the lowest valence band of the anatase nanocrystals. Furthermore, the facet of the anatase also affects the DSSC performance, which is enhanced in the order of non-facet < [111]-facet < {010}-facet.[111]- and {010}-faceted anatase nanocrystals with controllable crystal size and morphology were synthesized from tri-titanate H2Ti3O7 nanosheets by hydrothermal reaction. The nanostructures and the formation reaction mechanism of the obtained TiO2 nanocrystals were investigated using XRD, FE-SEM, and TEM. Furthermore, the photocatalytic and dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) performances of the synthesized anatase nanocrystals were also characterized. Two types of reactions occur in the formation process of the anatase nanocrystals. One is an in situ topochemical conversion reaction of the layered titanate structure to an anatase structure, and another is the dissolution

  10. MULTISCALE DYNAMICS OF SOLAR MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2012-03-20

    Multiscale topological complexity of the solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries. We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying these dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al.) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  11. Multiscale Dynamics of Solar Magnetic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Davila, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiscale topological complexity of the solar magnetic field is among the primary factors controlling energy release in the corona, including associated processes in the photospheric and chromospheric boundaries.We present a new approach for analyzing multiscale behavior of the photospheric magnetic flux underlying these dynamics as depicted by a sequence of high-resolution solar magnetograms. The approach involves two basic processing steps: (1) identification of timing and location of magnetic flux origin and demise events (as defined by DeForest et al.) by tracking spatiotemporal evolution of unipolar and bipolar photospheric regions, and (2) analysis of collective behavior of the detected magnetic events using a generalized version of the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation integral algorithm. The scale-free nature of the developed algorithms makes it possible to characterize the dynamics of the photospheric network across a wide range of distances and relaxation times. Three types of photospheric conditions are considered to test the method: a quiet photosphere, a solar active region (NOAA 10365) in a quiescent non-flaring state, and the same active region during a period of M-class flares. The results obtained show (1) the presence of a topologically complex asymmetrically fragmented magnetic network in the quiet photosphere driven by meso- and supergranulation, (2) the formation of non-potential magnetic structures with complex polarity separation lines inside the active region, and (3) statistical signatures of canceling bipolar magnetic structures coinciding with flaring activity in the active region. Each of these effects can represent an unstable magnetic configuration acting as an energy source for coronal dissipation and heating.

  12. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.; Miller, Richard K.

    1987-01-01

    The Sunflower large solar concentrator, developed in the early 1970's, is a salient example of a high-efficiency concentrator. The newly emphasized needs for solar dynamic power on the Space Station and for large, lightweight thermal sources are outlined. Existing concepts for high efficiency reflector surfaces are examined with attention to accuracy needs for concentration rates of 1000 to 3000. Concepts using stiff reflector panels are deemed most likely to exhibit the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation, particularly for the higher concentration ratios. Quantitative results are shown of the effects of surface errors for various concentration and focal-length diameter ratios. Cost effectiveness is discussed. Principal sources of high cost include the need for various dished panels for paraboloidal reflectors and the expense of ground testing and adjustment. A new configuration is presented addressing both problems, i.e., a deployable Pactruss backup structure with identical panels installed on the structure after deployment in space. Analytical results show that with reasonable pointing errors, this new concept is capable of concentration ratios greater than 2000.

  13. The interplanetary and solar magnetic field sector structures, 1962 - 1968

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The interplanetary magnetic field sector structure was observed from late 1962 through 1968. During this time it has been possible to study the manner in which the sector pattern and its relation to the photospheric magnetic field configuration changes from solar minimum to solar maximum. Observations were also made relating sector boundaries to specific regions on the solar disk. These and other observations related to the solar origin of the interplanetary field are briefly reviewed.

  14. Domains and Facets: A Hierarchical Approach to Personality Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrae, Robert R.

    The domain and facet approach to personality assessment is discussed. The strategy used to identify and measure aspects of the five factors of personality structure is described. Evidence concerning the factorial invariance of the resulting set of 30 facet scales and some recent evidence concerning their discriminant validity are reviewed. Some…

  15. The Construct of Agreeableness: Facet vs. Item Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newgent, Rebecca A.; Lee, Sang Min; Higgins, Kristin K.; Mulvenon, Sean W.; Connors, Joanie V.

    2004-01-01

    The Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO PI-R) was developed to operationalize the Five-Factor Model of Personality. Using correlational analysis and confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis, the present study investigates the facet structure of the domain of Agreeableness of the NEO-PI-R at the facet and item level to assess which is a more…

  16. Search Interface Design Using Faceted Indexing for Web Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devadason, Francis; Intaraksa, Neelawat; Patamawongjariya, Pornprapa; Desai, Kavita

    2001-01-01

    Describes an experimental system designed to organize and provide access to Web documents using a faceted pre-coordinate indexing system based on the Deep Structure Indexing System (DSIS) derived from POPSI (Postulate based Permuted Subject Indexing) of Bhattacharyya, and the facet analysis and chain indexing system of Ranganathan. (AEF)

  17. A Model of Job Facet Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Patricia G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Elements of the job that lead to overall job satisfaction were surveyed among public employees. The 17-facet model included promotion, training, supervisor, upper management, organization of work tasks, work stress, work challenge and autonomy, physical work space and equipment, work group, organizational structure, pay, etc. (Author/MH)

  18. Seismic probes of solar interior magnetic structure.

    PubMed

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Birch, Aaron; Gizon, Laurent; Tromp, Jeroen

    2012-09-01

    Sun spots are prominent manifestations of solar magnetoconvection, and imaging their subsurface structure is an outstanding problem of wide physical importance. Travel times of seismic waves that propagate through these structures are typically used as inputs to inversions. Despite the presence of strongly anisotropic magnetic waveguides, these measurements have always been interpreted in terms of changes to isotropic wave speeds and flow-advection-related Doppler shifts. Here, we employ partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization to determine the appropriate parametrization of the structural properties of the magnetic interior. Seven different wave speeds fully characterize helioseismic wave propagation: the isotropic sound speed, a Doppler-shifting flow-advection velocity, and an anisotropic magnetic velocity. The structure of magnetic media is sensed by magnetoacoustic slow and fast modes and Alfvén waves, each of which propagates at a different wave speed. We show that even in the case of weak magnetic fields, significant errors may be incurred if these anisotropies are not accounted for in inversions. Translation invariance is demonstrably lost. These developments render plausible the accurate seismic imaging of magnetoconvection in the Sun. PMID:23005276

  19. Faceted Gold Nanorods: Nanocuboids, Convex Nanocuboids, and Concave Nanocuboids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Zhou, Yadong; Villarreal, Esteban; Lin, Ye; Zou, Shengli; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-10

    Au nanorods are optically tunable anisotropic nanoparticles with built-in catalytic activities. The state-of-the-art seed-mediated nanorod synthesis offers excellent control over the aspect ratios of cylindrical Au nanorods, which enables fine-tuning of plasmon resonances over a broad spectral range. However, facet control of Au nanorods with atomic-level precision remains significantly more challenging. The coexistence of various types of low-index and high-index facets on the highly curved nanorod surfaces makes it extremely challenging to quantitatively elucidate the atomic-level structure-property relationships that underpin the catalytic competence of Au nanorods. Here we demonstrate that cylindrical Au nanorods undergo controlled facet evolution during their overgrowth in the presence of Cu(2+) and cationic surfactants, resulting in the formation of anisotropic nanostructures enclosed by well-defined facets, such as low-index faceting nanocuboids and high-index faceting convex nanocuboids and concave nanocuboids. These faceted Au nanorods exhibit enriched optical extinction spectral features, broader plasmonic tuning range, and enhanced catalytic tunability in comparison to the conventional cylindrical Au nanorods. The capabilities to both fine-tailor the facets and fine-tune the plasmon resonances of anisotropic Au nanoparticles open up unique opportunities for us to study, in great detail, the facet-dependent interfacial molecular transformations on Au nanocatalysts using surface-enhanced Raman scattering as a time-resolved spectroscopic tool. PMID:25927399

  20. Topological Structure of the Magnetic Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, R. C.

    2007-12-01

    The solar corona is a highly complex and active plasma environment, containing many exotic phenomena such as solar flares, coronal mass ejections, prominences, coronal loops, and bright points. The fundamental element giving coherence to all this apparent diversity is the strong coronal magnetic field, the dominant force shaping the plasma there. In this thesis, I model the 3D magnetic fields of various coronal features using the techniques of magnetic charge topology (MCT) in a potential field. Often the real coronal field has departures from its potential state, but these are so small that the potential field method is accurate enough to pick out the essential information about the structure and evolution of the magnetic field. First I perform a topological analysis of the magnetic breakout model for an eruptive solar flare. Breakout is represented by a topological bifurcation that allows initially enclosed flux from the newly emerging region in my MCT model of a delta sunspot to reconnect out to large distances. I produce bifurcation diagrams showing how this behaviour can be caused by changing the strength or position of the emerging flux source, or the force-free parameter α. I also apply MCT techniques to observational data of a coronal bright point, and compare the results to 3D numerical MHD simulations of the effects of rotating the sources that underlie the bright point. The separatrix surfaces that surround each rotating source are found to correspond to locations of high parallel electric field in the simulations, which is a signature of magnetic reconnection. The large-scale topological structure of the magnetic field is robust to changes in the method of deriving point magnetic sources from the magnetogram. Next, I use a Green's function expression for the magnetic field to relax the standard topological assumption of a flat photosphere and extend the concept of MCT into a spherical geometry, enabling it to be applied to the entire global coronal

  1. Cervical facet joint kinematics during bilateral facet dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Panjabi, Manohar M.; Simpson, Andrew K.; Pearson, Adam M.; Tominaga, Yasuhiro; Yue, James J.

    2007-01-01

    Previous biomechanical models of cervical bilateral facet dislocation (BFD) are limited to quasi-static loading or manual ligament transection. The goal of the present study was to determine the facet joint kinematics during high-speed BFD. Dislocation was simulated using ten cervical functional spinal units with muscle force replication by frontal impact of the lower vertebra, tilted posteriorly by 42.5°. Average peak rotations and anterior sliding (displacement of upper articulating facet surface along the lower), separation and compression (displacement of upper facet away from and towards the lower), and lateral shear were determined at the anterior and posterior edges of the right and left facets and statistically compared (P < 0.05). First, peak facet separation occurred, and was significantly greater at the left posterior facet edge, as compared to the anterior edges. Next, peak flexion rotation and anterior facet sliding occurred, followed by peak facet compression. The highest average facet translation peaks were 22.0 mm for anterior sliding, 7.9 mm for separation, 9.9 mm for compression and 3.6 mm for lateral shear. The highest average rotation of 63° occurred in flexion, significantly greater than all other directions. These events occurred, on average, within 0.29 s following impact. During BFD, the main sagittal motions included facet separation, flexion rotation, anterior sliding, followed by compression, however, non-sagittal motions also existed. These motions indicated that unilateral dislocation may precede bilateral dislocation. PMID:17566792

  2. Strong thin membrane structure. [solar sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A continuous process is described for producing strong lightweight structures for use as solar sails for spacecraft propulsion by radiation pressure. A thin reflective coating, such as aluminum, is applied to a rotating cylinder. A nylon mesh, applied over the aluminum coating, is then coated with a polymerizing material such as a para-xylylene monomer gas to polymerize as a film bound to the mesh and the aluminum. An emissivity increasing material such as chromium or silicon monoxide is applied to the polymer film to disperse such material colloidally into the growing polymer film, or to the final polymer film. The resulting membrane structure is then removed from the cylinder. Alternately, the membrane structure can be formed by etching a substrate in the form of an organic film such as a polymide, or a metal foil, to remove material from the substrate and reduce its thickness. A thin reflective coating (aluminum) is applied on one side of the substrate, and an emissivity increasing coating is applied on the reverse side of the substrate.

  3. Preliminary space station solar array structural design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, J. T.; Bush, H. G.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Structurally efficient ways to support the large solar arrays (3,716 square meters which are currently considered for space station use) are examined. An erectable truss concept is presented for the on orbit construction of winged solar arrays. The means for future growth, maintenance, and repair are integrally designed into this concept. Results from parametric studies, which highlight the physical and structural differences between various configuration options are presented. Consideration is given to both solar blanket and hard panel arrays.

  4. Offset truss hex solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John E. (Inventor); Sturgis, James D. (Inventor); Erikson, Raymond J. (Inventor); Waligroski, Gregg A. (Inventor); Scott, Michael A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A solar energy concentrator system comprises an offset reflector structure made up of a plurality of solar energy reflector panel sections interconnected with one another to form a piecewise approximation of a portion of a (parabolic) surface of revolution rotated about a prescribed focal axis. Each panel section is comprised of a plurality of reflector facets whose reflective surfaces effectively focus reflected light to preselected surface portions of the interior sidewall of a cylindrically shaped solar energy receiver. The longitudinal axis of the receiver is tilted at an acute angle with respect to the optical axis such that the distribution of focussed solar energy over the interior surface of the solar engine is optimized for dynamic solar energy conversion. Each reflector panel section comprises a flat, hexagonally shaped truss support framework and a plurality of beam members interconnecting diametrically opposed corners of the hexagonal framework recessed within which a plurality of (spherically) contoured reflector facets is disposed. The depth of the framework and the beam members is greater than the thickness of a reflector facet such that a reflector facet may be tilted (for controlling the effective focus of its reflected light through the receiver aperture) without protruding from the panel section.

  5. The magnetic field structure in the active solar corona.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.

    1971-01-01

    The structure of the magnetic field of the active solar corona is discussed with reference to optical and radio observations of the solar atmosphere. Eclipse observations provide evidence of fine scale structures in the solar atmosphere that appear to relate to the coronal magnetic field. The coronal magnetic field used for comparison is calculated from potential theory; the influence of solar activity upon the potential theory field is discussed with reference to observations of the Faraday rotation of a microwave signal from Pioneer 6 as it was occulted by the solar atmosphere. Evidence has been found suggesting the existence of expanding magnetic bottles located at 10 solar radii above flaring active regions. The dynamics of these events is discussed. It is further suggested that these magnetic bottles are an important component in the solar corona.

  6. Tracing heliospheric structures to their solar origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Hassler, Donald M.

    2016-03-01

    The composition of the solar wind serves as an excellent tracer of the solar/coronal origin of the solar wind. We summarize various processes which affect the composition of the solar wind as it expands from the Sun into the heliosphere. As it leaves the well-mixed photosphere, the solar wind is fractionated according to First Ionization Potential (FIP) or First Ionization Time (FIT) in the highly evolving chromosphere/transition region. Its charge states are further modified as it moves through the dynamic environment of the corona.

  7. Oxygen induced facet formation on Rh(2 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govind; Chen, Wenhua; Wang, Hao; Madey, T. E.

    2009-10-01

    Oxygen induced nanometer-scale faceting of the atomically rough Rh(2 1 0) surface has been studied using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The Rh(2 1 0) surface completely covered with nanometer-scale facets when annealed at ≥550 K in the presence of oxygen. LEED studies reveal that the pyramidal faceted surface is characterized by three-sided nanoscale pyramids exposing (7 3 1), (7 3 -1) and (1 1 0) faces. A clean faceted surface was prepared through the use of low temperature surface cleaning method using the reaction with H 2 while preserving ("freezing") the pyramidal facet structure. The resulting clean faceted surface remains stable for T ˜ 600 K and for higher temperatures; the faceted surface irreversibly relaxes to the planar surface. STM measurements confirms the formation of nanopyramids with average pyramid size ranging from 12 to 21 nm depending upon the annealing temperature. The nanopyramidal faceted Rh surface may be used as a potential template for the growth of metallic nanoclusters and for structure sensitive reactions.

  8. The structure of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christina On-Yee

    2010-12-01

    This dissertation is devoted to expanding our understanding of the solar wind structure in the inner heliosphere and variations therein with solar activity. Using spacecraft observations and numerical models, the origins of the large-scale structures and long-term trends of the solar wind are explored in order to gain insights on how our Sun determines the space environments of the terrestrial planets. I use long term measurements of the solar wind density, velocity, interplanetary magnetic field, and particles, together with models based on solar magnetic field data, to generate time series of these properties that span one solar rotation (˜27 days). From these time series, I assemble and obtain the synoptic overviews of the solar wind properties. The resulting synoptic overviews show that the solar wind around Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars is a complex co-rotating structure with recurring features and occasional transients. During quiet solar conditions, the heliospheric current sheet, which separates the positive interplanetary magnetic field from the negative, usually has a remarkably steady two- or four-sector structure that persists for many solar rotations. Within the sector boundaries are the slow and fast speed solar wind streams that originate from the open coronal magnetic field sources that map to the ecliptic. At the sector boundaries, compressed high-density and the related high-dynamic pressure ridges form where streams from different coronal source regions interact. High fluxes of energetic particles also occur at the boundaries, and are seen most prominently during the quiet solar period. The existence of these recurring features depends on how long-lived are their source regions. In the last decade, 3D numerical solar wind models have become more widely available. They provide important scientific tools for obtaining a more global view of the inner heliosphere and of the relationships between conditions at Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. When

  9. The structure of solar radio noise storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, C.; Subramanian, P.; Chambe, G.; Janardhan, P.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH) routinely produces snapshot images of the full sun (field of view ~3 R⊙) at 6 or 10 frequencies between 150 and 450 MHz, with typical resolution 3 arcmin and time cadence 0.2 s. Combining visibilities from the NRH and from the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope (GMRT) allows us to produce images of the sun at 236 or 327 MHz, with the same field as the NRH, a resolution as low as 20 arcsec, and a time cadence 2 s. Aims: We seek to investigate the structure of noise storms (the most common non-thermal solar radio emission) which is yet poorly known. We focus on the relation of position and altitude of noise storms with the observing frequency and on the lower limit of their sizes. Methods: We use an improved version of a previously used method for combining NRH and GMRT visibilities to get high-resolution composite images and to investigate the fine structure of noise storms. We also use the NRH data over several consecutive days around the common observation days to derive the altitude of storms at different frequencies. Results: We present results for noise storms on four days. Noise storms consist of an extended halo and of one or several compact cores with relative intensity changing over a few seconds. We found that core sizes can be almost stable over one hour, with a minimum in the range 31-35 arcsec (less than previously reported). The heliocentric distances of noise storms are ~1.20 and 1.35 R⊙ at 432 and 150 MHz, respectively. Regions where storms originate are thus much denser than the ambient corona and their vertical extent is found to be less than expected from hydrostatic equilibrium. Conclusions: The smallest observed sizes impose upper limits on broadening effects due to scattering on density inhomogeneities in the low and medium corona and constrain the level of density turbulence in the solar corona. It is possible that scatter broadening has been overestimated in the past, and that the observed sizes

  10. The Many Facets of PISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Trying to understand PISA is analogous to the parable of the blind men and the elephant. There are many facets of the PISA program, and thus many ways to both applaud and critique this ambitious international program of assessment that has gained enormous importance in the crafting of contemporary educational policy. One of the facets discussed in…

  11. Types of subtalar joint facets.

    PubMed

    Jung, Min-Ho; Choi, Byoung Young; Lee, Ji Yong; Han, Chang Sung; Lee, Jin Suk; Yang, Young Chul; Cho, Byung Pil

    2015-08-01

    Articular facets of the clinical subtalar joint (CSTJ) were analyzed using a total of 118 (right 57, left 61) dry, paired calcanei and tali from 68 Korean adult cadavers. The CSTJ facets were classified into the following three types depending on their continuity: type A, all three facets are separated; type B, the anterior and middle facets are partially connected; and type C, the anterior and middle facets are fused to form a single facet. The continuity between the anterior and middle facets was represented by the degree of separation (DS), which ranged between 2.00 (type A) and 1.00 (type C). Type A was most common (39.0 %) in calcanei and rarest (11.0 %) in tali. Matching of calcaneus-talus pairs yielded five combined types: A-A (11.0 %), A-B (28.0 %), B-B (18.6 %), B-C (13.6 %), and C-C (28.8 %). The mean DS was slightly greater in calcanei (1.53) than in tali (1.32), and decreased in the order of types A-A, A-B, B-B, B-C, and C-C. The intersecting angles between the anterior and middle facets, which are related to the mobility of the CSTJ, were inversely related to the DS. These findings indicate that the anterior and middle facets are fused more frequently in tali than in calcanei, and combinations of different CSTJ facet types (A-B, B-C) exist over 40 % of feet. Our results indicate that types with a smaller DS (such as B-C and C-C) are relatively mobile but less stable compared to those with a greater DS (such as A-A and A-B). PMID:25822134

  12. STEREO's in-situ perspective on the solar minimum solar wind structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Larson, D.; Schroeder, P.; Lee, C. O.; Sauvaud, J.; Acuna, M. H.; Galvin, A. B.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L.; Arge, C. N.; Odstrcil, D.; Riley, P.; Howard, R. A.; Aschwanden, M.; MacNeice, P.; Chulaki, A.

    2007-05-01

    STEREO multipoint measurements of the solar wind structure with the IMPACT and PLASTIC investigations, near Earth but off the Sun-Earth line, allow its sources and structure to be examined at solar minimum when such studies are particularly straightforward. With the aid of 3D models of the heliosphere available at the CCMC, we map the in-situ observations to their solar sources using a combination of the open field regions inferred from the SECCHI EUVI imagers and SOHO EIT, and the magnetogram-based models of the corona and solar wind. Our ultimate goal is the continuous tracking of solar wind source regions as the STEREO mission progresses, as well as the use of the mappings to deduce the distinctive properties of solar wind from different types of sources

  13. Simulation of period doubling of recurrent solar wind structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, Y. C.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1990-01-01

    Based on satellite observations of a recurrent solar wind structure conducted in 1974, an MHD simulation model, and input functions generated from plasma and magnetic field data, the continuing evolution of the solar wind structure outside 5 AU is studied. The model uses the Rankine-Hugoniot relations to describe the jumps in flow properties across the shocks, and it treats shocks as surfaces of discontinuity with zero thickness. Two interaction processes (the collision and the merging of shocks) play important roles in restructuring the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. The simulation result shows that period doubling occurs between 5 and 10 AU. The recurrent solar wind appears to be a persistent new structure between 10 and 20 AU, and it consists of one merged interaction region per solar rotation.

  14. Recent Progress in Heliogyro Solar Sail Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William K.; Warren, Jerry E.; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Gibbs, Samuel C.; Dowell, E.; Guerrant, Daniel; Lawrence Dale

    2014-01-01

    Results from recent National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research on the structural dynamics and control characteristics of heliogyro solar sails are summarized. Specific areas under investigation include coupled nonlinear finite element analysis of heliogyro membrane blade with solar radiation pressure effects, system identification of spinning membrane structures, solarelastic stability analysis of heliogyro solar sails, including stability during blade deployment, and results from small-scale in vacuo dynamics experiments with spinning high-aspect ratio membranes. A low-cost, rideshare payload heliogyro technology demonstration mission concept, used as a mission context for these heliogyro structural dynamics and solarelasticity investigations, is also described.

  15. Fine structure of the solar transition region - Observations and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Brueckner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of recent high spatial resolution observations of the solar transition region and temperature minimum, in the form of UV spectra and spectroheliographs from both sounding rockets and the Spacelab 2 flights of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS). Attention is given to the solar atmosphere structure implications of the HRST's observational results. The inclusion of fine structure in conjectures concerning the transition region affects the plausibility of 1D average models of the solar atmosphere, as well as the determination of temperature gradients, possible nonradiative-heating mechanisms, and the comparison of transition region structures with corresponding observations of the photosphere and corona.

  16. Structural considerations for solar installers : an approach for small, simplified solar installations or retrofits.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, Elizabeth H.; Schindel, Kay; Bosiljevac, Tom; Dwyer, Stephen F.; Lindau, William; Harper, Alan

    2011-12-01

    Structural Considerations for Solar Installers provides a comprehensive outline of structural considerations associated with simplified solar installations and recommends a set of best practices installers can follow when assessing such considerations. Information in the manual comes from engineering and solar experts as well as case studies. The objectives of the manual are to ensure safety and structural durability for rooftop solar installations and to potentially accelerate the permitting process by identifying and remedying structural issues prior to installation. The purpose of this document is to provide tools and guidelines for installers to help ensure that residential photovoltaic (PV) power systems are properly specified and installed with respect to the continuing structural integrity of the building.

  17. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES TRIGGERING SOLAR FLARES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, K.; Bamba, Y.; Yamamoto, T. T.; Iida, Y.; Toriumi, S.; Asai, A.

    2012-11-20

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections, the most catastrophic eruptions in our solar system, have been known to affect terrestrial environments and infrastructure. However, because their triggering mechanism is still not sufficiently understood, our capacity to predict the occurrence of solar eruptions and to forecast space weather is substantially hindered. Even though various models have been proposed to determine the onset of solar eruptions, the types of magnetic structures capable of triggering these eruptions are still unclear. In this study, we solved this problem by systematically surveying the nonlinear dynamics caused by a wide variety of magnetic structures in terms of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. As a result, we determined that two different types of small magnetic structures favor the onset of solar eruptions. These structures, which should appear near the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), include magnetic fluxes reversed to the potential component or the nonpotential component of major field on the PIL. In addition, we analyzed two large flares, the X-class flare on 2006 December 13 and the M-class flare on 2011 February 13, using imaging data provided by the Hinode satellite, and we demonstrated that they conform to the simulation predictions. These results suggest that forecasting of solar eruptions is possible with sophisticated observation of a solar magnetic field, although the lead time must be limited by the timescale of changes in the small magnetic structures.

  18. Simulation of interdigitated back contact solar cell with trench structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Min; Chun, Seungju; Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-Eun; Lee, Jong-Han; Boo, Hyunpil; Bae, Soohyun; Kang, Yoonmook; Lee, Hae-Seok; Kim, Donghwan

    2015-02-01

    We performed two-dimensional technology computer-aided design simulations for interdigitated back contact (IBC) solar cells with rear trench structures (TS), denoted here as TS-IBC solar cells. First, we calculated a reference simulation model for conventional IBC solar cells. We then assumed a trench structure at the rear surface of the IBC solar cell. For this structure, we analyzed solar cell performance as a function of various trench depths and type. It was found that emitter trench formation affects minority carrier collection, such that the short-circuit current density increases with increasing trench depth. However, the back-surface field (BSF) trench exhibited poor minority carrier collection, which reduced the conversion efficiency of the TS-IBC solar cells. It was also found that for the same trench depth (30 μm), the difference in conversion efficiencies of an IBC solar cell with an emitter trench and that with a BSF trench was 0.6%. We are thus convinced that the emitter trench structure is more important than the BSF trench structure.

  19. Recent perspectives in solar physics - Elemental composition, coronal structure and magnetic fields, solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newkirk, G., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Elemental abundances in the solar corona are studied. Abundances in the corona, solar wind and solar cosmic rays are compared to those in the photosphere. The variation in silicon and iron abundance in the solar wind as compared to helium is studied. The coronal small and large scale structure is investigated, emphasizing magnetic field activity and examining cosmic ray generation mechanisms. The corona is observed in the X-ray and EUV regions. The nature of coronal transients is discussed with emphasis on solar-wind modulation of galactic cosmic rays. A schematic plan view of the interplanetary magnetic field during sunspot minimum is given showing the presence of magnetic bubbles and their concentration in the region around 4-5 AU by a fast solar wind stream.

  20. Thermally-induced structural motions of satellite solar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, John Dennis

    1999-11-01

    Satellites have experienced attitude disturbances resulting from thermally. induced structural motions of flexible appendages since the early days of the space program. Thermally-induced structural motions are typically initiated during orbital eclipse transitions when a satellite exits from or enters into the Earth's shadow. The accompanying rapid changes in thermal loading may lead to time-varying temperature differences through the cross-section of appendages resulting in differential thermal expansion and corresponding structural deformations. Since the total angular momentum of the system must be conserved, motions of flexible appendages such as booms and solar arrays result in rigid body rotations of the entire satellite. These potentially large attitude disturbances may violate satellite pointing and jitter requirements. This research investigates thermally-induced structural motions of rigid panel solar arrays (solar panels) through analytical and experimental studies. Orbital eclipse transition heating and thermal analyses were completed to study solar panel thermal behavior and provide results for input to dynamics analyses. A hybrid coordinate dynamical model was utilized to study the planar dynamics of a simple satellite consisting of a rigid hub with a cantilevered flexible solar panel undergoing thermally-induced structural motions. Laboratory experimental studies were carried out to gain new insight into thermal-structural behavior and to validate analytical models. The experimental studies investigated the thermal-structural performance of honeycomb sandwich panels and satellite solar panel hardware subject to simulated eclipse transition heating. Results from the analytical and experimental studies illustrate the importance of the through-the-thickness temperature difference and its time derivatives as well as the ratio of the characteristic thermal and structural response times in solar panel thermally-induced structural motions. The thermal-structural

  1. Virioplankton Community Structure in Tunisian Solar Salterns

    PubMed Central

    Boujelben, Ines; Yarza, Pablo; Almansa, Cristina; Villamor, Judith; Maalej, Sami; Santos, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The microbial community inhabiting Sfax solar salterns on the east coast of Tunisia has been studied by means of different molecular and culture-dependent tools that have unveiled the presence of novel microbial groups as well as a community structure different from that of other coastal hypersaline environments. We have focused on the study of the viral assemblages of these salterns and their changes along the salinity gradient and over time. Viruses from three ponds (C4, M1, and TS) encompassing salinities from moderately hypersaline to saturated (around 14, 19, and 35%, respectively) were sampled in May and October 2009 and analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Additionally, for all three October samples and the May TS sample, viral metagenomic DNA was cloned in fosmids, end sequenced, and analyzed. Viral concentration, as well as virus-to-cell ratios, increased along the salinity gradient, with around 1010 virus-like particles (VLPs)/ml in close-to-saturation ponds, which represents the highest viral concentration reported so far for aquatic systems. Four distinct morphologies could be observed with TEM (spherical, tailed, spindled, and filamentous) but with various proportions in the different samples. Metagenomic analyses indicated that every pond harbored a distinct viral assemblage whose G+C content could be roughly correlated with that of the active part of the microbial community that may have constituted the putative hosts. As previously reported for hypersaline metaviromes, most sequences did not have matches in the databases, although some were conserved among the Sfax metaviromes. BLASTx, BLASTp, and dinucleotide frequency analyses indicated that (i) factors additional to salinity could be structuring viral communities and (ii) every metavirome had unique gene contents and dinucleotide frequencies. Comparison with hypersaline metaviromes available in the databases indicated that the viral

  2. Characterization of etched facets for GaN-based lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, M.; Schwegler, V.; Seyboth, M.; Eberhard, F.; Kirchner, C.; Kamp, M.; Ulu, G.; Ünlü, M. S.; Gruhler, R.; Hollricher, O.

    2001-09-01

    Dry-etching of laser facets is commonly used for (InAl)GaN/sapphire-based structures since the epitaxial planes of the nitride layers are rotated with respect to the substrate planes making cleaving impractical. To achieve steep and smooth facets by chemically assisted ion beam etching, a 3-layer resist system is developed for patterning. Characterization by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy shows facets with root-mean-square roughnesses of 7 nm and inclination angles of 2-4°. Optically pumped lasers yield low threshold excitation densities for fully doped separate confinement heterostructure lasers.

  3. SLAC Linac Preparations for FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Bentson, L.; Kharakh, D.; Owens, A.; Schuh, P.; Seeman, J.; Sheppard, J.C.; Stanek, M.; Wittmer, W.; Yocky, G.; Wienands, U.; /SLAC

    2011-02-07

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been cut at the two-thirds point to provide beams to two independent programs. The last third provides the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), leaving the first two-thirds available for FACET, the new experimental facility for accelerator science and test beams. In this paper, we describe this separation and projects to prepare the linac for the FACET experimental program.

  4. Supporting Structures for Flat Solar-Cell Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Strong supporting structures for flat solar photovoltaic arrays built with such commonly available materials as wood and galvanized steel sheet. Structures resist expected static loads from snow and ice as well as dynamic loads from winds and even Earthquake vibrations. Supporting structure uses inexpensive materials. Parts prefabricated to minimize assembly work in field.

  5. The spreading of a void on a facet during electromigration

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, X.; Bauer, C.L.; Mullins, W.W.; Klinger, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    A void of cross sectional area A may spread perpendicular to the applied electric field E{sub a} during electromigration because its leading surface develops a facet whose advance is limited by the supply of steps. If the facet is immobile (no step source) and the remaining surface is free to move, and if E{sub a}A is less than a threshold value, then the void assumes a stationary elongated shape dictated by a balance between capillarity and electric field. If E{sub a}A exceeds the threshold value, however, a balance is no longer possible, and the void spreads along the facet without arrest. If the facet has limited mobility, a balance is possible for all values of E{sub a}A, resulting in an elongated moving steady-state shape. The treatment simplifies the void shape as rectangular but preserves the essential features of capillarity and surface electromigration. The authors argue that the motion of a facet on a void along the outward normal requires defects (e.g., intersecting screw dislocations) that act as step sources since homogeneous nucleation of steps on the facet is expected to be negligible. Since voids in fine-line interconnects are often observed to be partially faceted, restricted void motion and resultant spreading which depend sensitively on crystallographic features, such as defect structure and grain orientation, may indeed limit the lifetime of fine-line interconnects in electronic devices.

  6. Rough surface scattering based on facet model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khamsi, H. R.; Fung, A. K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    A model for the radar return from bare ground was developed to calculate the radar cross section of bare ground and the effect of the frequency averaging on the reduction of the variance of the return. It is shown that, by assuming that the distribution of the slope to be Gaussian and that the distribution of the length of the facet to be in the form of the positive side of a Gaussian distribution, the results are in good agreement with experimental data collected by an 8- to 18-GHz radar spectrometer system. It is also shown that information on the exact correlation length of the small structure on the ground is not necessary; an effective correlation length may be calculated based on the facet model and the wavelength of the incident wave.

  7. Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    A prototype deployer for the STACBEAM (Stacking Triangular Articulated Compact Beam) is being developed. The STACBEAM is an accordian-folded solar array blanket. The prototype was constructed as a point design for support of a 23.9-kW blanket and is described.

  8. Impact of Financial Structure on the Cost of Solar Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.; Bird, L.; Schwabe, P.; Cory, K.

    2012-03-01

    To stimulate investment in renewable energy generation projects, the federal government developed a series of support structures that reduce taxes for eligible investors--the investment tax credit, the production tax credit, and accelerated depreciation. The nature of these tax incentives often requires an outside investor and a complex financial arrangement to allocate risk and reward among the parties. These financial arrangements are generally categorized as 'advanced financial structures.' Among renewable energy technologies, advanced financial structures were first widely deployed by the wind industry and are now being explored by the solar industry to support significant scale-up in project development. This report describes four of the most prevalent financial structures used by the renewable sector and evaluates the impact of financial structure on energy costs for utility-scale solar projects that use photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies.

  9. Space Station Freedom solar dynamic modules structural modelling and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, C.; Morris, R.

    1991-12-01

    In support of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Solar Dynamic Power Module effort, structural design studies were performed to investigate issues related to the design of the power module, its pointing capabilities, and the integration of the module into the SSF infrastructure. Of particular concern from a structural viewpoint are the dynamics of the power module, the impact of the power module on the Space Station dynamics and controls, and the required control effort for obtaining the specified Solar Dynamic Power Module pointing accuracy. Structural analyses were performed to determine the structural dynamics attributes of both the existing and the proposed structural dynamics module designs. The objectives of these analyses were to generate validated Solar Dynamic Power Module NASTRAN finite element models, combine Space Station and power module models into integrated system models, perform finite element modal analyses to assess the effect of the relocations of the power module center of mass, and provide modal data to controls designers for control systems design.

  10. Morphological evolution in oxygen-induced faceting of Re(1231)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hao; Chen Wenhua; Madey, Theodore E.

    2006-11-15

    We have studied oxygen-induced faceting of the atomically rough Re(1231) surface by means of Auger electron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In contrast to previous faceting studies on other refractory metal surfaces, where simple morphologies of the facets were reported, we find a coverage-dependent morphological evolution of the facets ranging from long sawtooth ridges to complex structures exposing four different facets. The faceting occurs only when oxygen coverage ({theta}) exceeds 0.5 monolayer (ML) and the surface is annealed at {>=}700 K. At low oxygen coverage (0.5 ML{<=}{theta}<0.7 ML), the O/Re(1231) surface becomes partially faceted upon annealing; further increasing of oxygen coverage (0.7 ML{<=}{theta}<0.9 ML) causes the surface to become completely faceted, forming long sawtooth ridges along the [2113] direction with typical dimensions of {approx}8 nm in width and >50 nm in length upon annealing at 1000 K. The size of the ridges grows with annealing temperature and annealing time, and the distance between the ridges is quite uniform. The two sides of each ridge have (0110) and (1121) orientations, and atomic-resolution STM images reveal that the edge of the ridge is atomically sharp. For 0.9 ML{<=}{theta}<1 ML, a third set of facets, identified as (1010), emerges and truncates the original ridges. With the surface fully covered by oxygen ({theta}=1 ML), a fourth facet (0111) also becomes prominent upon annealing. This morphological evolution is accompanied by a reduction of the average ridge length along [2113], indicating that the (1121) facet is metastable. Our work demonstrates that even in a simple adsorbate/substrate system, the adsorbate-induced modification of the anisotropy of surface free energy can induce a complex sequence of changes in the surface morphology. The faceted Re surfaces may be model systems to study structure sensitivity in catalytic reactions, and may also provide

  11. Facet-dependent photovoltaic efficiency variations in single grains of hybrid halide perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblebici, Sibel Y.; Leppert, Linn; Li, Yanbo; Reyes-Lillo, Sebastian E.; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Ed; Lee, Jiye; Melli, Mauro; Ziegler, Dominik; Angell, Daniel K.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Ashby, Paul D.; Toma, Francesca M.; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Sharp, Ian D.; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Photovoltaic devices based on hybrid perovskite materials have exceeded 22% efficiency due to high charge-carrier mobilities and lifetimes. Properties such as photocurrent generation and open-circuit voltage are influenced by the microscopic structure and orientation of the perovskite crystals, but are difficult to quantify on the intra-grain length scale and are often treated as homogeneous within the active layer. Here, we map the local short-circuit photocurrent, open-circuit photovoltage, and dark drift current in state-of-the-art methylammonium lead iodide solar cells using photoconductive atomic force microscopy. We find, within individual grains, spatially correlated heterogeneity in short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage up to 0.6 V. These variations are related to different crystal facets and have a direct impact on the macroscopic power conversion efficiency. We attribute this heterogeneity to a facet-dependent density of trap states. These results imply that controlling crystal grain and facet orientation will enable a systematic optimization of polycrystalline and single-crystal devices for photovoltaic and lighting applications.

  12. Facet recovery and light emission from GaN/InGaN/GaN core-shell structures grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy on etched GaN nanorod arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Boulbar, E. D.; Gîrgel, I.; Lewins, C. J.; Edwards, P. R.; Martin, R. W.; Šatka, A.; Allsopp, D. W. E.; Shields, P. A.

    2013-09-01

    The use of etched nanorods from a planar template as a growth scaffold for a highly regular GaN/InGaN/GaN core-shell structure is demonstrated. The recovery of m-plane non-polar facets from etched high-aspect-ratio GaN nanorods is studied with and without the introduction of a hydrogen silsesquioxane passivation layer at the bottom of the etched nanorod arrays. This layer successfully prevented c-plane growth between the nanorods, resulting in vertical nanorod sidewalls (˜89.8°) and a more regular height distribution than re-growth on unpassivated nanorods. The height variation on passivated nanorods is solely determined by the uniformity of nanorod diameter, which degrades with increased growth duration. Facet-dependent indium incorporation of GaN/InGaN/GaN core-shell layers regrown onto the etched nanorods is observed by high-resolution cathodoluminescence imaging. Sharp features corresponding to diffracted wave-guide modes in angle-resolved photoluminescence measurements are evidence of the uniformity of the full core-shell structure grown on ordered etched nanorods.

  13. Mirror Mode Structures in the Solar Wind: STEREO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Rivera, O.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2010-03-01

    Mirror mode structures occur in the solar wind either as an isolated magnetic field depression or as trains of magnetic holes (or peaks). Some trains have long durations and have been named mirror mode storms [1]. In this work we investigate mirror mode structures at 1 AU using STEREO A and B high resolution data. Magnetic field data were scanned to search for magnetic holes and peaks in a relatively steady ambient solar wind. We found several examples of mirror mode structures present in the ambient solar wind and also associated with SIRs. In order to study mirror mode origin, we present a case study with mirror mode structures present in the leading edge of a SIR during almost 8 hours corresponding to mirror mode storms. We analyze mirror mode shape and duration as well as plasma and magnetic field conditions that occur in the region surrounding mirror mode storms.

  14. Comparative modeling of InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The comparative modeling of p(+)n and n(+)p indium phosphide solar cell structures is studied using a numerical program PC-1D. The optimal design study has predicted that the p(+)n structure offers improved cell efficiencies as compared to n(+)p structure, due to higher open-circuit voltage. The various cell material and process parameters to achieve the maximum cell efficiencies are reported. The effect of some of the cell parameters on InP cell I-V characteristics was studied. The available radiation resistance data on n(+)p and p(+)p InP solar cells are also critically discussed.

  15. Solar Wind Structure at 1 AU: Comparison between Solar Minima 22/23 and 23/24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L.; Russell, C.; Luhmann, J. G.; Galvin, A. B.; Skoug, R. M.; Schroeder, P. C.

    2009-12-01

    The current solar minimum 23/24 has been unusually long and deep, compared with the solar minima in the space era. In order to see the consequence of the extremely quiet Sun on the solar wind, we compare the solar wind structure during the current solar minimum with the last solar minimum 22/23, which represents the case of a short and shallow solar minimum. Based on ACE, Wind, and STEREO in situ plasma and magnetic field observations, we identify and characterize stream interaction regions (SIRs), interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), interplanetary shocks, sector boundaries, and other structures in the solar wind at 1 AU for 1995 - 1997 and 2007 - 2009. The properties of these structures, such as the occurrence rate, SIR and ICME scale and interaction strength, shock Mach number, correlation between sector boundary and SIR, will be studied. In addition to the statistical study, we will present some case studies of events from this deep solar minimum.

  16. Correlation between crystallographic orientation and surface faceting in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yinbin; Mo, Kun; Yao, Tiankai; Lian, Jie; Fortner, Jeffrey; Jamison, Laura; Xu, Ruqing; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2016-09-01

    Here coordinated experimental efforts to quantitatively correlate crystallographic orientation and surface faceting features in UO2 are reported upon. A sintered polycrystalline UO2 sample was thermally etched to induce the formation of surface faceting features. Synchrotron Laue microdiffraction was used to obtain a precise crystallographic orientation map for the UO2 surface grains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to collect the detailed information on the surface morphology of the sample. The surface faceting features were found to be highly dependent on the crystallographic orientation. In most cases, Triple-plane structures containing one {100} plane and two {111} planes were found to dominate the surface of UO2. The orientation-faceting relationship established in this study revealed a practical and efficient method of determining crystallographic orientation based on the surface features captured by SEM images.

  17. FACET: The New User Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.I.; Decker, F.J.; Erikson, R.; Hast, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Li, S.Z.; Nosochkov, Y.; Phinney, N.; Sheppard, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; Seryi, A.; Wittmer, W.; /Michigan State U.

    2011-12-13

    FACET (Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests) is a new User Facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Its high power electron and positron beams make it a unique facility, ideal for beam-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration studies. The first 2 km of the SLAC linac produce 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron and positron beams with short bunch lengths of 20 {mu}m. A final focusing system can produce beam spots 10 {mu}m wide. User-aided Commissioning took place in summer 2011 and FACET will formally come online in early 2012. We present the User Facility, the current features, planned upgrades and the opportunities for further experiments. Accelerators are our primary tool for discovering the fundamental laws to the universe. Each new frontier we probe requires a new, more powerful method. Accelerators are therefore increasing in size and cost. The future of this field requires new accelerating techniques that can reach the high energies required over shorter distances. New concepts for high gradient acceleration include utilizing the wakes in plasma and dielectric and metallic structures. FACET was built to provide a test bed for novel accelerating concepts with its high charge and highly compressed beams. As a test facility unlike any other, it has also attracted groups interested in beam diagnostic techniques and terahertz studies. The first phase of the construction was completed in May 2011. Beam commissioning began in June and was interleaved with the installation of five experiments. Users were invited to aid with the commissioning for the month of August during which time experimental hardware and software were checked out and some first measurements were taken. FACET is currently in the process of becoming a Department of Energy User Facility for High Energy Physics.

  18. Facet-Dependent Cr(VI) Adsorption of Hematite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaopeng; Hou, Xiaojing; Song, Fahui; Zhao, Jincai; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-02-16

    In this study, the adsorption process of Cr(VI) on the hematite facets was systematically investigated with synchrotron-based Cr K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, density-functional theory calculation, and surface complexation models. Structural model fitting of EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that the interatomic distances of Cr-Fe were, respectively, 3.61 Å for the chromate coordinated hematite nanoplates with exposed {001} facets, 3.60 and 3.30 Å for the chromate coordinated hematite nanorods with exposed {001} and {110} facets, which were characteristic of inner-sphere complexation. In situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of two inner-sphere surface complexes with C3ν and C2ν symmetry, while the C3ν and C2ν species were assigned to monodentate and bidentate inner-sphere surface complexes with average Cr-Fe interatomic distances of 3.60 and 3.30 Å, respectively. On the basis of these experimental and theoretical results, we concluded that HCrO4(-) as dominated Cr(VI) species was adsorbed on {001} and {110} facets in inner-sphere monodentate mononuclear and bidentate binuclear configurations, respectively. Moreover, the Cr(VI) adsorption performance of hematite facets was strongly dependent on the chromate complexes formed on the hematite facets. PMID:26815307

  19. The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2014-01-01

    The complex planetary synchronization structure of the solar system, which since Pythagoras of Samos (ca. 570-495 BC) is known as the music of the spheres, is briefly reviewed from the Renaissance up to contemporary research. Copernicus' heliocentric model from 1543 suggested that the planets of our solar system form a kind of mutually ordered and quasi-synchronized system. From 1596 to 1619 Kepler formulated preliminary mathematical relations of approximate commensurabilities among the planets, which were later reformulated in the Titius-Bode rule (1766-1772), which successfully predicted the orbital position of Ceres and Uranus. Following the discovery of the ~ 11 yr sunspot cycle, in 1859 Wolf suggested that the observed solar variability could be approximately synchronized with the orbital movements of Venus, Earth, Jupiter and Saturn. Modern research has further confirmed that (1) the planetary orbital periods can be approximately deduced from a simple system of resonant frequencies; (2) the solar system oscillates with a specific set of gravitational frequencies, and many of them (e.g., within the range between 3 yr and 100 yr) can be approximately constructed as harmonics of a base period of ~ 178.38 yr; and (3) solar and climate records are also characterized by planetary harmonics from the monthly to the millennial timescales. This short review concludes with an emphasis on the contribution of the author's research on the empirical evidences and physical modeling of both solar and climate variability based on astronomical harmonics. The general conclusion is that the solar system works as a resonator characterized by a specific harmonic planetary structure that also synchronizes the Sun's activity and the Earth's climate. The special issue Pattern in solar variability, their planetary origin and terrestrial impacts (Mörner et al., 2013) further develops the ideas about the planetary-solar-terrestrial interaction with the personal contribution of 10

  20. Faceting diagram for sticky steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akutsu, Noriko

    2016-03-01

    Faceting diagrams for the step-faceting zone, the step droplet zone, and the Gruber-Mullins-Pokrovsky-Talapov (GMPT) zone for a crystal surface are obtained by using the density matrix renormalization group method to calculate the surface tension. The model based on these calculations is the restricted solid-on-solid (RSOS) model with a point-contact-type step-step attraction (p-RSOS model) on a square lattice. The point-contact-type step-step attraction represents the energy gain obtained by forming a bonding state with orbital overlap at the meeting point of the neighboring steps. In the step-faceting zone, disconnectedness in the surface tension leads to the formation of a faceted macrostep on a vicinal surface at equilibrium. The disconnectedness in the surface tension also causes the first-order shape transition for the equilibrium shape of a crystal droplet. The lower zone boundary line (ZBL), which separates the step-faceting zone and the step droplet zone, is obtained by the condition γ 1 = lim n → ∞ γ n / n , where γn is the step tension of the n-th merged step. The upper ZBL, which separates the GMPT zone and the step droplet zone, is obtained by the condition Aq,eff = 0 and Bq,eff = 0, where Aq,eff and Bq,eff represent the coefficients for the | q → | 2 term and the | q → | 3 term, respectively, in the | q → | -expanded form of the surface free energy f eff ( q → ) . Here, q → is the surface gradient relative to the (111) surface. The reason why the vicinal surface inclined in the <101> direction does not exhibit step-faceting is explained in terms of the one-dimensional spinless quasi-impenetrable attractive bosons at absolute zero.

  1. Solar cycle and diurnal dependence of auroral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partamies, N.; Whiter, D.; Syrjäsuo, M.; Kauristie, K.

    2014-10-01

    In order to facilitate usage of optical data in space climate studies, we have developed an automated algorithm to quantify the complexity of auroral structures as they appear in ground-based all-sky images. The image analysis is based on a computationally determined "arciness" value, which describes how arc like the auroral structures in the image are. With this new automatic method we have analyzed the type of aurora in about 1 million images of green aurora (λ = 557.7nm) captured at five camera stations in Finnish and Swedish Lapland in 1996-2007. We found that highly arc like structures can be observed in any time sector and their portion of the auroral structures varies much less than the fraction of more complex forms. The diurnal distribution of arciness is in agreement with an earlier study with high arc occurrence rate in the evening hours and steadily decreasing toward the late morning hours. The evolution of less arc-like auroral structures is more dependent on the level of geomagnetic activity and solar cycle than the occurrence of arcs. The median arciness is higher during the years close to the solar minimum than during the rest of the solar cycle. Unlike earlier proposed, the occurrence rate of both arcs and more complex auroral structures increases toward the solar maximum and decreases toward the solar minimum. The cyclic behavior of auroral structures seen in our data is much more systematic and clear than previously reported visual studies suggest. The continuous arciness index describing the complexity of auroral structures can improve our understanding on auroral morphology beyond the few commonly accepted structure classes, such as arcs, patches, and omega bands. Arciness can further be used to study the relationship of auroral structures at different complexity levels and magnetospheric dynamics.

  2. Faceting and roughening in quasicrystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, Anupam; Levine, Dov

    1987-01-01

    The question whether quasi-crystal shapes should be faceted is studied in a simple model of quasi-crystalline order. At T = 0, the model is proved to yield a completely faceted equilibrium shape in both two and three dimensions. At T greater than 0, an interface model is derived for a two-dimensional Penrose tiling. By mapping it onto a one-dimensional quasi-periodic Schroedinger equation, it is shown that the roughness exponent varies continuously with T at low T.

  3. Bilayer structures optimization as antireflective coating for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccon, S.; Zuppella, P.; Corso, A. J.; Pelizzo, M. G.

    2014-10-01

    The optimization of a silicon solar cell involves also the design of a proper antireflective coating (AR). We have considered different bilayer structures. The use of bilayers is oriented to have an antireflective effect on a broader range of wavelengths compared to single film AR. The materials considered include silicon oxide, magnesium fluoride, silicon nitride and titanium oxide. The thickness of each film in each structure has been optimized by theoretical calculations in order to minimize the weighted reflectivity, Rw. This is calculated taking into account the optical reflectivity, the internal quantum efficiency of the silicon solar cell and the solar flux on all the range of wavelengths of interest. Some of these optimized structures have been realized by e-beam vapor deposition as first tests. The improved optical performance of the samples have been verified at the UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer.

  4. Recent Developments in Smart Adaptive Structures for Solar Sailcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worton, M. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Oakley, J.; Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.

    2007-01-01

    The "Smart Adaptive Structures for Solar Sailcraft" development activity at MSFC has investigated issues associated with understanding how to model and scale the subsystem and multi-body system dynamics of a gossamer solar sailcraft with the objective of designing sailcraft attitude control systems. This research and development activity addressed three key tasks that leveraged existing facilities and core competencies of MSFC to investigate dynamics and control issues of solar sails. Key aspects of this effort included modeling and testing of a 30 m deployable boom; modeling of the multi-body system dynamics of a gossamer sailcraft; investigation of control-structures interaction for gossamer sailcraft; and development and experimental demonstration of adaptive control technologies to mitigate control-structures interaction.

  5. Coronal structure and the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    Aspects concerning the open coronal structure and geomagnetic disturbances are considered along with the general coronal emission characteristics and relations between the open coronal structure and the interplanetary field. The nonstatistical indicators of coronal structure are examined and questions are investigated regarding the accuracy obtained in the determination of the emission latitude and longitude in the high corona for plasma, fields, and particles. Attention is given to the problem of particle population organization by low-coronal neutral line structures in the absence of a high coronal polarity structure.

  6. THE STRUCTURE AND ORIGIN OF SOLAR PLUMES: NETWORK PLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, A.; Tison, E.; Bely-Dubau, F.; Wilhelm, K.

    2009-07-20

    This study is based upon plumes seen close to the solar limb within coronal holes in the emission from ions formed in the temperature region of 1 MK, in particular, the band of Fe IX 171 A from EIT on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. It is shown, using geometric arguments, that two distinct classes of structure contribute to apparently similar plume observations. Quasi-cylindrical structures are anchored in discrete regions of the solar surface (beam plumes), and faint extended structures require integration along the line of sight (LOS) in order to reproduce the observed brightness. This second category, sometimes called 'curtains', are ubiquitous within the polar holes and are usually more abundant than the beam plumes, which depend more on the enhanced magnetic structures detected at their footpoints. It is here proposed that both phenomena are based on plasma structures in which emerging magnetic loops interact with ambient monopolar fields, involving reconnection. The important difference is in terms of physical scale. It is proposed that curtains are composed of a large number of microplumes, distributed along the LOS. The supergranule network provides the required spatial structure. It is shown by modeling that the observations can be reproduced if microplumes are concentrated within some 5 Mm of the cell boundaries. For this reason, we propose to call this second population 'network plumes'. The processes involved could represent a major contribution to the heating mechanism of the solar corona.

  7. Coherent structure and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the coherent structures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft. Previously established novel wavelet and higher order statistics are used in this work. We analyze the wavelet power spectrum of various solar wind plasma parameters. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data. We analyze each wavelet power spectra for transient coherency, and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. These results offer a new understanding of various processes in a turbulent regime. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field. Keywords: Wavelet Power Spectrum, Coherent structure and Solar wind plasma

  8. Solar wind stream structure at large heliocentric distances Pioneer observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gazis, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    Time profiles and histograms of plasma data from Pioneers 10 and 11 are examined for the period between 1975 and 1983. During this time, Pioneer 10 traveled between a heliocentric distance of 8.7 and 30.4 AU. The velocity structure of the solar wind at these heliocentric distances is found to have one of two distinct forms: approximately 70 percent of the time the solar wind has a nearly flat velocity profile. Occasionally, this flat velocity profile is accompanied by quasi-periodic variations in density and in thermal speed consistent with the concept that the 'corotating interaction regions' which are produced by the interaction of high- and low-speed streams at intermediate heliocentric distances are replaced by 'pressure regions' in the outer heliosphere. The remaining 30 percent of the time the solar wind is marked by large (50-200 km/s) long-term (30-120 days) shifts in the average solar wind velocity.

  9. Coronal magnetic structure at a solar sector boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. M.; Svalgaard, L.

    1973-01-01

    The persistent large-scale coronal magnetic structure associated with a sector boundary appears to consist of a magnetic arcade loop structure extending from one solar polar region to the other in approximately the North-South direction. This structure was inferred from computer coronal magnetic field maps for days on which a stable magnetic sector boundary was near central meridian, based on an interplanetary sector boundary observed to recur during much of 1968 and 1969.

  10. Surface solitary waves and solitons. [in solar atmosphere and solar wind magnetic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Roberts, B.

    1984-01-01

    The solar atmosphere and solar wind are magnetically structured. The structuring can include tangential discontinuities, which can support surface waves. Such waves can be dispersive. This means that dispersion and nonlinearity can balance in such a way that solitary waves (or solitons) can result. This general point is illustrated by a two-dimensional nonlinear analysis which explicitly demonstrates the presence of long-wavelength solitary waves propagating on tangential discontinuities. If the waves are only weakly nonlinear, then they obey the Korteweg-de Vries equation and are true solitons.

  11. Facets of Speaking Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Nivja H.; Steinel, Margarita P.; Florijn, Arjen F.; Schoonen, Rob; Hulstijn, Jan H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the componential structure of second-language (L2) speaking proficiency. Participants--181 L2 and 54 native speakers of Dutch--performed eight speaking tasks and six tasks tapping nine linguistic skills. Performance in the speaking tasks was rated on functional adequacy by a panel of judges and formed the dependent variable in…

  12. Examining the Factor Structure of the 39-Item and 15-Item Versions of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire Before and After Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for People With Recurrent Depression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Research into the effectiveness and mechanisms of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) requires reliable and valid measures of mindfulness. The 39-item Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-39) is a measure of mindfulness commonly used to assess change before and after MBIs. However, the stability and invariance of the FFMQ factor structure have not yet been tested before and after an MBI; pre to post comparisons may not be valid if the structure changes over this period. Our primary aim was to examine the factor structure of the FFMQ-39 before and after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in adults with recurrent depression in remission using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Additionally, we examined whether the factor structure of the 15-item version (FFMQ-15) was consistent with that of the FFMQ-39, and whether it was stable over MBCT. Our secondary aim was to assess the general psychometric properties of both versions. CFAs showed that pre-MBCT, a 4-factor hierarchical model (excluding the “observing” facet) best fit the FFMQ-39 and FFMQ-15 data, whereas post-MBCT, a 5-factor hierarchical model best fit the data for both versions. Configural invariance across the time points was not supported for both versions. Internal consistency and sensitivity to change were adequate for both versions. Both FFMQ versions did not differ significantly from each other in terms of convergent validity. Researchers should consider excluding the Observing subscale from comparisons of total scale/subscale scores before and after mindfulness interventions. Current findings support the use of the FFMQ-15 as an alternative measure in research where briefer forms are needed. PMID:27078186

  13. Examining the factor structure of the 39-item and 15-item versions of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire before and after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for people with recurrent depression.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jenny; Strauss, Clara; Crane, Catherine; Barnhofer, Thorsten; Karl, Anke; Cavanagh, Kate; Kuyken, Willem

    2016-07-01

    Research into the effectiveness and mechanisms of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) requires reliable and valid measures of mindfulness. The 39-item Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-39) is a measure of mindfulness commonly used to assess change before and after MBIs. However, the stability and invariance of the FFMQ factor structure have not yet been tested before and after an MBI; pre to post comparisons may not be valid if the structure changes over this period. Our primary aim was to examine the factor structure of the FFMQ-39 before and after mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in adults with recurrent depression in remission using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Additionally, we examined whether the factor structure of the 15-item version (FFMQ-15) was consistent with that of the FFMQ-39, and whether it was stable over MBCT. Our secondary aim was to assess the general psychometric properties of both versions. CFAs showed that pre-MBCT, a 4-factor hierarchical model (excluding the "observing" facet) best fit the FFMQ-39 and FFMQ-15 data, whereas post-MBCT, a 5-factor hierarchical model best fit the data for both versions. Configural invariance across the time points was not supported for both versions. Internal consistency and sensitivity to change were adequate for both versions. Both FFMQ versions did not differ significantly from each other in terms of convergent validity. Researchers should consider excluding the Observing subscale from comparisons of total scale/subscale scores before and after mindfulness interventions. Current findings support the use of the FFMQ-15 as an alternative measure in research where briefer forms are needed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27078186

  14. A diffuse interface model of grain boundary faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, F.; Medlin, D. L.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Hattar, K.; Foiles, S. M.

    2016-06-01

    Interfaces, free or internal, greatly influence the physical properties and stability of materials microstructures. Of particular interest are the processes that occur due to anisotropic interfacial properties. In the case of grain boundaries (GBs) in metals, several experimental observations revealed that an initially flat GB may facet into hill-and-valley structures with well defined planes and corners/edges connecting them. Herein, we present a diffuse interface model that is capable of accounting for strongly anisotropic GB properties and capturing the formation of hill-and-valley morphologies. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to independently examine the various factors affecting GB faceting and subsequent facet coarsening. More specifically, our formulation incorporates higher order expansions to account for the excess energy due to facet junctions and their non-local interactions. As a demonstration of the modeling capability, we consider the Σ5 <001 > tilt GB in body-centered-cubic iron, where faceting along the {210} and {310} planes was experimentally observed. Atomistic calculations were utilized to determine the inclination-dependent GB energy, which was then used as an input in our model. Linear stability analysis and simulation results highlight the role of junction energy and associated non-local interactions on the resulting facet length scales. Broadly speaking, our modeling approach provides a general framework to examine the microstructural stability of polycrystalline systems with highly anisotropic GBs.

  15. A diffuse interface model of grain boundary faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, Fadi; Medlin, Douglas; Zimmerman, Jonathan; Hattar, Khalid; Foiles, Stephen

    Incorporating anisotropy into thermodynamic treatments of interfaces dates back to over a century ago. For a given orientation of two abutting grains in a pure metal, depressions in the grain boundary (GB) energy may exist as a function of GB inclination, defined by the plane normal. Therefore, an initially flat GB may facet resulting in a hill-and-valley structure. Herein, we present a diffuse interface model of GB faceting that is capable of capturing anisotropic GB energies and mobilities, and accounting for the excess energy due to facet junctions and their non-local interactions. The hallmark of our approach is the ability to independently examine the role of each of the interface properties on the faceting behavior. As a demonstration, we consider the Σ 5 < 001 > tilt GB in iron, where faceting along the { 310 } and { 210 } planes was experimentally observed. Linear stability analysis and numerical examples highlight the role of junction energy and associated non-local interactions on the resulting facet length scales. On the whole, our modeling approach provides a general framework to examine the spatio-temporal evolution of highly anisotropic GBs in polycrystalline metals. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Solar Array Structures for 300 kW-Class Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard; Rose, Geoff; Mann, Troy O.; Warren, Jerry E.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.; Kerslake, Tom; Kraft, Tom; Banik, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art solar arrays for spacecraft provide on the order of 20 kW of electrical power, and they usually consist of 3J solar cells bonded to hinged rigid panels about 1 inch in thickness. This structural construction allows specific mass and packaging volumes of up to approximately 70 W/kg and 15 kW/m3 to be achieved. Significant advances in solar array structures are required for future very-high-power spacecraft (300+ kW), such as those proposed for pre-positioning heavy cargo on or near the Moon, Mars, or asteroids using solar electric propulsion. These applications will require considerable increases in both W/kg and kW/m3, and will undoubtedly require the use of flexible-substrate designs. This presentation summarizes work sponsored by NASA's Game Changing Development Program since Oct. 2011 to address the challenge of developing 300+ kW solar arrays. The work is primarily being done at NASA Langley, NASA Glenn, and two contractor teams (ATK and DSS), with technical collaboration from AFRL/Kirtland. The near-tem objective of the project is design, analysis, and testing of 30-50 kW solar array designs that are extensible to the far-term objective of 300+ kW. The work is currently focused on three designs: the MegaFlex concept by ATK, the Mega-ROSA concept by DSS, and an in-house 300-kW Government Reference Array concept. Each of these designs will be described in the presentation. Results obtained to date by the team, as well as future work plans, for the design, analysis, and testing of these large solar array structures will be summarized.

  17. Control/structure interactions of Freedom's solar dynamic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. D.; Yunis, I.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address potential control/structures interaction (CSI) problems of large flexible multibody structures in the presence of pointing and tracking requirements. A control approach is introduced for the simultaneous tracking and vibration control of multibody space structures. The application that is discussed is Space Station Freedom configured with solar dynamic (SD) modules. The SD fine-pointing and tracking requirements may necessitate controller frequencies above the structural natural frequencies of Freedom and the SD modules. It is well known that this can give rise to CSI problems if the controller is designed without due consideration given to the structural dynamics of the system. In this paper, possible CSI problems of Freedom's solar dynamic power systems are demonstrated using a simple lumped mass model. A NASTRAN model of Freedom developed at NASA Lewis is used to demonstrate potential CSI problems and the proposed tracking and vibration control approach.

  18. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  19. Visible-light photocatalysis in Cu2Se nanowires with exposed {111} facets and charge separation between (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) polar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Ning, Lichao; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Congjie; Yang, Heqing; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2015-05-28

    The search for active narrow band gap semiconductor photocatalysts that directly split water or degrade organic pollutants under solar irradiation remains an open issue. We synthesized Cu2Se nanowires with exposed {111} facets using ethanol and glycerol as morphology controlling agents. The {111} facets were found to be the active facets for decomposing organic contaminants in the entire solar spectrum. Based on the polar structure of the Cu2Se {111} facets, a charge separation model between polar (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) surfaces is proposed. The internal electric field between polar (111) and (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) surfaces created by spontaneous polarization drives charge separation. The reduction and oxidation reactions occur on the positive (111) and negative (1[combining macron]1[combining macron]1[combining macron]) polar surfaces, respectively. This suggests the surface-engineering of narrow band gap semiconductors as a strategy to fabricate photocatalysts with high reactivity in the entire solar spectrum. The charge separation model can deepen the understanding of charge transfer in other semiconductor nanocrystals with high photocatalytic activities and offer guidance to design more effective photocatalysts as well as new types of solar cells, photoelectrodes and photoelectric devices. PMID:25920433

  20. Superlattices and multilayer structures for high efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, M.; Leburton, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Possible applications of superlattices to photovoltaic structures are discussed. A new concept based on doping superstructures (NIPI) can be exploited to significantly reduce recombination losses in III-V compound solar cells. A novel multijunction structure with lateral current transport is proposed. A computer simulation has been performed which shows that by optimizing the multilayer structure, short circuit current is substantially increased with minimum drop in open circuit voltage. An additional advantage of the structure is enhanced radiation tolerance. It is anticipated that this multilayer structure can be incorporated in multibandgap cells to achieve high efficiencies.

  1. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-17

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells. PMID:26457406

  2. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells.

  3. Low-cost solar array structure development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Early studies of flat-plate arrays have projected costs on the order of $50/square meter for installed array support structures. This report describes an optimized low-cost frame-truss structure that is estimated to cost below $25/square meter, including all markups, shipping an installation. The structure utilizes a planar frame made of members formed from light-gauge galvanized steel sheet and is supposed in the field by treated-wood trusses that are partially buried in trenches. The buried trusses use the overburden soil to carry uplift wind loads and thus to obviate reinforced-concrete foundations. Details of the concept, including design rationale, fabrication and assembly experience, structural testing and fabrication drawings are included.

  4. MUNI Ways and Structures Building Integrated Solar Membrane Project

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Randall

    2014-07-03

    The initial goal of the MUNI Ways and Structures Building Integrated Solar Membrane Installation Project was for the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) to gain experience using the integrated higher efficiency solar photovoltaic (PV) single-ply membrane product, as it differs from the conventional, low efficiency, thin-film PV products, to determine the feasibility of success of larger deployment. As several of CCSF’s municipal rooftops are constrained with respect to weight restrictions, staff of the Energy Generation Group of the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) proposed to install a solar PV system using single-ply membrane The installation of the 100 kW (DC-STC) lightweight photo voltaic (PV) system at the MUNI Ways and Structures Center (700 Pennsylvania Ave., San Francisco) is a continuation of the commitment of the City and County of San Francisco (CCSF) to increase the pace of municipal solar development, and serve its municipal facilities with clean renewable energy. The fourteen (14) solar photovoltaic systems that have already been installed at CCSF municipal facilities are assisting in the reduction of fossil-fuel use, and reduction of greenhouse gases from fossil combustion. The MUNI Ways & Structures Center roof has a relatively low weight-bearing capacity (3.25 pounds per square foot) and use of traditional crystalline panels was therefore rejected. Consequently it was decided to use the best available highest efficiency Building-Integrated PV (BIPV) technology, with consideration for reliability and experience of the manufacturer which can meet the low weight-bearing capacity criteria. The original goal of the project was to provide an opportunity to monitor the results of the BIPV technology and compare these results to other City and County of San Francisco installed PV systems. The MUNI Ways and Structures Center was acquired from the Cookson Doors Company, which had run the Center for many decades. The building was

  5. SOLAR RADIO BURSTS WITH SPECTRAL FINE STRUCTURES IN PREFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Tan, Baolin; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Simões, Paulo J.A.

    2015-01-20

    Good observations of preflare activities are important for us to understand the origin and triggering mechanism of solar flares, and to predict the occurrence of solar flares. This work presents the characteristics of microwave spectral fine structures as preflare activities of four solar flares observed by the Ondřejov radio spectrograph in the frequency range of 0.8-2.0 GHz. We found that these microwave bursts which occurred 1-4 minutes before the onset of flares have spectral fine structures with relatively weak intensities and very short timescales. They include microwave quasi-periodic pulsations with very short periods of 0.1-0.3 s and dot bursts with millisecond timescales and narrow frequency bandwidths. Accompanying these microwave bursts are filament motions, plasma ejection or loop brightening in the EUV imaging observations, and non-thermal hard X-ray emission enhancements observed by RHESSI. These facts may reveal certain independent, non-thermal energy releasing processes and particle acceleration before the onset of solar flares. They may help us to understand the nature of solar flares and to predict their occurrence.

  6. FRESH INSIGHTS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE SOLAR CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sarbani; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne; New, Roger; Serenelli, Aldo M. E-mail: w.j.chaplin@bham.ac.uk E-mail: r.new@shu.ac.uk

    2009-07-10

    We present new results on the structure of the solar core, obtained with new sets of frequencies of solar low-degree p modes obtained from the BiSON network. We find that different methods used in extracting the different sets of frequencies cause shifts in frequencies, but the shifts are not large enough to affect solar structure results. We find that the BiSON frequencies show that the solar sound speed in the core is slightly larger than that inferred from data from Michelson Doppler Imager low-degree modes, and the uncertainties on the inversion results are smaller. Density results also change by a larger amount, and we find that solar models now tend to show smaller differences in density compared to the Sun. The result is seen at all radii, a result of the fact that conservation of mass implies that density differences in one region have to cancel out density differences in others, since our models are constructed to have the same mass as the Sun. The uncertainties on the density results are much smaller too. We attribute the change in results to having more, and lower frequency, low-degree mode frequencies available. These modes provide greater sensitivity to conditions in the core.

  7. Solar cycle variation of large-scale coronal structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonucci, E.; Duvall, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    A green line intensity variation is associated with the interplanetary and photospheric magnetic sector structure. This effect depends on the solar cycle and occurs with the same amplitude in the latitude range 60 deg N - 60 deg S. Extended longitudinal coronal structures are suggested, which indicate the existence of closed magnetic field lines over the neutral line, separating adjacent regions of opposite polarities on the photospheric surface.

  8. Structure and evolutionary history of the solar system. IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.; Arrhenius, G.

    1974-01-01

    The chemical composition of planets and satellites, the origin of meteorites, and the location and structure of different secondary bodies are discussed in this concluding installment of the history of the Galaxy. Several traditional concepts are reviewed and rejected, and it is argued that with the empirical evidence now available it is possible to suggest a series of basic processes leading to the present structure of the planets and solar system.

  9. Faceted Boolean Library

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, John

    2004-06-01

    This software consists of C++ classes for intersecting pairs of triangular tiled manifold (water tight) surfaces under a Boolean operation. It contains the following classes: FSPolyhedron -- Holds the data structures for defining the vertices, connections, bounding boxes, and unit normal vectors of the triangles. The first two are input the rest are computed by this class FBIntersect -- Finds edges of intersection of the triangles in the two input polyhedra KDTree — A binary space partitioning tree based on the bounding boxes of the triangles, and methods for returning triangles that intersect a given ray or overlap a given axis-aligned box FBRetriangulate -- Performs retriangulation on triangles that have been intersected and thus have new internal and/or boundary edges FBTiler — The retriangulation algorithm FBDataUtil — Various static functions used by the other classes IntegerHash — A hash table class FBClassify — Classifies triangles in body A with respect to body B with respect to inside, outside, or same orientation FBlmprint.cpp — Code for imprinting one polyhedron onto another

  10. Faceted Boolean Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-06-01

    This software consists of C++ classes for intersecting pairs of triangular tiled manifold (water tight) surfaces under a Boolean operation. It contains the following classes: FSPolyhedron -- Holds the data structures for defining the vertices, connections, bounding boxes, and unit normal vectors of the triangles. The first two are input the rest are computed by this class FBIntersect -- Finds edges of intersection of the triangles in the two input polyhedra KDTree — A binarymore » space partitioning tree based on the bounding boxes of the triangles, and methods for returning triangles that intersect a given ray or overlap a given axis-aligned box FBRetriangulate -- Performs retriangulation on triangles that have been intersected and thus have new internal and/or boundary edges FBTiler — The retriangulation algorithm FBDataUtil — Various static functions used by the other classes IntegerHash — A hash table class FBClassify — Classifies triangles in body A with respect to body B with respect to inside, outside, or same orientation FBlmprint.cpp — Code for imprinting one polyhedron onto another« less

  11. Rendering Three-Dimensional Solar Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen

    1997-01-01

    An X-ray or EUV image of the corona or chromosphere is a 2D representation of an extended 3D complex for which a general inversion process is impossible. A specific model must be incorporated in order to understand the full 3D structure. We approach this problem by modeling a set of optically-thin 3D plasma flux tubes which we render these as synthetic images. The resulting images allow the interpretation of the X-ray/EUV observations to obtain information on (1) the 3D structure of X-ray images, i.e., the geometric structure of the flux tubes, and on (2) the internal structure using specific plasma characteristics, i.e., the physical structure of the flux tubes. The data-analysis technique uses magnetograms to characterize photospheric magnetic fields and extrapolation techniques to form the field lines. Using a new set of software tools, we have generated 3D flux tube structures around these field lines and integrated the plasma emission along the line of sight to obtain a rendered image. A set of individual flux-tube images is selected by a non-negative least-squares technique to Provide a match with an observed X-ray image. The scheme minimizes the squares of the differences between the synthesized image and the observed image with a non-negative constraint on the coefficients of the brightness of the individual flux-tube loops. The derived images are used to determine the specific photospheric foot points and physical data, i.e., scaling laws for densities and loop lengths. The development has led to Computer efficient integration and display software that is compatible for comparison with observations (e.g., Yohkoh SXT data, NIXT, or EIT). This analysis is important in determining directly the magnetic field configuration, which provides the structure of coronal loops, and indirectly the electric currents or waves, which provide the energy for the heating of the plasma. We have used very simple assumptions (i.e., potential magnetic fields and isothermal

  12. Hinge specification for a square-faceted tetrahedral truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A square-faceted tetrahedral truss is geometrically analyzed. Expressions are developed for single degree of freedom hinges which allow packaging of the structure into a configuration in which all members are parallel and closely packed in a square pattern. Deployment is sequential, thus providing control over the structure during deployment.

  13. Modeling the multi-ion structure of the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena; Wang, Tongjiang

    2014-06-01

    The solar corona is typically observed in EUV by SDO/AIA and other instruments using the heavy ion emission lines such as Fe IX, Fe XII, and other ion emission lines. However, the relative (to protons) abundance of the emitting ions is very low and the collisional coupling between the Fe ions and electrons decreases rapidly with height in the low corona, while gravitational settling may become significant in quiescent long-lived magnetic structures, such as streamers. Thus, the structure of the weakly collisional solar corona imaged in Fe IX (and other heavy ions) may differ significantly from the structure of the main electron-proton constituents of the corona. The electron structure is observed by white light coronagraphs, and during solar eclipses in the low corona. I present the results of multi-fluid modeling of coronal streamers and other magnetic structures that demonstrate the effects of weak coupling between the heavy ions and the coronal electron-proton components, and show that the multi-ion coronal structure must be taken into account in interpretation of EUV observations.

  14. Fine Structure and Optical Depth in the Solar Transition Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plovanic, Jacob; Kankelborg, C. C.; Williamson, K.

    2011-05-01

    Unresolved fine structure in the solar transition region (TR) has long been inferred from measurements of density-sensitive line pairs showing low filling factor (< 0.01). Low filling factor models for the structure of the He II source region, however, have not been well studied. We propose a highly structured model of the lower atmosphere in which He II is formed at low filling factors, leading to high emission measure and an optically thin He II line. This transparent TR material is juxtaposed with absorbing chromospheric structures, leading to the nearly uniform center to limb behavior of the He II line as observed.

  15. Predicting the Structure of the Solar Corona During the December 4, 2002 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran; Linker, Jon A.; Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    The solar magnetic field plays a key role in determining coronal. The principal input to MHD models is the observed solar magnetic field. 3D MHD models can be used to compare with eclipse and coronograph images, SOHO images (LOSCO, EIT), Ulysses and WIND spacecraft data, and interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements. MHD computations can tell us about the structure of the corona. Eclipses can help us to verify the accuracy of the models. 4 December, 2002 total eclipce: visible in the southern hemisphere (South Atlantic, southern Africa, Indian Ocean, and Australia). Total in center Angola is at 06:00 UT.

  16. Oxygen-induced nano-faceting of Re(11 2 bar 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Wenhua; Bartynski, Robert A.

    2015-05-01

    We report results from a detailed study of oxygen-induced faceting of Re(11 2 bar 1) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Depending on conditions for reaction with oxygen, the initially planar Re(11 2 bar 1) surface evolves sequentially to form zigzag chains consisting of (01 1 bar 0) and (10 1 bar 0) facets that coexist with stepped (11 2 bar 1) plateaus; three-sided pyramids exposing (01 1 bar 0), (10 1 bar 0) and (33 6 bar 4) facets; a faceted surface with five facets including (01 1 bar 0), (10 1 bar 0), (11 2 bar 2)-(2 × 1), (01 1 bar 1)-(2 × 1) and (10 1 bar 1)-(2 × 1); and four-sided pyramids exposing { 01 1 bar 0} and { 01 1 bar 1}-(2 × 1) facets. We have observed reversible morphological transitions between the faceted surfaces and discovered that each intermediate facet in the evolutionary chain contains microscopic structural elements of the preceding and following facets, which may provide a natural explanation for the microscopic mass transport pathways in the morphological evolution. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) data confirm the morphology of faceted surfaces and give complementary information to LEED results.

  17. Spectropolarimetry of fine magnetized structures in the upper solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas Anthony

    2013-12-01

    One of the earliest indications of magnetic fields acting in the solar atmosphere came at the beginning of the 20th century when George Hale noted a "decided definiteness of structure" in photographs within the Hydrogen Balmer-alpha line core. Fine structure both in the chromosphere and in the corona result from processes that are not well understood but accepted as a consequence of the solar magnetic field. Our knowledge of this field is lacking, and until recently, the assumed relationship between fine thermal structure and the magnetic field remained untested. Here, spectropolarimetric diagnostics of fine structures in the solar chromosphere and cool corona are advanced using the infrared He I triplet at 1083 nm. Precise calibration procedures are developed for the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS), recently commissioned at the Dunn Solar Telescope. Together with high-order adaptive optics, we simultaneously map fine structures while obtaining a polarimetric sensitivity of up to 2 x 10--4 of the incoming intensity. These instrument improvements result in the first maps of the He I polarized signatures within an active region superpenumbra, where Hale first recognized fine-structuring. Selective absorption and emission processes due to non-equilibrium optical pumping are recognized. Our interpretation, using advanced inversions of the He I triplet, provides confirmation of Hale's initial suspicion---the fine structures of the solar chromosphere are visual markers for the magnetic field. Yet, the fine chromospheric thermal structure is not matched by an equivalently fine magnetic structure. Our ability to measure this field suggests the utility of the He I triplet as an inner boundary condition for the inner heliospheric magnetic field. In the corona itself, we infer the vector properties of a catastrophically-cooled coronal loop, uniting space-based and ground-based instrumentation. We determine how fine loops are anchored in the photosphere via a

  18. Structure and sources of solar wind in the growing phase of 24th solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slemzin, Vladimir; Goryaev, Farid; Shugay, Julia; Rodkin, Denis; Veselovsky, Igor

    2015-04-01

    We present analysis of the solar wind (SW) structure and its association with coronal sources during the minimum and rising phase of 24th solar cycle (2009-2011). The coronal sources prominent in this period - coronal holes, small areas of open magnetic fields near active regions and transient sources associated with small-scale solar activity have been investigated using EUV solar images and soft X-ray fluxes obtained by the CORONAS-Photon/TESIS/Sphinx, PROBA2/SWAP, Hinode/EIS and AIA/SDO instruments as well as the magnetograms obtained by HMI/SDO. It was found that at solar minimum (2009) velocity and magnetic field strength of high speed wind (HSW) and transient SW from small-scale flares did not differ significantly from those of the background slow speed wind (SSW). The major difference between parameters of different SW components was seen in the ion composition represented by the C6/C5, O7/O6, Fe/O ratios and the mean charge of Fe ions. With growing solar activity, the speed of HSW increased due to transformation of its sources - small-size low-latitude coronal holes into equatorial extensions of large polar holes. At that period, the ion composition of transient SW changed from low-temperature to high-temperature values, which was caused by variation of the source conditions and change of the recombination/ionization rates during passage of the plasma flow through the low corona. However, we conclude that criteria of separation of the SW components based on the ion ratios established earlier by Zhao&Fisk (2009) for higher solar activity are not applicable to the extremely weak beginning of 24th cycle. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under the grant agreement eHeroes (project n° 284461, www.eheroes.eu).

  19. Raman scattering characterization of space solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintairov, Alexander M.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Paleeva, E. V.; Sorokina, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    A contactless method for the determination of the free-carrier density and the composition distribution across the thickness of 3-5 multi-layer solar cell structures, using the Raman scattering method, is developed. The method includes a step analysis of Raman spectra from optical phonons and phonon-plasmon modes of different layers. The method provides simultaneous measurements of the element composition and the thickness of the structure's layers together with the free-carrier density. The results of measurements of the free-carrier density composition distributions of the liquid phase epitaxy grown AlGaAs/GaAs and GaSb solar cell structures are presented and discussed.

  20. Longitudinal structure of solar activity: Regular and stochastic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    The ratio of regular and stochastic components in the behavior of the longitudinal-temporal distribution of solar activity is studied with the use of correlation and spectral analysis of data on sunspot groups for 12 solar cycles. It was found that data samples of about 10 years in length often (in 50% of cases) show the presence of regular structures in the longitudinal distribution of sunspot groups. However, these structures are nonstationary; their characteristic scales and rotation periods vary when changing from one 10-year interval to another. The behavior of the longitudinal structure of sunspot activity is mainly stochastic on a long time scale (50-100 years); it is characterized by a wide spectrum of spatial scales and a continuous spectrum of rotation periods, which takes a period from 25.6 to 28.5 days.

  1. Design of a lattice-based faceted classification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichmann, David A.; Atkins, John

    1992-01-01

    We describe a software reuse architecture supporting component retrieval by facet classes. The facets are organized into a lattice of facet sets and facet n-tuples. The query mechanism supports precise retrieval and flexible browsing.

  2. Pressure structure of solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishan, V.

    1987-01-01

    The steady state pressure structure of a coronal loop is discussed in terms of the MHD global invariants of an incompressible plasma. The steady state is represented by the superposition of two Chandrasekhar-Kendall functions corresponding to (n=m=0) and (n=m=1) modes. The relative contribution of the two modes (epsilon) is found to depend on the surface pressure of the coronal loop which is also the pressure of the external medium. The mixed mode state does not exist for high values of the external pressure because epsilon becomes complex.

  3. Study of Magnetic Structure in the Solar Photosphere and Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, Robert W.; Avrett, Eugene; Nisenson, Peter; Uitenbroek, Han; vanBallegooijen, Adriaan

    1998-01-01

    This grant funded an observational and theoretical program to study the structure and dynamics of the solar photosphere and low chromosphere, and the spectral signatures that result. The overall goal is to learn about mechanisms that cause heating of the overlying atmosphere, and produce variability of solar emission in spectral regions important for astrophysics and space physics. The program exploited two new ground-based observational capabilities: one using the Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma for very high angular resolution observations of the photospheric intensity field (granulation) and proxies of the magnetic field (G-band images); and the other using the Near Infrared Magnetograph at the McMath-Pierce Solar Facility to map the spatial variation and dynamic behavior of the solar temperature minimum region using infrared CO lines. We have interpreted these data using a variety of theoretical and modelling approaches, some developed especially for this project. Previous annual reports cover the work done up to 31 May 1997. This final report summarizes our work for the entire period, including the period of no-cost extension from 1 June 1997 through September 30 1997. In Section 2 we discuss observations and modelling of the photospheric flowfields and their consequences for heating of the overlying atmosphere, and in Section 3 we discuss imaging spectroscopy of the CO lines at 4.67 mu.

  4. Extended Solar System Structures Observed by WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Masci, Frank; Cutri, Roc; Walker, Russell; Mainzer, Amy; Bauer, James; Stevenson, Rachel; Tricarico, Pasquale

    2014-11-01

    Extended structures associated with recent asteroid collisions and comets were detected by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite, which conducted the first survey of the thermal emission of the sky in 1983. Twenty-seven years later, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), conducted a more sensitive survey of the sky at wavelengths spanning the shorter IRAS bandpasses and detected many of these same structures. Initial identifications include asteroid dust bands associated with collisions giving rise to the Karin and Beagle clusters within the Koronis and Themis asteroid families, respectively. An additional pair of bands is associated with the collision giving rise to the Veritas asteroid family. Comet trails associated with short-period comets have also been observed. Type 2 trails, detected by IRAS and possibly associated with asteroid collisions within the past few thousand years, have yet to be identified. Because WISE is significantly more sensitive than IRAS in the mid-infrared, it has detected some trails extending much further over their orbits and will greatly expand the catalog of trails detected in addition to those observed by IRAS and Spitzer (the latter by targeted observations). WISE and the yet more sensitive NEOCAM survey telescope will provide important insights into the recent collisional history of the asteroid belt and the nature and evolution of comets.

  5. Method of making quasi-grain boundary-free polycrystalline solar cell structure and solar cell structure obtained thereby

    DOEpatents

    Gonzalez, Franklin N.; Neugroschel, Arnost

    1984-02-14

    A new solar cell structure is provided which will increase the efficiency of polycrystalline solar cells by suppressing or completely eliminating the recombination losses due to the presence of grain boundaries. This is achieved by avoiding the formation of the p-n junction (or other types of junctions) in the grain boundaries and by eliminating the grain boundaries from the active area of the cell. This basic concept can be applied to any polycrystalline material; however, it will be most beneficial for cost-effective materials having small grains, including thin film materials.

  6. Study of small magnetic structures in the solar photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, I.; Domingo, V.; Bonet, J. A.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.

    2013-05-01

    The study of small scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere is of great relevance for the understanding of the global behaviour of the Sun. Because of the small spatial and temporal scales involved, the use of high resolution images and fast cadence is fundamental for their study. In order to obtain such images, sophisticated computational techniques that compensate for the atmospheric degradation and telescope aberration have been developed, improving in this way the spatial resolution. In this work, we use G-band images obtained with the 1 m-Swedish Solar Telescope located at La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain). The images have been restored with MOMFBD (Multi-Object Multi-Frame Blind Deconvolution), a technique that combines multiple images acquired in a short time interval. The resulting images have a resolution close to the diffraction limit of the telescope (0.1 arcsec) allowing the study of very small bright structures present in the inter-granular lanes in the solar photosphere, known as Bright Points. It is highlighted the great presence of magnetic structures in quiet Sun regions analyzed from different observational campaigns. The density of BPs in the quiet Sun shows a decrease as we approach the limb, with values of ≃q 1% at the centre (μ ≈ 1), and ≃q 0.2% at μ ≈ 0.3. We also present the discovery of small vortexes detected in the solar surface through the movement of BPs, with radii around 241 km and lifetimes longer than 5 minutes. Further analyses, comprising longer time series and information from different solar layers, are being performed aiming at a more in-depth knowledge of these phenomena.

  7. Engineering the Electronic Band Structure for Multiband Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, N.; Reichertz, L.A.; Yu, K.M.; Campman, K.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-07-12

    Using the unique features of the electronic band structure of GaNxAs1-x alloys, we have designed, fabricated and tested a multiband photovoltaic device. The device demonstrates an optical activity of three energy bands that absorb, and convert into electrical current, the crucial part of the solar spectrum. The performance of the device and measurements of electroluminescence, quantum efficiency and photomodulated reflectivity are analyzed in terms of the Band Anticrossing model of the electronic structure of highly mismatched alloys. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using highly mismatched alloys to engineer the semiconductor energy band structure for specific device applications.

  8. A Study of the Structure of the Source Region of the Solar Wind in Support of a Solar Probe Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habbal , Shadia R.

    1998-01-01

    Despite the richness of the information about the physical properties and the structure of the solar wind provided by the Ulysses and SOHO observations, fundamental questions regarding the nature of the coronal heating mechanisms, their source, and the manifestations of the fast and slow solar wind, still remain unanswered. The last unexplored frontier to establish the connection between the structure and dynamics of the solar atmosphere, its extension into interplanetary space, and the mechanisms responsible for the evolution of the solar wind, is the corona between 1 and 30 R(sub s). A Solar Probe mission offers an unprecedented opportunity to explore this frontier. The uniqueness of this mission stems from its trajectory in a plane perpendicular to the ecliptic which reaches within 9 R(sub s), of the solar surface over the poles and 3 - 9 R(sub s), at the equator. With a complement of simultaneous in situ and remote sensing observations, this mission is destined to have a significant impact on our understanding of the fundamental processes that heat the corona and drive the solar wind. The Solar Probe should be able to detect remnants and signatures of the processes which heat the corona and accelerate the solar wind. The primary objective of this proposal was to explore the structure of the different source regions of the solar wind through complementary observational and theoretical studies in support of a Solar Probe mission.

  9. Adjustable planar lightguide solar concentrators with liquid-prism structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Meng-Che; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei; Lee, Tsung-Xian; Chen, Yi-Yung

    2013-03-01

    Research interests on sunlight applications are booming in recent years, due to the worldwide green-energy trends. Either using PV cells to store sunlight then convert to electricity, or to use sunlight for direct illumination source are among the many research projects which deserve investigation. In this research, we focus a design combined the above two features together: direct sunlight illumination, and store the sunlight for later usage. Our design structure is as follows: 1. On the surface of outer layer, we use the liquid-prism structure to increase the angle tolerance range of solar concentrator; 2. Combine the micro structure of the solid-state prism and aspheric surfaces to produce a planar light guide structure, which compresses the plane light source into line light source, then guide the light into solar cells area; 3. Design a light switch using the liquid-prism of inside layer, and guides the sunlight into solar cells channel or indoor illumination channel. We apply it in the NLIS® developed at NTUST, not only retain the advantages of the static concentrator modules, but also eliminate the complex procedure of transmitting and emitting, reduce the loss and cost of energy transfer.

  10. Development and support structures for high-power solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, K.

    1984-01-01

    A number of structurally efficient configurations for wing-type solar arrays are developed by a combination of deepening the planform of the blanket and structure and by partitioning the blanket with battens and frequent attachments to the support structure. This technique reduces the tension required to avoid a low natural frequency for the blanket, and the load reduction results in a lighter structure. The use of three different structures are investigated: the Astromast, the Extendible Support Structure (ESS), and a new beam called the STACBEAM (Stacking Triangular Articulated Compact Beam) and their relative performances are compared. The investigation of the STACBEAM is emphasized because its sequential deployment is more reliable for very long systems, and its linear deployment facilitates local attachments to the blanket and the development of a low mass deployer.

  11. Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    The problem of chromospheric dynamics and heating consists of two problems: one, concerning the magnetic network on the boundary of supergranulation cells (CB), where the oscillation period is seven minutes, and the other, concerning the cell interior (CI), where the oscillation period is three minutes. The observational data on the oscillations and the emission of radiation can be used to determine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere provided answers are known to three critical questions, concerning: the nature of the waves powering the bright points, the origin of the observed oscillation periods and the mechanism of chromospheric heating. The recent modeling of the dynamics of the CI, which combines a sophisticated treatment of gas dynamics and radiative transfer in a one-dimensional model with empirical velocity input from the observations, answered the first of these questions: the waves powering K(sub 2upsilon), bright points are propagating acoustic waves. This firm conclusion declares invalid the model of Leibacher & Stein, which explains the observed period with standing acoustic waves in a chromospheric cavity. On the third question, the heating of the chromosphere in the CI, their model predicts that the temperature in the chromosphere is declining in the outward direction up to a height of at least I Mm most of the time, so even the time-average temperature is dropping monotonically in the outward direction, implying that lines formed in the chromosphere up to a height of at least 1 Mm appear in absorption most of the time and everywhere in the CI. The problem of the CI can be resolved with a two-component model, which combines a model for K(sub 2upsilon), bright points with a model for the background. The bright point model has the same aims as the CS94 model, except that the empirical driving from the LRK93 observations is replaced by impulsive excitation, as suggested by the properties of the Klein-Gordon equation.

  12. Mirror Mode structures in the solar wind observed by STEREO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizeth Enríquez-Rivera, Olivia; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Russell, C. T.; Jian, Lan; Luhmann, Janet G.

    Mirror mode structures have been found in the solar wind at various heliocentric distances with different missions. Recently, STEREO has observed mirror mode waves present as trains of holes and also as humps in the magnetic field strength. In some cases mirror mode trains last very long periods of time and have been therefore called "mirror mode storms". We present case studies of mirror mode structures (storms and trains) observed in the solar wind using STEREO data in three different locations: in the downstream region of the forward shock of a SIR, inside a SIR far from the forward shock and also in the ambient solar wind. In order to make a formal identification of the mirror mode we identify wave characteristics and we also study shock properties. Finally we perform a dispersion analysis and discuss the possible origin of mirror mode structures using curves of growth for different regimes of beta and proton temperature anisotropies. We study the effects that a small component of He in the plasma can have on mirror mode growth.

  13. Structural damages of maxillofacial biopolymers under solar aging.

    PubMed

    Eleni, P N; Krokida, M K; Frangou, M J; Polyzois, G L; Maroulis, Z B; Marinos-Kouris, D

    2007-09-01

    Additional types of silicone biopolymers are widely used in maxillofacial prosthetics. Therefore, the knowledge of the solar radiation's effect on their structural stability is highly important. Four different industrially synthesized biomaterials were examined, called Episil Europe 1, Europe 2, Europe 3 and Africa 3, which were exposed to solar radiation (UVA, UVB) for eight different time periods (from 8 to 168 h). Structural damages due to irradiation exposure were investigated by mechanical tests (compression) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) methods. Simple mathematical models were developed, containing parameters with physical meaning such as maximum stress (sigma(max)), maximum strain (epsilon), elasticity parameter (E), and viscoelastic parameter (p), for the compression test, and melting temperature (T (m)) and Enthalpy in melting point (Heat) for DSC. With increasing irradiation time their maximum stress and strain decreased significantly, and the materials lost their elasticity and molecular stability. A decrement in their melting points and heats was observed as irradiation time was increasing. Finally, experimental results demonstrated that solar radiation has a severe effect on the structural stability of the examined biomaterials. PMID:17483904

  14. Titanium dioxide nanoswords with highly reactive, photocatalytic facets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnowchik, Brian D.; Chiamori, Heather C.; Ding, Yong; Ha, Jong-Yoon; Wang, Zhong Lin; Lin, Liwei

    2010-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most widely studied and important materials for catalysis, photovoltaics, and surface science applications, but the ability to consistently control the relative exposure of higher surface energy facets during synthesis remains challenging. Here, we present the repeatable synthesis of highly reactive, rutile {001} or {101} facets on broad, sword-shaped TiO2 nanostructures rapidly synthesized in minutes. Growth occurs along planes of lower surface energy, repeatedly yielding nanostructures with large, high energy facets. The quantitative photocatalytic reactivity of the nanoswords, demonstrated by the photoreduction of silver, is over an order of magnitude higher than reference low energy TiO2{110} substrates. Therefore, the higher surface energy dominated TiO2 nanoswords are ideal structures for characterizing the physicochemical properties of rutile TiO2, and may be used to enhance a variety of catalytic, optical, and clean-technology applications.

  15. Highly concave platinum nanoframes with high-index facets and enhanced electrocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Xia, Bao Yu; Wu, Hao Bin; Wang, Xin; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2013-11-18

    Deeply excavated: Platinum nanoframes with highly concave {740} facets are synthesized directly by a facile oleylamine-assisted solvothermal method. Because of the unique structure and exposed high-index facets, the as-prepared Pt nanoframes exhibit very high electrocatalytic activity and remarkable stability for the oxygen reduction reaction and the oxidation of methanol and formic acid. PMID:24115319

  16. Traceback of intermittent structures in the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakwacki, M. S.; Ruiz, M. E.; Nuevo, F. A.; Mandrini, C. H.; Dasso, S.

    The intermittent structures identified in the solar wind (SW) are a key observable to study the nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in systems with low dissipation rate; and can be characterized by computing the degree of phase correlation of the magnetic field. Such indicator is; commonly; studied near the Earth using in situ observations; while the solar wind sources remain unknown. In this work; we analise in situ observations of magnetic field intensity from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft; located near 1 AU from the Sun; and synoptic charts provided by the Wilcox Obsevatory. We complement our study computing Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) models taking as boundary conditions synoptic maps from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). We identify one intermittent period by computing the phase coherence index. For these SW observations; we attempt to find the corresponding solar source identifying a particular pattern of the coronal magnetic field at the source surface; located at 2.5 at the time the SW would have left the Sun considering its speed at 1 AU to be constant. To ascertain that this magnetic pattern plays a significant role as source of SW intermittence; more examples should be analyzed.

  17. Solar chromospheric fine scale structures: dynamics and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.

    2012-01-01

    The solar chromosphere is a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer of the solar atmosphere that exhibits several phenomena on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution and long-duration observations, employing mostly lines, such as Halpha, the Ca II infrared lines and the Ca II H and K lines, obtained both from ground-based telescope facilities (e.g. DST, VTT, THEMIS, SST, DOT), as well as state-of-the-art satellites (e.g. SOHO, TRACE, HINODE) reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured chromospheric environment. What is known in literature as the chromospheric fine-scale structure mainly consists of small fibrilar-like features that connect various parts of quiet/active regions or span across the chromospheric network cell interiors, showing a large diversity of both physical and dynamic characteristics. The highly dynamic, fine-scale chromospheric structures are mostly governed by flows which reflect the complex geometry and dynamics of the local magnetic field and play an important role in the propagation and dissipation of waves. A comprehensive study of these structures requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved and investigation of their intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric levels. Furthermore, due to their large number present on the solar surface, it is essential to investigate their impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through processes such as magnetic reconnection and propagation of waves. The in-depth study of all aforementioned characteristics and processes, with the further addition of non-LTE physics, as well as the use of three-dimensional numerical simulations poses a fascinating challenge for both theory and numerical modeling of chromospheric fine-scale structures.

  18. The Cool and Belkin Faceted Classification of Information Interactions Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The complexity of human information activity is a challenge for both practice and research in information sciences and information management. Literature presents a wealth of approaches to analytically structure and make sense of human information activity including a faceted classification model of information interactions published…

  19. Three-dimensional evaluation of the facet joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folio, Les R.

    1990-04-01

    Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging nave revolurionalized analysis of vertebral anatomy and pathology. Further advances with 3-dimensional imaging have recently become an important adjunct for diagnosis and treatment in structural abnormalities. Facets are intimately related to their surrounding musculature and malalignment may cause pain directly or indirectly. High resolution 3-dimensional reformations of CT Scans give us new insight on structure and function of facet joints, since their motion and architecture are ever complex. It is well documented in the literature that facet joint biomecnanics is a partial contributor to the myriad at causes of low back The term "facet Joint syndrome" was coined in 1933 by GhorMley.3 The osteopathic lesion complex is well defined by LeRoy and McCole and comparison of roentgenographic findings before and after manipulation has teen described by Long and Lioyd.4,5 since alterations in facet biamechanics are an important aspect of osteopathic manipulative therapy (OT), 3-dimensional hign resolution imaging will prove to be a great asset in osteopathic research. Rotating the spine allows for different viewing perspectives to provide optimal and consistent measurements of the facet joint. Rotations are performed on the X, Y and 7, axis and measurements pre and post-manipulation are performed and compared on matching axis and perspectives. Rotation about the X, Y and Z axis help appreciate the 3-dimensionality of the vertebral column to project to the viewer a feeling that the spine is floating in space before them. This does give the viewer a 3-D understanding of the object however, only at a perspective at a Lime.

  20. Atomic structure of interface states in silicon heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    George, B M; Behrends, J; Schnegg, A; Schulze, T F; Fehr, M; Korte, L; Rech, B; Lips, K; Rohrmüller, M; Rauls, E; Schmidt, W G; Gerstmann, U

    2013-03-29

    Combining orientation dependent electrically detected magnetic resonance and g tensor calculations based on density functional theory we assign microscopic structures to paramagnetic states involved in spin-dependent recombination at the interface of hydrogenated amorphous silicon crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterojunction solar cells. We find that (i) the interface exhibits microscopic roughness, (ii) the electronic structure of the interface defects is mainly determined by c-Si, (iii) we identify the microscopic origin of the conduction band tail state in the a-Si:H layer, and (iv) present a detailed recombination mechanism. PMID:23581355

  1. The thermal structure of the magnetized solar transition region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mok, Y.; Van Hoven, G.

    1993-01-01

    The detailed thermal structure of the magnetized solar transition region, as measured by its differential emission measure DEM(T), is unknown. Proposals have been made that envision a significant lower-temperature contribution to the energy balance from cross-field (ion) heat flux. In this paper, we describe a self-consistent 2D MHD simulation (including the full effects of anisotropic thermal conduction) of a conceptual model due to Athay (1990). We display the detailed irregular thermal and magnetic structure of the transition region and demonstrate that the predicted DEM agrees with observations, particularly in the T less than 10 exp 5 K regime where previous theories had difficulty.

  2. Structuring of the Magnetospheric Plasma by the Solar Terrestrial Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Dominique

    The existence of a magnetospheric cavity around a planet depends on the interactions of the planet including its atmospheric and magnetic environment with the interplanetary medium. A magnetized planet like the Earth sets a magnetic obstacle against the supersonic super-Alfvénic solar wind flow. The solar wind pressure shapes the magnetosphere, compressing it on the dayside to a few Earth's radii while the nightside tail extends to hundreds of Earth's radii. Away from a homogeneous and constant distribution, very different plasma regions have been identified inside the magnetosphere. Mass and energy transfers with the solar wind are considered as responsible for the magnetospheric plasma structure and dynamics at large-scale as well as for impulsive or transient events. However, these transfer processes remain poorly understood, and reconnection and other working assumptions are presently put forward and developed. Detailed descriptions of the magnetosphere at various complexity levels can be found in textboo ks on space plasma physics. This simplified introduction only aims at proposing keys to get an insight into the structure of the magnetospheric plasma, into a few basic concepts and specific processes at the root of the present understanding and also into questions and issues to be addressed in the future.

  3. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  4. Dynamical structure of solar radio burst type III as evidence of energy of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Zety Sharizat Binti

    2013-11-01

    Observations of low frequency solar type III radio bursts associated with the ejection of plasma oscillations localized disturbance is due to excitation atoms in the plasma frequency incoherent radiations play a dominant role at the meter and decimeter wavelengths. Here, we report the results of the dynamical structure of solar flare type III that occurred on 9th March 2012 at National Space Centre, Sg Lang, Selangor, Malaysia by using the CALLISTO system. These bursts are associated with solar flare type M6 which suddenly ejected in the active region AR 1429 starting at 03:32 UT and ending at 05:00 UT with the peak at 04:12 UT. The observation showed an initial strong burst occurred due to strong signal at the beginning of the phase. We also found that both solar burst and flares tend to be a numerous on the same day and probability of chance coincidence is high. It is clearly seen that an impulsive lace burst was detected at 4:24 UT and it is more plausible that the energies are confined to the top of the loop when we compared with X-ray results. Associated with this event was type II with velocities 1285 km/s and type IV radio sweeps along with a full halo Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) first seen in SOHO/LASCO C2 imagery at 09/0426 Z. We concluded that the significance of study solar burst type III lies in the fact that the emission at decimetric wavelength comes from the role of magnetic field in active region that may provide the key to the energy release mechanism in a flare.

  5. Doubly slanted layer structures in holographic gelatin emulsions: solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Jenny; Chan, Po Shan; Sun, Caiming; Wing Ho, Choi; Tam, Wing Yim

    2010-04-01

    We have fabricated doubly slanted layer structures in holographic gelatin emulsions using a double-exposure two-beam interference from two light sources with different wavelengths. The doubly slanted layers, with different spacings and overlapping with each other, are fabricated such that they are slanted in opposite directions making a 30° angle with the holographic plate. The doubly slanted layer structures exhibit photonic stop bands corresponding to the two layered structures. More importantly, diffracted light beams from the slanted layers travel in different directions and emerge, through internal reflections, at the opposite edges of the gelatin plate. The doubly slanted layer structures could be used as solar concentrators such that sunlight is separated into different components and steered directly to photovoltaics with the corresponding wavelength sensitivities to enhance energy conversion efficiency.

  6. Structure of Water Ice in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David; Jenniskens, Peter; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Nearly all of the properties of solar system ices (chemical reaction rates, volatile retention and release, vaporization behavior, thermal conductivity, infrared spectral characteristics and the like) are a direct consequence of ice structure. However, the characterization of astrophysical ices and their laboratory analogs has typically utilized indirect measurements which yield phenomenological interpretations. When water ice is vapor-deposited at 14 K and warmed until it volatilizes in moderate vacuum, the ice undergoes a series of amorphous to amorphous and amorphous to crystalline structural transitions which we have characterized by diffraction methods. These structural transitions correlate with and underlie many phenomena observed in laboratory infrared and gas release experiments. The elucidation of the dynamic structural changes which occur in vapor-deposited water ice as a function of time, temperature and radiation history allows for the more complete interpretation of remote observations of astrophysical ices and their laboratory analogs.

  7. Nanopyramid structure for ultrathin c-Si tandem solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guijun; Li, He; Ho, Jacob Y L; Wong, Man; Kwok, Hoi Sing

    2014-05-14

    Recently, ultrathin crystalline silicon solar cells have gained tremendous interest because they are deemed to dramatically reduce material usage. However, the resulting conversion efficiency is still limited by the incomplete light absorption in such ultrathin devices. In this letter, we propose ultrathin a-Si/c-Si tandem solar cells with an efficient light trapping design, where a nanopyramid structure is introduced between the top and bottom cells. The superior light harvesting results in a 48% and 35% remarkable improvement of the short-circuit current density for the top and bottom cells, respectively. Meanwhile, the use of SiOx mixed-phase nanomaterial helps to provide the maximum light trapping without paying the price of reduced electrical performance, and conversion efficiencies of up to 13.3% have been achieved for the ultrathin tandem cell employing only 8 μm of silicon, which is 29% higher than the result obtained for the planar cell. PMID:24730470

  8. Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays, phase 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Efficient structures for geosynchronous spacecraft solar arrays were investigated. The STACBEAM (stacking triangular articulated compact beam) concept was selected. The primary component, the solar array blanket, is stored in a folded configuration and is deployed by controlled linear extension. Blanket stiffness is attained by axially tensioning the blanket and by providing periodic lateral ribs and standoffs which attach the blanket to the beam at several places along its length. The STACBEAM deploys sequentially (one bay at a time) using a deployer of sufficient rigidity so that beam stiffness is not degraded during deployment. The beam does not rotate during deployment, thus making blanket beam attachment possible in the packaged condition. In addition to high bending stiffness, the STACBEAM possesses high torsional rigidity due to nonflexible diagonals. The concept is adaptable to various size and loading requirements by changing member diameter and baylength, thus affecting the ratio of packaged and deployed length.

  9. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    This report covers technical progress during the third year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona," between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period June 16, 1998 to August 15, 1999. This is also the final report for this contract. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the three-year duration of this contract we have published 49 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 3 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles. We summarize our progress during the third year of the contract. Full descriptions of our work can be found in the cited publications, a few of which are attached to this report.

  10. THREE-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURE OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. H. K.; Bale, S. D.; Mallet, A.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Horbury, T. S.; Wicks, R. T.

    2012-10-20

    We present a measurement of the scale-dependent, three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field fluctuations in inertial range solar wind turbulence with respect to a local, physically motivated coordinate system. The Alfvenic fluctuations are three-dimensionally anisotropic, with the sense of this anisotropy varying from large to small scales. At the outer scale, the magnetic field correlations are longest in the local fluctuation direction, consistent with Alfven waves. At the proton gyroscale, they are longest along the local mean field direction and shortest in the direction perpendicular to the local mean field and the local field fluctuation. The compressive fluctuations are highly elongated along the local mean field direction, although axially symmetric perpendicular to it. Their large anisotropy may explain why they are not heavily damped in the solar wind.

  11. The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikic, Zoran

    2000-03-01

    This report covers technical progress during the third year of the NASA Space Physics Theory contract "The Structure and Dynamics of the Solar Corona," between NASA and Science Applications International Corporation, and covers the period June 16, 1998 to August 15, 1999. This is also the final report for this contract. Under this contract SAIC, the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), have conducted research into theoretical modeling of active regions, the solar corona, and the inner heliosphere, using the MHD model. During the three-year duration of this contract we have published 49 articles in the scientific literature. These publications are listed in Section 3 of this report. In the Appendix we have attached reprints of selected articles. We summarize our progress during the third year of the contract. Full descriptions of our work can be found in the cited publications, a few of which are attached to this report.

  12. Narrowband frequency-drift structures in solar type IV bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Yukio; Ono, Takayuki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Misawa, Hiroaki; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Katoh, Yuto; Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2013-12-01

    We have established the Zao Solar Radiospectrograph (ZSR), a new solar radio observation system, at the Zao observatory of Tohoku University, Japan. We observed narrowband fine structures with type IV bursts with ZSR on 2 and 3 November 2008. The observed fine structures are similar to fiber bursts in terms of the drift rates and the existence of emission and absorption stripes. Statistical analysis of the drift rates, however, shows that the observed fine structures are different from the ordinary fiber bursts as regards the sense and the magnitude of their drift rates. First, the observed drift rates include both positive and negative rates, whereas ordinary fiber bursts are usually characterized by negative drift rates. Second, the absolute values of the observed drift rates are tens of MHz s-1, whereas the typical drift rate of fiber bursts at 325 MHz is approximately -9 MHz s-1. In addition, all fine structures analyzed have narrow emission bands of less than 17 MHz. We also show that the observed narrowband emission features with drift rates of approximately 40 MHz s-1 can be interpreted as the propagation of whistler-mode waves, which is the same process as that underlying fiber bursts.

  13. Structural order in additive processed bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, James Thomas

    Considerable academic and industrial efforts have been dedicated to resolving scientific and technological issues associated with the fabrication of efficient plastic solar cells via solution deposition techniques. The most successful strategy used to generate solution processable devices implements a two component donor-acceptor type system composed of a (p-type) narrow bandgap conjugated polymer donor blended with a (n-type) fullerene acceptor. Due to the limited exciton diffusion lengths (~10 nm) inherent to these materials, efficient photoinduced charge generation requires heterojunction formation (i.e. donor/acceptor interfaces) in close proximity to the region of exciton generation. Maximal charge extraction therefore requires that donor and acceptor components form nanoscale phase separated percolating pathways to their respective electrodes. Devices exhibiting these structural characteristics are termed bulk heterojunction devices (BHJ). Although the BHJ architecture highlights the basic characteristics of functional donor-acceptor type organic solar cells, device optimization requires internal order within each phase and proper organization relative to the substrate in order to maximize charge transport efficiencies and minimize charge carrier recombination losses. The economic viability of BHJ solar cells hinges upon the minimization of processing costs; thus, commercially relevant processing techniques should generate optimal structural characteristics during film formation, eliminating the need for additional post deposition processing steps. Empirical optimization has shown that solution deposition using high boiling point additives (e.g. octanedithiol (ODT)) provides a simple and widely used fabrication method for maximizing the power conversion efficiencies of BHJ solar cells. This work will show using x-ray scattering that a small percentage of ODT (~2%) in chlorobenzene induces the nucleation of polymeric crystallites within 2 min of deposition

  14. Rational Design of a Structural Framework with Potential Use to Develop Chemical Reagents That Target and Modulate Multiple Facets of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sanghyun; Zheng, Xueyun; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Savelieff, Masha G.; Park, Hyun Min; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Kim, Jin Hoon; Derrick, Jeffrey S.; Kochi, Akiko; Lee, Hyuck Jin; Kim, Cheal; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bowers, Michael T.; Lim, Mi Hee

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by multiple, intertwined pathological features, including amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation, metal ion dyshomeostasis, and oxidative stress. We report a novel compound (ML) prototype of a rationally designed molecule obtained by integrating structural elements for Aβ aggregation control, metal chelation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulation, and antioxidant activity within a single molecule. Chemical, biochemical, ion mobility mass spectrometric, and NMR studies indicate that the compound ML targets metal-free and metal-bound Aβ (metal–Aβ) species, suppresses Aβ aggregation in vitro, and diminishes toxicity induced by Aβ and metal-treated Aβ in living cells. Comparison of ML to its structural moieties (i.e., 4-(dimethylamino)phenol (DAP) and (8-aminoquinolin-2-yl)methanol (1)) for reactivity with Aβ and metal–Aβ suggests the synergy of incorporating structural components for both metal chelation and Aβ interaction. Moreover, ML is water-soluble and potentially brain permeable, as well as regulates the formation and presence of free radicals. Overall, we demonstrate that a rational structure-based design strategy can generate a small molecule that can target and modulate multiple factors, providing a new tool to uncover and address AD complexity. PMID:24397771

  15. The Many Facets and Applications of Text Structure in Supporting Educational Trajectories of Elementary and Middle Grade Children in Content Area Reading Comprehension and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albro, Elizabeth; Williams, Joanna P.; Wijekumar, Kausalai; Meyer, Bonnie J. F.; Harris, Karen R.

    2015-01-01

    Content area reading comprehension and writing have been a challenge for children in the U.S. schools for many years as evidenced by state and national assessments. One promising solution to the problem is text structure based instruction that promotes strategic selection, encoding, retrieval, and use of information for myriads of activities…

  16. Crystallographic Facet-Induced Toxicological Responses by Faceted Titanium Dioxide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Li, Kai; Li, Xi; Chang, Yun; Feng, Yanlin; Sun, Xiujuan; Cheng, Yan; Wu, Zhijian; Zhang, Haiyuan

    2016-06-28

    Toxicological responses of nanomaterials have been closely correlated to their physicochemical properties, and establishment of a property-activity relationship of nanomaterials is favorable for a deep understanding of the nanomaterials' toxicity mechanism, prospectively predicting nanomaterials' potential hazards and rationally designing safer nanomaterials. Faceted nanomaterials usually exhibit more versatile and effective performance than spherical nanomaterials due to their selectively exposed crystallographic facets with high densities of unsaturated atoms. These facets have high surface reactivity, capable of eliciting strong interactions with biological systems. Few studies paid attention to the toxic behaviors of faceted nanomaterials in terms of their distinctive facets. In the present study, the toxicological role of the crystallographic facets of TiO2 nanomaterials was investigated, and the precise property-activity relationship was exploited to clearly understand the toxicity of faceted nanomaterials. A series of faceted TiO2 nanocrystals with the morphology of truncated octahedral bipyramids were prepared to expose different percentages of {101} and {001} facets on the surface. Density functional theory calculation revealed that {101} facets could only molecularly absorb water molecules while {001} facets due to their surface-unsaturated Ti atoms could dissociate the absorbed water molecules to generate hydroxyl radicals. Biophysical assessments corroborated the increased production of hydroxyl radicals on the {001} facets compared to {101} facets, which endowed {001} facets with strong hemolytic activity and elicited severe toxicities. A series of increased oxidative stress toxicological responses, including cellular ROS production, heme oxygenase-1 expression, cellular GSH depletion, and mitochondrial dysfunctions, were triggered by faceted TiO2 nanocrystals with progressively increased {001} percentages, demonstrating the toxicological roles of {001

  17. Effects of CeO2 Support Facets on VOx/CeO2 Catalysts in Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan; Wei, Zhehao; Gao, Feng; Kovarik, Libor; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong

    2014-05-13

    CeO2 supports with dominating facets, i.e., low index (100), (110) and (111) facets, are prepared. The facet effects on the structure and catalytic performance of supported vanadium oxide catalysts are investigated using oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol as a model reaction. In the presence of mixed facets, Infrared and Raman characterizations demonstrate that surface vanadia species preferentially deposit on CeO2 (100) facets, presumably because of its higher surface energy. At the same surface vanadium densities, VOx species on (100) facets show better dispersion, followed by (110) and (111) facets. The VOx species on CeO2 nanorods with (110) and (100) facets display higher activity and lower apparent activation energies compared to that on CeO2 nanopolyhedras with dominating (111) facets and CeO2 nanocubes with dominating (100) facets. The higher activity for VOx/CeO2(110) might be related to the more abundant oxygen vacancies present on the (110) facets, evidenced from Raman spectroscopic measurements.

  18. Complex Dynamic Flows in Solar Flare Sheet Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David E.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Observations of high-energy emission from solar flares often reveal the presence of large sheet-like structures, sometimes extending over a space comparable to the Sun's radius. Given that these structures are found between a departing coronal mass ejection and the post-eruption flare arcade, it is natural to associate the structure with a current sheet; though the relationship is unclear. Moreover, recent high-resolution observations have begun to reveal that the motions in this region are highly complex, including reconnection outflows, oscillations, and apparent wakes and eddies. We present a detailed first look at the complicated dynamics within this supra-arcade plasma, and consider implications for the interrelationship between the plasma and its embedded magnetic field.

  19. `Fingerprint' Fine Structure in the Solar Decametric Radio Spectrum Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, E. Y.; Zaitsev, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Dorovskyy, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    We study a unique fine structure in the dynamic spectrum of the solar radio emission discovered by the UTR-2 radio telescope (Kharkiv, Ukraine) in the frequency band of 20 - 30 MHz. The structure was observed against the background of a broadband type IV radio burst and consisted of parallel drifting narrow bands of enhanced emission and absorption on the background emission. The observed structure differs from the widely known zebra pattern at meter and decimeter wavelengths by the opposite directions of the frequency drift within a single stripe at a given time. We show that the observed properties can be understood in the framework of the radiation mechanism by virtue of the double plasma resonance effect in a nonuniform coronal magnetic trap. We propose a source model providing the observed frequency drift of the stripes.

  20. Division II: Commission 12: Solar Radiation and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, Alexander; Cauzzi, Gianna; Pillet, Valentin Martinez; Asplund, Martin; Brandenburg, Axel; Chou, Dean-Yi; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Gan, Weiqun; Kuznetsov, Vladimir D.; Rovira, Marta G.; Shchukina, Nataliya; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2015-08-01

    The President of C12, Alexander Kosovichev, presented the status of the Commission and its working Group(s). Primary activities included organization of international meetings (IAU Symposia, Special Sessions and Joint Discussion); review and support of proposals for IAU sponsored meetings; organization of working groups on the Commission topics to promote the international cooperation; preparation of triennial report on the organizational and science activities of Commission members. Commission 12 broadly encompasses topics of solar research which include studies of the Sun's internal structure, composition, dynamics and magnetism (through helioseismology and other techniques), studies of the quiet photosphere, chromosphere and corona, and also research of the mechanisms of solar radiation, and its variability on various time scales. Some overlap with topics covered by Commission 10 Solar Activity is unavoidable, and many activities are sponsored jointly by these two commissions. The Commission website can be found at http://sun.stanford.edu/IAU-Com12/, with information about related IAU Symposiums and activities, and links to appropriate web sites.

  1. Venus exospheric structure - The role of solar radiation pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, James

    1989-01-01

    The existence of a 'hot' population of hydrogen atoms in the Venus exosphere is well known. In the outer coronal region where it is dominant, r greater than about 2.0 R(V) (Venus radii), hydrogen atoms are also subject to a relatively strong radiation pressure exerted by resonant scattering of solar Lyman-alpha photons. Collisionless models illustrating the consequent structure are discussed, with the nonthermal population mimicked by a dual Maxwellian exobase kinetic distribution. In these models, a considerable fraction of the 'hot' atoms outside 2.0 R(V) belongs to the quasi-satellite component, this fraction exceeding 1/2 for r values between about 4.0 and 10.0 R(V). Solar ionization of bound atoms occurs mainly outside the ionopause, yielding a partial escape flux greater than about 2,000,000/sq cm per sec over the dayside exobase for assumed solar conditions. The inclusion of a cold exobase prescribed by Pioneer Venus observations has little influence on the outer region (in particular, the quasi-satellite component is unaltered) except that the transition to 'hot' kinetic character occurs closer to the exobase on the nightside due to the colder main exobase temperatures there.

  2. Vacuum-deposited diphenyl-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole solar cell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, G.; Dobrikov, G.; Heinrichova, P.; Karashanova, D.; Dimov, D.; Vala, M.; Weiter, M.; Zhivkov, I.

    2016-03-01

    Photoelectrical parameters were measured of solar cell ITO|PEDOT:PSS|composite| Al samples. The active composite film was deposited in vacuum by co-evaporation of 3,6-bis(5-(benzofuran-2-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,5-bis(2-ethylhexyl)pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4(2H,5H)-dione (DPP(TBFu)2) and fullerene (C60). Additional DPP(TBFu)2:C60 composite films were studied by spectroscopy in the ultraviolet and visible region (UV-VIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that solvent annealing (SVA) of composite DPP(TBFu)2:C60 vacuum-deposited films with tetrahydrofuran vapors improves the solar cell parameters by increasing the efficiency more than tenfold. This could be related to the more homogenized structure of the SVA composite film, as observed by SEM. The increased light absorption, as shown by UV-VIS spectroscopy, around the peak at 350 nm contributed to the better SVA solar cell performance. Photogeneration in the samples follows a monomolecular mechanism.

  3. Structure and Dynamics of the Quiet Solar Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalkofen, Wolfgang; Wagner, William (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For the meeting of the AAS/SPD in Albuquerque, NM, I organized a Topical Session of the AAS on Structure and Dynamics of Chromospheres. The grant support was used to bring to the US two of the speakers from abroad. I had invited them for presentations at the Session: Dr. Klaus Wilhelm, the former PI of the SUMER instrument on SOHO, from the Max-Planck Institut in Lindau, Germany, and Dr. Sirajul Hasan, from the Indian Institute of Astrophysics in Bangalore, India. Both speakers preceded their trip to the AAS meeting with a stay at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, where they interacted with members of the Solar and Stellar Physics division. The highlights of the visits were the talks at the AAS/SPD meeting, in which six invited speakers told the audience of astronomers about current problems in solar physics and their relation to stellar problems. An important result of the visits is a paper by Dr. Wilhelm and me on 'Observations of the upper solar chromosphere with SUMER on SOHO', which has been submitted to Astronomy and Astrophysics for publication.

  4. Generation of magnetic structures on the solar photosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Gangadhara, R. T.; Krishan, V.; Bhowmick, A. K.; Chitre, S. M.

    2014-06-20

    The lower solar atmosphere is a partially ionized plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms. In this, which is essentially a three-fluid system, the Hall effect arises from the treatment of the electrons and ions as two separate fluids and the ambipolar diffusion arises from the inclusion of neutrals as the third fluid. The Hall effect and ambipolar diffusion have been shown to be operational in a region beginning from near the photosphere up to the chromosphere. In a partially ionized plasma, the magnetic induction is subjected to ambipolar diffusion and the Hall drift in addition to the usual resistive dissipation. These nonlinear effects create sharp magnetic structures which then submit themselves to various relaxation mechanisms. A first-principles derivation of these effects in a three-fluid system and an analytic solution to the magnetic induction equation in a stationary state are presented, which in the general case includes the Hall effect, ambipolar diffusion, and ohmic dissipation. The temporal evolution of the magnetic field is then investigated under the combined as well as the individual effects of the Hall drift and ambipolar diffusion to demonstrate the formation of steep magnetic structures and the resultant current sheet formation. These structures have just the right features for the release of magnetic energy into the solar atmosphere.

  5. Nonlinear development of shocklike structure in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Lee, E; Parks, G K; Wilber, M; Lin, N

    2009-07-17

    We report first in situ multispacecraft observations of nonlinear steepening of compressional pulses in the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock. The magnetic field of a compressional pulse formed at the upstream edge of density holes is shown to suddenly break and steepen into a shocklike structure. During the early phase of development thermalization of ions is insignificant. Substantial thermalization of ions occurs as gyrating ions are observed at the steepened edge. These observations indicate that the mechanisms causing the dissipation of magnetic fields (currents) and ions are different in the early phase of shock development. PMID:19659262

  6. Eight Key Facets of Small Business Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, James Calvert

    1980-01-01

    Identifies eight key facets of small business management and suggests activities that may be used to assist in their development. The key facets are (1) product or service, (2) competition, (3) marketing strategies, (4) personnel needs, (5) equipment and facility needs, (6) finances, (7) planning, and (8) entrepreneurship. (JOW)

  7. Growth of Au@Ag core-shell pentatwinned nanorods: tuning the end facets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiqing; Goh, Hao Ying Johnny; Firdoz, Shaik; Lu, Xianmao

    2013-09-16

    Au@Ag core-shell nanorods with tunable end facets are obtained by coating Au bipyramids (BPs) with Ag. The resultant nanorods exhibit a pentatwinned crystal structure with tips terminated with either {110} or {111} facets. The control over the end facets is achieved by varying the capping agents and tuning the reduction rate of Ag. Specifically, when Ag is reduced slowly, Au@Ag nanorods with flat {110} end facets are formed with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as the capping agent. If CTAB is replaced with cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), Au@Ag nanorods with tips terminated with {111} facets are obtained. However, at a high Ag reduction rate, dumbbell-shaped Au@Ag nanorods are formed, with either CTAB or CTAC as the capping agent. The morphological evolution of the nanorods in each case is closely followed and a growth mechanism is proposed. PMID:23934938

  8. Synthesis of nitrogen doped faceted titanium dioxide in pure brookite phase with enhanced visible light photoactivity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jian; Jiang, San Ping

    2016-05-01

    Brookite titanium dioxide (TiO2) is rarely studied, as compared with anatase and rutile phases TiO2, due to its comparatively lower photoactivity. It has been recently reported that brookite TiO2 with active facets exhibits excellent performance, however, synthesis of such faceted brookite TiO2 is difficult because of its low thermodynamic phase stability and low structural symmetric. Furthermore, like faceted anatase and rutile TiO2, faceted brookite TiO2 is not responsive to visible light due to its wide bandgap. In this study, a novel dopant, hydrazine, was introduced in the development of nitrogen doping. By applying this dopant, nitrogen doped brookite nanorods with active {120}, {111} and {011¯} facets were successfully synthesized. The resultant materials exhibited remarkably enhanced visible-light photoactivity in photodegradation. PMID:26866886

  9. Measured and predicted root-mean-square errors in square and triangular antenna mesh facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    Deflection shapes of square and equilateral triangular facets of two tricot-knit, gold plated molybdenum wire mesh antenna materials were measured and compared, on the basis of root mean square (rms) differences, with deflection shapes predicted by linear membrane theory, for several cases of biaxial mesh tension. The two mesh materials contained approximately 10 and 16 holes per linear inch, measured diagonally with respect to the course and wale directions. The deflection measurement system employed a non-contact eddy current proximity probe and an electromagnetic distance sensing probe in conjunction with a precision optical level. Despite experimental uncertainties, rms differences between measured and predicted deflection shapes suggest the following conclusions: that replacing flat antenna facets with facets conforming to parabolically curved structural members yields smaller rms surface error; that potential accuracy gains are greater for equilateral triangular facets than for square facets; and that linear membrane theory can be a useful tool in the design of tricot knit wire mesh antennas.

  10. Empirically Derived Strength of Residential Roof Structures for Solar Installations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; Sanchez, Alfred; Campos, Ivan A.; Gerstle, Walter H.

    2014-12-01

    Engineering certification for the installation of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules on wood roofs is often denied because existing wood roofs do not meet structural design codes. This work is intended to show that many roofs are actually sufficiently strong given the conservatism in codes, documented allowable strengths, roof structure system effects, and beam composite action produced by joist-sheathing interaction. This report provides results from a testing program to provide actual load carrying capacity of residential rooftops. The results reveal that the actual load carrying capacity of structural members and systems tested are significantly stronger than allowable loads provided by the International Residential Code (IRC 2009) and the national structural code found in Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-10). Engineering analysis of residential rooftops typically ignores the system affects and beam composite action in determining rooftop stresses given a potential PV installation. This extreme conservatism combined with conservatism in codes and published allowable stress values for roof building materials (NDS 2012) lead to the perception that well built homes may not have adequate load bearing capacity to enable a rooftop PV installation. However, based on the test results presented in this report of residential rooftop structural systems, the actual load bearing capacity is several times higher than published values (NDS 2012).