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Sample records for sounding rocket motor

  1. The XQC microcalorimeter sounding rocket: a stable LTD platform 30 seconds after rocket motor burnout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, F. S.; Almy, R.; Apodaca, E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Galeazzi, M.; Kelley, R.; McCammon, D.; Stahle, C. K.; Szymkowiak, A. E.; Sanders, W. T.

    2000-04-01

    The XQC microcalorimeter sounding rocket experiment is designed to provide a stable thermal environment for an LTD detector system within 30 s of the burnout of its second stage rocket motor. The detector system used for this instrument is a 36-pixel microcalorimeter array operated at 60 mK with a single-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The ADR is mounted on a space-pumped liquid helium tank with vapor cooled shields which is vibration isolated from the rocket structure. We present here some of the design and performance details of this mature LTD instrument, which has just completed its third suborbital flight.

  2. Development and demonstration of flueric sounding rocket motor ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchese, V. P.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical and experimental program is described which established a flueric rocket motor ignition system concept incorporating a pneumatic match with a simple hand pump as the only energy source. An evaluation was made of this concept to determine the margins of the operating range and capabilities of every component of the system. This evaluation included a determination of power supply requirements, ignitor geometry and alinement, ignitor/propellant interfacing and materials and the effects of ambient temperatures and pressure. It was demonstrated that an operator using a simple hand pump for 30 seconds could ignite BKNO3 at a standoff distance of 100 m (330 ft) with the only connection to the ignitor being a piece of plastic pneumatic tubing.

  3. Sounding rockets in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, G. C.; Cooper, G. W.; Peterson, N. E.

    1982-01-01

    Sounding rockets are versatile tools for scientists studying the atmospheric region which is located above balloon altitudes but below orbital satellite altitudes. Three NASA Nike-Tomahawk sounding rockets were launched from Siple Station in Antarctica in an upper atmosphere physics experiment in the austral summer of 1980-81. The 110 kg payloads were carried to 200 km apogee altitudes in a coordinated project with Arcas rocket payloads and instrumented balloons. This Siple Station Expedition demonstrated the feasibility of launching large, near 1,000 kg, rocket systems from research stations in Antarctica. The remoteness of research stations in Antarctica and the severe environment are major considerations in planning rocket launching expeditions.

  4. Hybrid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A 10,000-pound thrust hybrid rocket motor is tested at Stennis Space Center's E-1 test facility. A hybrid rocket motor is a cross between a solid rocket and a liquid-fueled engine. It uses environmentally safe solid fuel and liquid oxygen.

  5. Hybrid Rocket Propulsion for Sounding Rocket Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A discussion of the H-225K hybrid rocket motor, produced by the American Rocket Company, is given. The H-225K motor is presented in terms of the following topics: (1) hybrid rocket fundamentals; (2) hybrid characteristics; and (3) hybrid advantages.

  6. Hybrid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Stennis Space Center conducts a test on a hybrid rocket motor fed by a liquid oxygen turbopump. The test occurred at the E-1 test facility. The test was believed to be the first of its kind in the world.

  7. Rocket Motor Microphone Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Herrera, Eric; Gee, Kent L.; Giraud, Jerom H.; Young, Devin J.

    2010-01-01

    At ATK's facility in Utah, large full-scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five-segment version of the reusable solid rocket motor, which is for use on the Ares I launch vehicle. As a continuous improvement project, ATK and BYU investigated the use of microphones on these static tests, the vibration and temperature to which the instruments are subjected, and in particular the use of vent tubes and the effects these vents have at low frequencies.

  8. Rocket motor aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, U. G.; Strahle, W. C.

    1983-10-01

    Vibration problems in solid propellant rocket motors are investigated. A class of interior flows modelled to simulate flow conditions inside rocket motor cavities is considered. Turbulence generated pressure fluctuations are shown to consist of two components - acoustic and hydrodynamics. The Bernoulli enthalpy theory of aeroacoustics is employed to extract acoustic pressure spectra from experimentally obtained turbulence data and acoustic impedance values at flow boundaries. The effects of turbulence intensities, sidewall acoustic impedance, axial mass blowing distribution, length to diameter ratio of the cavity and different mass flux on the acoustic pressure level are investigated. Typical pressure levels, under rocket motor conditions, are calculated using the A/B model of propellant response. Estimates of the hydrodynamic component of the pressure fluctuation are provided for the case of fully developed turbulent pipe flow terminated by a choked nozzle.

  9. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  10. Solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Ronn L.

    1993-01-01

    Structural requirements, materials and, especially, processing are critical issues that will pace the introduction of new types of solid rocket motors. Designers must recognize and understand the drivers associated with each of the following considerations: (1) cost; (2) energy density; (3) long term storage with use on demand; (4) reliability; (5) safety of processing and handling; (6) operability; and (7) environmental acceptance.

  11. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  12. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components and with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives functionally-required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g. powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf life characteristics.

  13. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  14. The United States sounding rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The United States sounding rocket program is discussed. The program is concerned with the fields of solar physics, galactic astronomy, fields and particles, ionospheric physics, aeronomy, and meteorology. Sounding rockets are described with respect to propulsion systems, gross weight, and capabilities. Instruments used to conduct ionospheric probing missions are examined. Results of previously conducted sounding rocket missions are included.

  15. A Half Century of Sounding Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J.

    2015-09-01

    One of the earliest and most successful sounding rocket activities in Europe, was the development of the Skylark system. The requirement for high altitude space research and the approaching International Geophysical Year in 1957-58, motivated the British to develop a sounding rocket system. After considerable investigation of the requirements for the propulsion system, the Raven motor and the necessary basic components and instrumentation of a payload system were developed. The first Skylark was launched on the 13th of February, 1957. This paper describes the development of the Skylark system, the advances in technology of its payload systems and their application in solar and stellar astronomy, upper atmosphere and microgravity research and technological proving of space systems.

  16. Small Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    It was three-two-one to brilliant fire as NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center tested a small solid rocket motor designed to mimic NASA's Space Launch System booster. The Mar. 14 test provides a qui...

  17. Solid rocket motor internal insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twichell, S. E. (Editor); Keller, R. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Internal insulation in a solid rocket motor is defined as a layer of heat barrier material placed between the internal surface of the case propellant. The primary purpose is to prevent the case from reaching temperatures that endanger its structural integrity. Secondary functions of the insulation are listed and guidelines for avoiding critical problems in the development of internal insulation for rocket motors are presented.

  18. Peregrine 100-km Sounding Rocket Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The Peregrine Sounding Rocket Program is a joint basic research program of NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Wallops, Stanford University, and the Space Propulsion Group, Inc. (SPG). The goal is to determine the applicability of this technology to a small launch system. The approach is to design, build, and fly a stable, efficient liquefying fuel hybrid rocket vehicle to an altitude of 100 km. The program was kicked off in October of 2006 and has seen considerable progress in the subsequent 18 months. This research group began studying liquifying hybrid rocket fuel technology more than a decade ago. The overall goal of the research was to gain a better understanding of the fundamental physics of the liquid layer entrainment process responsible for the large increase in regression rate observed in these fuels, and to demonstrate the effect of increased regression rate on hybrid rocket motor performance. At the time of this reporting, more than 400 motor tests were conducted with a variety of oxidizers (N2O, GOx, LOx) at ever increasing scales with thrust levels from 5 to over 15,000 pounds (22 N to over 66 kN) in order to move this technology from the laboratory to practical applications. The Peregrine program is the natural next step in this development. A number of small sounding rockets with diameters of 3, 4, and 6 in. (7.6, 10.2, and 15.2 cm) have been flown, but Peregrine at a diameter of 15 in. (38.1 cm) and 14,000-lb (62.3-kN) thrust is by far the largest system ever attempted and will be one of the largest hybrids ever flown. Successful Peregrine flights will set the stage for a wide range of applications of this technology.

  19. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) that is being developed to replace, in 1997, the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor which currently boosts the Space Shuttle. The ASRM will contain features to improve motor safety (fewer potential leak paths, improved seal materials, stronger case material, and fewer nozzle and case joints), an improved ignition system using through-bulkhead initiators, and highly reproducible manufacturing and inspection techniques with a large number of automated procedures. The ASRM will be able to deliver 12,000 lbs greater payloads to any given orbit of the Shuttle. There are also environmental improvements, realized by waste propellant recovery.

  20. NASA Sounding Rockets and Hi-C

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Sounding Rockets Program Office (SRPO), located at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility, provides suborbital launch vehicles, payload development, and field operations sup...

  1. NASA Sounding Rocket Program Educational Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosanova, G.

    2013-01-01

    Sat-C elements of the "pipeline" have been successfully demonstrated by five annual flights thus far from Wallops Flight Facility. RockSat-X has successfully flown twice, also from Wallops. The NSRP utilizes launch vehicles comprised of military surplus rocket motors (Terrier-Improved Orion and Terrier-Improved Malemute) to execute these missions. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is proud of its role in inspiring the "next generation of explorers" and is working to expand its reach to all regions of the United States and the international community as well.

  2. Atom Interferometry on Sounding Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, S. T.; Lachmann, M. D.; Becker, D.; Grosse, J.; Popp, M. A.; Wang, J. B.; Wendrich, T.; Rasel, E. M.; Quantus Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Atom interferometry in microgravity offers the possibility to perform high precision measurements of inertial forces complementary to experiments based on classical test masses. The ultimate goal is to perform these quantum measurements in space on board dedicated satellite missions. To reach this, a series of pathfinder microgravity experiments with cold atoms were build. The latest installment of these are conducted on sounding rockets. Here we give a short motivation of atom interferometry in space, an overview of the techniques used, and an introduction of the current mission MAIUS- 1.

  3. Solid rocket motor witness test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Christopher S.

    1991-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motor Witness Test was undertaken to examine the potential for using thermal infrared imagery as a tool for monitoring static tests of solid rocket motors. The project consisted of several parts: data acquisition, data analysis, and interpretation. For data acquisition, thermal infrared data were obtained of the DM-9 test of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor on December 23, 1987, at Thiokol, Inc. test facility near Brigham City, Utah. The data analysis portion consisted of processing the video tapes of the test to produce values of temperature at representative test points on the rocket motor surface as the motor cooled down following the test. Interpretation included formulation of a numerical model and evaluation of some of the conditions of the motor which could be extracted from the data. These parameters included estimates of the insulation remaining following the tests and the thickness of the charred layer of insulation at the end of the test. Also visible was a temperature signature of the star grain pattern in the forward motor segment.

  4. Solid Rocket Motor Acoustic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.D.

    1999-03-31

    Acoustic data are often required for the determination of launch and powered flight loads for rocket systems and payloads. Such data are usually acquired during test firings of the solid rocket motors. In the current work, these data were obtained for two tests at a remote test facility where we were visitors. This paper describes the data acquisition and the requirements for working at a remote site, interfacing with the test hosts.

  5. GREECE Sounding Rocket Mission Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R.; Grubbs, G. A., II; Bonnell, J. W.; Ogasawara, K.; Hampton, D. L.; Jahn, J. M.; Donovan, E.; Gustavsson, B.; Lanchester, B. S.; McHarg, M. G.; Spanswick, E.; Trondsen, T. S.; Valek, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    On 03 March 2014 at 11:09:50 UT the Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment (GREECE) sounding rocket successfully launched from Poker Flat, Alaska . It reached an apogee of approximately 335 km over the native village of Venetie during a dynamic post-midnight auroral event. A wide range of precipitating electrons were measured with the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) and Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP), cumulatively covering 300 ev to 200 keV in varying time resolutions. DC to low frequency electric and magnetic fields were measured at the same time and a langmuir probe was also employed. In addition to the on board instrumentation a suite of ground based imagers was deployed under apogee. We used several electron-multiplying charge-coupled devices (EMCCDs) with different filters and field of views imaging along magnetic zenith. This yielded multi-emission line information about the auroral brightness at the magnetic footprint of the rocket critical for our main goal of exploring the correlation of the sheer flows often observed in high resolution imagery during aurora and the in situ signatures of precipitating particles and waves. The instruments used will be discussed in further detail along with preliminary results of an event rich in particle and wave signatures.

  6. Small-Scale Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. successfully tested a sub-scale solid rocket motor on May 27. Testing a sub-scale version of a rocket motor is a cost-effective ...

  7. Microfabricated Liquid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Joppin, C.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Schneider, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Under NASA Glenn Research Center sponsorship, MIT has developed the concept of micromachined, bipropellant, liquid rocket engines. This is potentially a breakthrough technology changing the cost-performance tradeoffs for small propulsion systems, enabling new applications, and redefining the meaning of the term low-cost-access-to-space. With this NASA support, a liquid-cooled, gaseous propellant version of the thrust chamber and nozzle was designed, built, and tested as a first step. DARPA is currently funding MIT to demonstrate turbopumps and controls. The work performed herein was the second year of a proposed three-year effort to develop the technology and demonstrate very high power density, regeneratively cooled, liquid bipropellant rocket engine thrust chamber and nozzles. When combined with the DARPA turbopumps and controls, this work would enable the design and demonstration of a complete rocket propulsion system. The original MIT-NASA concept used liquid oxygen-ethanol propellants. The military applications important to DARPA imply that storable liquid propellants are needed. Thus, MIT examined various storable propellant combinations including N2O4 and hydrazine, and H2O2 and various hydrocarbons. The latter are preferred since they do not have the toxicity of N2O4 and hydrazine. In reflection of the newfound interest in H2O2, it is once again in production and available commercially. A critical issue for the microrocket engine concept is cooling of the walls in a regenerative design. This is even more important at microscale than for large engines due to cube-square scaling considerations. Furthermore, the coolant behavior of rocket propellants has not been characterized at microscale. Therefore, MIT designed and constructed an apparatus expressly for this purpose. The report details measurements of two candidate microrocket fuels, JP-7 and JP-10.

  8. Solid propellant rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowler, W. L.; Shafer, J. I.; Behm, J. W.; Strand, L. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of a solid propellant rocket engine with a controlled rate of thrust buildup to a desired thrust level are discussed. The engine uses a regressive burning controlled flow solid propellant igniter and a progressive burning main solid propellant charge. The igniter is capable of operating in a vacuum and sustains the burning of the propellant below its normal combustion limit until the burning propellant surface and combustion chamber pressure have increased sufficiently to provide a stable chamber pressure.

  9. A hybrid rocket engine design for simple low cost sounding rocket use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubelich, Mark; Rowland, John; Reese, Larry

    1993-06-01

    Preliminary test results on a nitrous oxide/HTPB hybrid rocket engine suitable for powering a small sounding rocket to altitudes of 50-100 K/ft are presented. It is concluded that the advantage of the N2O hybrid engine over conventional solid propellant rocket motors is the ability to obtain long burn times with core burning geometries due to the low regression rate of the fuel. Long burn times make it possible to reduce terminal velocity to minimize air drag losses.

  10. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-08-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  11. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  12. National Report on the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberspeaker, Philip; Fairbrother, Debora

    2013-01-01

    The U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 30 to 40 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community and other users. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program supports the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payloads, and providing both the rocket vehicle and launch operations services. Activities since 2011 have included two flights from Andoya Rocket Range, more than eight flights from White Sands Missile Range, approximately sixteen flights from Wallops Flight Facility, two flights from Poker Flat Research Range, and four flights from Kwajalein Atoll. Other activities included the final developmental flight of the Terrier-Improved Malemute launch vehicle, a test flight of the Talos-Terrier-Oriole launch vehicle, and a host of smaller activities to improve program support capabilities. Several operational missions have utilized the new Terrier-Malemute vehicle. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program is currently engaged in the development of a new sustainer motor known as the Peregrine. The Peregrine development effort will involve one static firing and three flight tests with a target completion data of August 2014. The NASA Balloon Program supported numerous scientific and developmental missions since its last report. The program conducted flights from the U.S., Sweden, Australia, and Antarctica utilizing standard and experimental vehicles. Of particular note are the successful test flights of the Wallops Arc Second Pointer (WASP), the successful demonstration of a medium-size Super Pressure Balloon (SPB), and most recently, three simultaneous missions aloft over Antarctica. NASA continues its successful incremental design qualification program and will support a science mission aboard WASP in late 2013 and a science mission aboard the SPB in early 2015. NASA has also embarked on an intra-agency collaboration to launch a rocket from a balloon to

  13. NASA sounding rockets, 1958 - 1968: A historical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, W. R.

    1971-01-01

    The development and use of sounding rockets is traced from the Wac Corporal through the present generation of rockets. The Goddard Space Flight Center Sounding Rocket Program is discussed, and the use of sounding rockets during the IGY and the 1960's is described. Advantages of sounding rockets are identified as their simplicity and payload simplicity, low costs, payload recoverability, geographic flexibility, and temporal flexibility. The disadvantages are restricted time of observation, localized coverage, and payload limitations. Descriptions of major sounding rockets, trends in vehicle usage, and a compendium of NASA sounding rocket firings are also included.

  14. A miniature solid propellant rocket motor

    SciTech Connect

    Grubelich, M.C.; Hagan, M.; Mulligan, E.

    1997-08-01

    A miniature solid-propellant rocket motor has been developed to impart a specific motion to an object deployed in space. This rocket motor effectively eliminated the need for a cold-gas thruster system or mechanical spin-up system. A low-energy igniter, an XMC4397, employing a semiconductor bridge was used to ignite the rocket motor. The rocket motor was ground-tested in a vacuum tank to verify predicted space performance and successfully flown in a Sandia National Laboratories flight vehicle program.

  15. Premature ignition of a rocket motor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Darlene Ruth

    2010-10-01

    During preparation for a rocket sled track (RST) event, there was an unexpected ignition of the zuni rocket motor (10/9/08). Three Sandia staff and a contractor were involved in the accident; the contractor was seriously injured and made full recovery. The data recorder battery energized the low energy initiator in the rocket.

  16. Solid rocket motor temperature sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, J.R.; Heister, S.D.

    1994-11-01

    The temperature sensitivity of the propellant and the solid rocket motor are described by several different temperature sensitivity coefficients. This enabled the derivation of three different relationships for the temperature sensitivity coefficient pi(sub K). To demonstrate this, two different propellants were used wherein the values of pi(sub K) were generated and compared. It was observed that the expressions are of equal complexity and offer ease of use. All involve only the burning rate data and the use of the parameters in St. Roberts burning rate low. It is also suggested that the most general expression for the sensitivity coefficient should be used since it is a true pi(sub K) relationship having the partial derivatives taken with the motor geometry held constant. 11 refs.

  17. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  18. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  19. Acoustic Measurements for Small Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Models have been developed to predict large solid rocket motor acoustic loads based on the scaling of small solid rocket motors. MSFC has measured several small solid rocket motors in horizontal and launch configurations to anchor these models. Solid Rocket Test Motor (SRTM) has ballistics similar to the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) therefore a good choice for acoustic scaling. Acoustic measurements were collected during the test firing of the Insulation Configuration Extended Length (ICXL) 7,6, and 8 (in firing order) in order to compare to RSRM horizontal firing data. The scope of this presentation includes: Acoustic test procedures and instrumentation implemented during the three SRTM firings and Data analysis method and general trends observed in the data.

  20. Acoustical and Flowfield Characterization of a Tabletop Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Margasahayam, Ravi; Norton, Michael P.; Caimi, Raoul E.; Voska, N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of the acoustical and flowfield environment for the scaled 1-pound-force (lbf) thrust tabletop motor was performed. The jet characterization is based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in conjunction with Kirchhoff surface integral formulation and compared with correlations developed for measured rocket noise and a pressure fluctuation scaling (PFS) method. Comparisons are made for the overall sound pressure levels (OASPL's) and spectral dependence of sound pressure level (SPL).

  1. Sound from apollo rockets in space.

    PubMed

    Cotten, D; Donn, W L

    1971-02-12

    Low-frequency sound has been recorded on at least two occasions in Bermuda with the passage of Apollo rocket vehicles 188 kilometers aloft. The signals, which are reminiscent of N-waves from sonic booms, are (i) horizontally coherent; (ii) have extremely high (supersonic) trace velocities across the tripartite arrays; (iii) have nearly identical appearance and frequencies; (iv) have essentially identical arrival times after rocket launch; and (v) are the only coherent signals recorded over many hours. These observations seem to establish that the recorded sound comes from the rockets at high elevation. Despite this high elevation, the values of surface pressure appear to be explainable on the basis of a combination of a kinetic theory approach to shock formation in rarefied atmospheres with established gas-dynamics shock theory. PMID:17734781

  2. Reduced hazard chemicals for solid rocket motor production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caddy, Larry A.; Bowman, Ross; Richards, Rex A.

    1995-01-01

    During the last three years. the NASA/Thiokol/industry team has developed and started implementation of an environmentally sound manufacturing plan for the continued production of solid rocket motors. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Thiokol Corporation have worked with other industry representatives and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to prepare a comprehensive plan to eliminate all ozone depleting chemicals from manufacturing processes and reduce the use of other hazardous materials used to produce the space shuttle reusable solid rocket motors. The team used a classical approach for problem-solving combined with a creative synthesis of new approaches to attack this challenge.

  3. Vibroacoustic studies on sounding rocket bulkheads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comrie, Jeffrey L.; Korde, Umesh A.

    2012-04-01

    The natural frequency coupling of 2 components of a sounding rocket system is studied, the forward bulkhead (commonly referred to as the "bulkhead" or "BH") and the payload cavity within the fairing. The bulkhead was modeled as a thin, flat, circular plate with a clamped boundary condition. The payload cavity was modeled as a column of air with closed ends contained by the rocket fairing. Both components were studied individually, and added together to obtain a coupled effect. The components were studied in terms of theoretical calculations and understanding, while testing the theory against experiments conducted in the laboratory. When appreciable differences between theory and experimental results were within reason for the individual components, the coupled system was tested. This methodology enabled a "piecewise" approach to studying and acquiring natural frequency shifting of the sounding rocket model through coupling. Experimental work for frequency tuning of the bulkhead through internal pressure modulation is presented. Guidelines for improvement of the vibroacoustic response through structural redesign and frequency tuning of sounding rockets are detailed.

  4. NASA Sounding Rocket Program educational outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberspeaker, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Educational and public outreach is a major focus area for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The NASA Sounding Rocket Program (NSRP) shares in the belief that NASA plays a unique and vital role in inspiring future generations to pursue careers in science, mathematics, and technology. To fulfill this vision, the NASA Sounding Rocket Program engages in a host of student flight projects providing unique and exciting hands-on student space flight experiences. These projects include single stage Orion missions carrying "active" high school experiments and "passive" Explorer School modules, university level Orion and Terrier-Orion flights, and small hybrid rocket flights as part of the Small-scale Educational Rocketry Initiative (SERI) currently under development. Efforts also include educational programs conducted as part of major campaigns. The student flight projects are designed to reach students ranging from Kindergarteners to university undergraduates. The programs are also designed to accommodate student teams with varying levels of technical capabilities - from teams that can fabricate their own payloads to groups that are barely capable of drilling and tapping their own holes. The program also conducts a hands-on student flight project for blind students in collaboration with the National Federation of the Blind. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is proud of its role in inspiring the "next generation of explorers" and is working to expand its reach to all regions of the United States and the international community as well.

  5. Ignition transient analysis of solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1990-01-01

    To predict pressure-time and thrust-time behavior of solid rocket motors, a one-dimensional numerical model is developed. The ignition phase of solid rocket motors (time less than 0.4 sec) depends critically on complex interactions among many elements, such as rocket geometry, heat and mass transfer, flow development, and chemical reactions. The present model solves the mass, momentum, and energy equations governing the transfer processes in the rocket chamber as well as the attached converging-diverging nozzle. A qualitative agreement with the SRM test data in terms of head-end pressure gradient and the total thrust build-up is obtained. Numerical results show that the burning rate in the star-segmented head-end section and the erosive burning are two important parameters in the ignition transient of the solid rocket motor (SRM).

  6. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  7. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    During the period December 1976 through February 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center, two special soundings were taken at Antigua, West Indies, and at the Churchill Research Range, monthly activities were initiated to establish stratospheric ozone climatology. This report presents the data results and flight profiles for the period covered.

  8. 24 Inch Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A scaled-down 24-inch version of the Space Shuttle's Reusable Solid Rocket Motor was successfully fired for 21 seconds at a Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Test Stand. The motor was tested to ensure a replacement material called Lycocel would meet the criteria set by the Shuttle's Solid Motor Project Office. The current material is a heat-resistant, rayon-based, carbon-cloth phenolic used as an insulating material for the motor's nozzle. Lycocel, a brand name for Tencel, is a cousin to rayon and is an exceptionally strong fiber made of wood pulp produced by a special 'solvent-spirning' process using a nontoxic solvent. It will also be impregnated with a phenolic resin. This new material is expected to perform better under the high temperatures experienced during launch. The next step will be to test the material on a 48-inch solid rocket motor. The test, which replicates launch conditions, is part of Shuttle's ongoing verification of components, materials, and manufacturing processes required by MSFC, which oversees the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor project. Manufactured by the ATK Thiokol Propulsion Division in Promontory, California, the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor measures 126 feet (38.4 meters) long and 12 feet (3.6 meters) in diameter. It is the largest solid rocket motor ever flown and the first designed for reuse. During its two-minute burn at liftoff, each motor generates an average thrust of 2.6 million pounds (1.2 million kilograms).

  9. NASA, ATK Successfully Test Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Video Gallery

    With a loud roar and mighty column of flame, NASA and ATK Aerospace Systems successfully completed a two-minute, full-scale test of the largest and most powerful solid rocket motor designed for fli...

  10. Program Computes Sound Pressures at Rocket Launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogg, Gary; Heyman, Roy; White, Michael; Edquist, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Launch Vehicle External Sound Pressure is a computer program that predicts the ignition overpressure and the acoustic pressure on the surfaces and in the vicinity of a rocket and launch pad during launch. The program generates a graphical user interface (GUI) that gathers input data from the user. These data include the critical dimensions of the rocket and of any launch-pad structures that may act as acoustic reflectors, the size and shape of the exhaust duct or flame deflector, and geometrical and operational parameters of the rocket engine. For the ignition-overpressure calculations, histories of the chamber pressure and mass flow rate also are required. Once the GUI has gathered the input data, it feeds them to ignition-overpressure and launch-acoustics routines, which are based on several approximate mathematical models of distributed sources, transmission, and reflection of acoustic waves. The output of the program includes ignition overpressures and acoustic pressures at specified locations.

  11. Esrange activities: Sounding rockets, balloons and satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helger, A.

    1980-06-01

    The range facilities are described in detail for the prospective user, including instrumentation launch capabilities, support facilities, and costs. High performance sounding rockets such as Aries and Nike BB can now, thanks to guidance systems, be launched above 500 km allowing the exploration of higher regions and longer observation time. Microgravity experiments using sounding rockets are successfully carried out from the range. Land recovery is necessary in this case. Since 1978 Esrange has been operating a Landsat remote sensing satellite receiving station as part of ESA's ground station network, Earthnet. Additional installations for reception and processing of SPOT and Landsat (D) data are planned. A satellite tracking and control station is envisaged in the near future.

  12. Solid rocket motor cost model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harney, A. G.; Raphael, L.; Warren, S.; Yakura, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic and standardized procedure for estimating life cycle costs of solid rocket motor booster configurations. The model consists of clearly defined cost categories and appropriate cost equations in which cost is related to program and hardware parameters. Cost estimating relationships are generally based on analogous experience. In this model the experience drawn on is from estimates prepared by the study contractors. Contractors' estimates are derived by means of engineering estimates for some predetermined level of detail of the SRM hardware and program functions of the system life cycle. This method is frequently referred to as bottom-up. A parametric cost analysis is a useful technique when rapid estimates are required. This is particularly true during the planning stages of a system when hardware designs and program definition are conceptual and constantly changing as the selection process, which includes cost comparisons or trade-offs, is performed. The use of cost estimating relationships also facilitates the performance of cost sensitivity studies in which relative and comparable cost comparisons are significant.

  13. Description and Flight Performance Results of the WASP Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pauw, J. F.; Steffens, L. E.; Yuska, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    A general description of the design and construction of the WASP sounding rocket and of the performance of its first flight are presented. The purpose of the flight test was to place the 862-pound (391-kg) spacecraft above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) on free-fall trajectory for at least 6 minutes in order to study the effect of "weightlessness" on a slosh dynamics experiment. The WASP sounding rocket fulfilled its intended mission requirements. The sounding rocket approximately followed a nominal trajectory. The payload was in free fall above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) for 6.5 minutes and reached an apogee altitude of 134 nautical miles (248 km). Flight data including velocity, altitude, acceleration, roll rate, and angle of attack are discussed and compared to nominal performance calculations. The effect of residual burning of the second stage motor is analyzed. The flight vibration environment is presented and analyzed, including root mean square (RMS) and power spectral density analysis.

  14. Encyclopedia: Satellites and Sounding Rockets, August 1959 - December 1969

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Major space missions utilizing satellites or sounding rockets managed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center between August 1959 and December 1969 were documented. The information was presented in the following form: (1) description of each satellite project where Goddard was responsible for the spacecraft or the successful launch or both, with data such as launch characteristics, objectives, etc.; (2) description of each Goddard sounding rocket project, with the following data: sounding rocket type, vehicle number, experimental affiliation, and type of experiment; (3) brief description of current sounding rockets and launch vehicles; (4) table of tracking and data acquisition stations. Summary tables are also provided.

  15. Sounding rocket and balloon flight safety philosophy and methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyma, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    NASA's sounding rocket and balloon goal is to successfully and safely perform scientific research. This is reflected in the design, planning, and conduct of sounding rocket and balloon operations. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the sounding rocket and balloon scientific community with flight safety philosophy and methodologies, and how range safety affects their programs. This paper presents the flight safety philosophy for protecting the public against the risk created by the conduct of sounding rocket and balloon operations. The flight safety criteria used to implement this philosophy are defined and the methodologies used to calculate mission risk are described.

  16. The DXL and STORM sounding rocket mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Nicholas E.; Carter, Jenny A.; Chiao, Meng P.; Chornay, Dennis J.; Collado-Vega, Yaireska M.; Collier, Michael R.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Koutroumpa, Dimitra; Kujawski, Joseph; Kuntz, K. D.; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Lepri, Susan T.; McCammon, Dan; Morgan, Kelsey; Porter, F. Scott; Prasai, Krishna; Read, Andy M.; Robertson, Ina P.; Sembay, Steve F.; Sibeck, David G.; Snowden, Steven L.; Uprety, Youaraj; Walsh, Brian M.

    2013-09-01

    The objective of the Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket experiment is to distinguish the soft X-ray emission due to the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) from that produced via Solar Wind charge exchange (SWCX). Enhanced interplanetary helium density in the helium focusing cone provides a spatial variation to the SWCX that can be identified by scanning through the focusing cone using an X-ray instrument with a large grasp. DXL consists of two large proportional counters refurbished from the Aerobee payload used during the Wisconsin All Sky Survey. The counters utilize P-10 fill gas and are covered by a thin Formvar window (with Cyasorb UV-24 additive) supported on a nickel mesh. DXL's large grasp is 10 cm2 sr for both the 1/4 and 3/4 keV bands. DXL was successfully launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico on December 12, 2012 using a Terrier Mk70 Black Brant IX sounding rocket. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) instrument is a prototype soft X-ray camera also successfully own on the DXL sounding rocket. STORM uses newly developed slumped micropore (`lobster eye') optics to focus X-rays onto a position sensitive, chevron configuration, microchannel plate detector. The slumped micropore optics have a 75 cm curvature radius and a polyimide/aluminum filter bonded to its surface. STORM's large field-of-view makes it ideal for imaging SWCX with exospheric hydrogen for future missions. STORM represents the first flight of lobster-eye optics in space.

  17. Field refurbishment of recoverable sounding rocket payloads.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needleman, H. C.; Tackett, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Sounding rocket payload field refurbishment has been shown to be an effective means for obtaining additional scientific data with substantial time and monetary savings. In a recent campaign three successful missions were flown using two payloads. Field refurbished hardware from two previously flown and recovered payloads were field integrated to form a third payload. Although this operational method may result in compromises in the refurbished system, it allows for quick turn around when the mission requires it. This paper describes the recent success of this approach with the Dudley Observatory Nike-Apache micrometeorite collection experiments launched from Kiruna, Sweden, in October 1972.

  18. Operation Argus. Sounding rocket measurements - Project Jason

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.L.; Allen, L.; Dennis, J.L.; Welch, J.A.; Walton, R.B.

    1984-08-31

    The general objective was to measure the distribution of beta particles originating from the Argus shots and subsequently trapped in the earth's magnetic field. This was accomplished with the aid of high-altitude sounding rockets containing radiation counters. The flux of high-energy electrons was measured as a function of: (1) magnetic latitude from 23 to 39 degrees; (2) altitude from sea level to 900 km; (3) electron energy; (4) time after the nuclear explosion; and (5) angular distribution with respect to magnetic field.

  19. Development of the Hawk/Nike Hawk sounding rocket vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    A new sounding rocket family, the Hawk and Nike-Hawk Vehicles, have been developed, flight tested and added to the NASA Sounding Rocket Vehicle Stable. The Hawk is a single-stage vehicle that will carry 35.6 cm diameter payloads weighing 45.5 kg to 91 kg to altitudes of 78 km to 56 km, respectively. The two-stage Nike-Hawk will carry payloads weighing 68 kg to 136 kg to altitudes of 118 km to 113 km, respectively. Both vehicles utilize the XM22E8 Hawk rocket motor which is available in large numbers as a surplus item from the U.S. Army. The Hawk fin and tail can hardware were designed in-house. The Nike tail can and fin hardware are surplus Nike-Ajax booster hardware. Development objectives were to provide a vehicle family with a larger diameter, larger volume payload capability than the Nike-Apache and Nike-Tomahawk vehicles at comparable cost. Both vehicles performed nominally in flight tests.

  20. ARIM-1: The Atmospheric Refractive Index Measurements Sounding Rocket Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, B. Ian (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    A conceptual design study of the ARIM-1 sounding rocket mission, whose goal is to study atmospheric turbulence in the tropopause region of the atmosphere, is presented. The study was conducted by an interdisciplinary team of students at the University of Alaska Fairbanks who were enrolled in a Space Systems Engineering course. The implementation of the ARIM-1 mission will be carried out by students participating in the Alaska Student Rocket Program (ASRP), with a projected launch date of August 1997. The ARIM-1 vehicle is a single stage sounding rocket with a 3:1 ogive nose cone, a payload diameter of 8 in., a motor diameter of 7.6 in., and an overall height of 17.0 ft including the four fins. Emphasis is placed on standardization of payload support systems. The thermosonde payload will measure the atmospheric turbulence by direct measurement of the temperature difference over a distance of one meter using two 3.45-micron 'hot-wire' probes. The recovery system consists of a 6 ft. diameter ribless guide surface drogue chute and a 33 ft. diameter main cross parachute designed to recover a payload of 31 pounds and slow its descent rate to 5 m/s through an altitude of 15 km. This document discusses the science objectives, mission analysis, payload mechanical configuration and structural design, recovery system, payload electronics, ground station, testing plans, and mission implementation.

  1. Hybrid sounding rocket development at the United States Air Force Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lydon, M. C.; Simmons, R. J.

    1993-06-01

    The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) has developed a LOx-HTPB (Liquid Oxygen-Hydroxyl Terminated Polybutadiene) powered sounding rocket. USAFA has proven the use of hybrid rockets as a forgiving instrument to teach the fundamentals of aerospace system engineering at the undergraduate level. A rocket motor has been designed which will deliver 1000 lbs. of thrust for 1O-15 seconds and power the vehicle to approximately 20,000 ft. The rocket will be recovered via parachute and system performance will be recorded with an onboard data acquisition system. The main subsystems have been tested successfully and a launch is expected this summer.

  2. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  3. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor case design status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, G. L.; Cash, S. F.; Beck, J. P.

    1993-06-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case design aimed at achieving a safer and more reliable solid rocket motor for the Space Shuttle system is considered. The ASRM case has a 150.0 inch diameter, three equal length segment, and 9Ni-4CO-0.3C steel alloy. The major design features include bolted casebolted case joints which close during pressurization, plasma arc welded factory joints, integral stiffener for splash down and recovery, and integral External Tank attachment rings. Each mechanical joint has redundant and verifiable o-ring seals.

  4. Device and process for attachment of parts to rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagla, Jon J.; Lowry, Robert W.; Mears, Otho L.

    1992-04-01

    An attachment platform positioned longitudinally on a rocket motor chamber and secured with laser welding techniques is described. Each attachment platform is continuously sealed longitudinally to the rocket motor chamber through the application of laser welding and optical seam tracking. Application of laser welding techniques allows for repair and installation of attachment platforms on rocket motors fully loaded with live propellant.

  5. Ignition transient analysis of solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    A 1-D numerical model based on the SIMPLE is developed to predict the pressure and thrust behavior of space shuttle solid rocket motors. The present model solves the conservation equations through the attached nozzle as well as in the combustion chamber. Numerical results were seen to agree qualitatively well with the test data by controlling the wetted perimeter in the head-end star-section of the motor and the erosive burning rate of the solid propellent.

  6. Dumbo: A pachydermal rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Bill

    1991-01-01

    A brief historical account is given of the Dumbo nuclear reactor, a type of folded flow reactor that could be used for rocket propulsion. Much of the information is given in viewgraph form. Viewgraphs show details of the reactor system, fuel geometry, and key characteristics of the system (folded flow, use of fuel washers, large flow area, small fuel volume, hybrid modulator, and cermet fuel).

  7. Atom Interferometry on a Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Dennis; Seidel, Stephan; Lachmann, Maike; Rasel, Ernst; Quantus Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The universality of free fall is one of the fundamental postulates of our description of nature. The comparison of the free fall of two ultra-cold clouds of different atomic species via atom interferometry comprises a method to precisely test this assumption. By performing the experiments in a microgravity environment the sensitivity of such an atom interferometric measurement can be increased. In order to fully utilize the potential of these experiments the usage of a Bose-Einstein condensate as the initial state of the atom interferometer is necessary. As a step towards the transfer of such a system in space an atom optical experiment is currently being prepared as the scientific payload for a sounding rocket mission. This mission is aiming at the first demonstration of a Bose-Einstein condensate in space and using this quantum degenerate matter as a source for atom interferometry. The launch of the rocket is planned for 2015 from ESRANGE. This first mission will be followed by two more that extend the scientific goals to the creation of degenerate mixtures in space and simultaneous atom interferometry with two atomic species. Their success would mark a major advancement towards a precise measurement of the universality of free fall with a space-born atom interferometer. This research is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under grant number DLR 50 1131-37.

  8. Digital attitude control for NASA sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Carlos

    1998-11-01

    Various configurations of Solar Pointing Control Systems have been used for NASA sounding rockets since an initial flight in December of 1967. Until now, these attitude control systems have used an analog controller. The demand for a more advanced attitude control system with better performance and flexibility leads to the testing of a digital control system. Computer aided design was used to develop the control equations and an embedded controller is used to implement these equations. The analog control system pointing performance was degraded by electrical noise and offsets getting into the sensor signals. The solution to this problem was to isolate the sun sensor from payload electrical nose and ground loops. To accomplish this the sun sensor output was digitized and the data was sent to the control system using a fiber optical cable. This control system was flown on Naval Research Laboratories rocket 36.140 and had less than 0.5 arc-second peak-to-peak jitter during the flight. With further refinements the digital system is expected to attain jitter of less than 0.2 arc- seconds peak-to-peak.

  9. Ignition transient analysis of solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1991-01-01

    Measurement data on the performance of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor show wide variations in the head-end pressure changes and the total thrust build-up during the ignition transient periods. To analyze the flow and thermal behavior in the tested solid rocket motors, a 1-dimensional, ideal gas flow model via the SIMPLE algorithm was developed. Numerical results showed that burning patterns in the star-shaped head-end segment of the propellant and the erosive burning rate are two important factors controlling the ignition transients. The objective of this study is to extend the model to include the effects of aluminum particle commonly used in solid propellants. To treat the effects of aluminum-oxide particles in the combustion gas, conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the particles are added in the numerical formulation and integrated by an inter-phase-slip algorithm.

  10. Instrumentation of UALR labscale hybrid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Andrew B.; Teague, Warfield; Wright, Ann M.; Wilson, Edmond W.

    2006-05-01

    The Central Arkansas Combustion Group has used a NASA EPSCoR grant to improve the instrumentation and control of its labscale hybrid rocket facility. The research group investigates fundamental aspects of combustion in hybrid rocket motors. This paper describes the new instrumentation, provides examples of measurements taken, and describes novel instrumentation which is in the process of development. A six degree-of-freedom thrust system measures the total work done during a burn to compare the efficiency of fuels and fuel additives. The new system measures the forces and moments in three spatial dimensions. An accurate measure of thrust oscillations will lead to better understanding of the cause and eventual minimization of the oscillations. Plume spectrometers are employed to determine and measure the reaction intermediates and products of combustion at the exhaust. The new control system features an oxygen mass flow controller, which allows the accurate measurement of the oxidant introduced into the motor.

  11. IUS solid rocket motor contamination prediction methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, C. R.; Kearnes, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A series of computer codes were developed to predict solid rocket motor produced contamination to spacecraft sensitive surfaces. Subscale and flight test data have confirmed some of the analytical results. Application of the analysis tools to a typical spacecraft has provided early identification of potential spacecraft contamination problems and provided insight into their solution; e.g., flight plan modifications, plume or outgassing shields and/or contamination covers.

  12. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Dennis; Phelps, Jack; Perkins, Fred

    2010-01-01

    RSRM is a highly reliable human-rated Solid Rocket Motor: a) Largest diameter SRM to achieve flight status; b) Only human-rated SRM. RSRM reliability achieved by: a)Applying special attention to Process Control, Testing, and Postflight; b) Communicating often; c) Identifying and addressing issues in a disciplined approach; d) Identifying and fully dispositioning "out-of-family" conditions; e) Addressing minority opinions; and f) Learning our lessons.

  13. Introduction to the Special Issue on Sounding Rockets and Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Zeiger, Ben; Pfaff, Rob; Garcia, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Rocket technology, originally developed for military applications, has provided a low-cost observing platform to carry critical and rapid-response scientific investigations for over 70 years. Even with the development of launch vehicles that could put satellites into orbit, high altitude sounding rockets have remained relevant. In addition to science observations, sounding rockets provide a unique technology test platform and a valuable training ground for scientists and engineers. Most importantly, sounding rockets remain the only way to explore the tenuous regions of the Earth’s atmosphere (the upper stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower ionosphere/thermosphere) above balloon altitudes (˜40km) and below satellite orbits (˜160km). They can lift remote sensing telescope payloads with masses up to 400kg to altitudes of 350km providing observing times of up to 6min above the blocking influence of Earth’s atmosphere. Though a number of sounding rocket research programs exist around the world, this article focuses on the NASA Sounding Rocket Program, and particularly on the astrophysical and solar sounding rocket payloads.

  14. Rocket Motor Joint Construction Including Thermal Barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal barrier for extremely high temperature applications consists of a carbon fiber core and one or more layers of braided carbon fibers surrounding the core. The thermal barrier is preferably a large diameter ring, having a relatively small cross-section. The thermal barrier is particularly suited for use as part of a joint structure in solid rocket motor casings to protect low temperature elements such as the primary and secondary elastomeric O-ring seals therein from high temperature gases of the rocket motor. The thermal barrier exhibits adequate porosity to allow pressure to reach the radially outward disposed O-ring seals allowing them to seat and perform the primary sealing function. The thermal barrier is disposed in a cavity or groove in the casing joint, between the hot propulsion gases interior of the rocket motor and primary and secondary O-ring seals. The characteristics of the thermal barrier may be enhanced in different applications by the inclusion of certain compounds in the casing joint, by the inclusion of RTV sealant or similar materials at the site of the thermal barrier, and/or by the incorporation of a metal core or plurality of metal braids within the carbon braid in the thermal barrier structure.

  15. Acceleration effects in solid propellant rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhenry, M. T.

    1986-01-01

    The performance variations due to acceleration loads imposed on spinning solid propellant rocket motors are investigated. The four potentially most significant modes of acceleration-induced phenomena are identified from a study of the literature and modeled. The four modes are a mechanical mode which deals with deformations of the propellant and case: a thermodynamic mode which covers acceleration-induced combustion phenomena; a stress mode which covers the stressed propellant's effect on burn rate; and a gas dynamic mode which deals with changes in gas flow in the chamber and through the nozzle. Simplified models of each mode are developed or taken from the literature and are added to an internal ballistics evaluation computer program. The resulting analysis is the first to include all of the modes. In order to do this an original analysis of the mechanical and stress modes was necessary. However, the analysis shows that the stress mode is not important for the circular perforated grains studied. The other effects are shown to have a significant influence on solid rocket motor performance. The magnitude of the different mode effects are such that one may not be ignored over the others as has been done in the past. The results of the analysis are compared to published rocket motor data. The comparisons indicate an erosive burning effect that is a function of spin rate. A qualitative explanation of the erosive effect is presented.

  16. Results of Labscale Hybrid Rocket Motor investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, B.; Frederick, R. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This work was performed to establish a labscale hybrid rocket motor test and evaluation capability at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The scope included activation of a Labscale Hybrid Motor, determination of baseline burning rates for PMMA fuel, and replication of pressure oscillations for HTPB fuel. The 0.820-in.-diam port, 10-in.-long fuel grains were burned for two seconds with gaseous oxygen. PMMA fuels were tested at oxygen fluxes from 0.047 lbm/sec sq in. to 0.378 lbm/sec sq in., and the HTPB fuel was evaluated at 0.378 lbm/sec sq in. The results showed that the labscale hybrid motor replicated previously reported PMMA fuel regression rates. The results also replicated low-frequency (less than 100 Hz) pressure oscillations that have been observed for HTPB fuels. These results establish the Labscale Hybrid Motor facility at MSFC.

  17. Thermal Electron Results from the CAPER Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; Pollock, Craig J.; Moore, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The Cleft Accelerated Plasma Experiment Rocket (CAPER) sounding rocket launched on January 21, 1999 at 06:13:30 UT into the cusp. Ion outflows and strong electric fields were present. We will present the preliminary results of the thermal electron detector, TECHS that was on this payload.

  18. Launch of 2014 RockOn Sounding Rocket

    NASA Video Gallery

    Students and teachers designed experiments which were included in the payload of the RockOn sounding rocket, seen here launching from NASA Wallops Flight Facility on June 26, 2014, at 7:21 a.m. EDT...

  19. Terrier-Black Brant Sounding Rocket Microacceleration Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas; Acevedo, Julio

    1998-01-01

    On September 10, 1997 a Terrier-Black Brant Sounding Rocket was launched to support the Lewis Research Center DARTFire combustion experiment at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. The sounding rocket also carried two microacceleration measurement systems to support the DARTFire experiment by measuring the microacceleration environment. The SAMS-FF system and a SAMS-type triaxial sensor head (TSH) were flown. The SAMS-FF system consisted of a variable frequency, digital output TSH and a roll rate sensor. Data from the two systems were analyzed and compared. Data will be presented from both systems in order to characterize the sounding rocket microacceleration environment. The data collected demonstrated that a sounding rocket is a viable vehicle for conducting space experiments that require a quiet, dedicated microacceleration environment.

  20. CIV Interferometer for a Solar Sounding Rocket Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. A.; West, E. A.; Davis, J. M.; Rees, D.

    2007-01-01

    A sounding rocket instrument consisting of two vacuum ultraviolet Fabry-Perot filters in series would allow high-spectral resolution over an extended field of view for solar observations of the transition region between the chromosphere and the corona.

  1. The C-REX Sounding Rocket Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Mark; Larsen, Miguel; Hampton, Donald; Dhadly, Manbharat; Ahrns, Jason; Aruliah, Anasuya; Kakinami, Yoshihiro; Barker, Barrett; Kiene, Andrew; Sigernes, Fred; Lorentzen, Dag

    2015-04-01

    On November 24, 2014, NASA launched a Black-Brant 12 sounding rocket from Andoya Space Center out over the Greenland Sea and into the ionospheric footprint of Earth's geomagnetic cusp. Roughly ten minutes later, ten barium/strontium tracer clouds were released into the thermosphere, at heights ranging from 190 to 420 km, and dispersed into a 3D volume extending over many tens of km around the main trajectory. Subsequent motions of the ionized barium and neutral barium/strontium components of the clouds were determined by photographic triangulation, using cameras based at Longyearbyen, Ny-Alesund, and aboard a NASA aircraft flying just south of Svalbard. For reasons that are currently not understood, there is a permanent enhancement in the neutral mass density in this part of Earth's thermosphere, which is expected to cause small but important and currently unpredictable perturbations to the orbits of spacecraft flying through it. Work in progress will use the C-REX photographic triangulations to measure winds and ion motion at multiple locations inside this density enhancement. By combining these very localized results with larger scale maps of wind derived from UCL's SCANDI interferometer and ion drifts measured by the EISCAT Svalbard radar, we hope to understand the flows that are responsible for creating and sustaining the thermospheric density anomaly.

  2. Sounding rocket experiment on capillary channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendahl, U.; Fechtmann, C.; Dreyer, M. E.

    2005-08-01

    This paper is concerned with flow rate limitations in open capillary channels under low-gravity conditions. The channels consist of two parallel plates bounded by free liquid surfaces along the open sides. In the case of steady flow the capillary pressure of the free surface balances the differential pressure between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. A maximum flow rate is achieved when the adjusted volumetric flow rate exceeds a certain limit leading to a collapse of the free surfaces. In order to investigate this type of flow an experiment aboard the sounding rocket TEXUS-41 was performed. The aim of the investigation was to achieve the profiles of the free liquid surfaces and to determine the maximum flow rate of the steady flow. For this purpose a new approach to the critical flow condition by enlarging the channel length was applied. The paper gives a review of the experimental set-up and the preparation of the flight procedures. Furthermore the experiment performance is described and the typical appearance of the flow indicated by its surface profiles is presented.

  3. Transition of sounding-rocket experiments to Shuttle/Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, C. G.

    1979-01-01

    Studies of the feasibility of using instruments of the type flown on balloons, sounding rockets, satellites, and Skylab ATM have led to the conclusion that sounding rocket instruments could be useful for conducting science experiments from space, both in their own right and in providing supporting data to other instruments observing the same object. Some engineering aspects of extending the viewing time from minutes to days are examined.

  4. Maxus: A new German/Swedish sounding rocket programme and Esrange - Your partner in satellite operations, sounding rockets and balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemi, Stig; Lundahl, Kaj; Wikstrom, Alf

    1992-08-01

    The Swedish space-operations center Esrange is described in terms of operational and data-acquisition support for rocket, satellite, and balloon programs, and the Maxus sounding rocket is presented. Located in northern Sweden the Esrange operations center offers good geographical position for polar-orbiting satellites. The Maxus rocket is capable of launching 700 kg of microgravity payloads to about 900 km for experiments lasting 14-15 min.

  5. Collaborative Sounding Rocket launch in Alaska and Development of Hybrid Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Tomohisa; Tsutsumi, Akimasa; Ito, Toshiyuki; Kan, Yuji; Tohyama, Fumio; Nakashino, Kyouichi; Hawkins, Joseph

    Tokai University student rocket project (TSRP) was established in 1995 for a purpose of the space science and engineering hands-on education, consisting of two space programs; the one is sounding rocket experiment collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks and the other is development and launch of small hybrid rockets. In January of 2000 and March 2002, two collaborative sounding rockets were successfully launched at Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. In 2001, the first Tokai hybrid rocket was successfully launched at Alaska. After that, 11 hybrid rockets were launched to the level of 180-1,000 m high at Hokkaido and Akita in Japan. Currently, Tokai students design and build all parts of the rockets. In addition, they are running the organization and development of the project under the tight budget control. This program has proven to be very effective in providing students with practical, real-engineering design experience and this program also allows students to participate in all phases of a sounding rocket mission. Also students learn scientific, engineering subjects, public affairs and system management through experiences of cooperative teamwork. In this report, we summarize the TSRP's hybrid rocket program and discuss the effectiveness of the program in terms of educational aspects.

  6. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program and space sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurkin, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    High altitude suborbital rockets (sounding rockets) have been extensively used for space science research in the post-World War II period; the NASA Sounding Rocket Program has been on-going since the inception of the Agency and supports all space science disciplines. In recent years, sounding rockets have been utilized to provide a low gravity environment for materials processing research, particularly in the commercial sector. Sounding rockets offer unique features as a low gravity flight platform. Quick response and low cost combine to provide more frequent spaceflight opportunities. Suborbital spacecraft design practice has achieved a high level of sophistication which optimizes the limited available flight times. High data-rate telemetry, real-time ground up-link command and down-link video data are routinely used in sounding rocket payloads. Standard, off-the-shelf, active control systems are available which limit payload body rates such that the gravitational environment remains less than 10(-4) g during the control period. Operational launch vehicles are available which can provide up to 7 minutes of experiment time for experiment weights up to 270 kg. Standard payload recovery systems allow soft impact retrieval of payloads. When launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, payloads can be retrieved and returned to the launch site within hours.

  7. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program and space sciences.

    PubMed

    Gurkin, L W

    1992-10-01

    High altitude suborbital rockets (sounding rockets) have been extensively used for space science research in the post-World War II period; the NASA Sounding Rocket Program has been on-going since the inception of the Agency and supports all space science disciplines. In recent years, sounding rockets have been utilized to provide a low gravity environment for materials processing research, particularly in the commercial sector. Sounding rockets offer unique features as a low gravity flight platform. Quick response and low cost combine to provide more frequent spaceflight opportunities. Suborbital spacecraft design practice has achieved a high level of sophistication which optimizes the limited available flight times. High data-rate telemetry, real-time ground up-link command and down-link video data are routinely used in sounding rocket payloads. Standard, off-the-shelf, active control systems are available which limit payload body rates such that the gravitational environment remains less than 10(-4) g during the control period. Operational launch vehicles are available which can provide up to 7 minutes of experiment time for experiment weights up to 270 kg. Standard payload recovery systems allow soft impact retrieval of payloads. When launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, payloads can be retrieved and returned to the launch site within hours. PMID:11537652

  8. Nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability in rocket motors.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lores, M. E.; Zinn, B. T.

    1973-01-01

    A new analytical technique for the solution of nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability problems in rocket combustors is developed. Using relatively little computation time, this technique is capable of predicting the transient and limit cycle behavior of the combustion instability oscillations as well as the disturbance amplitude required to trigger an instability in a linearly stable motor. The limit cycle waveforms are found to exhibit shock wave characteristics for most unstable engine operating conditions. It is shown that the characteristics of the resulting instability are independent of the nature of the initial disturbance and they depend solely upon the engine operating conditions and the characteristics of the unsteady combustion process.

  9. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  10. Advanced Solid Rocket Motor nozzle development status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, W. J.; Moss, J. D.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents a status update of the design and development of an improved nozzle for the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). The ASRM nozzle incorporates advanced state-of-the-art design features and materials which contribute to enhanced safety, reliability, performance, and producibility for the space shuttle boosters. During 1992 the nozzle design progressed through a successful Preliminary Design Review (PDR). An improved ablative material development program also culminated in the selection of new standard and low density carbon cloth phenolic prepreg offering reduced variability and improved process attributes. A subscale motor test series to evaluate new materials and design features was also completed. An overview update of the matured design characteristics, supporting analysis, key development-program results and program status and plans is reported.

  11. Development of a small high-thrust tractor rocket motor

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C.E.; Oberlander, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the parachute extraction tractor rocket motor design and test efforts conducted during the Sandia ASW/SOW development program. The prime contractor was Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico; the tractor rocket motor subcontractor was Morton Thiokol, Inc., Elkton, Maryland.

  12. Rotational flow in tapered slab rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Tony; Sams, Oliver C.; Majdalani, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    Internal flow modeling is a requisite for obtaining critical parameters in the design and fabrication of modern solid rocket motors. In this work, the analytical formulation of internal flows particular to motors with tapered sidewalls is pursued. The analysis employs the vorticity-streamfunction approach to treat this problem assuming steady, incompressible, inviscid, and nonreactive flow conditions. The resulting solution is rotational following the analyses presented by Culick for a cylindrical motor. In an extension to Culick's work, Clayton has recently managed to incorporate the effect of tapered walls. Here, an approach similar to that of Clayton is applied to a slab motor in which the chamber is modeled as a rectangular channel with tapered sidewalls. The solutions are shown to be reducible, at leading order, to Taylor's inviscid profile in a porous channel. The analysis also captures the generation of vorticity at the surface of the propellant and its transport along the streamlines. It is from the axial pressure gradient that the proper form of the vorticity is ascertained. Regular perturbations are then used to solve the vorticity equation that prescribes the mean flow motion. Subsequently, numerical simulations via a finite volume solver are carried out to gain further confidence in the analytical approximations. In illustrating the effects of the taper on flow conditions, comparisons of total pressure and velocity profiles in tapered and nontapered chambers are entertained. Finally, a comparison with the axisymmetric flow analog is presented.

  13. The method of solid rocket motors firings environmental engineering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Baojun; Xu, Ke; Peng, Keke; Mi, Yaoqi

    The solid rocket motors firings is one main source of space debris, the solid rocket motors firings model is a part of space debris engineering model. In this paper, researching the NASA and ESA model to achieve an appropriate firing model, using the discrete method to model the solid rocket motors firings; application of the long-term approximation orbit evolution algorithm to calculate the evolution of firings generated by a single solid rocket motors ignition event in space; finally, application of space debris environment space debris density algorithm to calculate the distribution of firings generated by a single solid rocket motors ignition event in space, analysing the influence on the space environment and spacecraft.

  14. Dynamic Analysis of Sounding Rocket Pneumatic System Revision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armen, Jerald

    2010-01-01

    The recent fusion of decades of advancements in mathematical models, numerical algorithms and curve fitting techniques marked the beginning of a new era in the science of simulation. It is becoming indispensable to the study of rockets and aerospace analysis. In pneumatic system, which is the main focus of this paper, particular emphasis will be placed on the efforts of compressible flow in Attitude Control System of sounding rocket.

  15. Sounding rocket activities of Japan in 2003 and 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Nobuaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Nonaka, Satoshi; Nakajima, Takashi; Takumi, Abe; Yuichi, Tsuda; Yamagami, Takamasa

    2005-08-01

    In October 2003, a new space agency, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) was reorganized and started as a primary space agency to promote all space activities in Japan. The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) belonged to JAXA and continued to promote space science and technologies using unique scientific satellites, sounding rockets and balloons. This paper summarizes sounding rocket and ballooning activities of ISAS in the fiscal year of 2003 and 2004, associated with satellite launch programs. In this time period, three sounding rockets and nineteen balloons were launched by ISAS. One of the sounding rocket, S-310-35 was an international collaboration between Japan and Norway, which was launched from Andoya Rocket Range (ARR), Andenes, Norway, so as to study the upper atmospheric dynamics and energetics associated with the auroral energy in the polar lower thermosphere. Through the combination with the national researchers and the cooperation with international organizations, ISAS will keep its own flight opportunities and be able to obtain many new scientific findings.

  16. X-ray astronomy experiments from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, Saul

    1987-01-01

    During the past fourteen years, the M.I.T. X-ray Astronomy sounding rocket group has designed, fabricated, and flown five different scientific sounding rocket payloads. These experiment payloads were launched on a total of twelve sounding rocket flights of which only one failed because of rocket problems. Eight of these flights yielded astronomical data that resulted in a total of twelve publications. The bulk of this research was supported by NASA Grant NGR 22-009-730 X-Ray Astronomy Experiments Sounding Rockets. The fifth and final experiment payload conceived and built under this Grant (the Wide Field Soft X-ray Camera: WFSXC) served as the prototype for the British Wide Field Camera (WFC) experiment to be launched on the ROSAT mission. The five experiment payloads and the results obtained from these experiments are briefly described. In the case of the WFSXC, which served principally as an engineering prototype for a major space mission, a number of papers written by British collaborators which describe the ROSAT Wide Field Camera are presented.

  17. Calculation of vibration mode and its experimental study in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Junwei; Sun, Weishen; Xing, Chunjing

    1992-05-01

    A method for the calculation of vibration mode in rocket motors is presented, and a corresponding program is worked out. Values calculated with this program are consistent with theoretical and experimental results, indicating that the program is soundly based. A new type of vibration excitation apparatus-turbo vibration exciter is also introduced and used for determination of natural frequency of acoustic cavities and of acoustic damping coefficients of motor.

  18. Solid rocket motor nozzle flexseal design sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donat, James R.

    1993-02-01

    On solid rocket motors, direction is controlled by controlling the thrust vector. To achieve this, the nozzle usually incorporates a flexseal that allows the nozzle to vector (or rotate) in any direction. The flexseal has a core of alternating layers of elastomer pads and metal or composite shims. Flexseal core design is an iterative process. An estimate of the flexseal core geometry is made. The core is then analyzed for performance characteristics such as stress, weight, and the torque required to vector the core. Based on a comparison between the requirements/constraints and analysis results, another estimate of the geometry is then made. Understanding the effects changes in the core geometry have on the performance characteristics greatly decreases the number of iterations and time required to optimize the design. This paper documents a study undertaken to better understand these effects and how sensitive performance characteristics are to core geometry changes.

  19. Upper Atmosphere Sounding Rocket Projects at Esrange Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, Christian; Kemi, Stig; Sjolander, Krister; Abrahamsson, Mattias

    Swedish Space Corporation, SSC has a long tradition of developing and launching scientific sounding rockets from Esrange Space Center with the aim to study the different layers of the atmosphere and near space. Now a new era has started with an initiative from the Swedish National Space Board, SNSB. The sounding rocket and atmospheric balloon activities will be vitalised with a national program offering the scientific community yearly rocket launches and balloon flights. The three upcoming sounding rocket missions that have recently started are: O-STATES O STATES (Oxygen transformation in the thermosphere) is a research project at the Meteorological Institute of Stockholm University with Prof. Jörg Gumbel, as responsible researcher. The payload comprises two instrument modules with totally 7 instruments for studying oxygen in its various forms. The payload will be launched twice on two sounding rockets at the same launch campaign, in different atmospheric conditions. This provides a cost-effective mission with a large research exchange. The launches from Esrange Space Center are preliminary scheduled to take place in August 2014 with an apogee of approximately 250 km. SPIDER SPIDER (Small Payloads for Investigation of Disturbances in Electrojet by Rockets) is a research project at Space and Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm with Nicholay Ivchenko as responsible researcher. The mission includes up to 10 subsidiary payloads ejected from the main payload to measure the structure of the electrostatic turbulence in the ionosphere. The measurements take place entirely in the subsidiary payloads, which are completely autonomous and recovered individually after the flight. The launch from Esrange Space Center is preliminary scheduled to take place in March 2015 with a desired apogee of approximately 140 km. LEEWAVES LEEWAVES (Local Excitation and Effects of Waves on Atmospheric Vertical Structure) is a research project at the Meteorological

  20. The development of space solid rocket motors in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianding, Huang; Dingyou, Ye

    1997-01-01

    China has undertaken to research and develop composite solid propellant rocket motors since 1958. At the request of the development of space technology, composite solid propellant rocket motor has developed from small to large, step by step. For the past thirty eight years, much progress has made, many technical obstacles, such as motor design, case materials and their processing technology, propellant formulations and manufacture, nozzles and thrust vector control, safe ignition, environment tests, nondestructive inspection and quality assurance, static firing test and measurement etc. have been solved. A serial of solid rocket motors have been offered for China's satellites launch. The systems of research, design, test and manufacture of solid rocket motors have been formed.

  1. The German scientific balloon and sounding rocket program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, A. F.; Otterbein, M.

    1987-08-01

    Sounding rocket projects in astronomy, aeronomy, magnetospheric research, material sciences, and life sciences under microgravity are described. Balloon projects in astronomy and aeronomy are presented. Satellite projects including AMPTE, SOHO, Cluster, San Marco-D, HELIOS, Giotto, Ulysses, CRAF, ISOPHOT, Rosat, and the Gamma Ray Observatory are mentioned.

  2. An Overview of the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberspeaker, Philip J.; Smith, Ira S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 50 to 60 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community. These missions support investigations sponsored by NASA's Offices of Space Science, Life and Microgravity Sciences & Applications, and Earth Science. The Goddard Space Flight Center has management and implementation responsibility for these programs. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program provides the science community with payload development support, environmental testing, launch vehicles, and launch operations from fixed and mobile launch ranges. Sounding rockets continue to provide a cost-effective way to make in situ observations from 50 to 1500 km in the near-earth environment and to uniquely cover the altitude regime between 50 km and 130 km above the Earth's surface. New technology efforts include GPS payload event triggering, tailored trajectories, new vehicle configuration development to expand current capabilities, and the feasibility assessment of an ultra high altitude sounding rocket vehicle. The NASA Balloon Program continues to make advancements and developments in its capabilities for support of the scientific ballooning community. The Long Duration Balloon (LDB) is capable of providing flight durations in excess of two weeks and has had many successful flights since its development. The NASA Balloon Program is currently engaged in the development of the Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB), which will be capable of providing flight times up to 100-days. Additional development efforts are focusing on ultra high altitude balloons, station keeping techniques and planetary balloon technologies.

  3. Additional historical solid rocket motor burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, Carsten; Homeister, Maren; Oswald, Michael; Stabroth, Sebastian; Klinkrad, Heiner; Vörsmann, Peter

    2009-06-01

    The use of orbital solid rocket motors (SRM) is responsible for the release of a high number of slag and Al 2O 3 dust particles which contribute to the space debris environment. This contribution has been modeled for the ESA space debris model MASTER (Meteoroid and Space Debris Terrestrial Environment Reference). The current model version, MASTER-2005, is based on the simulation of 1076 orbital SRM firings which mainly contributed to the long-term debris environment. SRM firings on very low earth orbits which produce only short living particles are not considered. A comparison of the modeled flux with impact data from returned surfaces shows that the shape and quantity of the modeled SRM dust distribution matches that of recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array measurements very well. However, the absolute flux level for dust is under-predicted for some of the analyzed Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) surfaces. This indicates that some past SRM firings are not included in the current event database. Thus it is necessary to investigate, if additional historical SRM burns, like the retro-burn of low orbiting re-entry capsules, may be responsible for these dust impacts. The most suitable candidates for these firings are the large number of SRM retro-burns of return capsules. This paper focuses on the SRM retro-burns of Russian photoreconnaissance satellites, which were used in high numbers during the time of the LDEF mission. It is discussed which types of satellites and motors may have been responsible for this historical contribution. Altogether, 870 additional SRM retro-burns have been identified. An important task is the identification of such missions to complete the current event data base. Different types of motors have been used to de-orbit both large satellites and small film return capsules. The results of simulation runs are presented.

  4. General view of the Aft Rocket Motor mated with the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Aft Rocket Motor mated with the External Tank Attach Ring and Aft Skirt Assembly in the process of being mounted onto the Mobile Launch Platform in the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  5. General view of the Aft Rocket Motor mated with the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Aft Rocket Motor mated with the External Tank Attach Ring and Aft Skirt Assembly being transported from the Rotation Processing and Surge Facility to the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  6. Lyman alpha coronagraph research sounding rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Kohl, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The ultraviolet light coronagraph was developed and successfully flown on three rocket flights on 13 April 1979, 16 February 1980 and 20 July 1982. During each of these flights, the Ultraviolet Light Coronagraph was flown jointly with the White Light Coronagraph provided by the High Altitude Observatory. Ultraviolet diagnostic techniques and instrumentation for determining the basic plasma parameters of solar wind acceleration regions in the extended corona were developed and verified and the understanding of the physics of the corona through the performance, analysis and interpretation of solar observations advanced. Valuable UV diagnostics can be performed in the absence of a natural solar eclipse.

  7. Inflatable device for excluding sea water from a rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purser, Michael J.

    1992-06-01

    An inflatable water exclusion device for protecting the rocket motor of a solid-propellant-powered missile, launched from below the surface of the sea by means of launching gas, from being damaged by a spout of water spurting up into the atmosphere. The device consists of a round base plate that attaches to an expellable baffle assembly located within the throat of the rocket motor nozzle, and an inflatable elastomer-coated cloth bag that is attached to the rim of the base plate. As the missile ascends toward the surface of the sea, launching gas that was originally contained within the voids of the rocket motor expands and streams out through the nozzle thereby causing the bag to inflate. After the missile has breached the surface of the sea the rocket motor ignites, thereby causing the baffle assembly and the inflatable water exclusion device attached thereto to be expelled from the nozzle and fall back into the sea.

  8. A smoke producing rocket motor for atmospheric wind profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Grubelich, M.C. ); Rowland, J. . Applied Physics Lab.)

    1991-01-01

    A composite propellant was developed to produce a dense plume from a rocket motor. The development of this propellant combined the smoke producing capabilities of a smoke generator with a rocket motor, thereby integrating the separate systems into one unit. A rocket motor was designed for use with this propellant to produce a high density particulate plume. This plume could then be used to determine the wind profile in the atmosphere by using a light detection and ranging system. Additionally, this smoke producing propellant could be used for rapid screening or identification. The burn rate characteristics of the propellant were measured and static firings of rocket motors were conducted to determine the performance of the propellant. The results of these tests will be presented as well as theoretical performance predictions of a flight vehicle.

  9. A smoke producing rocket motor for atmospheric wind profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Grubelich, M.C.; Rowland, J.

    1991-12-31

    A composite propellant was developed to produce a dense plume from a rocket motor. The development of this propellant combined the smoke producing capabilities of a smoke generator with a rocket motor, thereby integrating the separate systems into one unit. A rocket motor was designed for use with this propellant to produce a high density particulate plume. This plume could then be used to determine the wind profile in the atmosphere by using a light detection and ranging system. Additionally, this smoke producing propellant could be used for rapid screening or identification. The burn rate characteristics of the propellant were measured and static firings of rocket motors were conducted to determine the performance of the propellant. The results of these tests will be presented as well as theoretical performance predictions of a flight vehicle.

  10. An Overview of the NASA Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, Bobby J.; Needleman, Harvey C.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a combined total of approximately fifty to sixty missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community. These missions are provided in support of investigations sponsored by NASA'S Offices of Space Science, Life and Microgravity Sciences & Applications, and Earth Science. The Goddard Space Flight Center has management and implementation responsibility for these programs. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program has continued to su,pport the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payload and providing the rocket vehicle and launch operations necessary to provide the altitude/time required obtain the science objectives. The sounding rockets continue to provide a cost-effective way to make in situ observations from 50 to 1500 km in the near-earth environment and to uniquely cover the altitude regime between 50 km and 130 km above the Earth's surface, which is physically inaccessible to either balloons or satellites. A new architecture for providing this support has been introduced this year with the establishment of the NASA Sounding Rockets Contract. The Program has continued to introduce improvements into their operations and ground and flight systems. An overview of the NASA Sounding Rockets Program with special emphasis on the new support contract will be presented. The NASA Balloon Program continues to make advancements and developments in its capabilities for support of the scientific ballooning community. Long duration balloon (LDB) is a prominent aspect of the program with two campaigns scheduled for this calendar year. Two flights are scheduled in the Northern Hemisphere from Fairbanks, Alaska, in June and two flights are scheduled from McMurdo, Antarctica, in the Southern Hemisphere in December. The comprehensive balloon research and development (R&D) effort has continued with advances being made across the

  11. Hybrid rocket motor testing at Nammo Raufoss A/S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rønningen, Jan-Erik; Kubberud, Nils

    2005-08-01

    Hybrid rocket motor technology and the use of hybrid rockets have gained increased interest in recent years in many countries. A typical hybrid rocket consists of a tank containing the oxidizer in either liquid or gaseous state connected to the combustion chamber containing an injector, inert solid fuel grain and nozzle. Nammo Raufoss A/S has for almost 40 years designed and produced high-performance solid propellant rocket motors for many military missile systems as well as solid propellant rocket motors for civil space use. In 2003 an in-house technology program was initiated to investigate and study hybrid rocket technology. On 23 September 2004 the first in-house designed hybrid test rocket motor was static test fired at Nammo Raufoss Test Center. The oxidizer was gaseous oxygen contained in a tank pressurized to 10MPa, flow controlled through a sonic orifice into the combustion chamber containing a multi port radial injector and six bore cartridge-loaded fuel grain containing a modified HTPB fuel composition. The motor was ignited using a non-explosive heated wire. This paper will present what has been achieved at Nammo Raufoss since the start of the program.

  12. Measuring the Internal Environment of Solid Rocket Motors During Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisenberg, Brent; Smith, Doug; Speas, Kyle; Corliss, Adam

    2003-01-01

    A new instrumentation system has been developed to measure the internal environment of solid rocket test motors during motor ignition. The system leverages conventional, analog gages with custom designed, electronics modules to provide safe, accurate, high speed data acquisition capability. To date, the instrumentation system has been demonstrated in a laboratory environment and on subscale static fire test motors ranging in size from 5-inches to 24-inches in diameter. Ultimately, this system is intended to be installed on a full-scale Reusable Solid Rocket Motor. This paper explains the need for the data, the components and capabilities of the system, and the test results.

  13. Flip-Flop Recovery System for sounding rocket payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The design, development, and testing of the Flip-Flop Recovery System, which protects sensitive forward-mounted instruments from ground impact during sounding rocket payload recovery operations, are discussed. The system was originally developed to reduce the impact damage to the expensive gold-plated forward-mounted spectrometers in two existing Taurus-Orion rocket payloads. The concept of the recovery system is simple: the payload is flipped over end-for-end at a predetermined time just after parachute deployment, thus minimizing the risk of damage to the sensitive forward portion of the payload from ground impact.

  14. Theory of prediction of solar eclipse as observed from a sounding rocket using rocket trajectory and eclipse ephemeris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarvey, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with the problem of determining various solar eclipse variables as observed from a sounding rocket for various rocket trajectories. By applying the methods described to a set of trajectories, a set of boundary conditions, launch azimuth, quadrant elevation, and launch time may be selected to optimize any aspect of eclipse observation within the constraints imposed by rocket performance.

  15. Radial slot flows in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbing, J. H.; Heister, S. D.

    1993-06-01

    A series of parametric numerical solutions have been generated to characterize the two-dimensional flowfield due to the presence of a radial slot in a solid rocket propellant grain. Results have been parameterized in terms of upstream core Mach number, slot contraction ratio, and slot-to-core mass flow and momentum ratios. Numerical solutions of the axisymmetric Euler equations have been obtained on a 'generic' slot geometry using a cell-centered, finite volume scheme. Results indicate that both the stagnation pressure loss and grain suction force on the propellant segment downstream of the slot correlate well with slot-to-core momentum ratio; a parameter which has not been used in previous studies. Significant differences (in stagnation pressure losses) have been identified between the 2-D numerical results and the 1-D methods applied in current state-of-the-art ballistics codes. We anticipate that the correlations derived through this parametric study can be used in preliminary performance and grain stress analyses performed during the motor development process.

  16. Physico-Chemical Research on the Sounding Rocket Maser 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, Christian; Kemi, Stig; Abrahamsson, Mattias; Florin, Gunnar

    MASER is a sounding rocket platform for short-duration microgravity experiments, providing the scientific community with an excellent microgravity tool. The MASER programme has been running by SSC from 1987 and has up to 2012 provided twelve successful flights for microgravity missions with 6-7 minutes of microgravity, the g-level is normally below 1x10-5 g. The MASER 13 is planned to be launched in spring 2015 from Esrange Space Center in Northern Sweden. The rocket will carry four ESA financed experiment modules. The MASER 13 vehicle will be propelled by the 2-stage solid fuel VSB-30 rocket motor, which provided the 390 kg payload with an apogee of 260 km and 6 and a half minutes of microgravity. Swedish Space Corporation carries out the MASER missions for ESA and the program is also available for other customers. The payload comprise four different experiment modules of which three could be defined as physic-chemical research; XRMON-SOL, CDIC-3, MEDI. It also comprises the Maser Service Module and the recovery system. The Service Module provided real-time 5 Mbps down-link of compressed experiment digital video data from the on-board cameras, as well as high-speed housekeeping telemetry data. XRMON-SOL In this experiment the influence of gravity on the formation of an equiaxed microstructure will be investigated. Special attention will be put on the aspect of nucleation, segregation and impingement. The experiment scope is to melt and solidify an AlCu-alloy sample in microgravity. The solidification will be performed in an isothermal environment. The solidification process will be monitored and recorded with X-ray image during the whole flight, images will also be down-linked to ground for real-time monitoring and possible interaction. CDIC-3 The goal is to study in migrogravity the spatio-temporal dynamics of a chemical front travelling in a thin solution layer open to the air and specifically the respective role of Marangoni and density-related hydrodynamic

  17. Probabilistic failure assessment with application to solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Davidson, Barry D.; Moore, Nicholas R.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative methodology is being developed for assessment of risk of failure of solid rocket motors. This probabilistic methodology employs best available engineering models and available information in a stochastic framework. The framework accounts for incomplete knowledge of governing parameters, intrinsic variability, and failure model specification error. Earlier case studies have been conducted on several failure modes of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. Work in progress on application of this probabilistic approach to large solid rocket boosters such as the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor for the Space Shuttle is described. Failure due to debonding has been selected as the first case study for large solid rocket motors (SRMs) since it accounts for a significant number of historical SRM failures. Impact of incomplete knowledge of governing parameters and failure model specification errors is expected to be important.

  18. Universal Data Handling System for Sounding Rockets and Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, G.

    2015-09-01

    Data handling systems (DHS) used in service systems and experiment modules on sounding rockets and balloons have traditionally been different in design. A study was performed in 2012 at SSC to evaluate the feasibility of a common system usable across different platforms. The outcome was the “Unified DHS system”. The new DHS is very modular in design and can easily be adapted to different mission scenarios.

  19. Workshop on the Suborbital Science Sounding Rocket Program, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The unique characteristics of the sounding rocket program is described, with its importance to space science stressed, especially in providing UARS correlative measurements. The program provided opportunities to do innovative scientific studies in regions not other wise accessible; it was a testbed for developing new technologies; and its key attributes were flexibility, reliability, and economy. The proceedings of the workshop are presented in viewgraph form, including the objectives of the workshop and the workshop agenda.

  20. Past and Present Large Solid Rocket Motor Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kowalski, Robert R.; Owen, David B., II

    2011-01-01

    A study was performed to identify the current and historical trends in the capability of solid rocket motor testing in the United States. The study focused on test positions capable of testing solid rocket motors of at least 10,000 lbf thrust. Top-level information was collected for two distinct data points plus/minus a few years: 2000 (Y2K) and 2010 (Present). Data was combined from many sources, but primarily focused on data from the Chemical Propulsion Information Analysis Center s Rocket Propulsion Test Facilities Database, and heritage Chemical Propulsion Information Agency/M8 Solid Rocket Motor Static Test Facilities Manual. Data for the Rocket Propulsion Test Facilities Database and heritage M8 Solid Rocket Motor Static Test Facilities Manual is provided to the Chemical Propulsion Information Analysis Center directly from the test facilities. Information for each test cell for each time period was compiled and plotted to produce a graphical display of the changes for the nation, NASA, Department of Defense, and commercial organizations during the past ten years. Major groups of plots include test facility by geographic location, test cells by status/utilization, and test cells by maximum thrust capability. The results are discussed.

  1. Assessment of impact damage of composite rocket motor cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    This contract reviewed the available literature on mechanisms of low velocity impact damage in filament wound rocket motor cases, MDE methods to quantify damage, critical coupon level test methods, manufacturing and material process variables and empirical and analytical modeling off impact damage. The critical design properties for rocket motor cases are biaxial hoop and axial tensile strength. Low velocity impact damage is insidious because it can create serious nonvisible damage at very low impact velocities. In thick rocket motor cases the prevalent low velocity impact damage is fiber fracture and matrix cracking adjacent to the front face. In contrast, low velocity loading of thin wall cylinders induces flexure, depending on span length and the flexure induces delamination and tensile cracking on the back face wall opposed to impact occurs due to flexural stresses imposed by impact loading. Important NDE methods for rocket motor cases are non-contacting methods that allow inspection from one side. Among these are vibrothermography, and pulse-echo methods based on acoustic-ultrasonic methods. High resolution techniques such as x-ray computed tomography appear to have merit for accurate geometrical characterization of local damage to support development of analytical models of micromechanics. The challenge of coupon level testing is to reproduce the biaxial stress state that the full scale article experiences, and to determine how to scale the composite structure to model full sized behavior. Biaxial tensile testing has been performed by uniaxially tensile loading internally pressurized cylinders. This is experimentally difficult due to gripping problems and pressure containment. Much prior work focused on uniaxial tensile testing of model filament wound cylinders. Interpretation of the results of some studies is complicated by the fact that the fabrication process did not duplicate full scale manufacturing. It is difficult to scale results from testing subscale

  2. General view of the Aft Solid Rocket Motor Segment mated ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of the Aft Solid Rocket Motor Segment mated with the Aft Skirt Assembly and External Tank Attach Ring in the Rotation Processing and Surge Facility at Kennedy Space Center and awaiting transfer to the Vehicle Assembly Building where it will be mounted onto the Mobile Launch Platform. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  3. Analyses of Noise from Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) Firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Kent L.; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Jerome, Trevor W.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.; Hobbs, Christopher M.; James, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Space Launch Vehicle (SLS) program has chosen the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor V (RSRMV) as the booster system for initial flights. Lift off acoustics continue to be a consideration in overall vehicle vibroacoustic evaluations and launch pad modifications. Work started with the Ares program to understand solid rocket noise mechanisms is continuing through SLS program in conjunction with BYU/Blue Ridge Research Consulting.

  4. General view of a Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle in the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of a Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle in the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Assembly and Refurbishment Facility at Kennedy Space Center, being prepared to be mated with the Aft Skirt. In this view you can see the attach brackets where the Thrust Vector Control System actuators connect to the nozzle which can swivel the nozzle up to 3.5 degrees to redirect the thrust to steer and maintain the Shuttle's programmed trajectory. - Space Transportation System, Solid Rocket Boosters, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, Harris County, TX

  5. The Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE) Sounding Rocket Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Glenn T.; Hassler, Donald M.; Deforest, Craig; Slater, David D.; Thomas, Roger J.; Ayres, Thomas; Davis, Michael; de Pontieu, Bart; Diller, Jed; Graham, Roy; Michaelis, Harald; Schuele, Udo; Warren, Harry

    2016-03-01

    We present a summary of the solar observing Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE) sounding rocket program including an overview of the design and calibration of the instrument, flight performance, and preliminary chromospheric results from the successful November 2014 launch of the RAISE instrument. The RAISE sounding rocket payload is the fastest scanning-slit solar ultraviolet imaging spectrograph flown to date. RAISE is designed to observe the dynamics and heating of the solar chromosphere and corona on time scales as short as 100-200ms, with arcsecond spatial resolution and a velocity sensitivity of 1-2km/s. Two full spectral passbands over the same one-dimensional spatial field are recorded simultaneously with no scanning of the detectors or grating. The two different spectral bands (first-order 1205-1251Å and 1524-1569Å) are imaged onto two intensified Active Pixel Sensor (APS) detectors whose focal planes are individually adjusted for optimized performance. RAISE reads out the full field of both detectors at 5-10Hz, recording up to 1800 complete spectra (per detector) in a single 6-min rocket flight. This opens up a new domain of high time resolution spectral imaging and spectroscopy. RAISE is designed to observe small-scale multithermal dynamics in Active Region (AR) and quiet Sun loops, identify the strength, spectrum and location of high frequency waves in the solar atmosphere, and determine the nature of energy release in the chromospheric network.

  6. The FOXSI sounding rocket: Latest analysis and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilo Buitrago-Casas, Juan; Glesener, Lindsay; Christe, Steven; Krucker, Sam; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Ramsey, Brian; Han, Raymond

    2016-05-01

    Hard X-ray (HXR) observations are a linchpin for studying particle acceleration and hot thermal plasma emission in the solar corona. Current and past indirectly imaging instruments lack the sensitivity and dynamic range needed to observe faint HXR signatures, especially in the presences of brighter sources. These limitations are overcome by using HXR direct focusing optics coupled with semiconductor detectors. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket experiment is a state of the art solar telescope that develops and applies these capabilities.The FOXSI sounding rocket has successfully flown twice, observing active regions, microflares, and areas of the quiet-Sun. Thanks to its far superior imaging dynamic range, FOXSI performs cleaner hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy than previous instruments that use indirect imaging methods like RHESSI.We present a description of the FOXSI rocket payload, paying attention to the optics and semiconductor detectors calibrations, as well as the upgrades made for the second flight. We also introduce some of the latest FOXSI data analysis, including imaging spectroscopy of microflares and active regions observed during the two flights, and the differential emission measure distribution of the nonflaring corona.

  7. Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) locomotion during a sounding rocket flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark S.; Keller, Tony S.

    2008-05-01

    The locomotor activity of young Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) was studied during a Nike-Orion sounding rocket flight, which included a short-duration microgravity exposure. An infrared monitoring system was used to determine the activity level, instantaneous velocity, and continuous velocity of 240 (120 male, 120 female) fruit flies. Individual flies were placed in chambers that limit their motion to walking. Chambers were oriented both vertically and horizontally with respect to the rocket's longitudinal axis. Significant changes in Drosophila locomotion patterns were observed throughout the sounding rocket flight, including launch, microgravity exposure, payload re-entry, and after ocean impact. During the microgravity portion of the flight (3.8 min), large increases in all locomotion measurements for both sexes were observed, with some measurements doubling compared to pad (1 G) data. Initial effects of microgravity were probably delayed due to large accelerations from the payload despining immediately before entering microgravity. The results indicate that short-duration microgravity exposure has a large effect on locomotor activity for both males and females, at least for a short period of time. The locomotion increases may explain the increased male aging observed during long-duration exposure to microgravity. Studies focusing on long-duration microgravity exposure are needed to confirm these findings, and the relationship of increased aging and locomotion.

  8. Welded Titanium Case for Space-Probe Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, A. J.; Boundy, R. A.; Martens, H. E.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1959-01-01

    The high strength-to-weight ratio of titanium alloys suggests their use for solid-propellant rocket-motor cases for high-performance orbiting or space-probe vehicles. The paper describes the fabrication of a 6-in.-diam., 0.025-in.-wall rocket-motor from the 6A1-4V titanium alloy. The rocket-motor case, used in the fourth stage of a successful JPL-NASA lunar-probe flight, was constructed using a design previously proven satisfactory for Type 410 stainless steel. The nature and scope of the problems peculiar to the use of the titanium alloy, which effected an average weight saving of 34%, are described.

  9. Miniature Rocket Motor for Aircraft Stall/Spin Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Design accommodates different thrust levels and burn times with minimum weight. Different thrust levels achieved by substituting other propellants of different diameter and burn-rate characteristics. Different burn times achieved by simply changing length of grain/tube assembly. Grain bond material also acts as insulator for fiberglass tube. Rocket motor attached to aircraft model and ignited from radio-controlled 4.8-volt power source. Device provides more than twice energy available in previous designs at only 60 percent of weight. Rocket motor used to identify energy requirements for aircraft stall/spin recovery positive propulsion system.

  10. Modeling of nonlinear longitudinal instability in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Joseph D.; Levine, Jay N.

    A comprehensive model of nonlinear longitudinal combustion instability in solid rocket motors has been developed. The two primary elements of this stability analysis are a finite difference solution of the two phase flow in the combustion chamber and a coupled solution of the nonlinear transient propellant burning rate. A new combination finite difference scheme gives the analysis the ability to treat the type of multiple travelling shock wave instabilities that are frequently observed in reduced smoke tactical solid rocket motors. Models for predicting the behavior of both gas ejection and solid ejecta pulses were developed and incorporated into the analysis. Extensive comparisons between model predictions and experimental data from pulsed solid rocket motor firings have been carried out. The nonlinear instability analysis was found to be capable of predicting the complete range of nonlinear behavior observed in actual motor firing data. Good agreement between measured and predicted initial pulse amplitude, pulse evolution, limit cycle amplitude and mean pressure shift was obtained. This investigation has also provided new insight into the nature of nonlinear pulse triggered instability and the factors which influence its occurrence and severity. This new instability analysis should significantly enhance our capability to design tactical solid rocket motors that are free from troublesome and expensive nonlinear combusion instability problems.

  11. Failure analysis of solid rocket apogee motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    The analysis followed five selected motors through initial design, development, test, qualification, manufacture, and final flight reports. An audit was conducted at the manufacturing plants to complement the literature search with firsthand observations of the current philosophies and practices that affect reliability of the motors. A second literature search emphasized acquisition of spacecraft and satellite data bearing on solid motor reliability. It was concluded that present practices at the plants yield highly reliable flight hardware. Reliability can be further improved by new developments of aft-end bonding and initiator/igniter nondestructive test methods, a safe/arm device, and an insulation formulation. Minimum diagnostic instrumentation is recommended for all motor flights. Surplus motors should be used in margin testing. Criteria should be established for pressure and zone curing. The motor contractor should be represented at launch. New design analyses should be made of stretched motors and spacecraft/motor pairs.

  12. Near noise field characteristics of Nike rocket motors for application to space vehicle payload acoustic qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilton, D. A.; Bruton, D.

    1977-01-01

    Results of a series of noise measurements that were made under controlled conditions during the static firing of two Nike solid propellant rocket motors are presented. The usefulness of these motors as sources for general spacecraft noise testing was assessed, and the noise expected in the cargo bay of the orbiter was reproduced. Brief descriptions of the Nike motor, the general procedures utilized for the noise tests, and representative noise data including overall sound pressure levels, one third octave band spectra, and octave band spectra were reviewed. Data are presented on two motors of different ages in order to show the similarity between noise measurements made on motors having different loading dates. The measured noise from these tests is then compared to that estimated for the space shuttle orbiter cargo bay.

  13. Musical Sounds, Motor Resonance, and Detectable Agency

    PubMed Central

    LAUNAY, JACQUES

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the paradox that while human music making evolved and spread in an environment where it could only occur in groups, it is now often apparently an enjoyable asocial phenomenon. Here I argue that music is, by definition, sound that we believe has been in some way organized by a human agent, meaning that listening to any musical sounds can be a social experience. There are a number of distinct mechanisms by which we might associate musical sound with agency. While some of these mechanisms involve learning motor associations with that sound, it is also possible to have a more direct relationship from musical sound to agency, and the relative importance of these potentially independent mechanisms should be further explored. Overall, I conclude that the apparent paradox of solipsistic musical engagement is in fact unproblematic, because the way that we perceive and experience musical sounds is inherently social. PMID:27122999

  14. Investigation of rocket motors 3 inch number 1 Mk 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrington, L. M.

    1994-05-01

    In 1992, Aircraft Research and Development Unit (ARDU), RAAF, experienced two misfires with Rocket Motors, 3 in., No. 1, Mk 4, during a series of firings at Woomera. These motors were sampled from a batch manufactured in 1957, and subsequent to the misfires this batch was withdrawn from use. An alternate batch of motors manufactured in 1966 was available to ARDU. Tests were conducted on a number of these motors to advise on their suitability for use, and as a result, a further five years life was assigned with a recommendation to retest after that period.

  15. Dual sounding rocket observations of low-altitude electrostatic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, M. H.; Carlson, C. W.; Mcfadden, J. P.; Mozer, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    Two sounding rockets were used to simultaneously place two payloads on nearly the same magnetic field lines in the late-evening auroral zone. The dc electric field measurements obtained by the payloads imply a parallel potential of several kV below the higher payload, probably occurring between the two payloads. No possible resistive mechanism in observed in the 100 Hz-10 kKz band which could support the parallel field; this implies the existence of resistance-generating turbulence which are either at other frequencies, or of a type not measured by the probes, or localized parallel potentials not coincident with the payload trajectories.

  16. The Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation Sounding Rocket Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Kobayashi, K.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will describe the objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the unique optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. A sounding rocket payload has been developed to test the feasibility of magnetic field measurements in the Sun's transition region. The optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic sensitive lines formed in the transition region (CIV at 1550 A and MgII at 2800 A). This paper will concentrate on the polarization properties SUMI's toroidal varied-line-space (TVLS) gratings and its system level testing as we prepare to launch in the Summer of 2008.

  17. Sounding Rockets within Swedish National Balloon and Rocket Programme- Providing Access to Space from Esrange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjolander, K.; Karlsson, T.; Lockowandt, C.

    2015-09-01

    Initiated in 2012 by the Swedish National Space Board (SNSB), a new programme dedicated for Swedish scientists to gain access to space using balloons and sounding rockets was started. This programme promotes the possibility to ensure continuity in both the science and the technology used. The sounding rocket part of this national programme started with three possible missions. SPIDER (Small Payloads for Investigation of Disturbances in Electrojet by Rockets) from the Space and Plasma physics department of KTH, 0-STATES (Oxygen Species and Thermospheric Airglow in The Earth's Sky) from the Department of Meteorology Stockholm University (MISU) and LEEWAVES (Local Excitation and Effects of Waves on Atmospheric VErtical Structure) that is collaboration between KTH and MISU. These three missions were planned for launches in 2015 and 2016. SSc has been contracted on a launch ticket basis to provide the launch and service to the scientific instrumentation. This paper presents the SPIDER, 0-STATES and LEEWAVES missions focussing on a mission related technical solutions perspective.

  18. Combustion Stability Assessments of the Black Brant Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The Black Brant variation of the Standard Brant developed in the 1960's has been a workhorse motor of the NASA Sounding Rocket Project Office (SRPO) since the 1970's. In March 2012, the Black Brant Mk1 used on mission 36.277 experienced combustion instability during a flight at White Sands Missile Range, the third event in the last four years, the first occurring in November, 2009, the second in April 2010. After the 2010 event the program has been increasing the motor's throat diameter post-delivery with the goal of lowering the chamber pressure and increasing the margin against combustion instability. During the most recent combustion instability event, the vibrations exceeded the qualification levels for the Flight Termination System. The present study utilizes data generated from T-burner testing of multiple Black Brant propellants at the Naval Air Warfare Center at China Lake, to improve the combustion stability predictions for the Black Brant Mk1 and to generate new predictions for the Mk2. Three unique one dimensional (1-D) stability models were generated, representing distinct Black Brant flights, two of which experienced instabilities. The individual models allowed for comparison of stability characteristics between various nozzle configurations. A long standing "rule of thumb" states that increased stability margin is gained by increasing the throat diameter. In contradiction to this experience based rule, the analysis shows that little or no margin is gained from a larger throat diameter. The present analysis demonstrates competing effects resulting from an increased throat diameter accompanying a large response function. As is expected, more acoustic energy was expelled through the nozzle, but conversely more acoustic energy was generated due to larger gas velocities near the propellant surfaces.

  19. Rocket motors incorporating basalt fiber and nanoclay compositions and methods of insulating a rocket motor with the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajiwala, Himansu M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An insulation composition that comprises at least one nitrile butadiene rubber, basalt fibers, and nanoclay is disclosed. Further disclosed is an insulation composition that comprises polybenzimidazole fibers, basalt fibers, and nanoclay. The basalt fibers may be present in the insulation compositions in a range of from approximately 1% by weight to approximately 6% by weight of the total weight of the insulation composition. The nanoclay may be present in the insulation compositions in a range of from approximately 5% by weight to approximately 10% by weight of the total weight of the insulation composition. Rocket motors including the insulation compositions and methods of insulating a rocket motor are also disclosed.

  20. Expendable solid rocket motor upper stages for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. P.; Jones, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    A family of expendable solid rocket motor upper stages has been conceptually defined to provide the payloads for the Space Shuttle with performance capability beyond the low earth operational range of the Shuttle Orbiter. In this concept-feasibility assessment, three new solid rocket motors of fixed impulse are defined for use with payloads requiring levels of higher energy. The conceptual design of these motors is constrained to limit thrusting loads into the payloads and to conserve payload bay length. These motors are combined in various vehicle configurations with stage components derived from other programs for the performance of a broad range of upper-stage missions from spin-stabilized, single-stage transfers to three-axis stabilized, multistage insertions. Estimated payload delivery performance and combined payload mission loading configurations are provided for the upper-stage configurations.

  1. ASRM plume deflector analysis program. [advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Michael C.; Douglas, Freddie, III; Orlin, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents analytical conclusions resulting from subscale solid rocket motor tests and flowfield modeling for a plume deflector. Loads, flow characteristics, and corresponding material behavior were predicted or observed and will be used in final design of the deflector. The efforts resulted in quantifiable size reductions and lower cost material selections, which will significantly reduce the deflector cost while meeting performance requirements.

  2. Post-impact behavior of composite solid rocket motor cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highsmith, Alton L.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, composite materials have seen increasing use in advanced structural applications because of the significant weight savings they offer when compared to more traditional engineering materials. The higher cost of composites must be offset by the increased performance that results from reduced structural weight if these new materials are to be used effectively. At present, there is considerable interest in fabricating solid rocket motor cases out of composite materials, and capitalizing on the reduced structural weight to increase rocket performance. However, one of the difficulties that arises when composite materials are used is that composites can develop significant amounts of internal damage during low velocity impacts. Such low velocity impacts may be encountered in routine handling of a structural component like a rocket motor case. The ability to assess the reduction in structural integrity of composite motor cases that experience accidental impacts is essential if composite rocket motor cases are to be certified for manned flight. The study described herein was an initial investigation of damage development and reduction of tensile strength in an idealized composite subjected to low velocity impacts.

  3. Ion Flow Measurements from the JOULE Sounding Rocket Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangalli, L.; Knudsen, D.; Pfaff, R.; Burchil, J.; Larsen, M.; Clemmons, J.; Steigies, C.

    2006-12-01

    The JOULE sounding rocket mission was designed to investigate structured Joule dissipation in the auroral ionosphere. JOULE was launched March 27, 2003 from Poker Flat, Alaska, during a substorm. The mission included two instrumented rockets and two chemical release (TMA) rockets. One of the instrumented payloads carried a Suprathermal Ion Imager (SII) that measured 2-D (energy/angle) distributions of the core (0- 8 eV) ion population at a rate of 125 per second. SII measured one component of the ion drift velocitiy perpendicular to the magnetic field and the field-aligned component of the ion drift velocity. We present results showing good agreement between ion drifts measured perpendicular to the geomagnetic field and those inferred from an ěc E×ěc B measurement, with signs of ion demagnetization as the payload reached the upper E region. Also, the SII shows evidence of downward field-aligned ion flows at altitudes of 140-170 km within a region of enhanced auroral precipitation.

  4. Development of Thermal Barriers for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed using conventional 0-ring seals. The 5500+F combustion gases are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation. Special joint-fill compounds are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flowpath to the seals. On a number of occasions. NASA has observed in several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints hot gas penetration through defects in the joint- fill compound. The current nozzle-to-case joint design incorporates primary, secondary and wiper (inner-most) 0-rings and polysulfide joint-fill compound. In the current design, 1 out of 7 motors experience hot gas to the wiper 0-ring. Though the condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas to the wiper 0-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. NASA and solid rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and a thermal barrier, This paper presents burn-resistance, temperature drop, flow and resiliency test results for several types of NASA braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the thermal barriers when exposed to the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Thermal barriers braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over 6 minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Tests were performed on two thermal barrier braid architectures, denoted Carbon-3 and Carbon-6, to measure the temperature drop across and along the barrier in a compressed state when subjected to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch. Carbon-3 and Carbon-6 thermal barriers were excellent insulators causing temperature drops through their diameter of up to a 2800 and 2560 F. respectively. Gas temperature 1/4" downstream of the thermal barrier were within the

  5. Optical Design of the RAISE Sounding Rocket Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Roger J.; Hassler, Donald M.

    2004-01-01

    The Rapid Acquisition Imaging Spectrograph Experiment (RAISE) is a recently selected sounding rocket program to investigate the dynamics and heating of the outer solar atmosphere on time scales as short as looms. Its optical design represents the first in a new class of two-reflection W / E W imaging spectrometers with Toroidal Varied-Line Space (TVLS) gratings. Due to the remarkable imaging properties of such gratings, RAISE will measure spectra simultaneously over four different wavelength bands (1205-1243 & 1524-1559 A in first order, 602.5-621.5 & 762.0-779.5 A in second), with an unprecedented combination of spatial, spectral, and temporal resolutions. These spectral regions include many bright, well-resolved lines covering the temperature range from the low chromosphere up to the 2 MK Fe XI1 corona. The RAISE optical design features an extremely fast beam (f/7.0) and a minimum number of reflections, which together allow enough throughput to provide high quality spectral data even at its very short exposure times. Moreover, by operating with high magnification (x4.25), the RAISE spectrometer can most effectively utilize the full length and width available in the sounding rocket payload. First launch of this exciting new instrument is scheduled for 2006 June 21.

  6. Summary of the 1957-1982 UK scientific research sounding rocket programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delury, J. T.

    1983-06-01

    The Skylark, Petrel, Fulmar and Skua sounding rockets are described and over 750 flights using these rockets are summarized. Astrophysical and solar-terrestrial physics phenomena; the magnetosphere; space plasmas; and neutral winds were studied. Rockets were also used for X-ray astronomy.

  7. Launch summary for 1978 - 1982. [sounding rockets, space probes, and satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hills, H. K.

    1984-01-01

    Data pertinent to the launching of space probes, soundings rockets, and satellites presented in tables include launch date, time, and site; agency rocket identification; sponsoring country or countries; instruments carried for experiments; the peak altitude achieved by the rockets; and the apoapsis and periapsis for satellites. The experimenter or institution involved in the launching is also cited.

  8. The opportunity for hybrid rocket motors in commercial space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estey, Paul N.; Hughes, Brian G. R.

    1992-07-01

    Hybrid rocket motors which utilize a liquid oxidizer and a solid fuel offer the potential of significantly reducing the cost of propulsion systems for space launch vehicles. Hybrid propulsion systems have a high energy efficiency, a robust combustion process and because of the separation of the propellants both physically and by phase, hybrids cannot explode. This fundamental safety feature enables the hybrid system to be fabricated and operated at costs below those of competitive solid and liquid systems. Due to the safety and low-cost nature of hybrids, they are very attractive to commercial operators. The basics of the hybrid propulsion system and its operation are discussed along with a brief history and status of hybrid motor development. Potential applications of the hybrid rocket motor for commercial space launch vehicles are presented.

  9. Star 48 solid rocket motor nozzle analyses and instrumented firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The analyses and testing performed by NASA in support of an expanded and improved nozzle design data base for use by the U.S. solid rocket motor industry is presented. A production nozzle with a history of one ground failure and two flight failures was selected for analyses and testing. The stress analysis was performed with the Champion computer code developed by the U.S. Navy. Several improvements were made to the code. Strain predictions were made and compared to test data. Two short duration motor firings were conducted with highly instrumented nozzles. The first nozzle had 58 thermocouples, 66 strain gages, and 8 bondline pressure measurements. The second nozzle had 59 thermocouples, 68 strain measurements, and 8 bondline pressure measurements. Most of this instrumentation was on the nonmetallic parts, and provided significantly more thermal and strain data on the nonmetallic components of a nozzle than has been accumulated in a solid rocket motor test to date.

  10. Solid rocket motor case insulation bond nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas K.

    1990-01-01

    An effective insulator is needed to isolate the motor case from the hot combustion gases in such large solid rocket motors (SRMs) as those of the Space Shuttle, in order to preserve motor case integrity. An account is presently given of the ultrasonic NDE techniques employed to characterize the Space Shuttle's redesigned SRM. It is noted that current inspection procedures are sensitive to conditions that could result in anomalous ultrasonic indications; these conditions encompass (1) inner-outer surface nonparallelism, (2) sensor-surface nonparallelism, (3) contact pressure variation, (4) transducer coupling shoe wear, and (5) surface waviness. Both short-term and long-term NDE procedure recommendations are made.

  11. Hydrodynamic Stability Analysis of Particle-Laden Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, T. S.; Majdalani, J.

    2014-11-01

    Fluid-wall interactions within solid rocket motors can result in parietal vortex shedding giving rise to hydrodynamic instabilities, or unsteady waves, that translate into pressure oscillations. The oscillations can result in vibrations observed by the rocket, rocket subsystems, or payload, which can lead to changes in flight characteristics, design failure, or other undesirable effects. For many years particles have been embedded in solid rocket propellants with the understanding that their presence increases specific impulse and suppresses fluctuations in the flowfield. This study utilizes a two dimensional framework to understand and quantify the aforementioned two-phase flowfield inside a motor case with a cylindrical grain perforation. This is accomplished through the use of linearized Navier-Stokes equations with the Stokes drag equation and application of the biglobal ansatz. Obtaining the biglobal equations for analysis requires quantification of the mean flowfield within the solid rocket motor. To that end, the extended Taylor-Culick form will be utilized to represent the gaseous phase of the mean flowfield while the self-similar form will be employed for the particle phase. Advancing the mean flowfield by quantifying the particle mass concentration with a semi-analytical solution the finalized mean flowfield is combined with the biglobal equations resulting in a system of eight partial differential equations. This system is solved using an eigensolver within the framework yielding the entire spectrum of eigenvalues, frequency and growth rate components, at once. This work will detail the parametric analysis performed to demonstrate the stabilizing and destabilizing effects of particles within solid rocket combustion.

  12. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) sounding-rocket program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guidotti, J. G.

    1976-01-01

    An overall introduction to the NASA sounding rocket program as managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. The various sounding rockets, auxiliary systems (telemetry, guidance, etc.), launch sites, and services which NASA can provide are briefly described.

  13. An example of successful international cooperation in rocket motor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Russell A.; Berdoyes, Michel

    2002-07-01

    The history of over 25 years of cooperation between Pratt & Whitney, San Jose, CA, USA and Snecma Moteurs, Le Haillan, France in solid rocket motor and, in one case, liquid rocket engine technology is presented. Cooperative efforts resulted in achievements that likely would not have been realized individually. The combination of resources and technologies resulted in synergistic benefits and advancement of the state of the art in rocket motors and components. Discussions begun between the two companies in the early 1970's led to the first cooperative project, demonstration of an advanced apogee motor nozzle, during the mid 1970's. Shortly thereafter advanced carboncarbon (CC) throat materials from Snecma were comparatively tested with other materials in a P&W program funded by the USAF. Use of Snecma throat materials in CSD Tomahawk boosters followed. Advanced space motors were jointly demonstrated in company-funded joint programs in the late 1970's and early 1980's: an advanced space motor with an extendible exit cone and an all-composite advanced space motor that included a composite chamber polar adapter. Eight integral-throat entrances (ITEs) of 4D and 6D construction were tested by P&W for Snecma in 1982. Other joint programs in the 1980's included test firing of a "membrane" CC exit cone, and integral throat and exit cone (ITEC) nozzle incorporating NOVOLTEX® SEPCARB® material. A variation of this same material was demonstrated as a chamber aft polar boss in motor firings that included demonstration of composite material hot gas valve thrust vector control (TVC). In the 1990's a supersonic splitline flexseal nozzle was successfully demonstrated by the two companies as part of a US Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technology (IHPRPT) program effort. Also in the mid-1990s the NOVOLTEX® SEPCARB® material, so successful in solid rocket motor application, was successfully applied to a liquid engine nozzle extension. The first cooperative

  14. Development of Thermal Barriers For Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Joints in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors are sealed by O-rings to contain combustion gases inside the rocket that reach pressures of up to 900 psi and temperatures of up to 5500 F. To provide protection for the O-rings, the motors are insulated with either phenolic or rubber insulation. Gaps in the joints leading up to the O-rings are filled with polysulfide joint-fill compounds as an additional level of protection. The current RSRM nozzle-to-case joint design incorporating primary, secondary, and wiper O-rings experiences gas paths through the joint-fill compound to the innermost wiper O-ring in about one out of every seven motors. Although this does not pose a safety hazard to the motor, it is an undesirable condition that NASA and rocket manufacturer Thiokol want to eliminate. Each nozzle-to-case joint gas path results in extensive reviews and evaluation before flights can be resumed. Thiokol and NASA Marshall are currently working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design that has been used successfully in the field and igniter joint. They are also planning to incorporate the NASA Glenn braided carbon fiber thermal barrier into the joint. The thermal barrier would act as an additional level of protection for the O-rings and allow the elimination of the joint-fill compound from the joint.

  15. Studies of the exhaust products from solid propellant rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawbarn, R.; Kinslow, M.

    1976-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the feasibility of conducting environmental chamber tests on the physical processes which occur when a solid rocket motor exhaust mixes with the ambient atmosphere. Of particular interest was the interaction between hydrogen chloride, aluminum oxide, and water vapor. The program consisted of three phases: (1) building a small rocket motor and using it to provide the exhaust species in a controlled environment; (2) evaluating instruments used to detect and measure HCl concentrations and if possible determining whether the HCl existed in the gaseous state or as an acid aerosol; (3) monitoring a series of 6.4-percent scale space shuttle motor tests and comparing the results to the environmental chamber studies. Eighteen firings were conducted in an environmental chamber with the initial ambient relative humidity set at values from 29 to 100 percent. Two additional firings were made in a large shed, and four were made on an open concrete apron. Six test firings at MSFC were monitored, and the ground level concentrations are reported. Evidence is presented which shows that the larger Al2O3 (5 to 50 micrometers) particles from the rocket motor can act as condensation nuclei. Under appropriate ambient conditions where there is sufficient water vapor this results in the formation of an acid aerosol. Droplets of this acid were detected both in the environmental chamber and in the scaled shuttle engine tests.

  16. Thermal Barriers Developed for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Space shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed with conventional O-ring seals that are shielded from 5500 F combustion gases by thick layers of insulation and by special joint-fill compounds that fill assembly splitlines in the insulation. On a number of occasions, NASA has observed hot gas penetration through defects in the joint-fill compound of several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints. In the current nozzle-to-case joint, NASA has observed penetration of hot combustion gases through the joint-fill compound to the inboard wiper O-ring in one out of seven motors. Although this condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas penetration to the wiper O-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. The solid rocket motor manufacturer (Thiokol) approached the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field about the possibility of applying Glenn's braided fiber preform seal as a thermal barrier to protect the O-ring seals. Glenn and Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and by using a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier that would resist any hot gases that the J-leg does not block.

  17. Determination of failure limits for sterilizable solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, W. L.; Mastrolia, E. J.; Mcconnell, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A structural evaluation to establish probable failure limits and a series of environmental tests involving temperature cycling, sustained acceleration, and vibration were conducted on an 18-inch diameter solid rocket motor. Despite the fact that thermal, acceleration and vibration loads representing a severe overtest of conventional environmental requirements were imposed on the sterilizable motor, no structural failure of the grain or flexible support system was detected. The following significant conclusions are considered justified. It is concluded that: (1) the flexible grain retention system, which permitted heat sterilization at 275 F on the test motor, can readily be adopted to meet the environmental requirements of an operational motor design, and (2) if further substantiation of structural integrity is desired, the motor used is considered acceptable for static firing.

  18. First results from the OGRESS sounding rocket payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, T.; Schultz, T.; McCoy, J.; Miles, D.; Tutt, J.; McEntaffer, R.

    2015-09-01

    We present the first results from the Off-plane Grating Rocket for Extended Source Spectroscopy (OGRESS) sounding rocket payload based at the University of Iowa. OGRESS is designed to perform moderate resolution (R~10- 40) spectroscopy of diffuse celestial x-ray sources between 0.3 - 1.2 keV. A wire grid focuser constrains light from diffuse sources into a converging beam that feeds an array of off-plane diffraction gratings. The spectrum is focused onto Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors. OGRESS launched on the morning of May 2, 2015 and collected data for ~5 minutes before returning via parachute. OGRESS observed the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant with the goal of obtaining the most accurate physical diagnostics thus far recorded. During the flight, OGRESS had an unexpectedly high count rate which manifested as a highly uniform signal across the active area of the detector, swamping the expected spectrum from Cygnus. Efforts are still in progress to identify the source of this uniform signal and to discover if a usable spectrum can be extracted from the raw flight data.

  19. Sounding Rocket Instrument Development at UAHuntsville/NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Savage, Sabrina; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergei; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Podgorski, William; Kano, Ryouhei; Narukage, Noriyuki; Trujillo-Bueno, Javier

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of solar sounding rocket instruments developed jointly by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) is an EUV (19.3 nm) imaging telescope which was flown successfully in July 2012. The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a Lyman Alpha (121.6 nm) spectropolarimeter developed jointly with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and scheduled for launch in 2015. The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrograph is a soft X-ray (0.5-1.2 keV) stigmatic spectrograph designed to achieve 5 arcsecond spatial resolution along the slit.

  20. Sounding rocket flight report, MUMP 9 and MUMP 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grassl, H. J.

    1971-01-01

    The results of the launching of two-Marshall-University of Michigan Probes (MUMP 9 and MUMP 10), Nike-Tomahawk sounding rocket payloads, are summarized. The MUMP is similar to the thermosphere probe, an ejectable instrument package for studying the variability of the earth's atmospheric parameters. The MUMP 9 payload included an omegatron mass analyzer, a molecular fluorescence densitometer, a mini-tilty filter, and a lunar position sensor. This complement of instruments permitted the determination of the molecular nitrogen density and temperature in the altitude range from approximately 143 to 297 km over Wallops Island, Virginia, during January 1971. The MUMP 10 payload included an omegatron mass analyzer, an electron temperature probe, a cryogenic densitometer, and a solar position sensor. These instruments permitted the determination of the molecular nitrogen density and temperature and the charged particle density and temperature in the altitude range from approximately 145 to 290 km over Wallops Island during the afternoon preceding the MUMP 9 launch.

  1. CANSAT: Design of a Small Autonomous Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, Joshua; Duda, Michael; Garnand-Royo, Jeff; Jones, Alexa; Pickering, Todd; Tutko, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    CanSat is an international student design-build-launch competition organized by the American Astronautical Society (AAS) and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The competition is also sponsored by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), AGI, Orbital Sciences Corporation, Praxis Incorporated, and SolidWorks. Specifically, the 2009 Virginia Tech CanSat Team is funded by BAE Systems, Incorporated of Manassas, Virginia. The objective of the 2009 CanSat competition is to complete remote sensing missions by designing a small autonomous sounding rocket payload. The payload designed will follow and perform to a specific set of mission requirements for the 2009 competition. The competition encompasses a complete life-cycle of one year which includes all phases of design, integration, testing, reviews, and launch.

  2. Solar X-ray Astronomy Sounding Rocket Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. Daniel

    1989-01-01

    Several broad objectives were pursued by the development and flight of the High Resolution Soft X-Ray Imaging Sounding Rocket Payload, followed by the analysis of the resulting data and by comparison with both ground based and space based observations from other investigators. The scientific objectives were: to study the thermal equilibrium of active region loop systems by analyzing the X-ray observations to determine electron temperatures, densities, and pressures; by recording the changes in the large scale coronal structures from the maximum and descending phases of Cycle 21 to the ascending phase of Cycle 22; and to extend the study of small scale coronal structures through the minimum of Cycle 21 with new emphasis on correlative observations.

  3. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Program Overview and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Stan R.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) program is provided with a summary of lessons learned since the first test firing in 1977. Fifteen different lessons learned are discussed that fundamentally changed the motor's design, processing, and RSRM program risk management systems. The evolution of the rocket motor design is presented including the baseline or High Performance Solid Rocket Motor (HPM), the Filament Wound Case (FWC), the RSRM, and the proposed Five-Segment Booster (FSB).

  4. Radiation/convection coupling in rocket motors and plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R. C.; Saladino, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The three commonly used propellant systems - H2/O2, RP-1/O2, and solid propellants - primarily radiate as molecular emitters, non-scattering small particles, and scattering larger particles, respectively. Present technology has accepted the uncoupling of the radiation analysis from that of the flowfield. This approximation becomes increasingly inaccurate as one considers plumes, interior rocket chambers, and nuclear rocket propulsion devices. This study will develop a hierarchy of methods which will address radiation/convection coupling in all of the aforementioned propulsion systems. The nature of the radiation/convection coupled problem is that the divergence of the radiative heat flux must be included in the energy equation and that the local, volume-averaged intensity of the radiation must be determined by a solution of the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The intensity is approximated by solving the RTE along several lines of sight (LOS) for each point in the flowfield. Such a procedure is extremely costly; therefore, further approximations are needed. Modified differential approximations are being developed for this purpose. It is not obvious which order of approximations are required for a given rocket motor analysis. Therefore, LOS calculations have been made for typical rocket motor operating conditions in order to select the type approximations required. The results of these radiation calculations, and the interpretation of these intensity predictions are presented herein.

  5. Molded composite pyrogen igniter for rocket motors. [solid propellant ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.; Lucy, M. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A lightweight pyrogen igniter assembly including an elongated molded plastic tube adapted to contain a pyrogen charge was designed for insertion into a rocket motor casing for ignition of the rocket motor charge. A molded plastic closure cap provided for the elongated tube includes an ignition charge for igniting the pyrogen charge and an electrically actuated ignition squib for igniting the ignition charge. The ignition charge is contained within a portion of the closure cap, and it is retained therein by a noncorrosive ignition pellet retainer or screen which is adapted to rest on a shoulder of the elongated tube when the closure cap and tube are assembled together. A circumferentially disposed metal ring is provided along the external circumference of the closure cap and is molded or captured within the plastic cap in the molding process to provide, along with O-ring seals, a leakproof rotary joint.

  6. Reusable solid rocket motor case - Optimum probabilistic fracture control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1979-01-01

    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed in this paper. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis can be used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects on failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions can also be considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure that has been discussed in this paper can easily be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different fracture control plans.

  7. Endurance of a diffuser under severe rocket motor operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shani, Shimon; Katz, Uri

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a diffuser subjected to severe rocket motor operating conditions. High heat fluxes (over 1 (MW/sq m)) cause extremely high thermal and mechanical loads. The solution selected for the diffuser construction was based on a ductile steel structure, cooled by forced water flow through spiral channels. The paper describes the heat transfer analysis, the mechanical and water system design and post firing examination.

  8. World Data Center A (rockets and satellites) catalogue of data. Volume 1, part A: Sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A cumulative listing of all scientifically successful rockets that have been identified from various sources is presented. The listing starts with the V-2 rocket launched on 7 March 1947 and contains all rockets identified up to 31 December 1971.

  9. On Nonlinear Combustion Instability in Liquid Propellant Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. D. (Technical Monitor); Flandro, Gary A.; Majdalani, Joseph; Sims, Joseph D.

    2004-01-01

    All liquid propellant rocket instability calculations in current use have limited value in the predictive sense and serve mainly as a correlating framework for the available data sets. The well-known n-t model first introduced by Crocco and Cheng in 1956 is still used as the primary analytical tool of this type. A multitude of attempts to establish practical analytical methods have achieved only limited success. These methods usually produce only stability boundary maps that are of little use in making critical design decisions in new motor development programs. Recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of combustion instability in solid propellant rockets"' provides a firm foundation for a new approach to prediction, diagnosis, and correction of the closely related problems in liquid motor instability. For predictive tools to be useful in the motor design process, they must have the capability to accurately determine: 1) time evolution of the pressure oscillations and limit amplitude, 2) critical triggering pulse amplitude, and 3) unsteady heat transfer rates at injector surfaces and chamber walls. The method described in this paper relates these critical motor characteristics directly to system design parameters. Inclusion of mechanisms such as wave steepening, vorticity production and transport, and unsteady detonation wave phenomena greatly enhance the representation of key features of motor chamber oscillatory behavior. The basic theoretical model is described and preliminary computations are compared to experimental data. A plan to develop the new predictive method into a comprehensive analysis tool is also described.

  10. Five-Segment Solid Rocket Motor Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priskos, Alex S.

    2012-01-01

    In support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing a new, more powerful solid rocket motor for space launch applications. To minimize technical risks and development costs, NASA chose to use the Space Shuttle s solid rocket boosters as a starting point in the design and development. The new, five segment motor provides a greater total impulse with improved, more environmentally friendly materials. To meet the mass and trajectory requirements, the motor incorporates substantial design and system upgrades, including new propellant grain geometry with an additional segment, new internal insulation system, and a state-of-the art avionics system. Significant progress has been made in the design, development and testing of the propulsion, and avionics systems. To date, three development motors (one each in 2009, 2010, and 2011) have been successfully static tested by NASA and ATK s Launch Systems Group in Promontory, UT. These development motor tests have validated much of the engineering with substantial data collected, analyzed, and utilized to improve the design. This paper provides an overview of the development progress on the first stage propulsion system.

  11. An Acoustical Comparison of Sub-Scale and Full-Scale Far-Field Measurements for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, Jared; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Recently, members of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Fluid Dynamics Branch and Wyle Labs measured far-field acoustic data during a series of three Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) horizontal static tests conducted in Promontory, Utah. The test motors included the Technical Evaluation Motor 13 (TEM-13), Flight Verification Motor 2 (FVM-2), and the Flight Simulation Motor 15 (FSM-15). Similar far-field data were collected during horizontal static tests of sub-scale solid rocket motors at MSFC. Far-field acoustical measurements were taken at multiple angles within a circular array centered about the nozzle exit plane, each positioned at a radial distance of 80 nozzle-exit-diameters from the nozzle. This type of measurement configuration is useful for calculating rocket noise characteristics such as those outlined in the NASA SP-8072 "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." Acoustical scaling comparisons are made between the test motors, with particular interest in the Overall Sound Power, Acoustic Efficiency, Non-dimensional Relative Sound Power Spectrum, and Directivity. Since most empirical data in the NASA SP-8072 methodology is derived from small rockets, this investigation provides an opportunity to check the data collapse between a sub-scale and full-scale rocket motor.

  12. FIRE: Far-ultraviolet Imaging Rocket Experiment: a sounding rocket telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gantner, Brennan; Green, James; Beasley, Matthew; Kane, Robert; Lairson, Bruce; Lopez, Heidi; Grove, David; Franetic, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    FIRE (Far-ultraviolet Imaging Rocket Experiment) is a sounding rocket payload telescope designed to image between 900-1100Å. It is scheduled to launch on January 29th, 2011 from the Poker Flats complex in northern Alaska. For its first flight, it will target G191B2B, a white dwarf calibration source, and M51 (the Whirlpool Galaxy), the science target, to help determine the number of hot, young O stars, as well as the intervening dust attenuation. FIRE primary consists of a single primary mirror coated in silicon carbide, a 2000Å thick indium filter and a micro-channel plate detector coated with rubidium bromide. Combined, these create a passband of 900-1100Å for the system and reject the hydrogen Lyman-α to approximately a factor of 10-4. To ensure that the filter survives the launch, a small vacuum chamber has been built around it to keep the pressure at 10-8 torr or lower.

  13. Ignition transient calculations in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.; Foster, Winfred A., Jr.

    1993-07-01

    The work presented is part of an effort to develop a multidimensional ignition transient model for large solid propellant rocket motors. On the Space Shuttle, the ignition transient in the slot is induced when the igniter, itself a small rocket motor, is fired into the head-end portion of the main rocket motor. The computational results presented in this paper consider two different igniter configurations. The first configuration is a simulated Space Shuttle RSRM igniter which has one central nozzle that is parallel to the centerline of the motor. The second igniter configuration has a nozzle which is canted at an angle of 45 deg from the centerline of the motor. This paper presents a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of certain flow field characteristics inside the solid propellant star grain slot of the Space Shuttle during the ignition transient period of operation for each igniter configuration. The majority of studies made to date regarding ignition transient performance in solid rocket motors have concluded that the key parameter to be determined is the heat transfer rate to the propellant surface and hence the heat transfer coefficient between the gas and the propellant. In this paper the heat transfer coefficients, pressure and velocity distributions are calculated in the star slot. In order to validate the computational method and to attempt to establish a correlation between the flow field characteristics and the heat transfer rates a series of cold flow experimental investigations were conducted. The results of these experiments show excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement with the pressure and velocity distributions obtained from the CFD analysis. The CFD analysis utilized a classical pipe flow type correlation for the heat transfer rates. The experimental results provide an excellent qualitative comparison with regard to spatial distribution of the heat transfer rates as a function of nozzle configuration and igniter pressure. The

  14. Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1992-02-01

    A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The

  15. Ignition Transient Calculations in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Rhonald M.; Foster, Winfred A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The work presented is part of an effort to develop a multidimensional ignition transient model for large solid propellant rocket motors. On the Space Shuttle, the ignition transient in the slot is induced when the igniter, itself a small rocket motor, is fired into the head-end portion of the main rocket motor. The computational results presented in this paper consider two different igniter configurations. The first configuration is a simulated Space Shuttle RSRM igniter which has one central nozzle that is parallel to the centerline of the motor. The second igniter configuration has a nozzle which is canted at an angle of 45 deg from the centerline of the motor. This paper presents a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of certain flow field characteristics inside the solid propellant star grain slot of the Space Shuttle during the ignition transient period of operation for each igniter configuration. The majority of studies made to date regarding ignition transient performance in solid rocket motors have concluded that the key parameter to be determined is the heat transfer rate to the propellant surface and hence the heat transfer coefficient between the gas and the propellant. In this paper the heat transfer coefficients, pressure and velocity distributions are calculated in the star slot. In order to validate the computational method and to attempt to establish a correlation between the flow field characteristics and the heat transfer rates a series of cold flow experimental investigations were conducted. The results of these experiments show excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement with the pressure and velocity distributions obtained from the CFD analysis. The CFD analysis utilized a classical pipe flow type correlation for the heat transfer rates. The experimental results provide an excellent qualitative comparison with regard to spatial distribution of the heat transfer rates as a function of nozzle configuration and igniter pressure. The

  16. Overview of the manufacturing sequence of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John S.; Nix, Michael B.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacturing sequence of NASA's new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor, developed as a replacement of the Space Shuttle's existing Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor, is overviewed. Special attention is given to the case preparation, the propellant mix/cast, the nondestructuve evaluation, the motor finishing, and the refurbishment. The fabrication sequences of the case, the nozzle, and the igniter are described.

  17. Auroral Microphysics Rocket (AMICIST) and Reflight of the Phaze Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy Roger L.

    1998-01-01

    This grant was originally awarded for the flight of the AMICIST sounding rocket. However, upon launch failure of the PHAZE rocket, additional resources were placed in this grant to cover the launch of the PHAZE II rocket. AMICIST was successfully launched from the Poker Flat Range on February 24, 1995, and the PHAZE II was successfully launched also from the Poker Flat Range on February 10, 1997. The major objective of the AMICIST flight was to investigate the bursts of transverse ion acceleration occurring during aurora, commonly known as Lower Hybrid Solitary Structures, with the flight of two scientific payloads to unravel space from time effects. The data clearly showed that the structures of ion acceleration were a spatial phenomena having a scale size transverse to the local magnetic field of about 100 m. On the other hand, structures in the auroral electrons were generally observed on this flight to be temporal features that occurred at the same time at the two payloads separated by a few kilometers. The primary objective of the PHAZE rocket flight was to further study the temporal features of auroral electron precipitation having many electron detectors, some fixed in energy, that could study the distribution function of the auroral electrons on time scales of a fraction of a millisecond. A important paper on this topic has just been submitted for publication which uses the PHAZE data to show that the potential structure (electric field parallel to the magnetic field) that accelerates the auroral electrons within one Earth radius of the ground, is not static, but rather fluctuates with frequencies close to the local proton and hydrogen gyrofrequencies. The fluctuation appears to be an actual turning on and off of the electric field at these frequencies. When the potential is turned off, ambient electrons can enter the region and be accelerated along B when the potential is on creating field- aligned bursts which manifest themselves as flickering aurora seen

  18. The Study on Flexible Carbon Fiber Boom Research for Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Ma, X.; Zheng, L.; Guan, X.

    2015-09-01

    To accommodate the requirements of the sounding rocket that will be launched soon, this paper develops a new boom, which makes six new contributions: its deployment doesn't need proper centrifugal force generated by rocket anymore, suitable for the requirement that the sounding rocket is controlled not to rotate when rising; it is made by the flexible carbon fiber material and thus has a light weight; its deployment is driven by the bending elastic potential energy, more reliable and safer; due to its light weight, the effects on the rocket posture of its deployment are minor; its locking is done by itself but not by the rocket, which effectively avoids the interference of the separation of the rocket arrow and body with its deployment and enhances the reliability of its deployment; its unlocking is done by a fuse, more economic and more reliable.

  19. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    NASA's current models to predict lift-off acoustics for launch vehicles are currently being updated using several numerical and empirical inputs. One empirical input comes from free-field acoustic data measured at three Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) static firings. The measurements were collected by a joint collaboration between NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center, Wyle Labs, and ATK Launch Systems. For the first time NASA measured large-thrust solid rocket motor plume acoustics for evaluation of both noise sources and acoustic radiation properties. Over sixty acoustic free-field measurements were taken over the three static firings to support evaluation of acoustic radiation near the rocket plume, far-field acoustic radiation patterns, plume acoustic power efficiencies, and apparent noise source locations within the plume. At approximately 67 m off nozzle centerline and 70 m downstream of the nozzle exit plan, the measured overall sound pressure level of the RSRM was 155 dB. Peak overall levels in the far field were over 140 dB at 300 m and 50-deg off of the RSRM thrust centerline. The successful collaboration has yielded valuable data that are being implemented into NASA's lift-off acoustic models, which will then be used to update predictions for Ares I and Ares V liftoff acoustic environments.

  20. Demonstration of a sterilizable solid rocket motor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastrolia, E. J.; Santerre, G. M.; Lambert, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A solid propellant rocket motor containing 60.9 Kg (134-lb) of propellant was successfully static fired after being subjected to eight heat sterilization cycles (three 54-hour cycles plus five 40-hour cycles) at 125 C (257 F). The test motor, a modified SVM-3 chamber, incorporated a flexible grain retention system of EPR rubber to relieve thermal shrinkage stresses. The propellant used in the motor was ANB-3438, and 84 wt% solids system (18 wt% aluminum) containing 66 wt% stabilized ammonium perchlorate oxidizer and a saturated hydroxylterminated polybutadiene binder. Bonding of the propellant to the EPR insulation (GenGard V-4030) was provided by the use of SD-886, an epoxy urethane restriction.

  1. Stability of solid rocket motor with spray-liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Hu, Naihe

    1992-12-01

    Dynamic equations were developed for every link of the feedback control system of a solid rocket motor (SRM) with fuel injection. Using transfer functions and the parameter stability theory, equilibrium steady boundary equations and steady criteria were obtained and solved. It is shown that, the injection ratio, the pressure exponent, and tank pressure are the main design parameters affecting stability; therefore, the stability analysis of an SRM with fuel injection should concentrate on the initial phase of the motor operation. It was found that the motor stability of an SRM with fuel injection improves with the increase of the injection ratio, the free volume of the combustion chamber, and the value of the pressure exponent.

  2. Evidence of erosive burning in shuttle solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. L.

    1983-01-01

    Known models of Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) performance have failed to produce pressure-time traces which accurately matched actual motor performance, especially during the first 5 seconds after ignition and during the last quarter of web burn time. Efforts to compensate for these differences in model reconstruction and actual performance resulted in resorting to the use of a Burning Anomaly Rate Function (BARF). It was suspected that propellant erosive burning was primarily responsible for the variation of model from actual results. The three dimensional Hercules Grain Design and Internal Ballistics Evaluation Program was made operational and slightly modified and an extensive trial and error effort was begun to test the hypothesis of erosive burning as an explanation of the burning anomaly. It was found that introduction of erosive burning (using Green's erosive burning equation) over portions of the aft segment grain and above a threshold gas Mach number did, in fact, give excellent agreement with the actual motor trace.

  3. Thrust imbalance of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, W. A., Jr.; Sforzini, R. H.; Shackelford, B. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The Monte Carlo statistical analysis of thrust imbalance is applied to both the Titan IIIC and the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors (SRMs) firing in parallel, and results are compared with those obtained from the Space Shuttle program. The test results are examined in three phases: (1) pairs of SRMs selected from static tests of the four developmental motors (DMs 1 through 4); (2) pairs of SRMs selected from static tests of the three quality assurance motors (QMs 1 through 3); (3) SRMs on the first flight test vehicle (STS-1A and STS-1B). The simplified internal ballistic model utilized for computing thrust from head-end pressure measurements on flight tests is shown to agree closely with measured thrust data. Inaccuracies in thrust imbalance evaluation are explained by possible flight test instrumentation errors.

  4. Ionospheric Results with Sounding Rockets and the Explorer VIII Satellite (1960 )

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourdeau, R. E.

    1961-01-01

    A review is made of ionospheric data reported since the IGY from rocket and satellite-borne ionospheric experiments. These include rocket results on electron density (RF impedance probe), D-region conductivity (Gerdien condenser), and electron temperature (Langmuir probe). Also included are data in the 1000 kilometer region on ion concentration (ion current monitor) and electron temperature from the Explorer VIII Satellite (1960 xi). The review includes suggestions for second generation experiments and combinations thereof particularly suited for small sounding rockets.

  5. Direct electrical arc ignition of hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judson, Michael I., Jr.

    Hybrid rockets motors provide distinct safety advantages when compared to traditional liquid or solid propellant systems, due to the inherent stability and relative inertness of the propellants prior to established combustion. As a result of this inherent propellant stability, hybrid motors have historically proven difficult to ignite. State of the art hybrid igniter designs continue to require solid or liquid reactants distinct from the main propellants. These ignition methods however, reintroduce to the hybrid propulsion system the safety and complexity disadvantages associated with traditional liquid or solid propellants. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of a novel direct electrostatic arc ignition method for hybrid motors. A series of small prototype stand-alone thrusters demonstrating this technology were successfully designed and tested using Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic and Gaseous Oxygen (GOX) as propellants. Measurements of input voltage and current demonstrated that arc-ignition will occur using as little as 10 watts peak power and less than 5 joules total energy. The motor developed for the stand-alone small thruster was adapted as a gas generator to ignite a medium-scale hybrid rocket motor using nitrous oxide /and HTPB as propellants. Multiple consecutive ignitions were performed. A large data set as well as a collection of development `lessons learned' were compiled to guide future development and research. Since the completion of this original groundwork research, the concept has been developed into a reliable, operational igniter system for a 75mm hybrid motor using both gaseous oxygen and liquid nitrous oxide as oxidizers. A development map of the direct spark ignition concept is presented showing the flow of key lessons learned between this original work and later follow on development.

  6. A Review of Large Solid Rocket Motor Free Field Acoustics, Part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    At the ATK facility in Utah, large full scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five segment version of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor, which is for use on future launch vehicles. Since 2006, Acoustic measurements have been taken on large solid rocket motors at ATK. Both the four segment RSRM and the five segment RSRMV have been instrumented. Measurements are used to update acoustic prediction models and to correlate against vibration responses of the motor. Presentation focuses on two major sections: Part I) Unique challenges associated with measuring rocket acoustics Part II) Acoustic measurements summary over past five years

  7. The measurement of electron density in a rocket motor plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, David A.; Frederick, Robert A.

    1993-06-01

    This paper discusses the development of a diagnostic technique to measure the electron density in a rocket motor plume in order to characterize and rank solid rocket propellants based on their propensity to attenuate the communication signal to a missile. Three techniques were originally investigated as possible low-cost approaches that could be used for plume comparisons as a function of propellant. These approaches consisted of Langmuir probes, electromagnetic coils, and focused microwave probes. The focused microwave probe concept was considered the most appropriate technique to implement for the research to be conducted. The complete design and analysis of a focused microwave probe system operating at 17 GHz was conducted and the selection to determine this operating frequency discussed. Initial estimates of general uncertainty analysis suggest very good results are obtainable using a F-4 lens system and horn diameter of 17 in. for the 17 GHz frequency.

  8. Environmental Effects of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Exhaust Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, B.; Pergament, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    The deposition of NOx and HCl in the stratosphere from the space shuttle solid rocket motors (SRM) and exhaust plume is discussed. A detailed comparison between stratospheric deposition rates using the baseline SRM propellant and an alternate propellant, which replaces ammonium perchlorate by ammonium nitrate, shows the total NOx deposition rate to be approximately the same for each propellant. For both propellants the ratio of the deposition rates of NOx to total chlorine-containing species is negligibly small. Rocket exhaust ground cloud transport processes in the troposphere are also examined. A brief critique of the multilayer diffusion models (presently used for predicting pollutant deposition in the troposphere) is presented, and some detailed cloud rise calculations are compared with data for Titan 3C launches. The results show that, when launch time meteorological data are used as input, the model can reasonably predict measured cloud stabilization heights.

  9. A Normal Incidence X-ray Telescope (NIXT) Sounding Rocket Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Leon

    1997-01-01

    The following two papers, summarizing scientific results from the NIXT rocket program, are presented: (1) 'The Solar X-ray Corona,' - an introduction to the physics of the solar corona, with a major portion concerning a summary of results from the series of NIXT sounding rocket flights; and (2) 'Difficulties in Observing Coronal Structure.'

  10. Draft Environmental Statement For Physics and Astronomy Sounding Rocket, Balloon, and Airborne Research Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This document is a draft of an environmental impact statement, evaluating the effect on the environment of the use of sounding rockets, balloons and air borne research programs in studying the atmosphere.

  11. 77 FR 61642 - National Environmental Policy Act; Sounding Rockets Program; Poker Flat Research Range

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Environmental Policy Act; Sounding Rockets Program; Poker Flat Research... Flat Research Range (PFRR), Alaska. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act, as... addressed to Joshua Bundick, Manager, Poker Flat Research Range EIS, NASA Goddard Space Flight...

  12. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbach, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL Multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. This work builds upon previous efforts to verify the use of the acoustic velocity potential equation (AVPE) laid out by Campos. The acoustic velocity potential (psi) describing the acoustic wave motion in the presence of an inhomogeneous steady high-speed flow is defined by, del squared psi - (lambda/c) squared psi - M x [M x del((del)(psi))] - 2((lambda)(M)/c + M x del(M) x (del)(psi) - 2(lambda)(psi)[M x del(1/c)] = 0. with M as the Mach vector, c as the speed of sound, and ? as the complex eigenvalue. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF

  13. Multiple Changes to Reusable Solid Rocket Motors, Identifying Hidden Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhalgh, Phillip O.; McCann, Bradley Q.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) baseline is subject to various changes. Changes are necessary due to safety and quality improvements, environmental considerations, vendor changes, obsolescence issues, etc. The RSRM program has a goal to test changes on full-scale static test motors prior to flight due to the unique RSRM operating environment. Each static test motor incorporates several significant changes and numerous minor changes. Flight motors often implement multiple changes simultaneously. While each change is individually verified and assessed, the potential for changes to interact constitutes additional hidden risk. Mitigating this risk depends upon identification of potential interactions. Therefore, the ATK Thiokol Propulsion System Safety organization initiated the use of a risk interaction matrix to identify potential interactions that compound risk. Identifying risk interactions supports flight and test motor decisions. Uncovering hidden risks of a full-scale static test motor gives a broader perspective of the changes being tested. This broader perspective compels the program to focus on solutions for implementing RSRM changes with minimal/mitigated risk. This paper discusses use of a change risk interaction matrix to identify test challenges and uncover hidden risks to the RSRM program.

  14. DAQ: Software Architecture for Data Acquisition in Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Tran, Thanh; Nichols, Heidi; Bowles-Martinez, Jessica N.

    2011-01-01

    A multithreaded software application was developed by Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) to collect a set of correlated imagery, Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) and GPS data for a Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) sounding rocket flight. The data set will be used to advance Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) technology algorithms being researched at JPL. This paper describes the software architecture and the tests used to meet the timing and data rate requirements for the software used to collect the dataset. Also discussed are the challenges of using commercial off the shelf (COTS) flight hardware and open source software. This includes multiple Camera Link (C-link) based cameras, a Pentium-M based computer, and Linux Fedora 11 operating system. Additionally, the paper talks about the history of the software architecture's usage in other JPL projects and its applicability for future missions, such as cubesats, UAVs, and research planes/balloons. Also talked about will be the human aspect of project especially JPL's Phaeton program and the results of the launch.

  15. Towards a matter wave interferometer on a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zoest, Tim; Peters, Achim; Ahlers, Holger; Wicht, Andreas; Vogel, Anika; Wenzlawski, Anderas; Deutsch, Christian; Kajari, Endre; Gaaloul, Naceur; Dittus, Hansjürg; Hartwig, Jonas; Herr, Waldemar; Herrmann, Sven; Reichel, Jakob; Bongs, Kai; Koenemann, Thorben; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, Wojtek; Schiemangk, Max; Müntinga, Hauke; Meyer, Nadine; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Walser, Reinhold; Resch, Andreas; Rode, Christina; Seidel, Stephan; Sengstock, Klaus; Singh, Yeshpal; Schleich, Wolfgang; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rosenbusch, Peter; Wilken, Tobias; Goeklue, Ertan

    Applications of coherent matter waves are high resolution interferometers for measuring inertial and gravitational forces as well as testing fundamental physics, for which they may serve as a laser like source with mesoscopic quantum features. Out of possible applications, the test of the principle of equivalence in the quantum domain is selected as a target with the highest scientific interest on timescales of a microgravity experiment at the ISS or on a free flyer (ATV, FOTON or other satellites). The QUANTUS project demonstrated the technological feasibil-ity of coherent matter waves in microgravity. As a next step, the consortium will prepare and procure a sounding rocket mission to demonstrate technologies for matter wave interferome-try based on the broad experience of former developments with experiments in the droptower. Therefore, the experiment has to withstand strong requirements concerning environmental con-ditions (Temperature, shock, environmental pressure, etc.) and needs to be designed to fit in a 600 l volume (diameter 35 cm, length 160 cm). It is considered as an important step towards the technology required for the ISS and other platforms. These experiments will give further insights on the potential of inertial sensors based on atom interferometers and the technology is for example of interest for applications in earth observation and geodesy. They could replace classical techniques relying on test masses and promise a further improvement in the accuracy of such devices.

  16. Atom Interferometry on Sounding Rockets with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Stephan T.; Becker, Dennis; Lachmann, Maike D.; Herr, Waldemar; Rasel, Ernst M.; Quantus Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    One of the fundamental postulates of our description of nature is the universality of free fall, stating that the force exerted upon an object due to gravity is independent of its constitution. A precise test of this assumption is the comparison of the free fall of two ultra-cold clouds of different atomic species via atom interferometry. Since the sensitivity of the measurement is proportional to the square of the propagation time in the interferometer, it can be increased by performing the experiments in microgravity. In order to fully utilize the potential of the experiments the usage of a Bose-Einstein-Condensate as the initial state is necessary, because it is characterized by a small initial size and a low expansion velocity. As a step towards the transfer of such a system into space three sounding rocket missions with atom interferometers are currently being prepared. The launch of the first mission, aimed at the first demonstration of a Bose-Einstein-Condensate in space and an atom interferometer based on it is planned for 2016 from ESRANGE, Sweden. It will be followed by two more missions that extend the scientific goals to the creation of degenerate mixtures and dual-species atom interferometry. This research is funded by the German Space Agency DLR under Grant Number DLR 50 1131-37.

  17. A Sounding Rocket Payload to Test the Weak Equivalence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.; Phillips, James D.

    2014-03-01

    We are developing SR-POEM, a payload for detecting a possible violation of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) while on a sounding rocket's free-fall trajectory. We estimate an uncertainty of σ (η) <=10-17 from a single flight. The experiment consists of calibration maneuvers plus eight 120 s drops of the two test masses (TMs). The instrument orientation will be reversed between successive drops, which reverses the signal but leaves most systematic errors unchanged. Each TM comprises three bars and a Y-shaped connector. The six bars are in a hexagonal housing and stand in a plane perpendicular to the symmetry axis (Z axis) of the payload and close to its CM. At a distance of 0.3 m along the Z axis, there is a highly stable plate that holds six of our tracking frequency laser gauges (TFGs), which measure the distances to the bars. The TMs are surrounded by capacitance plates, which allow both measurement and control of TM position and orientation. A central theme of the design is the prevention and correction of systematic error. Temperature stability of the instrument is essential and, during the brief night-time flight, it is achieved passively. This work was supported in part by NASA grant NNX08AO04G.

  18. Fabrication of X-ray telescopes for sounding rocket flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Two X-ray telescopes and two detector systems were fabricated, and one of the telescopes (15 in. diameter, Wolter type I telescope) was flown on two sounding rocket flights. The telescopes were fabricated using the diamond point technique which provided the accurate figure of the mirrors to about a focal plane blur of 0.5 arc minutes. The 15 in. telescope mirrors were polished using standard polishing techniques to remove tooling marks from the diamond turning, then chemically polished to bring the X-ray reflectivity up to nearly the theoretical values. The optical image formed by the 15 in. telescope was found to produce a blur of about 40 arc seconds for a parallel beam of incoming laser light. The first flight of the telescope produced an X-ray image of Capella which indicated that the X-ray image was blurred to the extent of about 2 arc minutes. This additional image degradation was due to a slight error in focusing the X-ray image onto the detector.

  19. Modified modular imaging system designed for a sounding rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veach, Todd J.; Scowen, Paul A.; Beasley, Matthew; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2012-09-01

    We present the design and system calibration results from the fabrication of a charge-coupled device (CCD) based imaging system designed using a modified modular imager cell (MIC) used in an ultraviolet sounding rocket mission. The heart of the imaging system is the MIC, which provides the video pre-amplifier circuitry and CCD clock level filtering. The MIC is designed with standard four-layer FR4 printed circuit board (PCB) with surface mount and through-hole components for ease of testing and lower fabrication cost. The imager is a 3.5k by 3.5k LBNL p-channel CCD with enhanced quantum efficiency response in the UV using delta-doping technology at JPL. The recently released PCIe/104 Small-Cam CCD controller from Astronomical Research Cameras, Inc (ARC) performs readout of the detector. The PCIe/104 Small-Cam system has the same capabilities as its larger PCI brethren, but in a smaller form factor, which makes it ideally suited for sub-orbital ballistic missions. The overall control is then accomplished using a PCIe/104 computer from RTD Embedded Technologies, Inc. The design, fabrication, and testing was done at the Laboratory for Astronomical and Space Instrumentation (LASI) at Arizona State University. Integration and flight calibration are to be completed at the University of Colorado Boulder before integration into CHESS.

  20. Test of Re-Entry Systems at Estrange Using Sounding Rockets and Stratospheric Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, C.; Abrahamsson, M.; Florin, G.

    2015-09-01

    Stratospheric balloons and sounding rockets can provide an ideal in-flight platform for performing re-entry and other high speed tests off different types of vehicles and techniques. They are also ideal platforms for testing different types of recovery systems such as airbrakes and parachutes. This paper expands on some examples of platforms and missions for drop tests from balloons as well as sounding rockets launched from Esrange Space Center, a facility run by Swedish Space Corporation SSC in northern Sweden.

  1. A Low Cost GPS System for Real-Time Tracking of Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markgraf, M.; Montenbruck, O.; Hassenpflug, F.; Turner, P.; Bull, B.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to minimize the need for costly, complex, tracking radars, the German Space Operations Center has set up a research project for GPS based tracking of sounding rockets. As part of this project, a GPS receiver based on commercial technology for terrestrial applications has been modified to allow its use under the highly dynamical conditions of a sounding rocket flight. In addition, new antenna concepts are studied as an alternative to proven but costly wrap-around antennas.

  2. Environmental impact statement Space Shuttle advanced solid rocket motor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The proposed action is design, development, testing, and evaluation of Advanced Solid Rocket Motors (ASRM) to replace the motors currently used to launch the Space Shuttle. The proposed action includes design, construction, and operation of new government-owned, contractor-operated facilities for manufacturing and testing the ASRM's. The proposed action also includes transport of propellant-filled rocket motor segments from the manufacturing facility to the testing and launch sites and the return of used and/or refurbished segments to the manufacturing site. Sites being considered for the new facilities include John C. Stennis Space Center, Hancock County, Mississippi; the Yellow Creek site in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, which is currently in the custody and control of the Tennessee Valley Authority; and John F. Kennedy Space Center, Brevard County, Florida. TVA proposes to transfer its site to the custody and control of NASA if it is the selected site. All facilities need not be located at the same site. Existing facilities which may provide support for the program include Michoud Assembly Facility, New Orleans Parish, Louisiana; and Slidell Computer Center, St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana. NASA's preferred production location is the Yellow Creek site, and the preferred test location is the Stennis Space Center.

  3. Preventing Accidental Ignition of Upper-Stage Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, John; Morgan, Herbert; Cooper, Michael; Murbach, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a proposal to reduce the risk of accidental ignition of certain upper-stage rocket motors or other high energy hazardous systems. At present, mechanically in-line initiators are used for initiation of many rocket motors and/or other high-energy hazardous systems. Electrical shorts and/or mechanical barriers, which are the basic safety devices in such systems, are typically removed as part of final arming or pad preparations while personnel are present. At this time, static discharge, test equipment malfunction, or incorrect arming techniques can cause premature firing. The proposal calls for a modular out-of-line ignition system incorporating detonating-cord elements, identified as the donor and the acceptor, separated by an air gap. In the safe configuration, the gap would be sealed with two shields, which would prevent an accidental firing of the donor from igniting the system. The shields would be removed to enable normal firing, in which shrapnel generated by the donor would reliably ignite the acceptor to continue the ordnance train. The acceptor would then ignite a through bulkhead initiator (or other similar device), which would ignite the motor or high-energy system. One shield would be remotely operated and would be moved to the armed position when a launch was imminent or conversely returned to the safe position if the launch were postponed. In the event of failure of the remotely operated shield, the other shield could be inserted manually to safe the system.

  4. ASRM subscale plume deflector testing. [advanced solid rocket motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Freddie, III; Dawson, Michael C.; Orlin, Peter A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports the results of the scale model (1/22) testing of candidate refractory materials to be used as surface coatings for a solid rocket motor plume deflector structure. Five ROM tests were conducted to acquire data to support the selection, thickness determination, and placement of the materials. All data acquisition was achieved through nonintrusive methods. The tests demonstrated that little or no reductions in performance of the full-scale deflector would be experienced if the most economical materials were selected for construction.

  5. Solid propellant processing factor in rocket motor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The ways are described by which propellant processing is affected by choices made in designing rocket engines. Tradeoff studies, design proof or scaleup studies, and special design features are presented that are required to obtain high product quality, and optimum processing costs. Processing is considered to include the operational steps involved with the lining and preparation of the motor case for the grain; the procurement of propellant raw materials; and propellant mixing, casting or extrusion, curing, machining, and finishing. The design criteria, recommended practices, and propellant formulations are included.

  6. Structural behavior of solid rocket motor field joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Michael F.; Wingate, Robert T.

    1987-01-01

    Structural analysis studies conducted on three concepts for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor field joints are summarized. Deflections and stresses in the Challenger clevis-tang joint are compared with a proposed capture-tang replacement joint and with an alternate bolted joint design. Results indicate deflections and stresses are subsequently reduced in both the capture-tang and bolted joint concepts. The capture-tang and bolted joint designs are respectively 24 and 70 percent heavier than the baseline clevis-tang joint.

  7. High-pressure cryogenic valves for the Vulcain rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garceau, P.; Meyer, F.

    The high-pressure valve developed to control the flow of liquid oxygen or hydrogen into the gas generator of the ESA Vulcain rocket motor is described. The spherical ball-seal design employed provides high reliability over a service lifetime of 5000 on-off actuations at temperatures 20-350 K and pressures up to 200 bar. Leakage is limited to a few cu cm/sec of hydrogen at 20 K. The steps in the development process, from the definition of the valve specifications to the fabrication and testing phase are reviewed, and the final design is shown in drawings, diagrams, and photographs.

  8. Ice nucleus activity measurements of solid rocket motor exhaust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    The ice Nucleus activity of exhaust particles generated from combustion of Space Shuttle propellant in small rocket motors has been measured. The activity at -20 C was substantially lower than that of aerosols generated by unpressurized combustion of propellant samples in previous studies. The activity decays rapidly with time and is decreased further in the presence of moist air. These tests corroborate the low effectivity ice nucleus measurement results obtained in the exhaust ground cloud of the Space Shuttle. Such low ice nucleus activity implies that Space Shuttle induced inadvertent weather modification via an ice phase process is extremely unlikely.

  9. Solid Rocket Motor Backflow Analysis For CONTOUR Mishap Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2005-05-01

    A procedure developed for free molecule modeling of plume backflow from a STAR™ 30BP solid rocket motor is presented for work performed in support of the Comet Nucleus Tour spacecraft mishap investigation. Good general agreement is established with DSMC flowfield results, with interesting deviations developing as the plume backflow approaches the spacecraft surfaces closely, providing insights regarding characteristics of the surface Knudsen layer. Also, investigation of related free expansion results indicate significant discrepancies exist between the rarefied techniques and the continuum results from which their starting surfaces were created. The nature of these differences suggests that convective fluxes to CONTOUR may have been much higher than the rarefied analyses indicated.

  10. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Program - Lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccool, A. A.; Ray, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is given of the most important lessons learned concerning the Space Shuttle's Solid Rocket Motors with respect to flight safety, reuse requirements, system reliability, structural integrity, and hardware damage due to reentry, water impact, and retrieval. Within the major categories of flight safety, performance, and reuse/cost, priorities are identified for implementation of envisioned improvements; schedule and cost considerations are noted to have been substantially downgraded in favor of flight safety. The consequences of the primacy of flight safety are discussed in the areas of primary systems design, redundant systems, manufacturing and assembly processing, and launch constraints.

  11. Thrust vector control for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, D. N.; Brinton, B. C.

    1975-01-01

    Thrust vector control (TVC) for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) is obtained by omniaxis vectoring of the nozzle. The development and integration of the system are under the cognizance of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The nozzle and flexible bearing have been designed and will be built by Thiokol Corporation/Wasatch Division. The vector requirements of the system, the impact of multiple reuse on the components, and the unique problems associated with a large flexible bearing are discussed. The design details of each of the major TVC subcomponents are delineated. The subscale bearing development program and the overall development schedule also are presented.

  12. Erosive burning threshold conditions in solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Cohen, N. S.

    1989-01-01

    Erosive burning has been predicted to be enhanced by factors that increase the level of turbulence close to the propellant surface, such a high cross flow velocity, low surface blowing rate, propellant surface roughness, and adverse pressure gradient. A study is reported which was carried out with the objective of measuring the effects of these parameters on the scaling to larger rocket motor sizes of the transition to, or threshold conditions for, erosive burning rate augmentation. The results are used to develop a scaling criterion for the threshold conditions for erosive burning.

  13. SRM (Solid Rocket Motor) propellant and polymer materials structural modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The following investigation reviews and evaluates the use of stress relaxation test data for the structural analysis of Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellants and other polymer materials used for liners, insulators, inhibitors, and seals. The stress relaxation data is examined and a new mathematical structural model is proposed. This model has potentially wide application to structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. A dynamic modulus is derived from the new model for stress relaxation modulus and is compared to the old viscoelastic model and experimental data.

  14. Optical Measurements on Solid Specimens of Solid Rocket Motor Exhaust and Solid Rocket Motor Slag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, F. E., III

    1991-01-01

    Samples of aluminum slag were investigated to aid the Earth Science and Applications Division at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Alumina from space motor propellant exhaust and space motor propellant slag was examined as a component of space refuse. Thermal emittance and solar absorptivity measurements were taken to support their comparison with reflectance measurements derived from actual debris. To determine the similarity between the samples and space motor exhaust or space motor slag, emittance and absorbance results were correlated with an examination of specimen morphology.

  15. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A technical analysis of the solid propellant rocket engines for use with the space shuttle is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) solid rocket motor stage recovery, (2) environmental effects, (3) man rating of the solid propellant rocket engines, (4) system safety analysis, (5) ground support equipment, and (6) transportation, assembly, and checkout.

  16. THE ADIABATIC DEMAGNETIZATION REFRIGERATOR FOR THE MICRO-X SOUNDING ROCKET TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Wikus, P.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Leman, S. W.; Rutherford, J. M.; Trowbridge, S. N.; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Eckart, M. E.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Doriese, W. B.; McCammon, D.

    2010-04-09

    The Micro-X Imaging X-ray Spectrometer is a sounding rocket payload slated for launch in 2011. An array of Transition Edge Sensors, which is operated at a bath temperature of 50 mK, will be used to obtain a high resolution spectrum of the Puppis-A supernova remnant. An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) with a 75 gram Ferric Ammonium Alum (FAA) salt pill in the bore of a 4 T superconducting magnet provides a stable heat sink for the detector array only a few seconds after burnout of the rocket motors. This requires a cold stage design with very short thermal time constants. A suspension made from Kevlar strings holds the 255 gram cold stage in place. It is capable of withstanding loads in excess of 200 g. Stable operation of the TES array in proximity to the ADR magnet is ensured by a three-stage magnetic shielding system which consists of a superconducting can, a high-permeability shield and a bucking coil. The development and testing of the Micro-X payload is well underway.

  17. The Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator for the Micro-X Sounding Rocket Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikus, P.; Adams, J. S.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Bandler, S. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Eckart, M. E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leman, S. W.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Rutherford, J. M.; Trowbridge, S. N.

    2010-04-01

    The Micro-X Imaging X-ray Spectrometer is a sounding rocket payload slated for launch in 2011. An array of Transition Edge Sensors, which is operated at a bath temperature of 50 mK, will be used to obtain a high resolution spectrum of the Puppis-A supernova remnant. An Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR) with a 75 gram Ferric Ammonium Alum (FAA) salt pill in the bore of a 4 T superconducting magnet provides a stable heat sink for the detector array only a few seconds after burnout of the rocket motors. This requires a cold stage design with very short thermal time constants. A suspension made from Kevlar strings holds the 255 gram cold stage in place. It is capable of withstanding loads in excess of 200 g. Stable operation of the TES array in proximity to the ADR magnet is ensured by a three-stage magnetic shielding system which consists of a superconducting can, a high-permeability shield and a bucking coil. The development and testing of the Micro-X payload is well underway.

  18. The O-STATES Sounding Rocket Project - First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, J.

    2015-12-01

    In October 2015, the sounding rocket project O-STATES was conducted from Esrange Space Center (67.9°N, 21.1°E) in northern Sweden. The acronym O-STATES stands for "Oxygen Species and Thermospheric Airglow in The Earth's Sky" and the basic idea is that comprehensive information on the composition, specifically atomic oxygen in the ground state O and first excited state O(1D), and temperature of the lower thermosphere can be obtained from a limited set of optical measurements. Starting point for the analysis are daytime measurements of the O2(b1∑g+ - X3∑g-) Atmospheric Band system in the spectral region 755-780 nm and the O(1D-3P) Red Line at 630 nm. In the daytime lower thermosphere O(1D) is produced by O2 photolysis and the excited O2(b) state is mainly produced by energy transfer from O(1D) to the O2(X) ground state. In addition to O2 photolysis, both electron impact on O and dissociative recombination of O2+ are major sources of O(1D) in the thermosphere. Recent laboratory studies at SRI demonstrate that the O2(b) production populates the vibrational levels v=1 and v=0 in a ratio of ~4. While O2(b, v=0) is essentially unquenched, O2(b, v=1) is subject to collisional quenching that is dominated by O at altitudes above 160 km. Hence, the ratio of the Atmospheric Band emission from O2(b, v=1) and O2(b, v=0) is a measure of the O density. Finally, the spectral shape of the O2 Atmospheric Band is temperature dependent and spectrally resolved measurements of the Atmospheric Bands thus provide a measure of atmospheric temperature. This O2 Atmospheric Band analysis has been advocated as a technique for thermospheric remote sensing under the name Global Oxygen and Temperature (GOAT) Mapping. With O-STATES we want to characterize the GOAT technique by in-situ analysis of the O2 Atmospheric Band airglow and the underlying excitation mechanisms. By performing this dayglow analysis from a rocket payload, detailed local altitude profiles of the relevant emissions and

  19. Block 2 Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) conceptual design study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Segmented and monolithic Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) design concepts were evaluated with emphasis on joints and seals. Particular attention was directed to eliminating deficiencies in the SRM High Performance Motor (HPM). The selected conceptual design is described and discussed.

  20. Effects of Slag Ejection on Solid Rocket Motor Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Purinton, David C.; Hengel, John E.; Skelley, Stephen E.

    1995-01-01

    In past firings of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) both static test and flight motors have shown small pressure perturbations occurring primarily between 65 and 80 seconds. A joint NASA/Thiokol team investigation concluded that the cause of the pressure perturbations was the periodic ingestion and ejection of molten aluminum oxide slag from the cavity around the submerged nozzle nose which tends to trap and collect individual aluminum oxide droplets from the approach flow. The conclusions of the team were supported by numerous data and observations from special tests including high speed photographic films, real time radiography, plume calorimeters, accelerometers, strain gauges, nozzle TVC system force gauges, and motor pressure and thrust data. A simplistic slag ballistics model was formulated to relate a given pressure perturbation to a required slag quantity. Also, a cold flow model using air and water was developed to provide data on the relationship between the slag flow rate and the chamber pressure increase. Both the motor and the cold flow model exhibited low frequency oscillations in conjunction with periods of slag ejection. Motor and model frequencies were related to scaling parameters. The data indicate that there is a periodicity to the slag entrainment and ejection phenomena which is possibly related to organized oscillations from instabilities in the dividing streamline shear layer which impinges on the underneath surface of the nozzle.

  1. Space Shuttle solid rocket motor slag expulsion mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopson, Charles B.

    1995-01-01

    A 13 psi pressure perturbation occurred at approximately 68 seconds on the right Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) during the STS-54 space shuttle mission. While pressure perturbations are a normal characteristic of RSRM operation, the magnitude of the STS-54 perturbation and the resulting thrust imbalance between the left and right motors was outside of flight experience. A joint Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Thiokol Corporation (RSRM manufacturer) team soon narrowed the probable cause to a temporary nozzle restriction due to slag expulsion. In support of the team, Rockwell Aerospace performed fluid finite element simulations and vehicle flight dynamic correlations to investigate possible slag expulsion mechanisms responsible for pressure perturbations. Results of the simulations and analyses provided evidence that the combination of flight induced accelerations acting on accumulated slag and nozzle vectoring were the most probable cause of RSRM slag expulsion.

  2. Design and Experimental Study on Spinning Solid Rocket Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Heng; Jiang, Chunlan; Wang, Zaicheng

    The study on spinning solid rocket motor (SRM) which used as power plant of twice throwing structure of aerial submunition was introduced. This kind of SRM which with the structure of tangential multi-nozzle consists of a combustion chamber, propellant charge, 4 tangential nozzles, ignition device, etc. Grain design, structure design and prediction of interior ballistic performance were described, and problem which need mainly considered in design were analyzed comprehensively. Finally, in order to research working performance of the SRM, measure pressure-time curve and its speed, static test and dynamic test were conducted respectively. And then calculated values and experimental data were compared and analyzed. The results indicate that the designed motor operates normally, and the stable performance of interior ballistic meet demands. And experimental results have the guidance meaning for the pre-research design of SRM.

  3. Low-Cost Phased Array Antenna for Sounding Rockets, Missiles, and Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullinix, Daniel; Hall, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Corbin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost beamformer phased array antenna has been developed for expendable launch vehicles, rockets, and missiles. It utilizes a conformal array antenna of ring or individual radiators (design varies depending on application) that is designed to be fed by the recently developed hybrid electrical/mechanical (vendor-supplied) phased array beamformer. The combination of these new array antennas and the hybrid beamformer results in a conformal phased array antenna that has significantly higher gain than traditional omni antennas, and costs an order of magnitude or more less than traditional phased array designs. Existing omnidirectional antennas for sounding rockets, missiles, and expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) do not have sufficient gain to support the required communication data rates via the space network. Missiles and smaller ELVs are often stabilized in flight by a fast (i.e. 4 Hz) roll rate. This fast roll rate, combined with vehicle attitude changes, greatly increases the complexity of the high-gain antenna beam-tracking problem. Phased arrays for larger ELVs with roll control are prohibitively expensive. Prior techniques involved a traditional fully electronic phased array solution, combined with highly complex and very fast inertial measurement unit phased array beamformers. The functional operation of this phased array is substantially different from traditional phased arrays in that it uses a hybrid electrical/mechanical beamformer that creates the relative time delays for steering the antenna beam via a small physical movement of variable delay lines. This movement is controlled via an innovative antenna control unit that accesses an internal measurement unit for vehicle attitude information, computes a beam-pointing angle to the target, then points the beam via a stepper motor controller. The stepper motor on the beamformer controls the beamformer variable delay lines that apply the appropriate time delays to the individual array elements to properly

  4. Convection measurement package for space processing sounding rocket flights. [low gravity manufacturing - fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spradley, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The effects on heated fluids of nonconstant accelerations, rocket vibrations, and spin rates, was studied. A system is discussed which can determine the influence of the convective effects on fluid experiments. The general suitability of sounding rockets for performing these experiments is treated. An analytical investigation of convection in an enclosure which is heated in low gravity is examined. The gravitational body force was taken as a time-varying function using anticipated sounding rocket accelerations, since accelerometer flight data were not available. A computer program was used to calculate the flow rates and heat transfer in fluids with geometries and boundary conditions typical of space processing configurations. Results of the analytical investigation identify the configurations, fluids and boundary values which are most suitable for measuring the convective environment of sounding rockets. A short description of fabricated fluid cells and the convection measurement package is given. Photographs are included.

  5. HESTIA Commodities Exchange Pallet and Sounding Rocket Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaparro, Javier

    2013-01-01

    During my Spring 2016 internship, my two major contributions were the design of the Commodities Exchange Pallet and the design of a test stand for a 100 pounds-thrust sounding rocket. The Commodities Exchange Pallet is a prototype developed for the Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) program. Under the HESTIA initiative the Commodities Exchange Pallet was developed as a method for demonstrating multi-system integration thru the transportation of In-Situ Resource Utilization produced oxygen and water to a human habitat. Ultimately, this prototype's performance will allow for future evaluation of integration, which may lead to the development of a flight capable pallet for future deep-space exploration missions. For HESTIA, my main task was to design the Commodities Exchange Pallet system to be used for completing an integration demonstration. Under the guidance of my mentor, I designed, both, the structural frame and fluid delivery system for the commodities pallet. The fluid delivery system includes a liquid-oxygen to gaseous-oxygen system, a water delivery system, and a carbon-dioxide compressors system. The structural frame is designed to meet safety and transportation requirements, as well as the ability to interface with the ER division's Portable Utility Pallet. The commodities pallet structure also includes independent instrumentation oxygen/water panels for operation and system monitoring. My major accomplishments for the commodities exchange pallet were the completion of the fluid delivery systems and the structural frame designs. In addition, parts selection was completed in order to expedite construction of the prototype, scheduled to begin in May of 2016. Once the commodities pallet is assembled and tested it is expected to complete a fully integrated transfer demonstration with the ISRU unit and the Environmental Control and Life Support System test chamber in September of 2016. In addition to the development of

  6. Maturation of Structural Health Management Systems for Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quing, Xinlin; Beard, Shawn; Zhang, Chang

    2011-01-01

    Concepts of an autonomous and automated space-compliant diagnostic system were developed for conditioned-based maintenance (CBM) of rocket motors for space exploration vehicles. The diagnostic system will provide real-time information on the integrity of critical structures on launch vehicles, improve their performance, and greatly increase crew safety while decreasing inspection costs. Using the SMART Layer technology as a basis, detailed procedures and calibration techniques for implementation of the diagnostic system were developed. The diagnostic system is a distributed system, which consists of a sensor network, local data loggers, and a host central processor. The system detects external impact to the structure. The major functions of the system include an estimate of impact location, estimate of impact force at impacted location, and estimate of the structure damage at impacted location. This system consists of a large-area sensor network, dedicated multiple local data loggers with signal processing and data analysis software to allow for real-time, in situ monitoring, and longterm tracking of structural integrity of solid rocket motors. Specifically, the system could provide easy installation of large sensor networks, onboard operation under harsh environments and loading, inspection of inaccessible areas without disassembly, detection of impact events and impact damage in real-time, and monitoring of a large area with local data processing to reduce wiring.

  7. Optical Design of the MOSES Sounding Rocket Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Roger J.; Kankelborg, Charles C.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) is a sounding rocket payload now being developed by Montana State University in collaboration with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, and Mullard Space Science Laboratory. The instrument utilizes a unique optical design to provide solar EUV measurements with true 2-pixel resolutions of 1.0 arcsec and 60 mA over a full two-dimensional field of view of 1056 x 528 arcsec, all at a time cadence of 10 s. This unprecedented capability is achieved by means of an objective spherical grating 100 mm in diameter, ruled at 833 gr/mm. The concave grating focuses spectrally dispersed solar radiation onto three separate detectors, simultaneously recording the zero-order as well as the plus and minus first-spectral-order images. Data analysis procedures, similar to those used in X-ray tomography reconstructions, can then disentangle the mixed spatial and spectral information recorded by the multiple detectors. A flat folding mirror permits an imaging focal length of 4.74 m to be packaged within the payload's physical length of 2.82 m. Both the objective grating and folding flat have specialized, closely matched, multilayer coatings that strongly enhance their EUV reflectance while also suppressing off-band radiation that would otherwise complicate data inversion. Although the spectral bandpass is rather narrow, several candidate wavelength intervals are available to carry out truly unique scientific studies of the outer solar atmosphere. Initial flights of MOSES, scheduled to begin in 2004, will observe a 10 Angstrom band that covers very strong emission lines characteristic of both the sun's corona (Si XI 303 Angstroms) and transition-region (He II 304 Angstroms). The MOSES program is supported by a grant from NASA's Office of Space Science.

  8. Solid rocket motor certification to meet space shuttle requirements from challenge to achievement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. Q.; Kilminster, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Three solid rocket motor (SRM) design requirements for the Space Shuttle were discussed. No existing solid rocket motor experience was available for the requirement for a thrust-time trace, twenty uses for the principle hardware, and a moveable nozzle with an 8 deg. omnivaxial vectoring capability. The solutions to these problems are presented.

  9. Observations of the global structure of the stratosphere and mesosphere with sounding rockets and with remote sensing techniques from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.; Hilsenrath, E.; Krueger, A. J.; Nordberg, W.; Prabhakara, C.; Theon, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    Brief descriptions are given of the techniques involved in determining the global structure of the mesosphere and stratosphere based on sounding rocket observations and satellite remotely sensed measurements.

  10. Analysis and testing of similarity and scale effects in hybrid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal Swami, Rajeshwar; Gany, Alon

    2003-04-01

    In order to derive proper scaling rules in hybrid rocket motors, a theoretical similarity analysis is presented. By taking account of the main phenomena and effects, the similarity analysis defines the following three main conditions for testing a laboratory-scale hybrid rocket motor that can simulate a full-scale motor: (1) geometric similarity, (2) same fuel and oxidizer combination, and (3) scaling mass flow rate of oxidizer in proportion to the motor port diameter. To verify the analysis, tests are conducted on different-size polymethylmethacrylate/gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motors. These motors are scaled as per the similarity analysis and tested under similarity conditions. A fairly good agreement between the test-results and theoretical prediction verifies the similarity model. This also points out that the main processes and effects associated with hybrid rocket combustion have been considered adequately in the analysis.

  11. REM-RED Cosmic Radiation Monitoring Experiment On-Board the REXUS-17 Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabori, B.; Gerecs, A.; Hurtonyne Gyovai, A.; Benyei, D.; Naczi, F.; Hurtony, T.

    2015-09-01

    The cosmic radiation field is not well known up to the altitude of the lower orbiting spacecrafts. There are several ways to measure the cosmic radiation in this altitude; however it is not easy to apply them to a sounding rocket. The easiest way is to use Geiger-Muller (GM) counters to quantify the radiation level. The REMRED rocket experiment performed measurements with active radiation instruments (GM counters) in order to quantify the cosmic radiation field from the Earth's surface up to the maximum altitude of the REXUS rocket (about 90 km). The flight of the REM-RED experiment was carried out on the 1 7th of March 201 5 from the ESRANGE Space Center on-board the REXUS-17 student mission sounding rocket.

  12. Fluid-structure interaction of solid rocket motor inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, R. L.; Gramoll, K.; Weaver, M.; Flandro, G. A.

    1992-07-01

    The deformation of solid rocket motor inhibitor material due to loads imposed by the gas flow is studied in this effort. The flow field is computed around an infinitely stiff inhibitor using a Navier-Stokes solution procedure which provides the stress distributions on the inhibitor. These stresses are then fed into a structural finite element analysis code, ANSYS to determine the deflection based on these stresses and a realistic stiffness. The deformed shape is fed back into the Navier-Stokes solution procedure and a new grid and stress distribution are obtained. The process continues until the inhibitor deflection becomes fixed or periodic. While this is a somewhat crude approach, the availability of the two codes without modifications provide a tempting way to take a first look at a fluid-structure interaction problem and to help in the design of truly coupled approach. The geometry used is typical of those found in large solid rocket boosters of the type used on the Space Shuttle system and the Titan III series.

  13. Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzle alternate ablative evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, L. B.; Bailey, R. L.; Morrison, B. H.

    1981-01-01

    A series of subscale tests are shown to suggest that a lower-cost ablative material than the rayon-based carbon ablative currently used in the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) may be used as a substitute. Six such ablatives with outstanding performance characteristics, using spun PAN and continuous pitch and PAN fibers instead of the present, continuous rayon, were identified in the course of tests with HTPB/AL/AP solid propellant grains with a burn time of 12 sec. The test nozzle features an initial throat diameter of 2.2 in. and a 6.1 expansion ratio. In addition to nozzle structural feature drawings, extensive test data tables and propellant formulation and properties tables are provided.

  14. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint 5 Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, R. C.; Stratton, T. C.; LaMont, D. T.

    2003-01-01

    Torque tension testing of a newly designed Reusable Solid Rocket Motor nozzle bolted assembly was successfully completed. Test results showed that the 3-sigma preload variation was as expected at the required input torque level and the preload relaxation were within the engineering limits. A shim installation technique was demonstrated as a simple process to fill a shear lip gap between nozzle housings in the joint region. A new automated torque system was successfully demonstrated in this test. This torque control tool was found to be very precise and accurate. The bolted assembly performance was further evaluated using the Nozzle Structural Test Bed. Both current socket head cap screw and proposed multiphase alloy bolt configurations were tested. Results indicated that joint skip and bolt bending were significantly reduced with the new multiphase alloy bolt design. This paper summarizes all the test results completed to date.

  15. Measured particulate behavior in a subscale solid propellant rocket motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, W. D.; Hovland, D. L.; Netzer, D. W.

    1992-10-01

    Particulate matter are sized in the exhaust nozzle and plume of small rocket motors of varying geometry to assess the effects of the expansion process on particle size. Both converging and converging-diverging nozzles are considered, and particle sizing is accomplished at pressures of up to 4.36 MPa with aluminum loadings of 2.0 and 4.7 percent. An instrument based on Fraunhofer diffraction is used to measure the particle-size distributions showing that: (1) high burning rates reduce particle agglomeration and increase C* efficiency; (2) high pressures lead to small and monomodal D32 entering the nozzle; and (3) D32 sizes increase appreciably at the tailoff. Some variations in plume signature are theorized to be caused by the tailoff phenomenon, and particle collisions and/or surface effects in the nozzle convergence are suggested by the reduced number of larger particles at the nozzle convergence.

  16. The Effects of Orbital Distribution from Solid Rocket Motor Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Keke; Pang, Baojun; Xiao, Weike

    2013-08-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) firings are an important source of space debris environment. The resulting by-products are generally divided into two categories: slag and dust. Dust will re-entry sharply and do not pose a significant hazard. Slag debris can achieve centimeter level, these particles have a serious effect on risk assessment and defend structural design of spacecraft. It is important to understand the size distribution and orbital behavior of slag in order to predict the hazard posed both currently and in the future. Utilizing previous researches on SRM slag and 8-year launch cycle, we have analyzed the orbital distribution of SRM slag. The results indicate that SRM slag is a crucial component of the space debris environment. In order to sustainable utilization outer space, human should forbid the use of SRM in the future, especially for the medium Earth orbit (MEO) and geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) regions.

  17. Stability analysis and numerical simulation of simplified solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, G.; Casalis, G.; Estivalèzes, J.-L.

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the Parietal Vortex Shedding (PVS) instability that significantly influences the Pressure Oscillations of the long and segmented solid rocket motors. The eigenmodes resulting from the stability analysis of a simplified configuration, namely, a cylindrical duct with sidewall injection, are presented. They are computed taking into account the presence of a wall injection defect, which is shown to induce hydrodynamic instabilities at discrete frequencies. These instabilities exhibit eigenfunctions in good agreement with the measured PVS vortical structures. They are successfully compared in terms of temporal evolution and frequencies to the unsteady hydrodynamic fluctuations computed by numerical simulations. In addition, this study has shown that the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with the PVS are the driving force of the flow dynamics, since they are responsible for the emergence of pressure waves propagating at the same frequency.

  18. Radiation/convection coupling in rocket motor and plume analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saladino, A. J.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    A method for describing radiation/convection coupling to a flow field analysis was developed for rocket motors and plumes. The three commonly used propellant systems (H2/O2, RP-1/O2, and solid propellants) radiate primarily as: molecular emitters, non-scattering small particles (soot), and scattering larger particles (Al2O3), respectively. For the required solution, the divergence of the radiation heat flux was included in the energy equation, and the local, volume averaged intensity was determined by a solution to the radiative transfer equation. A rigorous solution to this problem is intractable, therefore, solution methods which use the ordinary and improved differential approximation were developed. This radiation model was being incorporated into the FDNS code, a Navier-Stokes flowfield solver for multiphase, turbulent combusting flows.

  19. Robotic NDE inspection of advanced solid rocket motor casings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcneelege, Glenn E.; Sarantos, Chris

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor program determined the need to inspect ASRM forgings and segments for potentially catastrophic defects. To minimize costs, an automated eddy current inspection system was designed and manufactured for inspection of ASRM forgings in the initial phases of production. This system utilizes custom manipulators and motion control algorithms and integrated six channel eddy current data acquisition and analysis hardware and software. Total system integration is through a personal computer based workcell controller. Segment inspection demands the use of a gantry robot for the EMAT/ET inspection system. The EMAT/ET system utilized similar mechanical compliancy and software logic to accommodate complex part geometries. EMAT provides volumetric inspection capability while eddy current is limited to surface and near surface inspection. Each aspect of the systems are applicable to other industries, such as, inspection of pressure vessels, weld inspection, and traditional ultrasonic inspection applications.

  20. The 260: The Largest Solid Rocket Motor Ever Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crimmins, P.; Cousineau, M.; Rogers, C.; Shell, V.

    1999-01-01

    Aerojet in the mid 1960s, under contract to NASA, built and static hot fire tested the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) in history for the purpose of demonstrating the feasibility of utilizing large SRMs for space exploration. This program successfully fabricated two high strength steel chambers, loaded each with approximately 1,68 million pounds of propellant, and static test fired these giants with their nozzles up from an underground silo located adjacent to the Florida everglades. Maximum thrust and total impulse in excess of 5,000,000 lbf and 3,470,000,000 lbf-sec were achieved. Flames from the second firing, conducted at night, were seen over eighty miles away. For comparative purposes: the thrust developed was nearly 100 times that of a Minuteman III second stage and the 260 in.-dia cross-section was over 3 times that of the Space Shuttle SRM.

  1. Flight demonstration of flight termination system and solid rocket motor ignition using semiconductor laser initiated ordnance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Maxfield, B.; Boucher, C.

    1995-01-01

    Solid State Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) offers new technology having potential for enhanced safety, reduced costs, and improved operational efficiency. Concerns over the absence of programmatic applications of the technology, which has prevented acceptance by flight programs, should be abated since LIO has now been operationally implemented by the Laser Initiated Ordnance Sounding Rocket Demonstration (LOSRD) Program. The first launch of solid state laser diode LIO at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) occurred on March 15, 1995 with all mission objectives accomplished. This project, Phase 3 of a series of three NASA Headquarters LIO demonstration initiatives, accomplished its objective by the flight of a dedicated, all-LIO sounding rocket mission using a two-stage Nike-Orion launch vehicle. LIO flight hardware, made by The Ensign-Bickford Company under NASA's first Cooperative Agreement with Profit Making Organizations, safely initiated three demanding pyrotechnic sequence events, namely, solid rocket motor ignition from the ground and in flight, and flight termination, i.e., as a Flight Termination System (FTS). A flight LIO system was designed, built, tested, and flown to support the objectives of quickly and inexpensively putting LIO through ground and flight operational paces. The hardware was fully qualified for this mission, including component testing as well as a full-scale system test. The launch accomplished all mission objectives in less than 11 months from proposal receipt. This paper concentrates on accomplishments of the ordnance aspects of the program and on the program's implementation and results. While this program does not generically qualify LIO for all applications, it demonstrated the safety, technical, and operational feasibility of those two most demanding applications, using an all solid state safe and arm system in critical flight applications.

  2. A Low Cost GPS System for Real-Time Tracking of Sounding Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markgraf, M.; Montenbruck, O.; Hassenpflug, F.; Turner, P.; Bull, B.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development as well as the on-ground and the in-flight evaluation of a low cost Global Positioning System (GPS) system for real-time tracking of sounding rockets. The flight unit comprises a modified ORION GPS receiver and a newly designed switchable antenna system composed of a helical antenna in the rocket tip and a dual-blade antenna combination attached to the body of the service module. Aside from the flight hardware a PC based terminal program has been developed to monitor the GPS data and graphically displays the rocket's path during the flight. In addition an Instantaneous Impact Point (IIP) prediction is performed based on the received position and velocity information. In preparation for ESA's Maxus-4 mission, a sounding rocket test flight was carried out at Esrange, Kiruna, on 19 Feb. 2001 to validate existing ground facilities and range safety installations. Due to the absence of a dedicated scientific payload, the flight offered the opportunity to test multiple GPS receivers and assess their performance for the tracking of sounding rockets. In addition to the ORION receiver, an Ashtech G12 HDMA receiver and a BAE (Canadian Marconi) Allstar receiver, both connected to a wrap-around antenna, have been flown on the same rocket as part of an independent experiment provided by the Goddard Space Flight Center. This allows an in-depth verification and trade-off of different receiver and antenna concepts.

  3. Spatial and temporal turbulence evolution as inferred from the WADIS sounding rocket project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnikov, Boris; Asmus, Heiner; Latteck, Ralph; Strelnikova, Irina; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Baumgarten, Gerd; Hildebrand, Jens; Höffner, Josef; Wörl, Raimund; Rapp, Markus; Friedrich, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The WADIS project (Wave propagation and dissipation in the middle atmosphere: energy budget and distribution of trace constituents) aimed at studying waves, their dissipation, and effects on trace constituents. The project comprised two sounding rocket campaigns conducted at the Andøya Space Center (69 °N, 16 °E). One sounding rocket was launched in summer 2013 and one in winter 2015. The WADIS-1 sounding rocket was launched on 27 of June 2013 into Polar Mesosphere Summer Echo (PMSE). Ground based PMSE observations were conducted using the MAARSY VHF- and the EISCAT-Tromsø radars. IAP RMR-lidar observed NLC colocated with PMSE. The WADIS-2 sounding rocket was launched on 5 of March of 2015 and had the same instrumentation on board. ALOMAR RMR- and IAP Fe-lidars and SAURA-MF radar measured mesospheric temperatures and winds throughout the launch window. In-situ measurements delivered high resolution altitude-profiles of neutral and plasma densities, neutral air temperature and turbulence. Extensive turbulence measurements were conducted employing different techniques. In-situ measurements were done on both upleg and downleg, implying that two profiles of each quantity were near simultaneously measured with high altitude resolution at ˜30 km horizontal distance. The measurements with MAARSY cover both up- and downleg parts of the rocket trajectory and the EISCAT-Tromsø radar is located 100 km away of the launch site. We discuss these turbulence measurements and its spatial and time evolution.

  4. Development of a new generation solid rocket motor ignition computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Winfred A., Jr.; Jenkins, Rhonald M.; Ciucci, Alessandro; Johnson, Shelby D.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of experimental and numerical investigations of the flow field in the head-end star grain slots of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor. This work provided the basis for the development of an improved solid rocket motor ignition transient code which is also described in this report. The correlation between the experimental and numerical results is excellent and provides a firm basis for the development of a fully three-dimensional solid rocket motor ignition transient computer code.

  5. Sounding rocket thermal analysis techniques applied to GAS payloads. [Get Away Special payloads (STS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, L. D.

    1979-01-01

    Simplified analytical techniques of sounding rocket programs are suggested as a means of bringing the cost of thermal analysis of the Get Away Special (GAS) payloads within acceptable bounds. Particular attention is given to two methods adapted from sounding rocket technology - a method in which the container and payload are assumed to be divided in half vertically by a thermal plane of symmetry, and a method which considers the container and its payload to be an analogous one-dimensional unit having the real or correct container top surface area for radiative heat transfer and a fictitious mass and geometry which model the average thermal effects.

  6. Making Ultraviolet Spectro-Polarimetry Polarization Measurements with the MSFC Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken; Davis, John; Gary, Allen

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe the Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program. This paper will concentrate on SUMI's VUV optics, and discuss their spectral, spatial and polarization characteristics. While SUMI's first flight (7/30/2010) met all of its mission success criteria, there are several areas that will be improved for its second and third flights. This paper will emphasize the MgII linear polarization measurements and describe the changes that will be made to the sounding rocket and how those changes will improve the scientific data acquired by SUMI.

  7. Stage separation study of Nike-Black Brant V Sounding Rocket System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferragut, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    A new Sounding Rocket System has been developed. It consists of a Nike Booster and a Black Brant V Sustainer with slanted fins which extend beyond its nozzle exit plane. A cursory look was taken at different factors which must be considered when studying a passive separation system. That is, one separation system without mechanical constraints in the axial direction and which will allow separation due to drag differential accelerations between the Booster and the Sustainer. The equations of motion were derived for rigid body motions and exact solutions were obtained. The analysis developed could be applied to any other staging problem of a Sounding Rocket System.

  8. CFD Analysis of the 24-inch JIRAD Hybrid Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan; Ungewitter, Ronald; Claflin, Scott

    1996-01-01

    A series of multispecies, multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of the 24-inch diameter joint government industry industrial research and development (JIRAD) hybrid rocket motor is described. The 24-inch JIRAD hybrid motor operates by injection of liquid oxygen (LOX) into a vaporization plenum chamber upstream of ports in the hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) solid fuel. The injector spray pattern had a strong influence on combustion stability of the JIRAD motor so a CFD study was initiated to define the injector end flow field under different oxidizer spray patterns and operating conditions. By using CFD to gain a clear picture of the flow field and temperature distribution within the JIRAD motor, it is hoped that the fundamental mechanisms of hybrid combustion instability may be identified and then suppressed by simple alterations to the oxidizer injection parameters such as injection angle and velocity. The simulations in this study were carried out using the General Algorithm for Analysis of Combustion SYstems (GALACSY) multiphase combustion codes. GALACSY consists of a comprehensive set of droplet dynamic submodels (atomization, evaporation, etc.) and a computationally efficient hydrocarbon chemistry package built around a robust Navier-Stokes solver optimized for low Mach number flows. Lagrangian tracking of dispersed particles describes a closely coupled spray phase. The CFD cases described in this paper represent various levels of simplification of the problem. They include: (A) gaseous oxygen with combusting fuel vapor blowing off the walls at various oxidizer injection angles and velocities, (B) gaseous oxygen with combusting fuel vapor blowing off the walls, and (C) liquid oxygen with combusting fuel vapor blowing off the walls. The study used an axisymmetric model and the results indicate that the injector design significantly effects the flow field in the injector end of the motor. Markedly different recirculation patterns are

  9. Solid-Fuel Regression Rate for Standard-Flow Hybrid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Takakazu; Yuasa, Saburo; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Shimada, Toru

    Marxman's diffusion-limited analysis of hybrid rocket combustion has been often used to investigate various combustion problems in hybrid rocket motors. This analysis was developed on the basis of the Reynolds analogy in turbulent boundary layers. This analogy assumes that both molecular and turbulent Prandtl numbers are equal to one. In the present study, a semi-empirical correlation between the Stanton number and the skin-friction coefficient in a turbulent boundary layer was obtained. This is applicable to hybrid rocket combustion, and also includes the effects of the Prandtl numbers variation. Using this correlation, a fuel regression rate equation for standard-flow hybrid rocket motors was obtained, and its characteristics were examined. In addition, the calculated regression rate characteristics were compared with the experimental data from the laboratory-scale hybrid rocket motors that used gaseous oxygen (GOX) as oxidizer and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as fuel.

  10. Sounding rocket research Aries/Firewheel, series 22, issue 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozer, F. S.

    1981-01-01

    Rocket experiments in ionospheric particle and field research flow in seven programs during the last decade are summarized. Experimental techniques were developed and are discussed including the double-probe field technique. The auroral zone, polar cap, and equatorial spread F were studied.