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Sample records for sound antarctica local

  1. Sounding rockets in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, G. C.; Cooper, G. W.; Peterson, N. E.

    1982-01-01

    Sounding rockets are versatile tools for scientists studying the atmospheric region which is located above balloon altitudes but below orbital satellite altitudes. Three NASA Nike-Tomahawk sounding rockets were launched from Siple Station in Antarctica in an upper atmosphere physics experiment in the austral summer of 1980-81. The 110 kg payloads were carried to 200 km apogee altitudes in a coordinated project with Arcas rocket payloads and instrumented balloons. This Siple Station Expedition demonstrated the feasibility of launching large, near 1,000 kg, rocket systems from research stations in Antarctica. The remoteness of research stations in Antarctica and the severe environment are major considerations in planning rocket launching expeditions.

  2. Monaural Sound Localization Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1997-01-01

    Research reported during the past few decades has revealed the importance for human sound localization of the so-called 'monaural spectral cues.' These cues are the result of the direction-dependent filtering of incoming sound waves accomplished by the pinnae. One point of view about how these cues are extracted places great emphasis on the spectrum of the received sound at each ear individually. This leads to the suggestion that an effective way of studying the influence of these cues is to measure the ability of listeners to localize sounds when one of their ears is plugged. Numerous studies have appeared using this monaural localization paradigm. Three experiments are described here which are intended to clarify the results of the previous monaural localization studies and provide new data on how monaural spectral cues might be processed. Virtual sound sources are used in the experiments in order to manipulate and control the stimuli independently at the two ears. Two of the experiments deal with the consequences of the incomplete monauralization that may have contaminated previous work. The results suggest that even very low sound levels in the occluded ear provide access to interaural localization cues. The presence of these cues complicates the interpretation of the results of nominally monaural localization studies. The third experiment concerns the role of prior knowledge of the source spectrum, which is required if monaural cues are to be useful. The results of this last experiment demonstrate that extraction of monaural spectral cues can be severely disrupted by trial-to-trial fluctuations in the source spectrum. The general conclusion of the experiments is that, while monaural spectral cues are important, the monaural localization paradigm may not be the most appropriate way to study their role.

  3. Active localization of virtual sounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, Jack M.; Hebert, C.; Cicinelli, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a virtual sound display built around a 12 MHz 80286 microcomputer and special purpose analog hardware. The display implements most of the primary cues for sound localization in the ear-level plane. Static information about direction is conveyed by interaural time differences and, for frequencies above 1800 Hz, by head sound shadow (interaural intensity differences) and pinna sound shadow. Static information about distance is conveyed by variation in sound pressure (first power law) for all frequencies, by additional attenuation in the higher frequencies (simulating atmospheric absorption), and by the proportion of direct to reverberant sound. When the user actively locomotes, the changing angular position of the source occasioned by head rotations provides further information about direction and the changing angular velocity produced by head translations (motion parallax) provides further information about distance. Judging both from informal observations by users and from objective data obtained in an experiment on homing to virtual and real sounds, we conclude that simple displays such as this are effective in creating the perception of external sounds to which subjects can home with accuracy and ease.

  4. Active localization of virtual sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Jack M.; Hebert, C.; Cicinelli, J. G.

    1991-06-01

    We describe a virtual sound display built around a 12 MHz 80286 microcomputer and special purpose analog hardware. The display implements most of the primary cues for sound localization in the ear-level plane. Static information about direction is conveyed by interaural time differences and, for frequencies above 1800 Hz, by head sound shadow (interaural intensity differences) and pinna sound shadow. Static information about distance is conveyed by variation in sound pressure (first power law) for all frequencies, by additional attenuation in the higher frequencies (simulating atmospheric absorption), and by the proportion of direct to reverberant sound. When the user actively locomotes, the changing angular position of the source occasioned by head rotations provides further information about direction and the changing angular velocity produced by head translations (motion parallax) provides further information about distance. Judging both from informal observations by users and from objective data obtained in an experiment on homing to virtual and real sounds, we conclude that simple displays such as this are effective in creating the perception of external sounds to which subjects can home with accuracy and ease.

  5. Sound localization in the alligator.

    PubMed

    Bierman, Hilary S; Carr, Catherine E

    2015-11-01

    In early tetrapods, it is assumed that the tympana were acoustically coupled through the pharynx and therefore inherently directional, acting as pressure difference receivers. The later closure of the middle ear cavity in turtles, archosaurs, and mammals is a derived condition, and would have changed the ear by decoupling the tympana. Isolation of the middle ears would then have led to selection for structural and neural strategies to compute sound source localization in both archosaurs and mammalian ancestors. In the archosaurs (birds and crocodilians) the presence of air spaces in the skull provided connections between the ears that have been exploited to improve directional hearing, while neural circuits mediating sound localization are well developed. In this review, we will focus primarily on directional hearing in crocodilians, where vocalization and sound localization are thought to be ecologically important, and indicate important issues still awaiting resolution. PMID:26048335

  6. Sound localization by echolocating bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytekin, Murat

    Echolocating bats emit ultrasonic vocalizations and listen to echoes reflected back from objects in the path of the sound beam to build a spatial representation of their surroundings. Important to understanding the representation of space through echolocation are detailed studies of the cues used for localization, the sonar emission patterns and how this information is assembled. This thesis includes three studies, one on the directional properties of the sonar receiver, one on the directional properties of the sonar transmitter, and a model that demonstrates the role of action in building a representation of auditory space. The general importance of this work to a broader understanding of spatial localization is discussed. Investigations of the directional properties of the sonar receiver reveal that interaural level difference and monaural spectral notch cues are both dependent on sound source azimuth and elevation. This redundancy allows flexibility that an echolocating bat may need when coping with complex computational demands for sound localization. Using a novel method to measure bat sonar emission patterns from freely behaving bats, I show that the sonar beam shape varies between vocalizations. Consequently, the auditory system of a bat may need to adapt its computations to accurately localize objects using changing acoustic inputs. Extra-auditory signals that carry information about pinna position and beam shape are required for auditory localization of sound sources. The auditory system must learn associations between extra-auditory signals and acoustic spatial cues. Furthermore, the auditory system must adapt to changes in acoustic input that occur with changes in pinna position and vocalization parameters. These demands on the nervous system suggest that sound localization is achieved through the interaction of behavioral control and acoustic inputs. A sensorimotor model demonstrates how an organism can learn space through auditory-motor contingencies

  7. Mezozooplankton Beneath the Summer Sea Ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica: Abundance, Species Composition, and DMSP content

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ross Sea Phaeocystis antarctica bloom contributes to a summer increase in under-ice planton biomass in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Due to difficulties of under-ice sampling, information on the mesozooplankton in McMurdo Sound is limited. We measured the abundance of mesooopl...

  8. Material sound source localization through headphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunai, Larisa; Peris-Fajarnes, Guillermo; Lengua, Ismael Lengua; Montaña, Ignacio Tortajada

    2012-09-01

    In the present paper a study of sound localization is carried out, considering two different sounds emitted from different hit materials (wood and bongo) as well as a Delta sound. The motivation of this research is to study how humans localize sounds coming from different materials, with the purpose of a future implementation of the acoustic sounds with better localization features in navigation aid systems or training audio-games suited for blind people. Wood and bongo sounds are recorded after hitting two objects made of these materials. Afterwards, they are analysed and processed. On the other hand, the Delta sound (click) is generated by using the Adobe Audition software, considering a frequency of 44.1 kHz. All sounds are analysed and convolved with previously measured non-individual Head-Related Transfer Functions both for an anechoic environment and for an environment with reverberation. The First Choice method is used in this experiment. Subjects are asked to localize the source position of the sound listened through the headphones, by using a graphic user interface. The analyses of the recorded data reveal that no significant differences are obtained either when considering the nature of the sounds (wood, bongo, Delta) or their environmental context (with or without reverberation). The localization accuracies for the anechoic sounds are: wood 90.19%, bongo 92.96% and Delta sound 89.59%, whereas for the sounds with reverberation the results are: wood 90.59%, bongo 92.63% and Delta sound 90.91%. According to these data, we can conclude that even when considering the reverberation effect, the localization accuracy does not significantly increase.

  9. An Isotopic Map of Dust Source Areas in the McMurdo Sound Sector of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakowski, M. A.; Aciego, S.; Delmonte, B.; Baroni, C.; Salvatore, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The McMurdo Sound sector of Antarctica features a unique, polar desert ecosystem characterized by low temperatures, hyper-aridity, and high-speed winds. These climatic conditions result in limited water sources, sparse vegetation, underdeveloped soils, and abundant unconsolidated sediment easily influenced by wind-driven transport. Radiogenic isotopes (87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd) provide constant signatures of dust from source- to sink-areas. Accordingly, aeolian dust derived from arid regions has been recognized in many studies as an important tracer of atmospheric circulation, as well as a tool for deciphering past climatic conditions in dust source regions. However, while major global dust sources (e.g. from South America, Africa, and Asia) are well studied and easily identifiable via distinct isotopic signatures when encountered in different depositional environments (e.g. Antarctic ice cores), local material from sources in and around the ice-free Dry Valleys and surrounding areas have remained in need of further documentation. We analyzed 40 samples of silt, sand, glacial drift, and weathered regolith material in both fine (<5μm) and coarse fractions collected from Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector, including Cape Royds, Cape Bird, and the McMurdo Ice Shelf. Here we present an ArcGIS-generated, high-precision geochemical map of Antarctic PSAs synthesized from our data and combined with geomorphological and stratigraphic information on the studied sites. We believe that our expanded isotopic catalogue and map can be used to enhance and/or prompt regional studies in a variety of disciplines, such as by providing greater constraints on models of regional dust variability and transport pathways and of the melting history of the Antarctic ice sheet, and by determining the provenance of dust archived in ice cores, lake sediment, soil records, and impurities in Antarctic sea-ice.

  10. Hearing in three dimensions: Sound localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to localize a source of sound in space is a fundamental component of the three dimensional character of the sound of audio. For over a century scientists have been trying to understand the physical and psychological processes and physiological mechanisms that subserve sound localization. This research has shown that important information about sound source position is provided by interaural differences in time of arrival, interaural differences in intensity and direction-dependent filtering provided by the pinnae. Progress has been slow, primarily because experiments on localization are technically demanding. Control of stimulus parameters and quantification of the subjective experience are quite difficult problems. Recent advances, such as the ability to simulate a three dimensional sound field over headphones, seem to offer potential for rapid progress. Research using the new techniques has already produced new information. It now seems that interaural time differences are a much more salient and dominant localization cue than previously believed.

  11. Influence of sound source width on human sound localization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel T; Paige, Gary D

    2012-01-01

    Free-field sound localization experiments generally assume that a loudspeaker can be approximated by a point-source; however, a large loudspeaker may extend beyond the width that two sources can be discriminated. Humans can accurately discriminate sound source locations within a few degrees, thus one might expect localization precision to decrease as a function of sound source diameter, much as precision is lower for localizing the center of a wide, blurry light source. In order to test the degree to which humans differentially localize small and large sound sources, auditory targets were presented using a single 25.4 cm by 10.2 cm elliptical loudspeaker with the primary axis oriented both horizontally and vertically in different sessions. Subjects were seated with their heads fixed by a bite bar in a darkened, echo-attenuating room facing a cylindrical, acoustically transparent screen at a distance of 2 meters. Auditory targets consisted of repeating bursts (5 Hz) of low frequency band-pass noise (0.2 - 1 kHz, 75 dB SPL). Subjects were instructed to quickly and accurately guide a laser pointer mounted on a cylindrical joystick towards targets, presented randomly within a field ± 40° in azimuth by ± 10° in elevation, with oversampled points located every ten degrees along the primary meridians. Localization accuracy and precision (mean and standard deviation of localization error at oversampled locations) were not significantly different between speaker orientations, and were comparable to baseline measurements recorded using a 7.6 cm circular speaker. We conclude that low frequency sound localization performance is not dependent upon the size of the sound source as predicted theoretically, and is well approximated by a point source. PMID:23367407

  12. The upper lithostratigraphic unit of ANDRILL AND-2A core (Southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica): Local Pleistocene volcanic sources, paleoenvironmental implications and subsidence in the southern Victoria Land Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Carlo, P.; Panter, K. S.; Bassett, K.; Bracciali, L.; Di Vincenzo, G.; Rocchi, S.

    2009-11-01

    We report results from the study of the uppermost 37 m of the Southern McMurdo Sound (SMS) AND-2A drill core, corresponding to the lithostratigraphic unit 1 (LSU 1), the most volcanogenic unit within the core. We present data on the age, composition, volcanological and depositional features of the volcanic sedimentary and tephra deposits of LSU 1 and discuss their source, mechanisms of emplacement and environment of deposition. Sedimentary features and compositional data indicate shallow water sedimentation for the whole of LSU 1. Most of LSU 1 deposits are a mixture of near primary volcanic material with minor exotic clasts derived from the Paleozoic crystalline basement rocks. Among volcanic materials, glassy particles are the most abundant. They were produced by mildly explosive basaltic eruptions occurring in subaerial and subaqueous environments. The Dailey Islands group, 13 km south-southwest of the SMS drill-site, has been identified as a possible source for the volcanics on the basis of similarity in composition and age. 40Ar- 39Ar laser step-heating analyses on a lava sample from Juergens Island yields an age of 775 ± 22 ka. Yet because of the minimal reworking features of vitriclasts, preservation of fragile structures in volcaniclastic sediments and evidence for volcanic seamounts to the north of the Dailey Islands, it is likely that some of the material originated also from vents close to the drill-site. Evidence for local volcanic sources and for deposition of sediments in a shallow marine environment provides indications about the local paleogeography and implications for the subsidence history of the southern Victoria Land Basin from Pleistocene to Recent.

  13. Judging sound rotation when listeners and sounds rotate: Sound source localization is a multisystem process.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan; Najam, Anbar

    2015-11-01

    In four experiments listeners were rotated or were stationary. Sounds came from a stationary loudspeaker or rotated from loudspeaker to loudspeaker around an azimuth array. When either sounds or listeners rotate the auditory cues used for sound source localization change, but in the everyday world listeners perceive sound rotation only when sounds rotate not when listeners rotate. In the everyday world sound source locations are referenced to positions in the environment (a world-centric reference system). The auditory cues for sound source location indicate locations relative to the head (a head-centric reference system), not locations relative to the world. This paper deals with a general hypothesis that the world-centric location of sound sources requires the auditory system to have information about auditory cues used for sound source location and cues about head position. The use of visual and vestibular information in determining rotating head position in sound rotation perception was investigated. The experiments show that sound rotation perception when sources and listeners rotate was based on acoustic, visual, and, perhaps, vestibular information. The findings are consistent with the general hypotheses and suggest that sound source localization is not based just on acoustics. It is a multisystem process. PMID:26627802

  14. Antarctica

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... Twilight in Antarctica, February 24, 2000 . Nearly 15 times every 24 hours, the Terra spacecraft, traveling southward, crosses from ... D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley ...

  15. The upper lithostratigraphic unit of ANDRILL AND-2A core (Southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica): local Pleistocene volcanic sources, paleoenvironmental implications and subsidence in the southern Victoria Land Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Carlo, P.; Panter, K. S.; Bassett, K. N.; Bracciali, L.; di Vincenzo, G.; Rocchi, S.

    2009-12-01

    We report results from the study of the uppermost 37 meters of the Southern McMurdo Sound (SMS) AND-2A drillcore, corresponding to the lithostratigraphic unit 1 (LSU 1), the most volcanogenic unit within the core. Nearly all of LSU 1 consists of volcanic breccia and sandstone that is a mixture of near primary volcanic material dominated by lava and vitric clasts with minor exotic material derived from distal basement sources. Lava clasts and glass are mafic and range from strongly alkaline (basanite, tephrite) to moderately alkaline (alkali basalt, hawaiite) compositions that are similar to nearby land deposits. 40Ar-39Ar laser step-heating analyses on groundmass separated from lava clasts yield Pleistocene ages (692±38 and 793±63, ±2σ internal errors). Volcanoes of the Dailey Island group, located ~13 km SW of the drillsite, are a possible source for the volcanic materials based on their close proximity, similar composition and age. A basanite lava flow on Juergens Island yields a comparable Pleistocene age of 775±22 ka. Yet there is evidence to suggest that the volcanic source is much closer to the drillsite and that the sediments were deposited in much shallower water relative to the present-day water depth of 384 mbsl. Evidence for local volcanic activity is based in part on the common occurrence of delicate vitriclasts (e.g. glass shards and Pele’s hair) and a minimally reworked ~2 meter thick monomict breccia that is interpreted to have formed by autobrecciating lava. In addition, conical-shaped seamounts and high frequency magnetic anomalies encompass the drillsite and extend south including the volcanoes of the Dailey Islands. Sedimentary features and structures indicate shallow water sedimentation for the whole of LSU 1. Rippled asymmetric cross-laminated sands and hummocky cross-stratification occur intermittently throughout LSU 1 and indicate water depths shallower than 100 meters. The occurrence of ooliths and layers containing siderite and Fe

  16. A probabilistic model for binaural sound localization.

    PubMed

    Willert, Volker; Eggert, Julian; Adamy, Jürgen; Stahl, Raphael; Körner, Edgar

    2006-10-01

    This paper proposes a biologically inspired and technically implemented sound localization system to robustly estimate the position of a sound source in the frontal azimuthal half-plane. For localization, binaural cues are extracted using cochleagrams generated by a cochlear model that serve as input to the system. The basic idea of the model is to separately measure interaural time differences and interaural level differences for a number of frequencies and process these measurements as a whole. This leads to two-dimensional frequency versus time-delay representations of binaural cues, so-called activity maps. A probabilistic evaluation is presented to estimate the position of a sound source over time based on these activity maps. Learned reference maps for different azimuthal positions are integrated into the computation to gain time-dependent discrete conditional probabilities. At every timestep these probabilities are combined over frequencies and binaural cues to estimate the sound source position. In addition, they are propagated over time to improve position estimation. This leads to a system that is able to localize audible signals, for example human speech signals, even in reverberating environments. PMID:17036807

  17. Marine record of Holocene climate, ocean, and cryosphere interactions: Herbert Sound, James Ross Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minzoni, Rebecca Totten; Anderson, John B.; Fernandez, Rodrigo; Wellner, Julia Smith

    2015-12-01

    The sediment record offshore James Ross Island, northeast Antarctic Peninsula presents an unparalleled opportunity to directly compare marine and terrestrial climate records spanning the Holocene in maritime Antarctica. An 11 m drill core was collected between Herbert Sound and Croft Bay as part of the SHALDRIL NBP-0502 initiative and produced the southernmost sediment record from the eastern side of the AP. Thirty-eight radiocarbon ages are used to construct an age model of centennial-scale resolution. Multi-proxy records, including magnetic susceptibility, pebble content, particle size, total organic carbon, and diatom assemblages, were interrogated in the context of nearby Holocene-age ice core, lake, and drift records from James Ross Island. Differences in the timing and expression of Holocene events reflect marine controls on tidewater glaciers, such as water mass configurations and sea ice. Glacial behavior mimics ice core paleotemperatures during the Holocene, with the exception of distinct ocean warming events. Herbert Sound was fully occupied by grounded ice during the Last Glacial Maximum, and experienced rapid lift-off, followed by a floating ice phase. The canopy of floating ice receded by 10 ± 2.4 cal kyr BP, presumably in response to Early Holocene warming. Herbert Sound and Croft Bay fully deglaciated by 7.2 cal kyr BP, when the Mid Holocene Hypsithermal commenced and the sound became open and productive. An extreme peak in productivity ˜6.1 cal kyr BP indicates an oceanic warming event that is not reflected in atmospheric temperature or lacustrine sediment records. Increase in sea ice cover and ice rafting mark the onset of the Neoglacial ˜2.5 cal kyr BP, when pronounced atmospheric cooling is documented in the James Ross Island ice core. Our comparison facilitates more holistic understanding of atmosphere-ocean-cryosphere interactions that may aid predictions of glacial response to future warming and sea-level scenarios.

  18. Sound Localization Strategies in Three Predators.

    PubMed

    Carr, Catherine E; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we compare some of the neural strategies for sound localization and encoding interaural time differences (ITDs) in three predatory species of Reptilia, alligators, barn owls and geckos. Birds and crocodilians are sister groups among the extant archosaurs, while geckos are lepidosaurs. Despite the similar organization of their auditory systems, archosaurs and lizards use different strategies for encoding the ITDs that underlie localization of sound in azimuth. Barn owls encode ITD information using a place map, which is composed of neurons serving as labeled lines tuned for preferred spatial locations, while geckos may use a meter strategy or population code composed of broadly sensitive neurons that represent ITD via changes in the firing rate. PMID:26398572

  19. [Sound localization cues of binaural hearing].

    PubMed

    Paulus, E

    2003-04-01

    The ability to localize sound sources in space is of considerable importance to the human safety- and survival-system. Consequently the current scientific interest in improving the safety-standard i. e. in air-traffic control has provided a new momentum for investigating spatial hearing. This review deals with the nature and the relative salience of the localization cues. Localization refers to judgements of the direction and distance of a sound source but here we will deal with direction only. We begin with a short introduction into the so-called Duplex theory which dates back to John William Strutt (later Lord Rayleigh). The idea is that sound localization is based on interaural time differences (ITD) at low frequencies and interaural level differences (ILD) at high frequencies. If the head remains stationary neither a given ITD nor an ILD can sufficiently define the position of a sound source in space. On such a theoretical basis cones of confusion which open outward from each ear can be predicted ambiguously projecting any source on the surface of such a cone onto an interaural axis. Our restricted ability at localizing sound sources in the vertical median plane is another example of possible ambiguity. At the end of the 19th century scientists already realized that occlusion of the pinnae cavities decreases localization competence. As a result of later achievements in physics and signal-theory it became more obvious that the pinnae may provide an additional cue for spatial hearing and that the outer ear together with the head and the upper torso form a sophisticated direction-dependent filter. The action of such a filter is mathematically described by the so-called Anatomical Transfer Function (ATF). The spectral patterning of the sound produced by the pinnae and the head is most effective when the source has spectral energy over a wide range and contains frequencies above 6 kHz, that is it contains wavelengths short enough to interact with the anatomical

  20. Comparing near-regional and local measurements of infrasound from Mount Erebus, Antarctica: Implications for monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowa, A. L.; Green, D. N.; Johnson, J. B.; Phillips, J. C.; Rust, A. C.

    2014-11-01

    Local (100 s of metres from vent) monitoring of volcanic infrasound is a common tool at volcanoes characterized by frequent low-magnitude eruptions, but it is generally not safe or practical to have sensors so close to the vent during more intense eruptions. To investigate the potential and limitations of monitoring at near-regional ranges (10 s of km) we studied infrasound detection and propagation at Mount Erebus, Antarctica. This site has both a good local monitoring network and an additional International Monitoring System infrasound array, IS55, located 25 km away. We compared data recorded at IS55 with a set of 117 known Strombolian events that were recorded with the local network in January 2006. 75% of these events were identified at IS55 by an analyst looking for a pressure transient coincident with an F-statistic detection, which identifies coherent infrasound signals. With the data from January 2006, we developed and calibrated an automated signal-detection algorithm based on threshold values of both the F-statistic and the correlation coefficient. Application of the algorithm across IS55 data for all of 2006 identified infrasonic signals expected to be Strombolian explosions, and proved reliable for indicating trends in eruption frequency. However, detectability at IS55 of known Strombolian events depended strongly on the local signal amplitude: 90% of events with local amplitudes > 25 Pa were identified at IS55, compared to only 26% of events with local amplitudes < 25 Pa. Event detection was also affected by considerable variation in amplitude decay rates between the local and near-regional sensors. Amplitudes recorded at IS55 varied between 3% and 180% of the amplitude expected assuming hemispherical spreading, indicating that amplitudes recorded at near-regional ranges to Erebus are unreliable indicators of event magnitude. Comparing amplitude decay rates with locally collected radiosonde data indicates a close relationship between recorded

  1. An Antarctica-to-Spain HF ionospheric radio link: Sounding results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilella, C.; Miralles, D.; Pijoan, J. L.

    2008-08-01

    Our research group in Electromagnetism and Communications is involved in a project dealing with the channel characterization of an ionospheric radio link from the Spanish Antarctic Base (62.6°S, 60.4°W) to the Observatori de l'Ebre (40.8°N, 0.5°E) in Spain. Since the link was established for the first time on December 2003, the sounder and measurement techniques have been improved on the basis of the preliminary results. In this paper, the final results of the project corresponding to the 2006/2007 sounding survey are presented. First the hardware and measurement techniques used to probe the channel are described. Then the results in terms of channel availability (and its daily, hourly, and frequency variation), multipath and Doppler spreads, and signal-to-noise ratio are discussed. These results are being used to design the physical layer of a low data rate transmission system intended to send the information acquired by a geomagnetic sensor in the Antarctica.

  2. Surface Clutter Removal in Airborne Radar Sounding Data from the Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Blankenship, D. D.; Morse, D. L.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.

    2005-01-01

    We have collected roughly 1,000 line-km of airborne radar sounding data over glaciers, rock/ice glaciers, permafrost, subsurface ice bodies, ice-covered saline lakes, and glacial deposits in Taylor and Beacon Valley. These data are being analyzed in order to develop techniques for discriminating between subsurface and off-nadir echoes and for detecting and characterizing subsurface interfaces. The identification of features on Mars exhibiting morphologies consistent with ice/rock mixtures, near-surface ice bodies and near-surface liquid water, and the importance of such features to the search for water on Mars, highlights the need for appropriate terrestrial analogs and analysis techniques in order to prepare for radar sounder missions to Mars. Climatic, hydrological, and geological conditions in the Dry Valleys of Antarctica are analogous in many ways to those on Mars. A crucial first step in the data analysis process is the discrimination of echo sources in the radar data. The goal is to identify all returns from the surface of off-nadir topography in order to positively identify subsurface echoes. This process will also be critical for radar data that will be collected in areas of Mars exhibiting significant topography, so that subsurface echoes are identified unambiguously. The positive detection and characterization of subsurface (including sub-ice) water is a primary goal of NASA's Mars exploration program. Our data over the Dry Valleys provides an opportunity to implement techniques we are developing to accomplish these goals.

  3. Evolving subglacial water systems in East Antarctica from airborne radar sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Sasha Peter

    The cold, lightless, and high pressure aquatic environment at the base of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet is of interest to a wide range of disciplines. Stable subglacial lakes and their connecting channels remain perennially liquid three kilometers below some of the coldest places on Earth. The presence of subglacial water impacts flow of the overlying ice and provides clues to the geologic properties of the bedrock below, and may harbor unique life forms which have evolved out of contact with the atmosphere for millions of years. Periodic release of water from this system may impact ocean circulation at the margins of the ice sheet. This research uses airborne radar sounding, with its unique ability to infer properties within and at the base of the ice sheet over large spatial scales, to locate and characterize this unique environment. Subglacial lakes, the primary storage mechanism for subglacial water, have been located and classified into four categories on the basis of the radar reflection properties from the sub-ice interface: Definite lakes are brighter than their surroundings by at least two decibels (relatively bright), and are both consistently reflective (specular) and have a reflection coefficient greater than -10 decibels (absolutely bright). Dim lakes are relatively bright and specular but not absolutely bright, possibly indicating non-steady dynamics in the overlying ice. Fuzzy lakes are both relatively and absolutely bright, but not specular, and may indicate saturated sediments or high frequency spatially heterogeneous distributions of sediment and liquid water (i.e. a braided steam). Indistinct lakes are absolutely bright and specular but no brighter than their surroundings. Lakes themselves and the different classes of lakes are not arranged randomly throughout Antarctica but are clustered around ice divides, ice stream onsets and prominent bedrock troughs, with each cluster demonstrating a different characteristic lake classification distribution

  4. Comparative study of heart sound localization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukadem, A.; Dieterlen, A.; Hueber, N.; Brandt, C.; Raymond, P.

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a comparative study of five algorithms of heart sound localization, one of which, is a method based on radial basis function networks applied in a novel approach. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are evaluated according to a data base of 50 subjects in which there are 25 healthy subjects selected from the University Hospital of Strasbourg (HUS) and from theMARS500 project (Moscow) and 25 subjects with cardiac pathologies selected from the HUS. This study is made under the control of an experienced cardiologist. The performance of each method is evaluated by calculating the area under a receiver operating curve (AUC) and the robustness is shown against different levels of additive white Gaussian noise.

  5. Millennial-scale variability of the George VI Sound Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, S.; Bentley, M.; Hodgson, D.; Bryant, C.; Carmicheal, E.; Noon, P.; Smith, J.; Sugden, D.; Verleyen, E.

    2003-04-01

    This project provides a Late Quaternary perspective of Antarctic ice shelf variability by examining sediment records from epishelf lakes dammed on the eastern side of Alexander Island by George VI Ice Shelf. In recent decades, vast areas of ice shelves on the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula have fragmented in a series of large break-up events, while others have disintegrated progressively. The global significance of current ice shelf loss is difficult to judge as similar variations may be a feature of the last 10,000 years. George VI Ice Shelf is currently close to the limit for ice shelf stability; hence, a two-season sediment-coring programme was undertaken to establish its palaeo-stability record. Recent results are presented from two principal study sites, Moutonnée and Ablation, with preliminary data from Cannonball and Citadel Bastion. These lakes are almost unique in Antarctica because they possess a continuous palaeolacustrine record of ice shelf history that can be linked to a geomorphological record of ice shelf variability. Most significant thus far, is the discovery of benthic foram-rich zones in the Moutonnée basin cores, representing at least one occasion when the ice shelf withdrew and open marine conditions existed in the sound. To determine when this occurred, mono-specific radiocarbon ages and oxygen and carbon isotope data are being obtained from forams, algal mat material and sediments. Physical, chemical and isotope analysis of cores reveals cyclic patterns that potentially match sections of ice core records.

  6. Airborne Radar Sounding and Ice Thickness Measurements over Lake Vostok, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, M. E.; Blankenship, D. D.; Morse, D. L.; Holt, J. W.; Kempf, S. D.; Richter, T. G.; Falola, B.; Oliason, S.

    2002-05-01

    Lake Vostok was discovered using airborne ice-sounding radar in East Antarctica during the mid 1970's, but interest in this largest known subglacial lake has increased in recent years. Frozen microbial discoveries from ice cores taken just above Lake Vostok suggest its potential for being an isolated biological ecosystem. Also, the lake's unique combination of glaciologic, hydrologic and geological processes make it a possible terrestrial analogue for sub-ice water on other planetary bodies. Satellite radar has mapped the spatial extent of the lake from surface topography, and Russian ground traverses have gathered radar and seismic data along select profiles, but the full subglacial environment has remained uncharted. In response to a proposal by R.E. Bell and M. Studinger at Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) conducted an airborne geophysical survey over Lake Vostok and its surroundings during the 2000/01 field season. The survey included 21,000 line-km of geophysical observations with a line spacing of 7.5 km and a tie-line spacing of 11.25 or 22.5 km. The instrument suite included incoherent ice-sounding radar, laser altimetry, and precise GPS positioning and navigation, as well as airborne gravity and magnetics measurements. The radar system consisted of a 60 MHz, 8000 watt peak power transmitter operating in pulsed continuous-wave mode at 12.5 kHz (with 250 ns pulse width), a log-detection incoherent receiver (with 80 dB dynamic range), and a signal digitizer with a unique capability to average signals rapidly. Incoherent radar observations constructed from 2048 averaged transmissions occurred roughly every 12 m along-track. Ice thicknesses in excess of 4000 m were routinely sounded over Lake Vostok using this system. In addition to the incoherent radar, a new acquisition system was developed on an experimental basis to coherently integrate radar signals utilizing synthetic aperture radar techniques

  7. Sound source localization identification accuracy: Level and duration dependencies.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A

    2016-07-01

    Sound source localization accuracy for noises was measured for sources in the front azimuthal open field mainly as a function of overall noise level and duration. An identification procedure was used in which listeners identify which loudspeakers presented a sound. Noises were filtered and differed in bandwidth and center frequency. Sound source localization accuracy depended on the bandwidth of the stimuli, and for the narrow bandwidths, accuracy depended on the filter's center frequency. Sound source localization accuracy did not depend on overall level or duration. PMID:27475204

  8. SoundCompass: a distributed MEMS microphone array-based sensor for sound source localization.

    PubMed

    Tiete, Jelmer; Domínguez, Federico; da Silva, Bruno; Segers, Laurent; Steenhaut, Kris; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization is a well-researched subject with applications ranging from localizing sniper fire in urban battlefields to cataloging wildlife in rural areas. One critical application is the localization of noise pollution sources in urban environments, due to an increasing body of evidence linking noise pollution to adverse effects on human health. Current noise mapping techniques often fail to accurately identify noise pollution sources, because they rely on the interpolation of a limited number of scattered sound sensors. Aiming to produce accurate noise pollution maps, we developed the SoundCompass, a low-cost sound sensor capable of measuring local noise levels and sound field directionality. Our first prototype is composed of a sensor array of 52 Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) microphones, an inertial measuring unit and a low-power field-programmable gate array (FPGA). This article presents the SoundCompass's hardware and firmware design together with a data fusion technique that exploits the sensing capabilities of the SoundCompass in a wireless sensor network to localize noise pollution sources. Live tests produced a sound source localization accuracy of a few centimeters in a 25-m2 anechoic chamber, while simulation results accurately located up to five broadband sound sources in a 10,000-m2 open field. PMID:24463431

  9. SoundCompass: A Distributed MEMS Microphone Array-Based Sensor for Sound Source Localization

    PubMed Central

    Tiete, Jelmer; Domínguez, Federico; da Silva, Bruno; Segers, Laurent; Steenhaut, Kris; Touhafi, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization is a well-researched subject with applications ranging from localizing sniper fire in urban battlefields to cataloging wildlife in rural areas. One critical application is the localization of noise pollution sources in urban environments, due to an increasing body of evidence linking noise pollution to adverse effects on human health. Current noise mapping techniques often fail to accurately identify noise pollution sources, because they rely on the interpolation of a limited number of scattered sound sensors. Aiming to produce accurate noise pollution maps, we developed the SoundCompass, a low-cost sound sensor capable of measuring local noise levels and sound field directionality. Our first prototype is composed of a sensor array of 52 Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) microphones, an inertial measuring unit and a low-power field-programmable gate array (FPGA). This article presents the SoundCompass’s hardware and firmware design together with a data fusion technique that exploits the sensing capabilities of the SoundCompass in a wireless sensor network to localize noise pollution sources. Live tests produced a sound source localization accuracy of a few centimeters in a 25-m2 anechoic chamber, while simulation results accurately located up to five broadband sound sources in a 10,000-m2 open field. PMID:24463431

  10. The Avian Head Induces Cues for Sound Localization in Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Schnyder, Hans A.; Vanderelst, Dieter; Bartenstein, Sophia; Firzlaff, Uwe; Luksch, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Accurate sound source localization in three-dimensional space is essential for an animal’s orientation and survival. While the horizontal position can be determined by interaural time and intensity differences, localization in elevation was thought to require external structures that modify sound before it reaches the tympanum. Here we show that in birds even without external structures like pinnae or feather ruffs, the simple shape of their head induces sound modifications that depend on the elevation of the source. Based on a model of localization errors, we show that these cues are sufficient to locate sounds in the vertical plane. These results suggest that the head of all birds induces acoustic cues for sound localization in the vertical plane, even in the absence of external ears. PMID:25390036

  11. Male advantage in sound localization at cocktail parties.

    PubMed

    Zündorf, Ida C; Karnath, Hans-Otto; Lewald, Jörg

    2011-06-01

    Sex differences exist in the structural organization of the human brain and are related to cognitive abilities. Females usually outperform men in verbal fluency, verbal memory, perceptual speed, numerical calculation, and fine motor skills, whereas males are superior in visuospatial abilities, throwing accuracy, and mathematical reasoning. Here we demonstrated a male advantage in spatial abilities for the auditory modality. We employed a sound localization task based on the so-called "cocktail party situation", requiring extraction of auditory information of a specific sound source when multiple competing sound sources were present. The results indicated better performance of males than females for localizing target sounds in a multi-source sound environment. This finding suggests a sex difference in the attentional mechanisms extracting spatial information of one acoustic event of interest from an auditory scene composed of multiple sound sources. It seems that the known male superiority in spatial abilities may be supramodal, rather than a specificity of the visual modality. PMID:20828679

  12. Onset of deglacial warming in West Antarctica driven by local orbital forcing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    WAIS Divide Project Members; Steig, Eric J.; Markle, Bradley R.; Schoenemann, Spruce W.; Ding, Qinghua; Taylor, Kendrick C.; McConnell, Joseph R.; Brook, Edward J.; Sowers, Todd; White, James W. C.; Alley, Richard B.; Chen, Hai; Clow, Gary D.; Cole-Dai, Jihong; Conway, Howard; Fitzpatrick, Joan J.; Hargreaves, Geoffrey; and others

    2013-01-01

    The cause of warming in the Southern Hemisphere during the most recent deglaciation remains a matter of debate. Hypotheses for a Northern Hemisphere trigger, through oceanic redistributions of heat, are based in part on the abrupt onset of warming seen in East Antarctic ice cores and dated to 18,000 years ago, which is several thousand years after high-latitude Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity began increasing from its minimum, approximately 24,000 years ago. An alternative explanation is that local solar insolation changes cause the Southern Hemisphere to warm independently. Here we present results from a new, annually resolved ice-core record from West Antarctica that reconciles these two views. The records show that 18,000 years ago snow accumulation in West Antarctica began increasing, coincident with increasing carbon dioxide concentrations, warming in East Antarctica and cooling in the Northern Hemisphere associated with an abrupt decrease in Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. However, significant warming in West Antarctica began at least 2,000 years earlier. Circum-Antarctic sea-ice decline, driven by increasing local insolation, is the likely cause of this warming. The marine-influenced West Antarctic records suggest a more active role for the Southern Ocean in the onset of deglaciation than is inferred from ice cores in the East Antarctic interior, which are largely isolated from sea-ice changes.

  13. Onset of deglacial warming in West Antarctica driven by local orbital forcing.

    PubMed

    2013-08-22

    The cause of warming in the Southern Hemisphere during the most recent deglaciation remains a matter of debate. Hypotheses for a Northern Hemisphere trigger, through oceanic redistributions of heat, are based in part on the abrupt onset of warming seen in East Antarctic ice cores and dated to 18,000 years ago, which is several thousand years after high-latitude Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity began increasing from its minimum, approximately 24,000 years ago. An alternative explanation is that local solar insolation changes cause the Southern Hemisphere to warm independently. Here we present results from a new, annually resolved ice-core record from West Antarctica that reconciles these two views. The records show that 18,000 years ago snow accumulation in West Antarctica began increasing, coincident with increasing carbon dioxide concentrations, warming in East Antarctica and cooling in the Northern Hemisphere associated with an abrupt decrease in Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. However, significant warming in West Antarctica began at least 2,000 years earlier. Circum-Antarctic sea-ice decline, driven by increasing local insolation, is the likely cause of this warming. The marine-influenced West Antarctic records suggest a more active role for the Southern Ocean in the onset of deglaciation than is inferred from ice cores in the East Antarctic interior, which are largely isolated from sea-ice changes. PMID:23945585

  14. Is the cochlea coiled to provide sound localization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xun; Xu, Chi; Bai, Long

    2012-06-01

    The potential physical effect of the cochlear shape on sound localization is studied from the perspective of signal processing. The sensory hair cells are taken to form a sensor array, and a numerical model is used to simulate the external sound pressure perceived by the sensory hair cells directly, that is, via bone conduction. The cognitive process is thus approximated as a signal processing array. The sound localization capabilities of a straight cochlea and a spiral cochlea are compared by examining the simulated acoustic images. The results demonstrate that the spiral shape can achieve better vertical sound localization. The analysis therefore indicates that the cochlear spiral shape might not only have evolved for space conservation reasons but also for possible perceptual benefits.

  15. Echo Source Discrimination in Airborne Radar Sounding Data for Mars Analog Studies, Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, J. W.; Blankenship, D. D.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.; Morse, D. L.; Williams, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    The recent identification of features on Mars exhibiting morphologies consistent with ice/rock mixtures, near-surface ice bodies and near-surface liquid water [1,2], and the importance of such features to the search for water on Mars, highlights the need for appropriate terrestrial analogs in order to prepare for upcoming radar missions targeting these and other water-related features. Climatic, hydrological, and geological conditions in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are analogous in many ways to those on Mars, and a number of ice-related features in the Dry Valleys may have direct morphologic and compositional counterparts on Mars.

  16. Localizing heart sounds in respiratory signals using singular spectrum analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Foad; Mohseni, Hamid R; Sanei, Saeid

    2011-12-01

    Respiratory sounds are always contaminated by heart sound interference. An essential preprocessing step in some of the heart sound cancellation methods is localizing primary heart sound components. Singular spectrum analysis (SSA), a powerful time series analysis technique, is used in this paper. Despite the frequency overlap of the heart and lung sound components, two different trends in the eigenvalue spectra are recognizable, which leads to find a subspace that contains more information about the underlying heart sound. Artificially mixed and real respiratory signals are used for evaluating the performance of the method. Selecting the appropriate length for the SSA window results in good decomposition quality and low computational cost for the algorithm. The results of the proposed method are compared with those of well-established methods, which use the wavelet transform and entropy of the signal to detect the heart sound components. The proposed method outperforms the wavelet-based method in terms of false detection and also correlation with the underlying heart sounds. Performance of the proposed method is slightly better than that of the entropy-based method. Moreover, the execution time of the former is significantly lower than that of the latter. PMID:21788177

  17. Biology-inspired acoustic sensors for sound source localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haijun; Chen, Zhong; Yu, Miao

    2008-03-01

    In this article, the design of a biology-inspired miniature directional microphone is presented. This microphone consists of two clamped circular diaphragms, which are mechanically coupled by a connecting bridge that is pivoted at its center. A theoretical model is constructed to determine the microphone response to sound incident from an arbitrary direction. Both the simulation and preliminary experimental results show that the proposed microphone provides a remarkable amplification of the time delay associated with the sound induced diaphragm responses. This study should be relevant to various sound source localization applications.

  18. Vertical and oblique ionospheric soundings over the long haul HF link between Antarctica and Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ads, A. G.; Bergadà, P.; Regué, J. R.; Alsina-Pagès, R. M.; Pijoan, J. L.; Altadill, D.; Badia, D.; Graells, S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a comparative study between the oblique sounding results, the International Telecommunication Union Rec533 HF prediction model, and the vertical sounding results of a transequatorial long haul link. The long haul link is a 12,760 km link between the Spanish Antarctic Station, SAS, located in the Livingston Island and the Ebro Observatory (OE) in Spain. The data were collected during three consecutive surveys (2009/2010, 2010/2011, and 2011/2012). The ionospheric channel from the SAS to the OE is studied in terms of frequency availability as function of time using the measurements of an oblique incidence sounder (OIS) and measurements of several vertical incidence sounding stations (VIS) placed near the estimated radiopropagation path. The results obtained show promising correlations between VIS and OIS measurements and led us to think that the frequency of largest availability for this particular long haul radio link can be estimated from the VIS sounding measurements.

  19. Local non-Gaussianity from rapidly varying sound speeds

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, Jon; Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Wands, David E-mail: gianmassimo.tasinato@port.ac.uk

    2012-08-01

    We study the effect of non-trivial sound speeds on local-type non-Gaussianity during multiple-field inflation. To this end, we consider a multiple-DBI model and use the δN formalism to track the super-horizon evolution of perturbations. By adopting a sum separable Hubble parameter we derive analytic expressions for the relevant quantities in the two-field case, valid beyond slow variation. We find that non-trivial sound speeds can, in principle, curve the trajectory in such a way that significant local-type non-Gaussianity is produced. Deviations from slow variation, such as rapidly varying sound speeds, enhance this effect. To illustrate our results we consider two-field inflation in the tip regions of two warped throats and find large local-type non-Gaussianity produced towards the end of the inflationary process.

  20. Monaural sound localization based on structure-induced acoustic resonance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keonwook; Kim, Youngwoong

    2015-01-01

    A physical structure such as a cylindrical pipe controls the propagated sound spectrum in a predictable way that can be used to localize the sound source. This paper designs a monaural sound localization system based on multiple pyramidal horns around a single microphone. The acoustic resonance within the horn provides a periodicity in the spectral domain known as the fundamental frequency which is inversely proportional to the radial horn length. Once the system accurately estimates the fundamental frequency, the horn length and corresponding angle can be derived by the relationship. The modified Cepstrum algorithm is employed to evaluate the fundamental frequency. In an anechoic chamber, localization experiments over azimuthal configuration show that up to 61% of the proper signal is recognized correctly with 30% misfire. With a speculated detection threshold, the system estimates direction 52% in positive-to-positive and 34% in negative-to-positive decision rate, on average. PMID:25668214

  1. Monaural Sound Localization Based on Structure-Induced Acoustic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keonwook; Kim, Youngwoong

    2015-01-01

    A physical structure such as a cylindrical pipe controls the propagated sound spectrum in a predictable way that can be used to localize the sound source. This paper designs a monaural sound localization system based on multiple pyramidal horns around a single microphone. The acoustic resonance within the horn provides a periodicity in the spectral domain known as the fundamental frequency which is inversely proportional to the radial horn length. Once the system accurately estimates the fundamental frequency, the horn length and corresponding angle can be derived by the relationship. The modified Cepstrum algorithm is employed to evaluate the fundamental frequency. In an anechoic chamber, localization experiments over azimuthal configuration show that up to 61% of the proper signal is recognized correctly with 30% misfire. With a speculated detection threshold, the system estimates direction 52% in positive-to-positive and 34% in negative-to-positive decision rate, on average. PMID:25668214

  2. Impact of hearing protection devices on sound localization performance

    PubMed Central

    Zimpfer, Véronique; Sarafian, David

    2014-01-01

    Hearing Protection Devices (HPDs) can protect the ear against loud potentially damaging sounds while allowing lower-level sounds such as speech to be perceived. However, the impact of these devices on the ability to localize sound sources is not well known. To address this question, we propose two different methods: one behavioral and one dealing with acoustical measurements. For the behavioral method, sound localization performance was measured with, and without, HPDs on 20 listeners. Five HPDs, including both passive (non-linear attenuation) and three active (talk-through) systems were evaluated. The results showed a significant increase in localization errors, especially front-back and up-down confusions relative to the “naked ear” test condition for all of the systems tested, especially for the talk-through headphone system. For the acoustic measurement method, Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) were measured on an artificial head both without, and with the HPDs in place. The effects of the HPDs on the spectral cues for the localization of different sound sources in the horizontal plane were analyzed. Alterations of the Interaural Spectral Difference (ISD) cues were identified, which could explain the observed increase in front-back confusions caused by the talk-through headphone protectors. PMID:24966807

  3. A robust method for heart sounds localization using lung sounds entropy.

    PubMed

    Yadollahi, Azadeh; Moussavi, Zahra M K

    2006-03-01

    Heart sounds are the main unavoidable interference in lung sound recording and analysis. Hence, several techniques have been developed to reduce or cancel heart sounds (HS) from lung sound records. The first step in most HS cancellation techniques is to detect the segments including HS. This paper proposes a novel method for HS localization using entropy of the lung sounds. We investigated both Shannon and Renyi entropies and the results of the method using Shannon entropy were superior. Another HS localization method based on multiresolution product of lung sounds wavelet coefficients adopted from was also implemented for comparison. The methods were tested on data from 6 healthy subjects recorded at low (7.5 ml/s/kg) and medium 115 ml/s/kg) flow rates. The error of entropy-based method using Shannon entropy was found to be 0.1 +/- 0.4% and 1.0 +/- 0.7% at low and medium flow rates, respectively, which is significantly lower than that of multiresolution product method and those of other methods reported in previous studies. The proposed method is fully automated and detects HS included segments in a completely unsupervised manner. PMID:16532776

  4. Feasibility report: Operation of light air cushion vehicle at McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibbern, J. S.

    1987-02-01

    This report explores the viability of the use of an air cushion vehicle (ACV) or hovercraft to perform logistic and scientific support in the area of McMurdo Station, Antarctica. After a review of personnel assets and facilities at McMurdo Station to support the ACV plus a reconnaissance of the five major routes selected, it appears that an air cushion vehicle in the 1 to 1 1/2 ton payload class would be of significant value to support operations. It would reduce transit times for surface vehicle traverses on the routes selected and reduce requirements for expenditure of helicopter flight time in others. Of major significance is the ability to handle passenger/shuttle requirements between the Scott Base transition and Williams Field Skiway. Use of the ACV for high frequency passenger operations would help preserve the snow road for cargo operations during periods of road deterioration.

  5. Binaural Sound Localizer for Azimuthal Movement Detection Based on Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keonwook; Choi, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Sound localization can be realized by utilizing the physics of acoustics in various methods. This paper investigates a novel detection architecture for the azimuthal movement of sound source based on the interaural level difference (ILD) between two receivers. One of the microphones in the system is surrounded by barriers of various heights in order to cast the direction dependent diffraction of the incoming signal. The gradient analysis of the ILD between the structured and unstructured microphone demonstrates the rotation directions as clockwise, counter clockwise, and no rotation of the sound source. Acoustic experiments with different types of sound source over a wide range of target movements show that the average true positive and false positive rates are 67% and 16%, respectively. Spectral analysis demonstrates that the low frequency delivers decreased true and false positive rates and the high frequency presents increases of both rates, overall. PMID:23112617

  6. Localization of sound sources by means of unidirectional microphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Bordoni, Giacomo; Marzani, Alessandro; Vipperman, Jeffrey

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the results of a new approach devoted to the localization of ground borne acoustic sources. It is demonstrated that an array made of at least three unidirectional microphones can be exploited to identify the position of the source. Sound features extracted either in the time domain or in the frequency domain are used to localize the direction of the incoming sound. This information is then fed into a semi-analytical algorithm aimed at identifying the source location. The novelty of the method presented here consists in the use of unidirectional microphones rather than omnidirectional microphones and in the ability to extract the sound direction by considering features like sound amplitude rather than the time of arrival. Experimental tests have been undertaken in a closed environment and have demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed approach. It is believed that this method may pave the road toward a new generation of reduced-size sound detectors and localizers, and future work is described in the conclusions.

  7. Modeling the utility of binaural cues for underwater sound localization.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jennifer N; Lloyd, David R; Banks, Patchouly N; Mercado, Eduardo

    2014-06-01

    The binaural cues used by terrestrial animals for sound localization in azimuth may not always suffice for accurate sound localization underwater. The purpose of this research was to examine the theoretical limits of interaural timing and level differences available underwater using computational and physical models. A paired-hydrophone system was used to record sounds transmitted underwater and recordings were analyzed using neural networks calibrated to reflect the auditory capabilities of terrestrial mammals. Estimates of source direction based on temporal differences were most accurate for frequencies between 0.5 and 1.75 kHz, with greater resolution toward the midline (2°), and lower resolution toward the periphery (9°). Level cues also changed systematically with source azimuth, even at lower frequencies than expected from theoretical calculations, suggesting that binaural mechanical coupling (e.g., through bone conduction) might, in principle, facilitate underwater sound localization. Overall, the relatively limited ability of the model to estimate source position using temporal and level difference cues underwater suggests that animals such as whales may use additional cues to accurately localize conspecifics and predators at long distances. PMID:24727491

  8. Preliminary results of a radio echo sounding survey of the Recovery Glacier, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbert, Angelika; Kleiner, Thomas; Steinhage, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The Recovery Glacier is draining about 8% of the East Antarctic ice sheet and feeds into the Filchner Ice Shelf. This ice shelf might be subjected in future to increasing basal melting (Hellmer et al., 2012) forcing potentially grounding line retreat. Compared to other areas in Antarctica this glacier is been surveyed very sparse and hence does not allow modeling studies yet. As many large and small subglacial lakes are present underneath this ice stream at different locations along the flow, the question of the influence of the lakes on ice stream genesis and ice stream dynamics arose. For investigating this influence by observation and subsequent modelling, an airborne campaign of the Alfred Wegener Institute was carried out in January 2014, covering the Recovery Ice Stream and two smaller glaciers merging with it, the Ramp Glacier and the Blackwall Glacier. The radar system uses a carrier frequency of 150MHz and a 600ns pulse. The survey includes several flights along flow lines in order to assess the basal roughness of the ice stream. Here we present the first preliminary data analysis.

  9. A comprehensive sounding of the ionospheric HF radio link from Antarctica to Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ads, A. G.; Bergadã, P.; Vilella, C.; Regué, J. R.; Pijoan, J. L.; Bardají, R.; Mauricio, J.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2003, our group has been investigating the performance of different transmission techniques for low-power low-interference High Frequency (HF) ionospheric communication systems. Specifically, we have focused on the link between the Spanish Antarctic Station (SAS) Juan Carlos I in Livingston Island and Ebro Observatory (OE) in Spain, in order to transmit the data gathered from some geomagnetic sensors. These transmission techniques require a valuable knowledge of the channel behavior, thus a comprehensive narrowband and wideband sounding of the ionospheric channel is needed. Some significant improvements both in the system and in the signal processing have been done to achieve this goal. The analysis time and the frequency band have been extended to 24 hours per day and to the whole HF band (2-30 MHz). Moreover, new measurements of the absolute propagation time and the Doppler frequency shift are introduced. In this paper, the sounding results obtained using the new system are presented.

  10. Extension of an Ice Shelf Water plume model beneath sea ice with application in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, K. G.; Langhorne, P. J.; Leonard, G. H.; Stevens, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    A one-dimensional, frazil-laden plume model predicts the properties of Ice Shelf Water (ISW) as it evolves beneath sea ice beyond the ice shelf edge. An idealized background ocean circulation, which moves parallel to the plume, imitates forcings other than the plume's own buoyancy. The size distribution and concentration of the plume's suspended frazil ice crystals are affected by the background circulation velocity, the root-mean square tidal velocity, the drag coefficient, and the efficiency of secondary nucleation. Consequently, these variables are the key physical controls on the survival of supercooled water with distance from the ice shelf, which is predicted using several realistic parameter choices. Starting at 65 m thick, the in situ supercooled layer thins to 11 ± 5 and 4 ± 3 m at distances of 50 and 100 km, respectively. We apply the extended model in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, along the expected path of the coldest water. Three late-winter oceanographic stations along this path, in conjunction with historical data, provide initial conditions and evaluation of the simulations. Near the ice shelf in the western Sound, the water column consisted entirely of ISW, and the subice platelet layer thickness exceeded 5 m with platelet crystals dominating the sea ice structure suggesting that ISW persisted throughout winter. Presuming a constant ISW flux, the model predicts that the plume increases thermodynamic growth of sea ice by approximately 0.1 m yr-1 (˜5% of the average growth rate) even as far as 100 km beyond the ice shelf edge.

  11. Aeromagnetic and radio echo ice-sounding measurements show much greater area of the Dufek intrusion, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.; Drewry, D.J.; Jankowski, E.; Grim, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    A combined aeromagnetic and radio echo ice-sounding survey made in 1978 in Antarctica over the Dufek layered mafic intrusion suggests a minimum area of the intrusion of about 50,000 square kilometers, making it comparable in size with the Bushveld Complex of Africa. Comparisons of the magnetic and subglacial topographic profiles illustrate the usefulness of this combination of methods in studying bedrock geology beneath ice-covered areas. Magnetic anomalies range in peak-to-trough amplitude from about 50 nanoteslas over the lowermost exposed portion of the section in the Dufek Massif to about 3600 nanoteslas over the uppermost part of the section in the Forrestal Range. Theoretical magnetic anomalies, computed from a model based on the subice topography fitted to the highest amplitude observed magnetic anomalies, required normal and reversed magnetizations ranging from 10-3 to 10-2 electromagnetic units per cubic centimeter. This result is interpreted as indicating that the Dufek intrusion cooled through the Curie isotherm during one or more reversals of the earth's magnetic field. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  12. Evolution of mammalian sound localization circuits: A developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2016-06-01

    Localization of sound sources is a central aspect of auditory processing. A unique feature of mammals is the smooth, tonotopically organized extension of the hearing range to high frequencies (HF) above 10kHz, which likely induced positive selection for novel mechanisms of sound localization. How this change in the auditory periphery is accompanied by changes in the central auditory system is unresolved. I will argue that the major VGlut2(+) excitatory projection neurons of sound localization circuits (dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), lateral and medial superior olive (LSO and MSO)) represent serial homologs with modifications, thus being paramorphs. This assumption is based on common embryonic origin from an Atoh1(+)/Wnt1(+) cell lineage in the rhombic lip of r5, same cell birth, a fusiform cell morphology, shared genetic components such as Lhx2 and Lhx9 transcription factors, and similar projection patterns. Such a parsimonious evolutionary mechanism likely accelerated the emergence of neurons for sound localization in all three dimensions. Genetic analyses indicate that auditory nuclei in fish, birds, and mammals receive contributions from the same progenitor lineages. Anatomical and physiological differences and the independent evolution of tympanic ears in vertebrate groups, however, argue for convergent evolution of sound localization circuits in tetrapods (amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals). These disparate findings are discussed in the context of the genetic architecture of the developing hindbrain, which facilitates convergent evolution. Yet, it will be critical to decipher the gene regulatory networks underlying development of auditory neurons across vertebrates to explore the possibility of homologous neuronal populations. PMID:27032475

  13. Transversal Anderson localization of sound in acoustic waveguide arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yangtao; Ke, Manzhu; Feng, Junheng; Wang, Mudi; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-22

    We present designs of one-dimensional acoustic waveguide arrays and investigate wave propagation inside. Under the condition of single identical waveguide mode and weak coupling, the acoustic wave motion in waveguide arrays can be modeled with a discrete mode-coupling theory. The coupling constants can be retrieved from simulations or experiments as the function of neighboring waveguide separations. Sound injected into periodic arrays gives rise to the discrete diffraction, exhibiting ballistic or extended transport in transversal direction. But sound injected into randomized waveguide arrays readily leads to Anderson localization transversally. The experimental results show good agreement with simulations and theoretical predictions. PMID:25812602

  14. Flexural controls on late Neogene basin evolution in southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Alan R. A.; Wilson, Gary S.; Jordan, Thomas; Tinto, Kirsty; Blakemore, Hamish

    2012-01-01

    The basins of southern McMurdo Sound have evolved under the influence of lithospheric flexure induced by the loads of the Erebus Volcanic Province. To characterise these basins, it is important to investigate the lithosphere's flexural properties, and estimate their influence on basin architecture and evolution. Seismic and gravity data are used to constrain 3D forward modelling of the progressive development of accommodation space within the flexural basins. Elastic plate flexure was calculated for a range of effective elastic thicknesses (T e) from 0.5 to 25 km using a spectral method. Models with low, but nonzero, T e values (2 km < T e < 5 km) produce the best fit to the gravity data, although uncertainty is high due to inaccuracies in the Digital Elevation Model. The slopes of flexural horizons revealed in seismic reflection lines are consistent with this, indicating a T e of 2 km to 5 km, although the depths to these horizons are not consistent, perhaps due to a northwards slope, or step, in the pre-flexural surface. These results indicate that the lithospheric strength of southern McMurdo Sound is significantly less than estimates of the regional average (T e ~ 20 km). This low strength may reflect the weakening effects of the Terror Rift, and perhaps also the Discovery Accommodation Zone, a region of major transverse faulting. A low T e model (T e = 3) for southern McMurdo Sound predicts the development of two discrete flexural depressions, each 2-2.5 km deep. The predicted stratigraphy of the northern basin reflects flexure due to Ross Island, predominantly erupted since ca. 1.8 Ma. The predicted stratigraphy of the southern basin reflects more gradual flexure from ca. 10 Ma to ca. 2 Ma, due to the more dispersed volcanoes of the Discovery subprovince. Collectively, these two basins have the potential to preserve a remarkable stratigraphic record of Antarctic climate change through the late Neogene.

  15. Reprint of: Flexural controls on late Neogene basin evolution in southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Alan R. A.; Wilson, Gary S.; Jordan, Tom; Tinto, Kirsty; Blakemore, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    The basins of southern McMurdo Sound have evolved under the influence of lithospheric flexure induced by the loads of the Erebus Volcanic Province. To characterise these basins, it is important to investigate the lithosphere's flexural properties, and estimate their influence on basin architecture and evolution. Seismic and gravity data are used to constrain 3D forward modelling of the progressive development of accommodation space within the flexural basins. Elastic plate flexure was calculated for a range of effective elastic thicknesses (Te) from 0.5 to 25 km using a spectral method. Models with low, but nonzero, Te values (2 km < Te < 5 km) produce the best fit to the gravity data, although uncertainty is high due to inaccuracies in the Digital Elevation Model. The slopes of flexural horizons revealed in seismic reflection lines are consistent with this, indicating a Te of 2 km to 5 km, although the depths to these horizons are not consistent, perhaps due to a northwards slope, or step, in the pre-flexural surface. These results indicate that the lithospheric strength of southern McMurdo Sound is significantly less than estimates of the regional average (Te ~ 20 km). This low strength may reflect the weakening effects of the Terror Rift, and perhaps also the Discovery Accommodation Zone, a region of major transverse faulting. A low Te model (Te = 3) for southern McMurdo Sound predicts the development of two discrete flexural depressions, each 2-2.5 km deep. The predicted stratigraphy of the northern basin reflects flexure due to Ross Island, predominantly erupted since ca. 1.8 Ma. The predicted stratigraphy of the southern basin reflects more gradual flexure from ca. 10 Ma to ca. 2 Ma, due to the more dispersed volcanoes of the Discovery subprovince. Collectively, these two basins have the potential to preserve a remarkable stratigraphic record of Antarctic climate change through the late Neogene.

  16. High Resolution Magnetic Anomaly Imaging of Southern McMurdo Sound (Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappini, M.; Gaya Pique, L. R.; Pignatelli, A.; Wilson, T.

    2004-12-01

    During the 2003-04 austral summer season, a low-altitude, high-resolution airborne magnetic survey was conducted in the area of Southern McMurdo Sound, western Ross Sea, in the framework of the joint Italian-US initiative called GEOIMAG (GEOphysical IMAGing of Antarctic tectonic and volcanic units in the Transantarctic Mountains and Ross Sea area). The survey was flown by helicopter from McMurdo Station, at a constant terrain clearance of 70 m. Profile spacing was 350 m. The resolution of the survey, the accuracy of the data acquisition, and a preliminary digital enhancement of the processed magnetic data have contributed to highlight the short-wavelength component of the regional magnetic anomaly field, resolving volcanic bodies and faults. A broad positive anomaly tapers northward from the volcanic Brown Peninsula. The breadth and low amplitude of the anomaly suggests this may mark relatively thin deposits of volcanic material on or near the seafloor. High-frequency and high-amplitude anomalies are associated with the volcanic Daily Islands at the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. Anomalies of similar amplitude and size in adjacent areas indicate additional volcanic cones occur on the seafloor and beneath the ice sheet. Low-amplitude, curvilinear anomalies with a convex shape toward McMurdo Sound occur offshore of the outlet of Ferrar Glacier and extending southward parallel to the coastline. The new data are being integrated with a multi-source database (magnetic, digital terrain data, bathymetry, regional structural trends) to obtain an unprecedented view of the magnetic signature of the major tectonic elements in the area. The structural and volcanic framework resulting from this investigation will provide important site survey information for the proposed ANDRILL drill sites in southern McMurdo Sound.

  17. 75 FR 16700 - Special Local Regulation, Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation, Swim Across the Sound, Long... Long Island Sound between Port Jefferson, NY and Captain's Cove Seaport, Bridgeport, CT due to the..., Prevention Department, USCG Sector Long Island Sound at 203-468-4459, e-mail christie.m.dixon@uscg.mil ....

  18. Design of laser monitoring and sound localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-long; Xu, Xi-ping; Dai, Yu-ming; Qiao, Yang

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a novel design of laser monitoring and sound localization system is proposed. It utilizes laser to monitor and locate the position of the indoor conversation. In China most of the laser monitors no matter used in labor in an instrument uses photodiode or phototransistor as a detector at present. At the laser receivers of those facilities, light beams are adjusted to ensure that only part of the window in photodiodes or phototransistors received the beams. The reflection would deviate from its original path because of the vibration of the detected window, which would cause the changing of imaging spots in photodiode or phototransistor. However, such method is limited not only because it could bring in much stray light in receivers but also merely single output of photocurrent could be obtained. Therefore a new method based on quadrant detector is proposed. It utilizes the relation of the optical integral among quadrants to locate the position of imaging spots. This method could eliminate background disturbance and acquired two-dimensional spots vibrating data pacifically. The principle of this whole system could be described as follows. Collimated laser beams are reflected from vibrate-window caused by the vibration of sound source. Therefore reflected beams are modulated by vibration source. Such optical signals are collected by quadrant detectors and then are processed by photoelectric converters and corresponding circuits. Speech signals are eventually reconstructed. In addition, sound source localization is implemented by the means of detecting three different reflected light sources simultaneously. Indoor mathematical models based on the principle of Time Difference Of Arrival (TDOA) are established to calculate the twodimensional coordinate of sound source. Experiments showed that this system is able to monitor the indoor sound source beyond 15 meters with a high quality of speech reconstruction and to locate the sound source position accurately.

  19. Microphones' directivity for the localization of sound sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Tajari, Mahdi; Spada, Antonino

    2011-06-01

    In a recent paper [P. Rizzo, G. Bordoni, A. Marzani, and J. Vipperman, "Localization of Sound Sources by Means of Unidirectional Microphones, Meas. Sci. Tech., 20, 055202 (12pp), 2009] the proof-of-concept of an approach for the localization of acoustic sources was presented. The method relies on the use of unidirectional microphones and amplitude-based signals' features to extract information about the direction of the incoming sound. By intersecting the directions identified by a pair of microphones, the position of the emitting source can be identified. In this paper we expand the work presented previously by assessing the effectiveness of the approach for the localization of an acoustic source in an indoor setting. As the method relies on the accurate knowledge of the microphones directivity, analytical expression of the acoustic sensors polar pattern were derived by testing them in an anechoic chamber. Then an experiment was conducted in an empty laboratory by using an array of three unidirectional microphones. The ability to locate the position of a commercial speaker placed at different positions in the room is discussed. The objective of this study is to propose a valid alternative to the common application of spaced arrays and therefore to introduce a new generation of reduced size sound detectors and localizers. The ability of the proposed methodology to locate the position of a commercial speaker placed at different positions in the room was evaluated and compared to the accuracy provided by a conventional time delay estimate algorithm.

  20. Sound localization of aerial broadband noise in pinnipeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Marla M.; Schusterman, Ronald J.; Kastak, David; Southall, Brandon L.

    2003-04-01

    Pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) emit broadband calls on land as part of their communication system in order to coordinate their reproductive activities. How well do they localize these types of signals? In this study, the aerial sound localization acuities of a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), and a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) were measured in the horizontal plane with a broadband white noise stimulus. Testing was conducted in a hemi-anechoic chamber using a left/right forced choice procedure to measure the minimum audible angle (MAA) for each subject. MAAs were defined as half the angular separation of two sound sources relative to a subject's midline that corresponded to 75% correct discrimination. MAAs were 3.6, 4.2, and 4.7 deg for the harbor seal, California sea lion, and northern elephant seal, respectively. These results demonstrate that these pinniped species had sound localization abilities comparable to the domestic cat and rhesus macaques. The acuity differences between our subjects were small, were not predicted by head size, and therefore likely reflect the relatively acute abilities of other pinniped species to localize aerial broadband signals.

  1. Jun Jaegyu Volcano: A Recently Discovered Alkali Basalt Volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, A.; Bailey, D.; Domack, E.; Brachfeld, S.; Gilbert, R.; Ishman, S.; Krahmann, G.; Leventer, A.

    2004-12-01

    Jun Jaegyu is a young volcanic construct discovered in May 2004 by researchers aboard the National Science Foundation (NSF) vessel Laurence M. Gould (LMG04-04). The volcano is located on the Antarctic continental shelf in Antarctic Sound, approximately 9 km due north of the easternmost point of Andersson Island. Swath bathymetry (NBP01-07) indicates that the volcano stands 700 meters above the seafloor, yet remains 275 meters short of the ocean surface. The seamount lies along a northwest-southeast oriented fault scarp and contains at least 1.5 km3 of volcanic rock. Video recording of the volcano's surface revealed regions nearly devoid of submarine life. These areas are associated with a thermal anomaly of up to 0.052° C higher than the surrounding ocean water. A rock dredge collected ~13 kg of material, over 80% of which was fresh volcanic rock; the remainder was glacial IRD. These observations, along with reports by mariners of discolored water in this region of Antarctic Sound, suggest that the volcano has been recently active. The basalt samples are generally angular, glassy and vesicular. Preliminary petrographic observations indicate that plagioclase, olivine, and clinopyroxene are all present as phenocryst phases, and that small (<1cm) rounded xenoliths are common. A comprehensive study of the volcano's petrography and whole-rock chemistry is currently underway. Jun Jaegyu is the northernmost volcanic center of the James Ross Island Volcanic Group (JRIVG), and the only center in this region of the Antarctic Peninsula with evidence of recent activity. It lies along the boundary between the Late Cenozoic JRIVG and the Upper Paleozoic rocks of the Trinity Peninsula Formation. While the tectonic setting of the region is complex, volcanism appears to be associated with active faults related to within-plate extension.

  2. Atypical vertical sound localization and sound-onset sensitivity in people with autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Eelke; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Kan, Cornelis C.; Hoekstra, Liesbeth; van Opstal, A. John; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are associated with auditory hyper- or hyposensitivity; atypicalities in central auditory processes, such as speech-processing and selective auditory attention; and neural connectivity deficits. We sought to investigate whether the low-level integrative processes underlying sound localization and spatial discrimination are affected in ASDs. Methods We performed 3 behavioural experiments to probe different connecting neural pathways: 1) horizontal and vertical localization of auditory stimuli in a noisy background, 2) vertical localization of repetitive frequency sweeps and 3) discrimination of horizontally separated sound stimuli with a short onset difference (precedence effect). Results Ten adult participants with ASDs and 10 healthy control listeners participated in experiments 1 and 3; sample sizes for experiment 2 were 18 adults with ASDs and 19 controls. Horizontal localization was unaffected, but vertical localization performance was significantly worse in participants with ASDs. The temporal window for the precedence effect was shorter in participants with ASDs than in controls. Limitations The study was performed with adult participants and hence does not provide insight into the developmental aspects of auditory processing in individuals with ASDs. Conclusion Changes in low-level auditory processing could underlie degraded performance in vertical localization, which would be in agreement with recently reported changes in the neuroanatomy of the auditory brainstem in individuals with ASDs. The results are further discussed in the context of theories about abnormal brain connectivity in individuals with ASDs. PMID:24148845

  3. Vertical-plane sound localization with distorted spectral cues

    PubMed Central

    Macpherson, Ewan A.; Sabin, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    For human listeners, the primary cues for localization in the vertical plane are provided by the direction-dependent filtering of the pinnae, head, and upper body. Vertical-plane localization generally is accurate for broadband sounds, but when such sounds are presented at near-threshold levels or at high levels with short durations (<20 ms), the apparent location is biased toward the horizontal plane (i.e., elevation gain <1). We tested the hypothesis that these effects result in part from distorted peripheral representations of sound spectra. Human listeners indicated the apparent position of 100-ms, 50–60dB SPL, wideband noise-burst targets by orienting their heads. The targets were synthesized in virtual auditory space and presented over headphones. Faithfully synthesized targets were interleaved with targets for which the directional transfer function spectral notches were filled in, peaks were levelled off, or the spectral contrast of the entire profile was reduced or expanded. As notches were filled in progressively or peaks levelled progressively, elevation gain decreased in a graded manner similar to that observed as sensation level is reduced below 30dB or, for brief sounds, increased above 45dB. As spectral contrast was reduced, gain dropped only at the most extreme reduction (25% of normal). Spectral contrast expansion had little effect. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that loss of representation of spectral features contributes to reduced elevation gain at low and high sound levels. The results also suggest that perceived location depends on a correlation-like spectral matching process that is sensitive to the relative, rather than absolute, across-frequency shape of the spectral profile. PMID:24076423

  4. Decadal Trends in Abundance, Size and Condition of Antarctic Toothfish in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, 1972-2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainley, David G.; Nur, Nadav; Eastman, Joseph T.; Ballard. Grant; Parkinson, Claire L; Evans, Clive W.; DeVries, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    We report analyses of a dataset spanning 38 years of near-annual fishing for Antarctic toothfish Dissostichus mawsoni, using a vertical setline through the fast ice of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, 1972-2010. This constitutes one of the longest biological time series in the Southern Ocean, and certainly the longest for any fish. Fish total length, condition and catch per unit effort (CPUE) were derived from the more than 5500 fish caught. Contrary to expectation, length-frequency was dominated by fish in the upper half of the industrial catch. The discrepancy may be due to biases in the sampling capabilities of vertical (this study) versus benthic (horizontal) fishing gear (industry long lines), related to the fact that only large Antarctic toothfish (more than 100 cm TL) are neutrally buoyant and occur in the water column. Fish length and condition increased from the early 1970s to the early 1990s and then decreased, related to sea ice cover, with lags of 8 months to 5 years, and may ultimately be related to the fishery (which targets large fish) and changes in the Southern Annular Mode through effects on toothfish main prey, Antarctic silverfish Pleuragramma antarcticum. CPUE was constant through 2001 and then decreased dramatically, likely related to the industrial fishery, which began in 1996 and which concentrates effort over the Ross Sea slope, where tagged McMurdo fish have been found. Due to limited prey choices and, therefore, close coupling among mesopredators of the Ross Sea, Antarctic toothfish included, the fishery may be altering the trophic structure of the Ross Sea.

  5. Radio-echo sounding at Dome C, East Antarctica: A comparison of measured and modeled data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Anna; Eisen, Olaf; Steinhage, Daniel; Zirizzotti, Achille; Urbini, Stefano; Cavitte, Marie; Blankenship, Donald D.; Wolff, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The internal layering architecture of ice sheets, detected with radio-echo sounding (RES), contains clues to past ice-flow dynamics and mass balance. A common way of relating the recorded travel time of RES reflections to depth is by integrating a wave-speed distribution. This results in an increasing absolute error with depth. We present a synchronization of RES-internal layers of different radar systems (Alfred Wegener Institute, Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, British Antarctic Survey and University of Texas Institute for Geophysics) with ice-core records from the Antarctic deep drill site Dome C. Synthetic radar traces are obtained from measurements of ice-core density and conductivity with a 1D model of Maxwell's equations. The reflection peaks of the different radar systems' measurements are shifted by a wiggle-matching algorithm, so they match the synthetic trace. In this way, we matched pronounced internal reflections in the RES data to conductivity peaks with considerably smaller depth uncertainties, and assigned them with the ice-core age. We examine the differences in shifts and resolution of the different RES data to address the question of their comparability and combined analysis for an extensive age-depth distribution.

  6. Magneto-stratigraphic studies in Neogene deposits of Taylor Valley and McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elston, D.P.; Bressler, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic polarity and susceptibility zonations obtained from drill cores have served to refine temporal correlations in glaciogenic sections cored in eastern Taylor Valley. The zonations have led to a better understanding of the glacial and structural history for an interval of time that extends from the late Miocene (about 7Ma) to perhaps near the end of the Pliocene (approx 2.4-1.8Ma). However polarity data from a core drilled in McMurdo Sound (hole MSSTS-1) were found to be less useful. In this core, normal and reverse polarity deposits of Holocene, Pleistocene, and Pliocene age are nearly 40m thick and appear to uncomformably overlie strata assigned to the middle Miocene on the basis of a reworked fauna and flora. Gaps in the stratigraphic coverage of the Miocene strata, and two intervals in which the magnetisation post-dates deposition, however, have made development of a reliable polarity zonation impossible, and no firm correlation could be made with the magnetic polarity time scale. -Authors

  7. Foraminiferal Record From Drillcore AND-2A, Southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishman, S.; Johnson, K.; Sprovieri, M.; Lirer, F.

    2008-12-01

    ANDRILL's Southern McMurdo Sound Project (SMS) recovered a 1138.54 meter cored interval in drill core AND-2A. A total of four hundred and fifty-nine samples from lithostratigraphic units (LSUs) 1-14 of AND-2A were collected for initial foraminiferal analyses, of which 219 yielded foraminifera. Preliminary analyses resulted in the recognition of 25 taxonomic groups including 4 genera of planktonic and 21 genera of benthic foraminifera. Planktonic foraminifera are rare, occurring in LSUs 1, 2, 5, 7 and 12. Benthic foraminifera were recovered from LSUs 2-9, 11, 12, and 14 with diversity ranging from 1 to 10 taxa. Preservation ranges from Good to Poor with the best preservation of Good to Fair in LSUs 1, 2 and 3. The remaining intervals are represented by Fair to Poor preservation. Broad benthic foraminiferal zonations are observed. Zone 1 includes LSU 1 through LSU 5 and contains benthic foraminifera common to the late Miocene and mid- Pliocene assemblages of DVDP 10 and 11 from Taylor Valley. Zone 2 is restricted to LSU 7 and includes foraminifera indicating a possible early to mid-Miocene age and change in depositional environment. Foraminiferal Zone 3 is comprised of LSU 8.1 through 14. With the exception of LSU 9, this zone has the lowest diversity, poorest preservation and recovery in AND-2A. The foraminiferal assemblages reported are consistent with the current age model of the core, having affinities to early Miocene through mid- Pliocene assemblages from the Victoria Land Basin and its margins. Further analyses will increase the resolution of the foraminiferal zonations and allow for better correlation to not only DVDP 10 and 11 but to the additional drill cores from the Victoria Land Basin and its margin.

  8. How to generate a sound-localization map in fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2015-03-01

    How sound localization is represented in the fish brain is a research field largely unbiased by theoretical analysis and computational modeling. Yet, there is experimental evidence that the axes of particle acceleration due to underwater sound are represented through a map in the midbrain of fish, e.g., in the torus semicircularis of the rainbow trout (Wubbels et al. 1997). How does such a map arise? Fish perceive pressure gradients by their three otolithic organs, each of which comprises a dense, calcareous, stone that is bathed in endolymph and attached to a sensory epithelium. In rainbow trout, the sensory epithelia of left and right utricle lie in the horizontal plane and consist of hair cells with equally distributed preferred orientations. We model the neuronal response of this system on the basis of Schuijf's vector detection hypothesis (Schuijf et al. 1975) and introduce a temporal spike code of sound direction, where optimality of hair cell orientation θj with respect to the acceleration direction θs is mapped onto spike phases via a von-Mises distribution. By learning to tune in to the earliest synchronized activity, nerve cells in the midbrain generate a map under the supervision of a locally excitatory, yet globally inhibitory visual teacher. Work done in collaboration with Daniel Begovic. Partially supported by BCCN - Munich.

  9. A Benthic Invertebrate Survey of Jun Jaegyu Volcano: An active undersea volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinones, G.; Brachfeld, S.; Gorring, M.; Prezant, R. S.; Domack, E.

    2005-12-01

    Jun Jaegyu volcano, an Antarctic submarine volcano, was dredged in May 2004 during cruise 04-04 of the RV Laurence M. Gould to determine rock, sediment composition and marine macroinvertebrate diversity. The objectives of this study are to examine the benthic assemblages and biodiversity present on a young volcano. The volcano is located on the continental shelf of the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula, where recent changes in surface temperature and ice shelf stability have been observed. This volcano was originally swath-mapped during cruise 01-07 of the Research Vessel-Ice Breaker Nathaniel B. Palmer. During LMG04-04 we also studied the volcano using a SCUD video camera, and performed temperature surveys along the flanks and crest. Both the video and the dredge indicate a seafloor surface heavily colonized by benthic organisms. Indications of fairly recent lava flows are given by the absence of marine life on regions of the volcano. The recovered dredge material was sieved, and a total of thirty-three invertebrates were extracted. The compilation of invertebrate community data can subsequently be compared to other benthic invertebrate studies conducted along the peninsula, which can determine the regional similarity of communities over time, their relationship to environmental change and health, if any, and their relationship to geologic processes in Antarctic Sound. Twenty-two rock samples, all slightly weathered and half bearing encrusted organisms, were also analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Except for one conglomerate sample, all are alkali basalts and share similar elemental compositions with fresh, unweathered samples from the volcano. Two of the encrusted basalt samples have significantly different compositions than the rest. We speculate this difference could be due to water loss during sample preparation, loss of organic carbon trapped within the vesicles of the samples and/or elemental uptake by the

  10. Interpretation of Ice Sheet Stratigraphy: a Radio - Sounding Study of the Dyer Plateau, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weertman, Bruce Randall

    Determining the flow history of ice sheets is an issue central to glaciology. Stratigraphic ice horizons provide the only known natural markers for inferring velocity at depth. Stratigraphy can be detected by radio-echo sounding (RES, also called radar) and dated by coring, which together determine the age field in the ice. In this thesis it is shown for the first time how ice flow can be deduced from stratigraphy. As a first step a method is given for the deduction of the spatial pattern of accumulation from shallow dated stratigraphy. The effects of densification and horizontal divergence are determined. It is then shown how, and when, internal motion can be deduced from dated stratigraphy. A theory is developed to deduce streamlines assuming steady-state flow and mass conservation. The theory does not require rheological assumptions or a spatial accumulation rate pattern. The theory can be used to determine internal deformation rates, accumulation rate history and whether or not observed stratigraphy is consistent with steady-state flow. As part of a collaborative program involving the British Antarctic Survey, the Byrd Polar Research Center, the Polar Ice Coring Office and the University of Washington, the author has used a newly devised RES system to measure the geometry of internal stratigraphy and ice thickness on the Dyer Plateau Ice Sheet, Antarctic Peninsula. RES -determined stratigraphy was dated by comparison to ice core stratigraphy. A prominent shallow RES horizon probably associated with the eruption of Tambora (1815) was used for estimating the spatial accumulation rate pattern. The estimated pattern is consistent with the pattern measured from burial markers indicating that the new method is accurate and that the recent accumulation rate pattern is not different from the 175 year average. An analysis of ice core stratigraphy indicates that over the past 500 years the accumulation rate has varied and over the past 50 years has had an increasing

  11. What Avian and Mammalian Sound Localization Have in Common

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2004-03-01

    The barn owl has long been considered to be the canonical example of how azimuthal sound localization works: In the laminar nucleus, the first station (nucleus) where excitatory signals from both ears come together, each neuron encodes a specific direction in space through a maximal firing rate, i.e., maximal activity. In small mammals such as gerbils a completely different mechanism has been found to hold in that all neurons in the MSO, the equivalent (homolog) of the avian laminar nucleus, respond in the same way by means of a firing rate that is a monotone function of the stimulus direction. In so doing they exploit a subtle interplay of precisely timed excitation and inhibition. We present a theory [1] that fully explains both the avian and the mammalian auditory map through spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) [2] of excitatory and inhibitory synapses during ontogeny. Hence we propose STDP as a universal principle underlying azimuthal sound localization. Refs: [1] C. Leibold and J.L. van Hemmen, TU Munich preprint (2003); [2] W. Gerstner, R. Kempter, J.L. van Hemmen, and H. Wagner, Nature 383 (1996) 76-78.

  12. Adaptive Sound Localization with a Silicon Cochlea Pair

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Vincent Yue-Sek; Jin, Craig T.; van Schaik, André

    2010-01-01

    A neuromorphic sound localization system is presented. It employs two microphones and a pair of silicon cochleae with address event interface for front-end processing. The system is based the extraction of interaural time difference from a far-field source. At each frequency channel, a soft-winner-takes-all network is used to preserve timing information before it is processed by a simple neural network to estimate auditory activity at all bearing positions. The estimates are then combined across channels to produce the final estimate. The proposed algorithm is adaptive and supports online learning, enabling the system to compensate for circuit mismatch and environmental changes. Its localization capability was tested with white noise and pure tone stimuli, with an average error of around 3° in the −45° to 45° range. PMID:21152257

  13. Interaction of katabatic wind and local surface mass balance at Scharffenbergbotnen Blue Ice Area, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwinger, T.; Malm, T.; Schäfer, M.; Stenberg, R.; Moore, J. C.

    2015-04-01

    We model the wind causing the formation of a blue ice area in Scharffenbergbotnen valley, Antarctica, using the finite element code Elmer. The high resolution numerical simulations of the local wind flow from katabatic wind fronts show highly spatially variable wind impact patterns and good congruence between places of enhanced wind-impact and the blue ice area. The results were fortuitously confirmed by the destruction of a field camp located in a high wind speed area and its subsequent redistribution to low velocity areas. In addition we perform wind simulations on an altered glacier geometry that resembles the thicker ice cover at the Late Glacial Maximum (LGM). These simulations indicate that the pronounced spatial wind-impact patterns depend on present day geometry and did not occur during the LGM. This leads to the conclusion that the formation of the blue ice area that is situated more inside the valley of Scharffenbergbotnen started only after the lowering of the ice surface, later than the LGM. Experiments with smoothed surface topography suggest that detailed positions of the high wind regions and hence individual blue ice fields, may have varied as the ice sheet lowered. The experiments and the field observations are consistent with localized violent katabatic events, rather than synoptic scale storms, playing the dominant role in the formation and maintenance of this, and perhaps many blue ice areas.

  14. Sound localization and auditory response capabilities in round goby (Neogobius melanostomus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollo, Audrey K.; Higgs, Dennis M.

    2005-04-01

    A fundamental role in vertebrate auditory systems is determining the direction of a sound source. While fish show directional responses to sound, sound localization remains in dispute. The species used in the current study, Neogobius melanostomus (round goby) uses sound in reproductive contexts, with both male and female gobies showing directed movement towards a calling male. The two-choice laboratory experiment was used (active versus quiet speaker) to analyze behavior of gobies in response to sound stimuli. When conspecific male spawning sounds were played, gobies moved in a direct path to the active speaker, suggesting true localization to sound. Of the animals that responded to conspecific sounds, 85% of the females and 66% of the males moved directly to the sound source. Auditory playback of natural and synthetic sounds showed differential behavioral specificity. Of gobies that responded, 89% were attracted to the speaker playing Padogobius martensii sounds, 87% to 100 Hz tone, 62% to white noise, and 56% to Gobius niger sounds. Swimming speed, as well as mean path angle to the speaker, will be presented during the presentation. Results suggest a strong localization of the round goby to a sound source, with some differential sound specificity.

  15. Visual capture of a stereo sound: Interactions between cue reliability, sound localization variability, and cross-modal bias.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Christopher; Zhou, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Multisensory interactions involve coordination and sometimes competition between multiple senses. Vision usually dominates audition in spatial judgments when light and sound stimuli are presented from two different physical locations. This study investigated the influence of vision on the perceived location of a phantom sound source placed in a stereo sound field using a pair of loudspeakers emitting identical signals that were delayed or attenuated relative to each other. Results show that although a similar horizontal range (+/-45°) was reported for timing-modulated and level-modulated signals, listeners' localization performance showed greater variability for the timing signals. When visual stimuli were presented simultaneously with the auditory stimuli, listeners showed stronger visual bias for timing-modulated signals than level-modulated and single-speaker control signals. Trial-to-trial errors remained relatively stable over time, suggesting that sound localization uncertainty has an immediate and long-lasting effect on the across-modal bias. Binaural signal analyses further reveal that interaural differences of time and intensity-the two primary cues for sound localization in the azimuthal plane-are inherently more ambiguous for signals placed using timing. These results suggest that binaural ambiguity is intrinsically linked with localization variability and the strength of cross-modal bias in sound localization. PMID:27475171

  16. Echo Source Discrimination in Airborne Radar Sounding Data From the Dry Valleys, Antarctica, for Mars Analog Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. W.; Blankenship, D. D.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.; Williams, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    The identification of features on Mars exhibiting morphologies consistent with ice/rock mixtures, near-surface ice bodies and near-surface liquid water, and the importance of such features to the search for water on Mars highlights the need for appropriate terrestrial analogs in order to prepare for upcoming radar missions targeting these and other water-related features. Climatic, hydrological, and geological conditions in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are analogous in many ways to those on Mars, and a number of ice-related features in the Dry Valleys may have direct morphologic and compositional counterparts on Mars. We have collected roughly 1,000 line-km of airborne radar sounding data in the Dry Valleys for Mars analog studies. A crucial first step in the data analysis process is the discrimination of echo sources in the radar data. The goal is to identify all returns from the surface of surrounding topography in order to positively identify subsurface echoes. This process will also be critical for radar data that will be collected in areas of Mars exhibiting significant topography, so that subsurface echoes are identified unambiguously. Using a Twin Otter airborne platform, data were collected in three separate flights during the austral summers of 1999-2000 and 2001-2002 using multiple systems, including a chirped 52.5 - 67.5 MHz coherent radar operating at 750 W and 8 kW peak power (with multiple receivers) and 1 - 2 microsecond pulse width, and a 60 MHz pulsed, incoherent radar operating at 8 kW peak power with 60 ns and 250 ns pulse width. The chirped, coherent data are suitable for the implementation of advanced pulse compression algorithms and SAR focusing. Flight elevation was nominally 500 m above the surface. Targets included permafrost, subsurface ice bodies, rock/ice glaciers, ice-covered saline lakes, and glacial deposits in Taylor and Beacon Valleys. A laser altimeter (fixed relative to the aircraft frame) was also used during both

  17. Manual of Suggested Activities for the Development of Sound Localization Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Roy J.; Huff, Roger A.

    The manual is intended to provide teachers of young blind children with activities to develop sound localization skills. Both group and individual activities are suggested for the following four categories: activities in which both child and sound are stationary, activities in which the child is stationary but the sound is moving, activities in…

  18. Sensitive and critical periods for visual calibration of sound localization by barn owls.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, E I; Knudsen, P F

    1990-01-01

    This study describes developmental changes in the capacity of owls to adjust sound localization in response to chronic prismatic displacement of the visual field and to recover accurate sound localization following the restoration of normal vision. Matched, binocular displacing prisms were mounted over the eyes of 19 barn owls (Tyto alba) beginning at ages ranging from 10 to 272 d. In nearly all cases, the visual field was shifted 23 degrees to the right. Sound localization was assessed on the basis of head orientations to sound sources, measured in a darkened sound chamber with a search coil system. Chronic exposure to a displaced visual field caused the owls to alter sound localization in the direction of the visual field displacement, thereby inducing a sound-localization error. The size of the sound-localization error that resulted depended on the age of the animal when prism experience began. Maximal errors of about 20 degrees were induced only when prism experience began by 21 d of age. As prism experience began at later ages, the magnitude of induced errors decreased. A bird that wore prisms beginning at 102 d of age, altered sound localization by only 6 degrees. An adult owl, when exposed chronically to a displaced visual field, altered sound localization by about 3 degrees. We refer to the early period in life when displaced vision induces exceptionally large sound-localization errors (relative to those induced in the adult) as a sensitive period. The capacity to recover accurate sound localization following restoration of normal vision was tested in 7 owls that had been raised wearing prisms. Four owls that had prisms removed by 182 d of age recovered accurate localization rapidly (over a period of weeks), whereas 3 owls that were older when the prisms were removed did not recover accurate localization when tested for up to 7 months after prism removal. Adjustment of sound localization slowed greatly or ceased at about 200 days of age, referred to here as

  19. Comparative physiology of sound localization in four species of owls.

    PubMed

    Volman, S F; Konishi, M

    1990-01-01

    Bilateral ear asymmetry is found in some, but not all, species of owls. We investigated the neural basis of sound localization in symmetrical and asymmetrical species, to deduce how ear asymmetry might have evolved from the ancestral condition, by comparing the response properties of neurons in the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICx) of the symmetrical burrowing owl and asymmetrical long-eared owl with previous findings in the symmetrical great horned owl and asymmetrical barn owl. In the ICx of all of these owls, the neurons had spatially restricted receptive fields, and auditory space was topographically mapped. In the symmetrical owls, ICx units were not restricted in elevation, and only azimuth was mapped in ICx. In the barn owl, the space map is two-dimensional, with elevation forming the second dimension. Receptive fields in the long-eared owl were somewhat restricted in elevation, but their tuning was not sharp enough to determine if elevation is mapped. In every species, the primary cue for azimuth was interaural time difference, although ICx units were also tuned for interaural intensity difference (IID). In the barn owl, the IIDs of sounds with frequencies between about 5 and 8 kHz vary systematically with elevation, and the IID selectivity of ICx neurons primarily encodes elevation. In the symmetrical owls, whose ICx neurons do not respond to frequencies above about 5 kHz, IID appears to be a supplementary cue for azimuth. We hypothesize that ear asymmetry can be exploited by owls that have evolved the higher-frequency hearing necessary to generate elevation cues. Thus, the IID selectivity of ICx neurons in symmetrical owls may preadapt them for asymmetry; the neural circuitry that underlies IID selectivity is already present in symmetrical owls, but because IID is not absolutely required to encode azimuth it can come to encode elevation in asymmetrical owls. PMID:2279234

  20. Spatial resolution limits for the localization of noise sources using direct sound mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Comesaña, D.; Holland, K. R.; Fernandez-Grande, E.

    2016-08-01

    One of the main challenges arising from noise and vibration problems is how to identify the areas of a device, machine or structure that produce significant acoustic excitation, i.e. the localization of main noise sources. The direct visualization of sound, in particular sound intensity, has extensively been used for many years to locate sound sources. However, it is not yet well defined when two sources should be regarded as resolved by means of direct sound mapping. This paper derives the limits of the direct representation of sound pressure, particle velocity and sound intensity by exploring the relationship between spatial resolution, noise level and geometry. The proposed expressions are validated via simulations and experiments. It is shown that particle velocity mapping yields better results for identifying closely spaced sound sources than sound pressure or sound intensity, especially in the acoustic near-field.

  1. Skin microbial flora and effectiveness of aseptic technique for deep muscle biopsies in Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii ) in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Mellish, J; Tuomi, P; Hindle, A; Jang, S; Horning, M

    2010-04-01

    Deep muscle biopsies were collected from the pectoralis and longissimus dorsi of wild Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, during October-December 2007. Sterile swabs were collected from the surface of each skin site before biopsy and from the deep-needle path after biopsy. No growth occurred in two of six pectoralis and three of six longissimus skin sites, or in four of 10 pectoralis deep biopsy and eight of 12 longissimus deep-biopsy sites. Positive skin culture was not predictive of deep-biopsy contamination, nor did contamination at one body location correlate with contamination at the second site. Psychrobacter species were most common in one or more samples from each of the four sample types. Only one of the eight documented bacteria exhibited resistance to commonly used antibiotics. PMID:20688668

  2. Sound localization with bilateral cochlear implants in noise: how much do head movements contribute to localization?

    PubMed

    Mueller, Martin F; Meisenbacher, Katrin; Lai, Wai-Kong; Dillier, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users encounter difficulties in localizing sound sources in everyday environments, especially in the presence of background noise and reverberation. They tend to show large directional errors and front-back confusions compared to normal hearing (NH) subjects in the same conditions. In this study, the ability of bilateral CI users to use head movements to improve sound source localization was evaluated. Speech sentences of 0.5, 2, and 4.5 seconds were presented in noise to the listeners in conditions with and without head movements. The results show that for middle and long signal durations, the CI users could significantly reduce the number of front-back confusions. The angular accuracy, however, did not improve. Analysis of head trajectories showed that the CI users had great difficulties in moving their head towards the position of the source, whereas the NH listeners targeted the source loudspeaker correctly. PMID:23684420

  3. Organized flow from the South Pole to the Filchner-Ronne ice shelf: An assessment of balance velocities in interior East Antarctica using radio echo sounding data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert G.; Siegert, Martin J.; Young, Duncan A.; Blankenship, Donald D.

    2007-09-01

    Ice flow through central Antarctica has the potential to transmit accumulation changes from deep-interior East Antarctica rapidly to the shelf, but it is poorly constrained owing to a dearth of ice-velocity observations. We use parameters derived from airborne radio echo sounding (RES) data to examine the onset, areal extent, and englacial conditions of an organized flow network (tributaries feeding an ice stream) draining from the South Pole to the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. We classified RES flight tracks covering the region according to whether englacial stratigraphy was disrupted (i.e., internal layers diverged significantly from the surface and bed echoes) or undisrupted (i.e., internal layers closely parallel surface and basal topography), and we calculated subglacial roughness along basal reflectors. Where satellite-measured surface ice-flow speeds are available (covering 39% of the study region), regions of fast and tributary flow correspond with RES flight tracks that exhibit more disrupted internal layers and smoother subglacial topography than their counterparts in regions of slow flow. This suggests that disrupted internal layering and smooth subglacial topography identified from RES profiles can be treated as indicators of past or present enhanced-flow tributaries where neither satellite nor ground-based ice-flow measurements are available. We therefore use these RES-derived parameters to assess the balance-flux-modeled steady state flow regime between the South Pole and Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. The RES analysis confirms that an organized flow network drains a wide region around the South Pole into the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. However, the spatial extent of this network, as delineated by the RES data, diverges from that predicted by currently available balance-flux models.

  4. Horizontal sound localization in cochlear implant users with a contralateral hearing aid.

    PubMed

    Veugen, Lidwien C E; Hendrikse, Maartje M E; van Wanrooij, Marc M; Agterberg, Martijn J H; Chalupper, Josef; Mens, Lucas H M; Snik, Ad F M; John van Opstal, A

    2016-06-01

    Interaural differences in sound arrival time (ITD) and in level (ILD) enable us to localize sounds in the horizontal plane, and can support source segregation and speech understanding in noisy environments. It is uncertain whether these cues are also available to hearing-impaired listeners who are bimodally fitted, i.e. with a cochlear implant (CI) and a contralateral hearing aid (HA). Here, we assessed sound localization behavior of fourteen bimodal listeners, all using the same Phonak HA and an Advanced Bionics CI processor, matched with respect to loudness growth. We aimed to determine the availability and contribution of binaural (ILDs, temporal fine structure and envelope ITDs) and monaural (loudness, spectral) cues to horizontal sound localization in bimodal listeners, by systematically varying the frequency band, level and envelope of the stimuli. The sound bandwidth had a strong effect on the localization bias of bimodal listeners, although localization performance was typically poor for all conditions. Responses could be systematically changed by adjusting the frequency range of the stimulus, or by simply switching the HA and CI on and off. Localization responses were largely biased to one side, typically the CI side for broadband and high-pass filtered sounds, and occasionally to the HA side for low-pass filtered sounds. HA-aided thresholds better than 45 dB HL in the frequency range of the stimulus appeared to be a prerequisite, but not a guarantee, for the ability to indicate sound source direction. We argue that bimodal sound localization is likely based on ILD cues, even at frequencies below 1500 Hz for which the natural ILDs are small. These cues are typically perturbed in bimodal listeners, leading to a biased localization percept of sounds. The high accuracy of some listeners could result from a combination of sufficient spectral overlap and loudness balance in bimodal hearing. PMID:27178443

  5. Spike-Timing-Based Computation in Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Dan F. M.; Brette, Romain

    2010-01-01

    Spike timing is precise in the auditory system and it has been argued that it conveys information about auditory stimuli, in particular about the location of a sound source. However, beyond simple time differences, the way in which neurons might extract this information is unclear and the potential computational advantages are unknown. The computational difficulty of this task for an animal is to locate the source of an unexpected sound from two monaural signals that are highly dependent on the unknown source signal. In neuron models consisting of spectro-temporal filtering and spiking nonlinearity, we found that the binaural structure induced by spatialized sounds is mapped to synchrony patterns that depend on source location rather than on source signal. Location-specific synchrony patterns would then result in the activation of location-specific assemblies of postsynaptic neurons. We designed a spiking neuron model which exploited this principle to locate a variety of sound sources in a virtual acoustic environment using measured human head-related transfer functions. The model was able to accurately estimate the location of previously unknown sounds in both azimuth and elevation (including front/back discrimination) in a known acoustic environment. We found that multiple representations of different acoustic environments could coexist as sets of overlapping neural assemblies which could be associated with spatial locations by Hebbian learning. The model demonstrates the computational relevance of relative spike timing to extract spatial information about sources independently of the source signal. PMID:21085681

  6. Challenges to Airborne and Orbital Radar Sounding in the Presence of Surface Clutter: Lessons Learned (so far) from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, J. W.; Peters, M. E.; Kempf, S. D.; Morse, D. L.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2005-12-01

    The search for life and in-situ resources for exploration on Mars targets both liquid and solid water, whether distributed or in reservoirs. Massive surface ice may cover potential habitats or other features of great interest. Ice-rich layering in the high latitudes holds clues to the climatic history of the planet. Multiple geophysical methods will clearly be necessary to fully characterize these various states of water (and other forms of ice), but radar sounding will be a critical component of the effort. Orbital radar sounders are already being employed and plans for surface-based and suborbital, above-surface radar sounders are being discussed. The difficulties in interpreting data from each type of platform are quite different. Given the lack of existing orbital radar sounding data from any planetary body, the analysis of airborne radar sounding data is quite useful for assessing the advantages and disadvantages of above-surface radar sounding on Mars. In addition to over 300,000 line-km of data collected over the Antarctic ice sheet by airborne radar sounding, we have recently analyzed data from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica where conditions and features emulate Mars in several respects. These airborne radar sounding data were collected over an ice-free area of Taylor Valley, ice-covered lakes, Taylor Glacier, and Beacon Valley. The pulsed radar (52.5 - 67.5 MHz chirp) was coherently recorded. Pulse compression and unfocused SAR processing were applied. One of the most challenging aspects of above-surface radar sounding is the determination of echo sources. This can, of course, be problematic for surface-based radar sounders given possible subsurface scattering geometries, but it is most severe for above-surface sounders because echoes from cross-track surface topography (surface clutter) can have similar time delays to those from the subsurface. We have developed two techniques to accomplish the identification of this surface clutter in single-pass airborne

  7. Infants' Perception of Illusions in Sound Localization: Reaching to Sounds in the Dark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Loretta; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Infants between four and eight months of age were tested for their ability to reach for visible and unseen toys that made sounds. Infants reached for toys in the dark under two auditory illusion conditions, the Haas effect and the midline illusion. Results indicated that, by four months of age, infants perceived the Haas effect and the midline…

  8. 76 FR 42542 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Bogue Sound; Morehead City, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... for Marine Events, Bogue Sound; Morehead City, North Carolina in the Federal Register (76 FR 30887... establishing Special Local Regulations for ``The Crystal Coast Grand Prix'' powerboat race, to be held on the... sponsor ``The Crystal Coast Grand Prix'' powerboat race on the waters of Bogue Sound adjacent to...

  9. A SOUND SOURCE LOCALIZATION TECHNIQUE TO SUPPORT SEARCH AND RESCUE IN LOUD NOISE ENVIRONMENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Hiroshi; Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto

    At some sites of earthquakes and other disasters, rescuers search for people buried under rubble by listening for the sounds which they make. Thus developing a technique to localize sound sources amidst loud noise will support such search and rescue operations. In this paper, we discuss an experiment performed to test an array signal processing technique which searches for unperceivable sound in loud noise environments. Two speakers simultaneously played a noise of a generator and a voice decreased by 20 dB (= 1/100 of power) from the generator noise at an outdoor space where cicadas were making noise. The sound signal was received by a horizontally set linear microphone array 1.05 m in length and consisting of 15 microphones. The direction and the distance of the voice were computed and the sound of the voice was extracted and played back as an audible sound by array signal processing.

  10. Detection and localization of sounds: Virtual tones and virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peter Xinya

    IPD-meter or an ITD-meter. Listeners estimated the lateral positions of 50 sine tones with IPDs ranging from -150° to +150° and with different frequencies, all in the range where signal fine structure supports lateralization. The estimates indicated that listeners lateralize sine tones on the basis of ITD and not IPD. In order to distinguish between sound sources in front and in back, listeners use spectral cues caused by the diffraction by pinna, head, neck and torso. To study this effect, the VRX technique was developed based on transaural technology. The technique was successful in presenting desired spectra into listeners' ears with high accuracy up to 16 kHz. When presented with real source and simulated virtual signal, listeners in an anechoic room could not distinguish between them. Eleven experiments on discrimination between front and back sources were carried out in an anechoic room. The results show several findings. First, the results support a multiple band comparison model, and disfavor a necessary band(s) model. Second, it was found that preserving the spectral dips was more important than preserving the spectral peaks for successful front/back discrimination. Moreover, it was confirmed that neither monaural cues nor interaural spectral level difference cues were adequate for front/back discrimination. Furthermore, listeners' performance did not deteriorate when presented with sharpened spectra. Finally, when presented with an interaural delay less than 200 mus, listeners could succeed to discriminate front from back, although the image was pulled to the side, which suggests that the localizations in azimuthal plane and in sagittal plane are independent within certain limits.

  11. Issues in Humanoid Audition and Sound Source Localization by Active Audition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadai, Kazuhiro; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Kitano, Hiroaki

    In this paper, we present an active audition system which is implemented on the humanoid robot "SIG the humanoid". The audition system for highly intelligent humanoids localizes sound sources and recognizes auditory events in the auditory scene. Active audition reported in this paper enables SIG to track sources by integrating audition, vision, and motor movements. Given the multiple sound sources in the auditory scene, SIG actively moves its head to improve localization by aligning microphones orthogonal to the sound source and by capturing the possible sound sources by vision. However, such an active head movement inevitably creates motor noises.The system adaptively cancels motor noises using motor control signals and the cover acoustics. The experimental result demonstrates that active audition by integration of audition, vision, and motor control attains sound source tracking in variety of conditions.onditions.

  12. Decoding neural responses to temporal cues for sound localization

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Dan FM; Benichoux, Victor; Brette, Romain

    2013-01-01

    The activity of sensory neural populations carries information about the environment. This may be extracted from neural activity using different strategies. In the auditory brainstem, a recent theory proposes that sound location in the horizontal plane is decoded from the relative summed activity of two populations in each hemisphere, whereas earlier theories hypothesized that the location was decoded from the identity of the most active cells. We tested the performance of various decoders of neural responses in increasingly complex acoustical situations, including spectrum variations, noise, and sound diffraction. We demonstrate that there is insufficient information in the pooled activity of each hemisphere to estimate sound direction in a reliable way consistent with behavior, whereas robust estimates can be obtained from neural activity by taking into account the heterogeneous tuning of cells. These estimates can still be obtained when only contralateral neural responses are used, consistently with unilateral lesion studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01312.001 PMID:24302571

  13. Effect of local cooling on skin temperature and blood flow of men in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidu, M.; Sachdeva, U.

    1993-12-01

    Alterations to the finger skin temperature (Tsk) and blood flow (FBF) before and after cold immersion on exposure to an Antarctic environment for 8 weeks were studied in 64 subjects. There was a significant fall in Tsk and increase in finger blood flow after 1 week of Antarctic exposure. The Tsk did not further change even after 8 weeks of stay in Antarctica but a significant increase in FBF was obtained after 8 weeks. The cold immersion test was performed at non-Antarctic and Antarctic conditions by immersing the hand for 2 min in 0 4° C cold water. In the non-Antarctic environment the Tsk and FBF dropped significantly ( P < 0.001) indicating a vasoconstriction response. Interestingly after 8 weeks of stay in Antarctic conditions, the skin temperature dropped ( P < 0.001) but the cold induced fall in FBF was inhibited. Based on these observations it may be hypothesized that continuous cold exposure in Antarctica results in vasodilatation, which overrides the stronger vasoactive response of acute cold exposure and thus prevents cold injuries.

  14. Airborne and ground based measurements in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, for the validation of satellite derived ice thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, Wolfgang; Haas, Christian; Langhorne, Pat; Leonard, Greg; Price, Dan; Barnsdale, Kelvin; Soltanzadeh, Iman

    2014-05-01

    Melting and freezing processes in the ice shelf cavities of the Ross and McMurdo Ice Shelves significantly influence the sea ice formation in McMurdo Sound. Between 2009 and 2013 we used a helicopter-borne laser and electromagnetic induction sounder (EM bird) to measure thickness and freeboard profiles across the ice shelf and the landfast sea ice, which was accompanied by extensive field validation, and coordinated with satellite altimeter overpasses. Using freeboard and thickness, the bulk density of all ice types was calculated assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. Significant density steps were detected between first-year and multi-year sea ice, with higher values for the younger sea ice. Values are overestimated in areas with abundance of sub-ice platelets because of overestimation in both ice thickness and freeboard. On the ice shelf, bulk ice densities were sometimes higher than that of pure ice, which can be explained by both the accretion of marine ice and glacial sediments. For thin ice, the freeboard to thickness conversion critically depends on the knowledge of snow properties. Our measurements allow tuning and validation of snow cover simulations using the Weather Research Forecasting (WRF) model. The simulated snowcover is used to calculate ice thickness from satellite derived freeboard. The results of our measurements, which are supported by the New Zealand Antarctic programme, draw a picture of how oceanographic processes influence the ice shelf morphology and sea ice formation in McMurdo Sound, and how satellite derived freeboard of ICESat and CryoSat together with information on snow cover can potentially capture the signature of these processes.

  15. Representation of sound localization cues in the auditory thalamus of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Proctor, L; Konishi, M

    1997-09-16

    Barn owls can localize a sound source using either the map of auditory space contained in the optic tectum or the auditory forebrain. The auditory thalamus, nucleus ovoidalis (N.Ov), is situated between these two auditory areas, and its inactivation precludes the use of the auditory forebrain for sound localization. We examined the sources of inputs to the N.Ov as well as their patterns of termination within the nucleus. We also examined the response of single neurons within the N.Ov to tonal stimuli and sound localization cues. Afferents to the N.Ov originated with a diffuse population of neurons located bilaterally within the lateral shell, core, and medial shell subdivisions of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. Additional afferent input originated from the ipsilateral ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus. No afferent input was provided to the N.Ov from the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus or the optic tectum. The N.Ov was tonotopically organized with high frequencies represented dorsally and low frequencies ventrally. Although neurons in the N.Ov responded to localization cues, there was no apparent topographic mapping of these cues within the nucleus, in contrast to the tectal pathway. However, nearly all possible types of binaural response to sound localization cues were represented. These findings suggest that in the thalamo-telencephalic auditory pathway, sound localization is subserved by a nontopographic representation of auditory space. PMID:9294226

  16. Localization of virtual sound sources with bilateral hearing aids in realistic acoustical scenes.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Martin F; Kegel, Andrea; Schimmel, Steven M; Dillier, Norbert; Hofbauer, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Sound localization with hearing aids has traditionally been investigated in artificial laboratory settings. These settings are not representative of environments in which hearing aids are used. With individual Head-Related Transfer Functions (HRTFs) and room simulations, realistic environments can be reproduced and the performance of hearing aid algorithms can be evaluated. In this study, four different environments with background noise have been implemented in which listeners had to localize different sound sources. The HRTFs were measured inside the ear canals of the test subjects and by the microphones of Behind-The-Ear (BTEs) hearing aids. In the first experiment the system for virtual acoustics was evaluated by comparing perceptual sound localization results for the four scenes in a real room with a simulated one. In the second experiment, sound localization with three BTE algorithms, an omnidirectional microphone, a monaural cardioid-shaped beamformer and a monaural noise canceler, was examined. The results showed that the system for generating virtual environments is a reliable tool to evaluate sound localization with hearing aids. With BTE hearing aids localization performance decreased and the number of front-back confusions was at chance level. The beamformer, due to its directivity characteristics, allowed the listener to resolve the front-back ambiguity. PMID:22712946

  17. Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capstick, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    1. The nature of sound; 2. Elasticity and vibrations; 3. Transverse waves; 4. Longitudinal waves; 5. Velocity of longitudinal waves; 6. Reflection and refraction. Doppler's principle; 7. Interference. Beats. Combination tones; 8. Resonance and forced vibrations; 9. Quality of musical notes; 10. Organ pipes; 11. Rods. Plates. Bells; 12. Acoustical measurements; 13. The phonograph, microphone and telephone; 14. Consonance; 15. Definition of intervals. Scales. Temperament; 16. Musical instruments; 17. Application of acoustical principles to military purposes; Questions; Answers to questions; Index.

  18. Sound source localization by hearing preservation patients with and without symmetric, low-frequency acoustic hearing

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, Louise H.; Dorman, Michael F.; Yost, William A.; Gifford, Rene H.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to study sound source localization by cochlear implant (CI) listeners with low-frequency (LF) acoustic hearing in both the operated ear and in the contralateral ear. Eight CI listeners had symmetrical LF acoustic hearing (symm) and four had asymmetric LF acoustic hearing (asymm). The effects of two variables were assessed: (i) the symmetry of the LF thresholds in the two ears and (ii) the presence/absence of bilateral acoustic amplification. Stimuli consisted of low-pass, high pass, and wide-band noise bursts presented in the frontal horizontal plane. Localization accuracy was 23 degrees of error for the symm listeners and 76 degrees of error for the asymm listeners. The presence of a unilateral CI used in conjunction with bilateral LF acoustic hearing does not impair sound source localization accuracy, but amplification for acoustic hearing can be detrimental to sound source localization accuracy. PMID:25832907

  19. Abiotic versus Biotic Drivers of Ocean pH Variation under Fast Sea Ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Matson, Paul G.; Washburn, Libe; Martz, Todd R.; Hofmann, Gretchen E.

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification is expected to have a major effect on the marine carbonate system over the next century, particularly in high latitude seas. Less appreciated is natural environmental variation within these systems, particularly in terms of pH, and how this natural variation may inform laboratory experiments. In this study, we deployed sensor-equipped moorings at 20 m depths at three locations in McMurdo Sound, comprising deep (bottom depth>200 m: Hut Point Peninsula) and shallow environments (bottom depth ∼25 m: Cape Evans and New Harbor). Our sensors recorded high-frequency variation in pH (Hut Point and Cape Evans only), tide (Cape Evans and New Harbor), and water mass properties (temperature and salinity) during spring and early summer 2011. These collective observations showed that (1) pH differed spatially both in terms of mean pH (Cape Evans: 8.009±0.015; Hut Point: 8.020±0.007) and range of pH (Cape Evans: 0.090; Hut Point: 0.036), and (2) pH was not related to the mixing of two water masses, suggesting that the observed pH variation is likely not driven by this abiotic process. Given the large daily fluctuation in pH at Cape Evans, we developed a simple mechanistic model to explore the potential for biotic processes – in this case algal photosynthesis – to increase pH by fixing carbon from the water column. For this model, we incorporated published photosynthetic parameters for the three dominant algal functional groups found at Cape Evans (benthic fleshy red macroalgae, crustose coralline algae, and sea ice algal communities) to estimate oxygen produced/carbon fixed from the water column underneath fast sea ice and the resulting pH change. These results suggest that biotic processes may be a primary driver of pH variation observed under fast sea ice at Cape Evans and potentially at other shallow sites in McMurdo Sound. PMID:25221950

  20. Abiotic versus biotic drivers of ocean pH variation under fast sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Matson, Paul G; Washburn, Libe; Martz, Todd R; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification is expected to have a major effect on the marine carbonate system over the next century, particularly in high latitude seas. Less appreciated is natural environmental variation within these systems, particularly in terms of pH, and how this natural variation may inform laboratory experiments. In this study, we deployed sensor-equipped moorings at 20 m depths at three locations in McMurdo Sound, comprising deep (bottom depth>200 m: Hut Point Peninsula) and shallow environments (bottom depth ∼25 m: Cape Evans and New Harbor). Our sensors recorded high-frequency variation in pH (Hut Point and Cape Evans only), tide (Cape Evans and New Harbor), and water mass properties (temperature and salinity) during spring and early summer 2011. These collective observations showed that (1) pH differed spatially both in terms of mean pH (Cape Evans: 8.009±0.015; Hut Point: 8.020±0.007) and range of pH (Cape Evans: 0.090; Hut Point: 0.036), and (2) pH was not related to the mixing of two water masses, suggesting that the observed pH variation is likely not driven by this abiotic process. Given the large daily fluctuation in pH at Cape Evans, we developed a simple mechanistic model to explore the potential for biotic processes--in this case algal photosynthesis--to increase pH by fixing carbon from the water column. For this model, we incorporated published photosynthetic parameters for the three dominant algal functional groups found at Cape Evans (benthic fleshy red macroalgae, crustose coralline algae, and sea ice algal communities) to estimate oxygen produced/carbon fixed from the water column underneath fast sea ice and the resulting pH change. These results suggest that biotic processes may be a primary driver of pH variation observed under fast sea ice at Cape Evans and potentially at other shallow sites in McMurdo Sound. PMID:25221950

  1. Sound localization with head movement: implications for 3-d audio displays

    PubMed Central

    McAnally, Ken I.; Martin, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the accuracy of sound localization is improved if listeners are allowed to move their heads during signal presentation. This study describes the function relating localization accuracy to the extent of head movement in azimuth. Sounds that are difficult to localize were presented in the free field from sources at a wide range of azimuths and elevations. Sounds remained active until the participants' heads had rotated through windows ranging in width of 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, or 64° of azimuth. Error in determining sound-source elevation and the rate of front/back confusion were found to decrease with increases in azimuth window width. Error in determining sound-source lateral angle was not found to vary with azimuth window width. Implications for 3-d audio displays: the utility of a 3-d audio display for imparting spatial information is likely to be improved if operators are able to move their heads during signal presentation. Head movement may compensate in part for a paucity of spectral cues to sound-source location resulting from limitations in either the audio signals presented or the directional filters (i.e., head-related transfer functions) used to generate a display. However, head movements of a moderate size (i.e., through around 32° of azimuth) may be required to ensure that spatial information is conveyed with high accuracy. PMID:25161605

  2. Perceptual factors contribute more than acoustical factors to sound localization abilities with virtual sources

    PubMed Central

    Andéol, Guillaume; Savel, Sophie; Guillaume, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Human sound localization abilities rely on binaural and spectral cues. Spectral cues arise from interactions between the sound wave and the listener's body (head-related transfer function, HRTF). Large individual differences were reported in localization abilities, even in young normal-hearing adults. Several studies have attempted to determine whether localization abilities depend mostly on acoustical cues or on perceptual processes involved in the analysis of these cues. These studies have yielded inconsistent findings, which could result from methodological issues. In this study, we measured sound localization performance with normal and modified acoustical cues (i.e., with individual and non-individual HRTFs, respectively) in 20 naïve listeners. Test conditions were chosen to address most methodological issues from past studies. Procedural training was provided prior to sound localization tests. The results showed no direct relationship between behavioral results and an acoustical metrics (spectral-shape prominence of individual HRTFs). Despite uncertainties due to technical issues with the normalization of the HRTFs, large acoustical differences between individual and non-individual HRTFs appeared to be needed to produce behavioral effects. A subset of 15 listeners then trained in the sound localization task with individual HRTFs. Training included either visual correct-answer feedback (for the test group) or no feedback (for the control group), and was assumed to elicit perceptual learning for the test group only. Few listeners from the control group, but most listeners from the test group, showed significant training-induced learning. For the test group, learning was related to pre-training performance (i.e., the poorer the pre-training performance, the greater the learning amount) and was retained after 1 month. The results are interpreted as being in favor of a larger contribution of perceptual factors than of acoustical factors to sound localization

  3. Sound localization in reverberant environments: physiological bases of the precedence effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Miles Andrew McLean

    Localization dominance, a phenomenon of the precedence effect, refers to the dominance of directional cues conveyed by sound arriving directly from the source over cues conveyed by reflected copies on the perception of sound source location. One theory of localization dominance is that leading sounds suppress neural responses to lagging sounds (Yin, 1994 Litovsky & Yin, 1998 a, b). Neurons in auditory nuclei respond best to a leading sound and have a reduced response to a lagging sound, supporting this hypothesis. It has been proposed that GABA-ergic or glycinergic inhibition suppresses neural responses to lagging sounds (Yin, 1994 Fitzpatrick et al. 1995 Pollack & Burger, 2002). An alternative hypothesis states that cochlear processing in low-frequency hearing animals alters directional cues conveyed by the leading and lagging sound, emphasising those present in the leading sound (Tollin, 1998 Hartung & Trahiotis 2001). Responses of single neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anaesthetised guinea pigs were recorded to binaural click pair stimuli. Responses of some neurons were recorded before, during, and after iontophoresis of either the GABAa receptor antagonist gabazine, or the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine. Blocking glycine did not decrease neural suppression of the lagging click in 8/10 neurons. Blocking GAB A did not decrease neural suppression of the lagging click in 11/16 neurons. The neural representation of directional cues in the output of low-frequency neurons to the leading click of a binaural click pair differed from those actually conveyed by the stimulus in 20/20 neurons. Examination of the responses of several such neurons indicated responses to the leading click represented a direction between that conveyed by the leading and lagging click. The results supported the hypothesis that cochlear processing of binaural click pairs alters directional cues conveyed by the stimulus. Limited support was also found for the hypothesis that

  4. Sound attenuation in ducts using locally resonant periodic aluminum patches.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, Maaz; Elnady, Tamer; Akl, Wael

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the control of low frequency noise has received a lot of attention for several applications. Traditional passive noise control techniques using Helmholtz resonators have size limitations in the low frequency range because of the long wavelength. Promising noise reductions, with flush mounted aluminum patches with no size problems can be obtained using local resonance phenomenon implemented in acoustic metamaterial techniques. The objective of this work is to introduce locally resonant thin aluminum patches flush mounted to a duct walls aiming at creating frequency stop bands in a specific frequency range. Green's function is used within the framework of interface response theory to predict the amount of attenuation of the local resonant patches. The two-port theory and finite elements are also used to predict the acoustic performance of these patches. No flow measurements were conducted and show good agreement with the models. The effect of varying the damping and the masses of the patches are used to expand the stop bandwidth and the effect of both Bragg scattering and the locally resonant mechanisms was demonstrated using mathematical models. The effect of the arrays of patches on the effective dynamic density and bulk modulus has also been investigated. PMID:27369152

  5. Sound localization in noise by normal-hearing listeners and cochlear implant users

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, Stefan; Seeber, Bernhard U.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterize horizontal-plane sound localization in interfering noise at different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and to compare performance across normal-hearing listeners and users of unilateral and bilateral cochlear implants (CIs). CI users report difficulties with listening in noisy environments. While their difficulties with speech understanding have been investigated in several studies, the ability to localize sounds in background noise has not extensively been examined, despite the benefits of binaural hearing being greatest in noisy situations. Sound localization is a measure of binaural processing and is thus well suited to assessing the benefit of bilateral implantation. The results will inform clinicians and implant manufacturers how to focus their efforts to improve localization with CIs in noisy situations. Design Six normal-hearing listeners, four unilateral and ten bilateral CI users indicated the perceived location of sound sources using a light pointer method. Target sounds were noise pulses played from one of 11 loudspeakers placed between −80° and +80° in the frontal horizontal plane in the free-field. Localization was assessed in quiet and in diffuse background noise at SNRs between +10 and −7 dB. Speech reception thresholds were measured and their relation to the localization results examined. Results Localization performance declined with decreasing SNR: Target sounds were perceived closer to the median plane and the standard deviation of responses increased. Localization performance across groups was compared using a measure of “Spatial Resolvability” (SR). This measure gives the angular separation between two sound sources that would enable an ideal observer to correctly distinguish them 69.1% of the time. For all participants SR increased with decreasing SNR, i.e. at low SNRs the spatial separation between sound sources remained distinguishable only when it was larger. Normal-hearing participants

  6. Human sound localization: measurements in untrained, head-unrestrained subjects using gaze as a pointer.

    PubMed

    Populin, Luis C

    2008-09-01

    Studies of sound localization in humans have used various behavioral measures to quantify the observers' perceptions; a non-comprehensive list includes verbal reports, head pointing, gun pointing, stylus pointing, and laser aiming. Comparison of localization performance reveals that in humans, just as in animals, different results are obtained with different experimental tasks. Accordingly, to circumvent problems associated with task selection and training, this study used gaze, an ethologically valid behavior for spatial pointing in species with a specialized area of the fovea, to measure sound localization perception of human subjects. Orienting using gaze as a pointer does not require training, preserves the natural link between perception and action, and allows for direct behavioral comparisons across species. The results revealed, unexpectedly, a large degree of variability across subjects in both accuracy and precision. The magnitude of the average angular localization errors for the most eccentric horizontal targets, however, were very similar to those documented in studies that used head pointing, whereas the magnitude of the localization errors for the frontal targets were considerably larger. In addition, an overall improvement in sound localization in the context of the memory-saccade task, as well as a lack of effect of initial eye and head position on perceived sound location were documented. PMID:18575853

  7. Physiological correlates of sound localization in a parasitoid fly, Ormia ochracea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshinsky, Michael Lee

    A major focus of research in the nervous system is the investigation of neural circuits. The question of how neurons connect to form functional units has driven modern neuroscience research from its inception. From the beginning, the neural circuits of the auditory system and specifically sound localization were used as a model system for investigating neural connectivity and computation. Sound localization lends itself to this task because there is no mapping of spatial information on a receptor sheet as in vision. With only one eye, an animal would still have positional information for objects. Since the receptor sheet in the ear is frequency oriented and not spatially oriented, positional information for a sound source does not exist with only one ear. The nervous system computes the location of a sound source based on differences in the physiology of the two ears. In this study, I investigated the neural circuits for sound localization in a fly, Ormia ochracea (Diptera, Tachinidae, Ormiini), which is a parasitoid of crickets. This fly possess a unique mechanically coupled hearing organ. The two ears are contained in one air sac and a cuticular bridge, that has a flexible spring-like structure at its center, connects them. This mechanical coupling preprocesses the sound before it is detected by the nervous system and provides the fly with directional information. The subject of this study is the neural coding of the location of sound stimuli by a mechanically coupled auditory system. In chapter 1, I present the natural history of an acoustic parasitoid and I review the peripheral processing of sound by the Ormian ear. In chapter 2, I describe the anatomy and physiology of the auditory afferents. I present this physiology in the context of sound localization. In chapter 3, I describe the directional dependent physiology for the thoracic local and ascending acoustic interneurons. In chapter 4, I quantify the threshold and I detail the kinematics of the phonotactic

  8. [Effect of cochlear implantation on sound localization for patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Liu, J F; Dai, J S; Wang, N Y

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review was to examine the current literature regarding application of cochlear implantation on patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL) for improvement on sound localization. The literature were searched in the PubMed database with 'cochlear implantation AND single-sided deafness' or 'cochlear implantation AND unilateral deafness' as keywords. The publication date of the articles was up to 2015-2-12. A total of 12 articles were included. The results show that the ability of sound localization for most of the USNHL subjects (90%) with cochlear implantation was significantly improved than that without CI, which suggests that CI is a superior auditory rehabilitation treatment than BAHA and CROS hearing aids for patients with USNHL, because of the re-establishment of the benefits of binaural hearing. In addition, the benefit of CI for USNHL requires a period of auditory experience or training. About 30% subjects showed significantly improvement on sound localization ability after CI worked for three months. For most of the patients (90%), the sound localization ability improved after CI worked for six months. When CI worked for nine months, all the subjects would show improvement on sound localization ability. Sound localization of the USNHL subjects with a CI is based primarily on interaural level differences (ILD) while interaural time differences (ITD) provide little advantage or probably not perceptible at all. The younger subject suffers from USNHL, the stronger the plasticity of the auditory center shows, which results in more obvious degeneration of the affected side and adaptive enhancement of the contralateral side of the auditory pathway. Similarly, the longer duration of USNHL lead to more obvious degeneration of the affected side and adaptive enhancement of the contralateral side. An adaptive enhancement of auditory pathway corresponding to the healthy ear will rely more on the monaural spatial cues that available to the

  9. A biomimetic coupled circuit based microphone array for sound source localization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huping; Xu, Xiangyuan; Jia, Han; Guan, Luyang; Bao, Ming

    2015-09-01

    An equivalent analog circuit is designed to mimic the coupled ears of the fly Ormia ochracea for sound source localization. This coupled circuit receives two signals with tiny phase difference from a space closed two-microphone array, and produces two signals with obvious intensity difference. The response sensitivity can be adjusted through the coupled circuit parameters. The directional characteristics of the coupled circuit have been demonstrated in the experiment. The miniature microphone array can localize the sound source with low computational burden by using the intensity difference. This system has significant advantages in various applications where the array size is limited. PMID:26428825

  10. Sound source localization inspired by the ears of the Ormia ochracea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntzman, Michael L.; Hall, Neal A.

    2014-07-01

    The parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea has the remarkable ability to locate crickets using audible sound. This ability is, in fact, remarkable as the fly's hearing mechanism spans only 1.5 mm which is 50× smaller than the wavelength of sound emitted by the cricket. The hearing mechanism is, for all practical purposes, a point in space with no significant interaural time or level differences to draw from. It has been discovered that evolution has empowered the fly with a hearing mechanism that utilizes multiple vibration modes to amplify interaural time and level differences. Here, we present a fully integrated, man-made mimic of the Ormia's hearing mechanism capable of replicating the remarkable sound localization ability of the special fly. A silicon-micromachined prototype is presented which uses multiple piezoelectric sensing ports to simultaneously transduce two orthogonal vibration modes of the sensing structure, thereby enabling simultaneous measurement of sound pressure and pressure gradient.

  11. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

  12. Non-line-of-sight sound source localization using matched-field processing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Victor; Knisely, Katherine E; Yönak, Serdar H; Grosh, Karl; Dowling, David R

    2012-01-01

    Acoustic diffraction allows sound to travel around opaque objects and therefore may allow beyond-line-of-sight sensing of remote sound sources. This paper reports simulated and experimental results for localizing sound sources based on fully shadowed microphone array measurements. The generic geometry includes a point source, a solid 90° wedge, and a receiving array that lies entirely in the shadow defined by the source location and the wedge. Source localization performance is assessed via matched-field (MF) ambiguity surfaces as a function of receiving array configuration, and received signal-to-noise ratio for the Bartlett and minimum variance distortionless (MVD) MF processors. Here, the sound propagation model is developed from a Green's function integral treatment. A simple 16 element line array of microphones is tested in three mutually orthogonal orientations. The experiments were conducted using an approximate 50-to-1-scaled tabletop model of a blind city-street intersection and produced ambiguity surfaces from source frequencies between 17.5 and 19 kHz that were incoherently summed. The experimental results suggest that a sound source may be localized by the MVD processor when using fully shadowed arrays that have significant aperture parallel to the edge of the wedge. However, this performance is reduced significantly for signal-to-noise ratios below 40 dB. PMID:22280592

  13. Biomimetic ears for a sensor agent robot to localize sound sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Daniel J.; Mita, Akira

    2011-04-01

    Our current environment and architecture are mainly static even though our surrounding society is constantly changing. This is why the Biofication of Living Spaces field was created, to get more adaptive and suitable living spaces. On the other hand, human was naturally empowered with a lot of features responding to the environment. His/her 2 ears are powerful tools from which he/she can acquire a lot of information such as the source localization of a sound. Interaural (between both ears) time differences enable a lateral localization and this function can be technologically reproduced. However, the sound localization in the median plane of the head provided amongst others by our external ear called the pinna is yet to be imitated in robotics. The idea of this paper is to build some biomimetic ear prototypes and to analyze theirs influences on a transfer function called Interaural Transfer Function (ITF). Once achieved, attaching these prototyped ears to a sensor agent robot, we aim particularly at a sound localization in the median plane of the robot. However, we will have a quick look at the horizontal sound localization too. Finally, these "ears" on the sensor agent robot will be convenient to get a" much accurate and useful information as possible with only 2 microphones and to use this agent for biofication of living spaces issues.

  14. The contribution of high frequencies to human brain activity underlying horizontal localization of natural spatial sounds

    PubMed Central

    Leino, Sakari; May, Patrick JC; Alku, Paavo; Liikkanen, Lassi A; Tiitinen, Hannu

    2007-01-01

    Background In the field of auditory neuroscience, much research has focused on the neural processes underlying human sound localization. A recent magnetoencephalography (MEG) study investigated localization-related brain activity by measuring the N1m event-related response originating in the auditory cortex. It was found that the dynamic range of the right-hemispheric N1m response, defined as the mean difference in response magnitude between contralateral and ipsilateral stimulation, reflects cortical activity related to the discrimination of horizontal sound direction. Interestingly, the results also suggested that the presence of realistic spectral information within horizontally located spatial sounds resulted in a larger right-hemispheric N1m dynamic range. Spectral cues being predominant at high frequencies, the present study further investigated the issue by removing frequencies from the spatial stimuli with low-pass filtering. This resulted in a stepwise elimination of direction-specific spectral information. Interaural time and level differences were kept constant. The original, unfiltered stimuli were broadband noise signals presented from five frontal horizontal directions and binaurally recorded for eight human subjects with miniature microphones placed in each subject's ear canals. Stimuli were presented to the subjects during MEG registration and in a behavioral listening experiment. Results The dynamic range of the right-hemispheric N1m amplitude was not significantly affected even when all frequencies above 600 Hz were removed. The dynamic range of the left-hemispheric N1m response was significantly diminished by the removal of frequencies over 7.5 kHz. The subjects' behavioral sound direction discrimination was only affected by the removal of frequencies over 600 Hz. Conclusion In accord with previous psychophysical findings, the current results indicate that frontal horizontal sound localization and related right-hemispheric cortical processes are

  15. 3-D inversion of airborne electromagnetic data parallelized and accelerated by local mesh and adaptive soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dikun; Oldenburg, Douglas W.; Haber, Eldad

    2014-03-01

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods are highly efficient tools for assessing the Earth's conductivity structures in a large area at low cost. However, the configuration of AEM measurements, which typically have widely distributed transmitter-receiver pairs, makes the rigorous modelling and interpretation extremely time-consuming in 3-D. Excessive overcomputing can occur when working on a large mesh covering the entire survey area and inverting all soundings in the data set. We propose two improvements. The first is to use a locally optimized mesh for each AEM sounding for the forward modelling and calculation of sensitivity. This dedicated local mesh is small with fine cells near the sounding location and coarse cells far away in accordance with EM diffusion and the geometric decay of the signals. Once the forward problem is solved on the local meshes, the sensitivity for the inversion on the global mesh is available through quick interpolation. Using local meshes for AEM forward modelling avoids unnecessary computing on fine cells on a global mesh that are far away from the sounding location. Since local meshes are highly independent, the forward modelling can be efficiently parallelized over an array of processors. The second improvement is random and dynamic down-sampling of the soundings. Each inversion iteration only uses a random subset of the soundings, and the subset is reselected for every iteration. The number of soundings in the random subset, determined by an adaptive algorithm, is tied to the degree of model regularization. This minimizes the overcomputing caused by working with redundant soundings. Our methods are compared against conventional methods and tested with a synthetic example. We also invert a field data set that was previously considered to be too large to be practically inverted in 3-D. These examples show that our methodology can dramatically reduce the processing time of 3-D inversion to a practical level without losing resolution

  16. Development of Sound Localization Strategies in Children with Bilateral Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Godar, Shelly P; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2015-01-01

    Localizing sounds in our environment is one of the fundamental perceptual abilities that enable humans to communicate, and to remain safe. Because the acoustic cues necessary for computing source locations consist of differences between the two ears in signal intensity and arrival time, sound localization is fairly poor when a single ear is available. In adults who become deaf and are fitted with cochlear implants (CIs) sound localization is known to improve when bilateral CIs (BiCIs) are used compared to when a single CI is used. The aim of the present study was to investigate the emergence of spatial hearing sensitivity in children who use BiCIs, with a particular focus on the development of behavioral localization patterns when stimuli are presented in free-field horizontal acoustic space. A new analysis was implemented to quantify patterns observed in children for mapping acoustic space to a spatially relevant perceptual representation. Children with normal hearing were found to distribute their responses in a manner that demonstrated high spatial sensitivity. In contrast, children with BiCIs tended to classify sound source locations to the left and right; with increased bilateral hearing experience, they developed a perceptual map of space that was better aligned with the acoustic space. The results indicate experience-dependent refinement of spatial hearing skills in children with CIs. Localization strategies appear to undergo transitions from sound source categorization strategies to more fine-grained location identification strategies. This may provide evidence for neural plasticity, with implications for training of spatial hearing ability in CI users. PMID:26288142

  17. Development of Sound Localization Strategies in Children with Bilateral Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; Godar, Shelly P.; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2015-01-01

    Localizing sounds in our environment is one of the fundamental perceptual abilities that enable humans to communicate, and to remain safe. Because the acoustic cues necessary for computing source locations consist of differences between the two ears in signal intensity and arrival time, sound localization is fairly poor when a single ear is available. In adults who become deaf and are fitted with cochlear implants (CIs) sound localization is known to improve when bilateral CIs (BiCIs) are used compared to when a single CI is used. The aim of the present study was to investigate the emergence of spatial hearing sensitivity in children who use BiCIs, with a particular focus on the development of behavioral localization patterns when stimuli are presented in free-field horizontal acoustic space. A new analysis was implemented to quantify patterns observed in children for mapping acoustic space to a spatially relevant perceptual representation. Children with normal hearing were found to distribute their responses in a manner that demonstrated high spatial sensitivity. In contrast, children with BiCIs tended to classify sound source locations to the left and right; with increased bilateral hearing experience, they developed a perceptual map of space that was better aligned with the acoustic space. The results indicate experience-dependent refinement of spatial hearing skills in children with CIs. Localization strategies appear to undergo transitions from sound source categorization strategies to more fine-grained location identification strategies. This may provide evidence for neural plasticity, with implications for training of spatial hearing ability in CI users. PMID:26288142

  18. Acoustic space learning for sound-source separation and localization on binaural manifolds.

    PubMed

    Deleforge, Antoine; Forbes, Florence; Horaud, Radu

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we address the problems of modeling the acoustic space generated by a full-spectrum sound source and using the learned model for the localization and separation of multiple sources that simultaneously emit sparse-spectrum sounds. We lay theoretical and methodological grounds in order to introduce the binaural manifold paradigm. We perform an in-depth study of the latent low-dimensional structure of the high-dimensional interaural spectral data, based on a corpus recorded with a human-like audiomotor robot head. A nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique is used to show that these data lie on a two-dimensional (2D) smooth manifold parameterized by the motor states of the listener, or equivalently, the sound-source directions. We propose a probabilistic piecewise affine mapping model (PPAM) specifically designed to deal with high-dimensional data exhibiting an intrinsic piecewise linear structure. We derive a closed-form expectation-maximization (EM) procedure for estimating the model parameters, followed by Bayes inversion for obtaining the full posterior density function of a sound-source direction. We extend this solution to deal with missing data and redundancy in real-world spectrograms, and hence for 2D localization of natural sound sources such as speech. We further generalize the model to the challenging case of multiple sound sources and we propose a variational EM framework. The associated algorithm, referred to as variational EM for source separation and localization (VESSL) yields a Bayesian estimation of the 2D locations and time-frequency masks of all the sources. Comparisons of the proposed approach with several existing methods reveal that the combination of acoustic-space learning with Bayesian inference enables our method to outperform state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25164245

  19. Neogene ice sheet, paleoclimatic and geological history of the McMurdo Sound region, Victoria Land Basin, Antarctica: overview of ANDRILL's first two drilling projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, R.; Naish, T.; Harwood, D.; Florindo, F.; Levy, R.; Teams, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    The ANtarctic geological DRILLing Program (ANDRILL), an international collaboration within IPY, has recovered 2 cores: from under the Ross Ice Shelf (McMurdo Ice Shelf Project (MIS) - AND-1B), and from the land-fast sea-ice of McMurdo Sound (Southern McMurdo Sound Project (SMS) - AND-2A). Drill cores reached respective total depths of 1285mbsf in c. 850m of water (MIS) and 1138.54mbsf in c. 380m of water (SMS). Repetitive facies successions in AND-1B core imply at least 60 fluctuations, of probable Milankovitch- duration, between subglacial, ice proximal and ice distal open marine environments. These are grouped into 3 types of facies cycles corresponding to glacial-interglacial variability during climatically distinct periods of Late Neogene: (1) cold-polar climate and ice (late Miocene and Pleistocene); (2) relatively warmer climate, polythermal ice and interglacials dominated by pelagic diatomite (Pliocene); (3) warmer climate, polythermal ice with interglacials dominated by hemipelagites (early late Miocene). A c. 80m-thick interval of diatomite of mid to late Pliocene age shows no apparent glacial cyclicity and represents an extended period of ice-free conditions indicating reduced or absent WAIS. Late Pliocene glacial-interglacial cycles characterized by abrupt alternations between subglacial/ice-proximal facies and open marine diatomite units imply significant WAIS dynamism, and contribution to global ice volume changes coeval with the initiation of Northern Hemisphere glaciations. A c. 4m-thick interval of diatomaceous mudstone in the mid-Pleistocene also represents warm-interglacial ice-free conditions. Intriguingly, glacial deposits interrupted by periodic, small- scale grounding-line retreats dominate the last 1m.y. Inter-hemispheric ice sheet coupling was probably controlled by Northern Hemispheric insolation and consequent glacial eustasy to account for much of the orbital-scale WAIS variability since 2.5Ma. A further expansion of WAIS occurred across

  20. The Offshore New Harbor (ONH) Seismic Expedition: Revealing the Stratigraphic History in the Southern McMurdo Sound Region, Ross Sea, Antarctica from the Greenhouse to Icehouse Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, S. F.; Speece, M. A.; Wilson, G. S.; Sunwall, D. A.; Tinto, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    In the austral spring 2008, the ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing) Program’s Offshore New Harbor Expedition successfully collected over 48 km of multi-channel seismic (MCS) data to investigate the stratigraphic and tectonic history of westernmost Southern McMurdo Sound during the Greenhouse World (Eocene) and the start of the Icehouse World (Oligocene). This survey represents an important step for identifying future drilling targets for ANDRILL, which is a multinational program, with the aim to recover stratigraphic intervals for interpreting Antarctica’s climate and glacial history over the past 50 million years. The goal of the Offshore New Harbor Project is to recover proximal archives from two widely recognized but unresolved time intervals regarding Antarctica’s history: 1) the mid-Paleogene cryospheric development on Antarctica; and 2) the abrupt climate shift across the Eocene/Oligocene transition. The ONH seismic survey used methods successfully employed by previous ANDRILL’s surveys in Southern McMurdo Sound (2005) and in Mackay Sea Valley (2007), which included deploying a Generator Injector (G.I.) airgun through holes drilled through the ice and a 1.5 km long streamer that used 60 gimbled geophones to measure the returning reflected seismic energy. Processing of the seismic data was successfully able to remove the bottom water multiple, permitting deeper seismic reflectors to be identified for the first time in this area. Since one of the two seismic lines crossed close to the previously drilled CIROS-1, correlation was possible between the seismic reflectors and the entire stratigraphic section at CIROS-1, which has been dated as old as Late Eocene (~37 Ma). Additionally, seismic and gravity data indicated that a thick sedimentary wedge of up to 5 km lie immediately east of CIROS-1. With the Devonian Beacon Sandstone Formation having been observed to be no thicker than 2 km on land, an additional 3 km of Cenozoic sediments may lie below and

  1. Simulation and testing of a multichannel system for 3D sound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Edward Albert

    Three-dimensional (3D) audio involves the ability to localize sound anywhere in a three-dimensional space. 3D audio can be used to provide the listener with the perception of moving sounds and can provide a realistic listening experience for applications such as gaming, video conferencing, movies, and concerts. The purpose of this research is to simulate and test 3D audio by incorporating auditory localization techniques in a multi-channel speaker system. The objective is to develop an algorithm that can place an audio event in a desired location by calculating and controlling the gain factors of each speaker. A MATLAB simulation displays the location of the speakers and perceived sound, which is verified through experimentation. The scenario in which the listener is not equidistant from each of the speakers is also investigated and simulated. This research is envisioned to lead to a better understanding of human localization of sound, and will contribute to a more realistic listening experience.

  2. Two-Dimensional Classical Wave Localization in a Third Sound System

    SciTech Connect

    Luhman, D. R.; Herrmann, J. C.; Hallock, R. B.

    2006-09-07

    Patterned calcium fluoride deposited on glass creates an effective two-dimensional scatterer of third sound propagating on a thin 4He film. We have utilized a substrate with a periodic arrangement of scatterers and a substrate with a random arrangement of scatterers to investigate classical wave propagation and localization using third sound. We observe pass bands on the periodic substrate while only low frequency modes are observed in the disordered case. The presence of high frequency modes on the ordered substrate and the absence of high frequency modes on the disordered substrate indicates we are observing localization on the disordered substrate. We compare the disordered data to the two-dimensional localization theory of Cohen and Machta and find reasonable agreement.

  3. Use of unidirectional microphones and signal processing for the localization of sound sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Bordoni, Giacomo; Marzani, Alessandro

    2009-05-01

    Targeting people or objects by passive acoustic sensors is of relevant interest in several military and civil applications, spanning from surveillance and patrolling systems to teleconferencing and human-robot interaction. To date methods and patents focused solely on the use of beamforming algorithms to compute the time of arrival of sounds detected by using omnidirectional microphones (OM) sparsely deployed. This paper describes the preliminary results of a novel approach devoted to the localization of ground borne acoustic sources. It is demonstrated that an array made of at least three unidirectional microphones can be exploited to detect the position the source. Pulse features extracted either in the time domain or in the frequency domain are used to identify the direction of the incoming sound. This information is then fed into a semi-analytical algorithm devoted to the identification of the source location. The novelty of the method presented here consists on the use of unidirectional microphones rather than omnidirectional microphones and on the ability to extract the sound direction by considering features like the pulse amplitude rather than the pulse arrival time. It is believed that this method may pave the road toward a new generation of reduced size sound detectors and localizers.

  4. Localization of a sound source in a noisy environment by hyperbolic curves in quefrency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Choon-Su; Jeon, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2014-10-01

    Time Difference of Arrivals (TDOAs) of sound waves between microphones have to do with source localization. How well a sound source can be localized depends on how precisely the TDOAs are estimated. Although many ways to estimate TDOA have been proposed, noise always prevents us from finding exact time differences more or less in practice. Cross correlation has been the most prevalent way to estimate time difference, and various cross correlations robust to noise have also been developed. Nevertheless, much remains to be done for exact TDOA estimation under noisy environments. A novel way to show time delays in quefrency domain by removing noise has been proposed, which is called Minimum Variance Cepstrum (MVC). In particular, it is practically desirable to visualize source position with as few number of sensors as possible. Once TDOAs are obtained precisely, it is enough to show the source position in a 2-D plane using hyperbolic curves with only three sensors. In this work, the MVC is adopted to accurately estimate TDOAs under noise, and a way to localize an acoustic source by intersecting hyperbolic curves using the TDOAs between three microphones is proposed. Numerical simulations on TDOA estimation and source localization with white Gaussian noise demonstrated that the proposed method worked well under the noisy environment, and we compared the results with those of other old but well-established cross correlation estimators. In addition, experiments to detect a leaking point on a pipe successfully showed where the leak sound was generated.

  5. Cosmogenic Ne-21 exposure ages of glacial boulders constrained by local bedrock erosion rates in Ong Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, D. J.; Balco, G.; Putkonen, J.; Bibby, T.; Giusti, C.; Ball, A. E.; Hedberg, C. P.; Diamond, M. S.; Ringger, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    In order to accurately determine the exposure age of glacial boulders with cosmogenic nuclides, we need to know something about the erosion rate of the rock and any previous exposure the boulder may have had. Commonly, the erosion rate is simply assumed, and inheritance is dealt with by both sampling strategy and removing outliers from the data. In this study, we determine the rock erosion rate by measuring the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in granite bedrock samples. This is used to constrain the exposure age of glacial boulders of the same lithology from the same locale. Ong Valley, Antarctica, (157.5 East, 83.25 South) is an ice-free valley in the Miller Range of the Central Transantarctic Mountains. The valley contains three distinct glacial drifts, and the oldest of these is well defined by an end moraine. We collected samples from six boulders on this end moraine, and six additional samples from the surrounding bedrock that is composed of the same lithology, the Hope Granite. The bedrock samples were collected from the ridge bordering the valley, well above the glacial limit. Because the bedrock samples have not been shielded by ice and have been exposed for millions of years, the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in these samples reflects only the erosion rate of the granite. We separated quartz from the granite samples following standard laboratory methods and measured the concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in the quartz at the BGC Noble Gas Thermochronometry Lab. The concentration of cosmogenic Ne-21 in the bedrock samples is interpreted as reflecting only the erosion rate. We can then assume that the erosion rate of the bedrock is equal to the erosion rate of the glacial boulders on the end moraine because they have the same lithology and have been subjected to the same climate conditions during their exposure. With this information, we can better constrain the exposure age of the glacial boulders in Ong Valley.

  6. A Method for Direct Localized Sound Speed Estimates Using Registered Virtual Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Byram, Brett C.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Jensen, Jørgen A.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate sound speed estimates are desirable in a number of fields. In an effort to increase the spatial resolution of sound speed estimates, a new method is proposed for direct measurement of sound speed between arbitrary spatial locations. The method uses the sound speed estimator developed by Anderson and Trahey. Their least squares fit of the received waveform’s curvature provides an estimate of the wave’s point of origin. The point of origin and the delay profile calculated from the fit are used to arrive at a spatially registered virtual detector. Between a pair of registered virtual detectors, a spherical wave is propagated. By beamforming the data, the time-of-flight between the two virtual sources can be calculated. From this information, the local sound speed can be estimated. Validation of the estimator is made using phantom and simulation data. The set of test phantoms consisted of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous media. Several different inhomogeneous phantom configurations were used for the physical validation. The simulation validation focused on the limits of target depth and signal-to-noise ratio on virtual detector registration. The simulations also compare the impact of two- and three-layer inhomogeneous media. The phantom results varied based on signal-to-noise ratio and geometry. The results for all cases were generally less than 1% mean error and standard deviation. The simulation results varied somewhat with depth and F/#, but primarily, they varied with signal-to-noise ratio and geometry. With two-layer geometries, the algorithm has a worst-case spatial registration bias of 0.02%. With three-layer geometries, the axial registration error gets worse with a bias magnitude up to 2.1% but is otherwise relatively stable over depth. The stability over depth of the bias in a given medium still allows for accurate sound speed estimates with a mean relative error less than 0.2%. PMID:22972913

  7. Do you hear where I hear?: isolating the individualized sound localization cues

    PubMed Central

    Romigh, Griffin D.; Simpson, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that individualized head-related transfer function (HRTF) measurements are needed to adequately capture all of the 3D spatial hearing cues. However, many perceptual studies have shown that localization accuracy in the lateral dimension is only minimally decreased by the use of non-individualized head-related transfer functions. This evidence supports the idea that the individualized components of an HRTF could be isolated from those that are more general in nature. In the present study we decomposed the HRTF at each location into average, lateral and intraconic spectral components, along with an ITD in an effort to isolate the sound localization cues that are responsible for the inter-individual differences in localization performance. HRTFs for a given listener were then reconstructed systematically with components that were both individualized and non-individualized in nature, and the effect of each modification was analyzed via a virtual localization test where brief 250 ms noise bursts were rendered with the modified HRTFs. Results indicate that the cues important for individualization of HRTFs are contained almost exclusively in the intraconic portion of the HRTF spectra and localization is only minimally affected by introducing non-individualized cues into the other HRTF components. These results provide new insights into what specific inter-individual differences in head-related acoustical features are most relevant to sound localization, and provide a framework for how future human-machine interfaces might be more effectively generalized and/or individualized. PMID:25520607

  8. Eight-choice sound localization by manatees: performance abilities and head related transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Colbert-Luke, Debborah E; Gaspard, Joseph C; Reep, Roger L; Bauer, Gordon B; Dziuk, Kimberly; Cardwell, Adrienne; Mann, David A

    2015-02-01

    Two experiments investigated the ability and means by which two male Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) may determine the direction of a sound source. An eight-choice discrimination paradigm was used to determine the subjects' sound localization abilities of five signal conditions covering a range of frequencies, durations, and levels. Subjects performed above the 12.5% chance level for all broadband frequencies and were able to localize sounds over a large level range. Errors were typically located to either side of the signal source location when presented in the front 180° but were more dispersed when presented from locations behind the subject. Front-to-back confusions were few and accuracy was greater when signals originated from the front 180°. Head-related transfer functions were measured to determine if frequencies were filtered by the manatee body to create frequency-specific interaural level differences (ILDs). ILDs were found for all frequencies as a function of source location, although they were largest with frequencies above 18 kHz and when signals originated to either side of the subjects. Larger ILDs were found when the signals originated behind the subjects. A shadowing-effect produced by the body may explain the relatively low occurrence of front-back confusions in the localization study. PMID:25533765

  9. Monitoring the environment: sound localization equipment for deaf-blind people.

    PubMed

    Borg, E; Rönnberg, J; Neovius, L; Kjellander, M

    1999-03-01

    The problems that deaf-blind subjects have with monitoring the environment and the strategies they use were identified using structured interviews. The use of the vibratory sense did not appear to be highly developed, but some individuals indicated that it has great potential. We describe here the design of a computerized laboratory device for sound localization, based on a three-microphone system with a cross correlation algorithm. It was found to have reasonable precision and sufficient reliability to allow the detection and localization of a person approaching a deaf-blind subject in an ordinary room. The next step is to miniaturize the equipment and build a portable prototype. PMID:10320064

  10. Inhibiting the inhibition: a neuronal network for sound localization in reverberant environments.

    PubMed

    Pecka, Michael; Zahn, Thomas P; Saunier-Rebori, Bernadette; Siveke, Ida; Felmy, Felix; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Klug, Achim; Pollak, George D; Grothe, Benedikt

    2007-02-14

    The precedence effect describes the phenomenon whereby echoes are spatially fused to the location of an initial sound by selectively suppressing the directional information of lagging sounds (echo suppression). Echo suppression is a prerequisite for faithful sound localization in natural environments but can break down depending on the behavioral context. To date, the neural mechanisms that suppress echo directional information without suppressing the perception of echoes themselves are not understood. We performed in vivo recordings in Mongolian gerbils of neurons of the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL), a GABAergic brainstem nucleus that targets the auditory midbrain, and show that these DNLL neurons exhibit inhibition that persists tens of milliseconds beyond the stimulus offset, so-called persistent inhibition (PI). Using in vitro recordings, we demonstrate that PI stems from GABAergic projections from the opposite DNLL. Furthermore, these recordings show that PI is attributable to intrinsic features of this GABAergic innervation. Implementation of these physiological findings into a neuronal model of the auditory brainstem demonstrates that, on a circuit level, PI creates an enhancement of responsiveness to lagging sounds in auditory midbrain cells. Moreover, the model revealed that such response enhancement is a sufficient cue for an ideal observer to identify echoes and to exhibit echo suppression, which agrees closely with the percepts of human subjects. PMID:17301185

  11. The natural history of sound localization in mammals – a story of neuronal inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Grothe, Benedikt; Pecka, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Our concepts of sound localization in the vertebrate brain are widely based on the general assumption that both the ability to detect air-borne sounds and the neuronal processing are homologous in archosaurs (present day crocodiles and birds) and mammals. Yet studies repeatedly report conflicting results on the neuronal circuits and mechanisms, in particular the role of inhibition, as well as the coding strategies between avian and mammalian model systems. Here we argue that mammalian and avian phylogeny of spatial hearing is characterized by a convergent evolution of hearing air-borne sounds rather than by homology. In particular, the different evolutionary origins of tympanic ears and the different availability of binaural cues in early mammals and archosaurs imposed distinct constraints on the respective binaural processing mechanisms. The role of synaptic inhibition in generating binaural spatial sensitivity in mammals is highlighted, as it reveals a unifying principle of mammalian circuit design for encoding sound position. Together, we combine evolutionary, anatomical and physiological arguments for making a clear distinction between mammalian processing mechanisms and coding strategies and those of archosaurs. We emphasize that a consideration of the convergent nature of neuronal mechanisms will significantly increase the explanatory power of studies of spatial processing in both mammals and birds. PMID:25324726

  12. Evaluation of Speech Intelligibility and Sound Localization Abilities with Hearing Aids Using Binaural Wireless Technology

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Iman; Parsa, Vijay; Macpherson, Ewan; Cheesman, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Wireless synchronization of the digital signal processing (DSP) features between two hearing aids in a bilateral hearing aid fitting is a fairly new technology. This technology is expected to preserve the differences in time and intensity between the two ears by co-ordinating the bilateral DSP features such as multichannel compression, noise reduction, and adaptive directionality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefits of wireless communication as implemented in two commercially available hearing aids. More specifically, this study measured speech intelligibility and sound localization abilities of normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners using bilateral hearing aids with wireless synchronization of multichannel Wide Dynamic Range Compression (WDRC). Twenty subjects participated; 8 had normal hearing and 12 had bilaterally symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. Each individual completed the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT) and a sound localization test with two types of stimuli. No specific benefit from wireless WDRC synchronization was observed for the HINT; however, hearing impaired listeners had better localization with the wireless synchronization. Binaural wireless technology in hearing aids may improve localization abilities although the possible effect appears to be small at the initial fitting. With adaptation, the hearing aids with synchronized signal processing may lead to an improvement in localization and speech intelligibility. Further research is required to demonstrate the effect of adaptation to the hearing aids with synchronized signal processing on different aspects of auditory performance. PMID:26557339

  13. Acoustical cues for sound localization by the Mongolian gerbil, Meriones unguiculatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Katuhiro; Furukawa, Shigeto

    2005-08-01

    The present study measured the head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) of the Mongolian gerbil for various sound-source directions, and explored acoustical cues for sound localization that could be available to the animals. The HRTF exhibited spectral notches for frequencies above 25 kHz. The notch frequency varied systematically with source direction, and thereby characterized the source directions well. The frequency dependence of the acoustical axis, the direction for which the HRTF amplitude was maximal, was relatively irregular and inconsistent between ears and animals. The frequency-by-frequency plot of the interaural level difference (ILD) exhibited positive and negative peaks, with maximum values of 30 dB at around 30 kHz. The ILD peak frequency had a relatively irregular spatial distribution, implying a poor sound localization cue. The binaural acoustical axis (the direction with the maximum ILD magnitude) showed relatively orderly clustering around certain frequencies, the pattern being fairly consistent among animals. The interaural time differences (ITDs) were also measured and fell in a +/-120 μs range. When two different animal postures were compared (i.e., the animal was standing on its hind legs and prone), small but consistent differences were found for the lower rear directions on the HRTF amplitudes, the ILDs, and the ITDs.

  14. Cue Reliability Represented in the Shape of Tuning Curves in the Owl's Sound Localization System

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Brian J.; Peña, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    Optimal use of sensory information requires that the brain estimates the reliability of sensory cues, but the neural correlate of cue reliability relevant for behavior is not well defined. Here, we addressed this issue by examining how the reliability of spatial cue influences neuronal responses and behavior in the owl's auditory system. We show that the firing rate and spatial selectivity changed with cue reliability due to the mechanisms generating the tuning to the sound localization cue. We found that the correlated variability among neurons strongly depended on the shape of the tuning curves. Finally, we demonstrated that the change in the neurons' selectivity was necessary and sufficient for a network of stochastic neurons to predict behavior when sensory cues were corrupted with noise. This study demonstrates that the shape of tuning curves can stand alone as a coding dimension of environmental statistics. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In natural environments, sensory cues are often corrupted by noise and are therefore unreliable. To make the best decisions, the brain must estimate the degree to which a cue can be trusted. The behaviorally relevant neural correlates of cue reliability are debated. In this study, we used the barn owl's sound localization system to address this question. We demonstrated that the mechanisms that account for spatial selectivity also explained how neural responses changed with degraded signals. This allowed for the neurons' selectivity to capture cue reliability, influencing the population readout commanding the owl's sound-orienting behavior. PMID:26888922

  15. Near-Field Sound Localization Based on the Small Profile Monaural Structure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngwoong; Kim, Keonwook

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic wave around a sound source in the near-field area presents unconventional properties in the temporal, spectral, and spatial domains due to the propagation mechanism. This paper investigates a near-field sound localizer in a small profile structure with a single microphone. The asymmetric structure around the microphone provides a distinctive spectral variation that can be recognized by the dedicated algorithm for directional localization. The physical structure consists of ten pipes of different lengths in a vertical fashion and rectangular wings positioned between the pipes in radial directions. The sound from an individual direction travels through the nearest open pipe, which generates the particular fundamental frequency according to the acoustic resonance. The Cepstral parameter is modified to evaluate the fundamental frequency. Once the system estimates the fundamental frequency of the received signal, the length of arrival and angle of arrival (AoA) are derived by the designed model. From an azimuthal distance of 3–15 cm from the outer body of the pipes, the extensive acoustic experiments with a 3D-printed structure show that the direct and side directions deliver average hit rates of 89% and 73%, respectively. The closer positions to the system demonstrate higher accuracy, and the overall hit rate performance is 78% up to 15 cm away from the structure body. PMID:26580618

  16. Near-Field Sound Localization Based on the Small Profile Monaural Structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngwoong; Kim, Keonwook

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic wave around a sound source in the near-field area presents unconventional properties in the temporal, spectral, and spatial domains due to the propagation mechanism. This paper investigates a near-field sound localizer in a small profile structure with a single microphone. The asymmetric structure around the microphone provides a distinctive spectral variation that can be recognized by the dedicated algorithm for directional localization. The physical structure consists of ten pipes of different lengths in a vertical fashion and rectangular wings positioned between the pipes in radial directions. The sound from an individual direction travels through the nearest open pipe, which generates the particular fundamental frequency according to the acoustic resonance. The Cepstral parameter is modified to evaluate the fundamental frequency. Once the system estimates the fundamental frequency of the received signal, the length of arrival and angle of arrival (AoA) are derived by the designed model. From an azimuthal distance of 3-15 cm from the outer body of the pipes, the extensive acoustic experiments with a 3D-printed structure show that the direct and side directions deliver average hit rates of 89% and 73%, respectively. The closer positions to the system demonstrate higher accuracy, and the overall hit rate performance is 78% up to 15 cm away from the structure body. PMID:26580618

  17. In vivo coincidence detection in mammalian sound localization generates phase delays.

    PubMed

    Franken, Tom P; Roberts, Michael T; Wei, Liting; Golding, Nace L; Joris, Philip X

    2015-03-01

    Sound localization critically depends on detection of differences in arrival time of sounds at the two ears (acoustic delay). The fundamental mechanisms are debated, but all proposals include a process of coincidence detection and a separate source of internal delay that offsets the acoustic delay and determines neural tuning. We used in vivo patch-clamp recordings of binaural neurons in the Mongolian gerbil and pharmacological manipulations to directly compare neuronal input to output and to separate excitation from inhibition. Our results cannot be accounted for by existing models and reveal that coincidence detection is not an instantaneous process, but is instead shaped by the interaction of intrinsic conductances with preceding synaptic activity. This interaction generates an internal delay as an intrinsic part of the process of coincidence detection. The multiplication and time-shifting stages thought to extract synchronous activity in many brain areas can therefore be combined in a single operation. PMID:25664914

  18. Inhibition in the balance: binaurally coupled inhibitory feedback in sound localization circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Iwao; Ohmori, Harunori; Rubel, Edwin W.

    2011-01-01

    Interaural time differences (ITDs) are the primary cue animals, including humans, use to localize low-frequency sounds. In vertebrate auditory systems, dedicated ITD processing neural circuitry performs an exacting task, the discrimination of microsecond differences in stimulus arrival time at the two ears by coincidence-detecting neurons. These neurons modulate responses over their entire dynamic range to sounds differing in ITD by mere hundreds of microseconds. The well-understood function of this circuitry in birds has provided a fruitful system to investigate how inhibition contributes to neural computation at the synaptic, cellular, and systems level. Our recent studies in the chicken have made significant progress in bringing together many of these findings to provide a cohesive picture of inhibitory function. PMID:21525367

  19. The influence of vision on sound localization abilities in both the horizontal and vertical planes.

    PubMed

    Tabry, Vanessa; Zatorre, Robert J; Voss, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Numerous recent reports have suggested that individuals deprived of vision are able to develop heightened auditory spatial abilities. However, most such studies have compared the blind to blindfolded sighted individuals, a procedure that might introduce a strong performance bias. Indeed, while blind individuals have had their whole lives to adapt to this condition, sighted individuals might be put at a severe disadvantage when having to localize sounds without visual input. To address this unknown, we compared the sound localization ability of eight sighted individuals with and without a blindfold in a hemi-anechoic chamber. Sound stimuli were broadband noise delivered via two speaker arrays: a horizontal array with 25 loudspeakers (ranging from -90° to +90°; 7.5°) and a vertical array with 16 loudspeakers (ranging from -45° to +67.5°). A factorial design was used, where we compared two vision conditions (blindfold vs. non-blindfold), two sound planes (horizontal vs. vertical) and two pointing methods (hand vs. head). Results show that all three factors significantly interact with one another with regards to the average absolute deviation error. Although blindfolding significantly affected all conditions, it did more so for head-pointing in the horizontal plane. Moreover, blindfolding was found to increase the tendency to undershoot more eccentric spatial positions for head-pointing, but not hand-pointing. Overall, these findings suggest that while proprioceptive cues appear to be sufficient for accurate hand pointing in the absence of visual feedback, head pointing relies more heavily on visual cues in order to provide a precise response. It also strongly argues against the use of head pointing methodologies with blindfolded sighted individuals, particularly in the horizontal plane, as it likely introduces a bias when comparing them to blind individuals. PMID:24376430

  20. The influence of vision on sound localization abilities in both the horizontal and vertical planes

    PubMed Central

    Tabry, Vanessa; Zatorre, Robert J.; Voss, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Numerous recent reports have suggested that individuals deprived of vision are able to develop heightened auditory spatial abilities. However, most such studies have compared the blind to blindfolded sighted individuals, a procedure that might introduce a strong performance bias. Indeed, while blind individuals have had their whole lives to adapt to this condition, sighted individuals might be put at a severe disadvantage when having to localize sounds without visual input. To address this unknown, we compared the sound localization ability of eight sighted individuals with and without a blindfold in a hemi-anechoic chamber. Sound stimuli were broadband noise delivered via two speaker arrays: a horizontal array with 25 loudspeakers (ranging from −90° to +90°; 7.5°) and a vertical array with 16 loudspeakers (ranging from −45° to +67.5°). A factorial design was used, where we compared two vision conditions (blindfold vs. non-blindfold), two sound planes (horizontal vs. vertical) and two pointing methods (hand vs. head). Results show that all three factors significantly interact with one another with regards to the average absolute deviation error. Although blindfolding significantly affected all conditions, it did more so for head-pointing in the horizontal plane. Moreover, blindfolding was found to increase the tendency to undershoot more eccentric spatial positions for head-pointing, but not hand-pointing. Overall, these findings suggest that while proprioceptive cues appear to be sufficient for accurate hand pointing in the absence of visual feedback, head pointing relies more heavily on visual cues in order to provide a precise response. It also strongly argues against the use of head pointing methodologies with blindfolded sighted individuals, particularly in the horizontal plane, as it likely introduces a bias when comparing them to blind individuals. PMID:24376430

  1. Excitation by Axon Terminal GABA Spillover in a Sound Localization Circuit.

    PubMed

    Weisz, Catherine J C; Rubio, Maria E; Givens, Richard S; Kandler, Karl

    2016-01-20

    Synapses from neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) onto neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) in the auditory brainstem are glycinergic in maturity, but also GABAergic and glutamatergic in development. The role for this neurotransmitter cotransmission is poorly understood. Here we use electrophysiological recordings in brainstem slices from P3-P21 mice to demonstrate that GABA release evoked from MNTB axons can spill over to neighboring MNTB axons and cause excitation by activating GABAAR. This spillover excitation generates patterns of staggered neurotransmitter release from different MNTB axons resulting in characteristic "doublet" postsynaptic currents in LSO neurons. Postembedding immunogold labeling and electron microscopy provide evidence that GABAARs are localized at MNTB axon terminals. Photolytic uncaging of p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) GABA demonstrates backpropagation of GABAAR-mediated depolarizations from MNTB axon terminals to the soma, some hundreds of microns away. These somatic depolarizations enhanced somatic excitability by increasing the probability of action potential generation. GABA spillover excitation between MNTB axon terminals may entrain neighboring MNTB neurons, which may play a role in the developmental refinement of the MNTB-LSO pathway. Axonal spillover excitation persisted beyond the second postnatal week, suggesting that this mechanism may play a role in sound localization, by providing new avenues of communication between MNTB neurons via their distal axonal projections. Significance statement: In this study, a new mechanism of neuronal communication between auditory synapses in the mammalian sound localization pathway is described. Evidence is provided that the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can spill over between axon terminals to cause excitation of nearby synapses to further stimulate neurotransmitter release. Excitatory GABA spillover between inhibitory axon terminals may have important implications

  2. Excitation by Axon Terminal GABA Spillover in a Sound Localization Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, Catherine J.C.; Rubio, Maria E.; Givens, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Synapses from neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) onto neurons of the lateral superior olive (LSO) in the auditory brainstem are glycinergic in maturity, but also GABAergic and glutamatergic in development. The role for this neurotransmitter cotransmission is poorly understood. Here we use electrophysiological recordings in brainstem slices from P3-P21 mice to demonstrate that GABA release evoked from MNTB axons can spill over to neighboring MNTB axons and cause excitation by activating GABAAR. This spillover excitation generates patterns of staggered neurotransmitter release from different MNTB axons resulting in characteristic “doublet” postsynaptic currents in LSO neurons. Postembedding immunogold labeling and electron microscopy provide evidence that GABAARs are localized at MNTB axon terminals. Photolytic uncaging of p-hydroxyphenacyl (pHP) GABA demonstrates backpropagation of GABAAR-mediated depolarizations from MNTB axon terminals to the soma, some hundreds of microns away. These somatic depolarizations enhanced somatic excitability by increasing the probability of action potential generation. GABA spillover excitation between MNTB axon terminals may entrain neighboring MNTB neurons, which may play a role in the developmental refinement of the MNTB-LSO pathway. Axonal spillover excitation persisted beyond the second postnatal week, suggesting that this mechanism may play a role in sound localization, by providing new avenues of communication between MNTB neurons via their distal axonal projections. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, a new mechanism of neuronal communication between auditory synapses in the mammalian sound localization pathway is described. Evidence is provided that the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can spill over between axon terminals to cause excitation of nearby synapses to further stimulate neurotransmitter release. Excitatory GABA spillover between inhibitory axon terminals may have important

  3. A Pulse-type Hardware Level Difference Detection Model Based on Sound Source Localization Mechanism in Barn Owl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Tsubasa; Sekine, Yoshifumi

    Auditory information processing is very important in the darkness where vision information is extremely limited. Barn owls have excellent hearing information processing function. Barn owls can detect a sound source in the high accuracy of less than two degrees in both of the vertical and horizontal directions. When they perform the sound source localization, the barn owls use the interaural time difference for localization in the horizontal plane, and the interaural level difference for localization in the vertical plane. We are constructing the two-dimensional sound source localization model using pulse-type hardware neuron models based on sound source localization mechanism of barn owl for the purpose of the engineering application. In this paper, we propose a pulse-type hardware model for level difference detection based on sound source localization mechanism of barn owl. Firstly, we discuss the response characteristics of the mathematical model for level difference detection. Next we discuss the response characteristics of the hardware mode. As a result, we show clearly that this proposal model can be used as a sound source localization model of vertical direction.

  4. Front-back confusion resolution in three-dimensional sound localization using databases built with a dummy head.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, Alexander; Cho, Sang Jin; Chong, Ui-Pil

    2007-07-01

    Sound localization plays an important role in everyday life. It helps us to separate sounds coming from different sources and thus to acquire acoustic information. This paper describes an algorithm for localizing the position of a sound source, as recorded by dummy head microphones. The recorded signals are considered to be basic, random signals within an imaginary round room. The goal of this research is to localize random signals produced from different positions using information about basic signals. The method used is based on the identification of similarities between basic and random signals. It includes an interaural time difference comparison at the beginning, and continues with further analysis of the differences in signal spectrums. One of the main issues arising in sound localization is the problem of front-back confusion, and this paper shows how it was resolved by the use of reference signals. PMID:17614506

  5. A Sr-Nd-Hf isotope characterization of dust source areas in Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakowski, Molly A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Delmonte, Barbara; Baroni, Carlo; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Sims, Kenneth W. W.

    2016-06-01

    Determining the geographical provenance of dust provides crucial insight into the global dust cycle. For the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS), the importance of Southern hemisphere potential dust sources has been thoroughly investigated using radiogenic isotopes, whereas proximal dust source areas located on the periphery of the ice sheet remain poorly documented from a geochemical standpoint. In this work, we expand the existing isotopic (Srsbnd Nd) catalogue of dust and sand-sized sediments from Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector, and incorporate Hf isotopic data to place additional constraints on dust source identification. The isotopic field for materials considered in this study is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.703 to 0.783, εNd between -12.01 and 6.36, and εHf from -16.77 to 6.89. As reported in previous works, the data reveal close relationships between Antarctic sediments and distinct parent lithologies; in addition, our findings emphasize the background presence of very fine dusts originating from dominant global sources and regional volcanic activity as barriers to direct source-to-sink comparison of isotopic signatures. Thus, geochemical characterizations of dust sources to the Antarctic ice sheet involving multiple size fractions, including coarser-grained particles more susceptible to short-range transport, can help us to rule out global sources of dust when examining local sediment cores and ice cores.

  6. A Sr-Nd-Hf isotope characterization of dust source areas in Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakowski, Molly A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Delmonte, Barbara; Baroni, Carlo; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Sims, Kenneth W. W.

    2016-06-01

    Determining the geographical provenance of dust provides crucial insight into the global dust cycle. For the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS), the importance of Southern hemisphere potential dust sources has been thoroughly investigated using radiogenic isotopes, whereas proximal dust source areas located on the periphery of the ice sheet remain poorly documented from a geochemical standpoint. In this work, we expand the existing isotopic (Srsbnd Nd) catalogue of dust and sand-sized sediments from Victoria Land and the McMurdo Sound sector, and incorporate Hf isotopic data to place additional constraints on dust source identification. The isotopic field for materials considered in this study is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr ratios ranging from 0.703 to 0.783, εNd between -12.01 and 6.36, and εHf from -16.77 to 6.89. As reported in previous works, the data reveal close relationships between Antarctic sediments and distinct parent lithologies; in addition, our findings emphasize the background presence of very fine dusts originating from dominant global sources and regional volcanic activity as barriers to direct source-to-sink comparison of isotopic signatures. Thus, geochemical characterizations of dust sources to the Antarctic ice sheet involving multiple size fractions, including coarser-grained particles more susceptible to short-range transport, can help us to rule out global sources of dust when examining local sediment cores and ice cores.

  7. Hovercraft experience in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Harvey C.

    The Model 1500 TD air-cushion vehicle (ACV) has been modified for the extreme conditions encountered in Antarctic operations; these operations began in the 1988-1989 austral summer. Performance evaluations covering 300 hours of engine operations have been obtained which demonstrate the basic soundness of this ACV's design and construction, and its applicability to Antarctic operations, where it was able to reduce travel time and fuel consumption in excess of 40 percent. In addition, passenger comfort was increased manyfold over wheeled and tracked vehicles for comparable missions. The ACV is judged capable of solving many of the transportation problems experienced in Antarctica.

  8. Integrated provenance-detrital thermochronology studies in ANDRILL AND-2A drill core: first evidence of an Oligocene exhumation episode (McMurdo Sound, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zattin, M.; Talarico, F. M.; Sandroni, S.

    2009-12-01

    An integrated investigation including provenance analysis of the gravel-fraction and detrital apatite fission-track (AFT) thermochronology on the AND-2A core provides new results to constrain the exhumation history of source regions and the reconstruction of sediment provenance models in the Ross Embayment in Late Cenozoic time. All the AFT ages, from 20 samples, evenly distributed in the uppermost 1000 m of the core, indicate that the entire succession originated from a source that exhumed in the Oligocene/Late Eocene time. In fact, most of the grains in nearly all the samples can be grouped into a youngest grain-age component (P1) in the range between 21.7 Ma and 43.4 Ma. However, most of the samples show more than one population, documenting the presence of multiple source areas in some periods of the basin history. On the other hand, the presence in some of the samples of a unique peak suggests a limited drainage system, as indicated by the petrographic data. The AFT data indicate the presence of active tectonics at the end of the Oligocene, therefore suggesting a source of sediments located along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) south of the Dry Valleys Block, where bedrock AFT ages indicate an older (Eocene) exhumation phase. Hence, the idea of a structural segmentation of the TAM during the Cenozoic (Wilson, Glob. Plan. Change, 1999) is well supported by these data. Provenance analysis of the gravel fraction highlights significant down-core modal and compositional variations and the occurrence of two main basement clast assemblages, diagnostic of specific source regions and occurring in distinct core sections: a) including marbles, garnet micaschists and diopside schists, suggesting oscillation of "local" glaciers in the on-shore area close to the AND-2A drill site, and b) low-grade metasediments and alkaline granites, indicating oscillations of a most extensive ice sheet/shelf with a clear provenance from the Skelton-Mulock glacier area. These data agree

  9. Detection of the Third Heart Sound Based on Nonlinear Signal Decomposition and Time-Frequency Localization.

    PubMed

    Barma, Shovan; Chen, Bo-Wei; Ji, Wen; Rho, Seungmin; Chou, Chih-Hung; Wang, Jhing-Fa

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a precise way to detect the third ( S3 ) heart sound, which is recognized as an important indication of heart failure, based on nonlinear single decomposition and time-frequency localization. The detection of the S3 is obscured due to its significantly low energy and frequency. Even more, the detected S3 may be misunderstood as an abnormal second heart sound with a fixed split, which was not addressed in the literature. To detect such S3, the Hilbert vibration decomposition method is applied to decompose the heart sound into a certain number of subcomponents while intactly preserving the phase information. Thus, the time information of all of the decomposed components are unchanged, which further expedites the identification and localization of any module/section of a signal properly. Next, the proposed localization step is applied to the decomposed subcomponents by using smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution followed by the reassignment method. Finally, based on the positional information, the S3 is distinguished and confirmed by measuring time delays between the S2 and S3. In total, 82 sets of cardiac cycles collected from different databases including Texas Heart Institute database are examined for evaluation of the proposed method. The result analysis shows that the proposed method can detect the S3 correctly, even when the normalized temporal energy of S3 is larger than 0.16, and the frequency of those is larger than 34 Hz. In a performance analysis, the proposed method demonstrates that the accuracy rate of S3 detection is as high as 93.9%, which is significantly higher compared with the other methods. Such findings prove the robustness of the proposed idea for detecting substantially low-energized S3 . PMID:26584485

  10. Encoding of natural sounds by variance of the cortical local field potential.

    PubMed

    Ding, Nai; Simon, Jonathan Z; Shamma, Shihab A; David, Stephen V

    2016-06-01

    Neural encoding of sensory stimuli is typically studied by averaging neural signals across repetitions of the same stimulus. However, recent work has suggested that the variance of neural activity across repeated trials can also depend on sensory inputs. Here we characterize how intertrial variance of the local field potential (LFP) in primary auditory cortex of awake ferrets is affected by continuous natural sound stimuli. We find that natural sounds often suppress the intertrial variance of low-frequency LFP (<16 Hz). However, the amount of the variance reduction is not significantly correlated with the amplitude of the mean response at the same recording site. Moreover, the variance changes occur with longer latency than the mean response. Although the dynamics of the mean response and intertrial variance differ, spectro-temporal receptive field analysis reveals that changes in LFP variance have frequency tuning similar to multiunit activity at the same recording site, suggesting a local origin for changes in LFP variance. In summary, the spectral tuning of LFP intertrial variance and the absence of a correlation with the amplitude of the mean evoked LFP suggest substantial heterogeneity in the interaction between spontaneous and stimulus-driven activity across local neural populations in auditory cortex. PMID:26912594

  11. Sound Source Localization for HRI Using FOC-Based Time Difference Feature and Spatial Grid Matching.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Hong

    2013-08-01

    In human-robot interaction (HRI), speech sound source localization (SSL) is a convenient and efficient way to obtain the relative position between a speaker and a robot. However, implementing a SSL system based on TDOA method encounters many problems, such as noise of real environments, the solution of nonlinear equations, switch between far field and near field. In this paper, fourth-order cumulant spectrum is derived, based on which a time delay estimation (TDE) algorithm that is available for speech signal and immune to spatially correlated Gaussian noise is proposed. Furthermore, time difference feature of sound source and its spatial distribution are analyzed, and a spatial grid matching (SGM) algorithm is proposed for localization step, which handles some problems that geometric positioning method faces effectively. Valid feature detection algorithm and a decision tree method are also suggested to improve localization performance and reduce computational complexity. Experiments are carried out in real environments on a mobile robot platform, in which thousands of sets of speech data with noise collected by four microphones are tested in 3D space. The effectiveness of our TDE method and SGM algorithm is verified. PMID:26502430

  12. Sound localization with communications headsets: comparison of passive and active systems.

    PubMed

    Abel, Sharon M; Tsang, Suzanne; Boyne, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that conventional hearing protectors interfere with sound localization. This research examines possible benefits from advanced communications devices. Horizontal plane sound localization was compared in normal-hearing males with the ears unoccluded and fitted with Peltor H10A passive attenuation earmuffs, Racal Slimgard II communications muffs in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through-circuitry (TTC) modes and Nacre QUIETPRO TM communications earplugs in off (passive attenuation) and push-to-talk (PTT) modes. Localization was assessed using an array of eight loudspeakers, two in each spatial quadrant. The stimulus was 75 dB SPL, 300-ms broadband noise. One block of 120 forced-choice loudspeaker identification trials was presented in each condition. Subjects responded using a laptop response box with a set of eight microswitches in the same configuration as the speaker array. A repeated measures ANOVA was applied to the dataset. The results reveal that the overall percent correct response was highest in the unoccluded condition (94%). A significant reduction of 24% was observed for the communications devices in TTC and PTT modes and a reduction of 49% for the passive muff and plug and muff with ANR. Disruption in performance was due to an increase in front-back reversal errors for mirror image spatial positions. The results support the conclusion that communications devices with advanced technologies are less detrimental to directional hearing than conventional, passive, limited amplification and ANR devices. PMID:18087116

  13. Efficient Approximation of Head-Related Transfer Functions in Subbands for Accurate Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Marelli, Damián; Baumgartner, Robert; Majdak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) describe the acoustic filtering of incoming sounds by the human morphology and are essential for listeners to localize sound sources in virtual auditory displays. Since rendering complex virtual scenes is computationally demanding, we propose four algorithms for efficiently representing HRTFs in subbands, i.e., as an analysis filterbank (FB) followed by a transfer matrix and a synthesis FB. All four algorithms use sparse approximation procedures to minimize the computational complexity while maintaining perceptually relevant HRTF properties. The first two algorithms separately optimize the complexity of the transfer matrix associated to each HRTF for fixed FBs. The other two algorithms jointly optimize the FBs and transfer matrices for complete HRTF sets by two variants. The first variant aims at minimizing the complexity of the transfer matrices, while the second one does it for the FBs. Numerical experiments investigate the latency-complexity trade-off and show that the proposed methods offer significant computational savings when compared with other available approaches. Psychoacoustic localization experiments were modeled and conducted to find a reasonable approximation tolerance so that no significant localization performance degradation was introduced by the subband representation. PMID:26681930

  14. Dynamic binaural sound localization based on variations of interaural time delays and system rotations.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Claude; Rogers, Chris; Massen, Francis

    2015-08-01

    This work develops the mathematical model for a steerable binaural system that determines the instantaneous direction of a sound source in space. The model combines system angular speed and interaural time delays (ITDs) in a differential equation, which allows monitoring the change of source position in the binaural reference frame and therefore resolves the confusion about azimuth and elevation. The work includes the analysis of error propagation and presents results from a real-time application that was performed on a digital signal processing device. Theory and experiments demonstrate that the azimuthal angle to the sound source is accurately yielded in the case of horizontal rotations, whereas the elevation angle is estimated with large uncertainty. This paper also proves the equivalence of the ITD derivative and the Doppler shift appearing between the binaurally captured audio signals. The equation of this Doppler shift is applicable for any kind of motion. It shows that weak binaural pitch differences may represent an additional cue in localization of sound. Finally, the paper develops practical applications from this relationship, such as the synthesizing of binaural images of pure and complex tones emitted by a moving source, and the generation of multiple frequency images for binaural beat experiments. PMID:26328682

  15. A Robust Sound Source Localization Approach for Microphone Array with Model Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hua; Shao, Huai-Zong; Peng, Qi-Cong

    In this paper, a robust sound source localization approach is proposed. The approach retains good performance even when model errors exist. Compared with previous work in this field, the contributions of this paper are as follows. First, an improved broad-band and near-field array model is proposed. It takes array gain, phase perturbations into account and is based on the actual positions of the elements. It can be used in arbitrary planar geometry arrays. Second, a subspace model errors estimation algorithm and a Weighted 2-Dimension Multiple Signal Classification (W2D-MUSIC) algorithm are proposed. The subspace model errors estimation algorithm estimates unknown parameters of the array model, i. e., gain, phase perturbations, and positions of the elements, with high accuracy. The performance of this algorithm is improved with the increasing of SNR or number of snapshots. The W2D-MUSIC algorithm based on the improved array model is implemented to locate sound sources. These two algorithms compose the robust sound source approach. The more accurate steering vectors can be provided for further processing such as adaptive beamforming algorithm. Numerical examples confirm effectiveness of this proposed approach.

  16. How Internally Coupled Ears Generate Temporal and Amplitude Cues for Sound Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedurmudi, A. P.; Goulet, J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Young, B. A.; Williams, R.; van Hemmen, J. L.

    2016-01-01

    In internally coupled ears, displacement of one eardrum creates pressure waves that propagate through air-filled passages in the skull and cause displacement of the opposing eardrum, and conversely. By modeling the membrane, passages, and propagating pressure waves, we show that internally coupled ears generate unique amplitude and temporal cues for sound localization. The magnitudes of both these cues are directionally dependent. The tympanic fundamental frequency segregates a low-frequency regime with constant time-difference magnification from a high-frequency domain with considerable amplitude magnification.

  17. How Internally Coupled Ears Generate Temporal and Amplitude Cues for Sound Localization.

    PubMed

    Vedurmudi, A P; Goulet, J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Young, B A; Williams, R; van Hemmen, J L

    2016-01-15

    In internally coupled ears, displacement of one eardrum creates pressure waves that propagate through air-filled passages in the skull and cause displacement of the opposing eardrum, and conversely. By modeling the membrane, passages, and propagating pressure waves, we show that internally coupled ears generate unique amplitude and temporal cues for sound localization. The magnitudes of both these cues are directionally dependent. The tympanic fundamental frequency segregates a low-frequency regime with constant time-difference magnification from a high-frequency domain with considerable amplitude magnification. PMID:26824568

  18. Sound source localization and speech understanding in complex listening environments by single-sided deaf listeners after cochlear implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zeitler, Daniel M.; Dorman, Michael F.; Natale, Sarah J.; Loiselle, Louise; Yost, William A.; Gifford, Rene H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess improvements in sound source localization and speech understanding in complex listening environments following unilateral cochlear implantation for single-sided deafness (SSD). Study Design Non-randomized, open, prospective case series Setting Tertiary referral center Patients Nine subjects with a unilateral cochlear implant (CI) for SSD (SSD-CI) were tested. Reference groups for the task of sound source localization included young (n=45) and older (n=12) normal hearing (NH) subjects and 27 bilateral CI (BCI) subjects. Intervention Unilateral cochlear implantation Main outcome measures Sound source localization was tested with 13 loudspeakers in a 180 arc in front of the subject. Speech understanding was tested with the subject seated in an 8-loudspeaker sound system arrayed in a 360-degree pattern. Directionally appropriate noise, originally recorded in a restaurant, was played from each loudspeaker. Speech understanding in noise was tested using the Azbio sentence test and sound source localization quantified using root mean square error. Results All CI subjects showed poorer-than-normal sound source localization. SSD-CI subjects showed a bimodal distribution of scores - six subjects had scores near the mean of those obtained by BCI subjects, while three had scores just outside the 95th percentile of NH listeners. Speech understanding improved significantly in the restaurant environment when the signal was presented to the side of the CI. Conclusions Cochlear implantation for SSD can offer improved speech understanding in complex listening environments and improved sound source localization in both children and adults. On tasks of sound source localization, SSD-CI patients typically perform as well as BCI patients and, in some cases, achieve scores at the upper boundary of normal performance. PMID:26375967

  19. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    PubMed

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils. PMID:24141311

  20. The Relative Contribution of Interaural Time and Magnitude Cues to Dynamic Sound Localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data from a study examining the relative contribution of interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) to the localization of virtual sound sources both with and without head motion. The listeners' task was to estimate the apparent direction and distance of virtual sources (broadband noise) presented over headphones. Stimuli were synthesized from minimum phase representations of nonindividualized directional transfer functions; binaural magnitude spectra were derived from the minimum phase estimates and ITDs were represented as a pure delay. During dynamic conditions, listeners were encouraged to move their heads; the position of the listener's head was tracked and the stimuli were synthesized in real time using a Convolvotron to simulate a stationary external sound source. ILDs and ITDs were either correctly or incorrectly correlated with head motion: (1) both ILDs and ITDs correctly correlated, (2) ILDs correct, ITD fixed at 0 deg azimuth and 0 deg elevation, (3) ITDs correct, ILDs fixed at 0 deg, 0 deg. Similar conditions were run for static conditions except that none of the cues changed with head motion. The data indicated that, compared to static conditions, head movements helped listeners to resolve confusions primarily when ILDs were correctly correlated, although a smaller effect was also seen for correct ITDs. Together with the results for static conditions, the data suggest that localization tends to be dominated by the cue that is most reliable or consistent, when reliability is defined by consistency over time as well as across frequency bands.

  1. ECC (Electrochemical Concentration Cell) ozonesonde observations at Mirny, Antarctica, during 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Lathrop, J. A.; Arbuzova, V. N.; Khattatov, V. U.; Nureyev, P. G.; Rudakov, V. V.; Zamyshlayev, I. V.

    1989-01-01

    Atmospheric ozone vertical distributions, air temperatures, and wind speed and direction data are presented for 40 balloon electrochemical concentration cell ozone soundings made at Mirny, Antarctica, in 1988.

  2. The role of envelope shape in the localization of multiple sound sources and echoes in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Caitlin S; Nelson, Brian S; Takahashi, Terry T

    2013-02-01

    Echoes and sounds of independent origin often obscure sounds of interest, but echoes can go undetected under natural listening conditions, a perception called the precedence effect. How does the auditory system distinguish between echoes and independent sources? To investigate, we presented two broadband noises to barn owls (Tyto alba) while varying the similarity of the sounds' envelopes. The carriers of the noises were identical except for a 2- or 3-ms delay. Their onsets and offsets were also synchronized. In owls, sound localization is guided by neural activity on a topographic map of auditory space. When there are two sources concomitantly emitting sounds with overlapping amplitude spectra, space map neurons discharge when the stimulus in their receptive field is louder than the one outside it and when the averaged amplitudes of both sounds are rising. A model incorporating these features calculated the strengths of the two sources' representations on the map (B. S. Nelson and T. T. Takahashi; Neuron 67: 643-655, 2010). The target localized by the owls could be predicted from the model's output. The model also explained why the echo is not localized at short delays: when envelopes are similar, peaks in the leading sound mask corresponding peaks in the echo, weakening the echo's space map representation. When the envelopes are dissimilar, there are few or no corresponding peaks, and the owl localizes whichever source is predicted by the model to be less masked. Thus the precedence effect in the owl is a by-product of a mechanism for representing multiple sound sources on its map. PMID:23175801

  3. The role of envelope shape in the localization of multiple sound sources and echoes in the barn owl

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Caitlin S.; Takahashi, Terry T.

    2013-01-01

    Echoes and sounds of independent origin often obscure sounds of interest, but echoes can go undetected under natural listening conditions, a perception called the precedence effect. How does the auditory system distinguish between echoes and independent sources? To investigate, we presented two broadband noises to barn owls (Tyto alba) while varying the similarity of the sounds' envelopes. The carriers of the noises were identical except for a 2- or 3-ms delay. Their onsets and offsets were also synchronized. In owls, sound localization is guided by neural activity on a topographic map of auditory space. When there are two sources concomitantly emitting sounds with overlapping amplitude spectra, space map neurons discharge when the stimulus in their receptive field is louder than the one outside it and when the averaged amplitudes of both sounds are rising. A model incorporating these features calculated the strengths of the two sources' representations on the map (B. S. Nelson and T. T. Takahashi; Neuron 67: 643–655, 2010). The target localized by the owls could be predicted from the model's output. The model also explained why the echo is not localized at short delays: when envelopes are similar, peaks in the leading sound mask corresponding peaks in the echo, weakening the echo's space map representation. When the envelopes are dissimilar, there are few or no corresponding peaks, and the owl localizes whichever source is predicted by the model to be less masked. Thus the precedence effect in the owl is a by-product of a mechanism for representing multiple sound sources on its map. PMID:23175801

  4. Adjustment of interaural time difference in head related transfer functions based on listeners' anthropometry and its effect on sound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yôiti; Watanabe, Kanji; Iwaya, Yukio; Gyoba, Jiro; Takane, Shouichi

    2005-04-01

    Because the transfer functions governing subjective sound localization (HRTFs) show strong individuality, sound localization systems based on synthesis of HRTFs require suitable HRTFs for individual listeners. However, it is impractical to obtain HRTFs for all listeners based on measurements. Improving sound localization by adjusting non-individualized HRTFs to a specific listener based on that listener's anthropometry might be a practical method. This study first developed a new method to estimate interaural time differences (ITDs) using HRTFs. Then correlations between ITDs and anthropometric parameters were analyzed using the canonical correlation method. Results indicated that parameters relating to head size, and shoulder and ear positions are significant. Consequently, it was attempted to express ITDs based on listener's anthropometric data. In this process, the change of ITDs as a function of azimuth angle was parameterized as a sum of sine functions. Then the parameters were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, in which the anthropometric parameters were used as explanatory variables. The predicted or individualized ITDs were installed in the nonindividualized HRTFs to evaluate sound localization performance. Results showed that individualization of ITDs improved horizontal sound localization.

  5. The bat head-related transfer function reveals binaural cues for sound localization in azimuth and elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytekin, Murat; Grassi, Elena; Sahota, Manjit; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2004-12-01

    Directional properties of the sound transformation at the ear of four intact echolocating bats, Eptesicus fuscus, were investigated via measurements of the head-related transfer function (HRTF). Contributions of external ear structures to directional features of the transfer functions were examined by remeasuring the HRTF in the absence of the pinna and tragus. The investigation mainly focused on the interactions between the spatial and the spectral features in the bat HRTF. The pinna provides gain and shapes these features over a large frequency band (20-90 kHz), and the tragus contributes gain and directionality at the high frequencies (60 to 90 kHz). Analysis of the spatial and spectral characteristics of the bat HRTF reveals that both interaural level differences (ILD) and monaural spectral features are subject to changes in sound source azimuth and elevation. Consequently, localization cues for horizontal and vertical components of the sound source location interact. Availability of multiple cues about sound source azimuth and elevation should enhance information to support reliable sound localization. These findings stress the importance of the acoustic information received at the two ears for sound localization of sonar target position in both azimuth and elevation. .

  6. Global Effects of Local Sound-Speed Perturbations in the Sun: A Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasoge, S. M.; Larson, T. P.

    2008-09-01

    We study the effect of localized sound-speed perturbations on global mode frequencies by applying techniques of global helioseismology to numerical simulations of the solar acoustic wave field. Extending the method of realization-noise subtraction ( e.g., Hanasoge, Duvall, and Couvidat, Astrophys. J. 664, 1234, 2007) to global modes and exploiting the luxury of full spherical coverage, we are able to achieve very highly resolved frequency differences that are then used to study sensitivities and the signatures of the thermal asphericities. We find that i) global modes are almost twice as sensitive to sound-speed perturbations at the bottom of the convection zone in comparison to anomalies well inside the radiative interior ( r≲0.55 R ⊙), ii) the m degeneracy is lifted ever so slightly, as seen in the a coefficients, and iii) modes that propagate in the vicinity of the perturbations show small amplitude shifts. Through comparisons with error estimates obtained from Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI; Scherrer et al., Solar Phys. 162, 129, 1995) observations, we find that the frequency differences are detectable with a sufficiently long time series (70 642 days).

  7. Comparing sound localization deficits in bilateral cochlear-implant users and vocoder simulations with normal-hearing listeners.

    PubMed

    Jones, Heath; Kan, Alan; Litovsky, Ruth Y

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear-implant (BiCI) users are less accurate at localizing free-field (FF) sound sources than normal-hearing (NH) listeners. This performance gap is not well understood but is likely due to a combination of compromises in acoustic signal representation by the two independent speech processors and neural degradation of auditory pathways associated with a patient's hearing loss. To exclusively investigate the effect of CI speech encoding on horizontal-plane sound localization, the present study measured sound localization performance in NH subjects listening to vocoder processed and nonvocoded virtual acoustic space (VAS) stimuli. Various aspects of BiCI stimulation such as independently functioning devices, variable across-ear channel selection, and pulsatile stimulation were simulated using uncorrelated noise (Nu), correlated noise (N0), or Gaussian-enveloped tone (GET) carriers during vocoder processing. Additionally, FF sound localization in BiCI users was measured in the same testing environment for comparison. Distinct response patterns across azimuthal locations were evident for both listener groups and were analyzed using a multilevel regression analysis. Simulated implant speech encoding, regardless of carrier, was detrimental to NH localization and the GET vocoder best simulated BiCI FF performance in NH listeners. Overall, the detrimental effect of vocoder processing on NH performance suggests that sound localization deficits may persist even for BiCI patients who have minimal neural degradation associated with their hearing loss and indicates that CI speech encoding plays a significant role in the sound localization deficits experienced by BiCI users. PMID:25385244

  8. Comparing Sound Localization Deficits in Bilateral Cochlear-Implant Users and Vocoder Simulations With Normal-Hearing Listeners

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Alan; Litovsky, Ruth Y.

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear-implant (BiCI) users are less accurate at localizing free-field (FF) sound sources than normal-hearing (NH) listeners. This performance gap is not well understood but is likely due to a combination of compromises in acoustic signal representation by the two independent speech processors and neural degradation of auditory pathways associated with a patient’s hearing loss. To exclusively investigate the effect of CI speech encoding on horizontal-plane sound localization, the present study measured sound localization performance in NH subjects listening to vocoder processed and nonvocoded virtual acoustic space (VAS) stimuli. Various aspects of BiCI stimulation such as independently functioning devices, variable across-ear channel selection, and pulsatile stimulation were simulated using uncorrelated noise (Nu), correlated noise (N0), or Gaussian-enveloped tone (GET) carriers during vocoder processing. Additionally, FF sound localization in BiCI users was measured in the same testing environment for comparison. Distinct response patterns across azimuthal locations were evident for both listener groups and were analyzed using a multilevel regression analysis. Simulated implant speech encoding, regardless of carrier, was detrimental to NH localization and the GET vocoder best simulated BiCI FF performance in NH listeners. Overall, the detrimental effect of vocoder processing on NH performance suggests that sound localization deficits may persist even for BiCI patients who have minimal neural degradation associated with their hearing loss and indicates that CI speech encoding plays a significant role in the sound localization deficits experienced by BiCI users. PMID:25385244

  9. Low-frequency sound propagation modeling over a locally-reacting boundary using the parabolic approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J. S.; Siegman, W. L.; Jacobson, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    There is substantial interest in the analytical and numerical modeling of low-frequency, long-range atmospheric acoustic propagation. Ray-based models, because of frequency limitations, do not always give an adequate prediction of quantities such as sound pressure or intensity levels. However, the parabolic approximation method, widely used in ocean acoustics, and often more accurate than ray models for lower frequencies of interest, can be applied to acoustic propagation in the atmosphere. Modifications of an existing implicit finite-difference implementation for computing solutions to the parabolic approximation are discussed. A locally-reacting boundary is used together with a one-parameter impedance model. Intensity calculations are performed for a number of flow resistivity values in both quiescent and windy atmospheres. Variations in the value of this parameter are shown to have substantial effects on the spatial variation of the acoustic signal.

  10. Petroleum geology of western Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Antarctica's geology is mostly obscured by thick, moving ice that covers 95% of the land and continental shelf. Reconnaissance investigations of outcrops, shallow boreholes, and geophysical surveys are limited and peripheral owing to ice coverage. However, it is possible to outline substantial elements of the regional geology. Further insight is gained by comparison to analogous sedimentary provinces, especially provinces once adjoined within the framework of the Gondwana supercontinent until middle Cretaceous. The petroleum potential of Antarctica, as in the case of the other related high-standing Gondwana continental fragments, is in Early Cretaceous rifts associated with the Gondwana breakup and with the Pacific convergence in the west Antarctica back arc. The Pacific-facing western Antarctica includes two structural provinces: (1) the Cretaceous and younger interior rift system on the east side of the Weddell and Ross Sea embayment, which contain aulacogens that form the boundary with East Antarctica and (2) the back-arc and fore-arc basins adjoining the Antarctica Peninsula and extending into Marie Byrd Land and the Bellingshausen Sea which are associated with the eastward convergence of the Pacific plate. The petroleum potential of the rifts may be assessed by analogies with related rifts of Australia, India, and South Africa; assessment of the convergent basins of western Antarctica depends upon analogy with similar basins of South America, New Zealand, and Indonesia. An estimate of the petroleum potential of western Antarctica generally is comparable with oil and gas occurrences (both in overall quantity and in field sizes) in the other Gondwana continental fragments. However, in view of the thict moving ice cover, the remote locale, and severe climate, petroleum production is largely beyond technology at this time and probably is economically unfeasible.

  11. High frequency source localization in a shallow ocean sound channel using frequency difference matched field processing.

    PubMed

    Worthmann, Brian M; Song, H C; Dowling, David R

    2015-12-01

    Matched field processing (MFP) is an established technique for source localization in known multipath acoustic environments. Unfortunately, in many situations, particularly those involving high frequency signals, imperfect knowledge of the actual propagation environment prevents accurate propagation modeling and source localization via MFP fails. For beamforming applications, this actual-to-model mismatch problem was mitigated through a frequency downshift, made possible by a nonlinear array-signal-processing technique called frequency difference beamforming [Abadi, Song, and Dowling (2012). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 3018-3029]. Here, this technique is extended to conventional (Bartlett) MFP using simulations and measurements from the 2011 Kauai Acoustic Communications MURI experiment (KAM11) to produce ambiguity surfaces at frequencies well below the signal bandwidth where the detrimental effects of mismatch are reduced. Both the simulation and experimental results suggest that frequency difference MFP can be more robust against environmental mismatch than conventional MFP. In particular, signals of frequency 11.2 kHz-32.8 kHz were broadcast 3 km through a 106-m-deep shallow ocean sound channel to a sparse 16-element vertical receiving array. Frequency difference MFP unambiguously localized the source in several experimental data sets with average peak-to-side-lobe ratio of 0.9 dB, average absolute-value range error of 170 m, and average absolute-value depth error of 10 m. PMID:26723312

  12. Vertical-plane sound localization probed with ripple-spectrum noise.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Ewan A; Middlebrooks, John C

    2003-07-01

    Ripple-spectrum stimuli were used to investigate the scale of spectral detail used by listeners in interpreting spectral cues for vertical-plane localization. In three experiments, free-field localization judgments were obtained for 250-ms, 0.6-16-kHz noise bursts with log-ripple spectra that varied in ripple density, peak-to-trough depth, and phase. When ripple density was varied and depth was held constant at 40 dB, listeners' localization error rates increased most (relative to rates for flat-spectrum targets) for densities of 0.5-2 ripples/oct. When depth was varied and density was held constant at 1 ripple/oct, localization accuracy was degraded only for ripple depths > or = 20 dB. When phase was varied and density was held constant at 1 ripple/oct and depth at 40 dB, three of five listeners made errors at consistent locations unrelated to the ripple phase, whereas two listeners made errors at locations systematically modulated by ripple phase. Although the reported upper limit for ripple discrimination is 10 ripples/oct [Supin et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 106, 2800-2804 (1999)], present results indicate that details finer than 2 ripples/oct or coarser than 0.5 ripples/oct do not strongly influence processing of spectral cues for sound localization. The low spectral-frequency limit suggests that broad-scale spectral variation is discounted, even though components at this scale are among those contributing the most to the shapes of directional transfer functions. PMID:12880054

  13. Input-Specific Gain Modulation by Local Sensory Context Shapes Cortical and Thalamic Responses to Complex Sounds.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ross S; Ahrens, Misha B; Linden, Jennifer F; Sahani, Maneesh

    2016-07-20

    Sensory neurons are customarily characterized by one or more linearly weighted receptive fields describing sensitivity in sensory space and time. We show that in auditory cortical and thalamic neurons, the weight of each receptive field element depends on the pattern of sound falling within a local neighborhood surrounding it in time and frequency. Accounting for this change in effective receptive field with spectrotemporal context improves predictions of both cortical and thalamic responses to stationary complex sounds. Although context dependence varies among neurons and across brain areas, there are strong shared qualitative characteristics. In a spectrotemporally rich soundscape, sound elements modulate neuronal responsiveness more effectively when they coincide with sounds at other frequencies, and less effectively when they are preceded by sounds at similar frequencies. This local-context-driven lability in the representation of complex sounds-a modulation of "input-specific gain" rather than "output gain"-may be a widespread motif in sensory processing. PMID:27346532

  14. Three-dimensional sound localization from a compact non-coplanar array of microphones using tree-based learning.

    PubMed

    Weng, J; Guentchev, K Y

    2001-07-01

    One of the various human sensory capabilities is to identify the direction of perceived sounds. The goal of this work is to study sound source localization in three dimensions using some of the most important cues the human uses. In an attempt to satisfy the requirements of portability and miniaturization in robotics, this approach employs a compact sensor structure that can be placed on a mobile platform. The objective is to estimate the relative sound source position in three-dimensional space without imposing excessive restrictions on its spatio-temporal characteristics and the environment structure. Two types of features are considered, interaural time and level differences. Their relative effectiveness for localization is studied, as well as a practical way of using these complementary parameters. A two-stage procedure was used. In the training stage, sound samples are produced from points with known coordinates and then are stored. In the recognition stage, unknown sounds are processed by the trained system to estimate the 3D location of the sound source. Results from the experiments showed under +/-3 degrees in average angular error and less than +/-20% in average radial distance error. PMID:11508957

  15. 77 FR 33967 - Special Local Regulations; OPSAIL 2012 Connecticut, Niantic Bay, Long Island Sound, Thames River...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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  16. Effects of congruency on localization of audiovisual three-dimensional speech sounds Part IIa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riederer, Klaus A. J.

    2003-10-01

    Part two of the current study [J. Acoust. Soc. Am., this issue] investigated localization of virtual audiovisual speech under exactly the same conditions. Perceived directions were signified by pushing keypad-buttons. Inside-the-head localization occurred almost only for the median-plane stimuli, being insignificant of the stimulus type (7.62% congruent, 9.38% incongruent, and 6.54% auditory-only) and disregarded from further analyses. The mean of correct answers was 46.81%. Factorial within-subjects ANOVA showed no significance on acoustic stimuli (/ipi/, /iti/) or stimulus type but showed strong dependence on direction (p=0.000015) and its interactions with acoustic stimuli (p=0.015374) and stimulus type (p=0.00812). Reaction times were highly dependent on direction (p=0.000002). From the 384 frontal location answers (azimuths 0°, +/-40°) 25.52% congruent, 28.39% incongruent, and 28.65% auditory-only were perceived as backward confused, for 0° azimuth only the corresponding values were 28.13%, 28.13%, and 35.94%. Back-front confusions were 13.80%, 9.64%, and 8.85% (azimuths 180°, +/-130°), and 18.75%, 14.06%, and 14.06% (azimuth 180°). Seeing the (congruently) talking face biased the localization more to the front, especially for the median-backward sounds. Obviously, vision overcomes weaker monaural localization cues as in the ventriloquism effect [Driver, Nature (London) 381, 66-68 (1996)]. [Work supported by Graduate School of Electronics, Telecommunication and Automation.

  17. Moving Sound Source Localization Based on Sequential Subspace Estimation in Actual Room Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Daisuke; Suyama, Kenji

    This paper presents a novel method for moving sound source localization and its performance evaluation in actual room environments. The method is based on the MUSIC (MUltiple SIgnal Classification) which is one of the most high resolution localization methods. When using the MUSIC, a computation of eigenvectors of correlation matrix is required for the estimation. It needs often a high computational costs. Especially, in the situation of moving source, it becomes a crucial drawback because the estimation must be conducted at every the observation time. Moreover, since the correlation matrix varies its characteristics due to the spatial-temporal non-stationarity, the matrix have to be estimated using only a few observed samples. It makes the estimation accuracy degraded. In this paper, the PAST (Projection Approximation Subspace Tracking) is applied for sequentially estimating the eigenvectors spanning the subspace. In the PAST, the eigen-decomposition is not required, and therefore it is possible to reduce the computational costs. Several experimental results in the actual room environments are shown to present the superior performance of the proposed method.

  18. Slowly emerging glycinergic transmission enhances inhibition in the sound localization pathway of the avian auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Fischl, Matthew J.; Weimann, Sonia R.; Kearse, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Localization of low-frequency acoustic stimuli is processed in dedicated neural pathways where coincidence-detecting neurons compare the arrival time of sound stimuli at the two ears, or interaural time disparity (ITD). ITDs occur in the submillisecond range, and vertebrates have evolved specialized excitatory and inhibitory circuitry to compute these differences. Glycinergic inhibition is a computationally significant and prominent component of the mammalian ITD pathway. However, evidence for glycinergic transmission is limited in birds, where GABAergic inhibition has been thought to be the dominant or exclusive inhibitory transmitter. Indeed, previous work showed that GABA antagonists completely eliminate inhibition in avian nuclei specialized for processing temporal features of sound, nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and nucleus laminaris (NL). However, more recent work shows that glycine is coexpressed with GABA in synaptic terminals apposed to neurons in both nuclei (Coleman WL, Fischl MJ, Weimann SR, Burger RM. J Neurophysiol 105: 2405–2420, 2011; Kuo SP, Bradley LA, Trussell LO. J Neurosci 29: 9625–9634, 2009). Here we show complementary evidence of functional glycine receptor (GlyR) expression in NM and NL. Additionally, we show that glycinergic input can be evoked under particular stimulus conditions. Stimulation at high but physiologically relevant rates evokes a slowly emerging glycinergic response in NM and NL that builds over the course of the stimulus. Glycinergic response magnitude was stimulus rate dependent, representing 18% and 7% of the total inhibitory current in NM and NL, respectively, at the end of the 50-pulse, 200-Hz stimulus. Finally, we show that the glycinergic component is functionally relevant, as its elimination reduced inhibition of discharges evoked by current injection into NM neurons. PMID:24198323

  19. Four-choice sound localization abilities of two Florida manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Colbert, Debborah E; Gaspard, Joseph C; Reep, Roger; Mann, David A; Bauer, Gordon B

    2009-07-01

    The absolute sound localization abilities of two Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) were measured using a four-choice discrimination paradigm, with test locations positioned at 45 deg., 90 deg., 270 deg. and 315 deg. angles relative to subjects facing 0 deg. Three broadband signals were tested at four durations (200, 500, 1000, 3000 ms), including a stimulus that spanned a wide range of frequencies (0.2-20 kHz), one stimulus that was restricted to frequencies with wavelengths shorter than their interaural time distances (6-20 kHz) and one that was limited to those with wavelengths longer than their interaural time distances (0.2-2 kHz). Two 3000 ms tonal signals were tested, including a 4 kHz stimulus, which is the midpoint of the 2.5-5.9 kHz fundamental frequency range of manatee vocalizations and a 16 kHz stimulus, which is in the range of manatee best-hearing sensitivity. Percentage correct within the broadband conditions ranged from 79% to 93% for Subject 1 and from 51% to 93% for Subject 2. Both performed above chance with the tonal signals but had much lower accuracy than with broadband signals, with Subject 1 at 44% and 33% and Subject 2 at 49% and 32% at the 4 kHz and 16 kHz conditions, respectively. These results demonstrate that manatees are able to localize frequency bands with wavelengths that are both shorter and longer than their interaural time distances and suggest that they have the ability to localize both manatee vocalizations and recreational boat engine noises. PMID:19525437

  20. Sound localization in common vampire bats: acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Rickye S; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°-within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms. PMID:25618037

  1. Sound localization in common vampire bats: Acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Rickye S.; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°—within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms. PMID:25618037

  2. 76 FR 39292 - Special Local Regulations & Safety Zones; Marine Events in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing fourteen temporary special local regulations and safety zones for marine events and fireworks displays within the Captain of the Port (COTP) Long Island Sound Zone. This action is necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the events. Entry into, transit through, mooring or anchoring within these zones is prohibited unless authorized......

  3. 33 CFR 100.100 - Special Local Regulations; Regattas and Boat Races in the Coast Guard Sector Long Island Sound...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special Local Regulations; Regattas and Boat Races in the Coast Guard Sector Long Island Sound Captain of the Port Zone. 100.100 Section 100.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON...

  4. 76 FR 53337 - Special Local Regulation and Safety Zones; Marine Events in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing temporary special local regulations and safety zones for marine events within the Captain of the Port (COTP) Long Island Sound Zone for regattas, fireworks displays and swim events. This action is necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the events. Entry into, transit through, mooring or anchoring within this zone is prohibited......

  5. 33 CFR 100.100 - Special Local Regulations; Regattas and Boat Races in the Coast Guard Sector Long Island Sound...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special Local Regulations; Regattas and Boat Races in the Coast Guard Sector Long Island Sound Captain of the Port Zone. 100.100 Section 100.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON...

  6. 33 CFR 100.1308 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydroplane event in accordance with 33 CFR 100. The Captain of the Port will provide notice of the...; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 100.1308 Section 100.1308... SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.1308 Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races within...

  7. A Spiking Neural Network Model of the Medial Superior Olive Using Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity for Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Glackin, Brendan; Wall, Julie A.; McGinnity, Thomas M.; Maguire, Liam P.; McDaid, Liam J.

    2010-01-01

    Sound localization can be defined as the ability to identify the position of an input sound source and is considered a powerful aspect of mammalian perception. For low frequency sounds, i.e., in the range 270 Hz–1.5 KHz, the mammalian auditory pathway achieves this by extracting the Interaural Time Difference between sound signals being received by the left and right ear. This processing is performed in a region of the brain known as the Medial Superior Olive (MSO). This paper presents a Spiking Neural Network (SNN) based model of the MSO. The network model is trained using the Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity learning rule using experimentally observed Head Related Transfer Function data in an adult domestic cat. The results presented demonstrate how the proposed SNN model is able to perform sound localization with an accuracy of 91.82% when an error tolerance of ±10° is used. For angular resolutions down to 2.5°, it will be demonstrated how software based simulations of the model incur significant computation times. The paper thus also addresses preliminary implementation on a Field Programmable Gate Array based hardware platform to accelerate system performance. PMID:20802855

  8. Changes in ice cover thickness and lake level of Lake Hoare, Antarctica - Implications for local climatic change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wharton, Robert A., Jr.; Mckay, Christopher P.; Clow, Gary D.; Andersen, Dale T.; Simmons, George M., Jr.; Love, F. G.

    1992-01-01

    Results are reported from 10 years of ice-thickness measurements at perennially ice-covered Lake Hoare in southern Victoria Land, Antarctica. The ice cover of this lake had been thinning steadily at a rate exceeding 20 cm/yr during the last decade but seems to have recently stabilized at a thickness of 3.3 m. Data concerning lake level and degree-days above freezing are presented to show the relationship between peak summer temperatures and the volume of glacier-derived meltwater entering Lake Hoare each summer. From these latter data it is inferred that peak summer temperatures have been above 0 C for a progressively longer period of time each year since 1972. Possible explanations for the thinning of the lake ice are considered. The thickness of the ice cover is determined by the balance between freezing during the winter and ablation that occurs all year but maximizes in summer. It is suggested that the term most likely responsible for the change in the ice cover thickness at Lake Hoare is the extent of summer melting, consistent with the rising lake levels.

  9. Median-plane sound localization as a function of the number of spectral channels using a channel vocoder

    PubMed Central

    Goupell, Matthew J.; Majdak, Piotr; Laback, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Using a vocoder, median-plane sound localization performance was measured in eight normal-hearing listeners as a function of the number of spectral channels. The channels were contiguous and logarithmically spaced in the range from 0.3 to 16 kHz. Acutely testing vocoded stimuli showed significantly worse localization compared to noises and 100 pulse∕s click trains, both of which were tested after feedback training. However, localization for the vocoded stimuli was better than chance. A second experiment was performed using two different 12-channel spacings for the vocoded stimuli, now including feedback training. One spacing was from experiment 1. The second spacing (called the speech-localization spacing) assigned more channels to the frequency range associated with speech. There was no significant difference in localization between the two spacings. However, even with training, localizing 12-channel vocoded stimuli remained worse than localizing virtual wideband noises by 4.8° in local root-mean-square error and 5.2% in quadrant error rate. Speech understanding for the speech-localization spacing was not significantly different from that for a typical spacing used by cochlear-implant users. These experiments suggest that current cochlear implants have a sufficient number of spectral channels for some vertical-plane sound localization capabilities, albeit worse than normal-hearing listeners, without loss of speech understanding. PMID:20136221

  10. Fast and persistent adaptation to new spectral cues for sound localization suggests a many-to-one mapping mechanism.

    PubMed

    Trapeau, Régis; Aubrais, Valérie; Schönwiesner, Marc

    2016-08-01

    The adult human auditory system can adapt to changes in spectral cues for sound localization. This plasticity was demonstrated by changing the shape of the pinna with earmolds. Previous results indicate that participants regain localization accuracy after several weeks of adaptation and that the adapted state is retained for at least one week without earmolds. No aftereffect was observed after mold removal, but any aftereffect may be too short to be observed when responses are averaged over many trials. This work investigated the lack of aftereffect by analyzing single-trial responses and modifying visual, auditory, and tactile information during the localization task. Results showed that participants localized accurately immediately after mold removal, even at the first stimulus presentation. Knowledge of the stimulus spectrum, tactile information about the absence of the earmolds, and visual feedback were not necessary to localize accurately after adaptation. Part of the adaptation persisted for one month without molds. The results are consistent with the hypothesis of a many-to-one mapping of the spectral cues, in which several spectral profiles are simultaneously associated with one sound location. Additionally, participants with acoustically more informative spectral cues localized sounds more accurately, and larger acoustical disturbances by the molds reduced adaptation success. PMID:27586720

  11. Tuning Neuronal Hardware with Microsecond Precision: Sound Localization in the Barn Owl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hemmen, J. Leo

    1998-03-01

    In auditory and electrosensory neuronal systems, there seems to exist an unresolved paradox: They encode behaviorally relevant signals in the range of a few microseconds with neurons that are at least one order of magnitude slower. The barn owl's auditory system is a prominent example that may serve to provide a solution(W. Gerstner, R. Kempter, J.L. van Hemmen, and H. Wagner, Nature 383) (1996) 76--78 to the above paradox. First, neuronal output is much more accurate than the input, phprovided the presynaptic spikes arrive coherently on the average -- as they do in the adult animal. Second, this coherence in signal arrival times can be attained through unsupervised Hebbian learning (`tuning') during ontogenetic development. The learning rule governing the strength of a synapse is based on the precise timing of input as compared to output spikes. Third, the learning rule also selects the correct delays from two independent groups of input, for example, from the left and right ear and, thus, can explain the tuning to interaural time differences in the microsecond range that underlies sound localization. The relation to stochastic resonance is indicated.

  12. Impulsive sound source localization using peak and RMS estimation of the time-domain beamformer output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Dae-Hoon; Choi, Jung-Woo; Kim, Yang-Hann

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a beamforming technique for locating impulsive sound source. The conventional frequency-domain beamformer is advantageous for localizing noise sources for a certain frequency band of concern, but the existence of many frequency components in the wide-band spectrum of impulsive noise makes the beamforming image less clear. In contrast to a frequency-domain beamformer, it has been reported that a time-domain beamformer can be better suited for transient signals. Although both frequency- and time-domain beamformers produce the same result for the beamforming power, which is defined as the RMS value of its output, we can use alternative directional estimators such as the peak value to enhance the performance of a time-domain beamformer. In this study, the performance of two different directional estimators, the peak and RMS output values, are investigated and compared with the incoherent measurement noise embedded in multiple microphone signals. The impulsive noise source is modeled as a triangular pulse, and the beamwidth and side lobe level of the time-domain beamformer are formulated as functions of the pulse duration, the microphone spacing, and the number of microphones. The proposed formula is verified via experiments in an anechoic chamber using a uniformly spaced linear array, and the results show that the peak estimation of beamformer output determines the location with better spatial resolution and a lower side lobe level than RMS estimation.

  13. MEMS Biomimetic Acoustic Pressure Gradient Sensitive Structure for Sound Source Localization

    PubMed Central

    An, Peng; Yuan, Weizheng; Ren, Sen

    2009-01-01

    The parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea shows an astonishing localization ability with its tiny hearing organ. A novel MEMS biomimetic acoustic pressure gradient sensitive structure was designed and fabricated by mimicking the mechanically coupled tympana of the fly. Firstly, the analytic representation formulas of the resultant force and resultant moment of the incoming plane wave acting on the structure were derived. After that, structure modal analysis was performed and the results show that the structure has out-of-phase and in-phase vibration modes, and the corresponding eigenfrequency is decided by the stiffness of vertical torsional beam and horizontal beam respectively. Acoustic-structural coupled analysis was performed and the results show that phase difference and amplitude difference between the responses of the two square diaphragms of the sensitive structure are effectively enlarged through mechanical coupling beam. The phase difference and amplitude difference increase with increasing incident angle and can be used to distinguish the direction of sound arrival. At last, the fabrication process and results of the device is also presented. PMID:22346718

  14. Sound localization in the presence of multiple reflections using a binaurally integrated cross-correlation/auto-correlation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Braasch, Jonas

    2016-07-01

    A precedence effect model is described that can use a binaural signal to robustly localize a sound source in the presence of multiple reflections for the frontal horizontal plane. The model also estimates a room impulse response from a running binaural signal and determines the spatial locations and delays of early reflections, without any prior or additional knowledge of the source. A dual-layer cross-correlation/auto-correlation algorithm is used to determine the interaural time difference of the direct sound source component and to estimate a binaural activity pattern. PMID:27475205

  15. Provenance Investigations Using Magnetic Susceptibility of Pebble- to Cobble-Sized Clasts in the AND-2A Core, ANDRILL Southern McMurdo Sound Project, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strada, E.; Florindo, F.; Sandroni, S.; Talarico, F.; Acton, G.; Jovane, L.; Ohneiser, C.; Sagnotti, L.; Verosub, K. L.; Wilson, G. S.; Science Team

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic susceptibilities of pebble- to cobble-sized clasts recovered in the ANDRILL SMS core (site AND-2A: 77° 45.488'S, 165° 16.605'E) (McMurdo Sound, Ross Sea) were measured on ice with a Bartington MS-2B susceptibility meter. Measurements were made on thin section billets or on clasts themselves when they were of suitable size for the instrument. The variability of the magnetic susceptibility is related both to variations in the primary magnetic mineral content of the source rocks as well as to secondary magnetic mineral formation/dissolution prior to and during the diagenetic process. Volcanic clasts, the dominant clast type thoughout the core, display the highest susceptibility values, but there is extreme heterogeneity of values within the same compositional type (i.e. felsic, intermediate, mafic). Given this, the susceptibilities of volcanic clasts in the AND-2A core are poorly suited for provenance studies. In contrast, the basement clasts (consisting of a variety of metasedimentary and intrusive rocks) can play an important role in defining ice provenance and dynamics. The textures and mineralogical compositions of intrusive and metamorphic rocks indicate the region between the Ferrar Glacier and the Mulock Glacier as the most likely provenance region. In order to better understand this result, we chose to undertake a magnetic petrology study on the most magnetic (Low-Field mass susceptibility, χ > 90*10-8 m3/kg) basement clasts sampled on ice. A comparison of the magnetic susceptibilities of our AND-2A clasts with samples collected from the outcrops of Southern Victoria Land (SVL) indicate that there is a good correlation between the highly magnetic metamorphic rocks of the region south of Ferrar Glacier and the most magnetic basement clasts in the core. In particular, the petrographic and magnetic features of metasedimentary clasts closely match both metasandstones from Baronick Glacier (Skelton Glacier area) and gneisses and schists from Hobbs Peak

  16. Numerical calculation of listener-specific head-related transfer functions and sound localization: Microphone model and mesh discretization

    PubMed Central

    Ziegelwanger, Harald; Majdak, Piotr; Kreuzer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) can be numerically calculated by applying the boundary element method on the geometry of a listener’s head and pinnae. The calculation results are defined by geometrical, numerical, and acoustical parameters like the microphone used in acoustic measurements. The scope of this study was to estimate requirements on the size and position of the microphone model and on the discretization of the boundary geometry as triangular polygon mesh for accurate sound localization. The evaluation involved the analysis of localization errors predicted by a sagittal-plane localization model, the comparison of equivalent head radii estimated by a time-of-arrival model, and the analysis of actual localization errors obtained in a sound-localization experiment. While the average edge length (AEL) of the mesh had a negligible effect on localization performance in the lateral dimension, the localization performance in sagittal planes, however, degraded for larger AELs with the geometrical error as dominant factor. A microphone position at an arbitrary position at the entrance of the ear canal, a microphone size of 1 mm radius, and a mesh with 1 mm AEL yielded a localization performance similar to or better than observed with acoustically measured HRTFs. PMID:26233020

  17. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew D.; Beemer, Brianne T.; Greene, Nathaniel T.; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G. Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  18. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew D; Beemer, Brianne T; Greene, Nathaniel T; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  19. The representation of sound localization cues in the barn owl's inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Singheiser, Martin; Gutfreund, Yoram; Wagner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    The barn owl is a well-known model system for studying auditory processing and sound localization. This article reviews the morphological and functional organization, as well as the role of the underlying microcircuits, of the barn owl's inferior colliculus (IC). We focus on the processing of frequency and interaural time (ITD) and level differences (ILD). We first summarize the morphology of the sub-nuclei belonging to the IC and their differentiation by antero- and retrograde labeling and by staining with various antibodies. We then focus on the response properties of neurons in the three major sub-nuclei of IC [core of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCc), lateral shell of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCls), and the external nucleus of the IC (ICX)]. ICCc projects to ICCls, which in turn sends its information to ICX. The responses of neurons in ICCc are sensitive to changes in ITD but not to changes in ILD. The distribution of ITD sensitivity with frequency in ICCc can only partly be explained by optimal coding. We continue with the tuning properties of ICCls neurons, the first station in the midbrain where the ITD and ILD pathways merge after they have split at the level of the cochlear nucleus. The ICCc and ICCls share similar ITD and frequency tuning. By contrast, ICCls shows sigmoidal ILD tuning which is absent in ICCc. Both ICCc and ICCls project to the forebrain, and ICCls also projects to ICX, where space-specific neurons are found. Space-specific neurons exhibit side peak suppression in ITD tuning, bell-shaped ILD tuning, and are broadly tuned to frequency. These neurons respond only to restricted positions of auditory space and form a map of two-dimensional auditory space. Finally, we briefly review major IC features, including multiplication-like computations, correlates of echo suppression, plasticity, and adaptation. PMID:22798945

  20. The representation of sound localization cues in the barn owl's inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Singheiser, Martin; Gutfreund, Yoram; Wagner, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    The barn owl is a well-known model system for studying auditory processing and sound localization. This article reviews the morphological and functional organization, as well as the role of the underlying microcircuits, of the barn owl's inferior colliculus (IC). We focus on the processing of frequency and interaural time (ITD) and level differences (ILD). We first summarize the morphology of the sub-nuclei belonging to the IC and their differentiation by antero- and retrograde labeling and by staining with various antibodies. We then focus on the response properties of neurons in the three major sub-nuclei of IC [core of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCc), lateral shell of the central nucleus of the IC (ICCls), and the external nucleus of the IC (ICX)]. ICCc projects to ICCls, which in turn sends its information to ICX. The responses of neurons in ICCc are sensitive to changes in ITD but not to changes in ILD. The distribution of ITD sensitivity with frequency in ICCc can only partly be explained by optimal coding. We continue with the tuning properties of ICCls neurons, the first station in the midbrain where the ITD and ILD pathways merge after they have split at the level of the cochlear nucleus. The ICCc and ICCls share similar ITD and frequency tuning. By contrast, ICCls shows sigmoidal ILD tuning which is absent in ICCc. Both ICCc and ICCls project to the forebrain, and ICCls also projects to ICX, where space-specific neurons are found. Space-specific neurons exhibit side peak suppression in ITD tuning, bell-shaped ILD tuning, and are broadly tuned to frequency. These neurons respond only to restricted positions of auditory space and form a map of two-dimensional auditory space. Finally, we briefly review major IC features, including multiplication-like computations, correlates of echo suppression, plasticity, and adaptation. PMID:22798945

  1. Mapping of saltwater intrusions into the McMurdo Ice Shelf, Antarctica, using electromagnetic induction sounding and ground penetrating radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, Wolfgang; Haas, Christian; Krützmann, Nikolai

    2010-05-01

    Ice Shelves, interacting with both the ocean and the atmosphere, are a sensitive indicator of a changing environment. The repeated observation of ice shelf thickness as a result of surface and bottom mass balance and ice shelf dynamics yields insight into this sensitive balance. Ice shelf thickness is normally measured by radar, or derived from freeboard height using knowledge about ice density and sea level height. Seismic methods may also be used but are usually limited to smaller areas. In general, melting at the underside of the ice shelf is expected to be highest near the grounding line, and the rise and outflow of diluted undercooled water may result in bottom freezing. In the presence of saline ice at the ice shelf bottom the use of radar for ice thickness measurements is limited, as the radar energy is effectively absorbed. This is also the case near the ice shelf edge where saltwater intrusions may be observed. In November 2009 we conducted helicopter-borne electromagnetic induction measurements in the McMurdo Sound to measure sea ice and ice shelf thickness within a validation experiment for the CryoSat-2 satellite. The instrument used was an "EM bird", which is more frequently operated in the Arctic to map sea ice thickness. The thickness of the ice shelf could be detected for values less than about 50 m, with a strong gradient perpendicular to the ice shelf front and significant undulations parallel to the ice shelf front. At the same time, we used a ground penetrating radar system in order to detect the transition depth between fresh water and saline ice. In this contribution we present the results of this combined airborne and ground based method, which could be further developed to a fully airborne or ground based technology detecting larger ice shelf thickness and ice shelf morphology in the presence of marine ice.

  2. The impact of glacier retreat from the Ross Sea on local climate: Characterization of mineral dust in the Taylor Dome ice core, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarons, S. M.; Aciego, S. M.; Gabrielli, P.; Delmonte, B.; Koornneef, J. M.; Wegner, A.; Blakowski, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent declines in ice shelf and sea ice extent experienced in polar regions highlight the importance of evaluating variations in local weather patterns in response to climate change. Airborne mineral particles (dust) transported through the atmosphere and deposited on ice sheets and glaciers in Antarctica and Greenland can provide a robust set of tools for resolving the evolution of climatic systems through time. Here we present the first high time resolution radiogenic isotope (strontium and neodymium) data for Holocene dust in a coastal East Antarctic ice core, accompanied by rare earth element composition, dust concentration, and particle size distribution during the last deglaciation. We aim to use these combined ice core data to determine dust provenance, with variations indicative of shifts in either dust production, sources, and/or transport pathways. We analyzed a series of 17 samples from the Taylor Dome (77°47‧47″S, 158°43‧26″E) ice core, 113-391 m in depth from 1.1-31.4 ka. Radiogenic isotopic and rare earth element compositions of dust during the last glacial period are in good agreement with previously measured East Antarctic ice core dust records. In contrast, the Holocene dust dataset displays a broad range in isotopic and rare earth element compositions, suggesting a shift from long-range transported dust to a more variable, local input that may be linked to the retreat of the Ross Ice Shelf during the last deglaciation. Observed changes in the dust cycle inferred from a coastal East Antarctic ice core can thus be used to infer an evolving local climate.

  3. Microstructural records of multiple retrograde local H2O supplement in the pelitic gneiss, Lützow-Holm Complex at Akarui Point, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Aya; Kitamura, Masao; Kawakami, Tetsuo

    2014-04-01

    The alkali-feldspar and biotite in the sillimanite-biotite-garnet gneiss from East Antarctica preserves characteristic microstructural evidence of multi-stage H2O supplement during the retrograde metamorphism. The first microstructural evidence is the "zoned feldspar," in which the mesoperthitic zone, the anti-perthitic zone, and lamella-free plagioclase zone coexist within a single crystal. They are occasionally found next to biotite, and are always depleted in orthoclase (Or) component toward the biotite. The formation process of this microstructure could be explained by the diffusion that oversteps the solvus. The second microstructural evidence is the serrate boundary between alkali-feldspar and biotite. The projections of biotite are selectively developed next to Or lamellae of alkali-feldspar every 3-5 μm. These two microstructures would have formed as the biotite grew by consuming potash in alkali-feldspar when H2O-bearing fluid locally passed through the grain boundaries. The former microstructure was formed at 825-900 °C before lamella formation, and the latter microstructure was formed after the lamella formation. These microstructures are the indicators of fluid pathways formed under two different temperature conditions. The common coexistence of these microstructures implies that the fluid used similar pathways during the retrograde metamorphism.

  4. Comparing Local-Time and Storm-Phase Distributions of EMIC Waves Observed by Van Allen Probes A, GOES-13, and Halley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnsted, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Lessard, M.; Singer, H. J.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Horne, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are expected to be highly efficient in depleting the ring current and in removing outer radiation belt electrons. However, the distribution of these waves in subauroral regions has not been well characterized. In this study we present 0-5 Hz magnetic field data from the Van Allen Probes A (RBSP A) spacecraft (in elliptical equatorial orbit with apogee at 5.8 RE), 0-1 Hz data from GOES-13 (in geosynchronous orbit), and 0-5 Hz data from Halley, Antarctica (L ~4.6), during the first full local-time precession of the Van Allen Probes from October 2012 through July 2014. The considerably different hourly local time vs. L distributions observed point to distinct locations and geomagnetic activity-dependent patterns of EMIC wave activity. GOES-13 wave occurrences exhibited a broad peak in the noon-to-dusk sector. He+ band events peaked near dusk, while H+ band waves peaked near noon, with a secondary peak centered near dawn. More EMIC waves occurred during storm main phase in the He+ band (5%) than in the H+ band (1%), and 80% and 89% of the He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, occurred under late storm recovery or quiet conditions. During all storm phases the local time occurrence patterns of < 0.4 Hz and 0.4-1.0 Hz events at Halley resembled those of He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, at GOES-13. The relatively few wave events at Halley with f > 1.0 Hz occurred at all local times, but with a modest, broad peak near dawn. Roughly 90% of both the 1570 Halley events < 1.0 Hz and the 142 Halley events > 1.0 Hz occurred during late storm recovery and quiet conditions. Events during compressions at GOES-13 (10%), Halley (6%), and RBSP A (6%) peaked near local noon, but with a secondary peak near midnight. Waves observed by RBSP A were distributed rather evenly in local time in all L shell ranges between 3 and 6, and the percentage occurring during late storm recovery or quiet conditions was only 65%. We interpret the difference in

  5. Geochemical record of Miocene sediment provenance and continental weathering in the McMurdo Sound, ANDRILL AND-2A, Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, S.; von Eynatten, H.; Kuhn, G.

    2010-12-01

    Geochemical whole rock analyses have been carried out on the AND-2A core during the drilling campaign 2007 with an Avaatech XRF-Core Scanner (XRF-CS). After the on-ice season, about 500 samples were prepared for conventional XRF measurements on fused glass discs to complete the semi-quantitative XRF-CS dataset. Based on this geochemical dataset we (i) indentify the dominant source rock pattern and (ii) constrain the corresponding paleoclimate conditions by the degree of chemical weathering. A multivariate statistical approach was applied to recognize the source rock composition of the AND-2A sediments. Hierarchical cluster analysis on the conventional XRF dataset provides clear evidence for four different clusters within both the diamicties (D1, D2, D3, D4) and mudstones (M1, M2, M3, M4). Element ratios of these four clusters were compared with literature data for potential source rocks from the McMurdo Sound area. For both lithologies the first cluster (D1 and M1) is strongly dominated by rocks from the Transantartic Mountains (TAM). All other clusters show a stepwise increase of the McMurdo Volcanic Group (MVG) with increasing cluster number. According to this, cluster D4 and M4 are close to the endmember composition of the MVG. These results subdivide the AND-2A core into three main provenance sections, seprated by major breaks at ~665 and ~225 meter below seafloor (mbsf). The lower section between ~1138 to 665 mbsf is dominated by high cluster numbers (D3-D4 and M3-M4) which corresponds to a predominance of volcanics from the MVG. In contrast, the middle section between ~665 to 225 mbsf is characterized by a strong TAM influence (cluster numbers D1-D2 and M1-M2). Above ~225 mbsf the provenance is again dominated by the MVG (cluster numbers D3-D4). The Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) is one of the widest used proxies to determine the influence of climate changes on bulk sediment composition. This index uses the major oxides ratios of Al2O3, Na2O, CaO and K2O

  6. Spatial hearing in Cope's gray treefrog: I. Open and closed loop experiments on sound localization in the presence and absence of noise.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Michael S; Bee, Mark A

    2014-04-01

    The ability to reliably locate sound sources is critical to anurans, which navigate acoustically complex breeding choruses when choosing mates. Yet, the factors influencing sound localization performance in frogs remain largely unexplored. We applied two complementary methodologies, open and closed loop playback trials, to identify influences on localization abilities in Cope's gray treefrog, Hyla chrysoscelis. We examined localization acuity and phonotaxis behavior of females in response to advertisement calls presented from 12 azimuthal angles, at two signal levels, in the presence and absence of noise, and at two noise levels. Orientation responses were consistent with precise localization of sound sources, rather than binary discrimination between sources on either side of the body (lateralization). Frogs were unable to discriminate between sounds arriving from forward and rearward directions, and accurate localization was limited to forward sound presentation angles. Within this region, sound presentation angle had little effect on localization acuity. The presence of noise and low signal-to-noise ratios also did not strongly impair localization ability in open loop trials, but females exhibited reduced phonotaxis performance consistent with impaired localization during closed loop trials. We discuss these results in light of previous work on spatial hearing in anurans. PMID:24504182

  7. Spatial hearing in Cope’s gray treefrog: I. Open and closed loop experiments on sound localization in the presence and absence of noise

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Michael S.; Bee, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to reliably locate sound sources is critical to anurans, which navigate acoustically complex breeding choruses when choosing mates. Yet, the factors influencing sound localization performance in frogs remain largely unexplored. We applied two complementary methodologies, open and closed loop playback trials, to identify influences on localization abilities in Cope’s gray treefrog, Hyla chrysoscelis. We examined localization acuity and phonotaxis behavior of females in response to advertisement calls presented from 12 azimuthal angles, at two signal levels, in the presence and absence of noise, and at two noise levels. Orientation responses were consistent with precise localization of sound sources, rather than binary discrimination between sources on either side of the body (lateralization). Frogs were unable to discriminate between sounds arriving from forward and rearward directions, and accurate localization was limited to forward sound presentation angles. Within this region, sound presentation angle had little effect on localization acuity. The presence of noise and low signal-to-noise ratios also did not strongly impair localization ability in open loop trials, but females exhibited reduced phonotaxis performance consistent with impaired localization during closed loop trials. We discuss these results in light of previous work on spatial hearing in anurans. PMID:24504182

  8. Dichotic sound localization properties of duration-tuned neurons in the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat

    PubMed Central

    Sayegh, Riziq; Aubie, Brandon; Faure, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies on duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) from the mammalian auditory midbrain have typically evoked spiking responses from these cells using monaural or free-field acoustic stimulation focused on the contralateral ear, with fewer studies devoted to examining the electrophysiological properties of duration tuning using binaural stimulation. Because the inferior colliculus (IC) receives convergent inputs from lower brainstem auditory nuclei that process sounds from each ear, many midbrain neurons have responses shaped by binaural interactions and are selective to binaural cues important for sound localization. In this study, we used dichotic stimulation to vary interaural level difference (ILD) and interaural time difference (ITD) acoustic cues and explore the binaural interactions and response properties of DTNs and non-DTNs from the IC of the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus). Our results reveal that both DTNs and non-DTNs can have responses selective to binaural stimulation, with a majority of IC neurons showing some type of ILD selectivity, fewer cells showing ITD selectivity, and a number of neurons showing both ILD and ITD selectivity. This study provides the first demonstration that the temporally selective responses of DTNs from the vertebrate auditory midbrain can be selective to binaural cues used for sound localization in addition to having spiking responses that are selective for stimulus frequency, amplitude, and duration. PMID:24959149

  9. Southern McMurdo Sound Project (SMS- ANDRILL): overview of Mid Miocene Climatic Optima events and correlations in western Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, D. M.; Florindo, F.; Levy, R. H.; Talarico, F.; Fielding, C.; Fischbein, S.; Sms Science Team

    2009-04-01

    The ANtarctic geological DRILLing Program (ANDRILL), an international collaboration between Antarctic research programs of Germany, Italy, New Zealand and the United States, successfully cored in late 2007 (with 98% recovery) a 1138 meter drill hole that documents an excellent history of high latitude paleoenvironmental conditions and climate/glacial variation during Miocene climatic optimum periods. In addition, fracture mapping, core orientation success, and borehole hydrofracture experiments reveal details regarding the history and current stress regime in the western Ross Sea. We present initial correlations of the AND-2A drillcore to global proxies of sea-level and deep-sea geochemical stratigraphy, guided by a robust chronostrati-graphic framework for the early and middle Miocene. Changes evident in stratigraphic sequences, physical properties (borehole and core), and geochemical logs, record fine details of glacial, climatic, tectonic and eustatic influence in the western Ross Sea help establish through correlation to existing records how local changes evident in the drillcore relate to regional and global events. These records combined with paleontological and geochemical evidence for terrestrial - marine paleotemperatures provide important data input for climate and ice-sheet model reconstructions and testing. An abundance of volcanic materials reveals evolution of the McMurdo Volcanic Group, including episodes of explosive volcanism. Substantial subsidence occurred within the last 2 Ma associated with volcanic loading from Ross Island, reversing the persistent littoral to shallow neritic depths evident through most of the cored sequence. Persistent sediment supply into western Victoria Land Basin during a steady phase of thermal subsidence produced a thick stratigraphic sequence from which we are reconstructing the details of paleoclimatic, eustatic and glacial variations on the shallow marine coast of the Transantarctic Mountains.

  10. Behavioural sensitivity to binaural spatial cues in ferrets: evidence for plasticity in the duplex theory of sound localization

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Peter; Nodal, Fernando R; King, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    For over a century, the duplex theory has guided our understanding of human sound localization in the horizontal plane. According to this theory, the auditory system uses interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) to localize low-frequency and high-frequency sounds, respectively. Whilst this theory successfully accounts for the localization of tones by humans, some species show very different behaviour. Ferrets are widely used for studying both clinical and fundamental aspects of spatial hearing, but it is not known whether the duplex theory applies to this species or, if so, to what extent the frequency range over which each binaural cue is used depends on acoustical or neurophysiological factors. To address these issues, we trained ferrets to lateralize tones presented over earphones and found that the frequency dependence of ITD and ILD sensitivity broadly paralleled that observed in humans. Compared with humans, however, the transition between ITD and ILD sensitivity was shifted toward higher frequencies. We found that the frequency dependence of ITD sensitivity in ferrets can partially be accounted for by acoustical factors, although neurophysiological mechanisms are also likely to be involved. Moreover, we show that binaural cue sensitivity can be shaped by experience, as training ferrets on a 1-kHz ILD task resulted in significant improvements in thresholds that were specific to the trained cue and frequency. Our results provide new insights into the factors limiting the use of different sound localization cues and highlight the importance of sensory experience in shaping the underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:24256073

  11. Trade-off in the sound localization abilities of early blind individuals between the horizontal and vertical planes.

    PubMed

    Voss, Patrice; Tabry, Vanessa; Zatorre, Robert J

    2015-04-15

    There is substantial evidence that sensory deprivation leads to important cross-modal brain reorganization that is paralleled by enhanced perceptual abilities. However, it remains unclear how widespread these enhancements are, and whether they are intercorrelated or arise at the expense of other perceptual abilities. One specific area where such a trade-off might arise is that of spatial hearing, where blind individuals have been shown to possess superior monaural localization abilities in the horizontal plane, but inferior localization abilities in the vertical plane. While both of these tasks likely involve the use of monaural cues due to the absence of any relevant binaural signal, there is currently no proper explanation for this discrepancy, nor has any study investigated both sets of abilities in the same sample of blind individuals. Here, we assess whether the enhancements observed in the horizontal plane are related to the deficits observed in the vertical plane by testing sound localization in both planes in groups of blind and sighted persons. Our results show that the blind individuals who displayed the highest accuracy at localizing sounds monaurally in the horizontal plane are also the ones who exhibited the greater deficit when localizing in the vertical plane. These findings appear to argue against the idea of generalized perceptual enhancements in the early blind, and instead suggest the possibility of a trade-off in the localization proficiency between the two auditory spatial planes, such that learning to use monaural cues for the horizontal plane comes at the expense of using those cues to localize in the vertical plane. PMID:25878278

  12. Joint inversion for transponder localization and sound-speed profile temporal variation in high-precision acoustic surveys.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Dosso, Stan E; Sun, Dajun

    2016-07-01

    This letter develops a Bayesian inversion for localizing underwater acoustic transponders using a surface ship which compensates for sound-speed profile (SSP) temporal variation during the survey. The method is based on dividing observed acoustic travel-time data into time segments and including depth-independent SSP variations for each segment as additional unknown parameters to approximate the SSP temporal variation. SSP variations are estimated jointly with transponder locations, rather than calculated separately as in existing two-step inversions. Simulation and sea-trial results show this localization/SSP joint inversion performs better than two-step inversion in terms of localization accuracy, agreement with measured SSP variations, and computational efficiency. PMID:27475210

  13. Sound source localization on an axial fan at different operating points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenger, Florian J.; Herold, Gert; Becker, Stefan; Sarradj, Ennes

    2016-08-01

    A generic fan with unskewed fan blades is investigated using a microphone array method. The relative motion of the fan with respect to the stationary microphone array is compensated by interpolating the microphone data to a virtual rotating array with the same rotational speed as the fan. Hence, beamforming algorithms with deconvolution, in this case CLEAN-SC, could be applied. Sound maps and integrated spectra of sub-components are evaluated for five operating points. At selected frequency bands, the presented method yields sound maps featuring a clear circular source pattern corresponding to the nine fan blades. Depending on the adjusted operating point, sound sources are located on the leading or trailing edges of the fan blades. Integrated spectra show that in most cases leading edge noise is dominant for the low-frequency part and trailing edge noise for the high-frequency part. The shift from leading to trailing edge noise is strongly dependent on the operating point and frequency range considered.

  14. The distribution of basal water between Antarctic subglacial lakes from radar sounding.

    PubMed

    Young, D A; Schroeder, D M; Blankenship, D D; Kempf, Scott D; Quartini, E

    2016-01-28

    Antarctica's subglacial lakes have two end member geophysical expressions: as hydraulically flat, radar reflective regions highlighted in ice surface topography and radar sounding profiles ('definite lakes'), and as localized sites of elevation change identified from repeat elevation observations ('active lakes') that are often found in fast flowing ice streams or enhanced ice flow tributaries. While 'definite lakes' can be identified readily by high bed reflectivity in radar sounding, the identification and characterization of less distinct subglacial lakes and water systems with radar sounding are complicated by variable radio-wave attenuation in the overlying ice. When relying on repeat elevation observations, the relatively short times series and biased distribution of elevation observations, along with the episodic nature of 'active lake' outflow and replenishment, limit our understanding of how water flows under the ice sheet. Using recently developed methods for quantifying the radar scattering behaviour of the basal interface of the ice, we can avoid the problem of attenuation, and observe the plumbing of the subglacial landscape. In West Antarctica's Ross Sea Embayment, we confirm that extensive distributed water systems underlie these ice streams. Distributed water sheets are upstream in the onset regions of fast flow, while canal systems underly downstream regions of fast flow. In East Antarctica, we use specularity analysis to recover substantial hydraulic connectivity extending beyond previous knowledge, connecting the lakes already delineated by traditional radar sounding or surface elevation transients. PMID:26667910

  15. Relating large-scale climate variability to local species abundance: ENSO forcing and shrimp in Breton Sound, Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piazza, Bryan P.; LaPeyre, Megan K.; Keim, B.D.

    2010-01-01

    Climate creates environmental constraints (filters) that affect the abundance and distribution of species. In estuaries, these constraints often result from variability in water flow properties and environmental conditions (i.e. water flow, salinity, water temperature) and can have significant effects on the abundance and distribution of commercially important nekton species. We investigated links between large-scale climate variability and juvenile brown shrimp Farfantepenaeus aztecus abundance in Breton Sound estuary, Louisiana (USA). Our goals were to (1) determine if a teleconnection exists between local juvenile brown shrimp abundance and the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and (2) relate that linkage to environmental constraints that may affect juvenile brown shrimp recruitment to, and survival in, the estuary. Our results identified a teleconnection between winter ENSO conditions and juvenile brown shrimp abundance in Breton Sound estuary the following spring. The physical connection results from the impact of ENSO on winter weather conditions in Breton Sound (air pressure, temperature, and precipitation). Juvenile brown shrimp abundance effects lagged ENSO by 3 mo: lower than average abundances of juvenile brown shrimp were caught in springs following winter El Niño events, and higher than average abundances of brown shrimp were caught in springs following La Niña winters. Salinity was the dominant ENSO-forced environmental filter for juvenile brown shrimp. Spring salinity was cumulatively forced by winter river discharge, winter wind forcing, and spring precipitation. Thus, predicting brown shrimp abundance requires incorporating climate variability into models.

  16. Effect of long-term training on sound localization performance with spectrally warped and band-limited head-related transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Majdak, Piotr; Walder, Thomas; Laback, Bernhard

    2013-09-01

    Sound localization in the sagittal planes, including the ability to distinguish front from back, relies on spectral features caused by the filtering effects of the head, pinna, and torso. It is assumed that important spatial cues are encoded in the frequency range between 4 and 16 kHz. In this study, in a double-blind design and using audio-visual training covering the full 3-D space, normal-hearing listeners were trained 2 h per day over three weeks to localize sounds which were either band limited up to 8.5 kHz or spectrally warped from the range between 2.8 and 16 kHz to the range between 2.8 and 8.5 kHz. The training effect for the warped condition exceeded that for procedural task learning, suggesting a stable auditory recalibration due to the training. After the training, performance with band-limited sounds was better than that with warped ones. The results show that training can improve sound localization in cases where spectral cues have been reduced by band-limiting or remapped by warping. This suggests that hearing-impaired listeners, who have limited access to high frequencies, might also improve their localization ability when provided with spectrally warped or band-limited sounds and adequately trained on sound localization. PMID:23967945

  17. The local--global analysis of the stimulated Brillouin scattering in the regime of nonlinear sound waves

    SciTech Connect

    Rozmus, W.; Casanova, M.; Pesme, D.; Heron, A.; Adam, J. )

    1992-03-01

    The effect of ion sound wave (ISW) nonlinearities on the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in long plasmas is investigated within the framework of the Korteweg--de Vries--Maxwell equations. The nonlinear evolution of the driven ISW results in the localization of the ion density on a scale shorter than the wavelength ({lambda}{sub {ital s}}) of the resonant ISW satisfying SBS three-wave matching conditions. Since the transverse wave amplitudes vary on a much longer scale, a local--global modeling of SBS is proposed in which this scale separation is exploited. The local part of the procedure includes a solution to the damped KdV equation with periodic boundary conditions and driven by a constant amplitude ponderomotive force. In the global part of the analysis approximate solutions for the transverse waves in long plasmas are constructed using the results from the local part. Particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to investigate the importance of kinetic effects for the local model. Numerical results obtained from the solutions to the KdV--Maxwell equations are well approximated by the local--global modeling. They are also compared with the results of a harmonic decomposition approximation.

  18. Parallel pathways mediating both sound localization and gaze control in the forebrain and midbrain of the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, E I; Knudsen, P F; Masino, T

    1993-07-01

    The hypothesis that sound localization and gaze control are mediated in parallel in the midbrain and forebrain was tested in the barn owl. The midbrain pathway for gaze control was interrupted by reversible inactivation (muscimol injection) or lesion of the optic tectum. Auditory input to the forebrain was disrupted by reversible inactivation or lesion of the primary thalamic auditory nucleus, nucleus ovoidalis (homolog of the medial geniculate nucleus). Barn owls were trained to orient their gaze toward auditory or visual stimuli presented from random locations in a darkened sound chamber. Auditory and visual test stimuli were brief so that the stimulus was over before the orienting response was completed. The accuracy and kinetics of the orienting responses were measured with a search coil attached to the head. Unilateral inactivation of the optic tectum had immediate and long-lasting effects on auditory orienting behavior. The owls failed to respond on a high percentage of trials when the auditory test stimulus was located on the side contralateral to the inactivated tectum. When they did respond, the response was usually (but not always) short of the target, and the latency of the response was abnormally long. When the auditory stimulus was located on the side ipsilateral to the inactivated tectum, responses were reliable and accurate, and the latency of responses was shorter than normal. In a tectally lesioned animal, response probability and latency to contralateral sounds returned to normal within 2 weeks, but the increase in response error (due to undershooting) persisted for at least 12 weeks. Despite abnormalities in the response, all of the owls were capable of localizing and orienting to contralateral auditory stimuli on some trials with the optic tectum inactivated or lesioned. This was not true for contralateral visual stimuli. Immediately following tectal inactivation, the owls exhibited complete neglect for visual stimuli located more than 20

  19. Enhanced Soundings for Local Coupling Studies: 2015 ARM Climate Research Facility Field Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, CR; Santanello, JA; Gentine, P

    2015-11-01

    Matching observed diurnal cycles is a fundamental yet extremely complex test for models. High temporal resolution measurements of surface turbulent heat fluxes and boundary layer properties are required to evaluate the daytime evolution of the boundary layer and its sensitivity to land-atmosphere coupling. To address this need, (12) one-day intensive observing periods (IOP) with enhanced radiosonding will be carried out at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF) during summer 2015. Each IOP will comprise a single launch to correspond with the nighttime overpass of the A-Train of satellites (~0830 UTC) and hourly launches during daytime beginning from 1130 UTC and ending at 2130 UTC. At 3-hourly intervals (i.e., 1140 UTC, 1440 UTC, 1740 UTC, and 2040 UTC) a duplicate second radiosonde will be launched 10 minutes subsequent to launch of the on-hour radiosonde for the purpose of assessing horizontal atmospheric variability. In summary, each IOP will have a 14-sounding supplement to the 6-hourly operational sounding schedule at the ARM-SGP CF. The IOP days will be decided before sunset on the preceding day, according to the judgment of the PI’s and taking into consideration daily weather forecasts and the operability of complimentary ARM-SGP CF instrumentation. An overarching goal of the project is to address how ARM could better observe land-atmosphere coupling to support the evaluation and refinement of coupled weather and climate models.

  20. Inverse problem with beamforming regularization matrix applied to sound source localization in closed wind-tunnel using microphone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padois, Thomas; Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2014-12-01

    Microphone arrays have become a standard technique to localize and quantify source in aeroacoustics. The simplest approach is the beamforming that provides noise source maps with large main lobe and strong side lobes at low frequency. Since a decade, the focus is set on deconvolution techniques such as DAMAS or Clean-SC. While the source map is clearly improved, these methods require a large computation time. In this paper, we propose a sound source localization technique based on an inverse problem with beamforming regularization matrix called Hybrid Method. With synthetic data, we show that the side lobes are removed and the main lobe is narrower. Moreover, if the sound noise source map provided by this method is used as input in the DAMAS process, the number of DAMAS iterations is highly reduced. The Hybrid Method is applied to experimental data obtained in a closed wind-tunnel. In both cases of acoustic or aeroacoustic data, the source is correctly detected. The proposed Hybrid Method is found simple to implement and the computation time is low if the number of scan points is reasonable.

  1. Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission with the DXL Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galeazzi, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Robertson, I.; Snowden, S.; Thomas, N. E.; Uprety, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket is a NASA approved mission with a scheduled first launch in December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission of the SWCX from that of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) to improve our understanding of both. To separate the SWCX contribution from the LHB. DXL will use the SWCX signature due to the helium focusing cone at 1=185 deg, b=-18 deg, DXL uses large area propostionai counters, with an area of 1.000 sq cm and grasp of about 10 sq cm sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keY bands. Thanks to the large grasp, DXL will achieve in a 5 minule flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  2. Geoethical approach to mineral activities in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalay, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    severe not only permanent, local impact on the environment, but also will have implications for other Earth's systems as a whole. Mineral prospecting and exploration in Antarctica need to be reflected and respected in any concept of environmental sustainability. Anyway, first stage of the geological surveying should be carried purely scientific and not designed to explore for and identify mineral deposits. It's obvious that although various countries claim sovereignty in certain regions of Antarctica, the continent should be continued to be politically neutral. Efforts of scientists and politicians should respect their own responsibility for the protection of the fragile Antarctic environment and of our planet in the whole taking care for future generations.

  3. ECC (electrochemical concentration cell) ozonesonde observations at South Pole, Antarctica, during 1987. Data report

    SciTech Connect

    Komhyr, W.D.; Franchois, P.R.; Kuester, S.E.; Reitelback, P.J.; Fanning, M.L.

    1988-03-01

    Atmospheric ozone vertical distributions, air temperatures, and wind speed and wind direction data are presented for 76 balloon electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesonde soundings made at South Pole, Antarctica, in 1987.

  4. Bringing Antarctica Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constible, Juanita; Williams, Lauren; Faure, Jaime; Lee, Richard E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    When one thinks of the amazing creatures of Antarctica, an insect probably does not come to mind. But this unlikely animal, and a scientific expedition to Antarctica, was the foundation for a learning event that created a community of learners spanning kindergarten through sixth grade and extended beyond the classroom. Miami University's Antarctic…

  5. Estimation of seismic wave velocity at seafloor surface and sound source localization based on transmitted wave observation with an ocean bottom seismometer offshore of Kamaishi, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Ryoichi

    2016-07-01

    An in situ method of estimating the seismic wave velocity at the seafloor surface by observing the particle motion of a wave transmitted into the sediment is presented; this method uses a sound source whose location is known. Conversely, a sound source localization method using the obtained seismic velocities and involving particle motion observation is also presented. Although this method is applicable only when the sound source exists within the critical incidence angle range, it is expected to contribute to the tracing of vocalizing baleen whales, which are unknown around Japanese waters.

  6. Deconvolution for the localization of sound sources using a circular microphone array.

    PubMed

    Tiana-Roig, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-09-01

    During the last decade, the aeroacoustic community has examined various methods based on deconvolution to improve the visualization of acoustic fields scanned with planar sparse arrays of microphones. These methods assume that the beamforming map in an observation plane can be approximated by a convolution of the distribution of the actual sources and the beamformer's point-spread function, defined as the beamformer's response to a point source. By deconvolving the resulting map, the resolution is improved, and the side-lobes effect is reduced or even eliminated compared to conventional beamforming. Even though these methods were originally designed for planar sparse arrays, in the present study, they are adapted to uniform circular arrays for mapping the sound over 360°. This geometry has the advantage that the beamforming output is practically independent of the focusing direction, meaning that the beamformer's point-spread function is shift-invariant. This makes it possible to apply computationally efficient deconvolution algorithms that consist of spectral procedures in the entire region of interest, such as the deconvolution approach for the mapping of the acoustic sources 2, the Fourier-based non-negative least squares, and the Richardson-Lucy. This investigation examines the matter with computer simulations and measurements. PMID:23967939

  7. 76 FR 30887 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events, Bogue Sound; Morehead City, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may submit a request... proposes establishing of Special Local Regulations for ``The Crystal Coast Grand Prix'' powerboat race, to... 20-21, 2011 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. East Coast Extreme Corporation will sponsor ``The Crystal...

  8. An investigation of matching symmetry in the human pinnae with possible implications for 3D ear recognition and sound localization.

    PubMed

    Claes, Peter; Reijniers, Jonas; Shriver, Mark D; Snyders, Jonatan; Suetens, Paul; Nielandt, Joachim; De Tré, Guy; Vandermeulen, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The human external ears, or pinnae, have an intriguing shape and, like most parts of the human external body, bilateral symmetry is observed between left and right. It is a well-known part of our auditory sensory system and mediates the spatial localization of incoming sounds in 3D from monaural cues due to its shape-specific filtering as well as binaural cues due to the paired bilateral locations of the left and right ears. Another less broadly appreciated aspect of the human pinna shape is its uniqueness from one individual to another, which is on the level of what is seen in fingerprints and facial features. This makes pinnae very useful in human identification, which is of great interest in biometrics and forensics. Anatomically, the type of symmetry observed is known as matching symmetry, with structures present as separate mirror copies on both sides of the body, and in this work we report the first such investigation of the human pinna in 3D. Within the framework of geometric morphometrics, we started by partitioning ear shape, represented in a spatially dense way, into patterns of symmetry and asymmetry, following a two-factor anova design. Matching symmetry was measured in all substructures of the pinna anatomy. However, substructures that 'stick out' such as the helix, tragus, and lobule also contained a fair degree of asymmetry. In contrast, substructures such as the conchae, antitragus, and antihelix expressed relatively stronger degrees of symmetric variation in relation to their levels of asymmetry. Insights gained from this study were injected into an accompanying identification setup exploiting matching symmetry where improved performance is demonstrated. Finally, possible implications of the results in the context of ear recognition as well as sound localization are discussed. PMID:25382291

  9. 77 FR 52604 - Special Local Regulations; Safety Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... of the Port Long Island Sound AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce two fireworks display safety zones in the Sector Long Island Sound... Port (COTP) Sector Long Island Sound or designated representative. DATES: The regulations in 33 CFR...

  10. Mineral resources of Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, P.D.; Williams, P.L.; Pride, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Metallic and nonmetallic mineral occurrences are abundant in Antarctica. The most significant known deposits are of iron, copper, and coal. In the Precambrian shield of East Antarctica, for example, iron is present as banded iron-formation and as magnetite in veins, pods, and schist. The largest deposits of iron are in the Prince Charles Mountains, where bodies of banded iron-formation at least as thick as 400 m extend, mostly under the ice for at least 120 km. Widely scattered morainal boulders and outcrops of iron-rich rock suggest that undiscovered iron deposits are also distributed over many other parts of East Antarctica. Gondwana reconstructions suggest that many more mineral deposits occur in Antarctica. However, ice covers nearly 98 percent of the continent, and few of the bedrock areas have even been prospected or geologically, geophysically, or geochemically mapped in detail.

  11. Antarctica: up for grabs

    SciTech Connect

    Shapley, D.

    1982-11-01

    Antarctica is viewed as a special area, requiring meticulous diplomacy to develop international agreements for exploiting its resources. Little exploration has been accomplished, but oil, gas, and marine krill resources are protected by a 14-nation treaty dating from 1961. The treaty fixed national claims on specific territories and launched scientific activities that reflect national interests. Studies of meteorology, climatology, oceanography, upper-atmospheric physics, and territorial biology have revealed Antarctica's resource potential for krill, minerals, and even ice. 4 figures. (DCK)

  12. Further Investigations of Cosmogenic Ne-21 Exposure Ages of Glacial Boulders Constrained by Local Bedrock Erosion Rates in Ong Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedberg, C. P.; Morgan, D. J.; Cox, J.; Balco, G.; Putkonen, J.; Bibby, T.

    2014-12-01

    A history of glaciation can be tracked by determining the exposure age of boulders found in glacial drifts using the concentration of the cosmogenic nuclide Ne-21. In order to calculate exposure age, the erosion rate and previous exposure must be taken into consideration. In this study, we measured cosmogenic Ne-21 concentrations in quartz from samples of bedrock and samples taken from distinct glacial drifts in Antarctica. We determined the erosion rate using the concentrations of Ne-21 in the bedrock and then used this rate to calculate the exposure ages of the samples taken from the glacial drifts. The samples were collected from the Ong Valley, Antarctica (157.5 East, 83.25 South), an ice-free valley in the Miller Range of the Central Transantarctic Mountains that contains three distinct glacial drifts. We analyzed samples from the oldest and the youngest of these drifts, from moraines from a small alpine glacier to the east of the main valley, and from the surrounding bedrock of the valley walls above the glacial limit. The average erosion rate we calculated was 23 cm/Myrs. The six samples from the oldest glacial drift have an average exposure age of 2.1 Myrs, but have a range of 4.4 Myrs. The exposure age of samples from the middle of the youngest drift on the valley floor average 90.1 kyrs, with a range of 13.4 kyrs. Samples from a lateral moraine of this youngest drift have an average exposure age of 145 kyrs, with a range of 134 kyrs. The 7 samples taken from the alpine glacier east of Ong Valley have an average age of 1.10 Myrs, but a range of 3.87 Myrs. The high variability in ages among samples from the same glacial drift arises from prior exposure and postdepositional movement of the rocks.

  13. Living and Working in Antarctica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemp, Noel

    This source book, designed for 11- to 14-year-old students, seeks to describe what life is like in Antarctica. In spite of extreme weather conditions, people go to Antarctica to work every summer. Some of them stay there during the winter as well. This book seeks to supply answers to such questions as: How do people get to Antarctica? Why do they…

  14. 33 CFR 100.1308 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... event in accordance with 33 CFR 100. The Captain of the Port will provide notice of the enforcement of...; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 100.1308 Section 100.1308... Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Location. The following areas are...

  15. 33 CFR 100.1308 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... event in accordance with 33 CFR 100. The Captain of the Port will provide notice of the enforcement of...; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 100.1308 Section 100.1308... Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Location. The following areas are...

  16. 76 FR 17339 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races Within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility in the Federal Register (75 FR 2833). On... Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule... CFR part 100 in the Federal Register (76 FR 3057). We did not receive any comments on the NPRM...

  17. 76 FR 3057 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races Within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Supplemental... designated hydroplane race areas within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound area of responsibility. When... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you...

  18. Geographic names of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Board on Geographic Names; Department of the Interior; Burrill, Meredith F.; Bertrand, Kenneth J.; Alberts, Fred G.

    1956-01-01

    The geographic nomenclature of Antarctica was long in need of an overall systematic treatment, objective in approach and based upon thorough examination of all the evidence. The results of such treatment over a period of about three years were presented in Geographical Names of Antarctica, Special Publication No. 86 of the Board on Geographical Names, in May 1947, two supplements to which were issued in 1949 and 1951. The continuing program since that publication has now covered most of the geographic naming in Antarctica. As research has filled in many of the previous gaps in knowledge, a number of names have been modified and minor amendments have been made in the policies. This revised publication brings together the greatly enlarged body of names officially standardized for use by the United States Government, together with new pertinent background information.

  19. Antarctica, why so Blue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reif, C.; Williams, Q.; Manners, U.

    2006-12-01

    Are all fast seismic anomalies at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) created alike? Much attention has been paid to the relative variations of seismic wave speeds in slow regions of the lowermost mantle, but there is a wealth of information in the fast anomalies as well. Here we systematically characterize fast regions at the CMB in terms of their shear, compressional, and bulk wave speed anomalies and Poisson's ratio using the largest long-period catalog to date of S, ScS, Sdiff, P, and Pdiff arrival times. The fastest regions at the CMB occur beneath Antarctica, Central America, and eastern Asia. The latter two have been active subduction zones for more than 200 Ma. However, Antarctica is an exception in that subduction has not occurred there in the last 100 Ma. And, during the final stages of subduction, young oceanic lithosphere may be positively buoyant compared to the mantle and not be likely to sink all the way to the CMB. Therefore, the youngest (and thus coldest) material beneath Antarctica near the CMB is around 130 Ma in age. It is puzzling why the region beneath Antarctica would have one of the fastest seismic signals since plate reconstructions indicate that for the last 200 Ma, the greatest volume of material has been subducted under the northern Pacific. However, outside of Antarctica, the strongest fast anomalies at the CMB are geographically coincident with the current pattern of subduction, not that of the distant past. It has been noted that the seismic anomalies at the CMB do not fit those predicted by past plate reconstructions, and this mismatch has been explained in terms of the presence of the thermal boundary layer. Here, we examine thermal and compositional effects that could be produced by the interaction of subducted material with a basal thermal boundary layer, and probe how strong fast anomalies can be produced in both unexpected (Antarctica) and expected regions (eastern Asia), while fast anomalies anticipated elsewhere (northern Pacific

  20. Abdominal sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... sounds by listening to the abdomen with a stethoscope ( auscultation ). Most bowel sounds are normal. However, there ... sounds can sometimes be heard even without a stethoscope. Hyperactive bowel sounds mean there is an increase ...

  1. Comparison between bilateral cochlear implants and Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural cochlear implant: speech perception, sound localization and patient self-assessment.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Damien; Lautissier, Sylvie; Bosset-Audoit, Amélie; Coriat, Géraldine; Beraha, Max; Maunoury, Antoine; Martel, Jacques; Darrouzet, Vincent; Bébéar, Jean-Pierre; Dauman, René

    2013-01-01

    An alternative to bilateral cochlear implantation is offered by the Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural cochlear implant, which allows stimulation of both cochleae within a single device. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare a group of Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural implant users (denoted BINAURAL group, n = 7) with a group of bilateral adult cochlear implant users (denoted BILATERAL group, n = 6) in terms of speech perception, sound localization, and self-assessment of health status and hearing disability. Speech perception was assessed using word recognition at 60 dB SPL in quiet and in a 'cocktail party' noise delivered through five loudspeakers in the hemi-sound field facing the patient (signal-to-noise ratio = +10 dB). The sound localization task was to determine the source of a sound stimulus among five speakers positioned between -90° and +90° from midline. Change in health status was assessed using the Glasgow Benefit Inventory and hearing disability was evaluated with the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit. Speech perception was not statistically different between the two groups, even though there was a trend in favor of the BINAURAL group (mean percent word recognition in the BINAURAL and BILATERAL groups: 70 vs. 56.7% in quiet, 55.7 vs. 43.3% in noise). There was also no significant difference with regard to performance in sound localization and self-assessment of health status and hearing disability. On the basis of the BINAURAL group's performance in hearing tasks involving the detection of interaural differences, implantation with the Neurelec Digisonic(®) SP Binaural implant may be considered to restore effective binaural hearing. Based on these first comparative results, this device seems to provide benefits similar to those of traditional bilateral cochlear implantation, with a new approach to stimulate both auditory nerves. PMID:23548561

  2. Antarctica: Discovery & Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gascoigne, Toss; Collett, Peter

    An examination of Antarctica, from the first sightings to the heroic explorations of the late 18th and early 19th centuries to modern-day research, is presented in this book. Twelve chapters are as follows: (1) The search begins; (2) Whalers and sealers: bites and nibbles; (3) The new continent: first sight; (4) Wintering: the first party; (5)…

  3. Getting Antarctica down Cold!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandmeier, Kay; Greeson, Linda

    1990-01-01

    Outlines learning activities for applying geography's five fundamental themes to studying Antarctica and points out the learning potential, for studying the economic, historical, and political geography of the continent. Groups activities for grades K-5, 6-8, and 8-12. Stresses cooperative learning in general, and includes a role play activity for…

  4. Married to Antarctica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    1991-01-01

    A novel theory about Earth's ancient history is presented. It is proposed that North America and Antarctica once lay side by side for perhaps as long as a billion years. The importance of these continental connections to geology and other disciplines is discussed. (KR)

  5. Complex Wind-Induced Variations of Surface Snow Accumulation Rates over East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, I.; Scambos, T. A.; Koenig, L.; van den Broeke, M.; Lenaerts, J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow-accumulation over Antarctica is important for mass balance estimates and climate studies based on ice core records. Using airborne radar, lidar and thresholds of surface slope, modeled surface mass balance (SMB) and wind fields, we have predicted continent-wide distribution of wind-scour zones over Antarctica. These zones are located over relatively steep ice surfaces formed by ice flow over bedrock topography. Near-surface winds accelerate over these steeper slopes and erode and sublimate the snow. This results in numerous localized regions (typically ≤ 200 km2) with reduced or negative surface accumulation. Although small zones of re-deposition occur at the base of the steeper slope areas, the redeposited mass is small relative to the ablation loss. Total losses from wind-scour and wind-glaze areas amounts to tens of gigatons annually. Near the coast, winds often blow significant amounts of surface snow from these zones into the ocean. Large uncertainties remain in SMB estimates over East Antarctica as climate models do not adequately represent the small-scale physical processes that lead to mass loss or redistribution over the wind-scour zones. In this study, we also use Operation IceBridge's snow radar data to provide evidence for a gradual ablation of ~16-18 m of firn (~200 years of accumulation) from wind-scour zones over the upper Recovery Ice Stream catchment. The maximum ablation rates observed in this region are ~ -54 kg m-2 a-1 (-54 mm water equivalent a-1). Our airborne radio echo-sounding analysis show snow redeposition downslope of the wind-scour zones is <10% of the cumulative mass loss. Our study shows that the local mass loss is dominated by sublimation to water vapor rather than wind-transport of snow.

  6. Antarctica and Its Ice Sheet: Knowledge Gained During the IGY/IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, C. R.

    2006-12-01

    At the end of World War II, the interior of Antarctica, with the exception of the mountains south of the Ross Ice Shelf, was still terra incognita. It was described simply as a nearly continuous high plateau. Even less was known about the ice thickness; the eminent glacial geologist, Richard Foster Flint, believed it "unlikely that the ice thickness exceeds 2000 feet except very locally; probably its average thickness is considerably less." Then in the late 1940's and early 1950's, seismic sounding in Greenland by the Expéditions Polaires Françaises and in Queen Maud Land by the Norwegian-British-Swedish Antarctic Expedition, 1949-52, revealed that, inland of the coastal mountains, the beds in both regions lie close to sea level. This led to a reappraisal of the Antarctic ice sheet, such that the prescient glaciologist, Robert P. Sharp, could predict, on the eve of the IGY, that "between 3000 and 4000 meters of ice will be found" in East Antarctica and that "work during IGY will establish an average thickness for Antarctic inland ice in excess of 1600 m." Seismic and gravity soundings on oversnow traverses conducted by eight countries during the IGY and the succeeding IGC showed Sharp to be basically correct, but there were major surprises, such as the vast Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains, completely hidden by the ice in central East Antarctica, and the equally vast Byrd Subglacial Basin beneath much of the West Antarctic ice sheet, so deep that roughly half the ice in the region lies below sea level. There were major discoveries on and above the surface too, such as the huge size of the Filchner/Ronne Ice Shelf, and the very existence of the Ellsworth and Pensacola Mountains, the former including the highest peak on the continent. Further, the fundamental difference between the crustal structures of East and West Antarctica became clear. A summary paper published in 1960, looking primarily at West Antarctica where the main U.S. activity lay, could conclude that

  7. DXL: A Sounding Rocket Mission for the Study of Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galeazzi, M.; Prasai, K.; Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S.; Cravens, T.; Robertson, I.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy (DXL) mission is an approved sounding rocket project with a first launch scheduled around December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission generated by solar wind charge exchange from that of the local hot bubble to improve our understanding of both. With 1,000 square centimeters proportional counters and grasp of about 10 square centimeters sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keV bands, DXL will achieve in a 5-minute flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  8. Extreme wind-ice interaction over Recovery Ice Stream, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Indrani; Scambos, Ted A.; Koenig, Lora S.; Broeke, Michiel R.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.

    2015-10-01

    Surface snow accumulation over East Antarctica is an important climate indicator but a difficult parameter to constrain. Surface mass ablation dominates over persistent wind-scour zones as near-surface katabatic winds accelerate over locally steeper ice surface topography, and sublimate and redistribute snow. Here we quantify ablation rates and downwind redeposition of snow over wind-scour zones in the upper Recovery Ice Stream catchment. Airborne radio echo-soundings show a gradual ablation of ~16-18 m of firn, corresponding to ~200 years of accumulation, over these zones and ablation rates of ~54 kg m-2 a-1 (54 mm water equivalent a-1). We conclude that mass loss is dominated by sublimation and mass is transported downwind as water vapor, because snow redeposition downslope of the wind-scour zones constitutes only a small fraction (<10%) of the cumulative mass loss.

  9. Experimental localization of an acoustic sound source in a wind-tunnel flow by using a numerical time-reversal technique.

    PubMed

    Padois, Thomas; Prax, Christian; Valeau, Vincent; Marx, David

    2012-10-01

    The possibility of using the time-reversal technique to localize acoustic sources in a wind-tunnel flow is investigated. While the technique is widespread, it has scarcely been used in aeroacoustics up to now. The proposed method consists of two steps: in a first experimental step, the acoustic pressure fluctuations are recorded over a linear array of microphones; in a second numerical step, the experimental data are time-reversed and used as input data for a numerical code solving the linearized Euler equations. The simulation achieves the back-propagation of the waves from the array to the source and takes into account the effect of the mean flow on sound propagation. The ability of the method to localize a sound source in a typical wind-tunnel flow is first demonstrated using simulated data. A generic experiment is then set up in an anechoic wind tunnel to validate the proposed method with a flow at Mach number 0.11. Monopolar sources are first considered that are either monochromatic or have a narrow or wide-band frequency content. The source position estimation is well-achieved with an error inferior to the wavelength. An application to a dipolar sound source shows that this type of source is also very satisfactorily characterized. PMID:23039435

  10. Earth - Antarctica Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This color picture of the limb of the Earth, looking north past Antarctica, is a mosaic of 11 images taken during a ten-minute period near 5:45 p.m. PST Dec. 8, 1990, by Galileo's imaging system. Red, green and violet filters were used. The picture spans about 1,600 miles across the south polar latitudes of our planet. The morning day/night terminator is toward the right. The South Pole is out of sight below the picture; the visible areas of Antarctica are those lying generally south of South America. The violet-blue envelope of Earth's atmosphere is prominent along the limb to the left. At lower left, the dark blue Amundsen Sea lies to the left of the Walgreen and Bakutis Coasts. Beyond it, Peter Island reacts with the winds to produce a striking pattern of atmospheric waves.