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Sample records for solid surfaces measured

  1. Direct measurement of surface stress of stretched soft solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Dufresne, Eric

    The wetting profile of liquid droplets on soft solids is determined by the competition between elasticity and solid surface stress. Near the contact point, the bulk elasticity becomes negligible such that Neumann's classic analysis nicely captures the wetting geometry and provides us an effective approach to directly measure the solid surface stress. Here, we report our experiments using confocal microscopy in studying the wetting of liquids on soft PDMS gels. While the droplets are sitting on the top, the substrates are biaxially strained. We observe that the wetting profiles and the three-phase contact angles are changing dramatically as the substrate is stretched. With Neumann's principle, we obtain the quantitative relation between surface stress of the PDMS and the applied strain. These results suggest a significant strain-dependence of surface energy and surface stress for our PDMS.

  2. Solid surface tension measured by a liquid drop under a solid film.

    PubMed

    Nadermann, Nichole; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand

    2013-06-25

    We show that a drop of liquid a few hundred microns in diameter placed under a solid, elastic, thin film (∼10 μm thick) causes it to bulge by tens of microns. The deformed shape is governed by equilibrium of tensions exerted by the various interfaces and the solid film, a form of Neumann's triangle. Unlike Young's equation, which specifies the contact angles at the junction of two fluids and a (rigid) solid, and is fundamentally underdetermined, both tensions in the solid film can be determined here if the liquid-vapor surface tension is known independently. Tensions in the solid film have a contribution from elastic stretch and a constant residual component. The residual component, extracted by extrapolation to films of vanishing thickness and supported by analysis of the elastic deformation, is interpreted as the solid-fluid surface tension, demonstrating that compliant thin-film structures can be used to measure solid surface tensions. PMID:23754440

  3. Measurement of Surface Tension of Solid Cu by Improved Multiphase Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, Masashi; Liukkonen, Matti; Friman, Michael; Heikinheimo, Erkki; Hämäläinen, Marko; Holappa, Lauri

    2008-08-01

    The surface tension of solid Cu was measured with the multiphase equilibrium (MPE) method in a Pb-Cu system at 700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C. A special focus was on the measurement of angles involved in MPE. First, the effect of reading error in each angle measurement on the final result of surface tension of solid was simulated. It was found that the two groove measurements under atmosphere conditions are the primary sources of error in the surface tension of solid in the present system. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to these angle measurements as a new method with high accuracy. The obtained surface-tension values of solid Cu in the present work were 1587, 1610, and 1521 mN/m at 700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C, respectively, representing reasonable temperature dependence.

  4. Quantitative Surface Emissivity and Temperature Measurements of a Burning Solid Fuel Accompanied by Soot Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piltch, Nancy D.; Pettegrew, Richard D.; Ferkul, Paul; Sacksteder, K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Surface radiometry is an established technique for noncontact temperature measurement of solids. We adapt this technique to the study of solid surface combustion where the solid fuel undergoes physical and chemical changes as pyrolysis proceeds, and additionally may produce soot. The physical and chemical changes alter the fuel surface emissivity, and soot contributes to the infrared signature in the same spectral band as the signal of interest. We have developed a measurement that isolates the fuel's surface emissions in the presence of soot, and determine the surface emissivity as a function of temperature. A commercially available infrared camera images the two-dimensional surface of ashless filter paper burning in concurrent flow. The camera is sensitive in the 2 to 5 gm band, but spectrally filtered to reduce the interference from hot gas phase combustion products. Results show a strong functional dependence of emissivity on temperature, attributed to the combined effects of thermal and oxidative processes. Using the measured emissivity, radiance measurements from several burning samples were corrected for the presence of soot and for changes in emissivity, to yield quantitative surface temperature measurements. Ultimately the results will be used to develop a full-field, non-contact temperature measurement that will be used in spacebased combustion investigations.

  5. Methods for measuring work surface illuminance in adaptive solid state lighting networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byungkun; Aldrich, Matthew; Paradiso, Joseph A.

    2011-10-01

    The inherent control flexibility implied by solid-state lighting - united with the rich details offered by sensor networks - prompts us to rethink lighting control. In this research, we propose several techniques for measuring work surface illuminance and ambient light using a sensor network. The primary goal of this research is to measure work surface illuminance without distraction to the user. We discuss these techniques, including the lessons learned from our prior research. We present a new method for measuring the illuminance contribution of an arbitrary luminaire at the work surface by decomposing the modulated light into its fundamental and harmonic components.

  6. Measurement of electronic structure at nanoscale solid-solid interfaces by surface-sensitive electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.-Q.; Henrich, Victor E.; Altman, Eric I.

    2008-01-07

    We explore the use of electron spectroscopy that samples the near-surface region of a crystal to study the electronic structure at the buried interfaces between two dissimilar transition-metal oxides. The interface is probed by comparing experimental ultraviolet photoelectron spectra to model spectra and by taking sequential differences between the experimental spectra as one oxide is grown on another. Using (100) Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NiO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CoO interfaces grown by molecular beam epitaxy, we show that there is a much higher density of electronic states at the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-CoO interface than at the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-NiO interface. The origin of this difference is discussed.

  7. Direct measurement of energy barriers on rough and heterogeneous solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, T.B.; LaGow, J.; Connelly, G.M.

    1996-12-31

    This paper will deal with the phenomenon of energy barriers to the spread of liquids on solids. These barriers often manifest themselves as a {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} of a sessile drop as liquid is added to it. That is, the volume of the drop increases, but the diameter does not. Thus the advancing contact angle ({theta}{sub a}) increases to a maximum. At the point where the hydrostatic pressure in the drop overcomes the {open_quotes}pinning{close_quotes} force the diameter suddenly increases and the drop relaxes to a metastable configuration which has a lower {theta}{sub a}. Energy barriers should be considered in many applications such as the spreading of liquid adhesives where thorough wetting is the goal. The interfacial forces involved are both long-range Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) forces and short-range acid-base (AB) forces. The authors will describe how they measure the energy barriers on real surfaces directly and resolve them into their LW and AB components.

  8. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness. PMID:25514470

  9. Temperature measurements on solid surfaces in rack-storage fires using IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, J.; Ren, N.; Chaos, M.

    2015-05-01

    The development of fire modeling tools capable of predicting large-scale fire phenomena is of great value to the fire science community. To this end, FM Global has developed an open-source CFD fire simulation code, FireFOAM. The accuracy of this code relies fundamentally on high-quality experimental validation data. However, at larger scales, detailed measurements of local quantities (e.g., surface temperatures) needed for model validation are difficult to obtain. Often, the information obtained from large-scale fire tests is limited to the global heat release rates (HRR) or point temperature or heat flux measurements from embedded thermocouples or heat flux gauges, respectively. The present study addresses this limitation by introducing IR thermographic measurements in a three- and a five-tier-high rack storage scenario. IR temperatures are compared against modeled results. The tested and modeled cases represent realistic industrial warehouse fire scenarios. The rack-stored commodity consisted of corrugated paperboard boxes wrapped around a steel cubic liners, placed on top of a hardwood pallet. The global heat release rate was measured using a 20- MW fire products collector located inside FM Global's Fire Technology Laboratory. An in-house calibrated microbolometer IR camera was used to obtain two-dimensional temperature measurements on the fuel surfaces and on the surfaces inside the flue spaces. Maximum temperatures up to 1200 K were observed on the external surfaces of the test array. Inside the flue spaces between pallet loads, temperatures up to 1400 K were measured. The modeled fire spread results match well fire spread shown in the IR thermographic images. The peak modeled surface temperatures obtained inside some of the horizontal flue spaces were ~1400K, which agreed well with the peak temperatures seen by the IR camera. The effect of the flames present between the surfaces of interest and the IR camera only contribute to about 50 K increase in measured

  10. Unified system for holographic measurement in fluid and solid mechanics: use of the system for 3D displacement measurement on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, Donald H.; Chan, Victor S. S.; Halliwell, Neil A.; Coupland, Jeremy M.

    1999-10-01

    This paper reports the use of a new holographic measurement system in the study of 3D surface displacements. Although equally applicable to fluid and solid mechanics, the aim of this report is to demonstrate the system's use in quantitative surface displacement measurements with a classical cantilever experiment, using a continuous-wave diode-pumped YAG laser system. The reported results exhibit an accuracy corresponding to other interferometric systems, but with a much larger displacement range. The measurement system employs a novel optical image shifting method to eliminate the problem of directional ambiguity. In addition, the reported system uses 3D complex correlation rather than 2D real correlation, thereby offering a direct method for measuring 3D displacement in 3D space. FInally, with the novel use of an optical fiber to probe the recorded holographic image space, it is found to be a simple matter to directly obtain 3D displacement measurements at precisely known surface locations.

  11. Study of the adsorbed layer on a solid electrode surface by specular reflection measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusu, Fumiyo; Takamura, Kiyoko

    1985-07-01

    Specular reflection measurements were carried out to study the adsorbed layers of certain heterocyclic compounds such as adenine, barbital, 2'-deoxyadenosine, phenobarbital, pyridine and thymine. When pyridine was present in 0.1M NaClO 4, a marked decrease in the reflectivity of a gold electrode was observed. In the potential range near the point of zero charge on the reflectivity-potential curve, the decrease was due to the adsorption of pyridine. Assuming the reflectivity change to be proportional to the surface coverage, the potential and concentration dependence of pyridine adsorption was determined and analysed on the basis of a Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm. The refractive indices and extinction coefficients for the adsorbed layers of the compounds investigated were evaluated using the observed reflectivity change, according to relations proposed by McIntyre and Aspnes.

  12. The critical size of brittle solid materials and the measurement of their surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamboliadis, Elias

    2012-12-01

    The relationship of the energy required to break a particle or a particulate material vs. particle size has been studied by many researchers. On the one hand, mineral processing engineers, who are interested in the specific energy (in joules per cubic meter or joules per kilogram) required for grinding, almost agree that it is inversely proportional to the particle size, although they might disagree on the type of the relationship. On the other hand, building and structural engineers, who are mainly interested in the strength of materials (in newtons per square meter or pascals), they almost agree that at the size range of the elements used, their strength depends on the quality of the material rather than its size. The present article shows that both groups of engineers are right about the size range of the bodies used by each one. However, there is a critical size that determines the fracture behavior of a brittle material. The definition of the critical size can be used to understand the practical results obtained as well as to measure the surface tension of the tested materials.

  13. Extracting local surface charges and charge regulation behavior from atomic force microscopy measurements at heterogeneous solid-electrolyte interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cunlu; Ebeling, Daniel; Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-10-01

    We present a method to determine the local surface charge of solid-liquid interfaces from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements that takes into account shifts of the adsorption/desorption equilibria of protons and ions as the cantilever tip approaches the sample. We recorded AFM force distance curves in dynamic mode with sharp tips on heterogeneous silica surfaces partially covered by gibbsite nano-particles immersed in an aqueous electrolyte with variable concentrations of dissolved NaCl and KCl at pH 5.8. Forces are analyzed in the framework of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in combination with a charge regulation boundary that describes adsorption and desorption reactions of protons and ions. A systematic method to extract the equilibrium constants of these reactions by simultaneous least-squared fitting to experimental data for various salt concentrations is developed and is shown to yield highly consistent results for silica-electrolyte interfaces. For gibbsite-electrolyte interfaces, the surface charge can be determined, yet, an unambiguous identification of the relevant surface speciation reactions is not possible, presumably due to a combination of intrinsic chemical complexity and heterogeneity of the nano-particle surfaces.

  14. Extracting local surface charges and charge regulation behavior from atomic force microscopy measurements at heterogeneous solid-electrolyte interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cunlu; Ebeling, Daniel; Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-10-21

    We present a method to determine the local surface charge of solid-liquid interfaces from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements that takes into account shifts of the adsorption/desorption equilibria of protons and ions as the cantilever tip approaches the sample. We recorded AFM force distance curves in dynamic mode with sharp tips on heterogeneous silica surfaces partially covered by gibbsite nano-particles immersed in an aqueous electrolyte with variable concentrations of dissolved NaCl and KCl at pH 5.8. Forces are analyzed in the framework of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in combination with a charge regulation boundary that describes adsorption and desorption reactions of protons and ions. A systematic method to extract the equilibrium constants of these reactions by simultaneous least-squared fitting to experimental data for various salt concentrations is developed and is shown to yield highly consistent results for silica-electrolyte interfaces. For gibbsite-electrolyte interfaces, the surface charge can be determined, yet, an unambiguous identification of the relevant surface speciation reactions is not possible, presumably due to a combination of intrinsic chemical complexity and heterogeneity of the nano-particle surfaces. PMID:26377347

  15. Attractive forces between hydrophobic solid surfaces measured by AFM on the first approach in salt solutions and in the presence of dissolved gases.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Mehdi; Nguyen, Anh V; Yakubov, Gleb E

    2015-02-17

    Interfacial gas enrichment of dissolved gases (IGE) has been shown to cover hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) data has recently been supported by molecular dynamics simulation. It was demonstrated that IGE is responsible for the unexpected stability and large contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles at the hydrophobic solid-water interface. Here we provide further evidence of the significant effect of IGE on an attractive force between hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The force in the presence of dissolved gas, i.e., in aerated and nonaerated NaCl solutions (up to 4 M), was measured by the AFM colloidal probe technique. The effect of nanobubble bridging on the attractive force was minimized or eliminated by measuring forces on the first approach of the AFM probe toward the flat hydrophobic surface and by using high salt concentrations to reduce gas solubility. Our results confirm the presence of three types of forces, two of which are long-range attractive forces of capillary bridging origin as caused by either surface nanobubbles or gap-induced cavitation. The third type is a short-range attractive force observed in the absence of interfacial nanobubbles that is attributed to the IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) at hydrophobic surfaces. Such a force was found to increase with increasing gas saturation and to decrease with decreasing gas solubility. PMID:25627159

  16. Associating fluids near solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, Chad James

    1998-09-01

    The properties of fluids near interfaces, in particular, the fluid-solid interfaces on which this work is concentrated, are important in many processes, such as: wettability as related to oil recovery and environmental cleanup, biochemical separation, bio-compatibility of materials, membrane separation, adsorption in porous solids and micro- or nanomanufacturing of thin films. However, little of the past simulation and theoretical work in the field has considered associating fluids. In this work we perform Metropolis Monte Carlo computer simulations for one-sited (dimerizing), two-sited (linear chain forming), and four-sited (cluster forming) hard spheres against hard, smooth walls. Reported are results for density and fraction of monomers (which determines the change in Helmholtz free energy due to association according to Wertheim's theory) versus distance from the surface. Also computed are adsorption and for the four- site fluid, orientation, cluster size, and fraction of sites bonded as functions of distance from the surfaces. We also consider binary mixtures and an associating fluid near active surfaces. Except for orientation and cluster size, results are compared (favorably, in general) against a new density functional theory, which combines elements of the Tarazona density functional for hard spheres and Wertheim's theory of association. This dissertation concludes with ideas for further work in the area.

  17. Solid surface mapping by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, M C; Osuna, S; Baráibar, I

    2005-09-16

    Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at infinite dilution, is a technique for characterising solid surfaces. Current practice is the injection of n-alkane homologous series to obtain the free energy of adsorption of the CH2 group, from which the London component of the solid surface free energy, gamma(d)s, is calculated. A value around 40 mJ/m2 is obtained for poly(ethylene), and 30 mJ/m2 for a clean glass fibre, while the potential surface interactivity of a glass fibre is far greater than that of poly(ethylene). A specific component of the surface, in mJ/m2, should be calculated in order to obtain significant parameters. As applied up to date, when calculating the specific component of the surface energy, the fact that W(sp)a energy values are in a totally different scale than AN or DN values is a major drawback. Consequently, Ka and Kb values obtained are in arbitrary energy units, different from those of the London component measured by injecting the n-alkane series. This paper proposes a method to obtain Ka and Kb values of the surface in the same energetic scale than the London component. The method enables us to correct the traditional London component of a solid, obtaining a new value, where the amount of WaCH2 accounting for Debye interactions with polar sites, is excluded. As a result, an approach to surface mapping is performed in several different substrate materials. We show results obtained on different solid surfaces: poly(ethylene), clean glass fibre, glass beads, chemically modified glass beads and carbon fibre. PMID:16130707

  18. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Thomas J.; Kotidis, Petros A.; Woodroffe, Jaime A.; Rostler, Peter S.

    1995-01-01

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-04-25

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  20. Femtosecond laser controlled wettability of solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng; Yang, Qing; Hou, Xun

    2015-12-14

    Femtosecond laser microfabrication is emerging as a hot tool for controlling the wettability of solid surfaces. This paper introduces four typical aspects of femtosecond laser induced special wettability: superhydrophobicity, underwater superoleophobicity, anisotropic wettability, and smart wettability. The static properties are characterized by the contact angle measurement, while the dynamic features are investigated by the sliding behavior of a liquid droplet. Using different materials and machining methods results in different rough microstructures, patterns, and even chemistry on the solid substrates. So, various beautiful wettabilities can be realized because wettability is mainly dependent on the surface topography and chemical composition. The distinctions of the underlying formation mechanism of these wettabilities are also described in detail. PMID:26415826

  1. Examination of instability growth in solid liner surfaces using comparisons of two dimensional MHD calculations and measured data

    SciTech Connect

    Atchison, W.L.; Faehl, R.J.; Morgan, D.V.; Reinovsky, R.E.

    1997-10-01

    Experiments being conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus facility are examining stability issues for driving an aluminum liner with a pulsed magnetic field. The Pegasus facility provides a current of 5 to 8 Megamperes to compress a cylindrical liner. Liners of various size and thickness are used, depending on the specific experimental objectives. In several of these experiments, the outer surface clearly develops perturbations in the mass distribution. These perturbations are strongest when the aluminum is suspected to have melted and in some cases partially vaporized. A series of specific experiments was designed to examine the growth rate of these instabilities. These experiments involved machining a sine wave onto the outer surface of the liner to seed a given wavelength. Two-dimensional MHD calculations, using the measured current profile, were performed to model the behavior of the liner under magnetic field compression. These predictions were made with a 2D Eulerian code complete with a Steinburg-Guinan strength model. The results of these calculations will be discussed in this paper. The density contours at specific times will be compared with the processed radiography.

  2. Nanofluids alter the surface wettability of solids.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sangwook; Horiuchi, Hiroki; Nikolov, Alex D; Wasan, Darsh

    2015-06-01

    We report the results of our studies on the changes in the contact angle and interfacial tension using a nanofluid composed of silica nanoparticles dispersed in water on three different solid substrates: gold (partially hydrophobic), glass (hydrophilic), and a silicon wafer (hydrophilic). We used both the goniometric method and drop-shape analysis to make the measurements. On the basis of the results of the drop-shape analysis using the Laplace equation, we evaluated the contributions of the interfacial tension change to the equilibrium contact angle and the presence of nanoparticles near the solid substrate, thereby elucidating the change in the wettability of the solid substrate. We found that the nanoparticles decrease the contact angle of the substrate with the increase in the nanoparticle concentration. To rationalize our experimental observations on the decrease in the contact angle of the solid substrate in the presence of nanoparticles, we calculated the surface volume fraction of the nanoparticles in the layer near the solid substrate using the particle layering model (based on the nanoparticles' excluded volume effect). We found that the volume fraction of the nanoparticles in the layer close to the substrate increased with an increase in the nanoparticle volume fraction in the bulk and correlated qualitatively with the change in the substrate wettability. The extent of the wettability alteration depends on the volume fraction of the nanoparticles, their size, and the type of substrate. We found a strong correlation between the change in the substrate wettability and the nanoparticle volume fraction in the layer closer to the substrate surface. PMID:25919686

  3. Stable water layers on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying-Jhan; Tai, Lin-Ai; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chang, Pin; Yang, Chung-Shi; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-02-17

    Liquid layers adhered to solid surfaces and that are in equilibrium with the vapor phase are common in printing, coating, and washing processes as well as in alveoli in lungs and in stomata in leaves. For such a liquid layer in equilibrium with the vapor it faces, it has been generally believed that, aside from liquid lumps, only a very thin layer of the liquid, i.e., with a thickness of only a few nanometers, is held onto the surface of the solid, and that this adhesion is due to van der Waals forces. A similar layer of water can remain on the surface of a wall of a microchannel after evaporation of bulk water creates a void in the channel, but the thickness of such a water layer has not yet been well characterized. Herein we showed such a water layer adhered to a microchannel wall to be 100 to 170 nm thick and stable against surface tension. The water layer thickness was measured using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and the water layer structure was characterized by using a quantitative nanoparticle counting technique. This thickness was found for channel gap heights ranging from 1 to 5 μm. Once formed, the water layers in the microchannel, when sealed, were stable for at least one week without any special care. Our results indicate that the water layer forms naturally and is closely associated only with the surface to which it adheres. Our study of naturally formed, stable water layers may shed light on topics from gas exchange in alveoli in biology to the post-wet-process control in the semiconductor industry. We anticipate our report to be a starting point for more detailed research and understanding of the microfluidics, mechanisms and applications of gas-liquid-solid systems. PMID:26856872

  4. Program Generates Images Of Solid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, Sharon P.; Bell, Bradley; Shores, David

    1991-01-01

    Solid Surface Modeler (SSM) computer program generates three-dimensional computer models of solid surfaces for use in visual analysis and animation. Provides advanced functions, including Constructive Solid Geometry, Skin Construction, Tube Construction, Material Property Editing, and Texture Map Tools. Allows user to change such attributes as color, reflectivity, smoothing, and position of object easily. Model saved in ASCII or binary format for use in another program or saved in edit format for reloading in SSM. Written in standard C.

  5. SU-E-T-96: Demonstration of a Consistent Method for Correcting Surface Dose Measurements Using Both Solid State and Ionization Chamber Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T; Gerbi, B; Higgins, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the surface dose (SD) measured using a PTW 30-360 extrapolation chamber with different commonly used dosimeters (Ds): parallel plate ion chambers (ICs): RMI-449 (Attix), Capintec PS-033, PTW 30-329 (Markus) and Memorial; TLD chips (cTLD), TLD powder (pTLD), optically stimulated (OSLs), radiochromic (EXR2) and radiographic (EDR2) films, and to provide an intercomparison correction to Ds for each of them. Methods: Investigations were performed for a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian Clinac 2300, 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm). The Ds were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth dref=1.7cm. The measurements for cTLD, OSLs, EDR2 and EXR2 were corrected to SD using an extrapolation method (EM) indexed to the baseline PTW 30-360 measurements. A consistent use of the EM involved: 1) irradiation of three Ds stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. An additional measurement was performed with externally exposed OSLs (eOSLs), that were rotated out of their protective housing. Results: All single Ds measurements overestimated the SD compared with the extrapolation chamber, except for Attix IC. The closest match to the true SD was measured with the Attix IC (− 0.1%), followed by pTLD (0.5%), Capintec (4.5%), Memorial (7.3%), Markus (10%), cTLD (11.8%), eOSL (12.8%), EXR2 (14%), EDR2 (14.8%) and OSL (26%). The EM method of correction for SD worked well for all Ds, except the unexposed OSLs. Conclusion: This EM cross calibration of solid state detectors with an extrapolation or Attix chamber can provide thickness corrections for cTLD, eOSLs, EXR2, and EDR2. Standard packaged OSLs were not found to be simply corrected.

  6. Eigenstress model for electrochemistry of solid surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongxin; Xiong, Xilin; Gao, Panpan; Li, Xi; Yan, Yu; Volinsky, Alex A.; Su, Yanjing

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic analysis and molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to systematically study the size-dependent electrochemical response of solids. By combining the generalized Young-Laplace equation with the popular Butler-Volmer formulation, the direct influence of surface stress on solid film electrochemical reactions was isolated. A series of thermodynamic formulas were developed to describe the size-dependent electrochemical properties of the solid surface. These formulas include intrinsic surface elastic parameters, such as surface eigenstress and surface elastic modulus. Metallic films of Au, Pt, Ni, Cu and Fe were studied as examples. The anodic current density of the metal film increased, while the equilibrium potential decreased with increasing solid film thickness. PMID:27256492

  7. Eigenstress model for electrochemistry of solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongxin; Xiong, Xilin; Gao, Panpan; Li, Xi; Yan, Yu; Volinsky, Alex A; Su, Yanjing

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic analysis and molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to systematically study the size-dependent electrochemical response of solids. By combining the generalized Young-Laplace equation with the popular Butler-Volmer formulation, the direct influence of surface stress on solid film electrochemical reactions was isolated. A series of thermodynamic formulas were developed to describe the size-dependent electrochemical properties of the solid surface. These formulas include intrinsic surface elastic parameters, such as surface eigenstress and surface elastic modulus. Metallic films of Au, Pt, Ni, Cu and Fe were studied as examples. The anodic current density of the metal film increased, while the equilibrium potential decreased with increasing solid film thickness. PMID:27256492

  8. A measurement method for distinguishing the real contact area of rough surfaces of transparent solids using improved Otsu technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bao-Jiang; Yan, Shao-Ze; Xiang, Wu-Wei-Kai

    2015-01-01

    An experimental method of measuring the real contact area of transparent blocks based on the principle of total internal reflection is presented, intending to support the investigation of friction characteristics, heat conduction, and energy dissipation at the contact interface. A laser sheet illuminates the contact interface, and the transmitted laser sheet is projected onto a screen. Then the contact information is acquired from the screen by a camera. An improved Otsu method is proposed to process the data of experimental images. It can compute the threshold of the overall image and filter out all the pixels one by one. Through analyzing the experimental results, we describe the relationship between the real contact area and the positive pressure during a continuous loading process, at different loading rates, with the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) material. A hysteresis phenomenon in the relationship between the real contact area and the positive pressure is found and explained. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11272171), the Beijing Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. 3132030), and the Education Ministry Doctoral Fund of China (Grant No. 20120002110070).

  9. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  10. Resonance Scattering Mechanisms in Solids and at Solid Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Andrew D.

    1987-09-01

    The concept of resonance electron scattering is applied to two very different solid state systems, one at the surface of a solid and one in the bulk. In part I, the problem of resonance scattering of electrons from molecules adsorbed on a metallic surface is examined. An analysis is made of the factors leading to the broadening and energy shift of the e -N _{2} vibrational excitation cross sections as compared to their gas phase analogues. Two effects are found to be important: the breaking of the molecular symmetry by the surface, and the influence of the metallic image potential. Multiple scattering calculations verify that these mechanisms produce a broadening and energy shift in the range of those seen experimentally. In part II, a new mechanism is formulated for the attenuation of ultrasound in mixed valence metals. The mechanism is based on the coupling of phonons to electrons in localized, atomic-like f-levels. The local nature of the interaction gives rise to a large enhancement over the standard (Pippard) result, especially in the limit of short electron mean free path. The mechanism also produces a 'bump' in the attenuation coefficient as a function of temperature, offering an explanation for the experimentally observed 12 K feature of UPt_{3} . A calculation of the attenuation coefficient for a mixed valence lattice reveals further enhancement and structure caused by coherent absorption at f-levels in many unit cells. The effects of degeneracy and correlation are examined in a calculation of the ultrasound attenuation for a system containing dilute Kondo impurities. The unifying theme of this work is the strong interaction between electrons and vibrational modes resulting from the trapping of electrons in localized resonance states. This mechanism has previously been seen to be of great importance for electron-molecule collisions in the gas phase. In the present work, its importance is demonstrated for scattering processes in solids and at solid surfaces

  11. Localized surface instabilities of stressed solids

    SciTech Connect

    Colin, J.; Grilhe, J.; Junqua, N.

    1998-12-31

    Localized instabilities formation on the free surface of solids has been studied when sources of non-homogeneous stress such as dislocations or precipitates are present in the bulk. This formalism of localized perturbations has been used to describe the butterfly transformation of cubic precipitates in superalloys and the contraction of rectangular specimens under stress.

  12. Dislocation-driven surface dynamics on solids.

    PubMed

    Kodambaka, S; Khare, S V; Swiech, W; Ohmori, K; Petrov, I; Greene, J E

    2004-05-01

    Dislocations are line defects that bound plastically deformed regions in crystalline solids. Dislocations terminating on the surface of materials can strongly influence nanostructural and interfacial stability, mechanical properties, chemical reactions, transport phenomena, and other surface processes. While most theoretical and experimental studies have focused on dislocation motion in bulk solids under applied stress and step formation due to dislocations at surfaces during crystal growth, very little is known about the effects of dislocations on surface dynamics and morphological evolution. Here we investigate the near-equilibrium dynamics of surface-terminated dislocations using low-energy electron microscopy. We observe, in real time, the thermally driven nucleation and shape-preserving growth of spiral steps rotating at constant temperature-dependent angular velocities around cores of dislocations terminating on the (111) surface of TiN in the absence of applied external stress or net mass change. We attribute this phenomenon to point-defect migration from the bulk to the surface along dislocation lines. Our results demonstrate that dislocation-mediated surface roughening can occur even in the absence of deposition or evaporation, and provide fundamental insights into mechanisms controlling nanostructural stability. PMID:15129275

  13. Drop Impact on a Solid Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josserand, C.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    A drop hitting a solid surface can deposit, bounce, or splash. Splashing arises from the breakup of a fine liquid sheet that is ejected radially along the substrate. Bouncing and deposition depend crucially on the wetting properties of the substrate. In this review, we focus on recent experimental and theoretical studies, which aim at unraveling the underlying physics, characterized by the delicate interplay of not only liquid inertia, viscosity, and surface tension, but also the surrounding gas. The gas cushions the initial contact; it is entrapped in a central microbubble on the substrate; and it promotes the so-called corona splash, by lifting the lamella away from the solid. Particular attention is paid to the influence of surface roughness, natural or engineered to enhance repellency, relevant in many applications.

  14. Characterization of the Surface of Moving Solid $(4) $ 4 He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livne, Ethan; Eyal, Anna; Scaly, Ori; Polturak, Emil

    2015-08-01

    Crystal grains of solid He can move in relation to each other even when embedded inside the solid [1, 2]. In this work, we characterize a macroscopic motion of solid hcp He composed of such grains. Motion is induced by applying an external torque to the solid contained inside an annular channel mounted on a torsional oscillator. In order to characterize the surface of the moving solid, we developed an in situ flow detection method using a sensitive "microphone" embedded in the wall of the channel. Motion is detected by counting the vibrations induced by rows of He atoms moving past the microphone. Such vibrations were detected only at T = 0.5 K, our lowest temperature. At this temperature, the measured dissipation associated with the solid He is zero within our accuracy. Our results indicate that the orientation of the surface of the moving solid is the (0001) basal plane of the hcp structure. At T = 0.5 K, we found that for speeds m/s, the solid flows without detectable friction.

  15. Solid Surface Combustion Experiment Yields Significant Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacksteder, Kurt R.; Koudelka, John M.; Vergilii, Franklin

    1999-01-01

    The spread of a flame over solid fuel is not only a fundamental textbook combustion phenomenon, but also the central element of destructive fires that cause tragic loss of life and property each year. Throughout history, practical measures to prevent and fight fires have been developed, but these have often been based on lessons learned in a costly fire. Since the 1960 s, scientists and engineers have employed powerful tools of scientific research to understand the details of flame spread and how a material can be rendered nonflammable. High-speed computers have enabled complex flame simulations, whereasand lasers have provided measurements of the chemical composition, temperature, and air velocities inside flames. The microgravity environment has emerged as the third great tool for these studies. Spreading flames are complex combinations of chemical reactions and several physical processes including the transport of oxygen and fuel vapor to the flame and the transfer of heat from the flame to fresh fuel and to the surroundings. Depending on its speed, air motion in the vicinity of the flame can affect the flame in substantially different ways. For example, consider the difference between blowing on a campfire and blowing out a match. On Earth, gravity induces air motion because of buoyancy (the familiar rising hot gases); this process cannot be controlled experimentally. For theoreticians, buoyant air motion complicates the problem modeling of flame spread beyond the capacity of modern computers to simulate. The microgravity environment provides experimental control of air motion near spreading flames, with results that can be compared with detailed theory. The Solid Surface Combustion Experiment (SSCE) was designed to obtain benchmark flame spreading data in quiescent test atmospheres--the limiting case of flames spreading. Professor Robert Altenkirch, Vice President for Research at Mississippi State University, proposed the experiment concept, and the NASA Lewis

  16. How solid-liquid adhesive property regulates liquid slippage on solid surfaces?

    PubMed

    Xue, Yahui; Wu, Yang; Pei, Xiaowei; Duan, Huiling; Xue, Qunji; Zhou, Feng

    2015-01-13

    The influence of solid-liquid adhesive property on liquid slippage at solid surfaces has been investigated using experiment approach on well-defined model surfaces as well as theoretical analysis. Based on a classical molecular-kinetic description for molecular and hydrodynamic slip, we propose a simple theoretical model that directly relates the liquid slip length to the liquid adhesive force on solid surfaces, which yields an exponential decay function. Well-defined smooth surfaces with varied surface wettability/adhesion are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers on gold with different mole ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic thiols. The adhesive force of a water droplet and the molecular slippage on these surfaces are probed by surface force apparatus and quartz crystal microbalance measurements, respectively. The experiment results are well consistent with our theoretical prediction. Our finding benefits the understanding of the underlying mechanism of liquid slippage on solid surfaces at molecular level and the rational design of microfluidics with an aim to be frictionless or highly controllable. PMID:25511171

  17. A soft solid surface on Titan as revealed by the Huygens Surface Science Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarnecki, John C.; Leese, Mark R.; Hathi, Brijen; Ball, Andrew J.; Hagermann, Axel; Towner, Martin C.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; McDonnell, J. Anthony M.; Green, Simon F.; Patel, Manish R.; Ringrose, Timothy J.; Rosenberg, Philip D.; Atkinson, Karl R.; Paton, Mark D.; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Clark, Benton C.; Ferri, Francesca; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Ghafoor, Nadeem A. L.; Kargl, Günter; Svedhem, Håkan; Delderfield, John; Grande, Manuel; Parker, David J.; Challenor, Peter G.; Geake, John E.

    2005-12-01

    The surface of Saturn's largest satellite-Titan-is largely obscured by an optically thick atmospheric haze, and so its nature has been the subject of considerable speculation and discussion. The Huygens probe entered Titan's atmosphere on 14 January 2005 and descended to the surface using a parachute system. Here we report measurements made just above and on the surface of Titan by the Huygens Surface Science Package. Acoustic sounding over the last 90m above the surface reveals a relatively smooth, but not completely flat, surface surrounding the landing site. Penetrometry and accelerometry measurements during the probe impact event reveal that the surface was neither hard (like solid ice) nor very compressible (like a blanket of fluffy aerosol); rather, the Huygens probe landed on a relatively soft solid surface whose properties are analogous to wet clay, lightly packed snow and wet or dry sand. The probe settled gradually by a few millimetres after landing.

  18. A soft solid surface on Titan as revealed by the Huygens Surface Science Package.

    PubMed

    Zarnecki, John C; Leese, Mark R; Hathi, Brijen; Ball, Andrew J; Hagermann, Axel; Towner, Martin C; Lorenz, Ralph D; McDonnell, J Anthony M; Green, Simon F; Patel, Manish R; Ringrose, Timothy J; Rosenberg, Philip D; Atkinson, Karl R; Paton, Mark D; Banaszkiewicz, Marek; Clark, Benton C; Ferri, Francesca; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Ghafoor, Nadeem A L; Kargl, Günter; Svedhem, Håkan; Delderfield, John; Grande, Manuel; Parker, David J; Challenor, Peter G; Geake, John E

    2005-12-01

    The surface of Saturn's largest satellite--Titan--is largely obscured by an optically thick atmospheric haze, and so its nature has been the subject of considerable speculation and discussion. The Huygens probe entered Titan's atmosphere on 14 January 2005 and descended to the surface using a parachute system. Here we report measurements made just above and on the surface of Titan by the Huygens Surface Science Package. Acoustic sounding over the last 90 m above the surface reveals a relatively smooth, but not completely flat, surface surrounding the landing site. Penetrometry and accelerometry measurements during the probe impact event reveal that the surface was neither hard (like solid ice) nor very compressible (like a blanket of fluffy aerosol); rather, the Huygens probe landed on a relatively soft solid surface whose properties are analogous to wet clay, lightly packed snow and wet or dry sand. The probe settled gradually by a few millimetres after landing. PMID:16319828

  19. Solid Surface Combustion at Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The spread of a flame in the gas over the surface of a solid combustible involves in an essential way the transfer of heat from the flame to the solid fuel immediately ahead of it. This heat transfer is affected by the character of the gas phase flame, and so the phenomenon of flame spreading under reduced gravity, in which the flow is generated by gasification of the solid combustible, is apt to be different from what occurs under the Earth's normal gravitational acceleration where the flow is largely buoyancy driven. An experiment is being designed for the Middeck of the Space Shuttle to aid us in understanding the process of flame spreading in the absence of a buoyancy driven flow. A chamber approximately 0.35 cu.m. in volume is to contain either a thin sample of a cellulosic material or a thick sample of polymethyl-methacrylate and an oxidizing environment of O2 and N2. Samples will be ignited at one end, and the ensuing flame spread will be filmed. The spread rate can be determined from the films, and surface and gas-phase temperatures just above the surface will also be recorded. These data will help to clarify the mechanism of forward heat transfer in the low gravity flames.

  20. Interactions between flames on parallel solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    1995-01-01

    The interactions between flames spreading over parallel solid sheets of paper are being studied in normal gravity and in microgravity. This geometry is of practical importance since in most heterogeneous combustion systems, the condensed phase is non-continuous and spatially distributed. This spatial distribution can strongly affect burning and/or spread rate. This is due to radiant and diffusive interactions between the surface and the flames above the surfaces. Tests were conducted over a variety of pressures and separation distances to expose the influence of the parallel sheets on oxidizer transport and on radiative feedback.

  1. Percent solids measurement using Coriolis technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.; Schietinger, M.

    1995-12-31

    In many industrial processes, measurement of percent solids is vital to product quality. Percent solids values are most often derived form measurement of density, specific gravity and refractive index. In the lab and in the process, measurement methods range from nuclear and refractometer to vibrating tube. For on-line measurement, Coriolis technology, a vibrating tube approach, is playing a more significant role. Coriolis technology is best known for the performance and benefits it provides for direct mass flow measurement. This discussion focuses on Coriolis technology as an option for percent solids measurement and its ability to provide real-time data for controlling the process, maintaining consistency, improving quality, and controlling costs. The combined abilities of a Coriolis mass flowmeter to provide direct mass flow and percent solids information simultaneously provides real-time control that is unattainable with any other single technology.

  2. Measurement of surface microtopography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.; Farr, T. G.; Muller, J.-P.; Lewis, P.; Leberl, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    Acquisition of ground truth data for use in microwave interaction modeling requires measurement of surface roughness sampled at intervals comparable to a fraction of the microwave wavelength and extensive enough to adequately represent the statistics of a surface unit. Sub-centimetric measurement accuracy is thus required over large areas, and existing techniques are usually inadequate. A technique is discussed for acquiring the necessary photogrammetric data using twin film cameras mounted on a helicopter. In an attempt to eliminate tedious data reduction, an automated technique was applied to the helicopter photographs, and results were compared to those produced by conventional stereogrammetry. Derived root-mean-square (RMS) roughness for the same stereo-pair was 7.5 cm for the automated technique versus 6.5 cm for the manual method. The principal source of error is probably due to vegetation in the scene, which affects the automated technique but is ignored by a human operator.

  3. Rupture and dewetting of water films on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mulji, Neil; Chandra, Sanjeev

    2010-12-01

    An experimental study was conducted to observe rupture and dewetting of water films, 0.5-2mm thick, on solid surfaces. The effects of surface roughness, wettability, protrusions on surfaces, and air entrapment between films and surfaces were studied. Film thickness measurements were made and film rupture and surface dewetting photographed. Experiments showed that liquid films ruptured first along the highest edges of test surfaces. Placing a protrusion on the surface had no effect-the liquid film continued to rupture along the edges. A thermodynamic model was developed to show that protrusions lower the surface energy of the system and promote wetting. Increasing surface roughness therefore increases film stability by resisting rupture and dewetting. Water films could be punctured by introducing an air bubble that burst and created a hole. The hole would close if the film was thick and the solid-liquid contact angle was either small or large; the hole would grow larger if the film was thin and the contact angle was in the mid-range (∼80°). An analytical model that calculates the difference between the surface energies of the two states can be used to predict whether a hole would lead to surface dewetting or not. PMID:20817200

  4. Acoustic Measurements for Small Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Models have been developed to predict large solid rocket motor acoustic loads based on the scaling of small solid rocket motors. MSFC has measured several small solid rocket motors in horizontal and launch configurations to anchor these models. Solid Rocket Test Motor (SRTM) has ballistics similar to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) therefore a good choice for acoustic scaling. Acoustic measurements were collected during the test firing of the Insulation Configuration Extended Length (ICXL) 7,6, and 8 (in firing order) in order to compare to RSRM horizontal firing data. The scope of this presentation includes: Acoustic test procedures and instrumentation implemented during the three SRTM firings and Data analysis method and general trends observed in the data.

  5. Laboratory Measurements of Celestial Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, A. J.; Beckwith, S. V. W.

    1997-01-01

    Our experimental study has focused on laboratory measurements of the low temperature optical properties of a variety of astronomically significant materials in the infrared and mm-wave region of the spectrum. Our far infrared measurements of silicate grains with an open structure have produced a variety of unusual results: (1) the low temperature mass opacity coefficient of small amorphous 2MgO(central dot)SiO2 and MgO(central dot)2SiO2 grains are many times larger than the values previously used for interstellar grain material; (2) all of the amorphous silicate grains studied possess the characteristic temperature dependent signature associated with two level systems in bulk glass; and (3) a smaller but nonzero two level temperature dependence signature is also observed for crystalline particles, its physical origin is unclear. These laboratory measurements yield surprisingly large and variable values for the mm-wave absorption coefficients of small silicate particles similar to interstellar grains, and suggest that the bulk absorptivity of interstellar dust at these long wavelengths will not be well known without such studies. Furthermore, our studies have been useful to better understand the physics of the two level absorption process in amorphous and crystalline grains to gain confidence in the wide applicability of these results.

  6. Gravity effects on flame spreading over solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andracchio, C. R.; Cochran, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the spreading of a flame over a solid combustible surface were determined. Flame propagation rates were measured from specimens of thin cellulose acetate sheets burning in both normal gravity (1 g) and reduced gravity (0 g) environments; the specimens were burned in various quiescent mixtures of oxygen, helium, argon, and nitrogen. A correlation for normal gravity and reduced gravity burning was obtained based on theoretical models of previous investigators.

  7. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  8. Particle engineering in pharmaceutical solids processing: surface energy considerations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Daryl R

    2015-01-01

    During the past 10 years particle engineering in the pharmaceutical industry has become a topic of increasing importance. Engineers and pharmacists need to understand and control a range of key unit manufacturing operations such as milling, granulation, crystallisation, powder mixing and dry powder inhaled drugs which can be very challenging. It has now become very clear that in many of these particle processing operations, the surface energy of the starting, intermediate or final products is a key factor in understanding the processing operation and or the final product performance. This review will consider the surface energy and surface energy heterogeneity of crystalline solids, methods for the measurement of surface energy, effects of milling on powder surface energy, adhesion and cohesion on powder mixtures, crystal habits and surface energy, surface energy and powder granulation processes, performance of DPI systems and finally crystallisation conditions and surface energy. This review will conclude that the importance of surface energy as a significant factor in understanding the performance of many particulate pharmaceutical products and processes has now been clearly established. It is still nevertheless, work in progress both in terms of development of methods and establishing the limits for when surface energy is the key variable of relevance. PMID:25876912

  9. A study on solid modelling with surface trimming method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching-Yun; Chang, San-Cheng

    1993-07-01

    This paper proposes a Surface Trimming Method based on the intersection curves between free-form surfaces so that a complex solid model with several primitive surfaces can be constructed. These solid models will not only be used by the mechanical engineering industry to design and analyze conventional mechanical parts, but will also be used by the civil engineers to design and analyze structures of irregular shape. The scope of solid modelling application is thus enhanced.

  10. Control of physical properties on solid surface via laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Nishimura, Akihiko

    2012-07-01

    In a safety operation of a nuclear power plant, vapor conditions such as a droplet or liquid membrane toward a solid surface of a heat exchanger and reactor vessel is important. In the present study, focusing on the droplet, the wettability on solid surface and surface free energy of solid are evaluated. In addition, wettability on a metal plate fabricated by laser processing is also considered for the nuclear engineering application.

  11. Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect from Scratches on Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapke, B. W.; Piatek, J. L.; Nelson, R. M.; Smythe, W. D.; Hale, A. S.

    2003-05-01

    Shepard and Arvidson [1] discovered that the solid surfaces of rocks exhibit an opposition effect. We have measured the phase curve of a natural surface of a piece of solid basalt between 0.05 and 5 degrees in circularly polarized light using the JPL long arm goniometer and confirmed that it has an opposition effect. The circular polarization ratio (CPR) increased with decreasing phase angle, consistent with a coherent backscatter opposition effect (CBOE) Recent laboratory investigations of the CBOE in planetary regolith analogs [2,3,4] have revealed that the width of the peak is remarkably insensitive to particle size, in strong contrast to theoretical expectations. We have hypothesized that one of the reasons for this might be that multiple scattering between irregularities, such as scratches, on the surfaces of a particle could cause coherent backscatter, in addition to scattering between particles. To test this hypothesis we ground the surface of a piece of plate glass with 5 micrometer abrasive and measured its phase curve. As the phase angle decreases, the intensity increases and the CPR decreases, consistent with specular reflection. However, near zero phase there is a nonlinear rise about 2 degrees wide superimposed on the linear specular peak accompanied by an increase in CPR, showing that coherent backscatter is occuring. A piece of commercial diffusing glass exhibited the same phenomena. These results support our hypothesis and also provide a possible explanation for the observations of opposition effects from the solid surfaces of rocks. This research was supported by a grant from NASA's PGG Program References cited: [1] Shepard and Arvidson, Icarus, 141, 172-178 (1999). [2] Nelson et al, Icarus, 147, 545-558 (2000). [3] Nelson et al, Planet. Space Sci., 50, 849-856 (2002). [4] Piatek et al, Abstract, DPS Conference (2003).

  12. Turbulent boundary layer over solid and porous surfaces with small roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, F. Y.; Schetz, J. A.; Collier, F.

    1982-01-01

    Skin friction and profiles of mean velocity, axial and normal turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stress in the untripped boundary layer were measured directly on a large diameter, axisymmetric body with: (1) a smooth, solid surface; (2) a sandpaper-roughened, solid surface; (3) a sintered metal, porous surface; (4) a smooth, perforated titanium surface; (5) a rough solid surface made of fine, diffusion bonded screening, and (6) a rough, porous surface of the same screening. Results obtained for each of these surfaces are discussed. It is shown that a rough, porous wall simply does not influence the boundary layer in the same way as a rough solid wall. Therefore, turbulent transport models for boundary layers over porous surfaces either with or without injection or suction, must include both surface roughness and porosity effects.

  13. Solid Surface Combustion Experiment: Thick Fuel Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, Robert A.; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; West, Jeff; Tang, Lin; Sacksteder, Kurt; Delichatsios, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    The results of experiments for spread over polymethylmethacrylate, PMMA, samples in the microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle are described. The results are coupled with modelling in an effort to describe the physics of the spread process for thick fuels in a quiescent, microgravity environment and uncover differences between thin and thick fuels. A quenching phenomenon not present for thin fuels is delineated, namely the fact that for thick fuels the possibility exists that, absent an opposing flow of sufficient strength to press the flame close enough to the fuel surface to allow the heated layer in the solid to develop, the heated layer fails to become 'fully developed.' The result is that the flame slows, which in turn causes an increase in the relative radiative loss from the flame, leading eventually to extinction. This potential inability of a thick fuel to develop a steady spread rate is not present for a thin fuel because the heated layer is the fuel thickness, which reaches a uniform temperature across the thickness relatively rapidly.

  14. Experimental Studies of Dynamics at Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, Thomas Avery

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of thermal and photoinduced processes on metal surfaces point to the importance of transient intermediate species in the understanding of dynamics. Experiments were performed using photoinduced desorption (PID), thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), high-resolution and time -resolved electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS and TREELS), and femtosecond multiphoton photoemission spectroscopy. The thermal and photoinduced reactions of Mo(CO)_6 adsorbed on Rh(100) were studied to better understand energy transfer between a photoexcited molecule and a metal surface. The Mo(CO)_6 partially dissociated upon adsorption, allowing a comparison to be made between Mo(CO)_6 adsorbed on the fragment-covered surface and a more ordered CO-covered surface. The energy transfer rate was found to be larger on the fragment-covered surface. The thermal reaction of hydrogen gas with oxygen adsorbed on Pt(111) was studied with TREELS between 130 and 160 K, observing the modes associated with hydroxyl adsorbed on the surface as a function of time while the sample, preadsorbed with atomic oxygen, was exposed to hydrogen gas. In coordination between Monte Carlo calculations and kinetic simulations, a model was developed whereby the reaction to form hydroxyl occurred between a molecular hydrogen precursor and oxygen at island boundaries. The photoinduced reaction of adsorbed atomic hydrogen and molecular oxygen to form hydroxyl and water on Pt(111) was studied in order to understand the reactivity of the hot oxygen atoms produced by photodissociation of molecular oxygen. The final products of the two oxygen -hydrogen reactions were the same. A measurement was made of the cross section for NO photodesorption from Pt(111) at 90 K. All of these experiments pointed to a need to make transient measurements on the ultrashort time scale in order to develop a more microscopic understanding of the dynamical processes that are occurring. As a result, a novel time-of-flight analyzer was

  15. Surface free energy of polypropylene and polycarbonate solidifying at different solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chibowski, Emil; Terpilowski, Konrad

    2009-12-01

    Advancing and receding contact angles of water, formamide, glycerol and diiodomethane were measured on polypropylene (PP) and polycarbonate (PC) sample surfaces which solidified at Teflon, glass or stainless steel as matrix surfaces. Then from the contact angle hystereses (CAH) the apparent free energies γstot of the surfaces were evaluated. The original PP surface is practically nonpolar, possessing small electron donor interaction ( γs-=1.91 mJ/m), as determined from the advancing contact angles of these liquids. It may result from impurities of the polymerization process. However, it increases up to 8-10 mJ/m 2 for PP surfaces contacted with the solids. The PC surfaces both original and modified show practically the same γs-=6.56.7 mJ/m. No electron acceptor interaction is found on the surfaces. The γstot of modified PP and PC surfaces depend on the kind of probe liquid and contacted solid surface. The modified PP γstot values determined from CAH of polar liquids are greater than that of original surface and they increase in the sequence: Teflon, glass, stainless steel surface, at which they solidified. No clear dependence is observed between γstot and dielectric constant or dipole moment of the polar probe liquids. The changes in γstot of the polymer surfaces are due to the polymer nature and changes in its surface structure caused by the structure and force field of the contacting solid. It has been confirmed by AFM images.

  16. Solid capillarity: when and how does surface tension deform soft solids?

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Bruno; Bäumchen, Oliver; Boulogne, François; Daniels, Karen E; Dufresne, Eric R; Perrin, Hugo; Salez, Thomas; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Style, Robert W

    2016-03-28

    Soft solids differ from stiff solids in an important way: their surface stresses can drive large deformations. Based on a topical workshop held in the Lorentz Center in Leiden, this Opinion highlights some recent advances in the growing field of solid capillarity and poses key questions for its advancement. PMID:26936296

  17. Homogenous Surface Nucleation of Solid Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Hamill, P.; Salcedo, D.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A general surface nucleation rate theory is presented for the homogeneous freezing of crystalline germs on the surfaces of aqueous particles. While nucleation rates in a standard classical homogeneous freezing rate theory scale with volume, the rates in a surface-based theory scale with surface area. The theory is used to convert volume-based information on laboratory freezing rates (in units of cu cm, seconds) of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and nitric acid dihydrate (NAD) aerosols into surface-based values (in units of sq cm, seconds). We show that a surface-based model is capable of reproducing measured nucleation rates of NAT and NAD aerosols from concentrated aqueous HNO3 solutions in the temperature range of 165 to 205 K. Laboratory measured nucleation rates are used to derive free energies for NAT and NAD germ formation in the stratosphere. NAD germ free energies range from about 23 to 26 kcal mole, allowing for fast and efficient homogeneous NAD particle production in the stratosphere. However, NAT germ formation energies are large (greater than 26 kcal mole) enough to prevent efficient NAT particle production in the stratosphere. We show that the atmospheric NAD particle production rates based on the surface rate theory are roughly 2 orders of magnitude larger than those obtained from a standard volume-based rate theory. Atmospheric volume and surface production of NAD particles will nearly cease in the stratosphere when denitrification in the air exceeds 40 and 78%, respectively. We show that a surface-based (volume-based) homogeneous freezing rate theory gives particle production rates, which are (not) consistent with both laboratory and atmospheric data on the nucleation of solid polar stratospheric cloud particles.

  18. Measurement of surface velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A new technique for measuring surface velocity fields is briefly described. It determines the surface velocity vector as a function of location and time by the analysis of thermal fluctuations of the surface profile in a small domain around the point of interest. The apparatus now being constructed will be used in a series of experiments involving flow fields established by temperature gradients imposed along a surface.

  19. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  20. Oceanic Precipitation Measurement - Surface Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepp, Christian

    2013-04-01

    State-of-the-art satellite derived and reanalysis based precipitation climatologies still show remarkably large differences in frequency, amount, intensity, variability and temporal behavior of precipitation over the oceans. Additionally so far appropriate in-situ validation instruments were not available for shipboard use. The uncertainties are largest for light precipitation within the ITCZ and subtropics and for cold season high-latitude precipitation including mix-phase and snowfall. Hence, a long-term issue on which IPWG and GPM-GV is urging more attention is the provision of high quality surface validation data in oceanic areas using innovative ship-based instruments. Precipitation studies would greatly benefit from systematic dataset collection and analysis as such data could also be used to constrain precipitation retrievals. To achieve this goal, the KlimaCampus and Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, Germany funded this project that uses automated shipboard optical disdrometers, called Eigenbrodt ODM470, that are capable of measuring liquid and solid precipitation using drop size distributions in minute intervals on moving ships with high accuracy even under high wind speeds and rough sea states. Since the project start in 2009 the statistical basis for a conclusive validation has significantly improved with comprehensive data collection of more than 3 million minutes of precipitation measurements onboard six ships. Currently, six ODM470 instrument systems are available of which three are long-term mounted onboard the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern (Alfred Wegner Institut) since June 2010, on R/V Akademik Ioffe (P.P.Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia) since September 2010 and on R/V Maria S. Merian (Brise Research, University of Hamburg) since December 2011. Three instruments are used for additional short-term shipboard campaigns and intercomparison projects. The core regions for these

  1. Structure and properties of solid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Difficulties in experimental studies of crystalline surfaces are related to the fact that surface atoms have an intrinsic tendency to react with their environment. A second problem is connected with the effective thickness of surfaces, which ranges from one to several atom layers. The phenomenology of surface interactions with gases are considered, taking into account physical adsorption, chemisorption, and the oxidation of surfaces. Studies of the surface structure are discussed, giving attention to field emission microscopy, field-ion microscopy, electron diffraction techniques, Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, ion microprobe methods, and low-energy backscattering spectroscopy. Investigations of semiconductor surfaces are also described.

  2. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1-2μm and length 100-200μm is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops. PMID:27300959

  3. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1 -2 μ m and length 100 -200 μ m is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops.

  4. Measurement of Thermal Radiation Properties of Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, J. C. (Editor)

    1963-01-01

    The overall objectives of the Symposium were to afford (1) an opportunity for workers in the field to describe the equipment and procedures currently in use for measuring thermal radiation properties of solids, (2) an opportunity for constructive criticism of the material presented, and (3) an open forum for discussion of mutual problems. It was also the hope of the sponsors that the published proceedings of the Symposium would serve as a valuable reference on measurement techniques for evaluating thermal radiation properties of solids, partic.ularly for those with limited experience in the field. Because of the strong dependence of emitted flux upon temperature, the program committee thought it advisable to devote the first session to a discussion of the problems of temperature measurement. All of the papers in Session I were presented at the request of and upon topics suggested by the Committee. Because of time and space limitations, it, was impossible to consider all temperature measurement problems that might arise--the objective was rather to call to the attention of the reader some of the problems that might be encountered, and to provide references that might provide solutions.

  5. Measuring Light Reflectance of BGO Crystal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Janecek, Martin; Moses, William

    2008-07-28

    A scintillating crystal's surface reflectance has to be well understood in order to accurately predict and optimize the crystal?s light collection through Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper, we measure the inner surface reflectance properties for BGO. The measurements include BGO crystals with a mechanically polished surface, rough-cut surface, and chemically etched surface, and with various reflectors attached, both air- coupled and with coupling compound. The measurements are performed with a laser aimed at the center of a hemispherical shaped BGO crystal. The hemispherical shape eliminates any non-perpendicular angles for light entering and exiting the crystal. The reflected light is collected with an array of photodiodes. The laser can be set at an arbitrary angle, and the photodiode array is rotated to fully cover 2? of solid angle. The current produced in the photodiodes is readout with a digital multimeter connected through a multiplexer. The two rows of photodiodes achieve 5-degree by 4-degree resolution, and the current measurement has a dynamic range of 10^5:1. The acquired data was not described by the commonly assumed linear combination of specular and diffuse (Lambertian) distributions, except for a very few surfaces. Surface roughness proved to be the most important parameter when choosing crystal setup. The reflector choice was of less importance and of almost no consequence for rough-cut surfaces. Pure specular reflection distribution for all incidence angles was measured for polished surfaces with VM2000 film, while the most Lambertian distribution for any surface finish was measured for titanium dioxide paint. The distributions acquired in this paper will be used to create more accurate Monte Carlo models for light reflection distribution within BGO crystals.

  6. Tools for measuring surface cleanliness

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  7. Measuring Roughnesses Of Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Al-Jumaily, Gahnim A.; Raouf, Nasrat A.; Anderson, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses use of scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy to measure roughnesses of optical surfaces. These techniques offer greater spatial resolution than other techniques. Report notes scanning tunneling microscopes and atomic force microscopes resolve down to 1 nm.

  8. Condensed matter physics at surfaces and interfaces of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    This research program is focused on structural and elastic properties of crystalline solids and interfaces between solids. We are particularly interested in novel forms of structural ordering and the effects of this ordering on the lattice dynamical properties. We are currently studying structural and vibrational properties of the surfaces of the elemental alkaline earths (particularly Be), and structural phenomena in the doped fullerites.

  9. Thermal slip for liquids at rough solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Chen, Yongping; Peterson, G. P.

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to examine the thermal slip of liquids at rough solid surfaces as characterized by fractal Cantor structures. The temperature profiles, potential energy distributions, thermal slip, and interfacial thermal resistance are investigated and evaluated for a variety of surface topographies. In addition, the effects of liquid-solid interaction, surface stiffness, and boundary condition on thermal slip length are presented. Our results indicate that the presence of roughness expands the low potential energy regions in adjacent liquids, enhances the energy transfer at liquid-solid interface, and decreases the thermal slip. Interestingly, the thermal slip length and thermal resistance for liquids in contact with solid surfaces depends not only on the statistical roughness height, but also on the fractal dimension (i.e., topographical spectrum).

  10. Capillary adhesion between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.

    2008-08-01

    I study how the contact area and the work of adhesion between two elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces depend on the relative humidity. The surfaces are assumed to be hydrophilic, and capillary bridges form at the interface between the solids. For elastically hard solids with relatively smooth surfaces, the area of real contact and therefore also the sliding friction are maximal when there is just enough liquid to fill out the interfacial space between the solids, which typically occurs for dK≈3hrms, where dK is the height of the capillary bridge and hrms the root-mean-square roughness of the (combined) surface roughness profile. For elastically soft solids, the area of real contact is maximal for very low humidity (i.e. small dK), where the capillary bridges are able to pull the solids into nearly complete contact. In both cases, the work of adhesion is maximal (and equal to 2γcosθ, where γ is the liquid surface tension and θ the liquid-solid contact angle) when d_{\\mathrm {K}} \\gg h_{\\mathrm {rms}} , corresponding to high relative humidity.

  11. Turbulent boundary layer over solid and porous surfaces with small roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, F. Y.; Schetz, J. A.; Collier, F.

    1982-01-01

    The wind tunnel models and instrumentation used as well as data reduction and error analysis techniques employed are described for an experimental study conducted to measure directly skin friction and obtain profiles of mean velocity, axial and normal turbulence intensity, and Reynolds stress in the untripped boundary on a large diameter axisymmetric body. Results are given for such a body with a (1) smooth, solid surface; (2) a sandpaper roughened, solid surface; (3) a sintered metal, porous surface; (4) a ""smooth'' performated titanium surface; (5) a rough, solid surface made of fine diffusion bonded screening; and (6) a rough, porous surface made of the same screening. The roughness values were in low range (k+ 5 to 7) just above what is normally considered ""hydraulically smooth''. Measurements were taken at several axial locations and tow or normal stream freestream velocities, 45.1 m/sec and 53.5 m/sec.

  12. Probing and Mapping Electrode Surfaces in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blinn, Kevin S.; Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Bottomley, Lawrence A.; Liu, Meilin

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are potentially the most efficient and cost-effective solution to utilization of a wide variety of fuels beyond hydrogen 1-7. The performance of SOFCs and the rates of many chemical and energy transformation processes in energy storage and conversion devices in general are limited primarily by charge and mass transfer along electrode surfaces and across interfaces. Unfortunately, the mechanistic understanding of these processes is still lacking, due largely to the difficulty of characterizing these processes under in situ conditions. This knowledge gap is a chief obstacle to SOFC commercialization. The development of tools for probing and mapping surface chemistries relevant to electrode reactions is vital to unraveling the mechanisms of surface processes and to achieving rational design of new electrode materials for more efficient energy storage and conversion2. Among the relatively few in situ surface analysis methods, Raman spectroscopy can be performed even with high temperatures and harsh atmospheres, making it ideal for characterizing chemical processes relevant to SOFC anode performance and degradation8-12. It can also be used alongside electrochemical measurements, potentially allowing direct correlation of electrochemistry to surface chemistry in an operating cell. Proper in situ Raman mapping measurements would be useful for pin-pointing important anode reaction mechanisms because of its sensitivity to the relevant species, including anode performance degradation through carbon deposition8, 10, 13, 14 ("coking") and sulfur poisoning11, 15 and the manner in which surface modifications stave off this degradation16. The current work demonstrates significant progress towards this capability. In addition, the family of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques provides a special approach to interrogate the electrode surface with nanoscale resolution. Besides the surface topography that is routinely collected by AFM and STM

  13. Artefacts for optical surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Stuart; Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Brownhill, Andrew; MacDonald, Lindsay

    2011-07-01

    Flexible manufacturing technologies are supporting the routine production of components with freeform surfaces in a wide variety of materials and surface finishes. Such surfaces may be exploited for both aesthetic and performance criteria for a wide range of industries, for example automotive, aircraft, small consumer goods and medial components. In order to ensure conformance between manufactured part and digital design it is necessary to understand, validate and promote best practice of the available measurement technologies. Similar, but currently less quantifiable, measurement requirements also exist in heritage, museum and fine art recording where objects can be individually hand crafted to extremely fine levels of detail. Optical 3D measurement systems designed for close range applications are typified by one or more illumination sources projecting a spot, line or structured light pattern onto a surface or surfaces of interest. Reflections from the projected light are detected in one or more imaging devices and measurements made concerning the location, intensity and optionally colour of the image. Coordinates of locations on the surface may be computed either directly from an understanding of the illumination and imaging geometry or indirectly through analysis of the spatial frequencies of the projected pattern. Regardless of sensing configuration some independent means is necessary to ensure that measurement capability will meet the requirements of a given level of object recording and is consistent for variations in surface properties and structure. As technologies mature, guidelines for best practice are emerging, most prominent at the current time being the German VDI/VDE 2634 and ISO/DIS 10360-8 guidelines. This considers state of the art capabilities for independent validation of optical non-contact measurement systems suited to the close range measurement of table top sized manufactured or crafted objects.

  14. Measuring Volatile/Solid Carbon Branching Ratios for Fischer-Tropsch-Type Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuth, J. A.; Johnson, N. M.; Carayon, A.

    2014-09-01

    Nebular CO can be converted to volatile organics or carbonaceous grain coatings on grain surfaces. The coating catalyzes further reaction and is easy to accrete into planetesimals. We measured the volatile/solid ratio vs. time, temperature & catalyst.

  15. Surface roughness effects with solid lubricants dispersed in mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusano, C.; Goglia, P. R.; Sliney, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The lubricating effectiveness of solid-lubricant dispersions are investigated in both point and line contacts using surfaces with both random and directional roughness characteristics. Friction and wear data obtained at relatively low speeds and at room temperature, indicate that the existence of solid lubricants such as graphite, MoS2, and PTFE in a plain mineral oil generally will not improve the effectiveness of the oil as a lubricant for such surfaces. Under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction force, as a function of time, initially depends upon the directional roughness properties of the contacting surfaces irrespective of whether the base oil or dispersions are used as lubricants.

  16. Measuring Surface Water From Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partsch, J.; Alsdorf, D.; Rodriguez, E.; Lettenmaier, D.; Mognard, N.; Participants, T.

    2006-12-01

    Surface fresh water is essential for life, yet we have surprisingly poor knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamics of surface fresh water discharge and changes in storage globally. For example, we are unable to answer such basic questions as "What is the spatial and temporal variability of water stored on and near the surface of all continents?" Furthermore, key societal issues, such as the susceptibility of life to flood hazards, cannot be answered with the current global, in-situ networks designed to observe river discharge at points but not flood events. The measurements required to answer these hydrologic questions are surface water area, the elevation of the water surface (h), its slope (dh/dx), and temporal change (dh/dt). Advances in remote sensing hydrology, particularly over the past 10 years and even more recently, have demonstrated that these hydraulic variables can be measured reliably from orbiting platforms. Measurements of inundated area have been used to varying degrees of accuracy as proxies for discharge, but are successful only when in-situ data are available for calibration and fail to indicate the dynamic topography of water surfaces. Radar altimeters have a rich, multi-decadal history of successfully measuring elevations of the ocean surface and are now also accepted as capable tools for measuring h along orbital profiles crossing fresh water bodies. However, altimeters are profiling tools which, because of their orbital spacings, miss too many fresh water bodies to be useful hydrologically. High spatial resolution images of dh/dt have been observed with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR), but the method requires emergent vegetation to scatter radar pulses back to the receiving antenna. Essentially, existing spaceborne methods have been used to measure components of surface water hydraulics, but none of the technologies can singularly supply the water volume and hydraulic measurements that are needed to accurately model the

  17. Measuring surface water from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsdorf, Douglas E.; RodríGuez, Ernesto; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2007-06-01

    Surface fresh water is essential for life, yet we have surprisingly poor knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamics of surface freshwater discharge and changes in storage globally. For example, we are unable to answer such basic questions as "What is the spatial and temporal variability of water stored on and near the surface of all continents?" Furthermore, key societal issues, such as the susceptibility of life to flood hazards, cannot be answered with the current global, in situ networks designed to observe river discharge at points but not flood events. The measurements required to answer these hydrologic questions are surface water area, the elevation of the water surface (h), its slope (∂h/∂x), and temporal change (∂h/∂t). Advances in remote sensing hydrology, particularly over the past 10 years and even more recently, have demonstrated that these hydraulic variables can be measured reliably from orbiting platforms. Measurements of inundated area have been used to varying degrees of accuracy as proxies for discharge but are successful only when in situ data are available for calibration; they fail to indicate the dynamic topography of water surfaces. Radar altimeters have a rich, multidecadal history of successfully measuring elevations of the ocean surface and are now also accepted as capable tools for measuring h along orbital profiles crossing freshwater bodies. However, altimeters are profiling tools, which, because of their orbital spacings, miss too many freshwater bodies to be useful hydrologically. High spatial resolution images of ∂h/∂t have been observed with interferometric synthetic aperture radar, but the method requires emergent vegetation to scatter radar pulses back to the receiving antenna. Essentially, existing spaceborne methods have been used to measure components of surface water hydraulics, but none of the technologies can singularly supply the water volume and hydraulic measurements that are needed to accurately model

  18. Lift-Off Instability During the Impact of a Drop on a Solid Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Shmuel; Kolinski, John; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    We directly measure the rapid spreading dynamics succeeding the impact of a droplet of fluid on a solid, dry surface. Upon impact, the air separating the liquid from the solid surface fails to drain and wetting is delayed as the liquid rapidly spreads outwards over a nanometer thin film of air. We show that the approach of the spreading liquid front toward the surface is unstable and the spreading front lifts off away from the surface. Lift-off ensues well before the liquid contacts the surface, in contrast with prevailing paradigm where lift-off of the liquid is contingent on solid-liquid contact and the formation of a viscous boundary layer. Here I will discuss the dynamics of liquid spreading over a thin film of air and its lift-off away from the surface over a large range of fluid viscosities.

  19. A LIDAR POLARIMETER TECHNIQUE FOR MEASURING SUSPENDED SOLIDS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates the capability of the lidar polarimeter to measure the concentration of suspended solids in water for a variety of measurement conditions. Previous laboratory and field measurements have demonstrated the potential of the system to measure turbidity, transm...

  20. Surface tension measurement from the indentation of clamped thin films.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuejuan; Jagota, Anand; Paretkar, Dadhichi; Hui, Chung-Yuen

    2016-06-21

    We developed an indentation technique to measure the surface tension of relatively stiff solids. In the proposed method, a suspended thin solid film is indented by a rigid sphere and its deflection is measured by optical interferometry. The film deflection is jointly resisted by surface tension, elasticity and residual stress. Using a version of nonlinear von Karman plate theory that includes surface tension, we are able to separate the contribution of elasticity to the total tension in the film. Surface tension is determined by extrapolating the sum of surface tension and residual stress to zero film thickness. We measured the surface tension of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using this technique and obtained a value of 19.5 ± 3.6 mN m(-1), consistent with the surface energy of PDMS reported in the literature. PMID:27189735

  1. Short-time spectroscopic measurement of the temperature of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, H.

    1984-02-01

    The short-time temperature rise dependent deformation caused by shocks on solids were measured with radiation pyrometric and spectroscopic methods. The methods can only be applied on solids emitting a measurable radiation and are based on spectral radiation and the temperature of the solid. The Planck-Kirchhoff radiation laws and the measuring method are presented. The measuring equipment consists of an image reproducing optical device and a photodetector with spectral or interference filters for wavelength selection.

  2. Surface fractal dimension of sintered porous solid niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skatkov, L. I.; Konotop, V. V.; Cheremskoy, P. G.; Gomozov, V. P.; Bayrachny, B. I.

    1994-12-01

    The surface fractal dimension of porous solid niobium obtained by vacuum sintering Nb powder is experimentally investigated. The surface fractal dimension D is the main object of our study. Results of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) agree very closely with those of Hg porosimetry. The surface dimensions are stated to be of the order of 2.8 which is a stipulation of a highly developed porous structure. Our results provide experimental support to the SAXS theory developed earlier.

  3. Solid colloids with surface-mobile linkers.

    PubMed

    van der Meulen, Stef A J; Helms, Gesa; Dogterom, Marileen

    2015-06-17

    In this report we review the possibilities of using colloids with surface mobile linkers for the study of colloidal self-assembly processes. A promising route to create systems with mobile linkers is the use of lipid (bi-)layers. These lipid layers can be either used in the form of vesicles or as coatings for hard colloids and emulsion droplets. Inside the lipid bilayers molecules can be inserted via membrane anchors. Due to the fluidity of the lipid bilayer, the anchored molecules remain mobile. The use of different lipid mixtures even allows creating Janus-like particles that exhibit directional bonding if linkers are used which have a preference for a certain lipid phase. In nature mobile linkers can be found e.g. as receptors in cells. Therefore, towards the end of the review, we also briefly address the possibility of using colloids with surface mobile linkers as model systems to mimic cell-cell interactions and cell adhesion processes. PMID:25993272

  4. Laser velocimeter measurements of multiphase flow of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Chen, R.C.; Bhunia, S.

    1989-01-01

    A unique refractive index matched facility for studying solid-liquid multiphase flow has been developed. The refractive index matching of the solid and the liquid allows the use of non-intrusive Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) to measure the solid and the liquid velocities. These measurements will be useful in developing a better understanding of solid-liquid flows, especially solid-liquid and solid-solid interactions. Silica gel and 50% sodium iodide solution in water (refractive index {approx}1.443) are used as the refractive index matched solid and liquid respectively. A two color back scatter mode LDV is used for making velocity measurements. Tests were conducted in solid-liquid slurries with volumetric solid concentration levels of 5% and 15% in the Reynolds number (Re) range of 400 to 9200. Silica gel particles of mean diameter 40 microns were used. Measurements included mapping of the solid and liquid velocities and obtaining the pressure drop data. Signal processing technique utilizing histogram of velocity measurements made at a point and signal amplitude discrimination was successfully used for differentiating between solid and liquid velocities. 34 refs., 61 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Surface force measurement of ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Jun; Hasegawa, Masayuki; Amemiya, Hironao; Kobayashi, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) has advantages such as room-temperature operation, high through-put, and high resolution. In the UV-NIL process, the mold needs a release coating material to prevent adhesion of the transfer resin. Usually, fluorinated silane coupling agents are used as release coating materials. To evaluate the release property, surface force analyzer equipment was used. This equipment can measure the surface forces between release-coated or noncoated mold material surfaces and UV-cured resin surfaces in the solid state. Lower surface forces were measured when a release coating was used on the mold material surface.

  6. High speed liquid impact onto wetted solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, H.H.; Field, J.E.; Pickles, C.S.J. . Dept. of Physics)

    1994-06-01

    The mechanics of impact by a high-speed liquid jet onto a solid surface covered by a liquid layer is described. After the liquid jet contacts the liquid layer, a shock wave is generated, which moves toward the solid surface. The shock wave is followed by the liquid jet penetrating through the layer. The influence of the liquid layer on the side jetting and stress waves is studied. Damage sites on soda-lime glass, PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) and aluminium show the role of shear failure and cracking and provide evidence for analyzing the impact pressure on the wetted solids and the spatial pressure distribution. The liquid layer reduces the high edge impact pressures, which occur on dry targets. On wetted targets, the pressure is distributed more uniformly. Despite the cushioning effect of liquid layers, in some cases, a liquid can enhance material damage during impact due to penetration and stressing of surface cracks.

  7. Surface flow measurements from drones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Drones are transforming the way we sense and interact with the environment. However, despite their increased capabilities, the use of drones in geophysical sciences usually focuses on image acquisition for generating high-resolution maps. Motivated by the increasing demand for innovative and high performance geophysical observational methodologies, we posit the integration of drone technology and optical sensing toward a quantitative characterization of surface flow phenomena. We demonstrate that a recreational drone can be used to yield accurate surface flow maps of sub-meter water bodies. Specifically, drone's vibrations do not hinder surface flow observations, and velocity measurements are in agreement with traditional techniques. This first instance of quantitative water flow sensing from a flying drone paves the way to novel observations of the environment.

  8. Optical measurements on contaminated surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonham, T. E.; Schmitt, R. J.; Linford, R. M. F.

    1975-01-01

    A bidirectional reflectometer system was developed for in situ measurements of the changes in spectral reflectance of surfaces contaminated with films of organic materials. The system permits experiments with films of controlled thickness in an environment that simulates the thermal, radiation, and vacuum conditions of space. The mechanical and optical construction of the reflectometer are discussed in detail, and actual data curves are used to illustrate its operation and performance.

  9. Estimating the Volumes of Solid Figures with Curved Surfaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Donald

    1991-01-01

    Several examples of solid figures that calculus students can use to exercise their skills at estimating volume are presented. Although these figures are bounded by surfaces that are portions of regular cylinders, it is interesting to note that their volumes can be expressed as rational numbers. (JJK)

  10. Investigation of surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces by modulating the electrical double layer.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong Kyun; Song, Myung Won; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    2015-05-20

    A solid surface in contact with water or aqueous solution usually carries specific electric charges. These surface charges attract counter ions from the liquid side. Since the geometry of opposite charge distribution parallel to the solid-liquid interface is similar to that of a capacitor, it is called an electrical double layer capacitor (EDLC). Therefore, there is an electrical potential difference across an EDLC in equilibrium. When a liquid bridge is formed between two conducting plates, the system behaves as two serially connected EDLCs. In this work, we propose a new method for investigating the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. By mechanically modulating the electrical double layers and simultaneously applying a dc bias voltage across the plates, an ac electric current can be generated. By measuring the voltage drop across a load resistor as a function of bias voltage, we can study the surface charge density on solid-liquid interfaces. Our experimental results agree very well with the simple equivalent electrical circuit model proposed here. Furthermore, using this method, one can determine the polarity of the adsorbed state on the solid surface depending on the material used. We expect this method to aid in the study of electrical phenomena on solid-liquid interfaces. PMID:25923410

  11. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  12. Reflectance measurements from particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, J.; Gritsevich, M.; Hakala, T.; Penttilä, A.; Eskelinen, J.; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P.; Arnalds, O.; Guirado, D.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids consists of, e.g., metals and rocky materials, and comets consist of, e.g., icy and rocky materials and dust. Their surfaces can be covered by small particles. To certain extent, these surfaces can resemble some natural or artificial surfaces on the Earth, such as snow layers, sand, gravels, or silt. By measuring the reflectance from such surfaces, one can gain better understanding on how to interpret astronomical observations of asteroids and comets. Even if not completely analogous, these samples and measurements provide a strict test bed for the scattering models applied to interpret observations of small Solar System bodies. FIGIFIGO (Finnish Geodetic Institute's Field Gonio-spectro-polari- radiometer) can measure the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) of surface targets of a diameter of around 10 cm, in a selected angular range and resolution, in the spectral range of 400-2400 nm, at about 10-nm resolution, including linear polarisation (Stokes I, Q, and U, or reflection coefficient matrix elements R_{11}, R_{12}, and R_{13}). Using FIGIFIGO, over 500 samples have been measured over the past years, including over 100 snow samples and almost 100 samples resembling sand, silt, soil, dust, or gravel. For planetary studies, especially interesting are dark volcanic ash and silt samples from Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvönt eruptions. These have been measured loose and compressed, smooth and rough, purely and deposited on snow. Further single-scattering measurements using the Granada setup and measurements using the Univ. Helsinki integrating sphere complement the picture. Generally, we have observed that the reflectance from volcanic materials behaves mostly as expected and modelled. BRF shows typical bowl shape with strong phase-angle dependence. Spectral features are smooth, with slight angular dependence. Polarisation depends strongly on the phase angle, weaker on other angles defining the scattering geometry, and smoothly on the wavelength. There

  13. Spatially Resolved Quantification of the Surface Reactivity of Solid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing; Xiao, Li; Lu, Juntao; Zhuang, Lin

    2016-05-17

    A new property is reported that accurately quantifies and spatially describes the chemical reactivity of solid surfaces. The core idea is to create a reactivity weight function peaking at the Fermi level, thereby determining a weighted summation of the density of states of a solid surface. When such a weight function is defined as the derivative of the Fermi-Dirac distribution function at a certain non-zero temperature, the resulting property is the finite-temperature chemical softness, termed Fermi softness (SF ), which turns out to be an accurate descriptor of the surface reactivity. The spatial image of SF maps the reactive domain of a heterogeneous surface and even portrays morphological details of the reactive sites. SF analyses reveal that the reactive zones on a Pt3 Y(111) surface are the platinum sites rather than the seemingly active yttrium sites, and the reactivity of the S-dimer edge of MoS2 is spatially anisotropic. Our finding is of fundamental and technological significance to heterogeneous catalysis and industrial processes demanding rational design of solid catalysts. PMID:27072349

  14. Variational quantum Monte Carlo calculations for solid surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bahnsen, R.; Eckstein, H.; Schattke, W.; Fitzer, N.; Redmer, R.

    2001-06-15

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods have proven to predict atomic and bulk properties of light and nonlight elements with high accuracy. Here we report on variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) calculations for solid surfaces. Taking the boundary condition for the simulation from a finite-layer geometry, the Hamiltonian, including a nonlocal pseudopotential, is cast in a layer-resolved form and evaluated with a two-dimensional Ewald summation technique. The exact cancellation of all jellium contributions to the Hamiltonian is ensured. The many-body trial wave function consists of a Slater determinant with parametrized localized orbitals and a Jastrow factor with a common two-body term plus an additional confinement term representing further variational freedom to take into account the existence of the surface. We present results for the ideal (110) surface of gallium arsenide for different system sizes. With the optimized trial wave function, we determine some properties related to a solid surface to illustrate that VMC techniques provide reasonable results under full inclusion of many-body effects at solid surfaces.

  15. Measuring surface fluxes in CAPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; D-Shah, T.; Nie, Dalin

    1992-01-01

    Two stations (site 1612 and site 2008) were operated by the University of Georgia group from 6 July 1991 to 18 August 1991. The following data were collected continuously: surface energy fluxes (i.e., net radiation, soil heat fluxes, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux), air temperature, vapor pressure, soil temperature (at 1 cm depth), and precipitation. Canopy reflectance and light interception data were taken three times at each site between 6 July and 18 August. Soil moisture content was measured twice at each site.

  16. Method for measuring surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Gary A.; Baker, Sheila N.; McCleskey, T. Mark

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  17. Surface tension and the mechanics of liquid inclusions in compliant solids.

    PubMed

    Style, Robert W; Wettlaufer, John S; Dufresne, Eric R

    2015-01-28

    Eshelby's theory of inclusions has wide-reaching implications across the mechanics of materials and structures including the theories of composites, fracture, and plasticity. However, it does not include the effects of surface stress, which has recently been shown to control many processes in soft materials such as gels, elastomers and biological tissue. To extend Eshelby's theory of inclusions to soft materials, we consider liquid inclusions within an isotropic, compressible, linear-elastic solid. We solve for the displacement and stress fields around individual stretched inclusions, accounting for the bulk elasticity of the solid and the surface tension (i.e. isotropic strain-independent surface stress) of the solid-liquid interface. Surface tension significantly alters the inclusion's shape and stiffness as well as its near- and far-field stress fields. These phenomena depend strongly on the ratio of the inclusion radius, R, to an elastocapillary length, L. Surface tension is significant whenever inclusions are smaller than 100L. While Eshelby theory predicts that liquid inclusions generically reduce the stiffness of an elastic solid, our results show that liquid inclusions can actually stiffen a solid when R<3L/2. Intriguingly, surface tension cloaks the far-field signature of liquid inclusions when R=3L/2. These results are have far-reaching applications from measuring local stresses in biological tissue, to determining the failure strength of soft composites. PMID:25503573

  18. Surface charging and charge decay in solid dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Neves, A.; Martins, H.J.A.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on surface charging and charge decay in solid dielectrics such as Teflon (P.T.F.E.), Epoxy (filled with alumina) and Polyethylene. The experiments were carried out in atmospheric air and SF{sub 6} environment. Impulse and ac voltage were used to generate charges, by partial discharges, in a point/insulation sample/plane electrode arrangement. The results showed that surface charging and charge decay are influenced by several parameters such as ambient gas, surface resistivity, voltage level and polarity and subsequent voltage application.

  19. Surface and defect morphologies in anisotropic elastic and piezoelectric solids

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Huajian; Barnett, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The authors investigate issues related to the equilibrium and stability of surface and line defect morphologies in both piezoelectric and anisotropic elastic solids. Following their previous efforts which established that mechanical stresses in purely elastic solids can promote instability of an initially flat surface with respect to surface roughening, they show that the (initially flat) interface between two dissimilar piezoelectric solids can be unstable when subjected to coupled electromechanical loading. Quite recent cross-sectional observations of electrodeposited thin films by Japanese and British researchers provide experimental confirmation of these predictions. The authors also investigate the occurrence of equilibrium arrangements (zero Peach-Koehler force arrangements) of line defects (dislocations) in anisotropic elastic crystals in the absence of externally applied stresses. Contrary to prevailing opinion, equilibrium arrangements of dislocations under no externally applied stresses appear to be the rule rather than the exception. The existence of such {open_quotes}zero stress arrangements{close_quotes} is fundamental to developing micromechanical models of plastically deforming solids.

  20. Bulk and surface acoustic waves in solid-fluid Fibonacci layered materials.

    PubMed

    Quotane, I; El Boudouti, E H; Djafari-Rouhani, B; El Hassouani, Y; Velasco, V R

    2015-08-01

    We study theoretically the propagation and localization of acoustic waves in quasi-periodic structures made of solid and fluid layers arranged according to a Fibonacci sequence. We consider two types of structures: either a given Fibonacci sequence or a periodic repetition of a given sequence called Fibonacci superlattice. Various properties of these systems such as: the scaling law and the self-similarity of the transmission spectra or the power law behavior of the measure of the energy spectrum have been highlighted for waves of sagittal polarization in normal and oblique incidence. In addition to the allowed modes which propagate along the system, we study surface modes induced by the surface of the Fibonacci superlattice. In comparison with solid-solid layered structures, the solid-fluid systems exhibit transmission zeros which can break the self-similarity behavior in the transmission spectra for a given sequence or induce additional gaps other than Bragg gaps in a periodic structure. PMID:25819878

  1. Residual Silicone Detection. [external tank and solid rocket booster surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T.

    1980-01-01

    Both photoelectron emission and ellipsometry proved successful in detecting silicone contamination on unpainted and epoxy painted metal surfaces such as those of the external tank and the solid rocket booster. Great success was achieved using photoelectron emission (PEE). Panels were deliberately contaminated to controlled levels and then mapped with PEE to reveal the areas and levels that were contaminated. The panels were then tested with regard to adhesive properties. Tapes were bonded over the contaminated and uncontaminated regions and the peel force was measured, or the contaminated panels were bonded (with CPR 483 foam) to uncontaminated panels and made into lap shear specimens. Other panels were bonded and made into wedge specimens for hydrothermal stress endurance tests. Strong adhesion resulted if the PEE signal fell within an acceptance window, but was poor outside the acceptance window. A prototype instrument is being prepared which can automatically be scanned over the external liquid hydrogen tank and identify those regions that are contaminated and will cause bond degradation.

  2. Removal of Particulate Contamination from Solid Surfaces Using Polymeric Micropillars.

    PubMed

    Izadi, Hadi; Dogra, Navneet; Perreault, François; Schwarz, Cynthia; Simon, Stefan; Vanderlick, T Kyle

    2016-07-01

    This Research Article describes a novel method for removal of particulate contamination, loosely referred to as dust, from solid surfaces using polymeric micropillars. In this Research Article, we illustrate for the first time that polymeric microfibrils of controlled interfacial and geometrical properties can effectively remove micrometric and submicrometric contaminant particles from a solid surface without damaging the underlying substrate. Once these microfibrils are brought into contact with a contaminated surface, because of their their soft and flexible structure, they develop intimate contact with both the surface contaminants and the substrate. While these intrinsically nonsticky micropillars have minimal interfacial interactions with the substrate, we show that they produce strong interfacial interactions with the contaminant particles, granting the detachment of the particles from the surface upon retraction of the cleaning material. The origin and strength of the interfacial interactions at the interfaces between a contaminant particle and both the substrate and the cleaning materials are thoroughly discussed. Unlike flat substrates of the same material, using microfibrillar structures of controlled interfacial and geometrical properties also allows the elimination of the adsorbed particles from the contact interface. Here we demonstrate that by moving the adsorbed particles from the tip to the side of the fibrils and consequently removing them from the contact interface, polymeric microfibrils can clean all contaminant particles from the surface. The effects of the geometrical and interfacial properties of polymeric micropillars on removing the adsorbed particles from the tips of the pillars are fully discussed. This research is not only important in terms of introducing a novel method which can offer a new paradigm for thorough yet nondestructive cleaning of dust particles from solid surfaces, but also it is of fundamental significance for researchers

  3. Three-dimensional microscopic deformation measurements on cellular solids.

    PubMed

    Genovese, K

    2016-07-01

    The increasing interest in small-scale problems demands novel experimental protocols providing dense sets of 3D deformation data of complex shaped microstructures. Obtaining such information is particularly significant for the study of natural and engineered cellular solids for which experimental data collected at macro scale and describing the global mechanical response provide only limited information on their function/structure relationship. Cellular solids, in fact, due their superior mechanical performances to a unique arrangement of the bulk material properties (i.e. anisotropy and heterogeneity) and cell structural features (i.e. pores shape, size and distribution) at the micro- and nano-scales. To address the need for full-field experimental data down to the cell level, this paper proposes a single-camera stereo-Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system that makes use of a wedge prism in series to a telecentric lens for performing surface shape and deformation measurements on microstructures in three dimensions. Although the system possesses a limited measurement volume (FOV~2.8×4.3mm(2), error-free DOF ~1mm), large surface areas of cellular samples can be accurately covered by employing a sequential image capturing scheme followed by an optimization-based mosaicing procedure. The basic principles of the proposed method together with the results of the benchmarking of its metrological performances and error analysis are here reported and discussed in detail. Finally, the potential utility of this method is illustrated with micro-resolution three-dimensional measurements on a 3D printed honeycomb and on a block sample of a Luffa sponge under compression. PMID:26773653

  4. Surface growth on percolation networks by a conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2016-02-01

    Surface growth by the conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid model is investigated on diluted lattices, i.e., on percolation networks that are embedded in two spatial dimensions. The growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α are defined, respectively, by the mean-square surface width via W2(t ) ˜t2 β and the mean-square saturated width via Wsat2(L ) ˜L2 α , where L is the system size. These are measured on both an infinite network and a backbone network and the results are compared with power-counting predictions obtained using the fractional Langevin equation. While the Monte Carlo results on deterministic fractal substrates show excellent agreement with the predictions [D. H. Kim and J. M. Kim, Phys. Rev. E 84, 011105 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.011105], the results on critical percolation networks deviate by 8%-12% from these predictions.

  5. Surface growth on percolation networks by a conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid growth model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Bub

    2016-02-01

    Surface growth by the conserved-noise restricted solid-on-solid model is investigated on diluted lattices, i.e., on percolation networks that are embedded in two spatial dimensions. The growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α are defined, respectively, by the mean-square surface width via W(2)(t)∼t(2β) and the mean-square saturated width via W(sat)(2)(L)∼L(2α), where L is the system size. These are measured on both an infinite network and a backbone network and the results are compared with power-counting predictions obtained using the fractional Langevin equation. While the Monte Carlo results on deterministic fractal substrates show excellent agreement with the predictions [D. H. Kim and J. M. Kim, Phys. Rev. E 84, 011105 (2011)], the results on critical percolation networks deviate by 8%-12% from these predictions. PMID:26986299

  6. Tuning the surface wettability of carbon nanotube carpets in multiscale hierarchical solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karumuri, Anil K.; He, Lvmeng; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M.

    2015-02-01

    An attractive approach of increasing functionality of solid surfaces is to create hierarchical multiscale morphology by attaching tailored carpet-like arrays of Carbon nanotubes (CNT) on them. Such surfaces offer fractal morphology along with unprecedented increase in specific surface areas, and significantly boost the potency of porous materials used in surface-active applications. However, full utilization of these structures will require intimate interaction between the solid surface and its environmental fluid. CNT arrays tend to be hydrophobic, which limit their effectiveness in aqueous environments. In this research, we investigated two different surface modifications methods to induce hydrophilic property to CNT nano-carpets on graphitic substrates: dry oxygen plasma treatment and wet sol-gel oxide coating. Structure, morphology, composition and chemistry of these multiscale surfaces have been related to wettability and water flow properties. Plasma oxygen treatments did not alter the surface morphology, but induced temporary wettability, that could be reversed by heat treatment. On the other hand, sol-gel treatment permanently coated the nanotubes with a strongly bonded layer of amorphous SiO2. This coating imparts permanent alterations in surface chemistry, contact angle, wettability and water flow. Porous carbon foams were coated with CNT arrays and their water permeability measured before and after sol-gel silica coating. The hydrophilic coating was seen to increase flow rate and reduce pressure build-up. These results have important implications on all devices that utilize surface activity of porous solids, such as catalytic membranes, antimicrobial filters, and microfluidic sensors.

  7. Highly efficient solid state catalysis by reconstructed (001) Ceria surface

    SciTech Connect

    Solovyov, VF; Ozaki, T; Atrei, A; Wu, LJ; Al-Mahboob, A; Sadowski, JT; Tong, X; Nykypanchuk, D; Li, Q

    2014-04-10

    Substrate engineering is a key factor in the synthesis of new complex materials. The substrate surface has to be conditioned in order to minimize the energy threshold for the formation of the desired phase or to enhance the catalytic activity of the substrate. The mechanism of the substrate activity, especially of technologically relevant oxide surfaces, is poorly understood. Here we design and synthesize several distinct and stable CeO2 (001) surface reconstructions which are used to grow epitaxial films of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7. The film grown on the substrate having the longest, fourfold period, reconstruction exhibits a twofold increase in performance over surfaces with shorter period reconstructions. This is explained by the crossover between the nucleation site dimensions and the period of the surface reconstruction. This result opens a new avenue for catalysis mediated solid state synthesis.

  8. Highly efficient solid state catalysis by reconstructed (001) Ceria surface

    PubMed Central

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav F.; Ozaki, Toshinori; Atrei, Andrea; Wu, Lijun; Al-Mahboob, Abdullah; Sadowski, Jerzy T.; Tong, Xiao; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Li, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Substrate engineering is a key factor in the synthesis of new complex materials. The substrate surface has to be conditioned in order to minimize the energy threshold for the formation of the desired phase or to enhance the catalytic activity of the substrate. The mechanism of the substrate activity, especially of technologically relevant oxide surfaces, is poorly understood. Here we design and synthesize several distinct and stable CeO2 (001) surface reconstructions which are used to grow epitaxial films of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7. The film grown on the substrate having the longest, fourfold period, reconstruction exhibits a twofold increase in performance over surfaces with shorter period reconstructions. This is explained by the crossover between the nucleation site dimensions and the period of the surface reconstruction. This result opens a new avenue for catalysis mediated solid state synthesis. PMID:24717357

  9. Three electrode measurements on solid electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, A.Q.; Glass, R.S.

    1995-12-01

    AC impedance spectroscopy and chronopotentiometry have been used to study solid-state ionic conductors. Results obtained using three electrodes are compared to those using a two-electrode configuration. The uncompensated resistance was shown to depend strongly on the geometric placement of the electrodes. The optimal configuration for minimized uncompensated resistance effects is similar to the Luggin capillary arrangement in the liquid phase. The effect of non-negligible geometric capacitance on interpretation of results is discussed.

  10. Intensity-value corrections for integrating sphere measurements of solid samples measured behind glass.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy J; Bernacki, Bruce E; Redding, Rebecca L; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S; Myers, Tanya L; Stephan, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the ultraviolet (UV), visible, or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental methods and a simple optical model, we demonstrate that glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report our observations that the measured reflectance values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflections arising at the air-quartz and sample-quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are offset in intensity in the hemispherical case, leading to measured values up to ~6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ~3.8% too high for 10% reflecting surfaces, approximately correct for 40-60% diffuse-reflecting surfaces, and ~1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon® surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for a 99% reflecting matte surface. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces, as verified by both theory and experiment, and depend on sphere design. Empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300-2300 nm range. PMID:25280186

  11. Intensity-Value Corrections for Integrating Sphere Measurements of Solid Samples Measured Behind Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Redding, Rebecca L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the ultraviolet (UV), visible, or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental methods and a simple optical model, we demonstrate that glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report our observations that the measured reflectance values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflections arising at the air–quartz and sample–quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are offset in intensity in the hemispherical case, leading to measured values up to ~6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ~3.8% too high for 10% reflecting surfaces, approximately correct for 40–60% diffuse-reflecting surfaces, and ~1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon® surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for a 99% reflecting matte surface. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces, as verified by both theory and experiment, and depend on sphere design. Finally, empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300–2300 nm range.

  12. Solid Deuterium-Tritium Surface Roughness In A Beryllium Inertial Confinement Fusion Shell

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Moody, J D; Montgomery, D S; Gautier, C

    2006-04-19

    Solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers for inertial confinement fusion experiments were formed inside of a 2 mm diameter beryllium shell and were characterized using phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging. The solid D-T surface roughness is found to be 0.4 {micro}m for modes 7-128 at 1.5 K below the melting temperature. The layer roughness is found to increase with decreasing temperature, in agreement with previous visible light characterization studies. However, phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging provides a more robust surface roughness measurement than visible light methods. The new x-ray imaging results demonstrate clearly that the surface roughness decreases with time for solid D-T layers held at 1.5 K below the melting temperature.

  13. Micro PIV measurement of slip flow on a hydrogel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, K.; Mochizuki, O.

    2014-06-01

    Slip flow on a hydrogel surface was investigated in order to clarify the effect of drag reduction on the aqueous surface of living things. Thin-film flow along the hydrogel surface was measured by using a micro PIV (particle image velocimetry) system for comparison with theoretical velocity distribution which satisfied the non-slip condition on a solid surface. The slip flow on the hydrogel was found to be related to the degree of swelling and molecular weight of the hydrogel materials. This shows the possibility of a reduction in wall shear stress as a result of the decrease in the velocity gradient near a wall surface.

  14. Pinhole formation from liquid metal microdroplets impact on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hao; Qi, Le-hua; Luo, Jun; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Deng, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    The impact of molten metal droplets on solid substrates may entrap gas to form pinholes. This letter shows that the detailed pinhole structure is more sophisticated than expected: the void is toroid, which is a result of rapid contact line retraction and subsequent phase change. The substrate surface roughness affects the pinhole size by providing leaky channels that weaken gas pressure buildup. When the droplet diameter is sufficiently large, Kevin-Helmholtz instability may be triggered to form multiple pinholes.

  15. Emission of correlated electron pairs from solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollisch, H.; Schwartzenberg, N. V.; Feder, R.

    2006-08-01

    Low-energy electron pairs, which are emitted from solid surfaces upon impact of a photon [ (γ,2e) process] or an electron [ (e,2e) process] carry information on the exchange and screened Coulomb interaction between the two electrons inside the solid. We present a method for calculating such correlated two-electron states as antisymmetrized products of two one-electron states coupled by a “correlation factor,” which depends upon the one-electron quantum numbers and the relative spatial coordinate. The resulting pair correlation functions are illustrated for the cases of two plane-wave electrons interacting via a bare and a screened Coulomb potential. Low-energy electron diffraction-type one-electron states are then coupled in this manner and employed as final pair states in calculations of (e,2e) and (γ,2e) reaction cross sections from the Cu(111) surface. For (e,2e) , the angular distributions calculated without and with Coulomb interaction U exhibit, for antiparallel spins, a distinct correlation hole. For parallel spins, a large hole, which is already present without U , is enhanced. The (γ,2e) distributions, which originate from the screened U inside the solid, have a large central region of enhanced intensity for antiparallel spins, out of which the exchange interaction carves a sizable hole. In all cases, the bare Coulomb repulsion on the way from the surface to the detectors reduces the intensity to zero for equal momenta of the two electrons.

  16. Modeling propellant combustion interacting with an eroding solid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1980-05-06

    A computatonal model of turbulent combustion flow acting on and influenced by an eroding wall surface is introduced. The combustion flow field is particle laden. Significant particulate mass loading occurs in the immediate neighborhood of the wall as a result of erosion products issuing from the deteriorating solid surface. In addition, cases are considered in which a substantial particle mass loading develops near the wall as a result of finely divided (sub micron diameter) particulates such as TiO/sub 2/ and talcum powder which are added to suppress erosion. In addition to statistical turbulent field particle flow interaction, the model includes multi-component molecular diffusion processes, and gas phase, gas/surface and or solid surface chemical reactions. Results indicate that despite the unsteady flow conditions, a limiting erosion rate is approached. This occurs as a result of the effective blowing off of the issing vapor phase products. The blowing reduces the gradients driving the incident combustion heat and mass transfer. An analogy is drawn to unsteady, ablative, heat transfer and thermal/material response in hypersonic aerodynamics. Surfaces investigated, at present, include bare steel and refractory metal coated steel walls.

  17. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM): useful for developing procedures for immobilization of proteins on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sha, Xue; Sun, Chengjun; Xu, Xiaohe; Alexander, Laura; Loll, Patrick J; Penn, Lynn S

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the combined use of liquid and air measurements with the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) for quantitative analysis of multistep reaction procedures leading to immobilized proteins on solid surfaces. Reactions are conducted on the surfaces of QCM sensor crystals and are quantified by measurements of resonant frequency of the crystals before and after each reaction step. When reactions are conducted in the flow cell of the QCM in the presence of solvent, measurement of resonant frequency can be made in situ (liquid measurement). When reactions cannot be conducted in the flow cell because of temperatures or solvents not tolerated by the cell, frequency can be measured after evaporation of solvent (air measurement). Each reaction step can be analyzed by either liquid or air measurement so that the whole multistep procedure is addressed, no matter how diverse the chemical nature of the steps. We conducted identical multistep procedures on two different starting surfaces, gold and silica, and found comparable results. PMID:23121645

  18. Progress in Infrared Pyrometry Measurements of Shocked Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Cazamias, J U; Hare, D E; Poulsen, P

    2001-11-05

    Temperature measurement is one of the grand challenges still facing experimental shock physics. A shock experiment fundamentally measures E({sigma}{sub x}, {var_epsilon}{sub 11}) which is an incomplete equation of state since temperature (or entropy) remains unspecified. Ideally, one would like to experimentally determine a free energy F(T, {var_epsilon}{sub ij}) from which all other thermo-mechanical properties might be derived. In practice, temperature measurement would allow direct comparison with theory/simulation since T and {var_epsilon}{sub 11} are in most theories the underlying variables. Temperature is a sensitive measure of energy partitioning, knowledge of which would increase our understanding phase boundaries and thermally activated processes (such as chemical reactivity (including dissociation and ionization)). Temperature measurement would also allow a thermodynamically consistent coupling of hydrodynamic equations of state to the material's constitutive (deformation) behavior. The measurement of the temperature of a material that has undergone severe strains at small time-scales is extremely difficult, and we are developing a method using infrared reflectance and pyrometry. The emitted power from a warm surface is measured over a range of wavelengths using a multi-channel IR detector with a response time of {approx}0.1 {micro}s. Each channel of the detector passes the radiation from a selected wavelength interval into a detector. Pyrometers typically have anywhere from three to six channels, and not all channels may have enough signal to contribute to the measurement under any given condition. The difficulty in the measurement lies in relating the radiance (power per unit area per solid angle) in each channel to the temperature of the surface since the radiance is determined not only by the temperature, but also by the emissivity of the surface. The emissivity is not a constant for any real surface, but varies both with angle of observation and

  19. SSM - SOLID SURFACE MODELER, VERSION 6.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Solid Surface Modeler (SSM) is an interactive graphics software application for solid-shaded and wireframe three- dimensional geometric modeling. It enables the user to construct models of real-world objects as simple as boxes or as complex as Space Station Freedom. The program has a versatile user interface that, in many cases, allows mouse input for intuitive operation or keyboard input when accuracy is critical. SSM can be used as a stand-alone model generation and display program and offers high-fidelity still image rendering. Models created in SSM can also be loaded into other software for animation or engineering simulation. (See the information below for the availability of SSM with the Object Orientation Manipulator program, OOM, a graphics software application for three-dimensional rendering and animation.) Models are constructed within SSM using functions of the Create Menu to create, combine, and manipulate basic geometric building blocks called primitives. Among the simpler primitives are boxes, spheres, ellipsoids, cylinders, and plates; among the more complex primitives are tubes, skinned-surface models and surfaces of revolution. SSM also provides several methods for duplicating models. Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) is one of the most powerful model manipulation tools provided by SSM. The CSG operations implemented in SSM are union, subtraction and intersection. SSM allows the user to transform primitives with respect to each axis, transform the camera (the user's viewpoint) about its origin, apply texture maps and bump maps to model surfaces, and define color properties; to select and combine surface-fill attributes, including wireframe, constant, and smooth; and to specify models' points of origin (the positions about which they rotate). SSM uses Euler angle transformations for calculating the results of translation and rotation operations. The user has complete control over the modeling environment from within the system. A variety of file

  20. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of drops colliding with solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, X.; McLaughlin, J. B.; Kontomaris, K.

    2009-04-01

    Video images of drops colliding with solid surfaces shown by Rioboo et al. (2002) reveal that, for large drop velocities, the drops flatten and form a ring structure before receding and, in some cases, rebounding from the surface. They described the sequence of events in terms of four distinct regimes. During the initial kinematic phase, the dimensionless wetting radius of the drop follows a universal form if the drop Weber and Reynolds numbers are sufficiently large. In the second phase, the drop becomes highly flattened and the values of the Weber and Reynolds numbers influence the time evolution of the dimensionless wetting radius and its maximum value. This is followed by a third phase in which the wetting radius begins to decrease with time and the wettability of the surface influences the dynamics. This paper presents simulation results for the early stages of drop impact and spreading on a partially wetting solid surface. The simulations were performed with a modified version of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) developed by Inamuro et al. (2004) for a liquid-gas density ratio of 1000. The Inamuro et al. version of the LBM was modified by incorporating rigid, no-slip boundary conditions and incorporating a boundary condition on the normal derivative of the order parameter to impose the desired equilibrium contact angle.

  1. Three-dimensional reconstructions of solid surfaces using conventional microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ficker, Tomáš; Martišek, Dalibor

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional digital replicas of solid surfaces are subject of interest of different branches of science and technology. The present paper in its introductory parts brings an overview of the various microscopic reconstructive techniques based on optical sectioning. The main attention is devoted to conventional reconstruction methods and especially to that one employing the Fourier transform. The three-dimensional replicas of this special reconstructive frequency method are compared graphically and numerically with the three-dimensional replicas of the confocal method. Based on the comparative study it has been concluded that the quality of the conventional replicas of surfaces possessing textures of intermediate height irregularities is acceptable and almost comparable with the quality of confocal replicas. This study is relevant both for identifying a convenient technique that provides good qualities of three-dimensional replicas and for selecting the hardware whose price is affordable even for small research groups studying rougher surface textures. PMID:26381761

  2. Measuring Ion Channels on Solid Supported Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Patrick; Dueck, Benjamin; Mourot, Alexandre; Hatahet, Lina; Fendler, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Application of solid supported membranes (SSMs) for the functional investigation of ion channels is presented. SSM-based electrophysiology, which has been introduced previously for the investigation of active transport systems, is expanded for the analysis of ion channels. Membranes or liposomes containing ion channels are adsorbed to an SSM and a concentration gradient of a permeant ion is applied. Transient currents representing ion channel transport activity are recorded via capacitive coupling. We demonstrate the application of the technique to liposomes reconstituted with the peptide cation channel gramicidin, vesicles from native tissue containing the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and membranes from a recombinant cell line expressing the ionotropic P2X2 receptor. It is shown that stable ion gradients, both inside as well as outside directed, can be applied and currents are recorded with an excellent signal/noise ratio. For the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and the P2X2 receptor excellent assay quality factors of Z′ = 0.55 and Z′ = 0.67, respectively, are obtained. This technique opens up new possibilities in cases where conventional electrophysiology fails like the functional characterization of ion channels from intracellular compartments. It also allows for robust fully automatic assays for drug screening. PMID:19580777

  3. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Properties of Clean Surfaces: Adhesion, Friction, and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter presents the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of smooth, atomically clean surfaces of solid-solid couples, such as metal-ceramic couples, in a clean environment. Surface and bulk properties, which determine the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of solid-solid couples, are described. The primary emphasis is on the nature and character of the metal, especially its surface energy and ductility. Also, the mechanisms of friction and wear for clean, smooth surfaces are stated.

  4. The measurement of surface gravity.

    PubMed

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10(-8) m s(-2)), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1-5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post

  5. Adsorption of comb copolymers on weakly attractive solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Striolo, A; Jayaraman, A; Genzer, J; Hall, C K

    2005-08-01

    In this work continuum and lattice Monte Carlo simulation methods are used to study the adsorption of linear and comb polymers on flat surfaces. Selected polymer segments, located at the tips of the side chains in comb polymers or equally spaced along the linear polymers, are attracted to each other and to the surface via square-well potentials. The rest of the polymer segments are modeled as tangent hard spheres in the continuum model and as self-avoiding random walks in the lattice model. Results are presented in terms of segment-density profiles, distribution functions, and radii of gyration of the adsorbed polymers. At infinite dilution the presence of short side chains promotes the adsorption of polymers favoring both a decrease in the depletion-layer thickness and a spreading of the polymer molecule on the surface. The presence of long side chains favors the adsorption of polymers on the surface, but does not permit the spreading of the polymers. At finite concentration linear polymers and comb polymers with long side chains readily adsorb on the solid surface, while comb polymers with short side chains are unlikely to adsorb. The simple models of comb copolymers with short side chains used here show properties similar to those of associating polymers and of globular proteins in aqueous solutions, and can be used as a first approximation to investigate the mechanism of adsorption of proteins onto hydrophobic surfaces. PMID:16122338

  6. Surface emission of landfill gas from solid waste landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Won; Shin, Ho-Chul

    The surface emission of landfill gas (LFG) was studied to estimate the amount of LFG efflux from solid waste landfills using an air flux chamber. LFG efflux increased as atmospheric temperature increased during the day, and the same pattern for the surface emission was observed for the change of seasons. LFG efflux rate decreased from summer through winter. The average LFG efflux rates of winter, spring and summer were 0.1584, 0.3013 and 0.8597 m 3 m -2 h -1 respectively. The total amount of surface emission was calculated based on the seasonal LFG efflux rate and the landfill surface area. From the estimates of LFG generation, it is expected that about 30% of the generated LFG may be released through the surface without extraction process. As forced extraction with a blower proceeded, the extraction well pressure decreased from 1100 to -100 mm H 2O, and the LFG surface efflux decreased markedly above 80%. Thus, the utilization of LFG by forced extraction would be the good solution for global warming and air pollution by LFG.

  7. Experimental study of surface tension, specific heat and thermal diffusivity of liquid and solid titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, K.; Wang, H. P.; Chang, J.; Wei, B.

    2015-10-01

    The thermophysical properties of liquid and solid titanium such as the surface tension, specific heat and thermal diffusivity have been investigated over a wide temperature range. By using electromagnetic levitation and oscillating drop method, the surface tension of liquid titanium was measured in the temperature range of 1802-2188 K. The viscosity and density of undercooled liquid titanium were calculated by some well-known models using the measured data as input. In addition, the specific heat of liquid titanium was determined over the experimental range using electromagnetic levitation and drop calorimetry obtaining the value of 33.64 J mol-1 K-1. In addition, the thermal diffusivity of solid titanium was measured by laser flash method in the temperature range of 171-1080 K.

  8. Scientific support for an orbiter middeck experiment on solid surface combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, Robert A.; Vedha-Nayagam, M.; Srikantaiah, Nataraj

    1988-01-01

    The objective is to determine the mechanism of gas-phase flame spread over solid fuel surfaces in the absence of any buoyancy or externally imposed gas-phase flow. Such understanding can be used to improve the fire safety aspects of space travel by providing information that will allow judicious selections of spacecraft materials and environments to be made. The planned experiment consists of measuring the flame spread rate over thermally thin and thermally thick fuels in a closed container in the low-gravity environment of the Space Shuttle. Measurements consist of flame spread rate and shape obtained from two views of the process as recorded on movie film and surface and gas-phase temperatures obtained from fine-wire thermocouples. The temperature measurements along with appropriate modeling provide information about the gas-to-solid heat flux. Environmental parameters to be varied are the oxygen concentration and pressure.

  9. Friction, Wear, and Surface Damage of Metals as Affected by Solid Surface Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisson, Edmond E; Johnson, Robert L; Swikert, Max A; Godfrey, Douglas

    1956-01-01

    As predicted by friction theory, experiments showed that friction and surface damage of metals can be reduced by solid surface films. The ability of materials to form surface films that prevent welding was a very important factor in wear of dry and boundary lubricated surfaces. Films of graphitic carbon on cast irons, nio on nickel alloys, and feo and fe sub 3 o sub 4 on ferrous materials were found to be beneficial. Abrasive films such as fe sub 2 o sub 3 or moo sub 3 were definitely detrimental. It appears that the importance of oxide films to friction and wear processes has not been fully appreciated.

  10. Solids concentration measurements in molten wax by an ultrasonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Blackwell, A.G.; Schehl, R.R.; Zarochak, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    The application of the three-phase slurry reactor system to coal liquefaction processing and chemical industries has recently received considerable attention. To design and efficiently operate a three-phase slurry reactor, the degree of dispersion of the solid (catalyst) in the reactor should be understood. The solids distribution within the reactor greatly affects its performance. An ultrasonic technique is under development for measuring solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 189 C. The data show that the velocity and attenuation of the sound are well-defined functions of the solid and gas concentrations in the molten wax.

  11. Splash of a liquid drop on a dry solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Shruti; Mandre, Shreyas; Rycroft, Chris; Brenner, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We study the early-time fluid mechanical phenomena of the splash of a liquid drop on a solid surface, focusing on the dynamics before contact through the intervening air layer. Previous theoretical work (e.g. Mani, Mandre and Brenner) on this problem neglected viscous effects in the liquid. However, a set of recent experiments show definitively that even at early times viscous effects in the liquid are important, and in particular have the ability to dramatically change the shape of the interface before contact. We describe a set of computations aimed to reproduce these experimental features. The simulations couple lubrication flow in the gas layer with nonsteady Stokes flow in the liquid, and surface tension at the liquid-air interface.

  12. Lift-Off Instability During the Impact of a Drop on a Solid Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolinski, John M.; Mahadevan, L.; Rubinstein, Shmuel M.

    2014-04-01

    We directly measure the rapid spreading dynamics succeeding the impact of a droplet of fluid on a solid, dry surface. Upon impact, the air separating the liquid from the solid surface fails to drain and wetting is delayed as the liquid rapidly spreads outwards over a nanometer thin film of air. We show that the approach of the spreading liquid front toward the surface is unstable and the spreading front lifts off away from the surface. Lift-off ensues well before the liquid contacts the surface, in contrast with prevailing paradigm where lift-off of the liquid is contingent on solid-liquid contact and the formation of a viscous boundary layer. Here we investigate the dynamics of liquid spreading over a thin film of air and its lift-off away from the surface over a large range of fluid viscosities and find that the lift-off instability is dependent on viscosity and occurs at a time that scales with the viscosity to the power of one half.

  13. Kinetics and molecular binding of GEPIs on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brandon

    proof-of-concept applications. In an enzyme immobilization study, for example enzymes immobilized via GEPIs showed significantly higher activity than those nonspecifically immobilized. In biomineralization studies, several bifunctional GEPIs showed the ability to mineralize hydroxyapatite out of a calcium phosphate solution, where control surfaces and peptides showed no mineralization ability. With the present first study, which established quantitative molecular binding procedures of solid binding peptides, it is now possible to design, tailor and implement GEPIs for a wide range of applications, from nanotechnology to medical problems that require an interface between a biopolymer/biosurface and an inorganic surface.

  14. Optical Measurement for Solid- and Liquid-Phase Sb2Te3 around Its Melting Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Masashi; Endo, Rie; Tsutsumi, Kouichi; Morikasa, Fukuyoshi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Fukaya, Toshio; Suzuki, Michio; Susa, Masahiro; Endo, Tomoyoshi; Tadokoro, Toshiyasu

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a system for measuring the complex refractive index of liquid- and solid-phase chalcogenide around their melting points. The system consists of a spectroscopic ellipsometer, an infrared heating system, and prism optics. As a container for the chalcogenide, we use a customized quartz cell, evacuated to several pascal level to avoid sample degradation. We adopted a measurement configuration that uses access from the bottom side, because a mirror-like surface which is necessary for optical measurement was naturally and easily created at the container bottom by gravity. We succeeded in observing the remarkable difference on the indices between liquid- and solid-phase Sb2Te3.

  15. Solids Fraction Measurement with a Reflective Fiber Optic Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Seachman, S.M.; Yue, P.C.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

    2006-11-01

    A method has been developed to extract solids fraction information from a reflective fiber optic probe. The commercially available reflective fiber optic probe was designed to measure axial particle velocity (both up and down directions). However, the reflected light intensity measured is related to particle size and particle concentration. A light reflection model is used to relate the reflected light intensity to solids fraction. In this model we assume that the reflected light intensity is a fixed fraction, K1, of the total light intensity lost in penetration of a solid layer. Also, the solids fraction is related to particle concentration, N, in the light path, by N = K2 (1- ε), where (1-ε) is the solids fraction. The parameters K1 and K2 are determined through a calibration and curve fitting procedure. This paper describes this procedure and the steps taken to derive the values of K1 and K2. It is proposed that the reflective fiber optic can be used for real time measurement of solids fraction in a circulating fluid bed.

  16. Solid supported lipid membranes: New concepts for the biomimetic functionalization of solid surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, W.; Naumann, R.; Friedrich, M.; Robertson, J. W. F.; Lösche, M.; Heinrich, F.; McGillivray, D. J.; Schuster, B.; Gufler, P. C.; Pum, D.; Sleytr, U. B.

    2010-01-01

    Surface-layer (S-layer) supported lipid membranes on solid substrates are interfacial architectures mimicking the supramolecular principle of cell envelopes which have been optimized for billions of years of evolution in most extreme habitats. The authors implement this biological construction principle in a variety of layered supramolecular architectures consisting of a stabilizing protein monolayer and a functional phospholipid bilayer for the design and development of new types of solid-supported biomimetic membranes with a considerably extended stability and lifetime—compared to existing platforms—as required for novel types of bioanalytical sensors. First, Langmuir monolayers of lipids at the water/air interface are used as test beds for the characterization of different types of molecules which all interact with the lipid layers in various ways and, hence, are relevant for the control of the structure, stability, and function of supported membranes. As an example, the interaction of S-layer proteins from the bulk phase with a monolayer of a phospholipid synthetically conjugated with a secondary cell wall polymer (SCWP) was studied as a function of the packing density of the lipids in the monolayer. Furthermore, SCWPs were used as a new molecular construction element. The exploitation of a specific lectin-type bond between the N-terminal part of selected S-layer proteins and a variety of glycans allowed for the buildup of supramolecular assemblies and thus functional membranes with a further increased stability. Next, S-layer proteins were self-assembled and characterized by the surface-sensitive techniques, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The substrates were either planar gold or silicon dioxide sensor surfaces. The assembly of S-layer proteins from solution to solid substrates could nicely be followed in-situ and in real time. As a next step toward S-layer supported bilayer membranes

  17. Nano Liquid Crystal Droplet Impact on Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; de Pablo, Juan; dePablo Team

    2015-03-01

    Liquid droplet impaction on solid surfaces is an important problem with a wide range of applications in everyday life. Liquid crystals (LCs) are anisotropic liquids whose internal structure gives rise to rich optical and morphological phenomena. In this work we study the liquid crystal droplet impaction on solid surfaces by molecular dynamics simulations. We employ a widely used Gay-Berne model to describe the elongated liquid crystal molecules and their interactions. Our work shows that, in contrast to isotropic liquids, drop deformation is symmetric unless an instability kicks in, in which case a nano scale liquid crystal droplet exhibits distinct anisotropic spreading modes that do not occur in simple liquids. The drop prefers spreading along the low viscosity direction, but inertia can in some cases overcome that bias. The effects of the director field of the droplet, preferred anchoring direction and the anchoring strength of the wall are investigated. Large scale (0.1 micron) simulations are performed to connect our nano scale results to the experiments. Our studies indicate that LCs could provide an interesting alternative for development of next-generation printing inks.

  18. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface.

    PubMed

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    According to Stokes' law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media. PMID:27596851

  19. A nanostructured surface increases friction exponentially at the solid-gas interface

    PubMed Central

    Phani, Arindam; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Hawk, John E.; Prashanthi, Kovur; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    According to Stokes’ law, a moving solid surface experiences viscous drag that is linearly related to its velocity and the viscosity of the medium. The viscous interactions result in dissipation that is known to scale as the square root of the kinematic viscosity times the density of the gas. We observed that when an oscillating surface is modified with nanostructures, the experimentally measured dissipation shows an exponential dependence on kinematic viscosity. The surface nanostructures alter solid-gas interplay greatly, amplifying the dissipation response exponentially for even minute variations in viscosity. Nanostructured resonator thus allows discrimination of otherwise narrow range of gaseous viscosity making dissipation an ideal parameter for analysis of a gaseous media. We attribute the observed exponential enhancement to the stochastic nature of interactions of many coupled nanostructures with the gas media. PMID:27596851

  20. Measuring and Plotting Surface-Contour Deviations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Lino A.; Shuck, Thomas; Crockett, Leroy K.

    1987-01-01

    Hand-held device measures deviation of contour of surface from desired contour and provides output to x-y plotter. Carriage on device rolled along track representing desired contour, while spring-loaded stylus on device deflects perpendicularly to track to follow surface. Operator moves carriage of contour-measuring device on beamlike track. Stylus on carriage traces contour of surface above it. Carriage of measuring device holds transducer measuring cross-track displacement of surface from desired contour, and multiple-turn potentiometer measuring position along track.

  1. Enhancement of Li+ ion conductivity in solid polymer electrolytes using surface tailored porous silica nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Jagdeep; Singh, Udai P.; Panda, Subhendu K.; Si, Satyabrata

    2016-09-01

    The current study represents the design and synthesis of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based solid polymer electrolytes by solvent casting approach using surface tailored porous silica as nanofillers. The surface tailoring of porous silica nanostructure is achieved through silanization chemistry using 3-glycidyloxypropyl trimethoxysilane in which silane part get anchored to the silica surface whereas epoxy group get stellated from the silica surface. Surface tailoring of silica with epoxy group increases the room temperature electrochemical performances of the resulting polymer electrolytes. Ammonical hydrolysis of organosilicate precursor is used for both silica preparation and their surface tailoring. The composite solid polymer electrolyte films are prepared by solution mixing of PEO with lithium salt in presence of silica nanofillers and cast into film by solvent drying, which are then characterized by impedance measurement for conductivity study and wide angle x-ray diffraction for change in polymer crystallinity. Room temperature impedance measurement reveals Li+ ion conductivity in the order of 10‑4 S cm‑1, which is correlated to the decrease in PEO crystallinity. The enhancement of conductivity is further observed to be dependent on the amount of silica as well as on their surface characteristics.

  2. Gauge Measures Large Spherical Bearing Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George L.

    1992-01-01

    Radius of spherical portion of surface computed from reading of depth gauge. Measuring tool calibrated by applying it to reference spherical surface of known radius. Used onsite, so unnecessary to ship bearings to laboratory for examination by computerized test equipment.

  3. Lunar surface outgassing and alpha particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, Richard D.; Binder, Alan B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particle?; produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-2 18 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238.

  4. Visualizing the shape of soft solid and fluid contacts between two surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Jonathan; Schellenberger, Frank; Kappl, Michael; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    The soft contact between two surfaces is fundamentally interesting for soft materials and fluid mechanics and relevant for friction and wear. The deformation of soft solid interfaces has received much interest because it interestingly reveals similarities to fluid wetting. We present an experimental route towards visualizing the three-dimensional contact geometry of either liquid-solid (i.e., oil and glass) or solid-solid (i.e., elastomer and glass) interfaces using a home-built combination of confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We monitor the shape of a fluid capillary bridge and the depth of indentation in 3D while simultaneously measuring the force. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the height of the capillary bridge depends on the interfacial tensions. By using a slowly evaporating solvent, we quantify the temporal evolution of the capillary bridge and visualized the influence of pinning points on its shape. The position dependence of the advancing and receding contact angle along the three-phase contact line, particle-liquid-air, is resolved. Extending our system, we explore the contact deformation of soft solids where elasticity, in addition to surface tension, becomes an important factor.

  5. Estimation of solid–liquid interfacial tension using curved surface of a soft solid

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Subrata; Phukan, Monmee; Ghatak, Animangsu

    2015-01-01

    Unlike liquids, for crystalline solids the surface tension is known to be different from the surface energy. However, the same cannot be said conclusively for amorphous materials like soft cross-linked elastomers. To resolve this issue we have introduced here a direct method for measuring solid–liquid interfacial tension by using the curved surface of a solid. In essence, we have used the inner surface of tiny cylindrical channels embedded inside a soft elastomeric film for sensing the effect of the interfacial tension. When a liquid is inserted into the channel, because of wetting-induced alteration in interfacial tension, its thin wall deflects considerably; the deflection is measured with an optical profilometer and analyzed using the Föppl–von Kármán equation. We have used several liquids and cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) as the solid to show that the estimated values of the solid–liquid interfacial tension matches with the corresponding solid–liquid interfacial energy reasonably well. PMID:26420871

  6. The Role of Surface Layer Processes in Solid Propellant Combustion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthy, Satyanarayanan R.

    The qualitative multidimensional theory of composite solid propellant combustion based on the sandwich burning methodology was applied to certain specific problems: (a) burning rate enhancement by ferric oxide, (b) plateau burning behavior caused by binder melt flow effects, and (c) characterization of the combustion of new energetic oxidizers--ADN and HNIW. Exothermic reactions at the interfacial contact lines between AP particles and the binder in the surface layer of the burning propellant assume significance in the presence of ferric oxide, and control the burning rate. Binder melt flow covers adjacent AP particle surfaces increasingly at higher pressures, and disperses the O/F leading edge flames attached to coarse particles. It also causes fine AP/binder matrix areas on the surface not to support a steady premixed flame at intermediate pressures, resulting in an overall decrease in the burning rate with increasing pressure, which implies plateau or mesa effects. ADN self -deflagration rate is significantly higher than that of AP, and controls the sandwich burning rate to a great extent. The O/F flame of ADN and binder still behaves as rate limiting, although strongly supported by ADN self-deflagration. ADN melts and vaporizes substantially before the binder, allowing for the possibility of complex physical processes in the surface layer. The strong exothermic decomposition of HNIW at moderate temperatures causes the oxidizer particles in the surface layer to be the sites of burning rate control. The problems addressed in this study combinedly point to the significance of crucial surface layer processes under the situations of interest, and signal a need to characterize such processes directly and in greater detail.

  7. Surface growth on diluted lattices by a restricted solid-on-solid model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhan; Lee, Sang Bub

    2009-08-01

    An influence of diluted sites on surface growth has been investigated, using the restricted solid-on-solid model. It was found that, with respect to equilibrium growth, the surface width and the saturated width exhibited universal power-law behaviors, i.e., W approximately t(beta) and W(sat) approximately L(zeta), regarding all cases with respect to the concentration of diluted sites x=1-p , with p being the occupation probability on each lattice site. For x < x(c) (=1-p(c), p(c) being the percolation threshold), the growth appeared to be similar to that of a regular lattice, both in two and three dimensions. For x=x(c), the growth yielded nontrivial exponents which were different from those on a regular lattice. In nonequilibrium growth, a considerable amount of diluted sites (x < or = x(c)) appeared to yield nonuniversal growth, unlike the case of a regular lattice. The cause of nonuniversal growth dynamics has been investigated, considering the growth on a backbone cluster and on lattices constructed with periodically and randomly diluted subcells. PMID:19792104

  8. Lunar Surface Material - Spacecraft Measurements of Density and Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.

    1969-01-01

    The relation of the density of the lunar surface layer to depth is probably best determined from spacecraft measurements of the bearing capacity as a function of depth. A comparison of these values with laboratory measurements of the bearing capacity of low-cohesion particulate materials as a function of the percentage of solid indicates that the bulk density at the lunar surface is about 1.1 grams per cubic centimeter and that it increases nearly linearly to about 1.6 grams per cubic centimeter at a depth of 5 centimeters.

  9. Thermal conductivity of halide solid solutions: measurement and prediction.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Poncsák, Sándor; St-Pierre, Rémi; Kiss, László I; Chartrand, Patrice

    2014-09-14

    The composition dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity in NaCl-KCl solid solutions has been measured as a function of composition and temperature. Samples with systematically varied compositions were prepared and the laser flash technique was used to determine the thermal diffusivity from 373 K to 823 K. A theoretical model, based on the Debye approximation of phonon density of state (which contains no adjustable parameters) was used to predict the thermal conductivity of both stoichiometric compounds and fully disordered solid solutions. The predictions obtained with the model agree very well with our measurement. A general method for predicting the thermal conductivity of different halide systems is discussed. PMID:25217938

  10. SSM - SOLID SURFACE MODELER, VERSION 6.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, S. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Solid Surface Modeler (SSM) is an interactive graphics software application for solid-shaded and wireframe three- dimensional geometric modeling. It enables the user to construct models of real-world objects as simple as boxes or as complex as Space Station Freedom. The program has a versatile user interface that, in many cases, allows mouse input for intuitive operation or keyboard input when accuracy is critical. SSM can be used as a stand-alone model generation and display program and offers high-fidelity still image rendering. Models created in SSM can also be loaded into other software for animation or engineering simulation. (See the information below for the availability of SSM with the Object Orientation Manipulator program, OOM, a graphics software application for three-dimensional rendering and animation.) Models are constructed within SSM using functions of the Create Menu to create, combine, and manipulate basic geometric building blocks called primitives. Among the simpler primitives are boxes, spheres, ellipsoids, cylinders, and plates; among the more complex primitives are tubes, skinned-surface models and surfaces of revolution. SSM also provides several methods for duplicating models. Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) is one of the most powerful model manipulation tools provided by SSM. The CSG operations implemented in SSM are union, subtraction and intersection. SSM allows the user to transform primitives with respect to each axis, transform the camera (the user's viewpoint) about its origin, apply texture maps and bump maps to model surfaces, and define color properties; to select and combine surface-fill attributes, including wireframe, constant, and smooth; and to specify models' points of origin (the positions about which they rotate). SSM uses Euler angle transformations for calculating the results of translation and rotation operations. The user has complete control over the modeling environment from within the system. A variety of file

  11. Surface Specularity as an Indicator of Shock-induced Solid-liquid Phase Transitions in Tin

    SciTech Connect

    G. D. Stevens, S. S. Lutz, B. R. Marshall, W.D. Turley, et al.

    2007-12-01

    When highly polished metal surfaces melt upon release after shock loading, they exhibit features that suggest significant surface changes accompany the phase transition. The reflection of light from such surfaces changes from specular (pre-shock) to diffuse upon melting. Typical of this phenomenon is the loss of signal light in velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) measurements, which usually occurs at pressures high enough to melt the free surface. Unlike many other potential material phase-sensitive diagnostics (e.g., reflectometry, conductivity), that show relatively small (1%-10%) changes, the specularity of reflection provides a more sensitive and definitive (>10x) indication of the solid-liquid phase transition. Data will be presented that support the hypothesis that specularity changes indicate melt in a way that can be measured easily and unambiguously.

  12. Controlling solid lipid nanoparticle adhesion by polyelectrolyte multilayer surface modifications.

    PubMed

    Finke, Jan Henrik; Schmolke, Hannah; Klages, C-P; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2013-06-01

    This study addresses the tunability of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) toward adsorption of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In SLN production for pharmaceutical applications, repellence from production equipment is desired while targeted adsorption is necessary for the functionalization of surfaces. SLN containing triglyceride/phospholipid or wax matrices were exposed to different PEM (consisting of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and poly(acrylic acid)). PEM varied regarding layer architecture and surface properties by means of deposition pH, top layer variation, PEGylation with poly(acrylic acid)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer, and thermal crosslinking. FTIR-ATR and SEM revealed SLN adhesion depending on PEM composition. Particle adsorption was tunable toward attraction as well as repellence: PEGylated PEM displayed lowest adsorption while PEM capped with PAH provided the strongest attraction of particles. Examinations at elevated temperatures resembled production conditions of SLN where these are processed as emulsions. Crystalline triglyceride SLN displayed high anisometry and, consequently, a large specific surface area. These platelets were more adherend than spherical droplets from the same formulation as an emulsion. Wax-based nanoparticles showed spherical shape, both in crystalline and molten state. However, adsorption was fostered as the fluidity of the disperse phase increased upon melting. Additionally, coalescence of adsorbed droplets took place, further increasing adsorption. PMID:23591009

  13. The hydrodynamics of bubble rise and impact with solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Manica, Rogerio; Klaseboer, Evert; Chan, Derek Y C

    2016-09-01

    A bubble smaller than 1mm in radius rises along a straight path in water and attains a constant speed due to the balance between buoyancy and drag force. Depending on the purity of the system, within the two extreme limits of tangentially immobile or mobile boundary conditions at the air-water interface considerably different terminal speeds are possible. When such a bubble impacts on a horizontal solid surface and bounces, interesting physics can be observed. We study this physical phenomenon in terms of forces, which can be of colloidal, inertial, elastic, surface tension and viscous origins. Recent advances in high-speed photography allow for the observation of phenomena on the millisecond scale. Simultaneous use of such cameras to visualize both rise/deformation and the dynamics of the thin film drainage through interferometry are now possible. These experiments confirm that the drainage process obeys lubrication theory for the spectrum of micrometre to millimetre-sized bubbles that are covered in this review. We aim to bridge the colloidal perspective at low Reynolds numbers where surface forces are important to high Reynolds number fluid dynamics where the effect of the surrounding flow becomes important. A model that combines a force balance with lubrication theory allows for the quantitative comparison with experimental data under different conditions without any fitting parameter. PMID:27378067

  14. Photovoltage and work function measurement of silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Alexander

    2005-12-01

    Photovoltage measurements on prepared silicon surfaces yielding information on surface state morphology and dynamics are reported. Surface photovoltage changes resulting from excitation using both tunable and fixed wavelength sources were monitored using a Kelvin Probe apparatus. Both sub-bandgap and super-bandgap excitation wavelengths were used on an array of doped and undoped Si surfaces. The majority of the measurements were conducted with the samples at atmospheric pressure. A simple theoretical model of finite crystal solid surfaces helped elaborate the essential difference between work function and the local work function determinations. Formulae for surface potential, surface state population and charge carrier relaxation resulting from selective excitation were derived using Shockley and Reed theory. The presence of atmospheric constituents chemisorbed on the surfaces was also investigated. Large photovoltage signals induced by laser excitation revealed optical saturation effects that could be related to surface potential information and work function evaluation. Narrow surface photovoltage and photoconductance spectral signatures of cleaved Si(111) samples observed at reduced temperature and pressure provided additional insight into the contribution of sub-bandgap excitation processes involving surface states.

  15. Measurements of Muon Catalyzed dt Fusion in Solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcelli, Tracy

    1999-05-01

    The first measurement of muon catalyzed dt fusion (dtμ arrow ^4He + n + μ^-) in solid HD at ~ 3 K has been performed. The theory describing the formation of the [(dtμ)pee)] muonic molecule from the resonant reaction tμ + HD arrow [(dtμ)pee], a key process in the dt fusion cycle, can now be tested against experimental results. Using an experimental technique which employs solid layers of hydrogen isotopes, the energy of molecular formation is determined via time of flight, and dt fusion time spectra in solid HD have been measured. The theory describing the resonant formation of the dtμ muonic molecule is compared to the experimental results through Monte Carlo simulations. The energy dependent molecular formation rates calculated for HD at 3 K have been employed in the Monte Carlo with the resultant fusion time spectra in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Measurements of muon-catalyzed dt fusion in solid HD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porcelli, Tracy Ann

    1999-12-01

    The first measurement of muon catalyzed dt fusion ( dtm--> 4He + n + m- ) in solid HD at ~ 3 K has been performed. The theory describing the formation of the [(dtm)pe e] muonic molecule from the resonant reaction tm+HD-->[(dtm) pee] , a key process in the dt fusion cycle, can now be tested against the experimental results. Using an experimental technique which employs solid layers of hydrogen isotopes, the energy of molecular formation is determined via time of flight, and dt fusion time spectra in solid HD have been measured. The theory describing the resonant formation of the dtm muonic molecule is compared to the experimental results through Monte Carlo simulations. The energy dependent molecular formation rates calculated for HD at 3 K have been employed in the Monte Carlo with the resultant simulated fusion time spectra in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  17. The anomalous solid state decomposition of ammonium dinitramide: a matter of surface polarization.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Brinck, Tore

    2009-05-28

    Polarized dinitramide anions on the surface of solid ammonium dinitramide (ADN) have a decomposition barrier that is reduced by 16 kcal mol(-1) and explain the anomalous solid state decomposition of ADN. PMID:19436902

  18. Neutralization Of Multiply Charged Rydberg Ions Interacting With Solid Surfaces Under The Grazing Incidence Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majkic, M. D.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Galijas, S. M. D.

    2010-07-01

    We elaborated the time-symmetric, two-state vector model to investigate the intermediate stages of the electron capture into the Rydberg states of multiply charged ions interacting with solid surface under the grazing incidence geometry. The neutralization distances for the ions XeZ+ interacting with Al-surface are calculated, for core charges Z ?[5,30]. The corresponding mean neutralization distances are in agreement with the data deduced from the measured kinetic energy gain due to the image acceleration of the ions.

  19. Changes in contact angle providing evidence for surface alteration in multi-component solid foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, Svenja K.; Hauf, Katharina; Vieira, Josélio; Heinrich, Stefan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Chocolate blooming, one of the major problems in the confectionery industry, is the formation of visible white spots or a greyish haze on the surface of chocolate products due to large sugar or fat crystals on the surface. This leads to aesthetic changes and deterioration of taste and thus large sales losses for the confectionery industry due to consumer complaints. Chocolate blooming is often related to migration of lipids or sugar molecules to the chocolate surface, where they recrystallize with an associated polymorphic change of crystal structure on the surface. The wetting behaviour from contact angle measurements gives further insight into surface properties and is needed to determine surface energies and to evaluate possible migration mechanisms and preferred pathways. Therefore, an equilibrium contact angle is needed which is not directly accessible and is influenced by surface texture and interaction between solid and test liquid. In this study, the surface of cocoa butter and conventional chocolates was characterized by measuring the contact angle with the sessile drop protocol. The influence of roughness, test liquid and pre-crystallization of the samples as well as the storage temperature were investigated. In case of no pre-crystallization, a change in surface properties due to storage at 20 °C was detected, whereas samples stored at 30 °C showed the same wetting behaviour as fresh samples. This is associated with polymorphic transformation from thermodynamically less stable crystals to more stable configurations.

  20. An experimental investigation of spanwise vortices interacting with solid and free surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Martin J.

    Coherent vortices are generated in flow fields due to flow interaction with sharp solid surfaces. Such vortices generate significant disturbances in the flow and affect its further development. In this dissertation attention is focused on the interaction of vortices with solid or free liquid/air surfaces. We examine vortices with their axis parallel or normal to the surface. Three main cases were examined: the interaction of a vortex pair propagating towards a solid boundary, the interaction of spanwise vortices in a turbulent boundary layer, and finally the interaction of spanwise vortices with a flat-plate wake and a free liquid surface. These problems hold significance in several engineering applications, including investigations into trailing wing tip vortices and their interaction with the ground, vortical effects on the development of turbulent boundary layers and free surface signatures and their detection in ship/submarine wakes. Data are acquired with a laser Doppler velocimetry system (LDV) and with Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV), using a high-speed digital video camera. The LDV system measures two components of velocity along appropriately chosen planes. Grids of data were acquired for different pitch rates of a disturbing flap that generates vortices. Phase-averaged vorticity and turbulence level contours are estimated and presented. It is found that vortices with diameter the order of the boundary layer quickly diffuse and disappear while their turbulent kinetic energy spreads uniformly across the entire boundary layer. Larger vortices have a considerably longer life span and in turn feed more vorticity into the boundary layer. Trailing edge vortices are generated in a water tunnel by sharp hinged motions of a flap. These vortices are allowed to reconnect with the free surface and mix with a turbulent free shear layer. The flow is conditionally sampled via frame grabbing of free surface shadowgraphs. It is found that the vortex core bends away from

  1. Neutralization distances of Ar^Z+ Rydberg ions interacting with solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majkic, M. D.; Nedeljkovic, N. N.; Galijas, S. M. D.

    2008-07-01

    We apply the recently developed time-symmetrized, two-state vector model to investigate the intermediate stages of the electron capture into the Rydberg states of multiply charged Ar^Z+ ions (core charge Z >> 1, principal quantum number n_A >> 1) escaping Al-solid surface at low velocity. The simple analytical formulae derived for the corresponding neutralization rates enable us to analyze the neutralization distances for the low-l Rydberg states (n_A,l_A,m_A), for different charge states Z of the ion. It is found that the inclusion of core polarization significantly reduces the neutralization distances. The neutralization distances for the highest Rydberg levels that can be populated in the vicinity of solid surface are in agreement with the data deduced from experiments in which the kinetic energy gain due to the image acceleration of the ions is measured.

  2. Analysis of measurements for solid state laser remote lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin

    1995-01-01

    The merits of using lidar systems for remote measurements of various atmospheric processes such as wind, turbulence, moisture, and aerosol concentration are widely recognized. Although the lidar technology has progressed considerably over the past two decades, significant research particularly in the area of solid state lidars remains to be conducted in order to fully exploit this technology. The work performed by the UAH (University of Alabama in Huntsville) personnel under this Delivery Order concentrated on analyses of measurements required in support of solid state laser remote sensing lidar systems which are to be designed, deployed, and used to measure atmospheric processes and constituents. UAH personnel has studied and recommended to NASA/MSFC the requirements of the optical systems needed to characterize the detection devices suitable for solid state wavelengths and to evaluate various heterodyne detection schemes. The 2-micron solid state laser technology was investigated and several preliminary laser designs were developed and their performance for remote sensing of atmospheric winds and clouds from a spaceborne platform were specified. In addition to the laser source and the detector, the other critical technologies necessary for global wind measurements by a spaceborne solid state coherent lidar systems were identified to be developed and demonstrated. As part of this work, an analysis was performed to determine the atmospheric wind velocity estimation accuracy using the line-of-sight measurements of a scanning coherent lidar. Under this delivery order, a computer database of materials related to the theory, development, testing, and operation of lidar systems was developed to serve as a source of information for lidar research and development.

  3. Interaction of atomic oxygen with solid surfaces at orbital altitudes (A0114)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Peters, P. N.

    1984-01-01

    The basic approach to this experiment is to expose a wide variety of material surfaces to the atomic flux in orbit. The experiment is passive and depends on preflight and postflight measurements of the test surfaces in the laboratory. The experiment will also include a reflectometer device to measure atomic beam reflection angles and thus momentum accommodations, and a unique passive spacecraft attitude sensor. Samples consisting of solid disks or thin film coatings on substrate disks will be mounted in a panel. The face of this panel will be flown on Long Duration Exposure Facility normal to the incident stream of oxygen atoms. Each disk will have part of its front surface masked so exposure to the atomic-oxygen reaction will be limited to selected areas, the shadowed areas being used as control surfaces in the measurements. A typical sample is an optically flat quartz disk overcoated with a film of the material of interest. These include Ag, Au, Pt, Nb, Ni, Al, C, Si, Ge, LiF, and a few engineering materials. Some materials for which the expected removal rate is high, such as carbon, will be solid disks rather than thin films.

  4. Measuring the Internal Environment of Solid Rocket Motors During Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenberg, Brent; Smith, Doug; Speas, Kyle; Corliss, Adam

    2003-01-01

    A new instrumentation system has been developed to measure the internal environment of solid rocket test motors during motor ignition. The system leverages conventional, analog gages with custom designed, electronics modules to provide safe, accurate, high speed data acquisition capability. To date, the instrumentation system has been demonstrated in a laboratory environment and on subscale static fire test motors ranging in size from 5-inches to 24-inches in diameter. Ultimately, this system is intended to be installed on a full-scale Reusable Solid Rocket Motor. This paper explains the need for the data, the components and capabilities of the system, and the test results.

  5. Communication: Fundamental measure theory for hard disks: fluid and solid.

    PubMed

    Roth, Roland; Mecke, Klaus; Oettel, Martin

    2012-02-28

    Two-dimensional hard-particle systems are rather easy to simulate but surprisingly difficult to treat by theory. Despite their importance from both theoretical and experimental points of view, theoretical approaches are usually qualitative or at best semi-quantitative. Here, we present a density functional theory based on the ideas of fundamental measure theory for two-dimensional hard-disk mixtures, which allows for the first time an accurate description of the structure of the dense fluid and the equation of state for the solid phase within the framework of density functional theory. The properties of the solid phase are obtained by freely minimizing the functional. PMID:22380024

  6. Optical Measurements on Solid Specimens of Solid Rocket Motor Exhaust and Solid Rocket Motor Slag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E., III

    1991-01-01

    Samples of aluminum slag were investigated to aid the Earth Science and Applications Division at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Alumina from space motor propellant exhaust and space motor propellant slag was examined as a component of space refuse. Thermal emittance and solar absorptivity measurements were taken to support their comparison with reflectance measurements derived from actual debris. To determine the similarity between the samples and space motor exhaust or space motor slag, emittance and absorbance results were correlated with an examination of specimen morphology.

  7. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  8. Imidazolium-based ionic liquids grafted on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Xin, Bingwei; Hao, Jingcheng

    2014-01-01

    Supported ionic liquids (SILs), which refer to ionic liquids (ILs) immobilized on supports, are among the most important derivatives of ILs. The immobilization process of ILs can transfer their desired properties to substrates. Combination of the advantages of ILs with those of support materials will derive novel performances while retaining properties of both moieties. SILs have been widely applied in almost all of fields involving ILs, and have brought about drastic expansion of the ionic liquid area. As green media in organic catalytic reactions, based on utilizing the ability of ILs to stabilize the catalysts, they have many advantages over free ILs, including avoiding the leaching of ILs, reducing their amount, and improving the recoverability and reusability of both themselves and catalysts. This has critical significance from both environmental and economical points of view. As novel functional materials in surface science and material chemistry, SILs are ideal surface modifying agents. They can modify and improve the properties of solids, such as wettability, lubricating property, separation efficiency and electrochemical response. With the achievements in the field of ILs, using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to SILs has drawn increasing attention in catalytic reactions and separation technologies, and achieved substantial progress. The combination of MNPs and ILs renders magnetic SILs, which exhibit the unique properties of ILs as well as facile separation by an external magnetic field. In this article, we focus on imidazolium-based ILs covalently grafted to non-porous and porous inorganic materials. The excellent stability and durability of this kind of SILs offer a great advantage compared with free ILs and IL films physically adsorbed on substrates without covalent bonds. Including examples from our own research, we overview mainly the applications and achievements of covalent-linked SILs in catalytic reactions, surface modification, separation

  9. Optical and surface properties of optically transparent Li3 PO4 solid electrolyte layer for transparent solid batteries.

    PubMed

    Pat, Suat; Özen, Soner; Şenay, Volkan; Korkmaz, Şadan

    2016-07-01

    In this study, optical and surface properties of the optically transparent Li3 PO4 solid electrolyte layer for transparent solid battery have been investigated for the first time. To determine the optical properties, transmittance, absorbance, reflection, refractive index spectra, and optical band gap were determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometer and optical interferometer. The surface property of the transparent Li3 PO4 solid electrolyte was analyzed using atomic force microscopy. One another important parameter is contact angle (CA) surface free energy (SFE). CA and SFE were determined by optical tensiometer. These values probably are a most important parameter for polymer and hybrid battery performance. For the best performance, value of CA should be low. As a result, solid electrolyte layer is a highly transparent and it has a high wettability. SCANNING 38:317-321, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26435203

  10. Embedded Sensors for Measuring Surface Regression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramer, Daniel J.; Taagen, Thomas J.; Vermaak, Anton G.

    2006-01-01

    The development and evaluation of new hybrid and solid rocket motors requires accurate characterization of the propellant surface regression as a function of key operational parameters. These characteristics establish the propellant flow rate and are prime design drivers affecting the propulsion system geometry, size, and overall performance. There is a similar need for the development of advanced ablative materials, and the use of conventional ablatives exposed to new operational environments. The Miniature Surface Regression Sensor (MSRS) was developed to serve these applications. It is designed to be cast or embedded in the material of interest and regresses along with it. During this process, the resistance of the sensor is related to its instantaneous length, allowing the real-time thickness of the host material to be established. The time derivative of this data reveals the instantaneous surface regression rate. The MSRS could also be adapted to perform similar measurements for a variety of other host materials when it is desired to monitor thicknesses and/or regression rate for purposes of safety, operational control, or research. For example, the sensor could be used to monitor the thicknesses of brake linings or racecar tires and indicate when they need to be replaced. At the time of this reporting, over 200 of these sensors have been installed into a variety of host materials. An MSRS can be made in either of two configurations, denoted ladder and continuous (see Figure 1). A ladder MSRS includes two highly electrically conductive legs, across which narrow strips of electrically resistive material are placed at small increments of length. These strips resemble the rungs of a ladder and are electrically equivalent to many tiny resistors connected in parallel. A substrate material provides structural support for the legs and rungs. The instantaneous sensor resistance is read by an external signal conditioner via wires attached to the conductive legs on the

  11. Surface texture measurement for additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantaphyllou, Andrew; Giusca, Claudiu L.; Macaulay, Gavin D.; Roerig, Felix; Hoebel, Matthias; Leach, Richard K.; Tomita, Ben; Milne, Katherine A.

    2015-06-01

    The surface texture of additively manufactured metallic surfaces made by powder bed methods is affected by a number of factors, including the powder’s particle size distribution, the effect of the heat source, the thickness of the printed layers, the angle of the surface relative to the horizontal build bed and the effect of any post processing/finishing. The aim of the research reported here is to understand the way these surfaces should be measured in order to characterise them. In published research to date, the surface texture is generally reported as an Ra value, measured across the lay. The appropriateness of this method for such surfaces is investigated here. A preliminary investigation was carried out on two additive manufacturing processes—selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM)—focusing on the effect of build angle and post processing. The surfaces were measured using both tactile and optical methods and a range of profile and areal parameters were reported. Test coupons were manufactured at four angles relative to the horizontal plane of the powder bed using both SLM and EBM. The effect of lay—caused by the layered nature of the manufacturing process—was investigated, as was the required sample area for optical measurements. The surfaces were also measured before and after grit blasting.

  12. Silicon-wafer-surface damage revealed by surface photovoltage measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Alvin M.

    1982-11-01

    Anomalous results of surface photovoltage (SPV) measurements on Si wafers are shown to be associated with a damaged region beneath the illuminated surface of the wafer being measured. The anomaly is a concave-upward curvature of the I0(α-1) plot with an r2 value, derived from linear regression analysis, less than the normally observed minimum value (˜0.98). Removal of the damaged region by an appropriate etching procedure allows subsequent SPV measurements whose results are substantially free of the previously observed anomaly. The qualitative character of the anomaly can be reproduced by a simple theoretical model in which only one effect of the damage is considered; this effect is a diminished quantum efficiency for hole-electron pair generation by photon absorption in the damaged region. The results suggest the use of SPV measurements as a test procedure for revealing the presence of surface damage in Si wafers.

  13. A nanodrop on the surface of a lubricating liquid covering a rough solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berim, Gersh O.; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2015-09-01

    A two-component fluid consisting of a lubricating fluid (LF) that covers a rough solid surface (surface decorated by periodic array of identical pillars) and a test fluid (TF) as a nanodrop over LF is considered. A horizontal external perturbative force is applied to TF and the density functional theory is used for the treatment of the system. The concepts of advancing and receding contact angles as well as of leading edges of the drop are revisited. Three different definitions of the contact angles are analyzed and the most plausible selected. The contact angles are calculated as functions of drop size and magnitude of the perturbative force. For small drops, both angles change nonmonotonously with increasing perturbative force. For larger drops, the advancing contact angle has the tendency to increase and the receding contact angle to decrease with increasing force. The sticking force which maintains the drop equilibrium in the presence of an external perturbative force is determined as function of the contact angles. It is shown that this dependence is similar to that for a drop on a rough solid surface in the absence of LF. A critical sticking force, defined as the largest value of the perturbative force for which the drop remains at equilibrium, is determined.A two-component fluid consisting of a lubricating fluid (LF) that covers a rough solid surface (surface decorated by periodic array of identical pillars) and a test fluid (TF) as a nanodrop over LF is considered. A horizontal external perturbative force is applied to TF and the density functional theory is used for the treatment of the system. The concepts of advancing and receding contact angles as well as of leading edges of the drop are revisited. Three different definitions of the contact angles are analyzed and the most plausible selected. The contact angles are calculated as functions of drop size and magnitude of the perturbative force. For small drops, both angles change nonmonotonously with

  14. Theoretical model for adhesive friction between elastomers and rough solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Momozono, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kenya; Kyogoku, Keiji

    2010-03-21

    A theoretical model for the adhesive friction between elastomers and rough solid surfaces is proposed on the basis of opening crack propagation processes at the boundary of the contact interfaces and the rate processes of formation of molecular bonds on the solid surface. This model, which is expressed as a product of the terms related to the two abovementioned processes, requires some measurable and fitted parameters such as the frictional shear strength expressed as a function of viscoelastic dissipation, rate-dependent elasticity, density of bonded molecular chains at a contact junction, critical velocity related to viscoelastic relaxation, and critical velocity related to the rate process of formation of molecular bonds on the solid surface. The friction-velocity relationship exhibits a remarkable fit to previously obtained experimental results for polymers such as engineering rubber, gels, and plastics (glassy polymers), and all fitting parameters are physically reasonable. The viscoelastic index "n" is also related to the "glass-to-rubber transition" of a nanometer-thick polymer layer for frictional behavior. Thus, from a practical viewpoint, this model can be used effectively for fitting the adhesive friction behavior of polymers. PMID:20331279

  15. Theoretical model for adhesive friction between elastomers and rough solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momozono, Satoshi; Nakamura, Kenya; Kyogoku, Keiji

    2010-03-01

    A theoretical model for the adhesive friction between elastomers and rough solid surfaces is proposed on the basis of opening crack propagation processes at the boundary of the contact interfaces and the rate processes of formation of molecular bonds on the solid surface. This model, which is expressed as a product of the terms related to the two abovementioned processes, requires some measurable and fitted parameters such as the frictional shear strength expressed as a function of viscoelastic dissipation, rate-dependent elasticity, density of bonded molecular chains at a contact junction, critical velocity related to viscoelastic relaxation, and critical velocity related to the rate process of formation of molecular bonds on the solid surface. The friction-velocity relationship exhibits a remarkable fit to previously obtained experimental results for polymers such as engineering rubber, gels, and plastics (glassy polymers), and all fitting parameters are physically reasonable. The viscoelastic index "n" is also related to the "glass-to-rubber transition" of a nanometer-thick polymer layer for frictional behavior. Thus, from a practical viewpoint, this model can be used effectively for fitting the adhesive friction behavior of polymers.

  16. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    The number and chemical identity of reactive sites on surfaces of glass affects the processing, reliability, and lifetime of a number of important commercial products. Surface site densities, distributions, and structural identities are closely tied to the formation and processing of the glass surface, and exert a direct influence on strength and coating performance. The surface of a glass sample may vary markedly from the composition and chemistry of the bulk glass. We are taking a physicochemical approach to understanding adsorption sites on pristine multicomponent glass fibers surfaces, directly addressing the effect of processing on surface reactivity. This project aimed to understand the energy distributions of surface adsorption sites, the chemical/structural identity of those sites, and the relationship of these glasses to glass composition, thermal history, and in future work, surface coatings. We have studied the bulk and surface structure as well as the surface reactivity of the glass fibers with solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, inverse gas chromatography (IGC), and computational chemistry methods. These methods, solid-state NMR and IGC, typically require high surface area materials; however, by using probe molecules for NMR experiments or packing a column at high density for IGC measurements, lower surface area materials, such as glass fibers, can be investigated. The glasses used within this study were chosen as representative specimens of fibers with potentially different reactive sites on their surfaces. The two glass compositions were centered around a nominal E-glass, which contains very little alkali cations and mainly alkaline earth cations, and wool glass, which contains an abundance of alkali cations. The concentration of boron was varied from 0 to 8 mole % in both fiber compositions. Fibers were drawn from each composition at a variety of temperatures and draw speeds to provide a range of glass samples with varying

  17. The effect of nanoparticle self-structuring on wetting and spreading of nanofluids on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondiparty, Kirtiprakash

    Nanofluids are suspensions of nanometer-sized particles in liquids. The nanoparticles self-structure at the three-phase contact region resulting in the structural disjoining pressure gradient which causes enhanced the spreading of nanofluids compared to simple fluids without nanoparticles. In this thesis, we attempt to understand the effect of the structural disjoining pressure on the spreading dynamics of nanofluids on solid surfaces. We observed nanoparticle self-structuring phenomena during film thinning on a smooth hydrophilic glass surface using a silica-nanoparticle aqueous suspension and reflected light interferometry. Our experiments revealed that film formed from small drop is thicker and contains more particle layers than a film formed from large drop. The data for the film-meniscus contact angle verses film thickness were obtained and used to calculate the structural energy isotherm of an asymmetric film. We studied the effect of structural disjoining pressure on the wedge meniscus profile formed by an oil drop on solid surface surrounded by nanofluid using Laplace Equation augmented with the structural disjoining pressure. Our analyses indicate that a suitable combination of the nanoparticle concentration, nanoparticle size, contact angle, and capillary pressure can result not only in the displacement of the three-phase contact line, but also in the spontaneous spreading of the nanofluid as a film on solid surface. We validated our theoretical predictions using experiments where we observed spreading of nanofluid on glass surface displacing a sessile drop of canola oil. The dynamic spreading of the nanofluid on a solid surface between a sessile oil drop on solid surface was experimentally measured using reflected light microscopy. We obtained the rate of nanofluid spreading by plotting the position of the inner contact line with time. The nanofluid film was found to spread at a constant velocity. We modeled the spreading dynamics of the nanofluid film

  18. PREFACE: International Conference on Solid Films and Surfaces (ICSFS 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achete, C. A.; Almeida, C. M.; Cremona, M.; Rocca, M.; Stavale, F.

    2015-03-01

    Foreword The 17th ICSFS took place at the wonderful city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from the 8th to the 11th of September, 2014. The conference focused on recent advances in controlling and characterizing the physical and chemical properties of films and surfaces, with a particular emphasis on materials for electronic, photonic and spintronic applications. In addition, themes of bio-functionalized structures and devices were strongly discussed in the ICSFS, covering interdisciplinary nano and nano-bio science and technology. The conference has promoted, in various sub-fields of materials surfaces and thin films, an excellent forum for exchange of ideas, presentation of technical achievements and discussion of future directions in the field. In this volume of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering we are glad to present 11 peer-reviewed ICSFS contributing papers. The cross-disciplinary nature of conference topics is clearly reflected in these Proceedings' contents. The themes discussed ranged from those close to more traditional condensed matter physics, such as semiconductor surfaces to physical chemistry related issues. The Proceedings were organized in accordance with contributions presented at the Conference. We were glad with the presence of over 160 participants, including 24 invited and plenary talks and over 50 oral contributions. We strongly believe that these Proceedings will be useful for a wide audience of those interested in basic and applied surfaces and thin solid interfaces. Acknowledgment We would like to acknowledge the hard work, professional skills and efficiency of the team which oversaw the general organization, particularly of Dicom (Social Communication Division) from the National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology, Inmetro (Brazil). We also would like to thank all the invited speakers and session chairs for making the meeting such a great success. The Conference was supported and sponsored by Academia

  19. Solid surface wetting and the deployment of drops in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Depew, J.

    1994-02-01

    The complete or partial deployment of liquid samples in low gravity is primarily influenced by the interfacial properties of the specific liquid and solid materials used because the overwhelming bias of the Earth gravitational acceleration is removed. This study addresses the engineering aspects of injecting and deploying drops of prescribed volume into an acoustic positioning chamber in microgravity. The specific problems of interest are the design, testing, and implementation of injector tips to be used in a simultaneously retracting dual-injector system in the Drop Physics Module microgravity experiment facility. Prior to release, the liquid to be deployed must be retained within a restricted area at the very end of the injectors under dynamic stimuli from the continuous injection flow as well as from the stepped motion of the injectors. The final released drop must have a well determined volume and negligible residual linear or angular momentum. The outcome of Earth-based short-duration low gravity experiments had been the selection of two types of injector tips which were flown as back-up parts. They were successfully utilized during the USML-1 Spacelab mission as the primary tips. The combination of a larger contact surface, liquid pinning with a sharp edge, and selective coating of strategic tip surfaces with a non-wetting compound has allowed a significant increase in the success rate of deployment of simple and compound drops of aqueous solutions of glycerol and silicone oil. The diameter of the samples studied in the Drop Physics Module range between 0.3 and 2.7 cm. The tests conducted on-orbit with a manually operated small device have allowed the calibration of the volume deployed for a few drop sizes. The design for improved tips to be used during the next USML flight is based on these results.

  20. Solid surface wetting and the deployment of drops in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Depew, J.

    1994-01-01

    The complete or partial deployment of liquid samples in low gravity is primarily influenced by the interfacial properties of the specific liquid and solid materials used because the overwhelming bias of the Earth gravitational acceleration is removed. This study addresses the engineering aspects of injecting and deploying drops of prescribed volume into an acoustic positioning chamber in microgravity. The specific problems of interest are the design, testing, and implementation of injector tips to be used in a simultaneously retracting dual-injector system in the Drop Physics Module microgravity experiment facility. Prior to release, the liquid to be deployed must be retained within a restricted area at the very end of the injectors under dynamic stimuli from the continuous injection flow as well as from the stepped motion of the injectors. The final released drop must have a well determined volume and negligible residual linear or angular momentum. The outcome of Earth-based short-duration low gravity experiments had been the selection of two types of injector tips which were flown as back-up parts. They were successfully utilized during the USML-1 Spacelab mission as the primary tips. The combination of a larger contact surface, liquid pinning with a sharp edge, and selective coating of strategic tip surfaces with a non-wetting compound has allowed a significant increase in the success rate of deployment of simple and compound drops of aqueous solutions of glycerol and silicone oil. The diameter of the samples studied in the Drop Physics Module range between 0.3 and 2.7 cm. The tests conducted on-orbit with a manually operated small device have allowed the calibration of the volume deployed for a few drop sizes. The design for improved tips to be used during the next USML flight is based on these results.

  1. Solid Surface Wetting and the Deployment of Drops in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Depew, J.

    1994-01-01

    The complete or partial deployment of liquid samples in low gravity is primarily influenced by the interfacial properties of the specific liquid and solid materials used because the overwhelming bias of the Earth gravitational acceleration is removed. This study addresses the engineering aspects of injecting and deploying drops of prescribed volume into an acoustic positioning chamber in microgravity. The specific problems of interest are the design, testing, and implementation of injector tips to be used in a simuttaneously retracting dual-injector system used in the Drop Physics Module microgravity experiment facility. Prior to release, the liquid to be deployed must be retained within a restricted area at the very end of the injectors even under dynamic stimuli due to continuous injection flow as well as to the stepped motion of the injectors, and the final released drop must have a well determined volume as well as negligible residual linear or angular momentum from the deployment process. The outcome of Earthbased short-duration low gravity experiments had been the selection of two types of injector tips which were flown as back-up parts and were successfully utilized during the USML-1 Spacelab mission. The combination of a larger contact surface, liquid pinning with a sharp edge, and selective coating of strategic tip surfaces with a non-wetting compound has allowed a significant increase in the success rate of deployment of simple and compound drops of aqueous solutions of glycerol and silicone oil. The diameter of the samples studied in the Drop Physics Module ranged between 0.3 and 2.7 cm. The tests conducted onsrbit with a manually operated small device have allowed the calibration of the volume deployed for a few drop sizes. The design for improved tips to be used during the next USML flight is based on these results.

  2. Computer-aided surface roughness measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, F.J.; Schankula, M.H.

    1983-11-01

    A diamond stylus profilometer with computer-based data acquisition/analysis system is being used to characterize surfaces of reactor components and materials, and to examine the effects of surface topography on thermal contact conductance. The current system is described; measurement problems and system development are discussed in general terms and possible future improvements are outlined.

  3. Low energy electron elastic reflection from solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starý, Vladimír.; Zemek, Josef

    2004-09-01

    Using our Monte-Carlo (MC) code, we calculated the ratio of the coefficients of elastic reflection of electrons from Si, SiO 2 and Au to those of Cu and Al in the electron energy range 0.2-1.0 and 1.5 keV (Au-Cu), respectively. The electron scattering was simulated by a single scattering model. For the MC calculations, we compared the elastic differential cross-sections calculated using a static field approximation with relativistic partial wave analysis on either the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential of free atoms (TFD model) or the Hartree-Fock-Wigner-Seitz (muffin-tin) potential of atoms in the solid state (HFWS model). The MC data were compared with the experimental values. For both models, reasonably good agreement for Si-Cu and SiO 2-Cu systems was found. In the Au-Cu system, better agreement was achieved using the TFD model. The addition of C in a surface interaction layer of 2-5 nm improves the agreement between simulated and experimental values for the Si-Al and Si-SiO 2 systems.

  4. A Portable, High Resolution, Surface Measurement Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihlefeld, Curtis M.; Burns, Bradley M.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    A high resolution, portable, surface measurement device has been demonstrated to provide micron-resolution topographical plots. This device was specifically developed to allow in-situ measurements of defects on the Space Shuttle Orbiter windows, but is versatile enough to be used on a wide variety of surfaces. This paper discusses the choice of an optical sensor and then the decisions required to convert a lab bench optical measurement device into an ergonomic portable system. The necessary trade-offs between performance and portability are presented along with a description of the device developed to measure Orbiter window defects.

  5. Surface dose measurement using TLD powder extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapley, P. . E-mail: rapleyp@tbh.net

    2006-10-01

    Surface/near-surface dose measurements in therapeutic x-ray beams are important in determining the dose to the dermal and epidermal skin layers during radiation treatment. Accurate determination of the surface dose is a difficult but important task for proper treatment of patients. A new method of measuring surface dose in phantom through extrapolation of readings from various thicknesses of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) powder has been developed and investigated. A device was designed, built, and tested that provides TLD powder thickness variation to a minimum thickness of 0.125 mm. Variations of the technique have been evaluated to optimize precision with consideration of procedural ease. Results of this study indicate that dose measurements (relative to D{sub max}) in regions of steep dose gradient in the beam axis direction are possible with a precision (2 standard deviations [SDs]) as good as {+-} 1.2% using the technique. The dosimeter was developed and evaluated using variation to the experimental method. A clinically practical procedure was determined, resulting in measured surface dose of 20.4 {+-} 2% of the D{sub max} dose for a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, 80-cm source-to-surface distance (SSD), Theratron 780 Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}C) beam. Results obtained with TLD powder extrapolation compare favorably to other methods presented in the literature. The TLD powder extrapolation tool has been used clinically at the Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre (NWORCC) to measure surface dose effects under a number of conditions. Results from these measurements are reported. The method appears to be a simple and economical tool for surface dose measurement, particularly for facilities with TLD powder measurement capabilities.

  6. Electron Microscopy Studies of Solid Surfaces and Interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdardziska-Josifovska, Marija

    1991-02-01

    Electron microscopy techniques for study of surfaces and interfaces have been investigated and applied to (100) and (111) surfaces of MgO and to interfaces of Mo/Si multilayers and CoSi_2/Si epitaxial films. MgO surfaces subjected to different annealing and chemical treatments have been characterized by reflection electron microscopy imaging, reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS). An oxygen rich (sqrt {3} times sqrt{3})R 30^circ reconstruction was found on the polar (111) surface upon annealing in oxygen at temperatures higher than 1500 ^circC. Transformation of the surface topography and segregation of calcium were observed on the cleaved (100) surface due to annealing. RHEED resonance conditions have been employed and studied with geometrical constructions, rocking curves and REELS. These conditions are associated with parabolas in the Kikuchi (K) patterns whose nature had been subject of much controversy. The parabolas have been explained as K lines of two-dimensional (2D) lattices in a general scheme which describes the K pattern geometry in terms of intersections of Brillouin zone boundaries with a sphere of reflections. Full treatment of the cases of 2D and 1D real lattices has revealed previously unknown boundaries in the form of parabolic surfaces (2D) and paraboloids of revolution (1D). These boundaries have been applied to lines which arise from electron channeling in 3D crystals and to RHEED parabolas from 2D surface reconstructions. Nanodiffraction, low angle dark-field imaging, electron holography, high spatial resolution EELS, and shadow imaging have been evaluated as means for measuring interface abruptness and change in mean-inner potential and compared to other microscopy techniques. Refraction effects at interfaces were observed as streaking of the nanodiffraction disks which was found to depend on the crystalline nature of the interface. For polycrystalline

  7. How Properties of Solid Surfaces Modulate the Nucleation of Gas Hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Chen, Guangjin; Zhang, Xianren; Sum, Amadeu K.; Wang, Wenchuan

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for CO2 dissolved in water near silica surfaces to investigate how the hydrophilicity and crystallinity of solid surfaces modulate the local structure of adjacent molecules and the nucleation of CO2 hydrates. Our simulations reveal that the hydrophilicity of solid surfaces can change the local structure of water molecules and gas distribution near liquid-solid interfaces, and thus alter the mechanism and dynamics of gas hydrate nucleation. Interestingly, we find that hydrate nucleation tends to occur more easily on relatively less hydrophilic surfaces. Different from surface hydrophilicity, surface crystallinity shows a weak effect on the local structure of adjacent water molecules and on gas hydrate nucleation. At the initial stage of gas hydrate growth, however, the structuring of molecules induced by crystalline surfaces are more ordered than that induced by amorphous solid surfaces. PMID:26227239

  8. Surface area measurement utilizing an acoustic bridge

    PubMed

    Torigoe; Ishii

    2000-05-01

    A new method is proposed for measuring the surface area of an object. The acoustic conductance of a cavity is proportional to the surface area of the cavity inner wall. The surface area of an object thus can be known from the measurement of the acoustic impedance of a chamber in which the object is placed. In order to measure the acoustic impedance accurately; the proposed method employs the acoustic bridge technique. The experimental device is composed of the following elements so arranged that their electric equivalents form a bridge circuit: a measuring chamber in which an object under test is placed and whose volume can be adjusted; a reference chamber whose inner surface area can be varied; a loudspeaker (the signal source) mounted between the two chambers; and a bypass channel at the midpoint of which a microphone (the null detector) is installed. This bridge balances when the volume and the inner surface area of each chamber become equal. The surface area of the object can then be known from the inner surface area of the reference chamber. Several experiments were performed with this device and the success of the proposed method was verified. PMID:10830378

  9. Tuning Solid Surfaces from Hydrophobic to Superhydrophilic by Submonolayer Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Sheng; Zhang, Zhenyu; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2006-01-01

    Molecular-scale understanding and manipulation of the wetting behavior of water on solids remains a fundamental challenge. Using diamond as a model system, we show that the naturally hydrophobic behavior of a hydrogen-terminated C(111) surface can be manipulated by replacing the H termination with a monolayer of adsorbate. In particular, a mixed monolayer of 1 3 Na and 2 3 F atoms leads to superhydrophilic behavior, as shown by first-principles calculations. The physical origin of the superhydrophilic behavior is attributed to the ionic nature of the Na adatoms, which mediate the right degree of binding strength between water molecules and the substrate.

  10. Surface morphology implications on Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Padmashri

    2011-12-01

    Langmuir probes are extensively employed to study the plasmas in space and laboratory environments. Successful measurements require a comprehensive modeling of both the plasma environment and the probe conditions in the form of current collection models. In this thesis, the surface morphology implications on the probe current collection are investigated. This problem is applied and solved in the context of a CubeSat regime. The first problem that is investigated is the consequence of surface structural variability on the current measurements. A new model for dealing with non-uniformity of the probe surface structure is developed in this paper. This model is applied to analyze the Langmuir probe data from a sounding rocket mission that was subjected to surface structural non-homogeneities. This model would be particularly useful for CubeSat platforms where elaborate probe design procedures are not feasible. The second problem that is investigated is the surface area implications on Langmuir probe measurements. It has been established that surface area ratio of the spacecraft to that of the probe needs to be sufficiently large to make successful plasma measurements. CubeSats would therefore pose a challenge for employing Langmuir-type instruments to study the space plasma. We inspect the feasibility of making plasma measurements using Langmuir probes subjected to CubeSat area constraints. This analysis is done for a forthcoming Utah State University (USU)/Space Dynamics Lab (SDL) CubeSat mission.

  11. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  12. Theoretical Foundation of Zisman's Empirical Equation for Wetting of Liquids on Solid Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Ruzeng; Cui, Shuwen; Wang, Xiaosong

    2010-01-01

    Theories of wetting of liquids on solid surfaces under the condition that van der Waals force is dominant are briefly reviewed. We show theoretically that Zisman's empirical equation for wetting of liquids on solid surfaces is a linear approximation of the Young-van der Waals equation in the wetting region, and we express the two parameters in…

  13. The solid angle (geometry factor) for a spherical surface source and an arbitrary detector aperture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-13

    It is proven that the solid angle (or geometry factor, also called the geometrical efficiency) for a spherically symmetric outward-directed surface source with an arbitrary radius and polar angle distribution and an arbitrary detector aperture is equal to the solid angle for an isotropic point source located at the center of the spherical surface source and the same detector aperture.

  14. Temporal coherence of high-order harmonics generated at solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmers, D.; Behmke, M.; Karsch, S.; Keyling, J.; Major, Z.; Stelzmann, C.; Pretzler, G.

    2014-07-01

    We present interferometric measurements of the temporal coherence of high-order harmonics generated by reflection of a titanium sapphire laser off a solid surface. It is found that the coherence length of the harmonic emission is significantly reduced compared with the bandwidth limited case. To identify the responsible mechanism, the acquired data were analyzed by means of particle-in-cell simulations, whose results show good agreement between the calculated spectra and the measured coherence times. We show that the observed broadening can be understood consistently by the occurrence of a Doppler shift induced by the moving plasma surface, which is dented by the radiation pressure of the laser pulse. In this case, this Doppler effect would also lead to positive chirp of the emitted radiation.

  15. Entanglement creation in electron-electron collisions at solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, R.; Giebels, F.; Gollisch, H.

    2015-08-01

    For spin-polarized low-energy electrons impinging on a crystalline surface, an important reaction channel is the collision with a bound valence electron of opposite spin, followed by the emission of a correlated electron pair with antiparallel spins. While primary and valence electrons are not entangled, the screened Coulomb interaction generates spin entanglement between the two outgoing electrons. As a quantitative measure of this entanglement, we calculated a modified von Neumann entropy in terms of direct and exchange transition matrix elements. For coplanar symmetric setups with equal energies of antiparallel-spin electrons, maximal entanglement is analytically shown to occur quite universally, irrespective of the choice of the primary electron energy, the outgoing electron energy, and polar emission angle, and even of the choice of the surface system. Numerical results for Fe(110) and Cu(111) demonstrate first that strong entanglement can persist for unequal energies and second that an overall entanglement reduction due to nonentangled parallel-spin electrons can be avoided for ferromagnetic and even for nonmagnetic surfaces.

  16. Surface heat transfer coefficient, heat efficiency, and temperature of pulsed solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, K.; Weber, H.

    1988-08-01

    The temperature of solid-state lasers is a critical parameter. Efficiency and output power are strongly influenced by it. The two parameters which determine the temperature are the heat generation efficiency (HGE) and the surface heat transfer coefficient (SHTC) of the laser rod. These parameters allow the scaling of the rod temperature up to high pumping powers. Moreover, from the temperature inside the rod, the temperature gradients and the mechanical stress can be evaluated. Using transient temperature measurements, the SHTC and the HGE were determined for air- and water-cooled Nd:YAG and alexandrite lasers. The SHTC can be confirmed by theoretical considerations.

  17. Solid-state coherent laser radar wind shear measuring systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. Milton

    1992-01-01

    Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) was established in 1984 to engage in the development of coherent laser radar systems and subsystems with applications in atmospheric remote sensing, and in target tracking, ranging and imaging. CTI focuses its capabilities in three major areas: (1) theoretical performance and design of coherent laser radar system; (2) development of coherent laser radar systems for government agencies such as DoD and NASA; and (3) development of coherent laser radar systems for commercial markets. The topics addressed are: (1) 1.06 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system; (2) wind measurement using 1.06 micron system; and flashlamp-pumped 2.09 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system.

  18. Solid Test Meal to Measure the Gastric Emptying with Magnetogastrography

    SciTech Connect

    Reynaga-Ornelas, M. G.; Roca-Chiapas, J. M. de ls; Cordova-Fraga, T.; Bernal, J. J.; Sosa, M.

    2008-08-11

    The gastric emptying is the time of evacuating the food ingested from the stomach to the duodenum in a controlled rate. Diverse studies express the results of the gastric emptying in form of half-time (t{sub 1/2}). The Magnetogastrography (MGG) is a biomagnetic technique that has the advantage of not being invasive, radiation free and does not interfere with the privacy of the subject. The objective was to analyze the magnetic signal of magnetic tracers mixed in a solid food to measure gastric emptying using Magnetogastrography. The ingested test meal displayed a magnetic signal, which served to obtain the signal registered by the fluxgate and the peristaltic contractions could be calculated while the stomach was emptying. The solid food product developed results to work satisfactorily in magnetogastrography.

  19. Solid Test Meal to Measure the Gastric Emptying with Magnetogastrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaga-Ornelas, M. G.; De la Roca-Chiapas, J. M.; Cordova-Fraga, T.; Bernal, J. J.; Sosa, M.

    2008-08-01

    The gastric emptying is the time of evacuating the food ingested from the stomach to the duodenum in a controlled rate. Diverse studies express the results of the gastric emptying in form of half-time (t1/2). The Magnetogastrography (MGG) is a biomagnetic technique that has the advantage of not being invasive, radiation free and does not interfere with the privacy of the subject. The objective was to analyze the magnetic signal of magnetic tracers mixed in a solid food to measure gastric emptying using Magnetogastrography. The ingested test meal displayed a magnetic signal, which served to obtain the signal registered by the fluxgate and the peristaltic contractions could be calculated while the stomach was emptying. The solid food product developed results to work satisfactorily in magnetogastrography.

  20. Tribology of thin wetting films between bubble and moving solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Stöckelhuber, K. W.; Tsekov, R.; Phan, C. M.; Heinrich, G.

    2014-07-01

    This work shows a successful example of coupling of theory and experiment to study the tribology of bubble rubbing on solid surface. Such kind of investigation is reported for the first time in the literature. A theory about wetting film intercalated between bubble and moving solid surface was developed, thus deriving the non-linear evolution differential equation which accounted for the friction slip coefficient at the solid surface. The stationary 3D film thickness profile, which appears to be a solution of the differential equation, for each particular speed of motion of the solid surface was derived by means of special procedure and unique interferometric experimental setup. This allowed us to determine the 3D map of the lift pressure within the wetting film, the friction force per unit area and the friction coefficient of rubbing at different speeds of motion of the solid surface. Thus, we observed interesting tribological details about the rubbing of the bubble on t! he solid surface like for example: 1. A regime of mixed friction between dry and lubricated friction exists in the range of 6-170 μm/s, beyond which the rubbing between the bubble and solid becomes completely lubricated and passes through the maximum; 2. The friction coefficient of rubbing has high values at very small speeds of solid's motion and reduces substantially with the increase of the speed of the solid motion until reaching small values, which change insignificantly with the further increase of the speed of the solid. Despite the numerous studies on the motion of bubble/droplet in close proximity to solid wall in the literature, the present investigation appears to be a step ahead in this area as far as we were able to derive 3D maps of the bubble close to the solid surface, which makes the investigation more profound.

  1. Discrete transistor measuring and matching using a solid core oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkinen, M.; Mäkelä, K.; Vuorela, T.; Palovuori, K.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents transistor measurements done at a constant temperature. The aim in this research was to develop a reliable and repeatable method for measuring and searching transistor pairs with similar parameters, as in certain applications it is advantageous to use transistors from the same production batch due to the significant variability in batches from different manufacturers. Transistor manufacturing methods are well established, but due to the large variability in tolerance, not even transistors from the same manufacturing batch have identical properties. Transistors' electrical properties are also strongly temperature-dependent. Therefore, when measuring transistor properties, the temperature must be kept constant. For the measurement process, a solid-core oven providing stable temperature was implemented. In the oven, the base-to-emitter voltage (VBE) and DC-current gain (β) of 32 transistors could be measured simultaneously. The oven's temperature was controlled with a programmable thermostat, which allowed accurate constant temperature operation. The oven is formed by a large metal block with an individual chamber for each transistor to be measured. Isolation of individual transistors and the highly thermally conductive metal core structure prevent thermal coupling between transistors. The oven enables repeatable measurements, and thus measurements between different batches are comparable. In this research study, the properties of over 5000 transistors were measured and the variance of the aforementioned properties was analyzed.

  2. Theoretical Model of Droplet Wettability on a Low-Surface-Energy Solid under the Influence of Gravity

    PubMed Central

    Yonemoto, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    The wettability of droplets on a low surface energy solid is evaluated experimentally and theoretically. Water-ethanol binary mixture drops of several volumes are used. In the experiment, the droplet radius, height, and contact angle are measured. Analytical equations are derived that incorporate the effect of gravity for the relationships between the droplet radius and height, radius and contact angle, and radius and liquid surface energy. All the analytical equations display good agreement with the experimental data. It is found that the fundamental wetting behavior of the droplet on the low surface energy solid can be predicted by our model which gives geometrical information of the droplet such as the contact angle, droplet radius, and height from physical values of liquid and solid. PMID:24511297

  3. Photogrammetric recession measurements of an ablating surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T. (Inventor); Heineck, James T. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An instrument and method for measuring the time history of recession of an ablating surface of a test article during testing in a high enthalpy thermal test facility, such as an arcjet. The method advances prior art by providing time-history data over the full ablating surface without targets and without any modifications to the test article. The method is non-intrusive, simple to implement, requires no external light source, and does not interfere with normal operations of the arcjet facility.

  4. Apparatus for measuring surface particulate contamination

    DOEpatents

    Woodmansee, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring surface particulate contamination includes a tool for collecting a contamination sample from a target surface, a mask having an opening of known area formed therein for defining the target surface, and a flexible connector connecting the tool to the mask. The tool includes a body portion having a large diameter section defining a surface and a small diameter section extending from the large diameter section. A particulate collector is removably mounted on the surface of the large diameter section for collecting the contaminants. The tool further includes a spindle extending from the small diameter section and a spool slidingly mounted on the spindle. A spring is disposed between the small diameter section and the spool for biasing the spool away from the small diameter section. An indicator is provided on the spindle so as to be revealed when the spool is pressed downward to compress the spring.

  5. The heat capacity of water near solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vučelić, V.; Vučelić, D.

    1983-11-01

    Anomalous heat capacities of water at solid/water interfaces have been obtained. The solids vary from inorganic (zeolites, porous class, silica gel, activated carbon) to biological (protein lysozyme and adrenal gland). Water heat capacities at all interfaces exhibit the same pattern. At room temperature the small values are close to ice and increase with temperature, reaching the value of free water between 380 and 440 K.

  6. [Multi-spectral thermometry based on radiation measurement within a finite solid-angle].

    PubMed

    Xin, Cheng-Yun; Cheng, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Zhong-Zheng

    2013-02-01

    Based on Planck's law, the surface temperature of an object can be determined by measurement of emitted radiation. The equation for monochromatic radiation thermometry within a finite solid-angle was deduced, and it was found that if the surface temperature and spectral emissivity can be solved at the same time, the specific radiation measurement conditions for multi-spectral thermometry should be generally met that the radiation measurement should be implemented within an infinitesimal solid-angle or within a finite solid-angle only for a perfect diffuser. When the directional spectral emissivity modeled by finite polynomial series is employed and proper mathematical transformation is used, a universal equation for monochromatic radiation thermometry is obtained. So the restrictions in radiation measurement can be got rid of, but spectral emissivity may not be solved simultaneously. Multi-solution problem was preliminarily investigated, and so a solution was put forward that the channel number should be more than the number of the variables to be solved and the nonlinear least squares method should be used. PMID:23697102

  7. Interpreting the probe-surface interaction of surface measuring instruments, or what is a surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard; Weckenmann, Albert; Coupland, Jeremy; Hartmann, Wito

    2014-09-01

    When using dimensional measuring instruments it is assumed that there is a property of the object, which we call surface, that is present before during and after the measurement, i.e. the surface is a fundamental property of an object that can, by appropriate means, be used to measure geometry. This paper will attempt to show that the fundamental property ‘surface’ does not exist in any simple form and that all the information we can have about a surface is the measurement data, which will include measurement uncertainty. Measurement data, or what will be referred to as the measured surface, is all that really exists. In this paper the basic physical differences between mechanically, electromagnetically and electrically measured surfaces are highlighted and discussed and accompanied by measurement results on a roughness artefact.

  8. Particle velocity and solid volume fraction measurements with a new capacitive flowmeter at the Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility. [Glass beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bobis, J.P.; Porges, K.G.A.; Raptis, A.C.; Brewer, W.E.; Bernovich, L.T.

    1986-08-01

    The performance of a new capacitive flowmeter has been assessed experimentally in a gas-entrained solid flow stream at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility (S/GFTF) for solid feedrates in the range of 0.5 to 2 kg/s and solid-gas loadings up to 22, corresponding to a range of solid volume fractions extending from 0.004 to 0.016. Two types of nonintrusive instruments using the capacitive principle were fabricated at ANL and installed in the horizontal leg of a 12.3 m test section to sense the solids. An improved electrode geometry designed to maximize the coverage of the duct interior while minimizing the readout error due to a nonuniform electric field, was incorporated for one spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes on the outside surface of a ceramic liner and for another spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes mounted flush with the duct inside surface. The capacitive instruments measured the solid volume fraction and the average particle velocity. The results are compared with time-of-flight measurements of short-lived radioactive particles that duplicate closely the size and density of the 1000..mu.. glass beads used in these flow tests. Results show that the solid volume fraction measurements agree with the theoretical models presented and that the particle velocity deduced from the cross-correlation scheme agreed to within 5% of the irradiated particle velocity technique for the 21 to 31 m/s range generated with the S/GFTF. 43 refs., 36 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. Noninterferometric topography measurements of fast moving surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinhasi, Shirly Vinikman; Eliezer, Shalom; Glam, Benny; Appelbaum, Gabi; Bakshi, Lior

    2011-08-01

    The topography of moving surfaces is recovered by noninterferometric measurements. The phase reconstruction is derived by measuring the intensities of a backscattered pulsed laser light and solving the transport intensity equation (TIE). The TIE is solved by expanding the phase into a series of Zernike polynomials, leading to a set of appropriate algebraic equations. This technique, which enables us to make a direct connection between experiments and the TIE, has been successfully tested in gas gun experiments. In particular, the topographies of a moving projectile and the free surface of a shocked target were recovered. PMID:21811317

  10. Bouncing of a hydrophobic solid object upon impact with water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Duck-Gyu; Kim, Ho-Young

    2006-11-01

    It is well known that a water drop impacting with a highly hydrophobic solid surface bounces. Here we show that a tiny hydrophobic solid object may bounce off liquid surface upon impact with the water pool. The impact behavior of such tiny solid with liquid is determined by surface tension, viscosity and density of the liquid, and size, density, hydrophobicity and impact velocity of the solid object. We show that depending on the impact conditions, the solid object may sink, oscillate on the surface, or bounce off. The regime map for such impact behavior is constructed using dimensionless numbers such as the Reynolds and Weber numbers. The implication of this phenomenon with the biological motility exhibited by insects that walk and jump on water is discussed.

  11. Absolute optical surface measurement with deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wansong; Sandner, Marc; Gesierich, Achim; Burke, Jan

    Deflectometry utilises the deformation and displacement of a sample pattern after reflection from a test surface to infer the surface slopes. Differentiation of the measurement data leads to a curvature map, which is very useful for surface quality checks with sensitivity down to the nanometre range. Integration of the data allows reconstruction of the absolute surface shape, but the procedure is very error-prone because systematic errors may add up to large shape deviations. In addition, there are infinitely many combinations for slope and object distance that satisfy a given observation. One solution for this ambiguity is to include information on the object's distance. It must be known very accurately. Two laser pointers can be used for positioning the object, and we also show how a confocal chromatic distance sensor can be used to define a reference point on a smooth surface from which the integration can be started. The used integration algorithm works without symmetry constraints and is therefore suitable for free-form surfaces as well. Unlike null testing, deflectometry also determines radius of curvature (ROC) or focal lengths as a direct result of the 3D surface reconstruction. This is shown by the example of a 200 mm diameter telescope mirror, whose ROC measurements by coordinate measurement machine and deflectometry coincide to within 0.27 mm (or a sag error of 1.3μm). By the example of a diamond-turned off-axis parabolic mirror, we demonstrate that the figure measurement uncertainty comes close to a well-calibrated Fizeau interferometer.

  12. Measurement of surface scratches on aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarr, Dennis P.

    1996-01-01

    In assuring the quality of aircraft, the skin quality must be free of surface imperfections. Surface imperfections such as scratches are unacceptable for cosmetic and structural reasons. Scratches beyond a certain depth are not repairable, resulting in costly replacement of an aircraft's part. Measurements of aircraft exterior surfaces require a ladder or cherry picker for positioning the inspector. Commercially-available computer vision systems are not portable, easy to use, or ergonomic. The machine vision system must be designed with these criteria in mind. The scratch measurement system (SMS) uses computer vision, digital signal processing, and automated inspection methods. The system is portable and battery powered. It is certified for measuring the depth and width of the anomaly. The SMS provides a comprehensive, analytical, and accurate reading. A hardcopy output provides a permanent record of the analysis. The graphical data shows the surface profile and provides substantial information of the surface anomaly. The factory and flight line use the SMS at different stages of aircraft production. Six systems have been built for use within Boeing. A patent was issued for the SMS in February 1994.

  13. Operation Argus. Surface measurements - project midas

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, P.; Chernosky, E.; Markham, T.; McCabe, L.; Peterson, A.

    1984-08-31

    The objective was to make surface measurements of the electromagnetic and optical effects in the detonation area (South Atlantic) and in the area geomagnetically conjugate (Azores) during the Argus experiment. The project participated in three events - Argus I, II, and III.

  14. Surface pressure measurements on a hypersonic vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Henfling, J.F.; Larson, D.E.; Payne, J.L.

    1996-02-01

    Extensive surface pressure measurements were obtained on a hypersonic vehicle configuration at Mach 8 for the purpose of computational fluid dynamics code validation. Experiments were conducted in the Sandia National Laboratories hypersonic wind tunnel. All measurements were made for laminar flow conditions at a Reynolds number (based on model length) of 1.81 x 10{sup 6} and perfect gas conditions. The basic vehicle configuration is a spherically blunted, 10{degree} half- angle cone, with a slice parallel to the axis of the vehicle. To the aft portion of the slice could be attached flaps of varying angle; 10, 20, and 30{degree}. Surface pressure measurements were obtained for angles of attack from -10 to +18{degree}, for various roll angles, at 96 locations on the body surface. All three deflected flap angles produced separated flow on the sliced portion of the body in front of the flap. Because of the three-dimensional expansion over the slice, the separated flow on the slice and flap was also highly three- dimensional. The results of the present experiment provide extensive surface pressure measurements for the validation of computational fluid dynamics codes for separated flow caused by an embedded shock wave.

  15. The influence of roughness of the surface on the interchange of momentum between gas flow and solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, A. I.; Friedlander, O. G.; Nikiforov, A. P.; Nesterov, S. B.; Nezhmetdinova, R. A.

    2012-11-01

    The interaction of high velocity free-molecular gas flow with the solid surface is studied. The influence of the surface structure on the momentum and scattering indicatrix of reflected molecular flow are investigated. The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of the gas flow scattered by a rough surface are given. Data about the surface structure, received by atomic force microscope are also reported.

  16. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Notwithstanding any provision of 40 CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under... for measurement of settleable solids. 434.64 Section 434.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this...

  17. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under this part shall be 0.4... for measurement of settleable solids. 434.64 Section 434.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this part, the...

  18. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Notwithstanding any provision of 40 CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under... for measurement of settleable solids. 434.64 Section 434.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this...

  19. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Notwithstanding any provision of 40 CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under... for measurement of settleable solids. 434.64 Section 434.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this...

  20. 40 CFR 434.64 - Procedure and method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 136, the method detection limit for measuring settleable solids under this part shall be 0.4... for measurement of settleable solids. 434.64 Section 434.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... method detection limit for measurement of settleable solids. For the purposes of this part, the...

  1. Solid scintillator based neutron fluctuation measurement on EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, N.; Zhu, Y. B.; Zhong, G. Q.; Hu, L. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Xu, L. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Microsecond level fast temporal resolved neutron flux and its fluctuation measurement system based on three types of solid scintillator detectors has been successfully established on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) for energetic particle (EP) and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities relevant studies. The detector #1, where 50mm thick polyethylene is used for neutron thermalization, is mostly sensitive to thermal neutron. The detector #2 and #3 measure fast D-D neutrons directly with different gamma immunity. Design details together with detector test results with three types of radioisotope sources are presented. The system has been successfully implemented in EAST experiments for neutron and gamma identification. Typical fast MHD fluctuation related EAST experimental results from this system is also presented.

  2. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  3. Alternative to the Shuttleworth formulation of solid surface stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottomley, D. J.; Ogino, T.

    2001-04-01

    We examine two derivations of the Shuttleworth equation (which is a relation between surface stress g, surface tension γ, and surface strain), and identify the flaws we perceive. Rectifying the perceived flaws leads not to the Shuttleworth equation but to g-γ equivalence. We conclude that surface stress is merely the generalization of the concept of surface tension to an elastically anisotropic system; the surface free-energy density is one-half of the trace of the surface stress tensor, to lowest order. In our opinion, our conclusions lead to a more coherent and elegant form of surface thermodynamics which should prove useful in controlling and in understanding nanometer-scale fabrication.

  4. Interfacial separation between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces: comparison of experiment with theory.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, B; Persson, B N J

    2009-01-01

    We study the average separation between an elastic solid and a hard solid, with a nominally flat but randomly rough surface, as a function of the squeezing pressure. We present experimental results for a silicon rubber (PDMS) block with a flat surface squeezed against an asphalt road surface. The theory shows that an effective repulsive pressure acts between the surfaces of the form p∼exp(-u/u(0)), where u is the average separation between the surfaces and u(0) a constant of the order of the root-mean-square roughness, in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:21817215

  5. Interfacial separation between elastic solids with randomly rough surfaces: comparison of experiment with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, B.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2009-01-01

    We study the average separation between an elastic solid and a hard solid, with a nominally flat but randomly rough surface, as a function of the squeezing pressure. We present experimental results for a silicon rubber (PDMS) block with a flat surface squeezed against an asphalt road surface. The theory shows that an effective repulsive pressure acts between the surfaces of the form p~exp(-u/u0), where u is the average separation between the surfaces and u0 a constant of the order of the root-mean-square roughness, in good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Analysis of the morphology of high surface area solids: studies of agglomeration and the determination of shape

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, W.C. Jr.; Blanco, C.; Coyne, K.; Neil, J.; Pajares, J.

    1987-07-01

    Characterization of the morphology of high surface area solids is most often accomplished by nitrogen desorption and/or mercury intrusion porosimetry. If the void/solid structure is viewed as an interconnected network, ad-de-sorption and retraction/intrusion may be associated with the openings and constrictions within the void network. This more realistic view adds another dimension to the analyses. The data can be analyzed as if the data consisted of agglomerated microspheres. This analysis proves consistent for compacted aerosol silicas but is inconsistent if the solid has a different morphology. More significantly, the ratios of the measured most probable radii of intrusion to those of retraction seem to be characteristic of the void solid structure and pore shapes, and thereby, it may be possible to infer the pore shapes and general structure from this more detailed analysis. A heuristic diagram of these trends is presented. 6 references.

  7. Study of solid/liquid and solid/gas interfaces in Cu-isoleucine complex by surface X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Pilar; Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R.

    2013-02-01

    The enzymes could be understood like structures formed by amino acids bonded with metals, which act as active sites. The research on the coordination of metal-amino acid complexes will bring light on the behavior of metal enzymes, due to the close relation existing between the atomic structure and the functionality. The Cu-isoleucine bond is considered as a good model system to attain a better insight into the characteristics of naturally occurring copper metalloproteins. The surface structure of metal-amino acid complex could be considered as a more realistic model for real systems under biologic working conditions, since the molecular packing is decreased. In the surface, the structural constrains are reduced, keeping the structural capability of surface complex to change as a function of the surrounding environment. In this work, we present a surface X-ray diffraction study on Cu-isoleucine complex under different ambient conditions. Cu(Ile)2 crystals of about 5 mm × 5 mm × 1 mm have been growth, by seeding method in a supersaturated solution, presenting a surface of high quality. The sample for the surface diffraction study was mounted on a cell specially designed for solid/liquid or solid/gas interface analysis. The Cu-isoleucine crystal was measured under a protective dry N2 gas flow and in contact with a saturated metal amino acid solution. The bulk and the surface signals were compared, showing different atomic structures. In both cases, from surface diffraction data, it is observed that the atomic structure of the top layer undergoes a clear structural deformation. A non-uniform surface relaxation is observed producing an inhomogeneous displacement of the surface atoms towards the surface normal.

  8. Surface topographical changes measured by phase-locked interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Fung, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    An electronic optical laser interferometer capable of resolving depth differences of as low as 30 A and planar displacements of 6000 A was constructed to examine surface profiles of bearing surfaces without physical contact. Topological chemical reactivity was determined by applying a drop of dilute alcoholic hydrochloric acid and measuring the profile of the solid surface before and after application of this probe. Scuffed bearing surfaces reacted much faster than virgin ones but that bearing surfaces exposed to lubricants containing an organic chloride reacted much more slowly. The reactivity of stainless steel plates, heated in a nitrogen atmosphere to different temperatures, were examined later at ambient temperature. The change of surface contour as a result of the probe reaction followed Arrhenius-type relation with respect to heat treatment temperature. The contact area of the plate of a ball/plate sliding elastohydrodynamic contact run on trimethylopropane triheptanoate with or without additives was optically profiled periodically. As scuffing was approached, the change of profile within the contact region changed much more rapidly by the acid probe and assumed a constant high value after scuffing. A nonetching metallurgical phase was found in the scuff mark, which was apparently responsible for the high reactivity.

  9. Adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces, and anisotropic surface tensions studied by capillary meniscus dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Cox, Andrew R; Pelan, Eddie G

    2016-07-01

    Here, we review the principle and applications of two recently developed methods: the capillary meniscus dynamometry (CMD) for measuring the surface tension of bubbles/drops, and the capillary bridge dynamometry (CBD) for quantifying the bubble/drop adhesion to solid surfaces. Both methods are based on a new data analysis protocol, which allows one to decouple the two components of non-isotropic surface tension. For an axisymmetric non-fluid interface (e.g. bubble or drop covered by a protein adsorption layer with shear elasticity), the CMD determines the two different components of the anisotropic surface tension, σs and σφ, which are acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", and vary throughout the interface. The method uses data for the instantaneous bubble (drop) profile and capillary pressure, but the procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) method. In the case of bubble or drop pressed against a substrate, which forms a capillary bridge, the CBD method allows one to determine also the capillary-bridge force for both isotropic (fluid) and anisotropic (solidified) adsorption layers. The experiments on bubble (drop) detachment from the substrate show the existence of a maximal pulling force, Fmax, that can be resisted by an adherent fluid particle. Fmax can be used to quantify the strength of adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces. Its value is determined by a competition of attractive transversal tension and repulsive disjoining pressure forces. The greatest Fmax values have been measured for bubbles adherent to glass substrates in pea-protein solutions. The bubble/wall adhesion is lower in solutions containing the protein HFBII hydrophobin, which could be explained with the effect of sandwiched protein aggregates. The applicability of the CBD method to emulsion systems is illustrated by experiments with soybean-oil drops adherent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in

  10. The effects of solid rocket motor effluents on selected surfaces and solid particle size, distribution, and composition for simulated shuttle booster separation motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jex, D. W.; Linton, R. C.; Russell, W. M.; Trenkle, J. J.; Wilkes, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A series of three tests was conducted using solid rocket propellants to determine the effects a solid rocket plume would have on thermal protective surfaces (TPS). The surfaces tested were those which are baselined for the shuttle vehicle. The propellants used were to simulate the separation solid rocket motors (SSRM) that separate the solid rocket boosters (SRB) from the shuttle launch vehicle. Data cover: (1) the optical effects of the plume environment on spacecraft related surfaces, and (2) the solid particle size, distribution, and composition at TPS sample locations.

  11. Influence of particle/solid surface zeta potential on particle adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Savaji, Kunal V; Niitsoo, Olivia; Couzis, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we attempt to understand monolayer formation of spherical particles on a solid surface immersed in a suspension and driven by electrostatic interaction force. The study focuses on the theoretical aspects of the particle adsorption and modeling work based on the random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach is done in order to describe the particle adsorption kinetics and the saturation coverage. The theoretical model is then compared with experimental data obtained under conditions similar to those of the modeling work. Studying the adsorption of polystyrene particles on a silicon wafer in an aqueous system was employed to experimentally validate the theoretical framework. It has been shown both theoretically and experimentally that the particle and solid surface zeta potential values do influence the adsorption kinetics but the effect is too negligible to be of any use in accelerating the kinetics. We have shown that the electrostatically driven particle adsorption is a transport limited process and the rate of transport is not a major function of the zeta potential values of the particle and the solid surface. The faster kinetics seen when the ionic concentration of the suspension is increased is because of the blocking effects and not due to faster approach of particles towards the solid surface. Finally, we have made an important addition to the existing models by incorporating the variation in the flux as a function of particle/solid surface zeta potentials, surface coverage and the randomized position of incidence of an incoming particle on the solid surface. PMID:24996026

  12. Aluminum flame temperature measurements in solid propellant combustion.

    PubMed

    Parigger, Christian G; Woods, Alexander C; Surmick, David M; Donaldson, A B; Height, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    The temperature in an aluminized propellant is determined as a function of height and plume depth from diatomic AlO and thermal emission spectra. Higher in the plume, 305 and 508 mm from the burning surface, measured AlO emission spectra show an average temperature with 1σ errors of 2980 ± 80 K. Lower in the plume, 152 mm from the burning surface, an average AlO emission temperature of 2450 ± 100 K is inferred. The thermal emission analysis yields higher temperatures when using constant emissivity. Particle size effects along the plume are investigated using wavelength-dependent emissivity models. PMID:24666953

  13. Measurement of Solid Rocket Propellant Burning Rate Using X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Matthew D.

    The burning rate of solid propellants can be difficult to measure for unusual burning surface geometries, but X-ray imaging can be used to measure burning rate. The objectives of this work were to measure the baseline burning rate of an electrically-controlled solid propellant (ESP) formulation with real-time X-ray radiography and to determine the uncertainty of the measurements. Two edge detection algorithms were written to track the burning surface in X-ray videos. The edge detection algorithms were informed by intensity profiles of simulated 2-D X-ray images. With a 95% confidence level, the burning rates measured by the Projected-Slope Intersection algorithm in the two combustion experiments conducted were 0.0839 in/s +/-2.86% at an average pressure of 407 psi +/-3.6% and 0.0882 in/s +/-3.04% at 410 psi +/-3.9%. The uncertainty percentages were based on the statistics of a Monte Carlo analysis on burning rate.

  14. Surface coating effects in remote sensing measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, Robert D.

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of the infrared spectra of a liquid-(water) coated quartz substrate and a solid-(pyrophyllite) coated quartzite are compared to theoretical values. Results demonstrate that in the case of the water-coated quartz, a loss in spectral contrast of the quartz emission occurs at the principal restrahlen wavelengths of 8.5, 9.0, and 12.5 µ but is most pronounced at 12.5 µ. In the case of pyrophyllite-coated quartzite, additional spectral features appear between 8.0 and 10.0 µ as the exposure of quartzite through the pyrophyllite coating is increased. Addition of the pure quartzite and pyrophyllite spectra, weighted by exposed area, is shown to satisfactorily describe the composite spectra.

  15. Lidar measurements of solid rocket propellant fire particle plumes.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Brown, Andrea M; Willitsford, Adam H; Dinello-Fass, Ryan; Airola, Marc B; Siegrist, Karen M; Thomas, Michael E; Chang, Yale

    2016-06-10

    This paper presents the first, to our knowledge, direct measurement of aerosol produced by an aluminized solid rocket propellant (SRP) fire on the ground. Such fires produce aluminum oxide particles small enough to loft high into the atmosphere and disperse over a wide area. These results can be applied to spacecraft launchpad accidents that expose spacecraft to such fires; during these fires, there is concern that some of the plutonium from the spacecraft power system will be carried with the aerosols. Accident-related lofting of this material would be the net result of many contributing processes that are currently being evaluated. To resolve the complexity of fire processes, a self-consistent model of the ground-level and upper-level parts of the plume was determined by merging ground-level optical measurements of the fire with lidar measurements of the aerosol plume at height during a series of SRP fire tests that simulated propellant fire accident scenarios. On the basis of the measurements and model results, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) team was able to estimate the amount of aluminum oxide (alumina) lofted into the atmosphere above the fire. The quantification of this ratio is critical for a complete understanding of accident scenarios, because contaminants are transported through the plume. This paper provides an estimate for the mass of alumina lofted into the air. PMID:27409023

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Sensors and actuators based on surface acoustic waves propagating along solid liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Gerhard

    2008-06-01

    The propagation of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) along solid-liquid interfaces depends sensitively on the properties of the liquid covering the solid surface and may result in a momentum transfer into the liquid and thus a propulsion effect via acoustic streaming. This review gives an overview of the design of different SAW devices used for the sensing of liquids and the basic mechanisms of the interaction of SAWs with overlaying liquids. In addition, applications of devices based on these phenomena with respect to touch sensing and the measurement of liquid properties such as density, viscosity or the composition of mixed liquids are described, including microfabricated as well as macroscopic devices made from non-piezoelectric materials. With respect to the rapidly growing field of acoustic streaming applications, recent developments in the movement of nanolitre droplets on a single piezoelectric chip, the rather macroscopic approaches to the acoustic pumping of liquids in channels and recent attempts at numerical simulations of acoustic streaming are reported.

  17. Studies of nanosecond pulse surface ionization wave discharges over solid and liquid dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishchev, Vitaly; Leonov, Sergey; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-12-01

    Surface ionization wave discharges generated by high-voltage nanosecond pulses, propagating over a planar quartz surface and over liquid surfaces (distilled water and 1-butanol) have been studied in a rectangular cross section test cell. The discharge was initiated using a custom-made, alternating polarity, high-voltage nanosecond pulse plasma generator, operated at a pulse repetition rate of 100-500 Hz, with a pulse peak voltage and current of 10-15 kV and 7-20 A, respectively, a pulse FWHM of ˜100 ns, and a coupled pulse energy of 2-9 mJ/pulse. Wave speed was measured using a capacitive probe. ICCD camera images demonstrated that the ionization wave propagated predominantly over the quartz wall or over the liquid surface adjacent to the grounded waveguide placed along the bottom wall of the test cell. Under all experimental conditions tested, the surface plasma ‘sheet’ was diffuse and fairly uniform, both for positive and negative polarities. The parameters of ionization wave discharge propagating over distilled water and 1-butanol surfaces were close to those of the discharge over a quartz wall. No perturbation of the liquid surface by the discharge was detected. In most cases, the positive polarity surface ionization wave propagated at a higher speed and over a longer distance compared to the negative polarity wave. For all three sets of experiments (surface ionization wave discharge over quartz, water and 1-butanol), wave speed and travel distance decreased with pressure. Diffuse, highly reproducible surface ionization wave discharge was also observed over the liquid butanol-saturated butanol vapor interface, as well as over the distilled water-saturated water vapor interface, without buffer gas flow. No significant difference was detected between surface ionization discharges sustained using single-polarity (positive or negative), or alternating polarity high-voltage pulses. Plasma emission images yielded preliminary evidence of charge removal from the

  18. Interfacial interactions between hydrocarbon liquids and solid surfaces used in mechanical oil spill recovery.

    PubMed

    Broje, Victoria; Keller, Arturo A

    2007-01-15

    The goal of this research was to study wetting and adhesion processes between various petroleum products and solid surfaces. When a liquid interacts with a solid surface, wetting, spreading and adhesion processes determine its behavior. These processes are of great importance for understanding oil spill response as well as oil spill behavior on land and in near shore environments, and oil extraction from the reservoir rock. The current study aimed at analyzing oil affinity and adhesion to surfaces used in the mechanical recovery of oil spills. A number of crude oils and petroleum products were tested with the surface materials that are used or may potentially be used to recover oil spills. Through the study of contact angles and recovered mass, it was found that the behavior of the oils at the solid surface is largely determined by the roughness of the solid. For smooth solids, contact angle hysteresis is a good indicator of the ability of the solid to retain oil. For rougher elastomers, the advancing contact angle can be used to predict wetting and adhesion processes between oil and solid. This study showed that oleophilic elastomers (e.g., Neoprene and Hypalon) have higher oil recovery potential than smooth polymers. PMID:17064718

  19. Measuring Wind Ventilation of Dense Surface Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, S. A.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Higgins, C. W.; Lehning, M.; Thomas, C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Wind ventilation enhances exposure of suspended, canopy-captured and corniced snow to subsaturated air and can significantly increase sublimation rate. Although sublimation rate may be high for highly ventilated snow this snow regime represents a small fraction snow that resides in a basin potentially minimizing its influence on snow mass balance. In contrast, the vast majority of a seasonal snowpack typically resides as poorly ventilated surface snow. The sublimation rate of surface snow is often locally so small as to defy direct measurement but regionally pervasive enough that the integrated mass loss of frozen water across a basin may be significant on a seasonal basis. In a warming climate, sublimation rate increases even in subfreezing conditions because the equilibrium water vapor pressure over ice increases exponentially with temperature. To better understand the process of wintertime surface snow sublimation we need to quantify the depth to which turbulent and topographically driven pressure perturbations effect air exchange within the snowpack. Hypothetically, this active layer depth increases the effective ventilated snow surface area, enhancing sublimation above that given by a plane, impermeable snow surface. We designed and performed a novel set of field experiments at two sites in the Oregon Cascades during the 2014 winter season to examine the spectral attenuation of pressure perturbations with depth for dense snow as a function of turbulence intensity and snow permeability. We mounted a Campbell Scientific Irgason Integrated CO2 and H2O Open Path Gas Analyzer and 3-D Sonic Anemometer one meter above the snow to capture mean and turbulent wind forcing and placed outlets of four high precision ParoScientific 216B-102 pressure transducers at different depths to measure the depth-dependent pressure response to wind forcing. A GPS antenna captured data acquisition time with sufficient precision to synchronize a Campbell Scientific CR-3000 acquiring

  20. Measuring defibrillator surface potentials for simulation verification.

    PubMed

    Tate, Jess; Stinstra, Jeroen; Pilcher, Thomas; Poursaid, Ahrash; Saarel, Elizabeth; MacLeod, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Though implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are increasing in use in both adults and children, little progress has been devoted to optimizing device and electrode placement. To facilitate effective ICD placement, especially in pediatric cases, we have developed a predictive model that evaluates the efficacy of a delivered shock. We have also developed an experimental validation approach based on measurements from clinical cases. The approach involves obtaining body surface potential maps of ICD discharges during implantation surgery using a limited lead selection and body surface estimation algorithm. Comparison of the simulated and measured potentials yielded very similar patterns and a typical correlation greater than 0.93, suggesting that the predictive simulation generates realistic potential values. This validation approach provides confidence in application of the simulation pipeline and offers areas to focus future improvements. PMID:22254294

  1. Reliability and Consistency of Surface Contamination Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rouppert, F.; Rivoallan, A.; Largeron, C.

    2002-02-26

    Surface contamination evaluation is a tough problem since it is difficult to isolate the radiations emitted by the surface, especially in a highly irradiating atmosphere. In that case the only possibility is to evaluate smearable (removeable) contamination since ex-situ countings are possible. Unfortunately, according to our experience at CEA, these values are not consistent and thus non relevant. In this study, we show, using in-situ Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometry on contaminated metal samples, that fixed contamination seems to be chemisorbed and removeable contamination seems to be physisorbed. The distribution between fixed and removeable contamination appears to be variable. Chemical equilibria and reversible ion exchange mechanisms are involved and are closely linked to environmental conditions such as humidity and temperature. Measurements of smearable contamination only give an indication of the state of these equilibria between fixed and removeable contamination at the time and in the environmental conditions the measurements were made.

  2. Measurement of single crystal surface parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, L. W.; Bell, A. E.; Strayer, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The sticking coefficient and thermal desorption spectra of Cs from the (110) plane of W was investigated. A sticking coefficient of unity for the monolayer region was measured for T 250 K. Several distinct binding states were observed in the thermal desorption spectrum. Work function and electron reflection measurements were made on the (110) and (100) crystal faces of Mo. Both LEED and Auger were used to determine the orientation and cleanliness of the crystal surfaces. The work function values obtained for the (110) and (100) planes of Mo were 4.92 and 4.18 eV respectively.

  3. Solid-state dosimeters: A new approach for mammography measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brateman, Libby F.; Heintz, Philip H.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To compare responses of modern commercially available solid-state dosimeters (SStDs) used in mammography medical physics surveys for two major vendors of current digital mammography units. To compare differences in dose estimates among SStD responses with ionization chamber (IC) measurements for several target/filter (TF) combinations and report their characteristics. To review scientific bases for measurements of quantities required for mammography for traditional measurement procedures and SStDs. Methods: SStDs designed for use with modern digital mammography units were acquired for evaluation from four manufacturers. Each instrument was evaluated under similar conditions with the available mammography beams provided by two modern full-field digital mammography units in clinical use: a GE Healthcare Senographe Essential (Essential) and a Hologic Selenia Dimensions 5000 (Dimensions), with TFs of Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh; and Rh/Rh and W/Rh, W/Ag, and W/Al, respectively. Measurements were compared among the instruments for the TFs over their respective clinical ranges of peak tube potentials for kVp and half-value layer (HVL) measurements. Comparisons for air kerma (AK) and their associated relative calculated average glandular doses (AGDs), i.e., using fixed mAs, were evaluated over the limited range of 28–30 kVp. Measurements were compared with reference IC measurements for AK, reference HVLs and calculated AGD, for two compression paddle heights for AK, to evaluate scatter effects from compression paddles. SStDs may require different positioning from current mammography measurement protocols. Results: Measurements of kVp were accurate in general for the SStDs (within −1.2 and +1.1 kVp) for all instruments over a wide range of set kVp’s and TFs and most accurate for Mo/Mo and W/Rh. Discrepancies between measurements and reference values were greater for HVL and AK. Measured HVL values differed from reference values by −6.5% to +3.5% depending on the SStD and

  4. Evaluation of Arctic broadband surface radiation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, N.; Long, C. N.; Augustine, J.; Halliwell, D.; Uttal, T.; Longenecker, D.; Niebergall, O.; Wendell, J.; Albee, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Arctic is a challenging environment for making in-situ surface radiation measurements. A standard suite of radiation sensors is typically designed to measure incoming and outgoing shortwave (SW) and thermal infrared, or longwave (LW), radiation. Enhancements may include various sensors for measuring irradiance in narrower bandwidths. Many solar radiation/thermal infrared flux sensors utilize protective glass domes and some are mounted on complex mechanical platforms (solar trackers) that keep sensors and shading devices trained on the sun along its diurnal path. High quality measurements require striking a balance between locating stations in a pristine undisturbed setting free of artificial blockage (such as from buildings and towers) and providing accessibility to allow operators to clean and maintain the instruments. Three significant sources of erroneous data in the Arctic include solar tracker malfunctions, rime/frost/snow deposition on the protective glass domes of the radiometers and operational problems due to limited operator access in extreme weather conditions. In this study, comparisons are made between the global and component sum (direct [vertical component] + diffuse) SW measurements. The difference between these two quantities (that theoretically should be zero) is used to illustrate the magnitude and seasonality of arctic radiation flux measurement problems. The problem of rime/frost/snow deposition is investigated in more detail for one case study utilizing both SW and LW measurements. Solutions to these operational problems that utilize measurement redundancy, more sophisticated heating and ventilation strategies and a more systematic program of operational support and subsequent data quality protocols are proposed.

  5. On quantum effects on the surface of solid hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, V. I.

    2013-10-15

    The low-frequency spectrum of hypothetical superfluidity on the free surface of a quantum crystal of hydrogen is determined. In the quantum-rough state of the surface, crystallization waves with a quadratic spectrum should propagate. In the atomically smooth state, the spectrum is linear. Crystallization waves propagating along elementary steps are also considered.

  6. Optical measurement system for characterizing plastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahleitner, R.; Niel, Kurt S.; Frank, S.

    2008-02-01

    Injection molded plastic parts are often influenced with the surface defect tiger stripes, which dramatically reduce the visual quality. Tiger stripes are known as alternating bands of bright and dull regions normally to the molded flow direction. This defect highly depends on the injection time and on the formation of the plastic compound. In the last years, the intensity of the tiger stripes defect was controlled visually. For quantifying the tiger strip defect a new, efficient, repeatable, reliable and nondestructive optical measurement system is proposed. To evaluate the dependency of the injection time, a number of five DIN-A5 plastic specimens are molded. Each of the five plates consists of the same material but they have different injection times. For the measurement, one specimen is put into the specimen holder, which is placed on the drawer of a closed cabinet. In this inside black painted cabinet a LED light source and a CCD Camera are mounted. The beams of the LED light are diffuse reflected on the surface of the specimen. To catch only parallel beams by the lens of the camera a large distance between specimen and camera is realized by two justified mirrors in the cabinet. The bright and dull regions of the tiger stripe defect have different diffuse reflection parameters. Thus in a picture of defined brightness the visibility of this defect is very good. To enhance the repeatability the failure of the camera noise and of the light oscillation is reduced by mends of averaging multiple images. Next, the surface structure is filtered out of the image and a representing number of horizontal grey-value lines are extracted. The so called tiger line signal is the difference between the grey line and a calculated polynomial function (degree of 6) and shows the surface defect of each line oscillating on the zero x-axis. For each tiger line signal the mean squared error is evaluated. To calculate a quantitative value of the whole surface, all line errors are

  7. Surface acoustic BLOCH oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling in a solid.

    PubMed

    de Lima, M M; Kosevich, Yu A; Santos, P V; Cantarero, A

    2010-04-23

    We present the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling of surface acoustic waves in perturbed grating structures on a solid substrate. A model providing a quantitative description of our experimental observations, including multiple Landau-Zener transitions of the anticrossed surface acoustic Wannier-Stark states, is developed. The use of a planar geometry for the realization of the Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling allows a direct access to the elastic field distribution. The vertical surface displacement has been measured by interferometry. PMID:20482064

  8. Simple relations for wettability of a droplet on a low-surface-energy solid

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2014-04-11

    A treatment of the contact angle is very difficult because it exhibits a hysteresis such as dynamic contact angle and does not necessarily take a constant value. For understanding such complicated behavior of droplet, simple but fundamental consideration is very important. In the present study, wettability of a binary mixture droplet on low surface energy solid is experimentally and theoretically investigated. A simple theoretical model is applied to the droplet behavior considering a situation before and after touching the solid surface from a view point of thermodynamic surface energy. The model can explain the relationships among the contact angle (θ), surface energy of liquid (σ{sub lg}) and the droplet radius (R)

  9. Radioactive ions for solid-state investigations at magnetic surfaces and interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertschat, H. H.; Potzger, K.; Weber, A.; Zeitz, W.-D.

    Hyperfine interactions observed at isomeric states of radioactive probe nuclei are used as a tool for solid-state investigations. This method is sensitive to atomic-scale properties. In recent years surface and interface investigations using radioactive probes delivered many results which can hardly be achieved by any other method. Several groups, e.g., from Konstanz, Leuven, Groningen, Aarhus, Uppsala, Tel Aviv, Pennsylvania, contributed to this field. Our group studies magnetic properties at surfaces and interfaces performing perturbed angular correlation (PAC) measurements in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN). We take advantage of the enhanced variety of PAC probes delivered by the on-line mass separator ISOLDE. First, we report on measurements of magnetic hyperfine fields ( Bhf) at Se adatoms on a ferromagnetic substrate using 77Se as a PAC probe. The investigation of induced magnetic interactions in nonmagnetic materials is a further subject of our studies. Here the nonmagnetic 4d element Pd is investigated, when it is in contact with ferromagnetic nickel. An outlook will be given on studies to be done in the future. The experiments were performed at the HMI, Berlin, and at CERN, Geneva.

  10. Measuring densities of solids and liquids using magnetic levitation: fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Mirica, Katherine A; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Phillips, Scott T; Gupta, Malancha; Whitesides, George M

    2009-07-29

    This paper describes an analytical system that uses magnetic levitation to measure densities of solids and water-immiscible organic liquids with accuracies ranging from +/-0.0002 to +/-0.02 g/cm(3), depending on the type of experiment. The technique is compatible with densities of 0.8-3 g/cm(3) and is applicable to samples with volumes of 1 pL to 1 mL; the samples can be either spherical or irregular in shape. The method employs two permanent NdFeB magnets positioned with like poles facing one another--with the axis between the poles aligned with the gravitational field--and a container filled with paramagnetic medium (e.g., MnCl(2) dissolved in water) placed between these magnets. Density measurements are obtained by placing the sample into the container and measuring the position of the sample relative to the bottom magnet. The balance of magnetic and gravitational forces determines the vertical position of the sample within the device; knowing this position makes it possible to calculate the density of the sample. PMID:19621960