Science.gov

Sample records for source emission rate

  1. Comparison of CALPUFF and ISCST3 models for predicting downwind odor and source emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingjuan; Parker, David B.; Parnell, Calvin B.; Lacey, Ronald E.; Shaw, Bryan W.

    CALPUFF model and ISCST3 Gaussian dispersion models were evaluated for predicting downwind odor concentrations and back-calculating area source odor emission rates. The comparison between the predicted and field-sampled downwind concentrations indicates that the CALPUFF model could fairly well predict average downwind odor concentrations. However, ISCST3 tended to under predict downwind odor concentrations as compared to the measured concentrations. Both the CALPUFF and ISCST3 models failed to predict peak odor concentrations using the constant average emission rate. Odor emission rates obtained by back-calculating fluxes using CALPUFF and ISC models with the same field measurements of downwind odor concentrations are significantly different. It indicates that back-calculated emission rates are model specific. The modeled emission rates tended to be higher than flux chamber source sampling results. The flux chamber protocol may under-estimate odor emission rates.

  2. Odor emission rate estimation of indoor industrial sources using a modified inverse modeling method.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Tingting; Sattayatewa, Chakkrid; Venkatesan, Dhesikan; Noll, Kenneth E; Pagilla, Krishna R; Moschandreas, Demetrios J

    2011-08-01

    Odor emission rates are commonly measured in the laboratory or occasionally estimated with inverse modeling techniques. A modified inverse modeling approach is used to estimate source emission rates inside of a postdigestion centrifuge building of a water reclamation plant. Conventionally, inverse modeling methods divide an indoor environment in zones on the basis of structural design and estimate source emission rates using models that assume homogeneous distribution of agent concentrations within a zone and experimentally determined link functions to simulate airflows among zones. The modified approach segregates zones as a function of agent distribution rather than building design and identifies near and far fields. Near-field agent concentrations do not satisfy the assumption of homogeneous odor concentrations; far-field concentrations satisfy this assumption and are the only ones used to estimate emission rates. The predictive ability of the modified inverse modeling approach was validated with measured emission rate values; the difference between corresponding estimated and measured odor emission rates is not statistically significant. Similarly, the difference between measured and estimated hydrogen sulfide emission rates is also not statistically significant. The modified inverse modeling approach is easy to perform because it uses odor and odorant field measurements instead of complex chamber emission rate measurements. PMID:21874959

  3. Odor Sampling: Techniques and Strategies for the Estimation of Odor Emission Rates from Different Source Types

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Laura; Sironi, Selena; Rosso, Renato Del

    2013-01-01

    Sampling is one of the main issues pertaining to odor characterization and measurement. The aim of sampling is to obtain representative information on the typical characteristics of an odor source by means of the collection of a suitable volume fraction of the effluent. The most important information about an emission source for odor impact assessment is the so-called Odor Emission Rate (OER), which represents the quantity of odor emitted per unit of time, and is expressed in odor units per second (ou·s−1). This paper reviews the different odor sampling strategies adopted depending on source type. The review includes an overview of odor sampling regulations and a detailed discussion of the equipment to be used as well as the mathematical considerations to be applied to obtain the OER in relation to the sampled source typology. PMID:23322098

  4. Characterization of emission rates from indoor combustion sources. Final report, March 1982-March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Moschandreas, D.J.; Relwani, S.M.; O'Neill, H.J.; Cole, J.T.; Elkins, R.H.

    1985-03-01

    Indoor air pollution in residences, offices, public access buildings, and the like may be as important a factor to public health as pollution in the outdoors and in indoor-industrial environments. The advent of energy-conservation measures, new technologies, and new materials in buildings may exacerbate the potential indoor air pollution problem. In addition to others, unvented gas appliances are perceived to be sources of indoor nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Chamber experiments were performed to measure emission rates of NO, NO2, and CO for range-top burners, range ovens, pilot lights, gas dryers, gas space heaters, and cigarettes. The values evaluated establish the range of emission rates for these constituents under well-controlled conditions. Emissions of particulate matter, formaldehyde, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds were also measured and found to be low compared to NOx and CO. Factors that impact on the emission rates from unvented gas appliances include appliance type, primary aeration level, relative humidity, and variable fuel rate (firing rate). Chamber experiments confirm that the presence of indoor surfaces (fabric, carpet, etc.) reduces the indoor NO2 concentrations.

  5. GAS-PHASE MASS TRANSFER MODEL FOR PREDICTING VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) EMISSION RATES FROM INDOOR POLLUTANT SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of the impact of sources on indoor pollutant concentrations and occupant exposure to indoor pollutants requires knowledge of the emission rates from the sources. Emission rates are often determined by chamber testing and the data from the chamber test are fitted to an em...

  6. Observed Barium Emission Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Hallinan, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The barium releases from the CRRES satellite have provided an opportunity for verifying theoretically calculated barium ion and neutral emission rates. Spectra of the five Caribbean releases in the summer of 1991 were taken with a spectrograph on board a U.S. Air Force jet aircraft. Because the line of sight release densities are not known, only relative rates could be obtained. The observed relative rates agree well with the theoretically calculated rates and, together with other observations, confirm the earlier detailed theoretical emission rates. The calculated emission rates can thus with good accuracy be used with photometric observations. It has been postulated that charge exchange between neutral barium and oxygen ions represents a significant source for ionization. If so. it should be associated with emissions at 4957.15 A and 5013.00 A, but these emissions were not detected.

  7. Use of open-path FTIR monitoring for emission rate assessment of industrial area sources during winter conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kricks, Robert J.; Keely, Jerry A.; Spellicy, Robert L.; Perry, Stephen H.

    1999-02-01

    Open-path Fourier transform-infrared (OP-FTIR) was used to collect emission data for a number of chemical compounds for several area sources at a northwestern industrial facility. The data collected was used in conjunction with meteorological measurements to assess the emission rate of several of the compounds from these area sources. The release of a tracer gas at a known emission rate and its subsequent measurement with the OP-FTIR allowed for correction of emission rates to account for local effects on the site specific vertical dispersion coefficients used for emission assessments. The methodology for emission rate assessment is presented, and the implications of correcting for site specific vertical dispersion are discussed. Four area source case studies are included for the study. Most of this data was collected during cold temperature conditions, and some of the data collected during the night time hours, this represents one of the first studies of site specific vertical dispersion under these conditions. Possible impacts of these conditions on emission rate determinations will be presented. The effectiveness of OP-FTIR as a tool for area source emission rate assessment will be evaluated. OP-FTIR was employed for data collection because of its ability to detect the compounds of interest accurately and with reasonable levels of detectability. Emission rate determinations were done for process ponds AA, and BB. Fence-line concentration measurements were also made north of pond AA. The on-site study was conducted from 11/10/97 through 11/26/97. The data collected indicated that moderate to significant levels of two target compounds were being emitted by both pond AA and pond BB. Emission rates were estimated using text book dispersion coefficients and found to overestimate actual emission rates based on tracer gas release significantly. One target compound's emission rate was found to also be related to wind speed.

  8. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: A conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster-Wittig, Tierney A.; Thoma, Eben D.; Albertson, John D.

    2015-08-01

    Emerging mobile fugitive emissions detection and measurement approaches require robust inverse source algorithms to be effective. Two Gaussian plume inverse approaches are described for estimating emission rates from ground-level point sources observed from remote vantage points. The techniques were tested using data from 41 controlled methane release experiments (14 studies) and further investigated using 7 field studies executed downwind of oil and gas well pads in Wyoming. Analyzed measurements were acquired from stationary observation locations 18-106 m downwind of the emission sources. From the fluctuating wind direction, the lateral plume geometry is reconstructed using a derived relationship between the wind direction and crosswind plume position. The crosswind plume spread is determined with both modeled and reconstructed Gaussian plume approaches and estimates of source emission rates are found through inversion. The source emission rates were compared to a simple point source Gaussian emission estimation approach that is part of Draft EPA Method OTM 33A. Compared to the known release rates, the modeled, reconstructed, and point source Gaussian controlled release results yield average percent errors of -5%, -2%, and 6% with standard deviations of 29%, 25%, and 37%, respectively. Compared to each other, the three methods agree within 30% for 78% of all 48 observations (41 CR and 7 Wyoming).

  9. Estimation of point source fugitive emission rates from a single sensor time series: a conditionally-sampled Gaussian plume reconstruction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a technique for determining the trace gas emission rate from a point source. The technique was tested using data from controlled methane release experiments and from measurement downwind of a natural gas production facility in Wyoming. Concentration measuremen...

  10. Bayesian Estimation of Fugitive Methane Point Source Emission Rates from a SingleDownwind High-Frequency Gas Sensor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bayesian Estimation of Fugitive Methane Point Source Emission Rates from a Single Downwind High-Frequency Gas Sensor With the tremendous advances in onshore oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) capability comes the realization that new tools are needed to support env...

  11. A primary standard for the measurement of alpha and beta particle surface emission rate from large area reference sources.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Anuradha; Kulkarni, D B; Joseph, Leena; Kulkarni, M S; Babu, D A R

    2016-01-01

    A large area windowless gas flow multi wire proportional counting system for the calibration of large area reference sources has been developed as a primary standard at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC). The counting system consists of a multi wire proportional counter (MWPC), vacuum system, gas flow system and pulse processing units. The MWPC detector assembly consists of a vacuum tight aluminum enclosure, multi wire grid and sliding source tray. Various detector characteristics like operating characteristics curve, Fe-55 spectrum for beta discriminator threshold setting and dead time of the measurement system were studied and determined in order to achieve an optimized detection capability. The surface emission rates of different source strengths were measured and their relative combined standard uncertainties were determined. Large Area Sources Comparison Exercise (LASCE) was organized by International Committee on Radionuclide Metrology (ICRM) working group and coordinated by National Institute for Ionising Radiation Metrology (ENEA), Italy, to demonstrate equivalence of surface emission rate measurements at the international platform. BARC participated in the programme and the results of LASCE are also discussed in this paper. PMID:26457924

  12. Volatile organic compound concentrations, emission rates, and source apportionment in newly-built apartments at pre-occupancy stage.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung H; Jo, Wan K

    2012-10-01

    The present study investigated the indoor concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde and their indoor emission characteristics in newly-built apartments at the pre-occupancy stage. In total, 107 apartments were surveyed for indoor and outdoor VOC concentrations in two metropolitan cities and one rural area in Korea. A mass balanced model was used to estimate surface area-specific emission rates of individual VOCs and formaldehyde. Seven (benzene, ethyl benzene, toluene, m,p-xylene, o-xylene, n-hexane, and n-heptane) of 40 target compounds were detectable in all indoor air samples, whereas the first five were detected in all outdoor air samples. Formaldehyde was also predominant in the indoor air samples, with a high detection frequency of 96%. The indoor concentrations were significantly higher than the outdoor concentrations for aromatics, alcohols, terpenes, and ketones. However, six halogenated VOCs exhibited similar concentrations for indoor and outdoor air samples, suggesting that they are not major components emitted from building materials. It was also suggested that a certain portion of the apartments surveyed were constructed by not following the Korean Ministry of Environment guidelines for formaldehyde emissions. Toluene exhibited the highest emission rate with a median value of 138 μg m(-2) h(-1). The target compounds with median emission rates greater than 20 μg m(-2) h(-1) were toluene, 1-propanol, formaldehyde, and 2-butanone. The wood panels/vinyl floor coverings were the largest indoor pollutant source, followed by floorings, wall coverings, adhesives, and paints. The wood panels/vinyl floor coverings contributed nearly three times more to indoor VOC concentrations than paints. PMID:22698369

  13. Field emission electron source

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  14. Field emission electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, A.K.; Cohen, M.L.

    2000-05-02

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm{sup 2} at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  15. Global Scale Attribution of Anthropogenic and Natural Dust Sources and their Emission Rates Based on MODIS Deep Blue Aerosol Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginoux, Paul; Prospero, Joseph M.; Gill, Thomas E.; Hsu, N. Christina; Zhao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the global dust cycle is limited by a dearth of information about dust sources, especially small-scale features which could account for a large fraction of global emissions. Here we present a global-scale high-resolution (0.1 deg) mapping of sources based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep Blue estimates of dust optical depth in conjunction with other data sets including land use. We ascribe dust sources to natural and anthropogenic (primarily agricultural) origins, calculate their respective contributions to emissions, and extensively compare these products against literature. Natural dust sources globally account for 75% of emissions; anthropogenic sources account for 25%. North Africa accounts for 55% of global dust emissions with only 8% being anthropogenic, mostly from the Sahel. Elsewhere, anthropogenic dust emissions can be much higher (75% in Australia). Hydrologic dust sources (e.g., ephemeral water bodies) account for 31% worldwide; 15% of them are natural while 85% are anthropogenic. Globally, 20% of emissions are from vegetated surfaces, primarily desert shrublands and agricultural lands. Since anthropogenic dust sources are associated with land use and ephemeral water bodies, both in turn linked to the hydrological cycle, their emissions are affected by climate variability. Such changes in dust emissions can impact climate, air quality, and human health. Improved dust emission estimates will require a better mapping of threshold wind velocities, vegetation dynamics, and surface conditions (soil moisture and land use) especially in the sensitive regions identified here, as well as improved ability to address small-scale convective processes producing dust via cold pool (haboob) events frequent in monsoon regimes.

  16. APMP comparison of measurement of surface emission rate of 36Cl large area source (APMP.RI(II)-K2.Cl-36).

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Akira; Hino, Yoshio

    2012-09-01

    An international comparison of measurement of beta particle surface emission rate from a (36)Cl large area source (APMP.RI(II)-S1.Cl-36) was carried out within the framework of the Asia-Pacific Metrology Program (APMP). Participants from APMP were NMIJ (Japan), KRISS (Korea) and INER (Chinese Taipei). Participants from the other RMOs were NIST (United States), PTB (Germany), NMISA (South Africa) and VNIIM (Russia). All the results of the participants agreed within ±1%. This was the first international comparison of measurement of surface emission rate of beta particle from a large area source. PMID:22424747

  17. Passive Effluent Diffusion in a Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer: An Airborne Approach to Locating Sources and Estimating Their Emission Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suard, Maxime

    We studied the near field dispersion of natural gas plumes leaking from transmission lines and diffusing in a convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), with the intent of providing an aerial system of leak detection and pinpointing, as well as quantitative leak rate estimation. We used high frequency measurements of methane and ethane concentrations on a fixed wing aircraft using high rate spectroscopic gas concentration measurements. We looked for characteristics of the effluent concentration field which can be related to the distance from the effluent source, and developed an empirical approach to effluent source position estimation from airborne effluent concentration measurements. From a mass-balance approach we developed a practical method of effluent leak rate estimation based on airborne effluent concentration measurements. Since gathering experimental data was costly and time-expensive, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) results were also investigated. Results showed that analysis of effluent concentration variability is likely to provide information about the position of the effluent source. The developed leak rate estimation method provided encouraging results showing that such an approach is able to yield relatively accurate leak rate estimates. LES results proved to be very useful as they helped to provide guidelines for experiments as well as to deepen our understanding of the diffusion dynamics of turbulent effluent plumes.

  18. Exploiting dual otoacoustic emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdala, Carolina; Kalluri, Radha

    2015-12-01

    Two distinct processes generate otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Reflection-source emissions, here recorded as stimulus frequency OAEs, are optimally informative at low sound levels and are more sensitive to slight hearing loss; they have been linked to cochlear amplifier gain and tuning. Distortion-source emissions are strongest at moderate-high sound levels and persist despite mild hearing loss; they likely originate in the nonlinear process of hair cell transduction. In this preliminary study, we exploit the unique features of each by generating a combined reflection-distortion OAE profile in normal hearing and hearing-impaired ears. Distortion-product (DP) and stimulus-frequency (SF) OAEs were recorded over a broad range of stimulus levels and frequencies. Individual I/O and transfer functions were generated for both emission types in each ear, and OAE peak strength, compression threshold, and rate of compression were calculated. These combined SFOAE and DPOAE features in normal and hearing-impaired ears may provide a potentially informative and novel index of hearing loss. This is an initial step toward utilizing OAE source in characterizing cochlear function and dysfunction.

  19. Minimization of nitrous oxide emission from CASS process treating low carbon source domestic wastewater: Effect of feeding strategy and aeration rate.

    PubMed

    Liang, Weihao; Yu, Chao; Ren, Hongqiang; Geng, Jinju; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during wastewater treatment can be mitigated by improving operational conditions, e.g., organic carbon supply and dissolved oxygen. To evaluate the control parameters for N2O emission in the low carbon source domestic wastewater treatment process, N2O emissions from Cyclic Activated Sludge System (CASS) under different feeding strategies and aeration rates were investigated. Results showed that continuous feeding enhanced nitrogen removal and reduced N2O emission compared to batch feeding, while a higher aeration rate led to less N2O emission. N2O was mainly produced during non-aeration phases in batch feeding CASS and the amount of N2O generated from denitrification decreased under continuous feeding, indicating that carbon source in the continuous influent relieved the electron competition between denitrification reductases during non-aeration phase. Moreover, taxonomic analysis based on high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed higher abundance of denitrifying bacteria, especially N2O-reducing bacteria in continuous feeding CASS. PMID:26386420

  20. ATLAS OF SOURCE EMISSION PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An atlas of various source emission particles characterized by electron optical techniques has been compiled for use by air pollution investigators. The particles studied were emitted by mobile, stationary, and natural sources. Sources included automobiles, manufacturing operatio...

  1. Differences in source emission rates of volatile organic compounds in inner-city residences of New York City and Los Angeles.

    PubMed

    Sax, Sonja N; Bennett, Deborah H; Chillrud, Steven N; Kinney, Patrick L; Spengler, John D

    2004-01-01

    The Toxics Exposure Assessment Columbia-Harvard (TEACH) Project characterized personal, indoor, and outdoor concentrations of a suite of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for high school students living in New York City (NYC) and Los Angeles (LA). This paper presents the analysis of VOC measurements collected indoors and outdoors for 46 students' homes in NYC and for 41 students' homes in LA across two seasons. Dual-sorbent thermal desorption tubes were used for the collection of 15 VOCs and C(18) 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine-coated cartridges were used for the collection of seven aldehydes. Air-exchange rates (AERs) were also measured using a perfluorocarbon tracer gas method. The AERs were lower in the winter in both cities, averaging 1 h(-1) in NYC and 1.4 h(-1) in LA, compared with 1.8 h(-1) in NYC in the summer and 2.5 h(-1) in LA in the fall. Higher AERs were generally associated with lower indoor-outdoor ratios with significant differences for the compounds with indoor sources, including chloroform, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and formaldehyde. Using a mass-balance model to account for AER and other housing parameters, effective source emission rates (SER) were calculated for each compound. Based on I/O ratios and source emission rates, VOCs could be divided into: (1). indoor-source-influenced compounds, (2). those with contributions from both indoor and outdoor sources, and (3). those with mostly outdoor sources. Significant indoor sources were found for the following six compounds (mean emission rates presented): chloroform (0.11 mg/h), 1,4-dichlorobenzene (19 mg/h), formaldehyde (5 mg/h), acetaldehyde (2 mg/h), benzaldehyde (0.6 mg/h), and hexaldehyde (2 mg/h). Although chloroform had variable I/O ratios across seasons, SERs, which accounted for AER, were similar in both cities for both seasons (e.g., LA means 0.12 and 0.11 mg/h in winter and fall, respectively). Formaldehyde had substantially higher indoor emission rates in the summer in NYC compared to winter (3

  2. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM INDUSTRIAL SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter identifies and describes major industrial sources of methane (CH4) emissions. or each source type examined, it identifies CH4 release points and discusses in detail the factors affecting emissions. t also summarizes and discusses available global and country-specific ...

  3. Acoustic emission source location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promboon, Yajai

    The objective of the research program was development of reliable source location techniques. The study comprised two phases. First, the research focused on development of source location methods for homogeneous plates. The specimens used in the program were steel railroad tank cars. Source location methods were developed and demonstrated for empty and water filled tanks. The second phase of the research was an exploratory study of source location method for fiber reinforced composites. Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement of wave propagation were carried out. This data provided the basis for development of a method using the intersection of the group velocity curves for the first three wave propagation modes. Simplex optimization was used to calculate the location of the source. Additional source location methods have been investigated and critically examined. Emphasis has been placed on evaluating different methods for determining the time of arrival of a wave. The behavior of wave in a water filled tank was studied and source location methods suitable for use in this situation have been examined through experiment and theory. Particular attention is paid to the problem caused by leaky Lamb waves. A preliminary study into the use of neural networks for source location in fiber reinforced composites was included in the research program. A preliminary neural network model and the results from training and testing data are reported.

  4. MAMAP - a new spectrometer system for column-averaged methane and carbon dioxide observations from aircraft: retrieval algorithm and first inversions for point source emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krings, T.; Gerilowski, K.; Buchwitz, M.; Reuter, M.; Tretner, A.; Erzinger, J.; Heinze, D.; Burrows, J. P.; Bovensmann, H.

    2011-04-01

    MAMAP is an airborne passive remote sensing instrument designed for measuring columns of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The MAMAP instrument consists of two optical grating spectrometers: One in the short wave infrared band (SWIR) at 1590-1690 nm to measure CO2 and CH4 absorptions and another one in the near infrared (NIR) at 757-768 nm to measure O2 absorptions for reference purposes. MAMAP can be operated in both nadir and zenith geometry during the flight. Mounted on an airplane MAMAP can effectively survey areas on regional to local scales with a ground pixel resolution of about 29 m × 33 m for a typical aircraft altitude of 1250 m and a velocity of 200 km h-1. The retrieval precision of the measured column relative to background is typically ≲ 1% (1σ). MAMAP can be used to close the gap between satellite data exhibiting global coverage but with a rather coarse resolution on the one hand and highly accurate in situ measurements with sparse coverage on the other hand. In July 2007 test flights were performed over two coal-fired powerplants operated by Vattenfall Europe Generation AG: Jänschwalde (27.4 Mt CO2 yr-1) and Schwarze Pumpe (11.9 Mt CO2 yr-1), about 100 km southeast of Berlin, Germany. By using two different inversion approaches, one based on an optimal estimation scheme to fit Gaussian plume models from multiple sources to the data, and another using a simple Gaussian integral method, the emission rates can be determined and compared with emissions as stated by Vattenfall Europe. An extensive error analysis for the retrieval's dry column results (XCO2 and XCH4) and for the two inversion methods has been performed. Both methods - the Gaussian plume model fit and the Gaussian integral method - are capable of delivering reliable estimates for strong point source emission rates, given appropriate flight patterns and detailed knowledge of wind conditions.

  5. Estimating Thermal Energy Emission and Eruption Rates at Guatemalan Volcanoes Using Thermal Data From a FLIR Camera, ASTER and MODIS Data Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, L. J.; Kapelanczyk, L.; Colvin, A. S.; Matias, O.; Rose, W. I.

    2008-12-01

    Analysis of thermal images taken with a Forward-Looking Infrared camera has allowed us to establish a baseline data set for three open vent volcanoes in Guatemala that vary in composition from dacite (Santiaguito) to basalt (Fuego and Pacaya). This allows for the evaluation of eruption rates using remote sensing and provides satellite thermal remote sensing validations. The field data were collected during two field trips in 2008. The Santiaguito data have been atmospherically corrected and analyzed to allow estimates of the emitted thermal energy and also the equivalent eruption rate (Rose, et al 2008). Using similar techniques, data from Pacaya volcano were analyzed to obtain estimated emission of thermal energy along with observations of vent morphology. The long term goal is to employ a variety of thermal remote sensing tools, including data comparison from ASTER and MODIS sources, in order to closely monitor eruption rates at open vent volcanoes, such as Santiaguito, Fuego and Pacaya. Ultimately, eruption rate estimates at these volcanoes may lead to improved hazard forecasts.

  6. Global-scale attribution of anthropogenic and natural dust sources and their emission rates based on MODIS Deep Blue aerosol products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginoux, Paul; Prospero, Joseph M.; Gill, Thomas E.; Hsu, N. Christina; Zhao, Ming

    2012-09-01

    Our understanding of the global dust cycle is limited by a dearth of information about dust sources, especially small-scale features which could account for a large fraction of global emissions. Here we present a global-scale high-resolution (0.1°) mapping of sources based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep Blue estimates of dust optical depth in conjunction with other data sets including land use. We ascribe dust sources to natural and anthropogenic (primarily agricultural) origins, calculate their respective contributions to emissions, and extensively compare these products against literature. Natural dust sources globally account for 75% of emissions; anthropogenic sources account for 25%. North Africa accounts for 55% of global dust emissions with only 8% being anthropogenic, mostly from the Sahel. Elsewhere, anthropogenic dust emissions can be much higher (75% in Australia). Hydrologic dust sources (e.g., ephemeral water bodies) account for 31% worldwide; 15% of them are natural while 85% are anthropogenic. Globally, 20% of emissions are from vegetated surfaces, primarily desert shrublands and agricultural lands. Since anthropogenic dust sources are associated with land use and ephemeral water bodies, both in turn linked to the hydrological cycle, their emissions are affected by climate variability. Such changes in dust emissions can impact climate, air quality, and human health. Improved dust emission estimates will require a better mapping of threshold wind velocities, vegetation dynamics, and surface conditions (soil moisture and land use) especially in the sensitive regions identified here, as well as improved ability to address small-scale convective processes producing dust via cold pool (haboob) events frequent in monsoon regimes.

  7. 40 CFR 74.22 - Actual SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....6 for natural gas For other fuels, the combustion source must specify the SO2 emissions factor. (c... (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.22 Actual SO2 emissions rate. (a) Data requirements. The designated representative of a combustion source shall submit...

  8. SOURCES OF COPPER AIR EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to update estimates of atmospheric emissions of copper and copper compounds in the U.S. Source categories evaluated included: metallic minerals, primary copper smelters, iron and steel making, combustion, municipal incineration, secondary coppe...

  9. Passive flux sampler for measurement of formaldehyde emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Naohide; Fujii, Minoru; Yamasaki, Akihiro; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    A new passive flux sampler (PFS) was developed to measure emission rates of formaldehyde and to determine emission sources in indoor environments. The sampler consisted of a glass Petri dish containing a 2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine (DNPH)-impregnated sheet. At the start of sampling, the PFS was placed with the open face of the dish on each of the indoor materials under investigation, such as flooring, walls, doors, closets, desks, beds, etc. Formaldehyde emitted from a source material diffused through the inside of the PFS and was adsorbed onto the DNPH sheet. The formaldehyde emission rates could be determined from the quantities adsorbed. The lower determination limits were 9.2 and 2.3 μg m -2 h -1 for 2- and 8-h sampling periods. The recovery rate and the precision of the PFS were 82.9% and 8.26%, respectively. The emission rates measured by PFS were in good agreement with the emission rates measured by the chamber method ( R2=0.963). This shows that it is possible to take measurements of the formaldehyde emission rates from sources in a room and to compare them. In addition, the sampler can be used to elucidate the emission characteristics of a source by carrying out emission measurements with different air-layer thicknesses inside the PFS and at different temperatures. The dependency of the emission rate on the thickness of the air layer inside the PFS indicated whether the internal mass transfer inside the source material or the diffusion in the gas-phase boundary layer controlled the formaldehyde emission rate from a material. In addition, as a pilot study, the formaldehyde emission rates were measured, and the largest emission source of formaldehyde could be identified from among several suspected materials in a model house by using the PFS.

  10. VALIDATION OF A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING POLLUTION EMISSION RATES FROM AREA SOURCES USING OPEN-PATH FTIR SEPCTROSCOPY AND DISPERSION MODELING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a methodology developed to estimate emissions factors for a variety of different area sources in a rapid, accurate, and cost effective manner. he methodology involves using an open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer to measure concentrations o...

  11. VALIDATION OF A METHOD FOR ESTIMATING POLLUTION EMISSION RATES FROM AREA SOURCES USING OPEN-PATH FTIR SPECTROSCOPY AND DISPERSION MODELING TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a rapid and cost effective methodology developed to estimate emissions factors of organic compounds from a variety of area sources. he methodology involves using an open-path Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer to measure concentrations of hydrocarb...

  12. Ultrafast spontaneous emission source using plasmonic nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Thang B.; Akselrod, Gleb M.; Argyropoulos, Christos; Huang, Jiani; Smith, David R.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2015-07-01

    Typical emitters such as molecules, quantum dots and semiconductor quantum wells have slow spontaneous emission with lifetimes of 1-10 ns, creating a mismatch with high-speed nanoscale optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, single-photon sources and lasers. Here we experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast (<11 ps) yet efficient source of spontaneous emission, corresponding to an emission rate exceeding 90 GHz, using a hybrid structure of single plasmonic nanopatch antennas coupled to colloidal quantum dots. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes coupled to a gold film separated by a thin polymer spacer layer and colloidal core-shell quantum dots, a stable and technologically relevant emitter. We show an increase in the spontaneous emission rate of a factor of 880 and simultaneously a 2,300-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence intensity, which indicates a high radiative quantum efficiency of ~50%. The nanopatch antenna geometry can be tuned from the visible to the near infrared, providing a promising approach for nanophotonics based on ultrafast spontaneous emission.

  13. Ultrafast spontaneous emission source using plasmonic nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thang B.; Akselrod, Gleb M.; Argyropoulos, Christos; Huang, Jiani; Smith, David R.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.

    2015-01-01

    Typical emitters such as molecules, quantum dots and semiconductor quantum wells have slow spontaneous emission with lifetimes of 1–10 ns, creating a mismatch with high-speed nanoscale optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes, single-photon sources and lasers. Here we experimentally demonstrate an ultrafast (<11 ps) yet efficient source of spontaneous emission, corresponding to an emission rate exceeding 90 GHz, using a hybrid structure of single plasmonic nanopatch antennas coupled to colloidal quantum dots. The antennas consist of silver nanocubes coupled to a gold film separated by a thin polymer spacer layer and colloidal core–shell quantum dots, a stable and technologically relevant emitter. We show an increase in the spontaneous emission rate of a factor of 880 and simultaneously a 2,300-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence intensity, which indicates a high radiative quantum efficiency of ∼50%. The nanopatch antenna geometry can be tuned from the visible to the near infrared, providing a promising approach for nanophotonics based on ultrafast spontaneous emission. PMID:26212857

  14. EXTERNAL COMBUSTION PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the development of particulate emission factors based on cutoff size for inhalable particles for external combustion sources. After a review of available information characterizing particulate emissions from external combustion sources, the data were s...

  15. An emission inventory of sulfur from anthropogenic sources in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsat, S. V.; Graf, H. F.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents first results of a comprehensive emission inventory of chemical species from anthropogenic activities (power generation, vehicles, ships and aircraft) in Antarctica, covering the 2004-2005 period. The inventory is based on estimated emission rates of fuel consumption provided by some of the Antarctic research stations. Since the emission sources have different modes of operation and use a variety of fuel, the emission flux rate of chemical species is calculated by multiplying the fuel consumption value with the density of fuel and appropriate emission factors. A separate inventory is prepared for each anthropogenic emission source in Antarctica. Depending on the type of operation, emission rates of SO2, and BC (Black Carbon, from shipping only) have been calculated using the above technique. However, only results of SO2 emissions from each source are presented here. Emission inventory maps of SO2 depicting the track/path taken by each mobile source are shown. The total annual SO2 is 158 Mg from power generation and vehicle operations, 3873 Mg from ships and 56 Mg from aircraft for 2004-2005 and these values undergo strong seasonality following the human activity in Antarctica. Though these figures are small when compared to the emissions at most other regions of the world, they are an indication that human presence in Antarctica leads to at least local pollution. The sources are mainly line and point sources and thus the local pollution potentially is relatively strong.

  16. An emission inventory of sulfur from anthropogenic sources in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsat, S. V.; Graf, H. F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents first results of a comprehensive emission inventory of chemical species from anthropogenic activities (power generation, vehicles, ships and aircraft) in Antarctica, covering the 2004-2005 period. The inventory is based on estimated emission rates of fuel consumption provided by some of the Antarctic research stations. Since the emission sources have different modes of operation and use a variety of fuel, the emission flux rate of chemical species is calculated by multiplying the fuel consumption value with the density of fuel and appropriate emission factors. A separate inventory is prepared for each anthropogenic emission source in Antarctica. Depending on the type of operation, emission rates of SO2, and BC (Black Carbon, from shipping only) have been calculated using the above technique. However, only results of SO2 emissions from each source are presented here. Emission inventory maps of SO2 depicting the track/path taken by each mobile source are shown. The total annual SO2 is 158 Mg from power generation and vehicle operations, 3873 Mg from ships and 56 Mg from aircraft for 2004-2005 and these values undergo strong seasonality following the human activity in Antarctica. Though these figures are small when compared to the emissions at most other regions of the world, they are an indication that human presence in Antarctica leads to at least local pollution. The sources are mainly line and point sources and thus the local pollution potentially is relatively strong.

  17. Emission Rates in ASTRAL Argon Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamar, Ola; Boivin, Robert; Loch, Stuart; Munoz, Jorge; Ballance, Connor

    2006-10-01

    Relative Emission rates measured in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source are compared to theoretical predictions. A spectrometer which features a 0.33 m Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator and a CCD camera is used for this study. ASTRAL produces bright intense Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^12 to 10^13 cm-3 and Te = 2 to 10 eV. A rf compensated Langmuir probe is used to measure Te and ne. In a first series of experiment Ar I, Ar II and Ar III transitions are monitored as a function of plasma density and this for constant electron temperature. In the second series of experiments, the same transitions are observed as a function of Te while ne is this time kept constant. Observations revealed that Te is by far the most significant parameter affecting the emission rate coefficients in the ASTRAL plasma. The spectroscopy measurements are compared with spectral modeling from the ADAS suite of codes. Our collisional-radiative formalism assumes that the excited levels are in quasi-static equilibrium with the ground and metastable populations. We use existing standard R-matrix electron-impact excitation data in our modeling, and assess this dataset against the results from a new R-matrix with pseudo-states calculation.

  18. Linearity between temperature peak and bioenergy CO2 emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Francesco; Gasser, Thomas; Bright, Ryan M.; Ciais, Philippe; Strømman, Anders H.

    2014-11-01

    Many future energy and emission scenarios envisage an increase of bioenergy in the global primary energy mix. In most climate impact assessment models and policies, bioenergy systems are assumed to be carbon neutral, thus ignoring the time lag between CO2 emissions from biomass combustion and CO2 uptake by vegetation. Here, we show that the temperature peak caused by CO2 emissions from bioenergy is proportional to the maximum rate at which emissions occur and is almost insensitive to cumulative emissions. Whereas the carbon-climate response (CCR; ref. ) to fossil fuel emissions is approximately constant, the CCR to bioenergy emissions depends on time, biomass turnover times, and emission scenarios. The linearity between temperature peak and bioenergy CO2 emission rates resembles the characteristic of the temperature response to short-lived climate forcers. As for the latter, the timing of CO2 emissions from bioenergy matters. Under the international agreement to limit global warming to 2 °C by 2100, early emissions from bioenergy thus have smaller contributions on the targeted temperature than emissions postponed later into the future, especially when bioenergy is sourced from biomass with medium (50-60 years) or long turnover times (100 years).

  19. Attributing Atmospheric Methane to Anthropogenic Emission Sources.

    PubMed

    Allen, David

    2016-07-19

    Methane is a greenhouse gas, and increases in atmospheric methane concentration over the past 250 years have driven increased radiative forcing of the atmosphere. Increases in atmospheric methane concentration since 1750 account for approximately 17% of increases in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, and that percentage increases by approximately a factor of 2 if the effects of the greenhouse gases produced by the atmospheric reactions of methane are included in the assessment. Because of the role of methane emissions in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, the identification and quantification of sources of methane emissions is receiving increased scientific attention. Methane emission sources include biogenic, geogenic, and anthropogenic sources; the largest anthropogenic sources are natural gas and petroleum systems, enteric fermentation (livestock), landfills, coal mining, and manure management. While these source categories are well-known, there is significant uncertainty in the relative magnitudes of methane emissions from the various source categories. Further, the overall magnitude of methane emissions from all anthropogenic sources is actively debated, with estimates based on source sampling extrapolated to regional or national scale ("bottom-up analyses") differing from estimates that infer emissions based on ambient data ("top-down analyses") by 50% or more. To address the important problem of attribution of methane to specific sources, a variety of new analytical methods are being employed, including high time resolution and highly sensitive measurements of methane, methane isotopes, and other chemical species frequently associated with methane emissions, such as ethane. This Account describes the use of some of these emerging measurements, in both top-down and bottom-up methane emission studies. In addition, this Account describes how data from these new analytical methods can be used in conjunction with chemical mass balance (CMB) methods for source

  20. Microscopic fungi as significant sesquiterpene emission sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HorváTh, Eszter; Hoffer, AndráS.; SebőK, Flóra; Dobolyi, Csaba; Szoboszlay, SáNdor; Kriszt, BaláZs; GelencséR, AndráS.

    2011-08-01

    Among the volatile organic compounds emitted by vegetation, isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their derivatives are thought to contribute to secondary organic aerosol formation. Although it is well known that microscopic fungi globally turn over vast amount of carbon by decomposing the organic matter in the soil, vegetation is considered as the exclusive source of biogenic secondary organic aerosol precursors in various atmospheric models. Secondary fungal metabolites including sesquiterpenes have been recognized as characteristic volatile organic compounds emitted by fungi. In the present study, we investigated the rates of sesquiterpene emission of microscopic fungi to establish their potential significance compared to those from vegetation. To sample the headspace of the pure culture of some common fungi, we used an aseptic flow-through apparatus designed for solid phase microextraction in our laboratory. The identified sesquiterpenes in the headspace extracts were quantified for eight strains of microscopic fungi belonging to four different genera. Our results showed that microscopic fungi emit a considerable amount of sesquiterpenes. Based on our first estimations microscopic fungi may be considered as potentially significant sesquiterpene emission sources whose contribution to secondary organic aerosol formation may be comparable to that of vegetation.

  1. Atmospheric process evaluation of mobile source emissions

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    During the past two decades there has been a considerable effort in the US to develop and introduce an alternative to the use of gasoline and conventional diesel fuel for transportation. The primary motives for this effort have been twofold: energy security and improvement in air quality, most notably ozone, or smog. The anticipated improvement in air quality is associated with a decrease in the atmospheric reactivity, and sometimes a decrease in the mass emission rate, of the organic gas and NO{sub x} emissions from alternative fuels when compared to conventional transportation fuels. Quantification of these air quality impacts is a prerequisite to decisions on adopting alternative fuels. The purpose of this report is to present a critical review of the procedures and data base used to assess the impact on ambient air quality of mobile source emissions from alternative and conventional transportation fuels and to make recommendations as to how this process can be improved. Alternative transportation fuels are defined as methanol, ethanol, CNG, LPG, and reformulated gasoline. Most of the discussion centers on light-duty AFVs operating on these fuels. Other advanced transportation technologies and fuels such as hydrogen, electric vehicles, and fuel cells, will not be discussed. However, the issues raised herein can also be applied to these technologies and other classes of vehicles, such as heavy-duty diesels (HDDs). An evaluation of the overall impact of AFVs on society requires consideration of a number of complex issues. It involves the development of new vehicle technology associated with engines, fuel systems, and emission control technology; the implementation of the necessary fuel infrastructure; and an appropriate understanding of the economic, health, safety, and environmental impacts associated with the use of these fuels. This report addresses the steps necessary to properly evaluate the impact of AFVs on ozone air quality.

  2. INSTRUMENTAL SENSING OF STATIONARY SOURCE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Remote sensing methods offer a number of advantages over contact measurement methods in the area of enforcement and surveillance of emissions from stationary sources. Several techniques have been developed that can measure the gas concentration, effluent velocity, and particulate...

  3. Radiation source with shaped emission

    DOEpatents

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Sweatt, William C.

    2003-05-13

    Employing a source of radiation, such as an electric discharge source, that is equipped with a capillary region configured into some predetermined shape, such as an arc or slit, can significantly improve the amount of flux delivered to the lithographic wafers while maintaining high efficiency. The source is particularly suited for photolithography systems that employs a ringfield camera. The invention permits the condenser which delivers critical illumination to the reticle to be simplified from five or more reflective elements to a total of three or four reflective elements thereby increasing condenser efficiency. It maximizes the flux delivered and maintains a high coupling efficiency. This architecture couples EUV radiation from the discharge source into a ring field lithography camera.

  4. 40 CFR 74.23 - 1985 Allowable SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.23 1985 Allowable SO2 emissions rate. (a) Data requirements. (1) The designated representative of the combustion source shall... data: (i) Allowable SO2 emissions rate of the combustion source expressed in lbs/mmBtu as defined...

  5. Determination of PM10 emission rates from street sweepers.

    PubMed

    Fitz, D R; Bumiller, K

    2000-02-01

    The use of street sweepers to clean paved roads, particularly after high-wind events, has been proposed as a PM10 control method. Using an artificial tunnel, the emission rates for several street sweepers were quantified under actual operating conditions. The tunnel was a tent enclosure, 6.1 x 4.3 x 73 m, open on both ends. PM10 concentrations were measured at the inlet and outlet while a sweeper removed sand deposited along the length. Measurements were made using a specialized low-volume filter sampler and an integrating nephelometer. The volume of air passing through the tunnel was measured by releasing an inert tracer, sulfur hexafluoride, at the inlet and measuring its concentration at the outlet. A large difference in emission rates between vacuum-type sweepers was observed, with rates varying from 5 to 100 mg m-1 swept. For the cleanest sweepers, the background rates (collected by sweeping clean pavement) were about half of the total PM10 emission rate. These background emission rates likely were from diesel exhaust; background rates for the single gasoline-powered sweeper were below detection. Particle light scattering data confirmed the filter collection results. The artificial tunnel approach would be useful in measuring total emissions from other mobile and stationary sources. PMID:10680347

  6. Jovian S emission: Model of radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, B. P.

    1994-04-01

    A physical model of the radiation source and an excitation mechanism have been suggested for the S component in Jupiter's sporadic radio emission. The model provides a unique explanation for most of the interrelated phenomena observed, allowing a consistent interpretation of the emission cone structure, behavior of the integrated radio spectrum, occurrence probability of S bursts, location and size of the radiation source, and fine structure of the dynamic spectra. The mechanism responsible for the S bursts is also discussed in connection with the L type emission. Relations are traced between parameters of the radio emission and geometry of the Io flux tube. Fluctuations in the current amplitude through the tube are estimated, along with the refractive index value and mass density of the plasma near the radiation source.

  7. Evaluation of Mobile Source Emissions and Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallmann, Timothy Ryan

    Mobile sources contribute significantly to air pollution problems. Relevant pollutants include numerous gaseous and particle-phase species that can affect human health, ecosystems, and climate. Accurate inventories of emissions from these sources are needed to help understand possible adverse impacts, and to develop effective air quality management strategies. Unfortunately large uncertainties persist in the understanding of mobile source emissions, and how these emissions are changing over time. This dissertation aims to evaluate long-term trends in mobile source emissions in the United States, and to make detailed measurements of emissions from present-day fleets of on-road vehicles operating in California. Long-term trends in mobile source emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO x) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the United States were investigated through development of a fuel-based emission inventory. Annual emissions from on- and off-road gasoline and diesel engines were quantified for the years 1996-2006. Diesel engines were found to be the dominant mobile source of NOx and PM2.5, and on-road diesel vehicles were identified as the single largest anthropogenic source of NOx emissions in the United States as of 2005. The importance of diesel engines as a source of exhaust particulate matter emissions has led to the recent introduction of advanced emission control technologies in the United States, such as diesel particle filters (DPF), which have been required since 2007 for all new on-road heavy-duty (HD) diesel engines. In addition to national requirements for the use of such control devices on new engines, California has mandated accelerated clean-up of statewide emissions from older in-use diesel engines. The plume capture method was further applied to measure emissions from a more diverse population of trucks observed at the Caldecott tunnel in summer 2010. Emissions from hundreds of individual trucks were measured, and emission factor distributions were

  8. SETTING PRIORITIES FOR CONTROL OF FUGITIVE PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM OPEN SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes setting priorities for controlling fugitive particulate emissions. Emission rate estimates of suspended particulates from open sources in the U.S. were obtained from emission factors and source extents in the literature. Major open sources, with their estimat...

  9. Controlling NOx emission from industrial sources

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.K.; Nueffer, W.; Grano, D.; Khan, S.; Staudt, J.E.; Jozewicz, W.

    2005-07-01

    A number of regulatory actions focused on reducing NOx emissions from stationary combustion sources have been taken in the United States in the last decade. These actions include the Acid Rain NOx regulations, the Ozone Transport Commission's NOx Budget Program, and the NOx SIP Call rulemakings. In addition to these regulations, the recent Interstate Air Quality Rulemaking proposal and other bills in the Congress are focusing on additional reductions of NOx. Industrial combustion sources accounted for about 18016 of NOx emissions in the United States in 2000 and constituted the second largest emitting source category within stationary sources, only behind electric utility sources. Based on these data, reduction of NOx emissions from industrial combustion sources is an important consideration in efforts undertaken to address the environmental concerns associated with NOx. This paper discusses primary and secondary NOx control technologies applicable to various major categories of industrial sources. The sources considered in this paper include large boilers, furnaces and fired heaters, combustion turbines, large IC engines, and cement kilns. For each source category considered in this paper, primary NOx controls are discussed first, followed by a discussion of secondary NOx controls.

  10. Polychlorinated Biphenyl Sources, Emissions, and Environmental Levels in school Buildings (PCB Workshop presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measure PCB emission rates from primary sources in laboratory chambersMeasure transport and sorption by materials and dust in laboratory chambersCharacterize PCBs in school building materialsEstimate PCB emission rates from sources in schoolsExamine congener patterns in sources a...

  11. Remote measurement of ground source emissivity

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    The remote measurement of the emissivity of ground materials is of tremendous value in their identification and mapping. Traditional techniques use reflected solar radiation for this measurement for wavelengths shorter than 5 {mu}m. With the development of new techniques, the 10 Jim atmospheric transmission window might also be used for this purpose. Previous work using the multi-angle data acquisition technique demonstrated its utility to determine source thermal emission. Here we find the multi-angle technique can be used to determine the source specular reflectivity to {approximately}0.05 if there is very good system performance (NETD {approx} 0.01 K).

  12. Proton emission from a laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Cavallaro, S.; Gammino, S.; Cutroneo, M.; Margarone, D.

    2012-02-15

    At intensities of the order of 10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}, ns pulsed lasers can be employed to ablate solid bulk targets in order to produce high emission of ions at different charge state and kinetic energy. A special interest is devoted to the production of protons with controllable energy and current from a roto-translating target irradiated in repetition rate at 1-10 Hz by a Nd:Yag pulsed laser beam. Different hydrogenated targets based on polymers and hydrates were irradiated in high vacuum. Special nanostrucutres can be embedded in the polymers in order to modify the laser absorption properties and the amount of protons to be accelerated in the plasma. For example, carbon nanotubes may increase the laser absorption and the hydrogen absorption to generate high proton yields from the plasma. Metallic nanostrucutres may increase the electron density of the plasma and the kinetic energy of the accelerated protons. Ion collectors, ion energy analyzer, and mass spectrometers, used in time-of-flight configuration, were employed to characterize the ion beam properties. A comparison with traditional proton ion source is presented and discussed.

  13. CONTROLLING NOX EMISSION FROM INDUSTRIAL SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of regulatory actions focused on reducing NOx emissions from stationary combustion sources have been taken in the United States in the last decade. These actions include the Acid Rain NOx regulations, the Ozone Transport Commission's NOx ...

  14. Nitrogen Source Effects on Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of N fertilizer source and tillage on nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from soils under several irrigated, crop management systems were evaluated. Irrigated corn production systems [conventional-till continuous corn (CT-CC); no-till continuous corn (NT-CC); NT corn-dry bean (NT-CDb); and NT cor...

  15. 40 CFR 63.843 - Emission limits for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Primary Aluminum Reduction...

  16. Krakow conference on low emissions sources: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.L.; Butcher, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Krakow Conference on Low Emission Sources presented the information produced and analytical tools developed in the first phase of the Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program. This phase included: field testing to provide quantitative data on missions and efficiencies as well as on opportunities for building energy conservation; engineering analysis to determine the costs of implementing pollution control; and incentives analysis to identify actions required to create a market for equipment, fuels, and services needed to reduce pollution. Collectively, these Proceedings contain reports that summarize the above phase one information, present the status of energy system management in Krakow, provide information on financing pollution control projects in Krakow and elsewhere, and highlight the capabilities and technologies of Polish and American companies that are working to reduce pollution from low emission sources. It is intended that the US reader will find in these Proceedings useful results and plans for control of pollution from low emission sources that are representative of heating systems in central and Eastern Europe. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  17. NMHC emissions from Asia: sources and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, T.; Blake, D. R.; Barletta, B.; Meinardi, S.; Rowland, F. S.; Chan, J. C.; Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.; Koike, M.; Kita, K.; Takigawa, M.; Kawakami, S.; Ogawa, T.

    2002-12-01

    Recent rapid industrialization and economic growth in Asia changed the industrial structure, land use, and people's lifestyle resulting in a dramatic change in the amount and composition of the gas emissions from Asia. Because emissions can be transported very rapidly once convected to the free troposphere, Asian emissions can affect both local and regional air quality and climate. To access the impact of changing emission from Asia, an airborne observation campaign PEACE (the Pacific Exploration of Asian Continental Emission) phase-A and B were conducted in January and April - May 2002, respectively, sponsored by NASDA (National Space Development Agency of Japan). The concentrations of NMHCs (nonmethanehydrocarbons) and halocarbons were obtained by whole air sampling and subsequent gas chromatography analyses in the laboratory. Quantified onboard the aircraft were CO, CO2, O3, NO, NO2, NOy, H2O, SO2, aerosols, and condensation nuclei. The experiment was conducted in the vicinity of Japan and PEACE-A and B represent the local winter and spring weather conditions. The trace gas distributions in the lower troposphere were often influenced by local pollution (i.e. from Japan, Korea) while those of the long-range transport (i.e. from Europe) were occasionally seen in the upper troposphere. This is confirmed by the airmass age estimation using the ratios of short-lived gases (i.e. C2H4) vs. more stable compounds (i.e. CO). Emissions from China were distinguished using data obtained from ground-based sampling and measurements. Transport from China was seen both in the lower troposphere and upper troposphere. Some case studies on source identification will be discussed.

  18. High rates of methane emissions from south taiga wetland ponds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glagolev, M.; Kleptsova, I.; Maksyutov, S.

    2012-04-01

    Since wetland ponds are often assumed to be insignificant sources of methane, there is a limited data about its fluxes. In this study, we found surprisingly high rates of methane emission at several shallow ponds in the south taiga zone of West Siberia. Wetland ponds within the Great Vasyugan Mire ridge-hollow-pool patterned bog system were investigated. 22 and 24 flux measurements from ponds and surrounded mires, respectively, were simultaneously made by a static chamber method in July, 2011. In contrast to previous measurements, fluxes were measured using the small boat with floated chamber to avoid disturbance to the water volume. Since the ebullition is most important emission pathway, minimization of physical disturbance provoking gas bubbling significantly increases the data accuracy. Air temperature varied from 15 to 22° C during the measurements, and pH at different pond depths - from 4.4 to 5. As it was found, background emission from surrounding ridges and hollows was 1.7/2.6/3.3 mgC·m-2·h1 (1st/2nd/3rd quartiles). These rates are in a perfect correspondence with the typical methane emission fluxes from other south taiga bogs. Methane emission from wetland ponds turned out to be by order of magnitude higher (9.3/11.3/15.6 mgC·m-2·h1). Comparing to other measurements in West Siberia, many times higher emissions (70.9/111.6/152.3 mgC·m-2·h1) were found in forest-steppe and subtaiga fen ponds. On the contrary, West Siberian tundra lakes emit methane insignificantly, with the flux rate close to surrounding wetlands (about 0.2-0.3 mgC·m-2·h1). Apparently, there is a naturally determined distribution of ponds with different flux rates over different West Siberia climate-vegetation zones. Further investigations aiming at revelation of the zones with different fluxes would be helpful for total flux revision purposes. With respect to other studies, high emission rates were already detected, for instance, in Baltic ponds (Dzyuban, 2002) and U.K. lakes

  19. Development of a novel methodology for indoor emission source identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, K. H.; Zhang, J. S.; Knudsen, H. N.; Wargocki, P.; Chen, H.; Varshney, P. K.; Guo, B.

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a methodology to identify individual sources of emissions based on the measurements of mixed air samples and the emission signatures of individual materials previously determined by Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS), an on-line analytical device. The methodology based on signal processing principles was developed by employing the method of multiple regression least squares (MRLS) and a normalization technique. Samples of nine typical building materials were tested individually and in combination, including carpet, ceiling material, gypsum board, linoleum, two paints, polyolefine, PVC and wood. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions from each material were measured in a 50-liter small-scale chamber. Chamber air was sampled by PTR-MS to establish a database of emission signatures unique to each individual material. The same task was performed to measure combined emissions from material mixtures for the application and validation of the developed signal separation method. Results showed that the proposed method could identify the individual sources under laboratory conditions with two, three, five and seven materials present. Further experiments and investigation are needed for cases where the relative emission rates among different compounds may change over a long-term period.

  20. Ar II Emission Processes and Emission Rate Coefficients in ASTRAL Helicon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Gardner, A.; Kamar, O.; Kesterson, A.; Loch, S.; Munoz, J.; Ballance, C.

    2008-11-01

    Emission processes for Ar II line emission are described for low temperature plasmas (Te < 10 eV). It is found that Ar II emission results primarily from Ar ion ground state excitation rather than from any Ar neutral state. This suggests that Ar II emission results from stepping processes which includes ionization and then excitation of the neutral Ar atom filling the vacuum chamber. The Ar II emission rate coefficients are measured in the ASTRAL helicon plasma source using a 0.33 m monochromator and a CCD camera. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 1E11 -- 1E13 cm-3 and Te = 2 - 10 eV, B-field <= 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure Te and ne. In this experiment, Ar II transitions are monitored as a function of Te while ne is kept constant. Experimental emission rates are obtained as a function of Te and compared to theoretical predictions. Theoretical predictions make use of the ADAS suite of codes as well as recent R-matrix electron-impact excitation calculations that includes pseudo-states contributions. Our collisional-radiative formalism assumes that the excited levels are in quasi-static equilibrium with the ground and metastable populations.

  1. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide...

  2. 40 CFR 74.24 - Current allowable SO 2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Current allowable SO 2 emissions rate... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.24 Current allowable SO 2 emissions rate. The designated representative shall submit the following data: (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 74.24 - Current allowable SO 2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Current allowable SO 2 emissions rate... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.24 Current allowable SO 2 emissions rate. The designated representative shall submit the following data: (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 74.24 - Current allowable SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Current allowable SO2 emissions rate... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.24 Current allowable SO2 emissions rate. The designated representative shall submit the following data: (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 74.24 - Current allowable SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Current allowable SO2 emissions rate... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.24 Current allowable SO2 emissions rate. The designated representative shall submit the following data: (a)...

  6. 40 CFR 74.24 - Current allowable SO2 emissions rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Current allowable SO2 emissions rate... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE OPT-INS Allowance Calculations for Combustion Sources § 74.24 Current allowable SO2 emissions rate. The designated representative shall submit the following data: (a)...

  7. Light absorption by biomass burning source emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan; Engling, Guenter; Moosmüller, Hans; Arnott, W. Patrick; Chen, L.-W. Antony; Wold, Cyle E.; Hao, Wei Min; He, Ke-bin

    2016-02-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol has relatively short atmospheric lifetimes yet plays a unique and important role in the Earth's climate system, making it an important short-term climate mitigation target. Globally, biomass burning is the largest source of BC emissions into the atmosphere. This study investigated the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of biomass burning BC generated by controlled combustion of various wildland fuels during the Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiments (FLAME). MAE values derived from a photoacoustic spectrometer (∼7.8 m2/g at a wavelength of 532 nm) were in good agreement with those suggested for uncoated BC when the emission ratios of organic carbon (OC) to elemental carbon (EC) were extremely low (i.e., below 0.3). With the increase of OC/EC, two distinct types of biomass smoke were identified. For the first type, MAE exhibited a positive dependence on OC/EC, while the overestimation of the light absorption coefficient (babs) by a filter-based method was less significant and could be estimated by a nearly constant correction factor. For the second type, MAE was biased low and correlated negatively with OC/EC, while the overestimation of babs by the filter-based method was much more significant and showed an apparent OC/EC dependence. This study suggests that BC emission factors determined by the commonly used thermal-optical methods might be sustantially overestimated for some types of biomass burning emissions. Our results also indicate that biomass burning emissions may include some liquid-like organics that can significantly bias filter-based babs measurements.

  8. Denitrification as a Source of NO Emissions using Isotope Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Laura; Loick, Nadine; Abalos, Diego; Dixon, Liz; Vallejo, Antonio; Watson, Catherine; McGeough, Karen; Well, Reinhard; Matthews, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Agricultural soils are a major source of nitric- (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) which are produced and consumed by biotic and abiotic soil processes. The dominant sources of NO and N2O are microbial nitrification and denitrification. Depending on the environmental conditions such as substrate availability, pH and water filled pore space (WFPS) N2O emissions have been attributed to both processes, whereas NO emissions are thought to predominantly derive from nitrification. This is due to the fact that the environmental factors which promote denitrifying conditions also restrict gaseous diffusivity causing consumption of the highly reactive NO. Recent findings however challenge this assumption indicating that denitrification can be a significant source of NO. Attributing gaseous emissions to specific soil processes is still difficult; however, advanced isotopic methods show great potential. Labelling methods rely on the use of 15N enriched substrates, whereas isotopomer analyses rely on differences in the utilisation of heavy vs light N and O isotopes at natural abundance. The present study analysed the effect of different enrichment levels on gaseous emissions using the gas-flow-soil-core technique (Cardenas et al 2003). This system provides continuous measurements of NO, N2O as well as N2 fluxes by exchanging the normal atmosphere with a mixture of He:O2 (80:20). This was combined with 15N labelled isotopic techniques and isotopomer measurements to determine the source and processes responsible for the measured N-emissions. Nutrient solutions were applied containing KNO3 with 15N at natural abundance, 5 atom% and 20 atom% enrichment at a rate of 75 kg N ha-1 together with glucose at a rate of 400 kg C ha-1. Results showed that at the higher level of enrichment gaseous emissions were affected by showing an increase in emissions of NO and N2O. Additionally, under denitrifying conditions (high WFPS and NO3- availability) denitrification played a key role in NO emissions

  9. Source gases: Concentrations, emissions, and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, Paul J.; Harriss, Robert; Penkett, Stuart A.; Makide, Yoshihiro; Sanhueza, Eugenio; Alyea, Fred N.; Rowland, F. Sherwood; Blake, Don; Sasaki, Toru; Cunnold, Derek M.

    1991-01-01

    Source gases are defined as those gases that influence levels of stratospheric ozone (O3) by transporting species containing halogen, hydrogen, and nitrogen to the stratosphere. Examples are the CFC's, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Other source gases that also come under consideration in an atmospheric O3 context are those that are involved in the O3 or hydroxyl (OH) radical chemistry of the troposphere. Examples are CH4, carbon monoxide (CO), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC's). Most of the source gases, along with carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O), are climatically significant and thus affect stratospheric O3 levels by their influence on stratospheric temperatures. Carbonyl sulphide (COS) could affect stratospheric O3 through maintenance of the stratospheric sulphate aerosol layer, which may be involved in heterogeneous chlorine-catalyzed O3 destruction. The previous reviews of trends and emissions of source gases, either from the context of their influence on atmospheric O3 or global climate change, are updated. The current global abundances and concentration trends of the trace gases are given in tabular format.

  10. Glow discharge lamp: A light source for optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanathan, K. S.; Srinivasan, V.; Nalini, S.; Mahalingam, T. R.

    A glow discharge lamp based on a modified version of the Grimm design has been fabricated. Its utility as a radiation source for optical emission spectrography by standardizing a method for the analysis of low alloy steels using a set of certified standards from DMRL, Hyderabad, has been demonstrated. A model has been proposed where the sputtering rates of different metals have been correlated with their heats of sublimation, metallic radii, and densities. Sputtering rates of ten different metals obtained from literature have been used to test this model, and the correlation appears to be excellent.

  11. Modeling study of natural emissions, source apportionment, and emission control of atmospheric mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Suraj K.

    ) and CAMNet (Canadian Atmospheric Mercury Measurement Network). The model estimated a total deposition of 474 Mg yr-1 to the CONUS (Contiguous United States) domain, with two-thirds being dry deposited. Reactive gaseous mercury contributed the most to 60% of deposition. Emission speciation distribution is a key factor for local deposition as contribution from large point sources can be as high as 75% near (< 100 km) the emission sources, indicating that emission reduction may result in direct deposition decrease near the source locations. Among the sources, BC contributes to about 68% to 91% of total deposition. Excluding the BC's contribution, EGU contributes to nearly 50% of deposition caused by CONUS emissions in the Northeast, Southeast and East Central regions, while emissions from natural processes are more important in the Pacific and West Central regions (contributing up to 40% of deposition). The modeling results implies that implementation of the new emission standards proposed by USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) would significantly benefit regions that have larger contributions from EGU sources. Control of mercury emissions from coal combustion processes has attracted great attention due to its toxicity and the emission-control regulations and has lead to advancement in state-of-the-art control technologies that alleviate the impact of mercury on ecosystem and human health. This part of the work applies a sorption model to simulate adsorption of mercury in flue gases, onto a confined-bed of activated carbon. The model's performances were studied at various flue gas flow rates, inlet mercury concentrations and adsorption bed temperatures. The process simulated a flue gas, with inlet mercury concentration of 300 ppb, entering at a velocity of 0.3 m s-1 from the bottom into a fixed bed (inside bed diameter of 1 m and 3 m bed height; bed temperature of 25 °C) of activated carbon (particle size of 0.004 m with density of 0.5 g cm-3 and

  12. PAVED ROAD PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of extensive field tests to develop emission factors for particulate emissions generated by traffic entrainment of paved road surface particulate matter. Using roadway surface silt loading as the basis, predictive emission factor equations for each partic...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1157 - Emission standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission standards for existing sources. 63.1157 Section 63.1157 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards...

  14. Setting maximum emission rates from ozone emitting consumer appliances in the United States and Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Glenn; Shaughnessy, Richard; Shu, Shi

    2011-02-01

    A Monte Carlo analysis of indoor ozone levels in four cities was applied to provide guidance to regulatory agencies on setting maximum ozone emission rates from consumer appliances. Measured distributions of air exchange rates, ozone decay rates and outdoor ozone levels at monitoring stations were combined with a steady-state indoor air quality model resulting in emission rate distributions (mg h -1) as a function of % of building hours protected from exceeding a target maximum indoor concentration of 20 ppb. Whole-year, summer and winter results for Elizabeth, NJ, Houston, TX, Windsor, ON, and Los Angeles, CA exhibited strong regional differences, primarily due to differences in air exchange rates. Infiltration of ambient ozone at higher average air exchange rates significantly reduces allowable emission rates, even though air exchange also dilutes emissions from appliances. For Houston, TX and Windsor, ON, which have lower average residential air exchange rates, emission rates ranged from -1.1 to 2.3 mg h -1 for scenarios that protect 80% or more of building hours from experiencing ozone concentrations greater than 20 ppb in summer. For Los Angeles, CA and Elizabeth, NJ, with higher air exchange rates, only negative emission rates were allowable to provide the same level of protection. For the 80th percentile residence, we estimate that an 8-h average limit concentration of 20 ppb would be exceeded, even in the absence of an indoor ozone source, 40 or more days per year in any of the cities analyzed. The negative emission rates emerging from the analysis suggest that only a zero-emission rate standard is prudent for Los Angeles, Elizabeth, NJ and other regions with higher summertime air exchange rates. For regions such as Houston with lower summertime air exchange rates, the higher emission rates would likely increase occupant exposure to the undesirable products of ozone reactions, thus reinforcing the need for zero-emission rate standard.

  15. The Power Source(s) of Nearby Low-Ionization Nuclear Emission Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Mallory; Eracleous, Michael; Maoz, Dan; Barth, Aaron J.; Walsh, Jonelle; Ho, Luis C.; Shields, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of low-ionization nuclear emission regions (LINERs) harbor supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with very low accretion rates. Since SMBHs spend most of their lifetimes in these low-accretion rate states, understanding LINERs is important for understanding active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the context of galaxy evolution. On scales of ~100 pc, the energy budget of LINERs appears to be deficient when the only source of power considered is the AGN. Thus, other energy sources are likely to contribute to the excitation of the emission-line gas. To probe these sources, we observed three nearby, bright LINERs, NGC 1052, NGC 4278 and NGC 4579, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We specifically looked at the 0.1-1 arcsecond (corresponding to 5-50 pc) scale to find what and how far from the nucleus these other energy sources are. After subtracting both the unresolved nuclear light and the spatially-extended starlight, we measured a number of diagnostic emission line ratios. We find that line ratios, such as [O III]/[O II] and [O III]/H-beta change as a function of distance from the nucleus. Within 5 pc, the line ratios suggest AGN photoionization. At larger distances the line ratios seem to be inconsistent with AGN photoionization, but they appear to be consistent with excitation by hot stars or shocks.

  16. 40 CFR 62.08 - Emission inventories and source surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission inventories and source... General Provisions § 62.08 Emission inventories and source surveillance. (a) Each subpart identifies the plan provisions for source surveillance which are disapproved, and sets forth the...

  17. Constraining Emission Models of Luminous Blazar Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Stawarz, Lukasz; Moderski, Rafal; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Madejski, Greg; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Many luminous blazars which are associated with quasar-type active galactic nuclei display broad-band spectra characterized by a large luminosity ratio of their high-energy ({gamma}-ray) and low-energy (synchrotron) spectral components. This large ratio, reaching values up to 100, challenges the standard synchrotron self-Compton models by means of substantial departures from the minimum power condition. Luminous blazars have also typically very hard X-ray spectra, and those in turn seem to challenge hadronic scenarios for the high energy blazar emission. As shown in this paper, no such problems are faced by the models which involve Comptonization of radiation provided by a broad-line-region, or dusty molecular torus. The lack or weakness of bulk Compton and Klein-Nishina features indicated by the presently available data favors production of {gamma}-rays via up-scattering of infrared photons from hot dust. This implies that the blazar emission zone is located at parsec-scale distances from the nucleus, and as such is possibly associated with the extended, quasi-stationary reconfinement shocks formed in relativistic outflows. This scenario predicts characteristic timescales for flux changes in luminous blazars to be days/weeks, consistent with the variability patterns observed in such systems at infrared, optical and {gamma}-ray frequencies. We also propose that the parsec-scale blazar activity can be occasionally accompanied by dissipative events taking place at sub-parsec distances and powered by internal shocks and/or reconnection of magnetic fields. These could account for the multiwavelength intra-day flares occasionally observed in powerful blazars sources.

  18. Mapping methane sources and emissions over California from direct airborne flux and VOC source tracer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, A.; Misztal, P. K.; Peischl, J.; Karl, T.; Jonsson, H. H.; Woods, R. K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying the contributions of methane (CH4) emissions from anthropogenic sources in the Central Valley of California is important for validation of the statewide greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and subsequent AB32 law implementation. The state GHG inventory is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The 'bottom-up' emission factors for CH4 have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate 'top-down' measurements to characterize emission rates. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agricultural and industry intensive region with large concentration of dairies and livestock operations, active oil and gas fields and refining operations, as well as rice cultivation all of which are known CH4 sources. In order to gain a better perspective of the spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, airborne measurements were conducted aboard a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of low-altitude and mixed layer airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements alongside coincident VOC measurements. Transects during eight unique flights covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. We report direct quantification of CH4 fluxes using real-time airborne Eddy Covariance measurements. CH4 and CO2 were measured at 1-Hz data rate using an instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) along with specific VOCs (like isoprene, methanol, acetone etc.) measured at 10-Hz using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer - Eddy Covariance (PTRMS-EC) flux system. Spatially resolved eddy covariance

  19. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O'Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size

  20. NONFERROUS INDUSTRY PARTICULATE EMISSIONS: SOURCE CATEGORY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the development of particulate emission factors based on cutoff size for inhalable particles for the nonferrous industry. After a review of available information characterizing particulate emissions from nonferrous plants, the data were summarized and ...

  1. Estimating gas emissions from multiple sources using a backward Lagrangian stochastic model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiling; Desjardins, Raymond L; van Haarlem, Ronald P; Flesch, Thomas K

    2008-11-01

    Manure storage tanks and animals in barns are important agricultural sources of methane. To examine the possibility of using an inverse dispersion technique based on a backward Lagrangian Stochastic (bLS) model to quantify methane (CH4) emissions from multiple on-farm sources, a series of tests were carried out with four possible source configurations and three controlled area sources. The simulated configurations were: (C1) three spatially separate ground-level sources, (C2) three spatially separate sources with wind-flow disturbance, (C3) three adjacent ground-level sources to simulate a group of adjacent sources with different emission rates, and (C4) a configuration with a ground level and two elevated sources. For multiple ground-level sources without flow obstructions (C1 and C3), we can use the condition number (K, the ratio of the uncertainty in the calculated emission rate to the uncertainty in the predicted ratio of concentration to emission rate) to evaluate the applicability of this inverse dispersion technique and a preliminary threshold of K <10 is recommended. For multiple sources with wind disturbance (C2) or an even more complex configuration including ground level and elevated sources (C4), a low kappa is not sufficient to provide reasonable discrete and total emission rates. The effect of flow obstructions can be neglected as long as the distance between the source and the measurement location is greater than approximately 10 times the height of the flow obstructions. This study shows that the bLS model has the potential to provide accurate discrete emission rates from multiple on-farm emissions of gases provided that certain conditions are met. PMID:19044157

  2. EMISSIONS FORECASTS FOR INDUSTRIAL PROCESS SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives national and regional air emissions forecasts from several sulfur oxide and nitrogen oxide (SOx and NOx) emissions control Process Model Projection Technique (PROMPT) test runs. PROMPT, one of a number of National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission fo...

  3. Study of acoustic emission sources and signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumarega, M. I. López; Armeite, M.; Oliveto, M. E.; Piotrkowski, R.; Ruzzante, J. E.

    2002-05-01

    Methods of acoustic emission (AE) signal analysis give information about material conditions, since AE generated in stressed solids can be used to indicate cracks and defect positions so as their damaging potential. We present a review of results of laboratory AE tests on metallic materials. Rings of seamless steel tubes, with and without oxide layers, were cut and then deformed by opening their ends. Seamless Zry-4 tubes were submitted to hydraulic stress tests until rupture with a purposely-constructed hydraulic system. In burst type signals, their parameters, Amplitude (A), Duration (D) and Risetime (R), were statistically studied. Amplitudes were found to follow the Log-normal distribution. This led to infer that the detected AE signal, is the complex consequence of a great number of random independent sources, which individual effects are linked. We could show, using cluster analysis for A, D and R mean values, with 5 clusters, coincidence between the clusters and the test types. A slight linear correlation was obtained for the parameters A and D. The arrival time of the AE signals was also studied, which conducted to discussing Poisson and Polya processes. The digitized signals were studied as (1/f)β noises. The general results are coherent if we consider the AE phenomena in the frame of Self Organized Criticality theory.

  4. AUTOMOTIVE HYDROCARBON EMISSION PATTERNS AND THE MEASUREMENT OF NONMETHANE HYDROCARBON EMISSION RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The advent of emission control technology has resulted in significant changes in both the total mass and detailed patterns of hydrocarbons emitted from automobiles. Emission rates of 56 hydrocarbons from 22 motor vehicles, including catalyst and noncatalyst configurations, were d...

  5. Atmospheric measurement of point source fossil fuel CO2 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G.; Bromley, T.; Norris, M.; Zondervan, A.

    2013-11-01

    We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Plant to examine methodologies for atmospheric monitoring of point source fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. The Kapuni plant, located in rural New Zealand, removes CO2 from locally extracted natural gas and vents that CO2 to the atmosphere, at a rate of ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. The plant is located in a rural dairy farming area, with no other significant CO2ff sources nearby, but large, diurnally varying, biospheric CO2 fluxes from the surrounding highly productive agricultural grassland. We made flask measurements of CO2 and 14CO2 (from which we derive the CO2ff component) and in situ measurements of CO2 downwind of the Kapuni plant, using a Helikite to sample transects across the emission plume from the surface up to 100 m a.g.l. We also determined the surface CO2ff content averaged over several weeks from the 14CO2 content of grass samples collected from the surrounding area. We use the WindTrax plume dispersion model to compare the atmospheric observations with the emissions reported by the Kapuni plant, and to determine how well atmospheric measurements can constrain the emissions. The model has difficulty accurately capturing the fluctuations and short-term variability in the Helikite samples, but does quite well in representing the observed CO2ff in 15 min averaged surface flask samples and in ~1 week integrated CO2ff averages from grass samples. In this pilot study, we found that using grass samples, the modeled and observed CO2ff emissions averaged over one week agreed to within 30%. The results imply that greater verification accuracy may be achieved by including more detailed meteorological observations and refining 14CO2 sampling strategies.

  6. Calculated emission rates for barium releases in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    The optical emissions from barium releases in space are caused by resonance and fluorescent scattering of sunlight. Emission rates for the dominant ion and neutral lines are calculated assuming the release to be optically thin and the barium to be in radiative equilibrium with the solar radiation. The solar spectrum has deep Fraunhofer absorption lines at the primary barium ion resonances. A velocity component toward or away from the sun will Doppler shift the emission lines relative to the absorption lines and the emission rates will increase many-fold over the rest value. The Doppler brightening is important in shaped charge or satellite releases where the barium is injected at high velocities. Emission rates as a function of velocity are calculated for the 4554, 4934, 5854, 6142 and 6497 A ion emission lines and the dominant neutral line at 5535 A. Results are presented for injection parallel to the ambient magnetic field, B, and for injection at an angle to B.

  7. RESEARCH AREA -- MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS (EMISSIONS CHARACTERIZATION AND PREVENTION BRANCH, APPCD, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this program is to characterize mobile source emissions which are one of the largest sources of tropospheric ozone precursor emissions (CO, NOx, and volotile organic compounds) in the U.S. The research objective of the Emissions Characterization and Prevention Br...

  8. RESEARCH ON EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION OF POP'S FROM COMBUSTION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chapter summarizes EPA's research on emissions and control of persistent organic pollutants (POPS) from combustion sources, with emphasis on source characterization and measurement, formation and destruction mechanisms, formation prevention, and flue gas cleaning. Laboratory exp...

  9. Emission of gravitational radiation from ultrarelativistic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalis, Ehud B.; Ori, Amos

    2001-09-01

    Recent observations suggest that blobs of matter are ejected with ultrarelativistic speeds in various astrophysical phenomena such as supernova explosions, quasars, and microquasars. In this paper we analyze the gravitational radiation emitted when such an ultrarelativistic blob is ejected from a massive object. We express the gravitational wave by the metric perturbation in the transverse-traceless gauge, and calculate its amplitude and angular dependence. We find that in the ultrarelativistic limit the gravitational wave has a wide angular distribution, like 1+cos θ. The typical burst's frequency is Doppler shifted, with the blueshift factor being strongly beamed in the forward direction. As a consequence, the energy flux carried by the gravitational radiation is beamed. In the second part of the paper we estimate the anticipated detection rate of such bursts by a gravitational-wave detector, for blobs ejected in supernova explosions. Dar and De Rujula recently proposed that ultrarelativistic blobs ejected from the central core in supernova explosions constitute the source of gamma-ray bursts. Substituting the most likely values of the parameters as suggested by their model, we obtain an estimated detection rate of about 1 per year by the advanced LIGO-II detector.

  10. Determination of methane emission rates on a biogas plant using data from laser absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groth, Angela; Maurer, Claudia; Reiser, Martin; Kranert, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the work was to establish a method for emission control of biogas plants especially the observation of fugitive methane emissions. The used method is in a developmental stage but the topic is crucial to environmental and economic issues. A remote sensing measurement method was adopted to determine methane emission rates of a biogas plant in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. An inverse dispersion model was used to deduce emission rates. This technique required one concentration measurement with an open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) downwind and upwind the source and basic wind information, like wind speed and direction. Different operating conditions of the biogas plant occurring on the measuring day (December 2013) could be represented roughly in the results. During undisturbed operational modes the methane emission rate averaged 2.8 g/s, which corresponds to 4% of the methane gas production rate of the biogas plant. PMID:25446786

  11. Dust from southern Africa: rates of emission and biogeochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattachan, A.; D'Odorico, P.; Zobeck, T. M.; Okin, G. S.; Dintwe, K.

    2012-12-01

    The stabilized linear dunefields in the southern Kalahari show signs of reactivation due to reduced vegetation cover owing to drought and/or overgrazing. It has been demonstrated with a laboratory dust generator that the southern Kalahari soils are good emitters of dust and that large-scale dune reactivation can potentially make the region an important dust source in the relatively low-dust Southern Hemisphere. We show that emergence of the southern Kalahari as a new dust source may affect ocean biogeochemistry as the soils are rich in soluble iron and the dust from the southern Kalahari commonly reaches the Southern Ocean. We investigate the biogeochemical properties of the fine fraction of soil from the Kalahari dunes and compare them to those of currently active dust sources such as the Makgadikgadi and the Etosha pans as well as other smaller pans in the region. Using field measurements of sediment fluxes and satellite images, we calculate the rates of dust emission from the southern Kalahari under different land cover scenarios. To assess the reversibility of dune reactivation in the southern Kalahari, we investigate the resilience of dunefield vegetation by looking at changes in soil nutrients, fine soil fractions, and seed bank in areas affected by intense denudation.

  12. N-bursty emission from Uranus: A cyclotron maser source?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, D. B.; Menietti, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Ray tracing studies of RX-mode emission from the north polar regions of Uranus indicate that the n-bursty radio emission may have a source along field lines with footprints near the northern magnetic pole (perhaps in the cusp), but not necessarily associated with regions of strong UV emission. This is in contrast with similar studies for the Uranus nightside smooth radio emission, which are believed to be due to the cyclotron maser instability. Source regions can be found for both hollow and filled emission cones and for frequencies well above the local gyrofreuquency implying that mechanisms other than the cyclotron maser mechanism may be operating.

  13. Source localization of Jupiter's Io dependent radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aubier, Monique G.; Genova, Francoise; Calvert, Wynne

    1988-01-01

    The peak frequencies of the Io-dependent part of the Jovian emissions are compared with the surface gyrofrequency determined from Jovian magnetic models in order to localize the source of Jovian radio emissions. The bulk of the Io-controlled emissions was found to be delayed by up to 70 deg of equatorial longitude from the predicted instantaneous position of the Io flux tube, with the L and S emissions both displaying this same unexpected behavior. It is suggested that the source of these emissions is delayed substantially with respect to Io either as an Alfven-wave delay or because of errors in the magnetic field models.

  14. Locating and estimating air emissions from sources of nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    To assist groups interested in inventorying air emissions of various potentially toxic substances, EPA is preparing a series of documents such as this to compile available information on sources and emissions of these substances. This document deals specifically with nickel. Its intended audience includes Federal, State and local air pollution personnel and others interested in locating potential emitters of nickel and in making gross estimates of air emissions therefrom. This document presents information on (1) the types of sources that may emit nickel, (2) process variations and release points that may be expected within these sources, and (3) available emissions information indicating the potential for nickel release into the air from each operation.

  15. 40 CFR 60.25 - Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... electronic documents shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 3—(Electronic reporting). (2) Periodic... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission inventories, source... State Plans for Designated Facilities § 60.25 Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports....

  16. 40 CFR 62.4622 - Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shall require the owner or operator of any such source to submit information within 30 days on the nature and amounts of emissions from such source and any other information as may be deemed necessary by... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission inventories,...

  17. 40 CFR 60.25 - Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... electronic documents shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 3—(Electronic reporting). (2) Periodic... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission inventories, source... State Plans for Designated Facilities § 60.25 Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports....

  18. 40 CFR 62.4622 - Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports. 62.4622 Section 62.4622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...) § 62.4622 Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports. (a) The requirements of § 60.25(a)...

  19. 40 CFR 62.4622 - Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports. 62.4622 Section 62.4622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...) § 62.4622 Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports. (a) The requirements of § 60.25(a)...

  20. 40 CFR 62.4622 - Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports. 62.4622 Section 62.4622 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...) § 62.4622 Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports. (a) The requirements of § 60.25(a)...

  1. REVIEW OF INDOOR EMISSION SOURCE MODELS--PART 1. OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor emission source models are mainly used as a component in indoor air quality (IAQ) and exposure modeling. They are also widely used to interpret the experimental data obtained from environmental chambers and buildings. This paper compiles 46 indoor emission source models fo...

  2. 40 CFR 63.843 - Emission limits for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emission limits for existing sources. 63.843 Section 63.843 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  3. 40 CFR 63.843 - Emission limits for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission limits for existing sources. 63.843 Section 63.843 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  4. 40 CFR 63.843 - Emission limits for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission limits for existing sources. 63.843 Section 63.843 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  5. Area Source Emission Measurements Using EPA OTM 10

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of air pollutant emissions from area and non-point sources is an emerging environmental concern. Due to the spatial extent and non-homogenous nature of these sources, assessment of fugitive emissions using point sampling techniques can be difficult. To help address th...

  6. Source sampling of particulate matter emissions from cotton harvesting - System field testing and emission factor development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emission factors are used in the air pollution regulatory process to quantify the mass of pollutants emitted from a source. Accurate emission factors must be used in the air pollution regulatory process to ensure fair and appropriate regulation for all sources. Agricultural sources, including cotton...

  7. Dry Sources of Plume Emissions on Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.

    2009-12-01

    rapidly frozen early oceanic water. A lack of highly saline particles in E ring that are expected to form due to significant evaporation of an aqueous reservoir also argues for dry sources. The E-ring grains [1,3] may represent neither thick salt deposits at the core-ice boundary nor brines that may exist at that boundary today [5]. A low upper limit for atomic Na content at Enceladus [6] is consistent with Na emission in salt particles from dry sources. A low (far from eutectic) NH3/H2O ratio in plumes [2] implies dry sources as well. If present, primary species (e.g. NH3, HCN) in plums [2] and Mg silicates in E-ring particles [3] could originate from unmelted fragments of sunken primordial crust that have been incorporated into the formed icy shell. The structural heterogeneity of current icy shell may account for the chemical diversity of gases [2] and solids [1,3] emitted from Enceladus. Refs.: [1] Portberg F. et al. (2009) Nature 459, 1098-1101. [2] Waite J. et al. et al. (2009) Nature 460, 487-490. [3] Postberg F. et al. (2008) Icarus 193, 438-454. [4] Schubert G. et al. (2007) Icarus 188, 335-345. [5] Zolotov M. (2007) GRL 34, L23203. [6] Schneider N. et al. (2009) Nature 459, 1098-1101.

  8. Registration for the Hanford Site: Sources of radioactive emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    This Registration Application serves to renew the registration for all Hanford Site sources of radioactive air emissions routinely reported to the State of Washington Department of Health (DOH). The current registration expires on August 15, 1993. The Application is submitted pursuant to the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246--247, and is consistent with guidance provided by DOH for renewal. The Application subdivides the Hanford Site into six major production, processing or research areas. Those six areas are in the 100 Area, 200 East Area, 200 West Area, 300 Area, 400 Area, and 600 Area. Each major group of point sources within the six areas listed above is represented by a Source Registration for Radioactive Air Emissions form. Annual emissions. for the sources are listed in the ``Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site,`` published annually. It is a requirement that the following Statement of Compliance be provided: ``The radioactive air emissions from the above sources do meet the emissions standards contained in Chapter 173-480-040 WAC, Ambient Air Quality Standards and Emissions Limits for Radionuclides. As the Statement of Compliance pertains to this submittal, the phrase ``above sources`` is to be understood as meaning the combined air emissions from all sources registered by this submittal.

  9. 40 CFR 1036.530 - Calculating greenhouse gas emission rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... applicable duty cycle as specified in 40 CFR 1065.650. Do not apply infrequent regeneration adjustment... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Calculating greenhouse gas emission... Procedures § 1036.530 Calculating greenhouse gas emission rates. This section describes how to...

  10. MICROBIAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES AND EXPOSURE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results from a study that examined microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions from six fungi and one bacterial species (Streptomyces spp.) commonly found in indoor environments. Data are presented on peak emission rates from inoculated agar plate...

  11. EFFECTS OF VENTILATION RATES AND PRODUCT LOADING ON ORGANIC EMISSION RATES FROM PARTICLEBOARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the effects of ventilation rates and product loading on organic emission rates from particleboard. Recently, investigators have confirmed the presence of varied and significant amounts of organic compounds in indoor environment, including compounds known or su...

  12. Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Faulkner, D.; Sullivan, D.P.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.; Russell, M.L.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13-week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings.

  13. Intake fraction variability between air pollution emission sources inside an urban area.

    PubMed

    Tainio, Marko; Holnicki, Piotr; Loh, Miranda M; Nahorski, Zbigniew

    2014-11-01

    The cost-effective mitigation of adverse health effects caused by air pollution requires information on the contribution of different emission sources to exposure. In urban areas the exposure potential of different sources may vary significantly depending on emission height, population density, and other factors. In this study, we quantified this intraurban variability by predicting intake fraction (iF) for 3,066 emission sources in Warsaw, Poland. iF describes the fraction of the pollutant that is inhaled by people in the study area. We considered the following seven pollutants: particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), benzo[a] pyrene (BaP), nickel (Ni), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb). Emissions for these pollutants were grouped into four emission source categories (Mobile, Area, High Point, and Other Point sources). The dispersion of the pollutants was predicted with the CALPUFF dispersion model using the year 2005 emission rate data and meteorological records. The resulting annual average concentrations were combined with population data to predict the contribution of each individual source to population exposure. The iFs for different pollutant-source category combinations varied between 51 per million (PM from Mobile sources) and 0.013 per million (sulfate PM from High Point sources). The intraurban iF variability for Mobile sources primary PM emission was from 4 per million to 100 per million with the emission-weighted iF of 44 per million. These results propose that exposure due to intraurban air pollution emissions could be decreased more effectively by specifically targeting sources with high exposure potency rather than all sources. PMID:24913007

  14. Spectra and rates of bremsstrahlung neutrino emission in stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gang; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the energy-differential rate for neutrino emission from electron-nucleus bremsstrahlung in stellar interiors taking into account the effects of electron screening and ionic correlations. We compare the energy-differential and the net rates, as well as the average ν¯e and ν¯x(x =μ ,τ ) energies, for this process with those for e± pair annihilation, plasmon decay, and photoneutrino emission over a wide range of temperature and density. We also compare our updated energy loss rates for the above thermal neutrino emission processes with the fitting formulas widely used in stellar evolution models and determine the temperature and density domain in which each process dominates. We discuss the implications of our results for detection of ν¯e from massive stars during their presupernova evolution and find that pair annihilation makes the predominant contribution to the signal from the thermal emission processes.

  15. 40 CFR 63.1505 - Emission standards for affected sources and emission units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that is a major source must not discharge or cause to be discharged to the atmosphere: (1) Emissions in... discharged to the atmosphere emissions in excess of: (1) 0.40 kilogram (kg) of THC, as propane, per megagram.../decoating kiln must not discharge or cause to be discharged to the atmosphere emissions in excess of: (i)...

  16. The Equivalence of Rater Sources on Job Analysis Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camara, Wayne J.

    Previous efforts to investigate the equivalence of rating sources for job analysis ratings have reported conflicting results. In the present research, correlational and generalizability analyses were conducted to examine the equivalency of rating sources for over 70 state civil service job classifications. Incumbent and supervisor ratings (N=697)…

  17. User access to the MAP3S source emissions inventory

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitz, C M; Evans, V A

    1981-03-01

    An emissions inventory based on data obtained from the National Emissions Data System (NEDS), the Federal Power Commission (FPC), Environment Canada, and other agencies was compiled by the MAP3S Central Data Coordination at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Pertinent data was brought together, collated, and loaded into computerized data bases using SYSTEM 2000 as the data base management system. These data bases are available to interested users for interactive scanning or batch retrieval. The emissions inventory consists of two distinct sections: a point source inventory and an area source inventory. The point source inventory covers the continental US and Canada; information is kept at the individual source level. The area source inventory covers the continental US; information is kept on a county basis. Work is in progress to obtain a Canadian area source inventory based on census divisions.

  18. Comparison of two dynamic measurement methods of odor and odorant emission rates from freshly dewatered biosolids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Sattayatewa, Chakkrid; Venkatesan, Dhesikan; Noll, Kenneth E; Pagilla, Krishna R; Moschandreas, Demetrios J

    2011-06-01

    Odor and odorant emission rates from freshly dewatered biosolids in a dewatering building of a Water Reclamation Plant (WRP) are measured using the EPA flux chamber and wind tunnel methods. Experimental results are compared statistically to test whether the two methods result in similar emission rates when experiments are performed under field conditions. To the best of our knowledge the literature is void of studies comparing the two methods indoors. In this paper the two methods are compared indoors where the wind velocity and air exchange rate are pertinent field conditions and can be measured. The difference between emission rates of odor and hydrogen sulfide measured with the two methods is not statistically significant (P values: 0.505 for odor, 0.130 for H(2)S). It is concluded that both methods can be used to estimate source emissions but selection of the most effective or efficient method depends on prevailing environmental conditions. The wind tunnel is appropriate for outdoor environments where wind effects on source emissions are more pronounced than indoors. The EPA flux chamber depends on the air exchange rate of the chamber, which simulates corresponding conditions of the indoor environment under investigation and is recommended for estimation of indoor pollution sources. PMID:21552636

  19. Volatile organic compound concentrations and emission rates in new manufactured and site-built houses.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, A T; Rudd, A F; Beal, D; Chandra, S

    2000-09-01

    Concentrations of 54 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ventilation rates were measured in four new manufactured houses over 2-9.5 months following installation and in seven new site-built houses 1-2 months after completion. The houses were in four projects located in hot-humid and mixed-humid climates. They were finished and operational, but unoccupied. Ventilation rates ranged from 0.14-0.78 h-1. Several of the site-built houses had ventilation rates below the ASHRAE recommended value. In both manufactured and site-built houses, the predominant airborne compounds were alpha-pinene, formaldehyde, hexanal, and acetic acid. Formaldehyde concentrations were below or near 50 ppb with a geometric mean value for all houses of 40 ppb. Similarities in the types of VOCs and in VOC concentrations indicated that indoor air quality in the houses was impacted by the same or similar sources. Major identified sources included plywood flooring, latex paint and sheet vinyl flooring. One site-built house was operated at ventilation rates of 0.14 and 0.32 h-1. VOC emission rates calculated at the two conditions agreed within +/- 10% for the most volatile compounds. Generally, the ratios of emission rates at the low and high ventilation rates decreased with decreasing compound volatility. Changes in VOC emission rates in the manufactured houses over 2-9.5 months after installation varied by compound. Only several compounds showed a consistent decrease in emission rate over this period. PMID:10979199

  20. AIR POLLUTION: GROUND-BASED SENSING OF SOURCE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some types of gaseous pollution sources, particularly extended area industrial complexes and those producing hot combustion products, cannot be monitored adequately with conventional point sampling methods. To aid in characterizing emissions from and in developing remote sensing ...

  1. MEASUREMENT OF PM-10 EMISSIONS FROM STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements of PM-10 particulate matter emissions from stationary sources were performed using two sampling approaches currently under development. PM-10 particulate matter is defined as all particles nominally 10 micrometers aerodynamic diameter and smaller. Aerodynamic inertia...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A MONITOR FOR HCN IN MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three real-time monitors for measurement of HCN concentrations in mobile source emissions have been designed, built, tested, and delivered to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The important design parameters for these identical instruments were determined during the firs...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1157 - Emission standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1157 Emission standards for existing sources. (a... percent. (b) Hydrochloric acid regeneration plants. (1) No owner or operator of an existing affected...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1157 - Emission standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1157 Emission standards for existing sources. (a... percent. (b) Hydrochloric acid regeneration plants. (1) No owner or operator of an existing affected...

  5. 40 CFR 63.1157 - Emission standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1157 Emission standards for existing sources. (a... percent. (b) Hydrochloric acid regeneration plants. (1) No owner or operator of an existing affected...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1157 - Emission standards for existing sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid Regeneration Plants § 63.1157 Emission standards for existing sources. (a... percent. (b) Hydrochloric acid regeneration plants. (1) No owner or operator of an existing affected...

  7. METHOD FOR MEASURING CARBON FIBER EMISSIONS FROM STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon fibers are highly conductive, lightweight and of small dimensions. When released as emissions from production, manufacturing, processing and disposal sources they may become airborne and disperse over wide areas. If they settle onto electronic or electrical components they...

  8. SOURCES OF ORGANIC AEROSOL: SEMIVOLATILE EMISSIONS AND PHOTOCHEMICAL AGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed research integrates emissions testing, smog chamber experiments, and regional chemical transport models (CTMs) to investigate the sources of organic aerosol in urban and regional environments.

  9. IRON AND STEEL PLANT OPEN SOURCE FUGITIVE EMISSION CONTROL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measurements of the control efficiency of various techniques used to mitigate emissions from open dust sources in the iron and steel industry. Of estimated emissions of 88,800 tons/year suspended particulate in 1978 (based on a 10-plant survey), 70, 13...

  10. IMPACT OF A PRIMARY SULFATE EMISSION SOURCE ON AIR QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A one-month study was carried out at an isolated oil-fired power plant in New York State to assess the impact of primary sulfate emissions on air quality. Emissions of total sulfate from the source varied from 22 kg/hr to 82 kg/hr per boiler with the sulfuric acid concentration a...

  11. Are mercury emissions from geologic sources significant? A status report.

    PubMed

    Gustin, Mae Sexauer

    2003-03-20

    Geologic sources of atmospheric mercury include areas of fossil and current geothermal activity, recent volcanic activity, precious and base metal deposits, and organic rich sedimentary rocks. Early estimates of emissions from these sources were not based on measurements of mercury fluxes but implied based on the difference between emissions from anthropogenic point sources and wet/dry deposition estimates. In the past approximately 7 years significant progress has been made in development of methods for the measurement of mercury emissions, definition of those parameters most important in controlling emissions and scaling up emissions from natural source areas. This paper summarizes the work done on scaling of emissions from discrete areas of natural enrichment and from the State of Nevada, which is situated within a global belt of mercury enrichment. Preliminary data indicate that elemental mercury is the predominant (>95%) form of mercury being emitted from these sources. Scaling results suggest that the value used in early models to represent emissions from global mercuriferous belts is too low by at least three times. PMID:12663180

  12. Ammonia emissions from non-agricultural sources in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, M. A.; Dragosits, U.; Tang, Y. S.; Fowler, D.

    A detailed literature review has been undertaken of the magnitude of non-agricultural sources of ammonia (NH 3) in the United Kingdom. Key elements of the work included estimation of nitrogen (N) excreted by different sources (birds, animals, babies, human sweat), review of miscellaneous combustion sources, as well as identification of industrial sources and use of NH 3 as a solvent. Overall the total non-agricultural emission of NH 3 from the UK in 1996 is estimated here as 54 (27-106) kt NH 3-N yr -1, although this includes 11 (6-23) kt yr -1 from agriculture related sources (sewage sludge spreading, biomass burning and agro-industry). Compared with previous estimates for 1990, component source magnitudes have changed both because of revised average emissions per source unit (emission factors) and changes in the source activity between 1990 and 1996. Sources with larger average emission factors than before include horses, wild animals and sea bird colonies, industry, sugar beet processing, household products and non-agricultural fertilizer use, with the last three sources being included for the first time. Sources with smaller emission factors than before include: land spreading of sewage sludge, direct human emissions (sweat, breath, smoking, infants), pets (cats and dogs) and fertilizer manufacture. Between 1990 and 1996 source activities increased for sewage spreading (due to reduced dumping at sea) and transport (due to increased use of catalytic converters), but decreased for coal combustion. Combined with the current UK estimates of agricultural NH 3 emissions of 229 kt N yr -1 (1996), total UK NH 3 emissions are estimated at 283 kt N yr -1. Allowing for an import of reduced nitrogen (NH x) of 30 kt N yr -1 and deposition of 230 kt N yr -1, these figures imply an export of 83 kt NH 3-N yr -1. Although export is larger than previously estimated, due to the larger contribution of non-agricultural NH 3 emissions, it is still insufficient to balance the UK

  13. Emissions of ozone precursors from stationary sources:. a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placet, M.; Mann, C. O.; Gilbert, R. O.; Niefer, M. J.

    This paper discusses and critiques methods used to estimate emissions of, and create both aggregate and detailed modeling inventories for, nitrogen oxides (NO x), volatile organic compounds (VOC) and carbon monoxide (CO), the main pollutants involved in ozone formation. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and methods to project emissions into the future are also briefly discussed. Many improvements have been made in emissions inventories over the past decade. For example, the required use of continuous emission monitors (CEMS) has produced site-specific emissions estimates from almost all US electric utility power plants, which are the major stationary source of NO x. However, many data quality issues remain. For example, the overall quality of standardized emission factors is very poor. In addition, uncertainties have been introduced by use of simplistic assumptions on the existent level of emission control. Even the use of CEMS has not eliminated uncertainty in emissions from power plants, because methods to deal with missing data can introduce bias. Emissions data for Mexico are not comprehensive, making ozone modeling in US border regions difficult. Data for VOC speciation is outdated, and crude data is often used to disaggregate emissions to the fine level of spatial and temporal detail needed for atmospheric modeling. It is difficult to make general statements about the importance of each of these problems, because there are no reliable estimates of the overall uncertainty of emissions values, and because the impact of emission inventory errors is very site specific. The Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP) initiated by the US Environmental Protection Agency promises to enhance the quality of future inventories, mainly through communication of best practices among state agencies. Further inventory improvement efforts must be focused on problems that most strongly influence poor prediction of ozone concentrations. Targets for improvement could be

  14. Atmospheric Verification of Point Source Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Norris, M. W.; Wiltshire, R.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G. W.; Bromley, T.

    2015-12-01

    Large point sources (electricity generation and large-scale industry) make up roughly one third of all fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. Currently, these emissions are determined from self-reported inventory data, and sometimes from smokestack emissions monitoring, and the uncertainty in emissions from individual power plants is about 20%. We examine the utility of atmospheric 14C measurements combined with atmospheric transport modelling as a tool for independently quantifying point source CO2ff emissions, to both improve the accuracy of the reported emissions and for verification as we move towards a regulatory environment. We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Facility as a test case. It is located in rural New Zealand with no other significant fossil fuel CO2 sources nearby, and emits CO2ff at ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. We use several different sampling methods to determine the 14C and hence the CO2ff content downwind of the emission source: grab flask samples of whole air; absorption of CO2 into sodium hydroxide integrated over many hours; and plant material which faithfully records the 14C content of assimilated CO2. We use a plume dispersion model to compare the reported emissions with our observed CO2ff mole fractions. We show that the short-term variability in plume dispersion makes it difficult to interpret the grab flask sample results, whereas the variability is averaged out in the integrated samples and we obtain excellent agreement between the reported and observed emissions, indicating that the 14C method can reliably be used to evaluated point source emissions.

  15. 75 FR 63259 - Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources and Emission Guidelines for Existing Sources...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ...This action proposes how EPA will address Clean Air Act requirements to establish new source performance standards for new units and emission guidelines for existing units for specific categories of solid waste incineration units. In previous actions, EPA has promulgated new source performance standards and emission guidelines for large municipal waste combustion units, small municipal waste......

  16. Locating and quantifying gas emission sources using remotely obtained concentration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Bill; Jonathan, Philip; González del Cueto, Fernando; Randell, David; Kosut, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    We describe a method for detecting, locating and quantifying sources of gas emissions to the atmosphere using remotely obtained gas concentration data; the method is applicable to gases of environmental concern. We demonstrate its performance using methane data collected from aircraft. Atmospheric point concentration measurements are modelled as the sum of a spatially and temporally smooth atmospheric background concentration, augmented by concentrations due to local sources. We model source emission rates with a Gaussian mixture model and use a Markov random field to represent the atmospheric background concentration component of the measurements. A Gaussian plume atmospheric eddy dispersion model represents gas dispersion between sources and measurement locations. Initial point estimates of background concentrations and source emission rates are obtained using mixed ℓ2 - ℓ1 optimisation over a discretised grid of potential source locations. Subsequent reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo inference provides estimated values and uncertainties for the number, emission rates and locations of sources unconstrained by a grid. Source area, atmospheric background concentrations and other model parameters, including plume model spreading and Lagrangian turbulence time scale, are also estimated. We investigate the performance of the approach first using a synthetic problem, then apply the method to real airborne data from a 1600 km2 area containing two landfills, then a 225 km2 area containing a gas flare stack.

  17. The sources of electrically evoked otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Zheng, Jiefu; Nuttall, Alfred L; Ren, Tianying

    2003-06-01

    It has been hypothesized that electrically evoked otoacoustic emissions (EEOAEs) are generated at a site on the basilar membrane near the stimulating electrode. From this original site, the energy propagates towards the oval window, giving rise to the short time delay component (SDC) of EEOAEs. The energy also propagates towards its characteristic frequency (CF) location, and the emission reflected from the CF location forms a long time delay component (LDC). This hypothesis is directly tested in this study by using an acoustical swept tone to modulate the EEOAEs generated by alternating electric current delivered to the round window niche in gerbils. An acoustical tone with a high sound pressure level or a small frequency separation from the EEOAE frequency induced a strong suppression of the EEOAE LDC, but no obvious suppression of the SDC. When the electrical current frequency was fixed, the swept acoustic tone induced a slight suppression, an enhanced peak, and a strong suppression of EEOAEs as the acoustic frequency was swept from the low to high frequency. These data indicate that the electrical current induced cochlear partition vibration near the stimulating electrode. One part of this energy propagates directly to the ear canal, forming the SDC, and the other part propagates to its CF place and is reflected from there to the ear canal, forming the LDC. PMID:12782357

  18. Monoterpene emission rate measurements from a Monterey pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juuti, Soile; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    1990-05-01

    The monoterpenes emitted from a Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) were investigated using a dynamic flow-through enclosure technique. The monoterpenes identified and quantified were α- and β-pinene, d-limonene + β-phellandrene, myrcene, camphene and Δ3-carene, with α- and β-pinene accounting for over 80% of the total monoterpene emissions. The monoterpene emission rate increased with temperature, in good agreement with previous data for other coniferous species. The absence of added CO2 to the synthetic air flow stream, exposure to elevated levels (300-500 ppb mixing ratio) of O3 for 3-4 hours, and increased air movement within the enclosure had no observable effect on the monoterpene emission rate at a given temperature. In contrast, "rough handling" of the pine during the sampling protocol resulted in increases in the monoterpene emission rate by factors of 10-50. These results will be useful to those designing enclosure sampling protocols for the determination of the emission rates of biogenic organic compounds from vegetation.

  19. Monoterpene emission rate measurements from a Monterey pine

    SciTech Connect

    Juuti, S. ); Arey, J.; Atkinson, R. )

    1990-05-20

    The monoterpenes emitted from a Monterey pine (pinus radiata) were investigated using a dynamic flow-through enclosure technique. The monoterpenes identified and quantified were {alpha}- and {beta}-pinene, d-limonene + {beta} phellandrene, myrcene, camphene and {Delta}{sup 3}-carene, with {alpha}- and {beta}-pinene accounting for over 80% of the total monoterpene emissions. The monoterpene emission rate increased with temperature, in good agreement with previous data for other coniferous species. The absence of added CO{sub 2} to the synthetic air flow stream, exposure to elevated levels (300-500 ppb mixing ratio) of O{sub 3} for 3-4 hours, and increased air movement within the enclosure, had no observable effect on the monoterpene emission rate at a given temperature. In contrast, rough handling of the pine during the sampling protocol resulted in increases in the monoterpene emission rate by factors of 10-50. These results will be useful to those designing enclosure sampling protocols for the determination of the emission rates of biogenic organic compounds from vegetation.

  20. Source Emissions in Multipollutant Air Quality Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activities and natural processes that emit pollutants into the ambient atmosphere are the underlying cause of all air quality problems. In a technical sense, we refer to these activities and processes as pollutant sources. Although air quality management is usually concerne...

  1. TRANSIT BUS LOAD-BASED MODAL EMISSION RATE MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) operations are a major source of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions in metropolitan area nationwide. Although HD¬DVs constitute a small portion of the on-road fleet, they typically contribute more than 45% of NOx and ...

  2. Comparison of emission rate values for odour and odorous chemicals derived from two sampling devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, N.; Ayoko, G. A.

    Field and laboratory measurements identified a complex relationship between odour emission rates provided by the US EPA dynamic emission chamber and the University of New South Wales wind tunnel. Using a range of model compounds in an aqueous odour source, we demonstrate that emission rates derived from the wind tunnel and flux chamber are a function of the solubility of the materials being emitted, the concentrations of the materials within the liquid; and the aerodynamic conditions within the device - either velocity in the wind tunnel, or flushing rate for the flux chamber. The ratio of wind tunnel to flux chamber odour emission rates (OU m -2 s) ranged from about 60:1 to 112:1. The emission rates of the model odorants varied from about 40:1 to over 600:1. These results may provide, for the first time, a basis for the development of a model allowing an odour emission rate derived from either device to be used for odour dispersion modelling.

  3. Global inventory of volatile organic compound emissions from anthropogenic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Piccot, S.D.; Watson, J.J.; Jones, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the development of a global inventory of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. It includes VOC estimates for seven classes of VOCs: paraffins, olefins, aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylene), formaldehyde, other aldehydes, other aromatics, and marginally reactive compounds. These classes represent general classes of VOC compounds that possess different chemical reactivities in the atmosphere. The inventory shows total global anthropogenic VOC emissions of about 110,000 Gg/yr, about 10% lower than global VOC inventories developed by other researchers. The study identifies the U.S. as the largest emitter (21% of the total global VOC), followed by the USSR, China, India, and Japan. Globally, fuel wood combustion and savanna burning were among the largest VOC emission sources, accounting for over 35% of the total global VOC emissions. The production and use of gasoline, refuse disposal activities, and organic chemical and rubber manufacturing were also found to be significant sources of global VOC emissions.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE: MUTAGENIC EMISSION RATES AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER EMISSION FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the emission rates and exposure concentrations of mutagens, nicotine, and particles from cigarettes. Studies were conducted under controlled laboratory and chamber conditions as well as in personal residences. The mutagenicity of enviro...

  5. Effect of low emission sources on air quality in Cracow

    SciTech Connect

    Nedoma, J.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents calculation of power engineering low emission and results of stimulation of the effect of this emission on air quality in Cracow, Poland. It has been stated that the segment of low emission in central areas of the town makes up ca. 40% of the observed concentration of sulfur dioxide. Furthermore it has been stated that the capital investment must be concentrated in the central part of the town in order to reach noticeable improvement of air quality in Cracow. Neither the output of a separate power source nor the emission level and its individual harmful effect, but the location of the source and especially packing density of the sources must decide the priority of upgrading actions.

  6. TEST METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE PARTICULATE MATTER EMISSIONS AND DEPOSITION RATES IN A RESEARCH HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses test methods to characterize particulate matter (PM) emissions and deposition rates in a research house. In a room in the research house, specially configured for PM source testing, a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered air supply system, used for...

  7. Aerostat-Lofted Instrument Platform and Sampling Method for Determination of Emissions from Open Area Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling emissions from open area sources, particularly sources of open burning, is difficult due to fast dilution of emissions and safety concerns for personnel. Representative emission samples can be difficult to obtain with flaming and explosive sources since personnel safety ...

  8. Noise source emissions, Davis Canyon site, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    This report has been prepared for the purpose of documenting the development of the data provided to the Repository Project Management (RPM) organization. The data provided encompass all phases of activity, from site preparation through the exploratory shaft facility (ESF) and repository construction and operation, and decommissioning. Noise environments expected from construction and operation of transportation corridors associated with the activity were also modeled. The data for the construction of transportation corridors were provided by Bechtel National, Inc. Use of the quietest equipment available within the proven state of the art was assumed, as was the use of acoustical enclosures to the extent practical. The programmatic assumptions are based on the noise-sensitive nature of the Canyonlands National Park. Another feature of the data is the use of 1/3-octave-band rather than 1/1-octave-band resolution of emission spectra. This was done to permit evaluation of audibility of sounds reaching the park.

  9. 40 CFR 62.08 - Emission inventories and source surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surveillance. 62.08 Section 62.08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... General Provisions § 62.08 Emission inventories and source surveillance. (a) Each subpart identifies the plan provisions for source surveillance which are disapproved, and sets forth the...

  10. 40 CFR 62.08 - Emission inventories and source surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surveillance. 62.08 Section 62.08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... General Provisions § 62.08 Emission inventories and source surveillance. (a) Each subpart identifies the plan provisions for source surveillance which are disapproved, and sets forth the...

  11. 40 CFR 62.08 - Emission inventories and source surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surveillance. 62.08 Section 62.08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... General Provisions § 62.08 Emission inventories and source surveillance. (a) Each subpart identifies the plan provisions for source surveillance which are disapproved, and sets forth the...

  12. SOURCES, EMISSION AND EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) AND RELATED CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the sources, emission, environmental fate and exposures for TCE, some of its metabolites, and some other chemicals known to produce identical metabolites. The major findings for TCE are:


    1. The primary sources releasing TCE to the environment ...

    2. WORKSHOP ON SOURCE EMISSION AND AMBIENT AIR MONITORING OF MERCURY

      EPA Science Inventory

      AN EPA/ORD Workshop on Source Emission and Ambient Air Monitoring of Mercury was held on 9/13-14/99, Bloomington, Minnesota. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the state-of-the-science in source and ambient air mercury monitoring as well as mercury monitoring research and...

    3. X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources

      SciTech Connect

      Cominsky, L

      2004-03-23

      This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

    4. Mass flow rate measurement in abrasive jets using acoustic emission

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ivantsiv, V.; Spelt, J. K.; Papini, M.

      2009-09-01

      The repeatability of abrasive jet machining operations is presently limited by fluctuations in the mass flow rate due to powder compaction, stratification and humidity effects. It was found that the abrasive mass flow rate for a typical abrasive jet micromachining setup could be determined by using data from the acoustic emission of the abrasive jet impacting a flat plate. Two methods for extracting the mass flow rate from the acoustic emission were developed and compared. In the first method, the number of particle impacts per unit time was determined by a direct count of peaks in the acoustic emission signal. The second method utilizes the power spectrum density of the acoustic emission in a specific frequency range. Both measures were found to correlate strongly with the mass flow rate measured by weighing samples of blasted powder for controlled time periods. It was found that the peak count method permits measurement of the average frequency of the impacts and the mass flow rate, but can only be applied to flow rates in which the impact frequency is approximately one order of magnitude less than the frequency of the target plate ringing. The power spectrum density method of signal processing is applicable to relatively fine powders and to flow rates at which the average impact frequency is of the same order of magnitude as that of the ringing due to the impact. The acoustic emission technique can be used to monitor particle flow variations over a wide range of time periods and provides a straightforward and accurate means of process control.

    5. Quantification of Methane Source Locations and Emissions in AN Urban Setting

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Crosson, E.; Richardson, S.; Tan, S. M.; Whetstone, J.; Bova, T.; Prasad, K. R.; Davis, K. J.; Phillips, N. G.; Turnbull, J. C.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. L.

      2011-12-01

      The regulation of methane emissions from urban sources such as landfills and waste-water treatment facilities is currently a highly debated topic in the US and in Europe. This interest is fueled, in part, by recent measurements indicating that urban emissions are a significant source of Methane (CH4) and in fact may be substantially higher than current inventory estimates(1). As a result, developing methods for locating and quantifying emissions from urban methane sources is of great interest to industries such as landfill and wastewater treatment facility owners, watchdog groups, and the governmental agencies seeking to evaluate or enforce regulations. In an attempt to identify major methane source locations and emissions in Boston, Indianapolis, and the Bay Area, systematic measurements of CH4 concentrations and meteorology data were made at street level using a vehicle mounted cavity ringdown analyzer. A number of discrete sources were detected at concentration levels in excess of 15 times background levels. Using Gaussian plume models as well as tomographic techniques, methane source locations and emission rates will be presented. In addition, flux chamber measurements of discrete sources such as those found in natural gas leaks will also be presented. (1) Wunch, D., P.O. Wennberg, G.C. Toon, G. Keppel-Aleks, and Y.G. Yavin, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases from a North American Megacity, Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 36, L15810, doi:10.1029/2009GL)39825, 2009.

    6. Neptune's non-thermal radio emissions - Phenomenology and source locations

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Rabl, Gerald K. F.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, Helmut O.; Kaiser, Michael L.

      1992-01-01

      During the inbound and the outbound leg of Voyager 2's encounter with Neptune, the Planetary Radio Astronomy (PRA) experiment aboard the spacecraft detected short radio bursts at frequencies within the range of about 500-1300 kHz, and broad-banded smoothly varying emission patterns within the frequency range from about 40-800 kHz. Both emissions can be described in terms of a period of 16.1 hours determining Neptune's rotation period. Furthermore, just near closest approach, a narrow-banded smoothly varying radio component was observed occurring between 600 and 800 kHz. After giving a brief overview about some general characteristics of Neptune's nonthermal radio emission, the source locations of Neptune's emission components are determined, using an offset tilted dipole model for Neptune's magnetic field. Assuming that the emission originates near the electron gyrofrequency a geometrical beaming model is developed in order to fit the observed emission episodes.

    7. Particulate matter composition and emission rates from the disk incorporation of class B biosolids into soil

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Paez-Rubio, Tania; Xin, Hua; Anderson, James; Peccia, Jordan

      Biosolids contain metal, synthetic organic compound, endotoxin, and pathogen concentrations that are greater than concentrations in the agricultural soils to which they are applied. Once applied, biosolids are incorporated into soils by disking and the aerosols produced during this process may pose an airborne toxicological and infectious health hazard to biosolids workers and nearby residents. Field studies at a Central Arizona biosolids land application site were conducted to characterize the physical, chemical, and biological content of the aerosols produced during biosolids disking and the content of bulk biosolids and soils from which the aerosols emanate. Arrayed samplers were used to estimate the vertical source aerosol concentration profile to enable plume height and associated source emission rate calculations. Source aerosol concentrations and calculated emission rates reveal that disking is a substantial source of biosolids-derived aerosols. The biosolids emission rate during disking ranged from 9.91 to 27.25 mg s -1 and was greater than previously measured emission rates produced during the spreading of dewatered biosolids or the spraying of liquid biosolids. Adding biosolids to dry soils increased the moisture content and reduced the total PM 10 emissions produced during disking by at least three times. The combination of bulk biosolids and aerosol measurements along with PM 10 concentrations provides a framework for estimating aerosol concentrations and emission rates by reconstruction. This framework serves to eliminate the difficulty and inherent limitations associated with monitoring low aerosol concentrations of toxic compounds and pathogens, and can promote an increased understanding of the associated biosolids aerosol health risks to workers and nearby residents.

    8. Characterization of gaseous pollutant and particulate matter emission rates from a commercial broiler operation part II: Correlated emission rates

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Roumeliotis, Taylor S.; Dixon, Brad J.; Van Heyst, Bill J.

      2010-10-01

      Emission rates of ammonia, acid gases, inorganic aerosols, methane, and size fractionated particulate matter were measured from a commercial broiler facility. This paper discusses the statistically influential parameters on numerous pollutants' emission from a broiler chicken facility and generates emission correlations to fill data gaps and develop averaged emission factors. Live mass of the birds was commonly a significant variable to each pollutant's emission. Some variables significantly impacted the pollutants' emissions, such as litter moisture content, but were measured discretely and cannot be used for filling in data gaps. House parameter correlations were, therefore, developed using parameters measured at the facility, such as indoor temperature, relative humidity, and the live mass of the birds, and relied on the mutual behaviour of discretely measured explanatory parameters and continuously monitored confounding variables. The live mass and the difference in the indoor temperature and the house set-point temperature were the most significant variables in each pollutant's correlation. The correlations predicted each pollutants emission to within 20% (total mass basis) over most broiler production cycles. Their validation on independent datasets also successfully estimated the flocks' emissions to within 3%. Emission factors (EFs) were developed for methane, ammonia, and size fractionated particulate matter using measured data and correlated emissions to fill in data gaps. PM 10 (particulate matter ≤10 microns) EFs were estimated to be 4.6 and 5.9 g d -1 [Animal Unit, AU] -1 for five and six week production cycles, respectively. PM 2.5 (PM ≤ 2.5 microns) EFs were 0.8 and 1.4 g d -1 AU -1 for five and six week cycles, respectively. Ammonia and methane emission factors were estimated at 120.8 and 197.0 g d -1 AU -1, respectively for a five week production cycle.

    9. Rep-rate explosive whisker emission cathode investigations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Litz, Marc S.; Golden, Jeffry

      1994-05-01

      An experiment is underway to study the performance of several materials as field-emission cathodes for low voltage (rate. This provides a high average power (50 kW) test bed for the study. A comparison is made of cathodes fabricated from velvet, carbon, diamond coatings, niobium wire nanocomposite, and poly-crystalline tungsten. Surface emission is monitored by an array of Faraday cups. The `turn-on' time, uniformity of emission, and gap closure time are measured as a function of the spatially averaged, macroscopic electric field at the cathode. The carbon fiber cathode produces the largest current density and has the lowest threshold voltage for emission.

  1. Aircraft-Based Measurements of Point Source Methane Emissions in the Barnett Shale Basin.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Tegan N; Shepson, Paul B; Cambaliza, Maria O L; Stirm, Brian H; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Yacovitch, Tara I; Herndon, Scott C; Lan, Xin; Lyon, David

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of methane (CH4) emission rates observed at eight different high-emitting point sources in the Barnett Shale, Texas, using aircraft-based methods performed as part of the Barnett Coordinated Campaign. We quantified CH4 emission rates from four gas processing plants, one compressor station, and three landfills during five flights conducted in October 2013. Results are compared to other aircraft- and surface-based measurements of the same facilities, and to estimates based on a national study of gathering and processing facilities emissions and 2013 annual average emissions reported to the U.S. EPA Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP). For the eight sources, CH4 emission measurements from the aircraft-based mass balance approach were a factor of 3.2-5.8 greater than the GHGRP-based estimates. Summed emissions totaled 7022 ± 2000 kg hr(-1), roughly 9% of the entire basin-wide CH4 emissions estimated from regional mass balance flights during the campaign. Emission measurements from five natural gas management facilities were 1.2-4.6 times larger than emissions based on the national study. Results from this study were used to represent "super-emitters" in a newly formulated Barnett Shale Inventory, demonstrating the importance of targeted sampling of "super-emitters" that may be missed by random sampling of a subset of the total. PMID:26148549

  2. Dilepton and photon emission rates from a hadronic gas. II

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, J.V.; Yamagishi, H.; Zahed, I.

    1997-11-01

    We extend our recent analysis of the dilepton and photon emission rates to the case of finite temperature and baryon density, within the context of a density expansion. To leading order, the effects of the baryon density are assessed using data (photon emission) or constraints from broken chiral symmetry (dilepton emission). Next-to-leading-order effects are worked out, and their contribution qualitatively assessed. The opening of the {pi}N cut causes the photon rate to saturate the upper limits for the photon yield from WA80 for a nucleon density that just reaches the lower limits of the low mass dileptons seen at CERES. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Large spontaneous emission rate enhancement in grating coupled hyperbolic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sreekanth, Kandammathe Valiyaveedu; Krishna, Koduru Hari; De Luca, Antonio; Strangi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM), a sub-wavelength periodic artificial structure with hyperbolic dispersion, can enhance the spontaneous emission of quantum emitters. Here, we demonstrate the large spontaneous emission rate enhancement of an organic dye placed in a grating coupled hyperbolic metamaterial (GCHMM). A two-dimensional (2D) silver diffraction grating coupled with an Ag/Al2O3 HMM shows 18-fold spontaneous emission decay rate enhancement of dye molecules with respect to the same HMM without grating. The experimental results are compared with analytical models and numerical simulations, which confirm that the observed enhancement of GCHMM is due to the outcoupling of non-radiative plasmonic modes as well as strong plasmon-exciton coupling in HMM via diffracting grating. PMID:25209102

  4. Pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma source for emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2004-05-11

    A low-power, plasma source-based, portable molecular light emission generator/detector employing an atmospheric pressure pulsed-plasma for molecular fragmentation and excitation is described. The average power required for the operation of the plasma is between 0.02 W and 5 W. The features of the optical emission spectra obtained with the pulsed plasma source are significantly different from those obtained with direct current (dc) discharge higher power; for example, strong CH emission at 431.2 nm which is only weakly observed with dc plasma sources was observed, and the intense CN emission observed at 383-388 nm using dc plasma sources was weak in most cases. Strong CN emission was only observed using the present apparatus when compounds containing nitrogen, such as aniline were employed as samples. The present apparatus detects dimethylsulfoxide at 200 ppb using helium as the plasma gas by observing the emission band of the CH radical. When coupled with a gas chromatograph for separating components present in a sample to be analyzed, the present invention provides an apparatus for detecting the arrival of a particular component in the sample at the end of the chromatographic column and the identity thereof.

  5. An inversion algorithm for determining area-source emissions from downwind concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Lehning, M; Shonnard, D R; Chang, D P; Bell, R L

    1994-10-01

    Measuring emissions from nonuniform area sources, such as waste repository sites, has been a difficult problem. A simple but reliable method is not available. An objective method of inverting downwind concentration measurements, utilizing an assumed form of atmospheric dispersion to reconstruct total emission rate and distribution, is described in this study. The Gaussian dispersion model is compared to a more realistic model based on K-theory and similarity expressions. A sensitivity analysis is presented indicating the atmospheric conditions under which a successful application of the method could be anticipated. Field releases of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) from a simulated area source in flat terrain were conducted to check the method, ability to reconstruct source distribution, and total emission rate. The sensitivity analysis and the field study confirm that a few ground-level concentration measurements and a simple determination of the atmospheric dispersion characteristics are sufficient, under neutral to stable conditions, to obtain the total emission rate accurately. Reconstruction of the spatial pattern of the source is possible by utilizing concentration information from samplers located on two separate ground-level receptor lines, if a shift in the wind direction occurs and if it can be assumed that the total emission rate is time invariant. A method of cross-checking the accuracy of the reconstruction, using a simultaneous tracer release, is presented. PMID:7812684

  6. EFFECT OF VENTILATION ON EMISSION RATES OF WOOD FINISHING MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results from EPA studies on the effect of ventilation (air changes per hour) and material loading on the emission rate for selected organics and total measured organics from three wood finishing materials (stain, polyurethane, and wax). The data are analyzed to sh...

  7. Control for NOx Emissions from Combustion Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PozodeFernandez, Maria E.; Collins, Michelle M.

    2000-01-01

    The Environmental Program Office at the Kennedy Space Center is interested in finding solutions and to promote research and development (R&D) that could contribute to solve the problems of air, soil, and groundwater contamination. This study is undertaken as part of NASA's environmental stewardship program. The objective of this study involves the removal of nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of the boilers at KSC using hydrogen peroxide. Phase 1 of this study have shown the potential of this process to be used as an alternative to the current methods of treatment used in the power industry. This report summarizes the research done during the ten-week summer program. During this period, support has been given to implement the modifications suggested for Phase 2 of the project, which focus on oxidation reactions carried at lower temperatures using an ultraviolet source. The redesign and assembly of the modifications for the scrubbing system was the main objective of this research.

  8. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide, trace gases and metals from Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyle, Philip R.; Meeker, Kimberley; Finnegan, David

    1990-11-01

    SO2 emission rates have been measured annually since 1983 at Mount Erebus, Antarctica by correlation spectrometer (COSPEC V). Following a 4 month period of sustained strombolian activity in late 1984, SO2 emissions declined from 230 Mg/day in 1983 to 25 Mg/day and then slowly increased from 16 Mg/day in 1985 to 51 Mg/day in 1987. Nine sets of filter packs containing particle and (Li-7)OH treated filters were collected in the plume in 1986 and analyzed by neutron activation. Using the COSPEC data and measured element/S ratios on the filters, emission rates have been determined for trace gases and metals. HCl and HF emissions in 1983 are inferred to be about 1200 and 500 Mg/day, respectively. Mt. Erebus has therefore been an important source of halogens to the Antarctic atmosphere and could be responsible for excess Cl found in central Antarctica snow.

  9. Acidifier application rate impacts on ammonia emissions from US roaster chicken houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Sanjay B.; Grimes, Jesse L.; Oviedo-Rondón, Edgar O.; Westerman, Philip W.

    2014-08-01

    Due to its potential environmental and public health impacts, emissions of ammonia (NH3) as well as several other gases from US livestock farms may be regulated. Broiler houses are important sources of NH3 emissions. However, there are no emissions data from roaster (8-12 wk old broilers, ˜4 kg ea.) houses. Producers treat the litter in broiler houses with acidifiers, such as sodium bisulfate (SBS, NaHSO4) to reduce ammonia production and protect bird health. However, there is very little data on the effect of acidifiers, particularly at high application rates on ammonia emissions. The impact of different SBS application rates [High (0.95-1.46 kg m-2, whole house), Medium (0.73 kg m-2, whole house), Low (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, whole house), and Control (0.37-0.49 kg m-2, brood chamber)] on ammonia emissions was evaluated in commercial roaster houses over 22 months spanning eight flocks. Ammonia emission from each fan was measured with an acid scrubber that operated only when the fan operated. Emissions were calculated using >95% measured data with the rest being estimated using robust methods. Exhaust ammonia-N concentrations were inversely correlated with the SBS application rates. Emission rates on animal unit (AU, where 1 AU = 500 kg live-mass) basis (ER, g d-1 AU-1) were reduced by 27, 13, and 5%, respectively, in the High, Medium, and Low treatments vs. the Control treatment (mean: 100 g d-1 AU-1, range: 86-114 g d-1 AU-1). Emission rates for the Control treatment measured in this study on roasters were mostly higher than ERs in the literature. Differences in ERs are not only due to diet, environmental and management conditions, but also due to measurement methods.

  10. Weak Line Quasars at High Redshift: Extremely High Accretion Rate Sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemmer, Ohad

    2011-10-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has recently discovered a remarkable group of ~80 quasars at z=2.2-5.9 with extremely weak emission lines in their rest-frame UV spectra. We propose to extend our XMM-Newton observations of such sources and obtain imaging spectroscopy of four quasars of this class with a total exposure time of 165 ks, providing ~1000 photons per source. This will enable an accurate measurement of the hard-X-ray photon index required for a robust determination of the accretion rate in each source. Steep spectral slopes will indicate that high accretion rates may be responsible for the intrinsic weakness of the UV emission lines. The proposed observations will lead to new insights about the accretion process and broad emission line formation in all active galactic nuclei.

  11. Weak Line Quasars at High Redshift: Extremely High Accretion Rate Sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemmer, Ohad

    2010-10-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has recently discovered a remarkable group of ~80 quasars at z=2.2-5.9 with extremely weak emission lines in their rest-frame UV spectra. We propose to extend our XMM-Newton observations of such sources and obtain imaging spectroscopy of four quasars of this class with a total exposure time of 165 ks, providing ~1000 photons per source. This will enable an accurate measurement of the hard-X-ray photon index required for a robust determination of the accretion rate in each source. Steep spectral slopes will indicate that high accretion rates may be responsible for the intrinsic weakness of the UV emission lines. The proposed observations will lead to new insights about the accretion process and broad emission line formation in all active galactic nuclei.

  12. Weak Line Quasars at High Redshift: Extremely High Accretion Rate Sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shemmer, Ohad

    2013-10-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has discovered a remarkable group of ~100 quasars with extremely weak emission lines in their rest-frame optical-UV spectra. We propose to extend our XMM-Newton observations of such sources and obtain imaging spectroscopy of six quasars of this class with a total exposure time of 128 ks, providing ~1000 photons per source. This will enable an accurate measurement of the hard-X-ray photon index required for a robust determination of the accretion rate in each source. Steep spectral slopes will indicate that high accretion rates may be responsible for the intrinsic weakness of the optical-UV emission lines. The proposed observations will lead to new insights about the accretion process and broad emission line formation in all active galactic nuclei.

  13. Halocarbon emissions and sources in the equatorial Atlantic Cold Tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepach, H.; Quack, B.; Raimund, S.; Fischer, T.; Atlas, E. L.; Bracher, A.

    2015-11-01

    Halocarbons from oceanic sources contribute to halogens in the troposphere, and can be transported into the stratosphere where they take part in ozone depletion. This paper presents distribution and sources in the equatorial Atlantic from June and July 2011 of the four compounds bromoform (CHBr3), dibromomethane (CH2Br2), methyl iodide (CH3I) and diiodomethane (CH2I2). Enhanced biological production during the Atlantic Cold Tongue (ACT) season, indicated by phytoplankton pigment concentrations, led to elevated concentrations of CHBr3 of up to 44.7 and up to 9.2 pmol L-1 for CH2Br2 in surface water, which is comparable to other tropical upwelling systems. While both compounds correlated very well with each other in the surface water, CH2Br2 was often more elevated in greater depth than CHBr3, which showed maxima in the vicinity of the deep chlorophyll maximum. The deeper maximum of CH2Br2 indicates an additional source in comparison to CHBr3 or a slower degradation of CH2Br2. Concentrations of CH3I of up to 12.8 pmol L-1 in the surface water were measured. In contrary to expectations of a predominantly photochemical source in the tropical ocean, its distribution was mostly in agreement with biological parameters, indicating a biological source. CH2I2 was very low in the near surface water with maximum concentrations of only 3.7 pmol L-1. CH2I2 showed distinct maxima in deeper waters similar to CH2Br2. For the first time, diapycnal fluxes of the four halocarbons from the upper thermocline into and out of the mixed layer were determined. These fluxes were low in comparison to the halocarbon sea-to-air fluxes. This indicates that despite the observed maximum concentrations at depth, production in the surface mixed layer is the main oceanic source for all four compounds and one of the main driving factors of their emissions into the atmosphere in the ACT-region. The calculated production rates of the compounds in the mixed layer are 34 ± 65 pmol m-3 h-1 for CHBr3, 10

  14. Halocarbon emissions and sources in the equatorial Atlantic Cold Tongue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepach, H.; Quack, B.; Raimund, S.; Fischer, T.; Atlas, E. L.; Bracher, A.

    2015-04-01

    Halocarbons from oceanic sources contribute to halogens in the troposphere, and can be transported into the stratosphere where they take part in ozone depletion. This paper presents distribution and sources in the equatorial Atlantic from June and July 2011 of the four compounds bromoform (CHBr3), dibromomethane (CH2Br2), methyl iodide (CH3I) and diiodomethane (CH2I2). Enhanced biological production during the Atlantic Cold Tongue (ACT) season, indicated by phytoplankton pigment concentrations, led to elevated concentrations of CHBr3 of up to 44.7 pmol L-1 and up to 9.2 pmol L-1 for CH2Br2 in surface water, which is comparable to other tropical upwelling systems. While both compounds correlated very well with each other in the surface water,CH2Br2 was often more elevated in greater depth than CHBr3, which showed maxima in the vicinity of the deep chlorophyll maximum. The deeper maximum of CH2Br2 indicates an additional source in comparison to CHBr3 or a slower degradation of CH2Br2. Concentrations of CH3I of up to 12.8 pmol L-1 in the surface water were measured. In contrary to expectations of a predominantly photochemical source in the tropical ocean, its distribution was mostly in agreement with biological parameters, indicating a~biological source. CH2I2 was very low in the near surface water with maximum concentrations of only 3.7 pmol L-1, and the observed anticorrelation with global radiation was likely due to its strong photolysis. CH2I2 showed distinct maxima in deeper waters similar to CH2Br2. For the first time, diapycnal fluxes of the four halocarbons from the upper thermocline into and out of the mixed layer were determined. These fluxes were low in comparison to the halocarbon sea-to-air fluxes. This indicates that despite the observed maximum concentrations at depth, production in the surface mixed layer is the main oceanic source for all four compounds and has an influence on emissions into the atmosphere. The calculated production rates of the

  15. Dilepton and photon emission rates from a hadronic gas. III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.; Zahed, I.; Yamagishi, H.

    1998-11-01

    We extend our early analyses of the dilepton and photon emission rates from a hadronic gas to account for strange mesons using a density expansion. The emission rates are reduced to vacuum correlation functions using three-flavor chiral reduction formulas, and the latter are assessed in terms of empirical data. Using a fire- ball, we compare our results to the low and intermediate mass dilepton data available from CERN. Our results suggest that a baryon free hadronic gas does not account for the excess of low mass dielectrons observed at CERES but does well in accounting for the intermediate dimuons at HELIOS. The same observations apply to the recent low and high p{sub t} dielectron rates from CERES. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Acoustic emission strand burning technique for motor burning rate prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, W. N.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) method is being used to measure the burning rate of solid propellant strands. This method has a precision of 0.5% and excellent burning rate correlation with both subscale and large rocket motors. The AE procedure burns the sample under water and measures the burning rate from the acoustic output. The acoustic signal provides a continuous readout during testing, which allows complete data analysis rather than the start-stop clockwires used by the conventional method. The AE method helps eliminate such problems as inhibiting the sample, pressure increase and temperature rise, during testing.

  17. Atmospheric emissions of mercury from Australian point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter F.

    The UN Global Mercury Assessment (GMA) estimates that atmospheric emissions of mercury from Australian stationary combustion sources were 97.0 tonnes for the year of 1995. This is more than 90% of the estimated emissions from stationary combustion for the whole of North America, and seems abnormally high for a country with a population of around 20 million, in spite of the fact that most of Australia's stationary energy supply is provided by coal. It is also significantly larger than previous estimates of mercury emissions from Australian sources. New estimates of Australian mercury emissions from stationary energy sources, based on both a top down and bottom up approach, are presented. These estimates can be reconciled for black coal fired power stations, but suggest that the bottom up approach (the Australian National Pollutant Inventory) significantly under-estimates emissions from brown coal fired plant, if mercury capture efficiencies in these plants are low, as observed for lignite-fired plant. The major uncertainties in these estimates are the coal mercury content in coals burnt in Australian power stations, and the mercury capture efficiency in particulate control devices used at these stations. Based on these estimates, Australian emissions of mercury from stationary energy are currently 2-8 tonnes/year, significantly lower than the GMA estimate.

  18. Footprint methods to separate N2O emission rates from adjacent paddock areas.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sandipan; McMillan, Andrew M S; Sturman, Andrew P; Harvey, Mike J; Laubach, Johannes

    2015-03-01

    Using micrometeorological techniques to measure greenhouse gas emissions from differently treated adjacent plots is a promising avenue to verify the effect of mitigation strategies at the field scale. In pursuing such an approach, it is crucial to accurately characterize the source area of the fluxes measured at each sampling point. Hence, a comprehensive footprint analysis method is required so that emission rates can be obtained for a specific field within a biochemically heterogeneous area. In this study, a footprint analysis method is developed to estimate the emission for an experiment where the flux of N2O is measured from several control and treated plots. The emission rate of an individual plot is estimated using an inverse footprint fraction approach where the footprint fractions are obtained from an analytical footprint model. A numerical solution for obtaining the background flux for such a multiplot measurement system is also provided. Results of the footprint analysis method are assessed, first, by comparing footprint fractions obtained from both an analytical footprint model and a "forward" simulation of a backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) model; and second, by comparing the emission rates of a control plot obtained from the footprint analysis method and from the "backward" simulation of the bLs model. It is found that the analytical footprint fractions compare well with the values obtained from the bLs model (correlation coefficient of 0.58 and 0.66 within p value <0.001). An average of 4.3 % of the measured fluxes is found to be contributed by sources outside the measured area and, excluding this outside area contribution to the measured flux, footprint corrected emission rates within the defined domain are found to increase by 2.1 to 5.8 % of the measured flux. Also, the proposed method of emission rate estimation is found to work well under a wide range of atmospheric stability. PMID:24899395

  19. Determination of Summertime VOC Emission Rates from Produced Water Ponds in the Uintah Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. S.; Woods, C.; Lyman, S.

    2013-12-01

    The observance of excess ozone concentrations in Utah's Uintah Basin over past several years has prompted several investigations into the extent and causes of the elevated ozone. Among these is the assessment of potential emissions of reactive VOCs. Evaporation ponds, used a remediation technique for treatment of contaminated production and other waters, are one potential source of significant VOC emissions and is estimated that there are around 160 such ponds within the Uintah Basin's oil and gas production areas. In June 2012 VOC emission rates for several reactive VOCs were derived for an evaporation facility consisting of a small inlet pond (≈0.03 acres) and two larger, serial ponds (≈4.3 acres each). The emission rates were determined over three sampling periods using an inverse modeling approach. Under this methodology, ambient VOC concentrations are determined at several downwind locations through whole-air collection into SUMMA canisters, followed by GC/MS quantification and compared with predicted concentrations using an EPA-approved dispersion model, AERMOD. The presumed emission rates used within the model were then adjusted until the modeled concentrations approach the observed concentrations. The derived emission rates for the individual VOCs were on the order of 10-3 g/s/m2 from the inlet pond and 10-6 g/s/m2 from the larger ponds. The emissions from the 1st pond in series after the inlet pond were about 3-4x the emissions from the 2nd pond. These combined emission rates are about an order of magnitude those reported for a single study in Colorado (Thoma, 2009). It should be noted, however, that the variability about each of the VOC emission rates was significant (often ×100% at the 95% confidence interval). Extrapolating these emission rates to the estimated total areas of all the evaporation ponds within Basin resulted in calculated Basin-wide VOC emissions 292,835 tons/yr. However, Bar-Ilan et al. (2009) estimated 2012 VOC oil and gas related

  20. A measurement system for alpha and beta surface emission rate using MWPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ye; Fang, Fang; Ren, Jia-Fu; He, Lin-Feng; Tang, Fang-Dong; Xu, Yi-He; Ding, Wei-Cheng

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a large area multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) as a standard for the measurement of alpha and beta surface emission rate at the Shanghai Institute of Measurement and Testing Technology (SIMT). To shorten the preparation time for chamber gas refilling, a self-designed gas control unit was adopted. Various characteristics of the system have been studied. The uncertainties were analysed. Three certified alpha plane sources (Am-241) and six certified beta plane sources (Tl-204 and Sr-90/Y-90) were measured by this system. The results show excellent agreement with the surface emission rate reported by the National Institute of Measuring, China (NIM) that En values of all measured sources are within ±1. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (41204133)

  1. 2-.mu.m fiber amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Shibin (Inventor); Wu, Jianfeng (Inventor); Geng, Jihong (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A 2-.mu.m fiber Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) source provides a wide emission bandwidth and improved spectral stability/purity for a given output power. The fiber ASE source is formed from a heavy metal oxide multicomponent glass selected from germanate, tellurite and bismuth oxides and doped with high concentrations, 0.5-15 wt. %, thulium oxides (Tm.sub.2O.sub.3) or 0.1-5 wt% holmium oxides (Ho.sub.2O.sub.3) or mixtures thereof. The high concentration of thulium dopants provide highly efficient pump absorption and high quantum efficiency. Co-doping of Tm and Ho can broaden the ASE spectrum.

  2. Industrial source identification and emission estimation of perfluorooctane sulfonate in China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shuangwei; Wang, Tieyu; Liu, Shijie; Jones, Kevin C; Sweetman, Andrew J; Lu, Yonglong

    2013-02-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and related chemicals (collectively "PFOS equivalents") are currently manufactured and used in a wide variety of industrial processes in China. Since 2003, the national annual production has increased dramatically to accommodate both domestic demands and ongoing overseas needs for metal plating, fire-fighting foams, photographic, semiconductor and aviation industries. Accordingly, PFOS-related industries are significant sources of PFOS to the environment in China, though little information is available. In the present study, industrial sources of PFOS in China were identified and emissions from major related industries, including PFOS manufacture, textile treatment, metal plating, fire-fighting and semiconductor industries, were evaluated. Contribution by various industrial sources and spatial distribution of the PFOS emission were discussed. It was estimated that the total emission of PFOS equivalents in China was 70t in 2010. Industrial use of PFOS in metal plating was identified as the largest source of PFOS pollution at the national level, followed by textile treatment, fire-fighting, PFOS manufacture and semiconductor industry. At the regional level, greater contributions were made by metal plating and textile treatment in most provinces of eastern China, while in the western part of China and several northeastern provinces fire-fighting was the predominant source. The contribution by PFOS manufacture was considerable in Hubei and Fujian provinces. Total emission, emission density and emission intensity showed geographical variations. In general, the eastern coastal provinces, as the most intensively industrialized regions of China, were characterized by significantly higher emission rates, emission density and emission intensity than those in western and northern China. Available monitoring data of PFOS concentrations in surface water of China reflected a similar distribution pattern, confirming that manufacture and industrial

  3. Acidic and total primary sulfates: development of emission factors for major stationary combustion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Goklany, I.M.; Hoffnagle, G.F.; Brackbill, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    ''Best estimates'' of emission factors for major sources of acidic and total primary sulfates are developed for use in the compilation of emission inventories for the eastern U.S. These may, in turn, be used for modeling of acidic or sulfate deposition. The factors are based upon a critical evaluation of the generic measurement methods used to quantify total and acidic primary sulfate emissions, and an exhaustive review and critique of individual papers and studies available in the open literature which present measurement data on primary sulfate emissions. It develops a qualitative rating scheme which specifies the level of confidence that should be attached to the emission factor determinations. The paper concludes that much of the existing data on primary sulfates from stationary combustion sources are, probably, significantly biased upward and, therefore, inappropriate for the derivation of emission factors. Therefore, existing estimates of primary sulfate emissions for these source categories are, probably, substanitally inflated. It also concludes that, for most source categories, very little confidence can be attached to the best estimates because of the paucity of data obtained from measurement techniques which are likely to be free of systematic bias. 68 references.

  4. CO2 EMISSIONS FROM BIOENERGY AND OTHER BIOGENIC SOURCES IN STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    On January 12, 2011, EPA announced a series of steps to address the treatment of biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with accounting for biogenic carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sour...

  5. Plasmonic nanogaps for broadband and large spontaneous emission rate enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Anthony P.; Adawi, Ali M.

    2014-02-07

    We present the optical properties of a plasmonic nanogap formed between a silver metallic nanoparticle and an extended silver film that shows a strong enhancement in the spontaneous emission rate over the whole visible range. In particular, we use three-dimensional finite difference time domain calculations to study the spontaneous emission rate and the quantum efficiency of an emitting material placed within the gap region as a function of the geometrical parameters of the plasmonic nanogap. Our calculations reveal that the enhancements in the total decay rate can be divided into two regions as a function of wavelength; region I spans the wavelength range from 350 nm to 500 nm and peaks at approximately at 400 nm. Region II covers the spectral range between 500 nm and 1000 nm. The enhancements in total decay rate in region I are mainly dominated by Ohmic losses by the metal, while the enhancements in total decay rate in region II are mainly dominated by radiative decay rate enhancements. Furthermore, our calculations show over 100 times enhancement in the spontaneous emission rate in region II. We combine this with quantum efficiency enhancements of almost 30 times from materials with low intrinsic quantum efficiencies and only a small reduction in efficiency from those with high intrinsic quantum efficiencies. All results appear easily achievable using realistic geometrical parameters and simple synthesis techniques. These results are attributed to the strong field confinements in the nanogap region. The structures are of high interest for both the fundamental understanding of light mater interactions under extreme electromagnetic field confinements and also potential applications in quantum optics and Raman spectroscopy.

  6. The sources of Uranus' dominant nightside radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Curtis, S. A.

    1987-01-01

    The broad-bandwidth radio emission detected by Voyager 2 over the nightside of Uranus is examined. It is concluded that the source location of the smooth component is consistent with emission originating near the electron gyrofrequency from a small set of field lines whose foot points lie near the Uranomagnetic southern (dark) pole. The source centroid is at L = 11.5, and extends in latitude between about L = 8 and L = 25. This deduced source region is primarily on closed field lines that pass through the outer radiation belt and have their opposite foot points near the Uranomagnetic northern pole (near the present epoch terminator). The source location of the bursty component is less well defined but is consistent with the set of open field lines which map down to the region surrounding the planet's south magnetic dipole tip.

  7. Modeling Atmospheric Emissions and Calculating Mortality Rates Associated with High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Alyssa

    Emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are a growing pollution concern throughout the global community, as they have been linked to numerous health issues. The freight transportation sector is a large source of these emissions and is expected to continue growing as globalization persists. Within the US, the expanding development of the natural gas industry is helping to support many industries and leading to increased transportation. The process of High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing (HVHF) is one of the newer advanced extraction techniques that is increasing natural gas and oil reserves dramatically within the US, however the technique is very resource intensive. HVHF requires large volumes of water and sand per well, which is primarily transported by trucks in rural areas. Trucks are also used to transport waste away from HVHF well sites. This study focused on the emissions generated from the transportation of HVHF materials to remote well sites, dispersion, and subsequent health impacts. The Geospatial Intermodal Freight Transport (GIFT) model was used in this analysis within ArcGIS to identify roadways with high volume traffic and emissions. High traffic road segments were used as emissions sources to determine the atmospheric dispersion of particulate matter using AERMOD, an EPA model that calculates geographic dispersion and concentrations of pollutants. Output from AERMOD was overlaid with census data to determine which communities may be impacted by increased emissions from HVHF transport. The anticipated number of mortalities within the impacted communities was calculated, and mortality rates from these additional emissions were computed to be 1 in 10 million people for a simulated truck fleet meeting stricter 2007 emission standards, representing a best case scenario. Mortality rates due to increased truck emissions from average, in-use vehicles, which represent a mixed age truck fleet, are expected to be higher (1 death per 341,000 people annually).

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A SOURCE PM10 SAMPLING TRAIN USING EMISSION GAS RECYCLE (EGR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurement of accurate particulate emission factors in ducted sources with particle size segregation involves a compromise between two conflicting requirements. In order to avoid anisokinetic sampling bias over a duct traverse, the flow rate of gas entering the sampling nozzle m...

  9. METHOD 25 - DETERMINATION OF TOTAL GASEOUS NON-METHANE ORGANIC EMISSIONS AS CARBON FROM STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Section 3.17 describes the procedures and specifications for determining volatile organic compounds as total gaseous non-methane organics from stationary sources. n emission sample is withdrawn from the stack at a constant rate through a heated filter and a chilled condensate tra...

  10. Tillage and Inorganic Nitrogen Source Effects on Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Irrigated Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were monitored from irrigated corn production systems receiving different N sources at fertilizer rates of 246 kg N ha-1 when in corn (Zea mays L.), 56 kg N ha-1 when in dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and 157 kg N ha-1 when in barley (Hordeum distichon L.). Croppin...

  11. Tillage and Nitrogen Source Effects on Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Irrigated Cropping Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrous oxide emissions were monitored from irrigated corn production systems receiving different N sources at fertilizer rates of 246 kg N ha-1 when in corn (Zea mays L.), 56 kg N ha-1 when in dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and 157 kg N ha-1 when in barley (Hordeum distichon L.). Cropping syst...

  12. EMISSIONS ASSESSMENT OF CONVENTIONAL STATIONARY SYSTEMS: VOLUME III. EXTERNAL COMBUSTION SOURCES FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report characterizes multimedia emissions from external combustion sources for electricity generation. Study results indicate that external combustion sources for electricity generation contribute significantly to the nationwide emissions burden. Flue gas emissions of NOx, SO...

  13. Mapping methane emission sources over California based on airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, T.; Guha, A.; Peischl, J.; Misztal, P. K.; Jonsson, H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2011-12-01

    The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (AB 32) has created a need to accurately characterize the emission sources of various greenhouse gases (GHGs) and verify the existing state GHG inventory. Methane (CH4) is a major GHG with a global warming potential of 20 times that of CO2 and currently constitutes about 6% of the total statewide GHG emissions on a CO2 equivalent basis. Some of the major methane sources in the state are area sources where methane is biologically produced (e.g. dairies, landfills and waste treatment plants) making bottom-up estimation of emissions a complex process. Other potential sources include fugitive emissions from oil extraction processes and natural gas distribution network, emissions from which are not well-quantified. The lack of adequate field measurement data to verify the inventory and provide independently generated estimates further contributes to the overall uncertainty in the CH4 inventory. In order to gain a better perspective of spatial distribution of major CH4 sources in California, a real-time measurement instrument based on Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) was installed in a Twin Otter aircraft for the CABERNET (California Airborne BVOC Emissions Research in Natural Ecosystems Transects) campaign, where the driving research goal was to understand the spatial distribution of biogenic VOC emissions. The campaign took place in June 2011 and encompassed over forty hours of airborne CH4 and CO2 measurements during eight unique flights which covered much of the Central Valley and its eastern edge, the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta and the coastal range. The coincident VOC measurements, obtained through a high frequency proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTRMS), aid in CH4 source identification. High mixing ratios of CH4 (> 2000 ppb) are observed consistently in all the flight transects above the Central Valley. These high levels of CH4 are accompanied by high levels of methanol which is an important

  14. 40 CFR 62.08 - Emission inventories and source surveillance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission inventories and source surveillance. 62.08 Section 62.08 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS General Provisions § 62.08...

  15. 40 CFR 60.25 - Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... electronic documents shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 3—(Electronic reporting). (2) Periodic... surveillance, reports. 60.25 Section 60.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... State Plans for Designated Facilities § 60.25 Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports....

  16. 40 CFR 60.25 - Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... electronic documents shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 3—(Electronic reporting). (2) Periodic... surveillance, reports. 60.25 Section 60.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... State Plans for Designated Facilities § 60.25 Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports....

  17. 40 CFR 60.25 - Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... electronic documents shall comply with the requirements of 40 CFR part 3—(Electronic reporting). (2) Periodic... surveillance, reports. 60.25 Section 60.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... State Plans for Designated Facilities § 60.25 Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports....

  18. 40 CFR 62.4622 - Emission inventories, source surveillance, reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTANTS Louisiana Plan for Control of Designated Pollutants from Existing Facilities (section 111(d) Plan... limitations or other control measures that are part of the applicable plan. (2) Commencing after the initial... source is in compliance with applicable emission limitations or other control measures that are part...

  19. INVENTORY OF COMBUSTION-RELATED EMISSIONS FROM STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the first year of a study covering the combustion-related emissions inventory phase of a 3-year program entitled, 'Analysis of NOx Control in Stationary Sources.' The study is aimed at assisting in the establishment of priorities for detailed studies of techn...

  20. FEASIBILITY OF DEVELOPING SOURCE SAMPLING METHODS FOR ASBESTOS EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this program was to determine the feasibility of developing methods for sampling asbestos in the emissions of major asbestos sources: (1) ore production and taconite production, (2) asbestos-cement production, (3) asbestos felt and paper production, and (4) the p...

  1. SOURCE EMISSION TESTS AT THE BALTIMORE DEMONSTRATION PYROLYSIS FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRW was retained by EPA/IERL Cincinnati in May of 1976 to conduct source emission tests at a solid waste treatment plant in Baltimore, Maryland. The plant is designed to recover low-grade fossil fuel from non-toxic solid waste by the use of a process known as pyrolysis. When plan...

  2. Methane emission by goats consuming different sources of condensed tannins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-four yearling Boer x Spanish wethers (7/8 Boer; initial body weight [BW] of 37.5 plus/minus 0.91 kg) were used to assess effects of different condensed tannin (CT) sources on methane emission. Diets were Kobe lespedeza (Lespedeza striata; K), K plus quebracho providing CT at 5% of dry matter...

  3. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Nnnnnn... - HAP Emissions Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements of the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as shown in the following table. ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES... production a. Primary rotary roasting kiln used to produce chromic oxide. b. Chromic oxide filter. c....

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Nnnnnn... - HAP Emissions Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements of the General Provisions (40 CFR part 63, subpart A) as shown in the following table. ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES... production a. Primary rotary roasting kiln used to produce chromic oxide. b. Chromic oxide filter. c....

  5. SENSITIVITY OF RADM TO POINT SOURCE EMISSIONS PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) and associated Engineering Model have been developed to study episodic source-receptor relationships on a regional scale. he RADM includes transport, chemical transformation, and deposition processes as well as input of emissions into the...

  6. Source Attribution of Methane Emissions in Northeastern Colorado Using Ammonia to Methane Emission Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilerman, S. J.; Neuman, J. A.; Peischl, J.; Aikin, K. C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Perring, A. E.; Robinson, E. S.; Holloway, M.; Trainer, M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to recent advances in extraction technology, oil and natural gas extraction and processing in the Denver-Julesburg basin has increased substantially in the past decade. Northeastern Colorado is also home to over 250 concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), capable of hosting over 2 million head of ruminant livestock (cattle and sheep). Because of methane's high Global Warming Potential, quantification and attribution of methane emissions from oil and gas development and agricultural activity are important for guiding greenhouse gas emission policy. However, due to the co-location of these different sources, top-down measurements of methane are often unable to attribute emissions to a specific source or sector. In this work, we evaluate the ammonia:methane emission ratio directly downwind of CAFOs using a mobile laboratory. Several CAFOs were chosen for periodic study over a 12-month period to identify diurnal and seasonal variation in the emission ratio as well as differences due to livestock type. Using this knowledge of the agricultural ammonia:methane emission ratio, aircraft measurements of ammonia and methane over oil and gas basins in the western US during the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Nexus (SONGNEX) field campaign in March and April 2015 can be used for source attribution of methane emissions.

  7. On-road emission rates of PAH and n-alkane compounds from heavy-duty diesel vehicles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sandip D; Ogunyoku, Temitope A; Miller, J Wayne; Cocker, David R

    2005-07-15

    This paper presents the quantification of the emission rates of PAH and n-alkane compounds from on-road emissions testing of nine heavy-duty diesel (HDD) vehicles tested using CE-CERT's Mobile Emissions Laboratory (MEL) over the California Air Resources Board (ARB) Four Phase Cycle. Per mile and per CO2 emission rates of PAHs and n-alkanes were highest for operation simulating congested traffic (Creep) and lowest for cruising conditions (Cruise). Significant differences were seen in emission rates over the different phases of the cycle. Creep phase fleet average emission rates (mg mi(-1)) of PAHs and n-alkanes were approximately an order of magnitude higher than Cruise phase. This finding indicates that models must account for mode of operation when performing emissions inventory estimates. Failure to account for mode of operation can potentially lead to significant over- and underpredictions of emissions inventories (up to 20 times), especially in small geographic regions with significant amounts of HDD congestion. Howeverthe PAH and n-alkane source profiles remained relatively constant for the different modes of operation. Variability of source profiles within the vehicle fleet exceeded the variability due to different operating modes. Analysis of the relative risk associated with the compounds indicated the importance of naphthalene as a significant contributor to the risk associated with diesel exhaust. This high relative risk is driven by the magnitude of the emission rate of naphthalene in comparison to other compounds. PMID:16082957

  8. Refining emission rate estimates using a coupled receptor-dispersion modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvaraju, N.; Pushpavanam, S.

    2010-10-01

    Receptor modeling techniques like chemical mass balance are used to attribute pollution levels at a point to different sources. Here we analyze the composition of particulate matter and use the source profiles of sources prevalent in a region to estimate quantitative source contributions. In dispersion modeling on the other hand the emission rates of various sources together with meteorological conditions are used to determine the concentrations levels at a point or in a region. The predictions using these two approaches are often inconsistent. In this work these differences are attributed to errors in emission inventory. Here an algorithm for coupling receptor and dispersion models is proposed to reduce the differences of the two predictions and determine the emission rates accurately. The proposed combined approach helps reconcile the differences arising when the two approaches are used in a stand-alone mode. This work is based on assuming that the models are perfect and uses a model-to-model comparison to illustrate the concept.

  9. A simple method for screening emission sources of carbonyl compounds in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shohei; Kume, Kazunari; Horiike, Toshiyuki; Honma, Nobuyuki; Fusaya, Masahiro; Ohura, Takeshi; Amagai, Takashi

    2010-06-15

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from building and furnishing materials are frequently observed in high concentrations in indoor air. Nondestructive analytical methods that determine the main parameters influencing concentration of the chemical substances are necessary to screen for sources of VOC emissions. Toward this goal, we have developed a new flux sampler, referred to herein as an emission cell for simultaneous multi-sampling (ECSMS), that is used for screening indoor emission sources of VOCs and for determining the emission rates of these sources. Because the ECSMS is based on passive sampling, it can be easily used on-site at a low cost. Among VOCs, low-molecular-weight carbonyl compounds including formaldehyde are frequently detected at high concentrations in indoor environments. In this study, we determined the reliability of the ECSMS for the collection of formaldehyde and other carbonyl compounds emitted from wood-based composites of medium density fiberboards and particleboards. We then used emission rates determined by the ECSMS to predict airborne concentrations of formaldehyde emitted from a bookshelf in a large chamber, and these data were compared to formaldehyde concentrations that were acquired simultaneously by means of an active sampling method. The values obtained from the two methods were quite similar, suggesting that ECSMS measurement is an effective method for screening primary sources influencing indoor concentrations of formaldehyde. PMID:20149530

  10. Source characteristics of Jovian narrow-band kilometric radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Manning, R.; Zarka, P.; Pedersen, B.-M.

    1993-07-01

    New observations of Jovian narrow-band kilometric (nKOM) radio emissions were made by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft during the Ulysses-Jupiter encounter in early February 1992. These observations have demonstrated the unique capability of the URAP instrument for determining both the direction and polarization of nKOM radio sources. An important result is the discovery that nKOM radio emission originates from a number of distinct sources located at different Jovian longitudes and at the inner and outermost regions of the Io plasma torus. These sources have been tracked for several Jovian rotations, yielding their corotational lags, their spatial and temporal evolution, and their radiation characteristics at both low latitudes far from Jupiter and at high latitudes near the planet. Both right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized nKOM sources were observed. The polarizations observed for sources in the outermost regions of the torus seem to favor extraordinary mode emission.

  11. Airborne reduced nitrogen: ammonia emissions from agriculture and other sources.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Natalie; Strader, Ross; Davidson, Cliff

    2003-06-01

    Ammonia is a basic gas and one of the most abundant nitrogen-containing compounds in the atmosphere. When emitted, ammonia reacts with oxides of nitrogen and sulfur to form particles, typically in the fine particle size range. Roughly half of the PM(2.5) mass in eastern United States is ammonium sulfate, according to the US EPA. Results from recent studies of PM(2.5) show that these fine particles are typically deposited deep in the lungs and may lead to increased morbidity and/or mortality. Also, these particles are in the size range that will degrade visibility. Ammonia emission inventories are usually constructed by multiplying an activity level by an experimentally determined emission factor for each source category. Typical sources of ammonia include livestock, fertilizer, soils, forest fires and slash burning, industry, vehicles, the oceans, humans, pets, wild animals, and waste disposal and recycling activities. Livestock is the largest source category in the United States, with waste from livestock responsible for about 3x10(9) kg of ammonia in 1995. Volatilization of ammonia from livestock waste is dependent on many parameters, and thus emission factors are difficult to predict. Despite a seasonal variation in these values, the emission factors for general livestock categories are usually annually averaged in current inventories. Activity levels for livestock are from the USDA Census of Agriculture, which does not give information about animal raising practices such as housing types and grazing times, waste handling systems, and approximate animal slurry spreading times or methods. Ammonia emissions in the United States in 1995 from sources other than livestock are much lower; for example, annual emissions are roughly 8x10(8) kg from fertilizer, 7x10(7) kg from industry, 5x10(7) kg from vehicles and 1x10(8) kg from humans. There is considerable uncertainty in the emissions from soil and vegetation, although this category may also be significant

  12. EPA's mobile monitoring of source emissions and near-source impact

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time ambient monitoring onboard a moving vehicle is a unique data collection approach applied to characterize large-area sources, such as major roadways, and detect fugitive emissions from distributed sources, such as leaking oil wells. EPA's Office of Research and Developme...

  13. Source dynamics of the microwave emission during a solar flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begum Shaik, Shaheda; Gary, Dale E.; Nita, Gelu M.

    2016-05-01

    Determining the microwave burst source characteristics is important to understand the parameters of the flare process which produce the microwave emission. Previous studies show that the microwave solar bursts do typically exhibit a single source of emission but also often show inhomogeneous sources as a function of frequency at some periods during the burst. This study focuses on the spectral and spatial dynamics of the microwave gyrosynchrotron source through the microwave spectral and imaging analysis. We report the source characteristics of few impulsive flare events observed by the newly upgraded Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA) in the frequency range of 2.5 to 18 GHz and from the complimentary data of (Nobeyama Radioheliograph / Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters) NoRH / NoRP. The low frequency optically thick part of the microwave spectrum is an indicator of spatial inhomogeneity and complexity of the sources. We concentrate in the dynamics of the low frequency spectrum (intensity and spectral index) measured by EOVSA, and compare it to the corresponding spatial propoerties of the NoRH sources observed at 17 GHz and to the loop structures seen in the EUV (Extreme Ultraviolet) images with SDO (Solar Dynamics Observatory).

  14. Study Pinpoints Sources of Polluting Vehicle Emissions (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    aftertreatment, high-molecular-weight fuel components and unburned lubricant were emitted at higher rates than in vehicles in good repair, with functioning emissions systems. Light-duty gasoline, medium-duty diesel, and heavy-duty natural gas vehicles produced more particles with fresh oil than with aged oil. The opposite trend was observed in light- and medium-duty high PM emitters. This effect was not readily apparent with heavy-duty diesel vehicles, perhaps because the lubricant represented a much smaller fraction of the total PM in those trucks.

  15. Are biogenic emissions a significant source of summertime atmospheric toluene in rural Northeastern United States?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. L.; Russo, R. S.; Zhou, Y.; Ambrose, J. L.; Haase, K.; Frinak, E. K.; Varner, R. K.; Wingenter, O. W.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R.; Sive, B. C.

    2008-06-01

    Summertime atmospheric toluene enhancements at Thompson Farm in the rural northeastern United States were unexpected and resulted in a toluene/benzene seasonal pattern that was distinctly different from that of other anthropogenic volatile organic compounds. Consequentially, three hydrocarbon sources were investigated for potential contributions to the enhancements during 2004 2006. These included: 1) increased warm season fuel evaporation coupled with changes in reformulated gasoline (RFG) content to meet U.S. EPA summertime volatility standards, 2) local industrial emissions and 3) local vegetative emissions. The contribution of fuel evaporation emission to summer toluene mixing ratios was estimated to range from 16 to 30 pptv d-1, and did not fully account for the observed enhancements (20 50 pptv) in 2004 2006. Static chamber measurements of alfalfa, a crop at Thompson Farm, and dynamic branch enclosure measurements of loblolly pine trees in North Carolina suggested vegetative emissions of 5 and 12 pptv d-1 for crops and coniferous trees, respectively. Toluene emission rates from alfalfa are potentially much larger as these plants were only sampled at the end of the growing season. Measured biogenic fluxes were on the same order of magnitude as the influence from gasoline evaporation and industrial sources (regional industrial emissions estimated at 7 pptv d-1) and indicated that local vegetative emissions make a significant contribution to summertime toluene enhancements. Additional studies are needed to characterize the variability and factors controlling toluene emissions from alfalfa and other vegetation types throughout the growing season.

  16. Are biogenic emissions a significant source of summertime atmospheric toluene in the rural Northeastern United States?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. L.; Russo, R. S.; Zhou, Y.; Ambrose, J. L.; Haase, K.; Frinak, E. K.; Varner, R. K.; Wingenter, O. W.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R.; Sive, B. C.

    2009-01-01

    Summertime atmospheric toluene enhancements at Thompson Farm in the rural northeastern United States were unexpected and resulted in a toluene/benzene seasonal pattern that was distinctly different from that of other anthropogenic volatile organic compounds. Consequently, three hydrocarbon sources were investigated for potential contributions to the enhancements during 2004-2006. These included: (1) increased warm season fuel evaporation coupled with changes in reformulated gasoline (RFG) content to meet US EPA summertime volatility standards, (2) local industrial emissions and (3) local vegetative emissions. The contribution of fuel evaporation emission to summer toluene mixing ratios was estimated to range from 16 to 30 pptv d-1, and did not fully account for the observed enhancements (20-50 pptv) in 2004-2006. Static chamber measurements of alfalfa, a crop at Thompson Farm, and dynamic branch enclosure measurements of loblolly pine trees in North Carolina suggested vegetative emissions of 5 and 12 pptv d-1 for crops and coniferous trees, respectively. Toluene emission rates from alfalfa are potentially much larger as these plants were only sampled at the end of the growing season. Measured biogenic fluxes were on the same order of magnitude as the influence from gasoline evaporation and industrial sources (regional industrial emissions estimated at 7 pptv d-1 and indicated that local vegetative emissions make a significant contribution to summertime toluene enhancements. Additional studies are needed to characterize the variability and factors controlling toluene emissions from alfalfa and other vegetation types throughout the growing season.

  17. Field measurement of greenhouse gas emission rates and development of emission factors for wastewater treatment. Final report, September 1994-March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, B.; LaCosse, J.

    1997-09-01

    The report gives results of field testing to develop more reliable greenhouse gas (GHG) emission estimates for Wastewater treatment (WWT) lagoons. Field tests of emissions were conducted for WWT lagoons that use anaerobic processes to treat large volumes of wastewater with large biological oxygen demand (BOD) loadings. Air emissions and wastewater were measured at anaerobic lagoons at three meat processing plants and two publicly owned treatment works. The overall emission rates of CH4, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, ammonia (NH3), and chlorofluorocarbons were measured from each source using an open-path monitoring approach. The emitted compounds were identified and quantified by Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Emission factors were developed for CH4 and NH3 as a function of the plant production rate, wastewater parameters (e.g., influent BOD and chemical oxygen demand (COD) loadings), and WWT system performance (e.g., BOD and COD removal rates).

  18. Optimized source selection for intracavitary low dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nurushev, T.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2005-05-01

    A procedure has been developed for automating optimal selection of sources from an available inventory for the low dose rate brachytherapy, as a replacement for the conventional trial-and-error approach. The method of optimized constrained ratios was applied for clinical source selection for intracavitary Cs-137 implants using Varian BRACHYVISION software as initial interface. However, this method can be easily extended to another system with isodose scaling and shaping capabilities. Our procedure provides optimal source selection results independent of the user experience and in a short amount of time. This method also generates statistics on frequently requested ideal source strengths aiding in ordering of clinically relevant sources.

  19. Fission-neutrons source with fast neutron-emission timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusev, G.; Baramsai, B.; Bond, E. M.; Jandel, M.

    2016-05-01

    A neutron source with fast timing has been built to help with detector-response measurements. The source is based on the neutron emission from the spontaneous fission of 252Cf. The time is provided by registering the fission fragments in a layer of a thin scintillation film with a signal rise time of 1 ns. The scintillation light output is measured by two silicon photomultipliers with rise time of 0.5 ns. Overall time resolution of the source is 0.3 ns. Design of the source and test measurements using it are described. An example application of the source for determining the neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination by a stilbene crystal is given.

  20. HVAC SYSTEMS AS EMISSION SOURCES AFFECTING INDOOR AIR QUALITY: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluates heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems as contaminant emission sources that affect indoor air quality (IAQ). Various literature sources and methods for characterizing HVAC emission sources are reviewed. Available methods include in situ test...

  1. NATURAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATE ESTIMATES FOR U.S. WOODLAND LANDSCAPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission rate factors are estimated for 49 tree genera based on a review of foliar emission rate measurements. oliar VOC emissions are grouped into three categories: isoprene, monoterpenes and other VOC'S. ypical emission rates at a leaf temperatur...

  2. Dispersion from safety valves and other momentum emission sources: Continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzevack, E. L.

    Safety valves are atypical pollutant emission sources in petroleum refineries and chemical plants. Their releases are characterized by very high velocities (from 20ms -1 to sonic) and near-ambient temperatures, so they are referred to as momentum sources, as opposed to bouyant sources. Since releases from these sources to the atmosphere may contain relatively high (often 100%) pollutant concentrations we have developed a method of accurately predicting the critical ground level concentrations of pollutants resulting from such sources. (The critical ground level concentration is the highest ambient pollutant concentration at any downwind location or meterological condition.) Since no data were available on which to base an air dispersion model for predicting ground level concentrations for momentum sources, an experimental program was undertaken, consisting of a full scale simulation of a momentum source emission using an inert tracer gas and downwind sampling to determine resulting critical ground level concentrations. Based on the data collected, a dispersion calculation method for estimating ground level concentrations from momentum sources was developed. The general form of this correlation is similar to the previously suggested, but not validated, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) momentum plume equation. The modified equation contains an additional parameter to account for the large gas density differences often encountered with momentum source releases. The equation was designed to be somewhat conservative to compensate for the randomness of atmospheric phenomena, the limited amount of experimental data, and the fact that safety valve releases can include dangerous substances. The calculation method described in this report is recommended to predict peak ambient concentrations for any source dominated by momentum plume conditions.

  3. Polychlorinated Biphenyl Sources, Emissions, and Environmental Levels in School Buildings

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building materials and components containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were used in some U.S. school buildings until the late 1970s and may be present today. PCB emission rates from caulk and fluorescent light ballasts were measured in laboratory chambers. PCB concentrat...

  4. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Rates from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, an Update: 2002-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates from Kilauea Volcano were first measured by Stoiber and Malone (1975) and have been measured on a regular basis since 1979 (Greenland and others, 1985; Casadevall and others, 1987; Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001, Elias and Sutton, 2002, Sutton and others, 2003). Compilations of SO2 emission-rate and wind-vector data from 1979 through 2001 are available on the web. (Elias and others, 1998 and 2002). This report updates the database through 2006, and documents the changes in data collection and processing that have occurred during the interval 2002-2006. During the period covered by this report, Kilauea continued to release SO2 gas predominantly from its summit caldera and east rift zone (ERZ) (Elias and others, 1998; Sutton and others, 2001, Elias and others, 2002, Sutton and others, 2003). These two distinct sources are always measured independently (fig.1). Sulphur Banks is a minor source of SO2 and does not contribute significantly to the total emissions for Kilauea (Stoiber and Malone, 1975). From 1979 until 2003, summit and east rift zone emission rates were derived using vehicle- and tripod- based Correlation Spectrometry (COSPEC) measurements. In late 2003, we began to augment traditional COSPEC measurements with data from one of the new generation of miniature spectrometer systems, the FLYSPEC (Horton and others, 2006; Elias and others, 2006, Williams-Jones and others, 2006).

  5. The measurement of roadway PM 10 emission rates using atmospheric tracer ratio techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantamaneni, Ravi; Adams, Glen; Bamesberger, Lee; Allwine, Eugene; Westberg, Hal; Lamb, Brian; Claiborn, Candis

    In this work, stationary and mobile point source tracer release techniques have been used to determine PM 10 emission rates from four-lane commercial/residential paved roads under sanded and unsanded conditions, and from unpaved roads relative to site-specific vehicular and ambient parameters. Measured street (4 + lanes; ⩾ 10,000 vehicles per day) emission factors for unsanded and sanded roads were 40 and 20% lower, respectively, than the EPA approved reference value. The sanded road emission factor was approximately 40% higher than that for the unsanded road. These results indicate a consistent relationship between PM 10 and relative humidity under unsanded conditions. There is some evidence to suggest that street sweeping has a measurable effect on PM,, emission reduction during periods of low relative humidity (i.e. ⩽ 30%). Within the constraints imposed by the variable experimental conditions, the emission factors determined for unpaved roads agreed reasonably well with the unpaved road empirical formula. Limited correlations were observed with ambient meteorological parameters. The capability of the "upwind-dowiawind" concentration modeling method to predict accurate emission was tested using a Gaussian dispersion model (SIMFLUX). Predictions agreed well with the experimentally determined emission factors.

  6. Switching regulator emission control circuit for ion sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clay, F. P., Jr.; Brock, F. J.; Melfi, L. T., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An electron emission control circuit of the switching regulator type operating at 100 kHz has been developed which maintains a constant emission current within 0.1% for a cathode power demand variation of approximately 100%. The power output stage has an efficiency of 67%, and the overall efficiency is 45% when driving a thoria-coated iridium cathode having a nominal resistance at operating temperature of 2.5 ohms. Under optimum conditions, the bus power demand is 1.75 W. The circuit is useful in controlling the electron emission current of ion sources in applications which involve a substantial variation of the cathode work function, such as oxygen partial pressure measurements over a large dynamic range.

  7. Software for emission rate modeling of accidental toxic releases

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.; Vashisth, S.

    1999-08-01

    This book fulfills the need for Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This software is based on the guidelines released by the USEPA. It includes manual and proprietary software on CDROM. Contents include release scenario description (two-phase and single-phase choked/unchoked gas release, two-phase pressurized and refrigerated liquid release, single-phase high and low volatility liquid release); emission rate model development for each release class; software design and software evaluation and application.

  8. Development of source testing, analytical, and mutagenicity bioassay procedures for evaluating emissions from municipal and hospital waste combustors.

    PubMed Central

    Watts, R R; Lemieux, P M; Grote, R A; Lowans, R W; Williams, R W; Brooks, L R; Warren, S H; DeMarini, D M; Bell, D A; Lewtas, J

    1992-01-01

    Incineration is currently being used for disposal of about 10% of the solid waste generated in the United States, and this percentage will likely increase as land disposal declines. Siting new incinerators, however, is often controversial because of concerns related to the possibility of adverse health effects and environmental contamination from long-term exposure to stack emissions. Specific concerns relate to the adequacies of a) stack emission testing protocols, b) existing regulations, and c) compliance monitoring and enforcement of regulations. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency laboratories are cooperatively conducting research aimed at developing new testing equipment and procedures that will allow a more comprehensive assessment of the complex mixture of organics that is present in stack emissions. These efforts are directed specifically toward developing source testing equipment and procedures, analytical procedures, and bioassay procedures. The objectives of this study were to field test two types of high-volume source dilution samplers, collect stack samples for use in developing analytical and mutagenicity bioassay procedures, and determine mutagenicity of organics associated with emission particles from two municipal waste combustors and a hospital waste combustor. Data are presented for particle concentrations and emission rates, extractable organic concentrations and emission rates, and Salmonella (Ames) mutagenic potency and emission rates. The mutagenic emission rates and emission factors are compared to other incinerators and combustion sources. PMID:1486854

  9. The infrared emission bands. III. Southern IRAS sources.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M; Tielens, A G; Bregman, J; Witteborn, F C; Rank, D M; Allamandola, L J; Wooden, D H; de Muizon, M

    1989-06-01

    We present airborne 5-8 micrometers spectra of southern IRAS sources which reveal strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features. The good correlation between the bands, in particular the dominant 6.2 and "7.7" micrometers features, strongly imply a common carrier, reinforcing the PAH hypothesis. However, small but detectable spectral variations exist. Planetaries have a distinctly different ratio of I(6.2)/I(7.7) than other nebulae, accompanied by a redward shift in the actual wavelength of the "7.7" micrometers peak. Further, we have detected a new feature, previously predicted from laboratory spectra of PAH molecules, at 5.2 micrometers in many of these sources. Spectra of two rare [WC 10] planetary nebular nuclei indicate a very prominent plateau of emission, linking the 6.2 and 7.7 micrometers bands. Several of our sources show definite evidence for emission structure between 14 and 23 micrometers in their IRAS Low-Resolution Spectral Atlas spectra: we attribute this structure to PAH bands. too. We have defined the "generic" spectrum of emission bands relating the mean intensities of each band to that of the strongest, near 7.7 micrometers. We have added three more planetary or protoplanetary nebulae to our correlation between 7.7 micrometers band intensity and nebular gas phase C/O ratio, namely NGC 6302, HR 4049, and the highly carbon-rich [WC 10] nucleus, CPD--56 degrees 8032. For the latter we have determined a ratio for C/O of approximately 4.8 from IUE observations. The good correlation between the intensity ratio of the "7.7" micrometers feature relative to the far-infrared dust continuum and nebular C/O also supports a carbonaceous carrier for these emission features. PMID:11542167

  10. Global High-Resolution Emission Inventories from Combustion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, S.; Huang, Y.; Chen, H.; Shen, H.

    2014-12-01

    A series efforts have been made to reduce uncertainty of emission inventories from combustion sources. The inventories developed are highly resolved spatially (0.1 degree), temporally (monthly or daily), and sectorically (over 60 combustion sources). Sub-national, instead of national fuel data are used to reduce spatial bias due to uneven distribution of per person energy consumption within large countries. Space-for-time substitution method was developed to model the dependence of residential energy consumptions on a series of meteorological and socioeconomic conditions. The regression models were used to project temporal variation of energy consumption, subsequently emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants. The models can also be used to downscale spatial distribution of residential emissions. By using this approach, global emission inventories of black carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, mercury, TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 have been established. The inventories were used to potential health impact assessment, atmospheric transport and long-range transport modeling, as well as exposure and health impact modeling.

  11. High emission rate of sulfuric acid from Bezymianny volcano, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenski, Michael; Taran, Yuri; Galle, Bo

    2015-09-01

    High concentrations of primary sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in fumarolic gases and high emission rate of sulfuric acid aerosol in the plume were measured at Bezymianny volcano, an active dome-growing andesitic volcano in central Kamchatka. Using direct sampling, filter pack sampling, and differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements, we estimated an average emission of H2SO4 at 243 ± 75 t/d in addition to an average SO2 emission of 212 ± 65 t/d. The fumarolic gases of Bezymianny correspond to arc gases released by several magma bodies at different stages of degassing and contain 25-92% of entrained air. H2SO4 accounts for 6-87 mol% of the total sulfur content, 42.8 mol% on average, and SO2 is the rest. The high H2SO4 in Bezymianny fumaroles can be explained by catalytic oxidation of SO2 inside the volcanic dome. Because sulfate aerosol is impossible to measure remotely, the total sulfur content in a plume containing significant H2SO4 may be seriously underestimated.

  12. What could have caused pre-industrial biomass burning emissions to exceed current rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Werf, G. R.; Peters, W.; van Leeuwen, T. T.; Giglio, L.

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies based on trace gas mixing ratios in ice cores and charcoal data indicate that biomass burning emissions over the past millennium exceeded contemporary emissions by up to a factor of 4 for certain time periods. This is surprising because various sources of biomass burning are linked with population density, which has increased over the past centuries. Here we have analyzed how emissions from several biomass burning sources could have fluctuated to yield emissions that are in correspondence with recent results based on ice core mixing ratios of carbon monoxide (CO) and its isotopic signature measured at South Pole station (SPO). Based on estimates of contemporary fire emissions and the TM5 chemical transport model, we found that CO mixing ratios at SPO are more sensitive to emissions from South America and Australia than from Africa, and are relatively insensitive to emissions from the Northern Hemisphere. We then explored how various biomass burning sources may have varied over the past centuries and what the resulting emissions and corresponding CO mixing ratio at SPO would be, using population density variations to reconstruct sources driven by humans (e.g. fuelwood burning) and a new model to relate savanna emissions to changes in fire return times. We found that to match the observed ice core CO data all savannas in the Southern Hemisphere had to burn annually, or bi-annually in combination with deforestation and slash and burn agriculture matching current levels despite much lower population densities and lack of machinery to aid the deforestation process. While possible, these scenarios are unlikely and in conflict with current literature. However, we do show the large potential for increased emissions from savannas in a pre-industrial world. This is mainly because in the past, fuel beds were probably less fragmented compared to the current situation; we show that the majority of savannas have not burned in the past 10 yr, even in Africa which

  13. What could have caused pre-industrial biomass burning emissions to exceed current rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Werf, G. R.; Peters, W.; van Leeuwen, T. T.; Giglio, L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies based on trace gas mixing ratios in ice cores and charcoal data indicate that biomass burning emissions over the past millennium exceeded contemporary emissions by up to a factor of 4 for certain time periods. This is surprising because various sources of biomass burning are linked with population density, which has increased over the past centuries. We have analysed how emissions from several landscape biomass burning sources could have fluctuated to yield emissions that are in correspondence with recent results based on ice core mixing ratios of carbon monoxide (CO) and its isotopic signature measured at South Pole station (SPO). Based on estimates of contemporary landscape fire emissions and the TM5 chemical transport model driven by present-day atmospheric transport and OH concentrations, we found that CO mixing ratios at SPO are more sensitive to emissions from South America and Australia than from Africa, and are relatively insensitive to emissions from the Northern Hemisphere. We then explored how various landscape biomass burning sources may have varied over the past centuries and what the resulting emissions and corresponding CO mixing ratio at SPO would be, using population density variations to reconstruct sources driven by humans (e.g., fuelwood burning) and a new model to relate savanna emissions to changes in fire return times. We found that to match the observed ice core CO data, all savannas in the Southern Hemisphere had to burn annually, or bi-annually in combination with deforestation and slash and burn agriculture exceeding current levels, despite much lower population densities and lack of machinery to aid the deforestation process. While possible, these scenarios are unlikely and in conflict with current literature. However, we do show the large potential for increased emissions from savannas in a pre-industrial world. This is mainly because in the past, fuel beds were probably less fragmented compared to the current situation

  14. Modeling Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From Emissions of Combustion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, Shantanu Hemant

    Atmospheric aerosols exert a large influence on the Earth's climate and cause adverse public health effects, reduced visibility and material degradation. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA), defined as the aerosol mass arising from the oxidation products of gas-phase organic species, accounts for a significant fraction of the submicron atmospheric aerosol mass. Yet, there are large uncertainties surrounding the sources, atmospheric evolution and properties of SOA. This thesis combines laboratory experiments, extensive data analysis and global modeling to investigate the contribution of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (SVOC and IVOC) from combustion sources to SOA formation. The goals are to quantify the contribution of these emissions to ambient PM and to evaluate and improve models to simulate its formation. To create a database for model development and evaluation, a series of smog chamber experiments were conducted on evaporated fuel, which served as surrogates for real-world combustion emissions. Diesel formed the most SOA followed by conventional jet fuel / jet fuel derived from natural gas, gasoline and jet fuel derived from coal. The variability in SOA formation from actual combustion emissions can be partially explained by the composition of the fuel. Several models were developed and tested along with existing models using SOA data from smog chamber experiments conducted using evaporated fuel (this work, gasoline, fischertropschs, jet fuel, diesels) and published data on dilute combustion emissions (aircraft, on- and off-road gasoline, on- and off-road diesel, wood burning, biomass burning). For all of the SOA data, existing models under-predicted SOA formation if SVOC/IVOC were not included. For the evaporated fuel experiments, when SVOC/IVOC were included predictions using the existing SOA model were brought to within a factor of two of measurements with minor adjustments to model parameterizations. Further, a volatility

  15. Uranian H Ly-alpha emission - The interstellar wind source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yelle, R. V.; Sandel, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    IUE observation of Uranian emissions in hydrogen Lyman alpha (H Ly-alpha) over the past four years have recently been summarized by Clarke et al. (1985). Over this time period they find an average H Ly-alpha brightness of 1260 R which they estimate is composed of 200 R of solar scattered radiation and 1060 R from a collisional source. A third component, not considered by previous authors, is the reflection of H Ly-alpha emissions from the interstellar wind. Hydrogen in the interstellar wind forms an extended source of H Ly-alpha whose importance relative to the solar flux increases with distance from the sun. The present paper demonstrates that scattering of interstellar H Ly-alpha is more important than scattering of solar H Ly-alpha for reasonable values of H column abundance and, in fact, may make up 10-40 percent of the observed signal. Large H column abundances are still required to explain the H Ly-alpha brightness solely on the basis of resonant scattering; therefore it is likely that the emissions are due in part to collisional sources and in part to the scattering of interstellar H Ly-alpha with solar scattering playing a minor role.

  16. Carbon nanotube based field emission X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan

    This dissertation describes the development of field emission (FE) x-ray sources with a carbon-nanotube (CNT) cathode. Field emission x-rays have advantages over conventional x-rays by replacing the thermionic cathode with a cold cathode so that electrons are emitted at room temperature and emission is voltage controllable. CNTs are found to be excellent electron emitters with low threshold fields and high current density which makes them ideal for generate field emission x-rays. Macroscopic CNT cold cathodes are prepared and the parameters to tune their field emission properties are studied: structure and morphology of CNT cathodes, temperature as well as electronic work function of CNT. Macroscopic CNT cathodes with optimized performance are chosen to build a high-resolution x-ray imaging system. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution up to nanoseconds and spatial resolution down to 10 micron. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging and micro-computed tomography are also demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for non-destructive testing and for non-invasive small-animal imaging for biomedical research.

  17. Mitigation strategies for methane emissions from agricultural sources

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, J.M.

    1993-12-31

    Anthropogenic emissions of CH{sub 4} account for 70% of total global emissions of this greenhouse gas. Current anthropogenic emissions of CH{sub 4} in the US are estimated to be between 24-30 Tg CH{sub 4} or 7-9% of the global anthropogenic total. By comparison the US is responsible for 27% of anthropogenic emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel use. Table 1 shows that the major anthropogenic sources of CH{sub 4} in the US are landfills (37%), domestic livestock and livestock waste (31%) and the coal mining/natural gas/petroleum industries (28%). On a global basis it is estimated that US landfills contribute 30% to the global landfill total, whereas livestock (including waste) and the coal mining/natural gas/petroleum industries each contribute about 8% to their respective global totals. The US is an insignificant contributor (< 1%) to global emissions of CH{sub 4} from rice paddies.

  18. Size-resolved emission rates of airborne bacteria and fungi in an occupied classroom

    PubMed Central

    Qian, J; Hospodsky, D; Yamamoto, N; Nazaroff, W W; Peccia, J

    2012-01-01

    The role of human occupancy as a source of indoor biological aerosols is poorly understood. Size-resolved concentrations of total and biological particles in indoor air were quantified in a classroom under occupied and vacant conditions. Per-occupant emission rates were estimated through a mass-balance modeling approach, and the microbial diversity of indoor and outdoor air during occupancy was determined via rDNA gene sequence analysis. Significant increases of total particle mass and bacterial genome concentrations were observed during the occupied period compared to the vacant case. These increases varied in magnitude with the particle size and ranged from 3 to 68 times for total mass, 12–2700 times for bacterial genomes, and 1.5–5.2 times for fungal genomes. Emission rates per person-hour because of occupancy were 31 mg, 37 × 106 genome copies, and 7.3 × 106 genome copies for total particle mass, bacteria, and fungi, respectively. Of the bacterial emissions, ∼18% are from taxa that are closely associated with the human skin microbiome. This analysis provides size-resolved, per person-hour emission rates for these biological particles and illustrates the extent to which being in an occupied room results in exposure to bacteria that are associated with previous or current human occupants. Practical Implications Presented here are the first size-resolved, per person emission rate estimates of bacterial and fungal genomes for a common occupied indoor space. The marked differences observed between total particle and bacterial size distributions suggest that size-dependent aerosol models that use total particles as a surrogate for microbial particles incorrectly assess the fate of and human exposure to airborne bacteria. The strong signal of human microbiota in airborne particulate matter in an occupied setting demonstrates that the aerosol route can be a source of exposure to microorganisms emitted from the skin, hair, nostrils, and mouths of other occupants

  19. Carbonyl emissions from vehicular exhausts sources in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Ho, Kin Fai; Lee, Shun Cheng; Cheng, Yan; Yu, Jian Zhen; Lam, Ka Man; Feng, Natale Sin Yau; Huang, Yu

    2012-02-01

    Vehicular emission (VE) is one of the important anthropogenic sources for airborne carbonyls in urban area. Six types of VE-dominated samples were collected at representative locations in Hong Kong where polluted by a particular fueled type of vehicles, including (i) a gas refilling taxis station (liquefied petroleum gas [LPG] emission); (ii) a light-duty passenger car park (gasoline emission); (iii) a minibus station (diesel emission); (iv) a single-deck-bus depot (diesel emission); (v) a double-deck-bus depot (diesel emission); and (vi) a whole-food market entrance for light- and heavy-duty vehicles (diesel emission). A total of 15 carbonyls in the samples were quantified. Formaldehyde was the most abundant carbonyl among the VE-dominated samples, and its contribution to the total quantified amount on a molar basis ranged from 54.8% to 60.8%. Acetaldehyde and acetone were the next two abundant carbonyls. The carbonyls were quantified at three roadside locations in Hong Kong. The highest concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, 22.7 +/- 8.4 and 6.0 +/- 2.8 microg/m3, respectively, were determined in the samples collected at a main transportation gate for goods between Hong Kong and Mainland China. The total quantified carbonyl concentration, 37.9 +/- 9.3 microg/m3, was the highest at an entrance of a cross-harbor tunnel in downtown area. The theoretical carbonyls compositions of the three roadside locations were estimated according to the VE-dominated sample profiles and the statistics on vehicle numbers and types during the sampling period. The measured compositions of formaldehyde were much higher than the theoretical compositions in summer, demonstrating that photochemical reactions significantly contributed to the formaldehyde production in the roadsides. PMID:22442938

  20. 40 CFR 63.1505 - Emission standards for affected sources and emission units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... that is a major or area source. (d) Scrap dryer/delacquering kiln/decoating kiln. On and after the compliance date established by § 63.1501: (1) The owner or operator of a scrap dryer/delacquering kiln/decoating kiln must not discharge or cause to be discharged to the atmosphere emissions in excess of: (i)...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1505 - Emission standards for affected sources and emission units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... that is a major or area source. (d) Scrap dryer/delacquering kiln/decoating kiln. On and after the compliance date established by § 63.1501: (1) The owner or operator of a scrap dryer/delacquering kiln/decoating kiln must not discharge or cause to be discharged to the atmosphere emissions in excess of: (i)...

  2. 40 CFR 63.1505 - Emission standards for affected sources and emission units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... that is a major or area source. (d) Scrap dryer/delacquering kiln/decoating kiln. On and after the compliance date established by § 63.1501: (1) The owner or operator of a scrap dryer/delacquering kiln/decoating kiln must not discharge or cause to be discharged to the atmosphere emissions in excess of: (i)...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1505 - Emission standards for affected sources and emission units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... that is a major or area source. (d) Scrap dryer/delacquering kiln/decoating kiln. On and after the compliance date established by § 63.1501: (1) The owner or operator of a scrap dryer/delacquering kiln/decoating kiln must not discharge or cause to be discharged to the atmosphere emissions in excess of: (i)...

  4. Atmospheric Pollution and Emission Sources in South Asian Urban Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, K. F.; Husain, Liaquat

    2009-04-01

    Rapid urbanization, and lack of efficient monitoring and control of pollution, along with phenomena like Asian Brown Haze or prolonged episodes of winter fog, makes the South Asian atmospheric chemistry a very complex one. The anthropogenic aerosols released from this region are projected to become the dominant component of anthropogenic aerosols worldwide in the next 25 years (Nakicenovic and Swart, 2000). The region is one of the most densely populated in the world, with present population densities of 100-500 persons km-2. There are six big cities, namely, Delhi, Dhaka, Karachi, Kolkata, Lahore, and Mumbai, each housing a population around or above 10 million. There is now a real concern about the sustainability of the region's ability to support the population due to air pollution, loss of biodiversity and soil degradation. Therefore, we conducted several extensive campaigns over last 10 years in Lahore, Karachi, and Islamabad in Pakistan to (1) chemically characterize the aerosols (PM2.5 mass, concentrations of trace elements, ions, black and organic carbon), and gaseous pollutants (concentrations of NH3, SO2, HONO, HNO3, HCl and (COOH)2, and (2) identify the major emission sources in this region. Exceedingly high concentrations of all species, relative to major urban areas of US and Europe, were observed. Concentrations of PM2.5, BC, Pb, SO42-, NH4+, HONO, NH3 respectively, up to 476, 110, 12, 66, 60, 19.6 and 50 μgm-3 were observed in these cities, which were far in excess of WHO and US EPA air quality standard (Biswas et al., 2008). We use air parcel back trajectories, intercomponent relationships and meteorological observations to explain chemistry and emission sources of aerosol constituents. Carbonaceous aerosols contributed up to 69% of the PM2.5 mass (Husain et al., 2007). Source apportionment was conducted using positive matrix factorization. The analysis has classified six emission sources of aerosol components, namely, industrial activities, wood

  5. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H(-) ion sources.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2014-02-01

    A RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H(-) ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ∼1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a means for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN (aluminum nitrite) chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed. PMID:24593570

  6. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H- ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    An RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H- ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ~1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a mean for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  7. Dose rate constant and energy spectrum of interstitial brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2001-01-01

    In the past two years, several new manufacturers have begun to market low-energy interstitial brachytherapy seeds containing 125I and 103Pd. Parallel to this development, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has implemented a modification to the air-kerma strength (S(K)) standard for 125I seeds and has also established an S(K) standard for 103Pd seeds. These events have generated a considerable number of investigations on the determination of the dose rate constants (inverted V) of interstitial brachytherapy seeds. The aim of this work is to study the general properties underlying the determination of dose rate constant and to develop a simple method for a quick and accurate estimation of dose rate constant. As the dose rate constant of clinical seeds is defined at a fixed reference point, we postulated that dose rate constant may be calculated by treating the seed as an effective point source when the seed's source strength is specified in S(K) and its source characteristics are specified by the photon energy spectrum measured in air at the reference point. Using a semi-analytic approach, an analytic expression for dose rate constant was derived for point sources with known photon energy spectra. This approach enabled a systematic study of dose rate constant as a function of energy. Using the measured energy spectra, the calculated dose rate constant for 125I model 6711 and 6702 seeds and for 192Ir seed agreed with the AAPM recommended values within +/-1%. For the 103Pd model 200 seed, the agreement was 5% with a recently measured value (within the +/-7% experimental uncertainty) and was within 1% with the Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic expression for dose rate constant proposed here can be evaluated using a programmable calculator or a simple spreadsheet and it provides an efficient method for checking the measured dose rate constant for any interstitial brachytherapy seed once the energy spectrum of the seed is known. PMID:11213926

  8. Dose characterization in the near-source region for two high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruqing; Li, X Allen

    2002-08-01

    High dose rate (HDR) 192Ir sources are currently used in intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) for the peripheral arterial system. This poses a demand on evaluating accurate dose parameters in the near-source region for such sources. The purpose of this work is to calculate the dose parameters for the old VariSource HDR 192Ir source and the new microSelectron HDR 192Ir source, using Monte Carlo electron and photon transport simulation. The two-dimensional (2D) dose rate distributions and the air kerma strengths for the two HDR sources were calculated by EGSnrc and EGS4 Monte Carlo codes. Based on these data, the dose parameters proposed in the AAPM TG-60 protocol were derived. The dose rate constants obtained are 13.119+/-0.028 cGy h(-1) U(-1) for the old VariSource source, and 22.751+/-0.031 cGy h(-1) U(-1) for the new microSelectron source at the reference point (r0 = 2 mm, theta = pi/2). The 2D dose rate distributions, the radial dose functions, and the anisotropy functions presented for the two sources cover radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 10 mm. In the near-source region on the transverse plane, the dose effects of the charged particle nonequilibrium and the beta-particle dose contribution were studied. It is found that at radial distances ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm, these effects increase the calculated dose rates by up to 29% for the old VariSource source, and by up to 12% for the new microSelectron source, which, in turn, change values of the radial dose function and the anisotropy function. The present dose parameters, which account for the charged particle nonequilibrium and the beta particle contribution, may be used for accurate IVB dose calculation. PMID:12201413

  9. Modeling indoor air concentrations near emission sources in imperfectly mixed rooms.

    PubMed

    Furtaw, E J; Pandian, M D; Nelson, D R; Behar, J V

    1996-09-01

    Assessments of exposure to indoor air pollutants usually employ spatially well-mixed models which assume homogeneous concentrations throughout a building or room. However, practical experience and experimental data indicate that concentrations are not uniform in rooms containing point sources of emissions; concentrations tend to be greater in close proximity to the source than they are further from it. This phenomenon could account for the observation that "personal air" monitors frequently yield higher concentrations than nearby microenvironmental monitors (i.e., the so-called "personal cloud" effect). In this project, we systematically studied the concentrations of a tracer gas at various distances from its emission source in a controlled-environment, room-size chamber under a variety of ventilation conditions. Measured concentrations in the proximity of the source deviated significantly above the predictions of a conventional well-mixed single-compartment mass balance model. The deviation was found to be a function of distance from the source and total room air flow rate. At typical air flow rates, the average concentration at arm's length (approximately 0.4 meters) from the source exceeds the theoretical well-mixed concentration by a ratio of about 2:1. However, this ratio is not constant; the monitored concentration appears to vary randomly from near the theoretical value to several times above it. Concentration data were fitted to a two-compartment model with the source located in a small virtual compartment within the room compartment. These two compartments were linked with a stochastic air transfer rate parameter. The resulting model provides a more realistic simulation of exposure concentrations than does the well-mixed model for assessing exposure to emissions from active sources. Parameter values are presented for using the enhanced model in a variety of typical situations. PMID:8925388

  10. Rate effect on mechanical properties of hydraulic concrete flexural-tensile specimens under low loading rates using acoustic emission technique.

    PubMed

    Su, Huaizhi; Hu, Jiang; Tong, Jianjie; Wen, Zhiping

    2012-09-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) waveform is generated by dislocation, microcracking and other irreversible changes in a concrete material. Based on the AE technique (AET), this paper focuses on strain rate effect on physical mechanisms of hydraulic concrete specimens during the entire fracture process of three point bending (TPB) flexural tests at quasi-static levels. More emphasis is placed on the influence of strain rate on AE hit rate and AE source location around peak stress. Under low strain rates, namely 0.77×10(-7)s(-1), 1×10(-7)s(-1) to 1×10(-6)s(-1) respectively, the results show that the tensile strength increases as the strain rate increases while the peak AE hit rate decreases. Meanwhile, the specimen under a relatively higher strain rate shows a relatively wider intrinsic process zone in a more diffuser manner, lots of distributed microcracks relatively decrease stress intensity, thus delay both microcracking localization and macrocrack propagation. These phenomena can be attributed to Stéfan effect. In addition, further tests, namely the combination of AE monitoring and strain measuring systems was designed to understand the correlation between AE event activity and microfracture (i.e., microcracking and microcracking localization). The relative variation trend of cumulative AE events accords well with that of the load-deformation curve. PMID:22534061