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Sample records for south indian castes

  1. Genetic variation in South Indian castes: evidence from Y-chromosome, mitochondrial, and autosomal polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, WS; Thara, R; Mowry, BJ; Zhang, Y; Witherspoon, DJ; Tolpinrud, W; Bamshad, MJ; Tirupati, S; Padmavati, R; Smith, H; Nancarrow, D; Filippich, C; Jorde, LB

    2008-01-01

    Background Major population movements, social structure, and caste endogamy have influenced the genetic structure of Indian populations. An understanding of these influences is increasingly important as gene mapping and case-control studies are initiated in South Indian populations. Results We report new data on 155 individuals from four Tamil caste populations of South India and perform comparative analyses with caste populations from the neighboring state of Andhra Pradesh. Genetic differentiation among Tamil castes is low (RST = 0.96% for 45 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) markers), reflecting a largely common origin. Nonetheless, caste- and continent-specific patterns are evident. For 32 lineage-defining Y-chromosome SNPs, Tamil castes show higher affinity to Europeans than to eastern Asians, and genetic distance estimates to the Europeans are ordered by caste rank. For 32 lineage-defining mitochondrial SNPs and hypervariable sequence (HVS) 1, Tamil castes have higher affinity to eastern Asians than to Europeans. For 45 autosomal STRs, upper and middle rank castes show higher affinity to Europeans than do lower rank castes from either Tamil Nadu or Andhra Pradesh. Local between-caste variation (Tamil Nadu RST = 0.96%, Andhra Pradesh RST = 0.77%) exceeds the estimate of variation between these geographically separated groups (RST = 0.12%). Low, but statistically significant, correlations between caste rank distance and genetic distance are demonstrated for Tamil castes using Y-chromosome, mtDNA, and autosomal data. Conclusion Genetic data from Y-chromosome, mtDNA, and autosomal STRs are in accord with historical accounts of northwest to southeast population movements in India. The influence of ancient and historical population movements and caste social structure can be detected and replicated in South Indian caste populations from two different geographic regions. PMID:19077280

  2. INDIANS OF SOUTH DAKOTA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ARTICHOKER, JOHN, JR.

    USING A QUESTION AND ANSWER FORMAT, THIS DOCUMENT ATTEMPTS TO EXPLAIN MANY FACETS OF THE PROBLEMS FACING THE SOUTH DAKOTA INDIANS, PARTICULARLY THOSE SIOUX INDIANS WHO HAVE RETAINED THEIR CUSTOMS AND CULTURE WHETHER LIVING ON OR OFF THE RESERVATIONS. A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE DACOTAH INDIANS AND THEIR EVENTUAL RESTRICTION TO RESERVATIONS PROVIDES THE

  3. South Dakota Indian Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota State Library, Pierre.

    Listed in this American Indian bibliography are 310 books and pamphlets dating from 1894 to 1971. Entries are arranged under the following headings: Art and Music, Bibliography, Culture, Fiction, Government Relations, History, Language, and Religion and Mythology. Also included is a list of publishers and addresses, containing 111 entries. (HBC)

  4. Genetic Evidence on the Origins of Indian Caste Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bamshad, Michael; Kivisild, Toomas; Watkins, W. Scott; Dixon, Mary E.; Ricker, Chris E.; Rao, Baskara B.; Naidu, J. Mastan; Prasad, B.V. Ravi; Reddy, P. Govinda; Rasanayagam, Arani; Papiha, Surinder S.; Villems, Richard; Redd, Alan J.; Hammer, Michael F.; Nguyen, Son V.; Carroll, Marion L.; Batzer, Mark A.; Jorde, Lynn B.

    2001-01-01

    The origins and affinities of the ?1 billion people living on the subcontinent of India have long been contested. This is owing, in part, to the many different waves of immigrants that have influenced the genetic structure of India. In the most recent of these waves, Indo-European-speaking people from West Eurasia entered India from the Northwest and diffused throughout the subcontinent. They purportedly admixed with or displaced indigenous Dravidic-speaking populations. Subsequently they may have established the Hindu caste system and placed themselves primarily in castes of higher rank. To explore the impact of West Eurasians on contemporary Indian caste populations, we compared mtDNA (400 bp of hypervariable region 1 and 14 restriction site polymorphisms) and Y-chromosome (20 biallelic polymorphisms and 5 short tandem repeats) variation in ?265 males from eight castes of different rank to ?750 Africans, Asians, Europeans, and other Indians. For maternally inherited mtDNA, each caste is most similar to Asians. However, 20%30% of Indian mtDNA haplotypes belong to West Eurasian haplogroups, and the frequency of these haplotypes is proportional to caste rank, the highest frequency of West Eurasian haplotypes being found in the upper castes. In contrast, for paternally inherited Y-chromosome variation each caste is more similar to Europeans than to Asians. Moreover, the affinity to Europeans is proportionate to caste rank, the upper castes being most similar to Europeans, particularly East Europeans. These findings are consistent with greater West Eurasian male admixture with castes of higher rank. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial genome and the Y chromosome each represents only a single haploid locus and is more susceptible to large stochastic variation, bottlenecks, and selective sweeps. Thus, to increase the power of our analysis, we assayed 40 independent, biparentally inherited autosomal loci (1 LINE-1 and 39 Alu elements) in all of the caste and continental populations (?600 individuals). Analysis of these data demonstrated that the upper castes have a higher affinity to Europeans than to Asians, and the upper castes are significantly more similar to Europeans than are the lower castes. Collectively, all five datasets show a trend toward upper castes being more similar to Europeans, whereas lower castes are more similar to Asians. We conclude that Indian castes are most likely to be of proto-Asian origin with West Eurasian admixture resulting in rank-related and sex-specific differences in the genetic affinities of castes to Asians and Europeans. PMID:11381027

  5. Social Affiliation and the Demand for Health Services: Caste and Child Health in South India *

    PubMed Central

    Luke, Nancy; Munshi, Kaivan

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses the role of social affiliation, measured by caste, in shaping investments in child health. The special setting that we have chosen for the analysis – tea estates in the South Indian High Range – allows us to control nonparametrically for differences in income, access to health services, and patterns of morbidity across low caste and high caste households. In this controlled setting, low caste households spend more on their children's health than high caste households, reversing the pattern we would expect to find elsewhere in India. Moreover, health expenditures do not vary by gender within either caste group, in contrast once again with the male preference documented throughout the country. A simple explanation, based on differences in the returns to human capital across castes in the tea estates is proposed to explain these striking results. PMID:18046465

  6. INDIAN CASTE SYSTEM: HISTORICAL AND PSYCHOANALYTIC VIEWS.

    PubMed

    Vallabhaneni, Madhusudana Rao

    2015-12-01

    This paper elucidates the historical origins and transformations of India's caste system. Surveying the complex developments over many centuries, it points out that three positions have been taken in this regard. One suggests that the caste one is born into can be transcended within one's lifetime by performing good deeds. The other declares caste to be immutable forever. And, the third says that one can be reborn into a higher caste if one lives a virtuous life. Moving on to the sociopolitical realm, the paper notes how these positions have been used and exploited. The paper then attempts to anchor the existence and purpose of the Hindu caste system in Freud's ideas about group psychology and Klein's proposals of splitting and projective identification. The paper also deploys the large group psychology concepts of Volkan and the culturally nuanced psychoanalytic anthropology of Roland and Kakar. It concludes with delineating some ameliorative strategies for this tragic problem in the otherwise robust democratic society of India. PMID:26611129

  7. OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW LOOKING SOUTH OF CONTAINMENT SYSTEM (TOP), SLAB CASTING MACHINE AND RUN OUT WITH TRAVELING TORCH. MACHINE IS CASTING IN TWIN MOLD. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  8. The lost-wax casting of icons, utensils, bells, and other items in South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, R. M.; Pilhii, S. G. K.; Damodaran, A. D.

    2002-10-01

    Indian artisans and craftsmen have long been masters at extracting and shaping metals and alloys, as proven by archaeological finds from the 2nd3rd millennia B.C. For example, two well-known artifacts, castings of the dancing girl of Mohenjo Daro and the Mother Goddess of Adichanallur, Tamilnadu, depict a high degree of metallurgical knowledge. Those castings were formed by the lost wax process, which later was modified and became known as investment casting. In various parts of India, this age-old casting process is still being practiced, without any major modifications. This paper discusses details of the process used by the Indian artisans of Swamimalai, Tamilnadu, and Mannar, Kerala, South India in shaping copper-base alloys into icons and utensils, bells, and lamps.

  9. Indian Place Names in South Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasque, Thomas J.

    A cursory examination of place names on a map of South Dakota does not reflect the important role that Indians have played in the state and their relation to the land framed by its borders. Only three towns with populations over 1,000 bear names that clearly come from Indian languages: Sioux Falls, Sisseton, and Yankton. The hostile relationship

  10. Population Differentiation of Southern Indian Male Lineages Correlates with Agricultural Expansions Predating the Caste System

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Varatharajan Santhakumari; Syama, Adhikarla; Ashokan, Kumaran Samy; Gandhirajan, Kavandanpatti Thangaraj; Vijayakumar, Koothapuli; Narayanan, Muthuswamy; Jayalakshmi, Mariakuttikan; Ziegle, Janet S.; Royyuru, Ajay K.; Parida, Laxmi; Wells, R. Spencer; Renfrew, Colin; Schurr, Theodore G.; Smith, Chris Tyler; Platt, Daniel E.; Pitchappan, Ramasamy

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies that pooled Indian populations from a wide variety of geographical locations, have obtained contradictory conclusions about the processes of the establishment of the Varna caste system and its genetic impact on the origins and demographic histories of Indian populations. To further investigate these questions we took advantage that both Y chromosome and caste designation are paternally inherited, and genotyped 1,680 Y chromosomes representing 12 tribal and 19 non-tribal (caste) endogamous populations from the predominantly Dravidian-speaking Tamil Nadu state in the southernmost part of India. Tribes and castes were both characterized by an overwhelming proportion of putatively Indian autochthonous Y-chromosomal haplogroups (H-M69, F-M89, R1a1-M17, L1-M27, R2-M124, and C5-M356; 81% combined) with a shared genetic heritage dating back to the late Pleistocene (1030 Kya), suggesting that more recent Holocene migrations from western Eurasia contributed <20% of the male lineages. We found strong evidence for genetic structure, associated primarily with the current mode of subsistence. Coalescence analysis suggested that the social stratification was established 46 Kya and there was little admixture during the last 3 Kya, implying a minimal genetic impact of the Varna (caste) system from the historically-documented Brahmin migrations into the area. In contrast, the overall Y-chromosomal patterns, the time depth of population diversifications and the period of differentiation were best explained by the emergence of agricultural technology in South Asia. These results highlight the utility of detailed local genetic studies within India, without prior assumptions about the importance of Varna rank status for population grouping, to obtain new insights into the relative influences of past demographic events for the population structure of the whole of modern India. PMID:23209694

  11. Population differentiation of southern Indian male lineages correlates with agricultural expansions predating the caste system.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, Ganeshprasad; Soria-Hernanz, David F; Kavitha, Valampuri John; Arun, Varatharajan Santhakumari; Syama, Adhikarla; Ashokan, Kumaran Samy; Gandhirajan, Kavandanpatti Thangaraj; Vijayakumar, Koothapuli; Narayanan, Muthuswamy; Jayalakshmi, Mariakuttikan; Ziegle, Janet S; Royyuru, Ajay K; Parida, Laxmi; Wells, R Spencer; Renfrew, Colin; Schurr, Theodore G; Smith, Chris Tyler; Platt, Daniel E; Pitchappan, Ramasamy

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies that pooled Indian populations from a wide variety of geographical locations, have obtained contradictory conclusions about the processes of the establishment of the Varna caste system and its genetic impact on the origins and demographic histories of Indian populations. To further investigate these questions we took advantage that both Y chromosome and caste designation are paternally inherited, and genotyped 1,680 Y chromosomes representing 12 tribal and 19 non-tribal (caste) endogamous populations from the predominantly Dravidian-speaking Tamil Nadu state in the southernmost part of India. Tribes and castes were both characterized by an overwhelming proportion of putatively Indian autochthonous Y-chromosomal haplogroups (H-M69, F-M89, R1a1-M17, L1-M27, R2-M124, and C5-M356; 81% combined) with a shared genetic heritage dating back to the late Pleistocene (10-30 Kya), suggesting that more recent Holocene migrations from western Eurasia contributed <20% of the male lineages. We found strong evidence for genetic structure, associated primarily with the current mode of subsistence. Coalescence analysis suggested that the social stratification was established 4-6 Kya and there was little admixture during the last 3 Kya, implying a minimal genetic impact of the Varna (caste) system from the historically-documented Brahmin migrations into the area. In contrast, the overall Y-chromosomal patterns, the time depth of population diversifications and the period of differentiation were best explained by the emergence of agricultural technology in South Asia. These results highlight the utility of detailed local genetic studies within India, without prior assumptions about the importance of Varna rank status for population grouping, to obtain new insights into the relative influences of past demographic events for the population structure of the whole of modern India. PMID:23209694

  12. South Dakota Indian Recipients of Public Welfare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota State Dept. of Public Welfare, Pierre.

    In October of each year, the Research and Statistics Section of the South Dakota Department of Public Welfare studies the racial makeup of its recipients to report on the proportion of American Indians, the state's largest minority group (32,402 or 4.9% of the state's population according to the 1970 census), receiving assistance under state

  13. South Indian foods: Contaminants and their effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaswamy, S.N.; Balachandran, B.; Balanehru, S. )

    1991-08-01

    Life style including dietary habits is one of the most important factors responsible for different types of cancer. The role of diet in human cancer has prompted many to analyze the food items, particularly the heat processed foods and food components for possible mutagens and carcinogens. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed during combustion, pyrolysis and pyrosynthesis of organic matter. Epidemiological studies have unequivocally established a relationship between the occurrence of PAHs and different types of cancers. Since the incidence of stomach cancer in South India in very high, the authors have screened several commonly consumed food dishes and food components for possible contaminants, such as PAHs. Since many of the Indian food items are stored for long periods, mycotoxin contamination is possible and therefore, they have screened some of the food components for the presence of zearalenone, a Fusarium mycotoxin. This paper reports the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and zearalenone in the commonly consumed food items. The mutagenic and genotoxic effects of these food items are also reported.

  14. Dugout at South Potter Slough, Lower Brule Indian Reservation, SD

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Dugout at South Potter Slough. Object in foreground is a goose nesting tub. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule Indian Reservation in South Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe using gr...

  15. Mass, heat and freshwater fluxes in the South Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng

    1986-01-01

    Six hydrographic sections were used to examine the circulation and property fluxes in the South Indian Ocean from 10 to 32 deg S. The calculations were made by applying an inverse method to the data. In the interior of the South Indian Ocean, the geostrophic flow is generally northward. At 18 deg S, the northward interior mass flux is balanced by the southward Ekman mass flux at the surface, whereas at 32 deg S the northward interior mass flux is balanced by the southward mass flux of the Agulhas Current. There is a weak, southward mass flux of 6 x 10 to the 9th kg/s in the Mozambique Channel. The rate of water exchange between the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean is dependent on the choice of the initial reference level used in the inverse calculation. The choice of 1500 m, the depth of the deep oxygen minimum, has led to a flux of water from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean at a rate of 6.6 x 10 to the 9th kg/s. Heat flux calculations indicate that the Indian Ocean is exporting heat to the rest of the world's oceans at a rate of -0.69 x 10 to the 15th W at 18 deg S and -0.25 x 10 to the 15th W at 32 deg S (negative values being southward).

  16. Prediction equation for lung functions in South Indian children.

    PubMed

    Nair, R H; Kesavachandran, C; Sanil, R; Sreekumar, R; Shashidhar, S

    1997-10-01

    Lung functions including VC, IVC, FVC, FEV0.5, FEV1, PEF, FEF0.2-1.2, FEF25-75%, FEF75-85%, PIF, FMFT, MVV(IND), peak expiratory flow at 25%, 50% and 75% of FVC, peak inspiratory flow at 75%, 50%, 25% and the ratio between different lung volumes were measured with Vitallograph Compact-II spirometer on 109 South Indian school boys in the age group of five to sixteen years. The results show an increase in "lung volumes" and "flow rates" with increase in age, height and weight. FMFT and MVV(IND) also increase with increase in anthropometric measurements. All the lung functions except FEF75-85% and the ratio between different lung volumes show significant positive correlation with age, height and weight. Regression equations were derived for predicting normal lung functions for healthy South Indian boys. Lung volumes and flow rates were lower than North Indian and foreign boys. The decrease in lung functions in South Indian boys were due to their sea level dwelling, dietary habits and comparatively lower anthropometric measurements. PMID:10235662

  17. Multi-layer Clouds Over the South Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The complex structure and beauty of polar clouds are highlighted by these images acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on April 23, 2003. These clouds occur at multiple altitudes and exhibit a noticeable cyclonic circulation over the Southern Indian Ocean, to the north of Enderbyland, East Antarctica.

    The image at left was created by overlying a natural-color view from MISR's downward-pointing (nadir) camera with a color-coded stereo height field. MISR retrieves heights by a pattern recognition algorithm that utilizes multiple view angles to derive cloud height and motion. The opacity of the height field was then reduced until the field appears as a translucent wash over the natural-color image. The resulting purple, cyan and green hues of this aesthetic display indicate low, medium or high altitudes, respectively, with heights ranging from less than 2 kilometers (purple) to about 8 kilometers (green). In the lower right corner, the edge of the Antarctic coastline and some sea ice can be seen through some thin, high cirrus clouds.

    The right-hand panel is a natural-color image from MISR's 70-degree backward viewing camera. This camera looks backwards along the path of Terra's flight, and in the southern hemisphere the Sun is in front of this camera. This perspective causes the cloud-tops to be brightly outlined by the sun behind them, and enhances the shadows cast by clouds with significant vertical structure. An oblique observation angle also enhances the reflection of light by atmospheric particles, and accentuates the appearance of polar clouds. The dark ocean and sea ice that were apparent through the cirrus clouds at the bottom right corner of the nadir image are overwhelmed by the brightness of these clouds at the oblique view.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 17794. The panels cover an area of 335 kilometers x 605 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 142 to 145 within World Reference System-2 path 155.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  18. Intestinal helminths in lowland South American Indians: some evolutionary interpretations.

    PubMed

    Confalonieri, U; Ferreira, L F; Arajo, A

    1991-12-01

    Data on intestinal parasite infections for South American Indians in prehistoric times as revealed by coprolite analysis are being used to support transoceanic migration routes from the Old World to the New World. These same findings on modern semi-isolated aborigines, considered persisting prehistoric patterns, are also of great importance as indicators of pre-Columbian peopling of South America. This is the case for the Lengua Indians from Paraguay, studied in the 1920s, and the Yanomami and the Salum from Brazil, studied in the 1980s. The intestinal parasitic profile of these groups can be empirically associated with culture change, but no clear correlations with the population biology of their hosts can be made at present because of scarcity of data. PMID:1959913

  19. Increased arterial stiffness in South Dakota American Indian children.

    PubMed

    Litz, Andrew M; Van Guilder, Gary P

    2016-02-01

    Arterial stiffness has been observed in white American obese children, yet there are no data in American Indian youth, who are affected disproportionately by the cardiovascular consequences of childhood obesity and its accompanying risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of childhood overweight-obesity and cardiometabolic risk factors with arterial stiffness in South Dakota white American and American Indian children. Thirty-six (28 white American and 8 American Indian) children (age, 13 1 years; grades 6-8) from a rural South Dakota elementary and middle school were studied: 18 had a healthy weight (body mass index (BMI), 19.5 1.9 kg/m(2)) and 18 were overweight-obese (BMI, 26.8 3.5 kg/m(2)). Arterial stiffness was assessed using applanation tonometry via pulse wave analysis to determine carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (crPWV) and aortic augmentation index (AIx). There were no differences (P = 0.94) in crPWV between healthy weight (7.1 1.4 m/s) and overweight-obese (7.3 1.0 m/s) children, even after controlling for risk factors. However, crPWV was markedly elevated (P = 0.002) in overweight-obese American Indian children (7.7 1.1 m/s) compared with white American children (6.8 0.5 m/s), and these differences remained after controlling for blood pressure and more severe obesity in the American Indians. An obesity-matched subgroup analysis indicated that crPWV (7.7 1.1 vs 6.8 0.4 m/s) remained significantly greater in the American Indians (P = 0.03). There were no between-group differences in aortic AIx. These findings indicate an adverse influence of American Indian ethnicity on arterial stiffening in children with elevated adiposity. Arterial stiffness in American Indian children may accelerate early adulthood vascular disease. PMID:26761621

  20. Constituents of south Indian vetiver oils.

    PubMed

    Mallavarapu, Gopal Rao; Syamasundar, Kodakandla V; Ramesh, S; Rao, Bhaskaruni R Rajeswara

    2012-02-01

    The essential oils isolated from vetiver [Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash.] roots collected from four locations in south India were analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. Eighty constituents, representing 94.5-97.8% of the oils, have been identified. The oils from Bangalore, Hyderabad, Kundapur, and Mettupalayam were rich in sesquiterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes with cedrane, bisabolane, eudesmane, eremophilane, and zizaane skeletons. The main components of the four essential oils were: eudesma-4,6-diene (delta-selinene) + beta-vetispirene (3.9-6.1%), beta-vetivenene (0.9-9.4%), 13-nor-trans-eudesma-4(15),7-dien-11-one + amorph-4-en-10-ol (5.0-6.4%), trans-eudesma-4(15),7-dien-12-ol (vetiselinenol) + (E)-opposita-4(15),7(11)-dien-12-ol (3.7-5.9%), eremophila-1 (10),11-dien-2alpha-ol (nootkatol) + ziza-6(13)-en-12-ol (khusimol) (16.1-19.2%), and eremophila-1(10),7(11)-dien-2alpha-ol (isonootkatol) + (E)-eremophila-1(10),7(11)-12-ol (isovalencenol) (5.6-6.9%). The important compounds that impart the characteristic vetiver odor are: khusimene, delta-selinene, beta-vetivenene, cyclocopacamphan-12-ol (epimers A and B), vetiselinenol, khusimol, isovalencenol, khusimone, alpha-vetivone, and beta-vetivone. The chemical profiles of the oils are comparable to Haitian vetiver oil. PMID:22474964

  1. Climatic records of the last and penultimate deglaciations in the South Atlantic and South Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Elisabeth; Waelbroeck, Claire; Govin, Aline; Skinner, Luke; Vzquez Riveiros, Natalia; Dewilde, Fabien; Isguder, Gulay; Rebaubier, Hlne

    2013-04-01

    Surface and deep-water records of Termination I and II in two twin South Atlantic deep-sea cores (4409' S, 1414' W, 3770 m depth) and one South Indian core (4629' S, 8801' E, 3420 m depth) are presented. Sea surface temperature has been reconstructed based on planktonic foraminifera census counts in all cases, as well as Mg/Ca of G. bulloides and N. pachyderma s. over the last deglaciation. The uncertainty on reconstructed SST using different statistical methods and different faunal databases is assessed. Over the last deglaciation, combined 14C dating and correlation of the SST record with the air temperature signal recorded in Antarctic ice cores allowed us to correct for variable surface reservoir ages in the South Atlantic core (Skinner et al., 2010). Preliminary dating of the South Indian core over the last termination has been done by correlation of its magnetic signal with those of a neighboring 14C dated core (Smart et al., 2010). We have refined the later age scale using the Atlantic core age scale as reference. Benthic isotopic signals in the South Atlantic and South Indian cores over the last deglaciation exhibit the same amplitude and timing. Our results thus indicate that bottom waters at the South Indian site remained isolated from better ventilated deep waters of northern origin until ~15 ka (Waelbroeck et al., 2011). Over Termination II, the two cores have been dated by correlation of their SST records with the air temperature signal recorded in EDC versus the EDC3 age scale (Govin et al., 2009; 2012). A careful examination of the various sources of uncertainty on the derived dating has been performed. Benthic and planktonic isotopic signals reveal analogies but also differences with respect to the last termination. SST was significantly warmer during the Last Interglacial than during the Holocene in both sites. South Atlantic deep waters were also significantly better ventilated during the Last Interglacial than during the Holocene, whereas bottom water ventilation was similar during these two interglacials at the South Indian site.

  2. Efficacy of Cheiloscopy in Determination of Sex Among South Indians

    PubMed Central

    Kautilya D., Vijay; Bodkha, Pravir; Rajamohan, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Human identification plays a vital role in any crime investigation. Along with the various other established methods, cheiloscopy also plays a key role in linking the criminal with the crime. The ability of a technique in differentiating the sex of a person in the field can help in screening a large number of suspects. This study evaluated the efficacy of cheiloscopy in determination of sex among South Indians. It also studied the pattern of dimorphism in the lips and lip prints of south Indians. Material and Methods: Lip prints from 100 medical students (50 males and 50 females) were obtained and were analyzed, based on Tsuchihashi and Suzuki classification, to check for dimorphism. Lip dimensions were studied by using standard sliding calipers for dimorphism. Results and Discussion: The most common pattern of lip print among males was Type III as compared to Type I in females. The outer four portions of the lip showed statistically significant differences in males and females. Middle portion of the lip was statistically insignificant in sex determination, based on lip print patterns. Thickness of the lip was significantly larger in males as compared to that in females and this criterion could be used to establish a logistic regression for determination of sex of a person. Conclusion: Lips not only significantly differ among the males and females in the pattern of the lip print that they present, but they also differ in their size. These features can effectively be used to determine the sex of a person accurately. PMID:24298473

  3. Prevalence of duodenal diverticulum in South indians: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Sulochana; Kannaiyan, Kavitha; Thiagarajan, Sivakami

    2013-01-01

    Background. Duodenum is the second most common site of diverticula after the colon. Diagnosis of duodenal diverticula is incidental and found during other therapeutic procedures. In 90% of cases, they are asymptomatic, and less than 10% develop clinical symptoms. The difficulty to ascertain the true incidence of duodenal diverticula demanded for the present study to elucidate the prevalence of the duodenal diverticulum in South Indians. Materials and Methods. One hundred and twenty specimens of duodenum were utilized for the study. The prevalence, anatomical location, and dimension of duodenal diverticulum were studied. Results. Among the 120 specimens of duodenum, five specimens had solitary, extraluminal, and globular-shaped diverticula in the medial wall of the duodenum. In three (60%) cases, it was found in the second part of duodenum and in two (40%) cases in the third part. The mean size of the diverticula was 1.4?cm. Conclusion. In the present study in South Indian people, the prevalence (4.2%) of duodenal diverticula is low comparable to other studies in the literature. Even though most of the duodenal diverticula are asymptomatic, the knowledge about its frequency and location is of great importance to prevent complications like diverticulitis, hemorrhage, obstructive jaundice, and perforation. PMID:25938103

  4. Palatal rugae in population differentiation between South and North Indians: A discriminant function analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Shankar; Anuthama, Krishnamurthy; Shaikh, Hidayathulla; Murali, Kruthika; Suresan, Vinay; Nisharudeen, Khaja; Brinda Devi, Sulur Pechimuthu; Rajasundaram, Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The present study is aimed at delineation of different types of rugae in two different populations and developing a discriminant function for the same. Materials and Methods: A total of 940 subjects were included in the present study. The sample consisted of 466 subjects from South Indian population and 474 from North Indian population in the age group of 18-23 years. Neo colloid Easy flow() alginate impressions of maxillary arch were made and casts were immediately poured with Type IV dental stone. A sharp graphite pencil was used to delineate the rugae and patterns were recorded according to the classification given by Kapali et al. The association between different population and different sexes was analyzed with chi-square test and a stepwise discriminant function analysis was also performed to develop a discriminant formula. Results: Wavy, curved and straight rugae were the most common forms in both groups. Chi-square analysis for association between rugae shape and population groups showed significant differences among all the rugae patterns at the P < 5%. Chi-square analysis for assessing sex differences in the rugae shapes showed significant difference in straight, unification and circular type. Five rugae shapes curved, wavy, nonspecific, unification and circular were selected for discriminant function. Conclusion: The discriminant function equation obtained from the different rugae shapes in the present study was highly accurate enough to distinguish the Southern and Northern Indian population with the classification accuracy of 87.8%. Thus to identify a specific population, separate discriminant function formulae have to be developed. Hence, the study of palatal rugae is one of the simple and reliable tools for population identification in forensic science. PMID:23741146

  5. Lightning activity in the South West Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovalo, C.; Barthe, C.

    2012-12-01

    Lightning activity within tropical convective events of the Southwest Indian ocean (0°N-40°S;30°E-110°E) is investigated. The World Wide Lightning Location Network is used as it provides global lightning data since 2005. First, a 7-year lightning climatology over the Southwest Indian Ocean has been performed using the WWLLN data from 2005 to 2011. Fig. 1 shows the same main features as presented in other studies: the «hot spots» are found in the maritime continent and Sri Lanka (> 50 fl. km-2 yr-1) but also over South India and Madagascar (> 10-20 fl. km-2 yr-1). Lightning flashes within tropical cyclones represent 50% to 100% of the total lightning activity in some oceanic areas (between 10°S and 20°S). Moreover, lightning activity is more intense during the November-to-April period which corresponds to the wet/cyclonic season. Then, lightning activity in tropical storms was studied. Lightning strokes were found to occur mainly in the region 50-100 km from the storm center (inner core region). Moreover, Fig. 2 shows that, before an intensity increase, lightning activity starts decreasing from -18h to 0h in the eyewall region (0-50 km) and increases from -24h to +6h in the rainband region (200-300 km).; Distribution of the annual mean flash density (fl. km-2 yr-1) over the SWIO. The black box corresponds to the area of responsibility of RSMC La Réunion. ; Lightning density in the eyewall (top), inner core (middle) and rainband (bottom) regions for weakening and intensifying tropical storms in the Southwest Indian Ocean. A threshold for the intensity change have been used (± 10 kts (6h)-1).

  6. Multiple Instrument Translation for Use with South Asian Indian Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Manju; Miller, Arlene; Wilbur, JoEllen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe translation of five measures (physical activity, acculturation, discrimination, self-efficacy, and depression) from English into Hindi using the committee translation method, focus group, and think-aloud interviews. Two South Asian Indian (SAI) immigrant bilingual translators and a moderator reached consensus on 93 of 102 items, using the committee method. Discrepancy in nine items was resolved with a focus group conducted with five bilingual SAI immigrants. Ten other bilingual SAI immigrants participated in think-aloud interviews to assess understanding and interpretation of the questions. More than 10 additional changes were made following the think-aloud interviews. Sequential use of multiple translation techniques improved translation with culturally acceptable language, thereby maintaining equivalence with original versions. PMID:21818758

  7. Sex determination from hand dimensions of North and South Indians.

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Rastogi, Prateek

    2009-05-01

    When dismembered human remains are encountered, the decedent's sex may not be obvious. For these scenarios, techniques for sex determination may play a vital part of the medicolegal investigation. Five hundred hands (230 males, 270 females) from North and South Indian region were studied to investigate sexual dimorphism in hand dimensions (hand length, hand breadth, and palm length). The hand index (hand breadth/hand length x 100) and the palm index (hand breadth/palm length x 100) were derived. The hand dimensions show a higher accuracy in sex determination when compared to indices. Of all hand dimensions, hand breadth has the highest accuracy of sex determination in the study group. The sex differences were found to be statistically significant only for the hand index on the left side. The morphometric parameters of the hand show considerable sexual dimorphism in the Indian population while the hand and palm index remain poor sex indicators. The study thus has medicolegal implications when a dismembered hand is brought for examination. PMID:19302378

  8. Indian Gaming in South Dakota: Conflict in Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, William V.

    2009-01-01

    Legal gaming on Indian reservations has increased dramatically since the 1987 landmark decision by the United States Supreme Court in "California v. Cabazon Band of Mission Indians." In this case the Supreme Court upheld by a 6-3 vote the right under federal law for Indians to run gambling operations without state regulation in states where such

  9. Root canal morphology of South Asian Indian maxillary molar teeth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shishir; Pawar, Mansing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to study the root canal morphology of South Asian Indian Maxillary molars using a tooth clearing technique. Materials and Methods: Hundred teeth each comprising of first, second, and third molars collected from different dental schools and clinics in India were subjected to standard dye penetration, decalcification and clearing procedure before being studied. Results: The first molar mesiobuccal roots exhibited 69% Type I, 24% Type II, 4% Type IV, 2% Type V, and 1% exhibited a Vertuccis Type VIII canal anatomy. In the group with three separate roots the second molar mesiobuccal roots in exhibited 80.6% Type I, 15.3% Type II, 2.7% Type IV, and 1.4% Type V canal anatomy while the third molars mesiobuccal roots exhibited 57.4% Type I, 32% Type II, 2.1% Type III, 8.5% Type IV, 1% had a Type V canal anatomy in the similar group. Conclusion: A varied root canal anatomy was seen in the mesiobuccal root canal of the maxillary molars. PMID:25713497

  10. Aberdeen Area Indian Health Service Environmental Health Program Review Conducted by: Indian Health Committee of the National Environmental Health Association (Aberdeen, South Dakota, May 23-27, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Aberdeen, SD. Aberdeen Area Office.

    The Indian Health Committee met in Aberdeen, South Dakota, during the week of May 23, 1977 to (1) review the environmental health services provided to the tribal units on the 15 Indian reservations located in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa, and (2) make recommendations for improvement or expansion of current programs, if needed. The

  11. The Indian Ocean Experiment: Widespread Air Pollution from South and Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Crutzen, P. J.; Ramanathan, V.; Andreae, M. O.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Campos, T.; Cass, G. R.; Dickerson, R. R.; Fischer, H.; de Gouw, J. A.; Hansel, A.; Jefferson, A.; Kley, D.; de Laat, A. T. J.; Lal, S.; Lawrence, M. G.; Lobert, J. M.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Mitra, A. P.; Novakov, T.; Oltmans, S. J.; Prather, K. A.; Reiner, T.; Rodhe, H.; Scheeren, H. A.; Sikka, D.; Williams, J.

    2001-02-01

    The Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) was an international, multiplatform field campaign to measure long-range transport of air pollution from South and Southeast Asia toward the Indian Ocean during the dry monsoon season in January to March 1999. Surprisingly high pollution levels were observed over the entire northern Indian Ocean toward the Intertropical Convergence Zone at about 6S. We show that agricultural burning and especially biofuel use enhance carbon monoxide concentrations. Fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning cause a high aerosol loading. The growing pollution in this region gives rise to extensive air quality degradation with local, regional, and global implications, including a reduction of the oxidizing power of the atmosphere.

  12. Signals of the South China Sea summer rainfall variability in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhuoqi; Wu, Renguang; Wang, Weiqiang

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigates signals of the South China Sea (SCS) summer rainfall variability in the Indian Ocean. It is found that the SCS summer rainfall has a negative relationship with December-January-February (DJF) western-equatorial Indian Ocean (WIO) sea surface temperature (SST), a positive relationship with an asymmetric mode of precipitation anomalies in the tropical Indian Ocean during March-April-May (MAM), and a positive relationship with June-July-August (JJA) South Indian Ocean (SIO) SST. The WIO SST anomalies induce same-sign southeast Indian Ocean SST anomalies through an anomalous zonal vertical circulation. The southeast Indian Ocean SST anomalies last from late winter to early summer and induce opposite-sign SCS summer rainfall anomalies via an anomalous meridional vertical circulation. The asymmetric mode influences the SCS summer rainfall variation via the North Indian Ocean (NIO) SST anomalies with significant cloud-radiation and wind-evaporation effect. Positive (negative) SIO SST anomalies drive an anomalous direct circulation between the SIO and the NIO, and an anomalous indirect circulation between the NIO and the SCS which facilitates the occurrence of cyclonic (anti-cyclonic) wind anomalies over the SCS-western North Pacific and results in positive (negative) SCS summer rainfall anomalies. Partial correlation analysis indicates that the influence of DJF WIO SST anomalies and JJA SIO SST anomalies on the SCS summer rainfall is partly ENSO-independent, while the MAM asymmetric mode is mostly related to the preceding DJF eastern Pacific SST anomalies.

  13. Genetic variation in genes involved in folate and drug metabolism in a south Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Padmalatha S; Murali, T. S; Vasudevan, T. G; Prasada, Shama K.; Bhagavath, Ashok Kumar; Pai, Pranita; Gopinath, P. M.; Satyamoorthy, K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic variations represented as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) vary across the world population. This genetic polymorphism (such as SNPs) plays an important role in pharmacogenomics. SNPs that affects cellular metabolism, by altering the enzyme activity, have an important role in therapeutic outcome. Allele frequencies in number of clinically relevant SNPs within south Indian populations are not yet known. Hence, we genotyped randomly selected unrelated south Indian subjects from different locations of south India representing the heterogeneous ethnic background of the population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Common variants of MTHFD1, TYMS, SHMT1, MTR, MTRR, CBS and SULT1A1 gene polymorphisms were screened from healthy unrelated south Indian volunteers. Genotypes were determined using RFLP analysis of polymerase chain reaction-amplified products and confirmed by DNA sequencing. Chi-square test was performed to test for deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for each locus. RESULTS: Gene allele frequency for several polymorphisms in our study differed significantly between the populations of other nations reported for several of the SNPs. These results demonstrate that the populations in different geographic regions may have widely varying genetic allele frequencies for clinically relevant SNPs. CONCLUSION: The present study reports, for the first time, the frequency distribution of MTHFD1, TYMS, SHMT1, MTR, MTRR, CBS and SULTIA1 gene polymorphisms in a south Indian population. Population-specific genetic polymorphism studies will help in practicing pharmacogenomic principles in the clinics. PMID:21747588

  14. Facial Indices of North and South Indian Adults: Reliability in Stature Estimation and Sexual Dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    LC, Prasanna; S, Bhosale; AS, DSouza; H, Mamatha; RH, Thomas; KS, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Anthropological studies have document differences in craniofacial features as well as in body characteristics among different populations. The variations in the facial morphology arise through a differential growth and they help us in distinguishing one person from another. These are controlled by a number of factors which include genetic heritage, climate and environment in which we live. Very few researchers from India have worked on these facial features with respect to population and environment. The present work was undertaken to determine whether facial variations were subjected to sexual dimorphism. In addition, comparison of facial indices was made, in order to determine possible variations between south and north Indian populations. Methods: The sample consisted of 200 individuals, 100 each from north and south Indian regions. Various facial parameters were determined on the basis of international anatomical description and facial indices were calculated. Results: North Indian males and females had highest facial height and upper facial height. Facial width of south Indians was more as compared to that of north Indians in both sexes. Regression equation was calculated to compare the probable height with actual height. Conclusion: All the facial parameters and facial indices were found to be statistically highly significant and they showed inter-regional and gender variations. These indices will be beneficial in facial reconstruction surgeries, maxillofacial surgeries, and in forensic medicine, for estimating the stature and sex of an individual. PMID:24086833

  15. Hamstring graft size and anthropometry in south Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Supradeeptha; Satyaprasad, Jonnalagedda

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim The role of anthropometric measurements in the prediction of hamstring autograft size in Indian population remains unclear. Till now, no studies have been done on Indian population. Methods We evaluated 41 consecutive patients (34 males, 7 females) prospectively with anterior cruciate ligament deficiency scheduled for reconstruction using hamstring autograft at our institution between June 2011 and June 2013. Preoperatively we recorded age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, and activity level. Intraoperative measurements of semitendinosus tendon like absolute length, diameter before fashioning the graft and final diameter of the tripled graft using sizing tubes calibrated to 1mm. Correlation coefficient (Pearson's r) analysis was used. Results As per study there is no correlation between graft diameter, age, sex, weight, activity, and body mass index, of patients. Height of patients correlated to graft diameter in both Indian men and women (p<0.001). Conclusion Anthropometric measurements such as weight, gender, activity level cannot be used as definitive predictors for the hamstring graft diameter during harvest but height of the patients can be taken as good predictor in Indian population. PMID:26403553

  16. Ocean transport and variability studies of the South Pacific, Southern, and Indian Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Church, John A.; Cresswell, G. R.; Nilsson, C. S.; Mcdougall, T. J.; Coleman, R.; Rizos, C.; Penrose, J.; Hunter, J. R.; Lynch, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyze ocean dynamics in the western South Pacific and the adjacent Southern Ocean and the eastern Indian Ocean. Specifically, our objectives for these three regions are, for the South Pacific Ocean: (1) To estimate the volume transport of the east Australian Current (EAC) along the Australian coast and in the Tasman Front, and to estimate the time variability (on seasonal and interannual time scales) of this transport. (2) To contribute to estimating the meridional heat and freshwater fluxes (and their variability) at about 30 deg S. Good estimates of the transport in the western boundary current are essential for accurate estimates of these fluxes. (3) To determine how the EAC transport (and its extension, the Tasman Front and the East Auckland Current) closes the subtropical gyre of the South Pacific and to better determine the structure at the confluence of this current and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. (4) To examine the structure and time variability of the circulation in the western South Pacific and the adjacent Southern Ocean, particularly at the Tasman Front. For the Indian Ocean: (5) To study the seasonal interannual variations in the strength of the Leeuwin Current. (6) To monitor the Pacific-Indian Ocean throughflow and the South Equatorial and the South Java Currents between northwest Australia and Indonesia. (7) To study the processes that form the water of the permanent oceanic thermocline and, in particular, the way in which new thermocline water enters the permanent thermocline in late winter and early spring as the mixed layer restratifies. For the Southern Ocean: (8) To study the mesoscale and meridional structure of the Southern Ocean between 150 deg E and 170 deg E; in particular, to describe the Antarctic frontal system south of Tasmania and determine its interannual variability; to estimate the exchanges of heat, salt, and other properties between the Indian and Pacific Oceans; and to investigate the annual ventilation of the Antarctic Intermediate Water and Subantarctic Mode Water Masses.

  17. Connection of sea level height between Western Pacific and South Indian Ocean in recent decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DU, Y.; Wang, T.; Zhuang, W.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Based on merged altimetry data and in site observations from tide gauges, we analyzed the fast increasing trend of sea surface height (SSH) in the recent two decades in the tropical Pacific and Indian Ocean. The results of analysis indicated a dynamic connection of SSH between the tropical western Pacific and the southeastern Indian Ocean. The low-frequency variations of SSH propagate westward in the tropical Pacific, enter the Indonesian Seas through the waveguide, and influence the southeastern India Ocean with the Kelvin-Rossby wave transformation. The thermal structure of upper ocean reveals the above adjustment mainly occur in the thermocline. However, the impacts from the Pacific are limited in the southeast Indian Ocean. In the central and west of the south Indian Ocean, local wind dominates the SSH changes in the last two decades. By lead-lag statistic analyses, we identified the cause of interdecadal from the interannual SSH variations. The interannual SSH variations is dominated by ENSO, forced by the anomalous wind along the equatorial Pacific. Whereas, the interdecadal SSH variations results from the off-equatorial wind stress curl, which is closely related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. The dynamic connections between the western Pacific and the south Indian Ocean were tested in the baroclinic Rossby wave solution and the numerical experiments based on the nonlinear reduced-gravity dynamics model.

  18. Can Indian Ocean SST variability impact TC activity in the South Pacific? A Spatial Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Andrew D.; Verdon-Kidd, Danielle C.; Kiem, Anthony S.

    2015-04-01

    Tropical Cyclones (TCs) represent a significant natural hazard to the 15 island nations and 2.7 million inhabitants of the South Pacific, accounting for 76% of reported disasters in the region since 1950. This vast area, dominated by the coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions of the South Pacific fuels the highly variable nature of TCs (both spatially and temporally), leading to difficulties in planning for and responding to these extreme events. While it is well known that the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) plays a significant role in modulating the background state on which TCs form, there are other large-scale climate drivers operating on annual timescales or longer within the South Pacific (e.g. ENSO Modoki and the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation) and outside the Pacific Basin (e.g. the Indian Ocean Dipole and the Southern Annular Mode) that may also influence TC formation. In response to this issue, the impact of these large-scale climate drivers upon the spatial characteristics of tropical cyclogenesis is assessed for the South Pacific region (5o-35oS, 145oE-130oW) over a 67-year period (1945-2011). It is shown, that in addition to the impact of 'Pacific-centric' climate drivers, eastern Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures significantly impact the spatial characteristics of tropical cyclogenesis in the South Pacific. In particular, warming (cooling) in the eastern Indian Ocean is found to result in an eastward (westward) shift in the average location of tropical cyclogenesis in the South Pacific (up to 712km between extreme phases). One mechanism that may account for this east/west modulation of TC activity in the South Pacific is the propagation of warmer water from the Timor Sea through the Coral Sea to the Pacific, resulting in a strengthening of the Pacific Warm Pool and associated meteorological characteristics connected with tropical cyclogenesis. Understanding how other large-scale climate modes interact with Indian Ocean processes is important in producing a 'real-life' climatology of TCs for the region. As such, when Indian Ocean SST variability is coupled with other drivers, for example, ENSO, significant amplification of TC activity is found; up to 1540km to the east of the overall mean centre of cyclogenesis. Given the extreme impacts of TCs, any improvements in the understanding of what causes the spatial variability of TC formation may help TC forecasting methods for the region, in turn improving disaster risk management and preparedness for the nations of the South Pacific.

  19. South Dakota NASA Space Grant Consortium Creating Bridges in Indian Country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolman, J. R.

    2004-12-01

    The South Dakota Space Grant Consortium (SDSGC) was established March 1, 1991 by a NASA Capability Enhancement Grant. Since that time SDSGC has worked to provide earth and space science educational outreach to all students across South Dakota. South Dakota has nine tribes and five tribal colleges. This has presented a tremendous opportunity to develop sustainable equitable partnerships and collaborations. SDSGC believes strongly in developing programs and activities that highlight the balance of indigenous science and ways of knowing with current findings in contemporary science. This blending of science and culture creates a learning community where individuals, especially students, can gain confidence and pride in their unique skills and abilities. Universities are also witnessing the accomplishments and achievements of students who are able to experience a tribal college environment and then carry that experience to a college/university/workplace and significantly increase the learning achievement of all. The presentation will highlight current Tribal College partnerships with Sinte Gleska University and Oglala Lakota College amongst others. Programs and activities to be explained during the presentation include: Native Connections, Scientific Knowledge for Indian Learning and Leadership (SKILL), Bridges to Success Summer Research Program, Fire Ecology Summer Experience, and dual enrolled/college bridge programs. The presentation will also cover the current initiatives underway through NASA Workforce Development. These include: partnering program with the Annual He Sapa Wacipi, American Indian Space Days 2005, NASA research/internship programs and NASA Fellow Summit. An overview of recent American Indian student success will conclude the presentation. The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology has struggled over many years to develop and implement sustainable successful initiatives with Tribal Colleges and Communities. The motivating philosophy is the betterment of all people in South Dakota. If people are provided equity and access, there is no limit to what they can accomplish. SDSM&T in the last three years has graduated nineteen American Indians with degrees in engineering, many of those students' tribal college transfers. This is a significant increase, as only forty American Indian had graduated in thirty years. NASA' presence on the SDSM&T campus has provided the necessary focus and encouragement for success to take place. We are building bridges in South Dakota and the builders are from Indian Country.

  20. Alpha-globin gene haplotypes in South American Indians.

    PubMed

    Zago, M A; Melo Santos, E J; Clegg, J B; Guerreiro, J F; Martinson, J J; Norwich, J; Figueiredo, M S

    1995-08-01

    The haplotypes of the alpha-globin gene cluster were determined for 99 Indians from the Brazilian Amazon region who belong to 5 tribes: Wayampí, Wayana-Apalaí, Kayapó, Arára, and Yanomámi. Three predominant haplotypes were identified: Ia (present in 38.9% of chromosomes), IIIa (25.8%), and IIe (22.1%). The only alpha-globin gene rearrangement detected was alpha alpha alpha 3.7 I gene triplication associated with haplotype IIIa, found in high frequencies (5.6% and 10.6%) in two tribes and absent in the others. alpha-Globin gene deletions that cause alpha-thalassemia were not seen, supporting the argument that malaria was absent in these populations until recently. The heterogeneous distribution of alpha-globin gene haplotypes and rearrangements among the different tribes differs markedly from the homogeneous distribution of beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes and reflects the action of various genetic mechanisms (genetic drift, founder effect, consanguinity) on small isolated population groups with a complicated history of divergence-fusion events. The alpha-globin gene haplotype distribution has some similarities to distributions observed in Southeast Asian and Pacific Island populations, indicating that these populations have considerable genetic affinities. However, the absence of several features of the alpha-globin gene cluster that are consistently present among the Pacific Islanders suggests that the similarity of haplotypes between Brazilian Indians and people from Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia is more likely to result of ancient common ancestry rather than the consequence of recent direct genetic contribution through immigration. PMID:7649529

  1. The dynamic connection of the Indonesian Throughflow, South Indian Ocean Countercurrent and the Leeuwin Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, E.; Le Bars, D.; de Ruijter, W. P. M.

    2015-09-01

    East of Madagascar, wind and surface buoyancy fluxes reinforce each other, leading to frontogenesis, outcrop and an eastward along-front flow: the South Indian Ocean Countercurrent (SICC). In the east the Leeuwin Current (LC) is a unique eastern boundary current which flows poleward along Australia. It is often described as a regional coastal current forced by an off-shore meridional density gradient or a sea surface slope, yet little is known of the forcing and dynamics that control these open ocean meridional gadients. To complete this understanding, we make use of both an ocean general circulation model and a conceptual two-layer model. The SICC impinges on west Australia and adds to a sea level slope and a southward geostrophic coastal jet: the Leeuwin Current. The SICC and the LC are thus dynamically connected. An observed transport maximum of the LC around 22 S is directly related to this impingement of the SICC. The circulation of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) through the Indian Ocean appears to be partly trapped in the upper layer north of the outcrop line and is redirected along this outcrop line to join the eastward flow of the SICC. Shutdown of the ITF in both models strongly decreases the Leeuwin Current transport and breaks the connection between the LC and SICC. In this case, most of the SICC was found to reconnect to the internal gyre circulation in the Indian Ocean. The Indonesian Throughflow, South Indian Ocean Countercurrent and the Leeuwin Current are thus dynamically coupled.

  2. Impact of eddies on surface chlorophyll in the South Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufois, Francois; Hardman-Mountford, Nick; Greenwood, Jim; Richardson, Anthony; Feng, Ming; Herbette, Steven; Matear, Richard

    2015-04-01

    A unique feature of the subtropical South Indian Ocean is the existence of anticyclonic eddies that have higher chlorophyll concentrations than cyclonic eddies. Off Western Australia, this anomalous behavior is related to the seeding of anticyclonic eddies with shelf water enriched in phytoplankton biomass and nutrients. Further off-shore, two mechanisms have been suggested to explain the eddy/chlorophyll relationship: (i) eddies originating from the Australian coast maintain their chlorophyll anomaly while propagating westward; and (ii) eddy-induced Ekman upwelling (downwelling) enhances (dampens) nutrient supply in anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddies. Here we describe the relationship between eddies and surface chlorophyll within the South Indian Ocean, and discuss possible mechanisms to explain the anomalous behavior in light of new analyses performed using satellite chlorophyll data. We show that anticyclonic eddies exhibit higher surface chlorophyll concentration than cyclonic eddies across the entire South Indian Ocean basin (from 20 to 28S), particularly in winter. Using Self Organizing Maps we analyze the chlorophyll patterns within anticyclonic eddies and cyclonic eddies and highlight their complexity. Our analysis suggests that multiple mechanisms may underlie the observed eddy/chlorophyll relationship. Based on Argo float data, we postulate the relationship may be partly related to seasonal adjustment of the mixed layer depth within eddies. Deeper mixing in anticyclonic eddies is expected to enhance nutrient supply to the mixed layer, while shallower mixing in cyclonic eddies is expected to reduce it. This could explain why the observed winter surface chlorophyll bloom is stronger in anticyclonic eddies than in cyclonic eddies.

  3. Zeolites in the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, William H.; Bush, Alfred L.; Gude, Arthur J., 3rd

    1982-01-01

    Zeolites of possible commercial value occur in the Brule Formation of Oligocene age and the Sharps Formation (Harksen, 1961) of Miocene age which crop out in a wide area in the northern part of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The thickness of the zeolite-bearing Interval and the extent of areas within the Interval which contain significant amounts of zeolites are far greater than was expected prior to this investigation. The shape of the zeolite-bearing Interval is tabular and the dimensions of Its exposure are roughly 10 ml x 200 mi x 150 ft (16 km x 160 km x 45 m) thick. Within the study area, there are tracts in which the zeolite resource potential is significant (see pl. 2). This report is intended to inform the Oglala Sioux Tribe of some of the most promising zeolite occurrences. Initial steps can then be taken by the Tribe toward possible development of the resources, should they wish to do so. The data contained herein identify areas of high zeolite potential, but are not adequate to establish economic value for the deposits. If development is recommended by the tribal government, we suggest that the tribal government contact companies involved in research and production of natural zeolites and provide them with the data in this report.

  4. Genetic variants in leptin: Determinants of obesity and leptin levels in South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Shruti; Salman, Mohammed; Siddalingaiah, Lokesh B; Lakshmi, GL; Xaviour, D; Sreenath, Jwalapuram

    2014-01-01

    The revelation of leptin action mechanisms has led to various attempts to establish the association of polymorphisms in the leptin gene with obesity-related phenotypes. But, outcomes have been contradicting, which made the information on the role of the leptin gene in regulating the mechanism of pathophysiology of obesity inexplicable. Moreover, none of the studies are known to have similar implications on the Indian population. To address such contradictions, our study aims to evaluate the association of leptin gene polymorphism with obesity and leptin levels in a South Indian Population. A total of 304 cases (BMI?27.5) and 309 controls (BMI?23) from local inhabitants of Mysore, Karnataka were recruited for the study. The leptin gene variants rs7799039, rs2167270 and rs4731426 independently, as well as in 4 haplotype combinations, were found to be significantly associated with the risk of obesity. An increasing trend in BMI and leptin levels was observed with every addition of A and C minor alleles of exonic variant (rs2167270) and intronic variant (rs4731426) respectively. However, only AA genotype of SNP rs7799039 was positively associated with BMI. None of the SNPs were associated with fat percentage and waist to hip ratio. On a whole, this data suggests that the common polymorphisms in the leptin gene are strong predictors of obesity and leptin levels in South Indians. PMID:26167411

  5. Reduction of the Powerful Greenhouse Gas N2O in the South-Eastern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Raes, Eric J; Bodrossy, Levente; Van de Kamp, Jodie; Holmes, Bronwyn; Hardman-Mountford, Nick; Thompson, Peter A; McInnes, Allison S; Waite, Anya M

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a key catalyst of stratospheric ozone depletion. Yet, little data exist about the sink and source terms of the production and reduction of N2O outside the well-known oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). Here we show the presence of functional marker genes for the reduction of N2O in the last step of the denitrification process (nitrous oxide reductase genes; nosZ) in oxygenated surface waters (180-250 O2 μmol.kg-1) in the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Overall copy numbers indicated that nosZ genes represented a significant proportion of the microbial community, which is unexpected in these oxygenated waters. Our data show strong temperature sensitivity for nosZ genes and reaction rates along a vast latitudinal gradient (32°S-12°S). These data suggest a large N2O sink in the warmer Tropical waters of the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Clone sequencing from PCR products revealed that most denitrification genes belonged to Rhodobacteraceae. Our work highlights the need to investigate the feedback and tight linkages between nitrification and denitrification (both sources of N2O, but the latter also a source of bioavailable N losses) in the understudied yet strategic Indian Ocean and other oligotrophic systems. PMID:26800249

  6. Reduction of the Powerful Greenhouse Gas N2O in the South-Eastern Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Raes, Eric J.; Bodrossy, Levente; Van de Kamp, Jodie; Holmes, Bronwyn; Hardman-Mountford, Nick; Thompson, Peter A.; McInnes, Allison S.; Waite, Anya M.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a powerful greenhouse gas and a key catalyst of stratospheric ozone depletion. Yet, little data exist about the sink and source terms of the production and reduction of N2O outside the well-known oxygen minimum zones (OMZ). Here we show the presence of functional marker genes for the reduction of N2O in the last step of the denitrification process (nitrous oxide reductase genes; nosZ) in oxygenated surface waters (180–250 O2 μmol.kg-1) in the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Overall copy numbers indicated that nosZ genes represented a significant proportion of the microbial community, which is unexpected in these oxygenated waters. Our data show strong temperature sensitivity for nosZ genes and reaction rates along a vast latitudinal gradient (32°S-12°S). These data suggest a large N2O sink in the warmer Tropical waters of the south-eastern Indian Ocean. Clone sequencing from PCR products revealed that most denitrification genes belonged to Rhodobacteraceae. Our work highlights the need to investigate the feedback and tight linkages between nitrification and denitrification (both sources of N2O, but the latter also a source of bioavailable N losses) in the understudied yet strategic Indian Ocean and other oligotrophic systems. PMID:26800249

  7. Estimation of stature from hand dimensions of north and south Indians.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Prateek; Nagesh, K R; Yoganarasimha, K

    2008-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to predict the stature of a person using hand length and breadth. The study includes 500 right-hand dominant medical students aged between 20 and 30 years, from northern and southern parts of India, studying in Kasturba medical college, Manipal, India. Hand length was measured 'between the distal wrist crease and the tip of middle finger (HL-1)' and 'between the mid-point of inter-styloid line to the tip of middle finger (HL-2)'. Hand breadth was measured between radial side of the second metacarpophalyngeal joint and ulnar side of the fifth metacarpophalyngeal joint (HB). No significant difference was present in hand dimensions between north and south Indians. When compared between both hands, right-hand dimensions were larger than the left hand, with statistically significant difference in HL-2 and HB. Linear regression equations using hand length is more helpful in estimating stature than the hand breadth. The correlation coefficients ranged from 0.673 to 0.665 and 0.740 to 0.732 in north Indian males and females, respectively. Whereas in south Indians, it ranged from 0.752 to 0.732 and 0.701 to 0.691 in males and females, respectively. Multiple regression equations give better results than linear regression equations. HL-2 gives more accurate results in stature estimation than the HL-1. PMID:18291701

  8. Assessment of craniometric traits in South Indian dry skulls for sex determination.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Balakrishnan; Pai, Mangala M; Prabhu, Latha V; Muralimanju, B V; Rai, Rajalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton plays an important role in sex determination in forensic anthropology. The skull bone is considered as the second best after the pelvic bone in sex determination due to its better retention of morphological features. Different populations have varying skeletal characteristics, making population specific analysis for sex determination essential. Hence the objective of this investigation is to obtain the accuracy of sex determination using cranial parameters of adult skulls to the highest percentage in South Indian population and to provide a baseline data for sex determination in South India. Seventy adult preserved human skulls were taken and based on the morphological traits were classified into 43 male skulls and 27 female skulls. A total of 26 craniometric parameters were studied. The data were analyzed by using the SPSS discriminant function. The analysis of stepwise, multivariate, and univariate discriminant function gave an accuracy of 77.1%, 85.7%, and 72.9% respectively. Multivariate direct discriminant function analysis classified skull bones into male and female with highest levels of accuracy. Using stepwise discriminant function analysis, the most dimorphic variable to determine sex of the skull, was biauricular breadth followed by weight. Subjecting the best dimorphic variables to univariate discriminant analysis, high levels of accuracy of sexual dimorphism was obtained. Percentage classification of high accuracies were obtained in this study indicating high level of sexual dimorphism in the crania, setting specific discriminant equations for the gender determination in South Indian people. PMID:26519924

  9. Accuracy of Demirjian's 8 teeth method for age prediction in South Indian children: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Rezwana Begum; Srinivas, Baratam; Sanghvi, Praveen; Satyanarayana, Gajjarapu; Gopalakrishnan, Meera; Pavani, B. Vamsi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Demirjian's method of tooth development is most commonly used to assess age in individuals with emerging teeth. However, its application on numerous populations has resulted in wide variations in age estimates and consequent suggestions for the method's adaptation to the local sample. Original Demirjian's method utilized seven mandibular teeth, to which recently third molar is added so that the method can be applied on a wider age group. Furthermore, the revised method developed regression formulas for assessing age. In Indians, as these formulas resulted in underestimation, India-specific regression formulas were developed recently. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the accuracy and applicability of original regression formulas (Chaillet and Demirjian 2004) and India-specific regression formulas (Acharya 2010) using Demirjian's 8 teeth method in South Indian children of age groups 9–20 years. Methods: The present study consisted of 660 randomly selected subjects (330 males and 330 females) were in the aged ranging from 9 to 20 years divided into 11 groups according to their age. Demirjian's 8 teeth method was used for staging of teeth. Results: Demirjian's method underestimated the dental age (DA) by 1.66 years for boys and 1.55 years for girls and 1.61 years in total. Acharya's method over estimated DA by 0.21 years for boys and 0.85 years for girls and 0.53 years in total. The absolute accuracy was better for Acharya's method compared with Demirjian method. Conclusion: This study concluded that both the Demirjian and Indian regression formulas were reliable in assessing age making Demirjian's 8 teeth method applicable for South Indians. PMID:25684903

  10. Vitamin B12 intake and status in early pregnancy among urban South Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Tinu Mary; Duggan, Christopher; Thomas, Tinku; Bosch, Ronald; Rajendran, Ramya; Virtanen, Suvi M; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Kurpad, Anura V

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the vitamin B12 status of South Indian women in early pregnancy and its relationship with sociodemographic, anthropometry and dietary intake. Methods Cross-sectional study among 366 pregnant urban South Indian women ≤14 weeks of gestation with outcome variables defined as low vitamin B12 blood concentration (<150 pmol/L) and impaired vitamin B12 status [low vitamin B12 plus elevated methylmalonic acid (MMA) >0.26 μmol/L)]. Results Low plasma vitamin B12 concentration was observed in 51.1% of the women, while 42.4% had impaired B12 status. Elevated MMA, elevated homocysteine ( >10 μmol/L) and low erythrocyte folate (<283 nmol/L) was observed among 75.8%, 43.3% and 22.2% of women, respectively. The median (25th, 75th percentile) dietary intake of vitamin B12 was 1.25 (0.86, 1.96) μg/day. Lower maternal body weight was associated with higher vitamin B12 concentration [prevalence ratios (PR) (95% CI) 0.57 (0.39, 0.84)). The predictors of impaired vitamin B12 status were non-use of yoghurt [PR (95%CI) 1.63 (1.03, 2.58)], non-use of fish [PR (95% CI) 1.32 (1.01, 1.71)] and primiparity [PR (95% CI) 1.41 (1.05, 1.90)]. Conclusion A high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in early pregnancy among urban South Indian women was related to primiparity and to a low consumption of yoghurt and fish. PMID:23344013

  11. Radiographic assessment of facial soft tissue thickness in South Indian population - An anthropologic study.

    PubMed

    Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi S; Mallapur, M D

    2016-04-01

    Facial reconstruction is a technique used in forensic anthropology to identify an unknown person. Various methods used for facial reconstruction are drawings, sculpture and computer aided image building which is mainly based on facial soft tissue thickness measurement. Several methods have been established for measuring facial soft tissue thickness (FSTT) with each one having certain limitations. There is limited data available on FSTT among South Indian population. Hence the present study was ventured to determine the FSTT among South Indian adults and also to find FSTT difference between male and female. 308 subjects of South Indian origin (18-27years) having full set of permanent dentition who require orthodontic treatment were included in the study. Subjects were assessed for Body Mass Index (BMI) and diagnostic digital x-ray of lateral cephalogram (LC), Lateral oblique (LO) view and posterior-anterior (PA) view was obtained. The digital image was transferred to Adobe Photoshop CS4 software and 23 different soft tissue points were measured. Mean FSTT was more in males compared to females except for three landmarks. Statistically significant difference was observed in 20 landmarks when height and weight was compared in males, whereas in females only 12 landmarks showed significant difference. BMI showed good correlation with FSTT in both males and females, which was confirmed by linear regression. The best regressor in terms of estimating FSTT in association with age/sex/BMI were nasion, sub nasale, labial superioris, labrale inferius, gnathion, inferior border of zygomatic, right and left gonion. Stepwise discriminant analysis using all variables showed 94.8% of overall accuracy in sex determination. The observation of present study suggests that LO and PA view along with LC gives information regarding mean FSTT among South Indian population. Even though BMI plays a dominant role in determining FSTT, but age, sex, height and weight should also be considered with care while facial reconstruction. Additionally the present regression equation contributes towards increase in the specificity of the tissue depths and can be used in real cases by allowing the practitioners to calculate individual tissue depth. PMID:26924726

  12. Local and remote forcing of decadal sea level and thermocline depth variability in the South Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenary, Laurie L.; Han, Weiqing

    2013-01-01

    AbstractAnalysis is performed on a set of diagnostic numerical experiments designed to isolate local <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean forcing versus remote forcing from the Pacific via the Indonesian throughflow on decadal variability of subsurface temperature, sea level, and thermocline depth of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. It is found that the vertical structure of decadal temperature variability varies from decade-to-decade, with maximum variation peaking in the vicinity of the thermocline. The decadal-scale temperature variations in the tropical southwestern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean between 5°S and 17°S are primarily associated with the vertical displacements of the thermocline. Prior to the early 1990s, decadal variations in sea level and thermocline depth can be described in terms of a baroclinic Sverdrup balance, forced by Ekman pumping velocity associated with windstress curl acting on the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Beginning in the early 1990s, decadal variability of the equatorial Pacific trades forces thermocline variations that modify the sea level and thermocline depth across the tropical <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean basin. Farther <span class="hlt">south</span>, between 20°S and 30°S, oceanic internal variability makes significant contributions to decadal variability of the thermocline. The anomalies along the western coast of Australia are primarily driven by regional forcing acting on the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean prior to the 1990s, and signals originating from the equatorial Pacific make a greater contribution thereafter.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3781558','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3781558"><span id="translatedtitle">Inverted Y chromosome polymorphism in the Gujerati Muslim <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bernstein, R; Wadee, A; Rosendorff, J; Wessels, A; Jenkins, T</p> <p>1986-11-01</p> <p>An inverted Y chromosome has been found at a very high frequency in a Muslim <span class="hlt">Indian</span> community living in the Johannesburg-Witwatersrand area of the Transvaal Province of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa: 8 of 141 (5.7%) retrospectively identified <span class="hlt">Indian</span> males had an inv(Y)(p11.2q11.23) and all were of the Muslim faith. The inversion was found in 22 of 72 (30.5%) prospectively studied normal Muslim <span class="hlt">Indian</span> males. All the carriers of the inversion were Gujarati-speakers whose families migrated to the Transvaal from the Gujerat Province of India during the first half of this century. The origins of the ancestors of the individuals with inv(Y) were traced to a small village, Kholvad, near the city of Surat, and some neighbouring villages. The polymorphic frequency of the inv(Y) has probably been produced through random genetic drift in a reproductively isolated community, maintained by strict endogamous marriage customs based on religious and linguistic affiliations. There was no indication that the inverted Y was associated with any reproductive disadvantages. PMID:3781558</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.3065L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.3065L"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Countercurrent: a return pathway of the Indonesian Throughflow?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lambert, Erwin; leBars, Dewi; de Ruijter, Will</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Counter Current (SICC) is associated with a thermal front embedded in a broad eastward flow across the subtropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean and feeds into the poleward Leeuwin Current (LC). Previous studies have shown that the LC and SICC are sensitive to variations of the inflow of Pacific water through the Indonesian Passages (ITF). These subtropical countercurrents, of which the SICC is an example, are characterized by high eddy activity and theoretical work has shown the non-linear nature of their dynamics. That has motivated us to investigate the inertial response to the ITF of the IO circulaion. Analysis of two global eddy resolving model runs with the Indonesian Passages open and closed showed that the full 15 Sv of the ITF flows through the Mozambique Channel but only 10 Sv ends up in the Agulhas Current. This suggests that the SICC-LC system forms part of the return pathway of the ITF to the Pacific. Using the Hallberg Isopycnal Model we have investigated the combined effect of ITF, wind- and buoyancy forcing on the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean circulation in the inertial boundary layer regime.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4095716','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4095716"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence of Catalase (-21 A/T) Gene Variant in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> (Tamil) Population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lourdhu Mary, A.; Nithya, K.; Isabel, W.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Catalase, an endogenous antioxidant enzyme, is responsible for regulating reactive species levels. Several epidemiologic studies have suggested that single nucleotide polymorphism in catalase gene may be associated with many diseases. The genotype of CAT (-21 A/T) point mutation in promoter region of catalase gene was determined by polymerase chain based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in the DNA of 100 healthy volunteers. The frequency of CAT (-21 A/T) gene polymorphism AA, AT, and TT genotypes was found to be 7, 23, and 70 percent, respectively. The mutant “T” allele frequency was found to be 0.82 among the <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> (Tamil) population. Chi square analysis showed that the study population lies within the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The wild type genotype (AA) was found to be very low (7%) and the mutant genotype (AT/TT) was found to be more prevalent (93%) among the <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. This suggests that the high prevalence of mutant genotype may increase the susceptibility to oxidative stress associated diseases. PMID:25057503</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3534380','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3534380"><span id="translatedtitle">Sequencing and analysis of a <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> personal genome</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background With over 1.3 billion people, India is estimated to contain three times more genetic diversity than does Europe. Next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the understanding of diversity by enabling whole genome sequencing at greater speed and lower cost. While genomes from people of European and Asian descent have been sequenced, only recently has a single male genome from the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent been published at sufficient depth and coverage. In this study we have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian <span class="hlt">Indian</span> female (SAIF) from the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> state of Kerala. Results We identified over 3.4 million SNPs in this genome including over 89,873 private variations. Comparison of the SAIF genome with several published personal genomes revealed that this individual shared ~50% of the SNPs with each of these genomes. Analysis of the SAIF mitochondrial genome showed that it was closely related to the U1 haplogroup which has been previously observed in Kerala. We assessed the SAIF genome for SNPs with health and disease consequences and found that the individual was at a higher risk for multiple sclerosis and a few other diseases. In analyzing SNPs that modulate drug response, we found a variation that predicts a favorable response to metformin, a drug used to treat diabetes. SNPs predictive of adverse reaction to warfarin indicated that the SAIF individual is not at risk for bleeding if treated with typical doses of warfarin. In addition, we report the presence of several additional SNPs of medical relevance. Conclusions This is the first study to report the complete whole genome sequence of a female from the state of Kerala in India. The availability of this complete genome and variants will further aid studies aimed at understanding genetic diversity, identifying clinically relevant changes and assessing disease burden in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. PMID:22938532</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890012836','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890012836"><span id="translatedtitle">Heat flow, heat generation and crustal thermal structure of the northern block of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Craton</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Gupta, Mohan L.; Sharma, S. R.; Sundar, A.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Heat flow values and heat generation data calculated from the concentration of heat producing radioactive elements, U, Th and K in surface rocks were analyzed. The <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Craton according to Drury et al., can be divided into various blocks, separated by late Proterozoic shear belts. The northern block comprises Eastern and Western Dharwar Cratons of Rogers (1986), Naqvi and Rogers (1987) and a part of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> granulite terrain up to a shear system occupying the Palghat-Cauvery low lands. The geothermal data analysis clearly demonstrates that the present thermal characteristics of the above two Archaean terrains of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Australian Shields are quite similar. Their crustal thermal structures are likely to be similar also.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=migration&pg=6&id=EJ1020028','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=migration&pg=6&id=EJ1020028"><span id="translatedtitle">U.S. Engineering Degrees for Improving <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Graduate Students' Marriage and Dowry Options</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yakaboski, Tamara; Sheridan, Robyn Stout; Dade, Kristin</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The article examines improved marriage opportunities as an unexplored motivator for pursuing international education via U.S. graduate engineering degrees and stresses the need to centralize gender in analyzing academic mobility and international education. This interdisciplinary qualitative study explores how <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> men and women's</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=marriage&id=EJ1020028','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=marriage&id=EJ1020028"><span id="translatedtitle">U.S. Engineering Degrees for Improving <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Graduate Students' Marriage and Dowry Options</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yakaboski, Tamara; Sheridan, Robyn Stout; Dade, Kristin</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The article examines improved marriage opportunities as an unexplored motivator for pursuing international education via U.S. graduate engineering degrees and stresses the need to centralize gender in analyzing academic mobility and international education. This interdisciplinary qualitative study explores how <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> men and women's…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3848863','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3848863"><span id="translatedtitle">New data regarding distribution of cattle ticks in the <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean islands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Recent studies have produced new insight into the origin and distribution of some cattle ticks in the <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean islands. Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, introduced from Tanzania in 2002, is now well established on Grande Comore but has not yet reached the other islands of the archipelago (Mohéli, Anjouan and Mayotte). Only one of the two clades identified in Africa has settled so far. Amblyomma variegatum, which was not supposed to be able to persist in the Antananarivo region (1300 m) nor in other Malagasy regions of high altitude without regular introductions of ticks by infested cattle, is now endemic as a general rule up to 1600 m although other regions of lower altitude (1400 m) are still free of the tick. This species remains confined in a small area of the west coast on La Reunion Island. On the contrary, Hyalomma dromedarii could not settle on Madagascar where it was introduced in 2008 and Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi is not yet present in Grande Comore despite regular introductions by infested cattle from Tanzania. A phylogeographic approach has been carried out at an intra-specific level for A. variegatum. This study has led to the identification of two main lineages, one covering all species distribution and one restricted to East Africa and the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean area. These two lineages are in sympatry in Madagascar where a high genetic diversity has been described, whereas a lower genetic diversity is observed on other islands. These results seem to agree with the historical data concerning the introduction of the tick in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean area. PMID:24016261</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>1</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li class="active"><span>3</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_3 --> <div id="page_4" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="61"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014OcScD..11.2879Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014OcScD..11.2879Z"><span id="translatedtitle">Eddy characteristics in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean as inferred from surface drifter</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zheng, Shaojun; Du, Yan; Li, Jiaxun; Cheng, Xuhua</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Using a geometric eddy identification method, cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies from submesoscale to mesoscale in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (SIO) have been statistically investigated based on 2082 surface drifters from 1979 to 2013. 19252 eddies are identified with 60% anticyclonic eddies. For the submesoscale eddies (radius r < 10 km), the ratio of cyclonic eddies (3183) to anticyclonic eddies (7182) is 1 to 2. In contrast, number of anticyclonic and cyclonic eddies with radius r ? 10 km is almost equal. Mesoscale and submesoscale eddies show different spatial distribution. Eddies with radius r ? 100 km mainly appear in a band along 25 S, in Mozambique Channel, and Agulhas Current, characterized by large eddy kinetic energy. The submesoscale anticyclonic eddies are densely distributed in the subtropical basin in the central SIO. The number of mesoscale eddies shows statistically significant seasonal variability, reaching a maximum in October and then minimum in February.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoRL..39.6602H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012GeoRL..39.6602H"><span id="translatedtitle">The impact of advective transport by the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Countercurrent on the Madagascar plankton bloom</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huhn, F.; von Kameke, A.; Prez-Muuzuri, V.; Olascoaga, M. J.; Beron-Vera, F. J.</p> <p>2012-03-01</p> <p>Based on ten years (1998-2007) of satellite ocean color data we analyze the spatiotemporal patterns in the seasonal Madagascar plankton bloom with respect to the advection of the recently discovered Southern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Countercurrent (SICC). In maps of Finite-time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) and Finite-Time Zonal Drift (FTZD) computed from altimetry derived velocities we observe a narrow zonal jet that starts at 25S at the southern tip of Madagascar, an important upwelling region, and extends to the east further than the largest plankton blooms (2500 km). In bloom years, the jet coincides with large parts of the northern boundary of the plankton bloom, acting as a barrier to meridional transport. Our findings suggest that advection is an important and so far underestimated mechanism for the eastward propagation and the extent of the plankton bloom. This supports the hypothesis of a single nutrient source <span class="hlt">south</span> of Madagascar.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.9336P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013EGUGA..15.9336P"><span id="translatedtitle">Annual Pollen and Spore Sedimentation Record off <span class="hlt">South</span> Java in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Poliakova, Anastasia; Rixen, Tim; Behling, Hermann</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Marine sediments are excellent archives recording environmental changes in the ocean as well as on land. In particular pollen and spores preserved in marine sediments could provide crucial information on land use and climate changes in the past. However, in order to better understand and interpret sedimentary records studies on modern pollen and spore transportation and sedimentation is needed. Therefore a sediment trap was deployed for about one year (December 2001 - November 2002) off <span class="hlt">South</span> Java in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean at a water-depth of about 2000 m. Abundance and taxa composition of pollen and spores collected by the sediment trap reflect climatic (monsoon conditions and ocean currents) as well as biological (flowering periods, migration ability of pollen) factors controlling their sedimentation. Pollen and, at a lower rate, pteridophyta spore concentration tends to increase during non-monsoon period.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUSMED33C..01C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AGUSMED33C..01C"><span id="translatedtitle">Population Growth and Sprawl on the Pine Ridge <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Campbell, R. L.</p> <p>2006-05-01</p> <p>The most important impact on global land cover is human use and development. With the recent population growth occurring on the reservations in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota, especially Pine Ridge <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, the towns and agricultural areas of the reservation are undergoing a change. Although urban sprawl certainly is not a consideration on the reservations, the population explosion currently underway has seen a subsequent increase in rural sprawl. In this case, rural sprawl is defined as exponential population growth and geographic expansion of remote reservation communities. Using satellite imagery and software to render these images is a cost effective way to investigate this growth. Also, using remotely sensed data and a GIS (geographic information system) package can address different issues that concern people and communities in and around the Pine Ridge area. The objective of my project is to observe land use change on the Pine Ridge <span class="hlt">Indian</span> reservation using Geographic Information Systems such as; ARCGis 9, ENVI, and Multispec, along with Landsat 4, 5, and 7 imagery over the past 20 years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3927245','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3927245"><span id="translatedtitle">Plasma homocysteine levels in depression and schizophrenia in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Tamilian population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Narayan, Sunil K; Verman, Arul; Kattimani, Shivanand; Ananthanarayanan, P H; Adithan, Chandrasekaran</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Context: Hyperhomocysteinemia has been associated with psychiatric diseases in non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> populations. Objectives: We aimed to determine if total plasma Homocysteine (Hcys) is associated with schizophrenia or depression in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Tamil patients and if so, to correlate their severity and phenomenology to Hcys levels. Settings and Design: 40 patients each with schizophrenia and depression and 40 healthy controls were recruited from the psychiatry department of a quaternary referral centre. Association between Hcys and psychiatric disorders was determined using a Case- control design. Hcys levels were correlated with age, gender and severity and duration of the disease by appropriate statistical methods using SPSS17. Materials and Methods: Schizophrenia and depression were defined using ICD10 DCR version. Severity of depression was assessed by Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and that of schizophrenia using Positive and Negative Schizophrenia scales (PANSS). Hcys levels were determined using automated chemiluminiscence immunoassay (74-76). Statistical Analysis: Differences between the mean values of plasma homocysteine levels among schizophrenia, depression and control groups were compared using analysis of variants. The association between the severity and duration of schizophrenia and depression and the plasma homocysteine levels were determine using Pearson correlation. Conclusions: In Tamilian population, schizophrenia and depression are associated with total plasma Hcys levels which correlated with the duration and severity of psychosis. PMID:24574558</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4701704','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4701704"><span id="translatedtitle">Morphology and topography of the parietal emissary foramina in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>: an anatomical study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Saralaya, Vasudha V.; Somesh, M. S.; Prabhu, Latha V.; Krishnamurthy, Ashwin; Chettiar, Ganesh Kumar; Pai, Mangala M.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The objectives of the present study were to study the prevalence of the parietal emissary vein in adult <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population and to study the distance of foramen from the sagittal suture. There were 58 adult human skulls in the present study which were available at the anatomy department of our institution. The study included 116 parietal bones which have been observed macroscopically for the number, prevalence and topography of the emissary foramen. The emissary foramen was present in 83 parietal bones (71.5%) of the present study. It was present at the junction between the middle 1/3 and posterior 1/3 region of the parietal bone. The foramen was observed solitary in 73 parietal bones (62.9%), double in 8 bones (6.9%), and triple in 2 parietal bones (1.7%). The foramen was not observed in 33 parietal bones (28.4%). The bilateral absence of parietal emissary foramen was seen in 7 skulls (12.1%). It was absent unilaterally in 19 skulls (32.7%). The accessory foramina were seen in only 8 skulls (13.8%). The mean distance of the foramen from the sagittal suture was 6.7±2.9 mm and 6.8±2.8 mm on the right and left sides respectively. The prevalence of parietal emissary vein in the present study was 71.5%. The present study has observed important data about the morphology and morphometry of the parietal emissary vein in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. The identification of parietal emissary veins and accessory veins is important in the operation room to prevent the blood loss. PMID:26770881</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS43G..04M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS43G..04M"><span id="translatedtitle">Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean: Revealing Annual-Period Planetary Waves</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Menezes, V. V.; Vianna, M. L.; Phillips, H. E.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Increased understanding of the dynamics of the real ocean depends crucially on global-scale routine observations of oceanic and surface atmospheric variables. A new milestone has been reached with the launch of two dedicated satellite missions to routinely measure the sea surface salinity (SSS) fields from space. In the present work, a thorough analysis of the first 2 years of Aquarius SSS data in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean is performed together with the Argo and RAMA data. This analysis is focused into 3 questions: How accurately is Aquarius observing the fresh Indonesian Throughflow and the salty subtropical waters? Can Aquarius give a spatial context for interpreting the data measured by the RAMA mooring system, which are highly resolved in time, but very sparse in space? Can westward propagating seasonal signals be observed in the Aquarius SSS fields as recently described in model simulations? We find Aquarius observations to be highly correlated with those obtained from Argo and RAMA, with lowest RMS differences found in the salty subtropical waters. In the tropical region, Aquarius gives slightly fresher SSS than in situ data mainly due to rainfall effects, except in the eastern basin where the freshening seems to be related to sharp localized leakages of very fresh waters from the Indonesian seas that the Aquarius L3 product is not able to properly resolve. Aquarius data are shown to reproduce quite well the annual cycle obtained from RAMA and Argo gridded data sets. The annual cycle is characterized by SSS propagating features with different characteristics west and east of the Ninety East Ridge, with the observed patterns better interpreted as a superposition of planetary wave modes. The SSS features are strikingly different from altimetry-derived sea surface height waves. Our results suggest that SSS annual propagation might be reflecting coupled ocean-atmosphere dynamics and surface-subsurface processes operating over the entire <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRC..119.3883M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRC..119.3883M"><span id="translatedtitle">Aquarius sea surface salinity in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean: Revealing annual-period planetary waves</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Menezes, Viviane V.; Vianna, Marcio L.; Phillips, Helen E.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>A new milestone has been reached with the launch of two dedicated satellite missions to routinely measure the sea surface salinity (SSS) fields from space at global and regional scales. In the present work, a thorough analysis of the first 2 years of Aquarius SSS data in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean is performed. This analysis is focused on three questions: How accurate is Aquarius SSS related to in situ data from the fresh Indonesian Throughflow and salty subtropical waters? Can Aquarius give a spatial context for the data measured by the RAMA mooring system? Are westward propagating annual-period signals described in recent model simulations reproduced by Aquarius-derived SSS? We find Aquarius observations to be highly correlated with those of Argo floats, with small disagreements occurring near oceanic fronts. Aquarius gives fresher SSS than in situ data in the tropical region due to rainfall effects, except in the eastern basin where the freshening seems to be related to sharp localized leakages of very fresh waters from the Indonesian seas that the Aquarius product is not able to properly resolve. Aquarius data are shown to reproduce quite well the annual cycle obtained from RAMA and Argo gridded data sets. The annual cycle in Aquarius is characterized by SSS propagating features with different characteristics west and east of the Ninety East Ridge. These features are strikingly different from sea surface height waves. Our results suggest that SSS annual propagation might be reflecting coupled ocean-atmosphere dynamics and surface-subsurface processes operating over the entire <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770881','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26770881"><span id="translatedtitle">Morphology and topography of the parietal emissary foramina in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>: an anatomical study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Murlimanju, B V; Saralaya, Vasudha V; Somesh, M S; Prabhu, Latha V; Krishnamurthy, Ashwin; Chettiar, Ganesh Kumar; Pai, Mangala M</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The objectives of the present study were to study the prevalence of the parietal emissary vein in adult <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population and to study the distance of foramen from the sagittal suture. There were 58 adult human skulls in the present study which were available at the anatomy department of our institution. The study included 116 parietal bones which have been observed macroscopically for the number, prevalence and topography of the emissary foramen. The emissary foramen was present in 83 parietal bones (71.5%) of the present study. It was present at the junction between the middle 1/3 and posterior 1/3 region of the parietal bone. The foramen was observed solitary in 73 parietal bones (62.9%), double in 8 bones (6.9%), and triple in 2 parietal bones (1.7%). The foramen was not observed in 33 parietal bones (28.4%). The bilateral absence of parietal emissary foramen was seen in 7 skulls (12.1%). It was absent unilaterally in 19 skulls (32.7%). The accessory foramina were seen in only 8 skulls (13.8%). The mean distance of the foramen from the sagittal suture was 6.7±2.9 mm and 6.8±2.8 mm on the right and left sides respectively. The prevalence of parietal emissary vein in the present study was 71.5%. The present study has observed important data about the morphology and morphometry of the parietal emissary vein in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. The identification of parietal emissary veins and accessory veins is important in the operation room to prevent the blood loss. PMID:26770881</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3519775','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3519775"><span id="translatedtitle">Arrival of Paleo-<span class="hlt">Indians</span> to the Southern Cone of <span class="hlt">South</span> America: New Clues from Mitogenomes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>de Saint Pierre, Michelle; Gandini, Francesca; Perego, Ugo A.; Bodner, Martin; Gmez-Carballa, Alberto; Corach, Daniel; Angerhofer, Norman; Woodward, Scott R.; Semino, Ornella; Salas, Antonio; Parson, Walther; Moraga, Mauricio; Achilli, Alessandro; Torroni, Antonio; Olivieri, Anna</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>With analyses of entire mitogenomes, studies of Native American mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation have entered the final phase of phylogenetic refinement: the dissection of the founding haplogroups into clades that arose in America during and after human arrival and spread. Ages and geographic distributions of these clades could provide novel clues on the colonization processes of the different regions of the double continent. As for the Southern Cone of <span class="hlt">South</span> America, this approach has recently allowed the identification of two local clades (D1g and D1j) whose age estimates agree with the dating of the earliest archaeological sites in <span class="hlt">South</span> America, indicating that Paleo-<span class="hlt">Indians</span> might have reached that region from Beringia in less than 2000 years. In this study, we sequenced 46 mitogenomes belonging to two additional clades, termed B2i2 (former B2l) and C1b13, which were recently identified on the basis of mtDNA control-region data and whose geographical distributions appear to be restricted to Chile and Argentina. We confirm that their mutational motifs most likely arose in the Southern Cone region. However, the age estimate for B2i2 and C1b13 (1113,000 years) appears to be younger than those of other local clades. The difference could reflect the different evolutionary origins of the distinct <span class="hlt">South</span> American-specific sub-haplogroups, with some being already present, at different times and locations, at the very front of the expansion wave in <span class="hlt">South</span> America, and others originating later in situ, when the tribalization process had already begun. A delayed origin of a few thousand years in one of the locally derived populations, possibly in the central part of Chile, would have limited the geographical and ethnic diffusion of B2i2 and explain the present-day occurrence that appears to be mainly confined to the Tehuelche and Araucanian-speaking groups. PMID:23240014</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26095803','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26095803"><span id="translatedtitle">Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T polymorphism is associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease in young <span class="hlt">South</span> African <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ramkaran, Prithiksha; Phulukdaree, Alisa; Khan, Sajidah; Moodley, Devapregasan; Chuturgoon, Anil A</p> <p>2015-10-15</p> <p>Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) reduces 5',10'-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5'-methyltetrahydrofolate, and is involved in remethylation of homocysteine to methionine, two important reactions involved in folate metabolism and methylation pathways. The common MTHFR C677T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs1801133) has been associated with raised levels of homocysteine, a well known risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD is a major cause of mortality worldwide. The age of onset of this chronic disorder is on the decline, particularly in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa (SA) have a higher prevalence of premature CAD compared to Black <span class="hlt">South</span> Africans. The MTHFR C677T SNP has not been investigated in the SA <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. The present study therefore investigated the MTHFR C677T SNP in young SA <span class="hlt">Indian</span> males with CAD compared to young <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Black male controls. A total of 290 subjects were recruited into this study which included 106 CAD patients (diagnosed on angiography, mean age 37.5, range 24-45 years), 100 <span class="hlt">Indian</span> male controls (mean age 37.5, range 28-45 years), and 84 Black male controls (mean age 36.4, range 25-45). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to genotype CAD patients and healthy controls. Data for clinical markers were obtained from pathology reports. There was a significant association between the 677 MTHFR variant (T) allele and CAD patients compared to the healthy <span class="hlt">Indian</span> controls (p=0.0353, OR=2.105 95% CI 1.077-4.114). <span class="hlt">Indian</span> controls presented with a higher frequency of the variant allele compared to Black controls (7% vs. 2% respectively, p=0.0515 OR=3.086 95% CI 0.9958-9.564). The MTHFR C677T SNP did not influence levels of total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, triglycerides, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, HbA1c or hsCRP. The higher frequency of the MTHFR 677 variant allele in <span class="hlt">South</span> African <span class="hlt">Indians</span> may be a contributing factor to the higher risk profile for the development of premature CAD in <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. PMID:26095803</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.1505L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.1505L"><span id="translatedtitle">Freshening of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean during the Argo period: observations, causes, and impact on regional sea level change</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Llovel, William; Lee, Tong</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Steric sea level change has been identified as one of the major contributors to the regional sea level changes. This contribution varies in space and time. Temperature (thermosteric) contribution to sea level has been found to be generally more important than salinity (halosteric) effect. Based on temperature and salinity data from Argo floats during 2005-2013 and coincident sea level measurements from satellite altimetry, we found that the central-eastern part of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean stood out in the entire world ocean as a region that had a more dominant halosteric contribution to sea level change. The conspicuously large halosteric contribution was associated with a freshening in the upper few hundred meters. Neither local atmospheric forcing nor halosteric signal transmitted from the Pacific can explain this freshening. An observed strengthening of the Indonesian throughflow since early 2007 and the enhanced precipitation in the Indonesian Seas inferred from various precipitation estimates compounded by strong tidal mixing are the likely causes of the freshening of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. The findings also have implications to the potential influence of regional water cycle and ocean currents in the maritime Continent region to sea level changes in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean prior to the Argo era and sea level projection in the future in response to climate change. Sustained measurements of sea surface salinity from satellites will significantly enhance our capability to study the impact of regional water cycle in the Maritime Continent region to related changes in the marginal seas and the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20090112','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20090112"><span id="translatedtitle">A comparative study of <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> children with Tamil children born in France.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Malenfant, Chantal</p> <p>2009-11-01</p> <p>A comparative database with Tamil children [( 0 to 6 yr old, <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> (n=13) and Sri Lanka (n=69)] born in France (Paris and its suburbs, first generation) and those living in <span class="hlt">south</span> India [(Tamil Nadu (n=43) and Kerala (n=66)] was created with the ultimate purpose of preventing deficiencies in children's health. Two main methods were used for collection of socio-demographic data as parents and body mass index of children. In France, Tamil boys (n=42) and girls (n=40) had almost the same percentage for obesity (about 5%), adiposity rebound was more for girls (7%) than for boys (2%). But thinness (between the 3(rd) and 10(th) percentile) was more in boys (22%) and girls (24%). In India (boys n=48, girls n=61), obesity was more in girls than those born in France; as also adiposity rebound, and underweight was noticed in a third of both girls and boys. In France, cultural impact of immigration is very important and can explain the stress of immigrant families. This may account for the thinness of the children. PMID:20090112</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.A22B1060C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003AGUFM.A22B1060C"><span id="translatedtitle">Convective Lofting Links <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Air Pollution to Recurrent <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic Ozone Maxima</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chatfield, R. B.; Guan, H.; Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J.</p> <p>2003-12-01</p> <p>We extend on our analysis of equatorial tropospheric ozone to illustrate the contributions of <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian pollution export in forming episodes of high O3 over the Atlantic Ocean. We amplify on an earlier description of a broad resolution of the "Atlantic Paradox," for the Jan-Feb-March period, which included initial indications of a very long-distance contribution from <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia. The approach has been to describe typical periods of significant maximum and minimum tropospheric ozone for early 1999, exploiting TOMS tropospheric ozone estimates jointly with characteristic features of the SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes) ozone soundings. Further investigation of the Total Tropospheric Ozone (TTO) record for all of 1999 suggests that there are repeated periods of very long-distance Asian influence crossing Africa, with an apparent effect on those portions of the Atlantic Equatorial troposphere which are downwind. Trajectory analyses suggest that the pattern over the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean is complex: a sequence invoving multiple or mixed combustion sources, low level transport, cumulonimbus venting, and high-level transport to the west seem to be indicated by the TTO record. Biomass burning, fossil and biofuel combustion, and lighting seem to all contribute. For the Atlantic, burning and lighting on adjacent continents as well as episodes of this cross-Africa long-distance transport are all linked in a coordinated seasonal march: all are related by movement of the sun. However, interseasonal tropical variability related to the Madden-Julian oscillation allows intermittent ozone buildups that depart from the seasonal norm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24832686','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24832686"><span id="translatedtitle">Insights into the genetic structure and diversity of 38 <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span> from deep whole-genome sequencing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wong, Lai-Ping; Lai, Jason Kuan-Han; Saw, Woei-Yuh; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Cheng, Anthony Youzhi; Pillai, Nisha Esakimuthu; Liu, Xuanyao; Xu, Wenting; Chen, Peng; Foo, Jia-Nee; Tan, Linda Wei-Lin; Koo, Seok-Hwee; Soong, Richie; Wenk, Markus Rene; Lim, Wei-Yen; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Little, Peter; Chia, Kee-Seng; Teo, Yik-Ying</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">South</span> Asia possesses a significant amount of genetic diversity due to considerable intergroup differences in culture and language. There have been numerous reports on the genetic structure of Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, although these have mostly relied on genotyping microarrays or targeted sequencing of the mitochondria and Y chromosomes. Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in Singapore are primarily descendants of immigrants from Dravidian-language-speaking states in <span class="hlt">south</span> India, and 38 individuals from the general population underwent deep whole-genome sequencing with a target coverage of 30X as part of the Singapore Sequencing <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Project (SSIP). The genetic structure and diversity of these samples were compared against samples from the Singapore Sequencing Malay Project and populations in Phase 1 of the 1,000 Genomes Project (1 KGP). SSIP samples exhibited greater intra-population genetic diversity and possessed higher heterozygous-to-homozygous genotype ratio than other Asian populations. When compared against a panel of well-defined Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, the genetic makeup of the SSIP samples was closely related to <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. However, even though the SSIP samples clustered distinctly from the Europeans in the global population structure analysis with autosomal SNPs, eight samples were assigned to mitochondrial haplogroups that were predominantly present in Europeans and possessed higher European admixture than the remaining samples. An analysis of the relative relatedness between SSIP with two archaic hominins (Denisovan, Neanderthal) identified higher ancient admixture in East Asian populations than in SSIP. The data resource for these samples is publicly available and is expected to serve as a valuable complement to the <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian samples in Phase 3 of 1 KGP. PMID:24832686</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4022468','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4022468"><span id="translatedtitle">Insights into the Genetic Structure and Diversity of 38 <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span> from Deep Whole-Genome Sequencing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Saw, Woei-Yuh; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Cheng, Anthony Youzhi; Pillai, Nisha Esakimuthu; Liu, Xuanyao; Xu, Wenting; Chen, Peng; Foo, Jia-Nee; Tan, Linda Wei-Lin; Koo, Seok-Hwee; Soong, Richie; Wenk, Markus Rene; Lim, Wei-Yen; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Little, Peter; Chia, Kee-Seng; Teo, Yik-Ying</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">South</span> Asia possesses a significant amount of genetic diversity due to considerable intergroup differences in culture and language. There have been numerous reports on the genetic structure of Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, although these have mostly relied on genotyping microarrays or targeted sequencing of the mitochondria and Y chromosomes. Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in Singapore are primarily descendants of immigrants from Dravidian-language–speaking states in <span class="hlt">south</span> India, and 38 individuals from the general population underwent deep whole-genome sequencing with a target coverage of 30X as part of the Singapore Sequencing <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Project (SSIP). The genetic structure and diversity of these samples were compared against samples from the Singapore Sequencing Malay Project and populations in Phase 1 of the 1,000 Genomes Project (1 KGP). SSIP samples exhibited greater intra-population genetic diversity and possessed higher heterozygous-to-homozygous genotype ratio than other Asian populations. When compared against a panel of well-defined Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, the genetic makeup of the SSIP samples was closely related to <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. However, even though the SSIP samples clustered distinctly from the Europeans in the global population structure analysis with autosomal SNPs, eight samples were assigned to mitochondrial haplogroups that were predominantly present in Europeans and possessed higher European admixture than the remaining samples. An analysis of the relative relatedness between SSIP with two archaic hominins (Denisovan, Neanderthal) identified higher ancient admixture in East Asian populations than in SSIP. The data resource for these samples is publicly available and is expected to serve as a valuable complement to the <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian samples in Phase 3 of 1 KGP. PMID:24832686</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999Tectp.302..159M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999Tectp.302..159M"><span id="translatedtitle">Intraplate stress distribution induced by topography and crustal density heterogeneities beneath the <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> shield, India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mandal, Prantik</p> <p>1999-02-01</p> <p>The occurrences of intraplate earthquakes in the <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> shield is attributed to movement along old pre-existing Precambrian shear/weak zones in response to the perturbation in the local stress regime due to topography, crustal density inhomogeneities and the dominant plate tectonic force in <span class="hlt">south</span> India (i.e. an assumed ridge compression of 30 MPa). To obtain a causal relationship between these stresses and pre-existing weak zones in the <span class="hlt">south</span> of India, the stresses are estimated a depth of 20 km beneath two study areas lying at 9-16N and 73-80E. A two-layered homogeneous lithospheric model with irregular interfaces of a small amplitude and a flat lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary has been used for the elasto-static stress calculations. The estimated three-dimensional elastic intraplate stresses show that most of the small to moderate earthquakes in southern India, such as Malabar Coast (1828, intensity VII), Malabar (1858, intensity VI), Coimbatore (1900, intensity VIII), Shimoga (1975, M=5), Idukki (1988, M=4.5) and Wadakkancheri (1994, M?4), have occurred in the zones where an noticeable change in the stress gradient is observed. However, the occurrences of a few earthquakes, such as Bellary (1843, intensity VII), Ongole (1967, M=5), Bangalore (1984, M=4.6), and Tirupattur (1984, M=4.5), may be attributed to the presence of weak faults (low material strength) at their focal depths. A marked concentration of stress is estimated beneath the region west of 78E whilst a subdued level of stresses is observed in the region east of 78E. A maximum value of 60 MPa at 5 km depth is calculated beneath a region about 100 km west of Bangalore, whilst the highest value of 64 MPa at 20 km depth is obtained beneath a region near Coimbatore. Based on these stress concentrations, it is suggested that the regions near the western end of both Dharwar as well as the <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> granulite terrain are the potential locales for future earthquakes. The estimated principal stress directions for both the study areas suggest a dominance of strike-slip and reverse mode of deformation for <span class="hlt">south</span> India. However, the direction of maximum compression axis shows a dominant NE direction near Bangalore and a variation from N-S to NE near Coimbatore. Analysis of the computed stresses indicates that the orientation of principal stresses favors strike-slip movement at the focal depths of the Ongole (1967) and Idukki (1988) earthquakes, but a combination of reverse and strike-slip deformation at the focal depth of the 1984 Bangalore earthquake. These results are in good agreement with the reported focal mechanism solution for those earthquakes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3907410','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3907410"><span id="translatedtitle">Mitochondrial Control Region Alterations and Breast Cancer Risk: A Study in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pullari, Priyanka; Malempati, Sravanthi; Thupurani, Murali Krishna; Perugu, Shyam; Guruvaiah, Praveen; K, Lakshmi Rao; Digumarti, Raghunadha Rao; Nallanchakravarthula, Varadacharyulu; Bhanoori, Manjula; Satti, Vishnupriya</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Mitochondrial displacement loop (D-loop) is the hot spot for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations which influence the generation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Association of D-loop alterations with breast cancer has been reported in few ethnic groups; however none of the reports were documented from <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent. Methodology We screened the entire mitochondrial D-loop region (1124 bp) of breast cancer patients (n?=?213) and controls (n?=?207) of <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> origin by PCR-sequencing analysis. Haplotype frequencies for significant loci, the standardized disequilibrium coefficient (D?) for pair-wise linkage disequilibrium (LD) were assessed by Haploview Software. Principal Findings We identified 7 novel mutations and 170 reported polymorphisms in the D-loop region of patients and/or controls. Polymorphisms were predominantly located in hypervariable region I (60%) than in II (30%) of D-loop region. The frequencies of 310C insertion (P?=?0.018), T16189C (P?=?0.0019) variants and 310Cins/16189C (P?=?0.00019) haplotype were significantly higher in cases than in controls. Furthermore, strong LD was observed between nucleotide position 310 and 16189 in controls (D??=?0.49) as compared to patients (D??=?0.14). Conclusions Mitochondrial D-loop alterations may constitute inherent risk factors for breast cancer development. The analysis of genetic alterations in the D-loop region might help to identify patients at high risk for bad progression, thereby helping to refine therapeutic decisions in breast cancer. PMID:24497926</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED164220.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED164220.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Report of the Select Committee on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs to the National Congress of American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> (at) Rapid City, <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.</p> <p></p> <p>A brief summary of activities of the Senate's Select Committee on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs from April 1977 to September 1978 is presented in this report along with a status report on more than 30 of the bills which have been referred to the committee (James Abourezk, chairman). The status report on bills is organized under these headings: jurisdiction and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy...45..273Q','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy...45..273Q"><span id="translatedtitle">The decadal variability of the tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean SST-the <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian High relation: CMIP5 model study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Qu, X.; Huang, G.</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Based on Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) models, present study investigates the decadal variability of the tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (TIO) sea surface temperature (SST)-the <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian High (SAH) relation (hereafter TSR) as well as its responses to the global warming. Out of the 17 CMIP5 models, only one (GFDL-CM3) reproduces reasonably the influence of the TIO SST on the SAH. In the historical simulations of GFDL-CM3, the TSR features fluctuations modulated by the western Pacific SST and the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent precipitation. When the TIO warming is accompanied by warm western Pacific, the western Pacific SST-induced tropospheric warming propagates westwards, warms the troposphere surrounding the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, enhances SAH and leads to higher TSR; when accompanied by not so warmed western Pacific, the TSR is lower. While, if the TIO warming is accompanied by negative rainfall anomalies over the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent, the rainfall-induced upper-troposphere cyclone over the subtropical Asia weakens the response of the SAH and leads to lower TSR; if not accompanied by negative rainfall anomalies, the TSR is higher. The decadal variability of the TSR is not subject to the global warming. In RCP45 and RCP85 scenarios, the TSR is also not directly affected by global warming. The rainfall over the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent is still a factor modulating the TSR. While, the western Pacific SST is invalid in the influences of the TIO SST on the SAH.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_2");'>2</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li class="active"><span>4</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_4 --> <div id="page_5" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="81"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4393904','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4393904"><span id="translatedtitle">Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy and Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis in a Family of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Descent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Subramanian, Muthiah; Senthil, N.; Sujatha, S.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Inherited channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from dysfunction of ion channels in cellular membranes. They may manifest as diseases affecting skeletal muscle contraction, the conduction system of the heart, nervous system function, and vision syndromes. We describe a family of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> descent with hypokalemic periodic paralysis in which four members also have idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a genetically heterogeneous channelopathy that has been linked to mutations in genes encoding three ion channels CACNIAS, SCN4A, and KCNJ2 predominantly. Although data on specific gene in idiopathic generalized epilepsy is relatively scarce, mutations of voltage gated sodium channel subunit genes (CACNB4) and nonsense mutations in voltage gated calcium channels (CACNA1A) have been linked to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in two families. We speculate that gene mutations altering the ability of the beta subunit to interact with the alpha subunit of the CaV1.1 channel and mutations in the pore-forming potassium channel subunit may be possible explanations for the combined manifestation of both diseases. Functional analysis of voltage gated calcium channel and other ion channels mutations may provide additional support and insight for the causal role of these mutations. The understanding of mutations in ion-channel genes will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of such inherited channelopathies. PMID:25893123</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3835296','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3835296"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of Microsatellite Polymorphisms in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Patients with Non Syndromic Cleft Lip and Palate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xavier, DL; Arif, YA; Murali, RV; Kishore Kumar, S; Vipin Kumar, S; Tamang, R; Thangaraj, K; Bhaskar, LVKS</p> <p></p> <p>Non syndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCLP) is a complex congenital anomaly with varying incidence among patients of different geographical origins. Multiple contributing factors are known to trigger the cleft formation. There are several genes involved in the aetiology of NSCLP and they are different in different populations. The genetic components of clefts that underlie the susceptibility to respond to the environment still remain unclear. In this study, five microsatellite polymorphisms from five candidate genes were employed to analyze the association between these genes and NSCLP in 83 patients and 90 controls. Genotyping was performed by separating and visualizing the fluorescently-labeled polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. The association of the five microsatellite polymorphisms with NSCLP was tested by using the CLUMP v1.9 program that uses the Monte Carlo method. The genotypic distribution is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the control group for only the MSX1 and DLX3 genes. The RARA microsatellite was significantly associated with NSCLP. Our results suggest that the RARA gene is involved in pathogenesis of cleft lip and palate in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. PMID:24265584</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009coco.book..138R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009coco.book..138R"><span id="translatedtitle">Zone Based Hybrid Feature Extraction Algorithm for Handwritten Numeral Recognition of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Scripts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rajashekararadhya, S. V.; Ranjan, P. Vanaja</p> <p></p> <p>India is a multi-lingual multi script country, where eighteen official scripts are accepted and have over hundred regional languages. In this paper we propose a zone based hybrid feature extraction algorithm scheme towards the recognition of off-line handwritten numerals of <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> scripts. The character centroid is computed and the image (character/numeral) is further divided in to n equal zones. Average distance and Average angle from the character centroid to the pixels present in the zone are computed (two features). Similarly zone centroid is computed (two features). This procedure is repeated sequentially for all the zones/grids/boxes present in the numeral image. There could be some zones that are empty, and then the value of that particular zone image value in the feature vector is zero. Finally 4*n such features are extracted. Nearest neighbor classifier is used for subsequent classification and recognition purpose. We obtained 97.55 %, 94 %, 92.5% and 95.2 % recognition rate for Kannada, Telugu, Tamil and Malayalam numerals respectively.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3925555','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3925555"><span id="translatedtitle">A Comparative Rugoscopic Study of the Dentate and Edentulous Individuals in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rajguru, Jagdish Prasad; Somayaji, Nagaveni S.; Masthan, K. M. K.; Babu, Aravindha N.; Mohanty, Neeta</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This study analyzes the rugae pattern in dentulous and edentulous patients and also evaluates the association of rugae pattern between males and females. Aims and Objectives. This study aims to investigate rugae patterns in dentulous and edentulous patients of both sexes in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population and to find whether palatoscopy is a useful tool in human identification. Materials and Methods. Four hundred outpatients from Sree Balaji Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, were included in the study. The study group was equally divided between the sexes, which was further categorized into 100 dentulous and edentulous patients, respectively. Results. The edentulous male showed the highest mean of wavy pattern and total absence of circular pattern while the edentulous female group showed the highest mean of curved pattern and total absence of nonspecific pattern, while dentate population showed similar value as that of the overall population such as straight, wavy, and curved patterns. Conclusion. The present study concludes that there is similar rugae pattern of distribution between male and female dentate population while there is varied pattern between the sexes of edentulous population. However, the most predominant patterns were straight, wavy, and circular patterns. PMID:24605051</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4181178','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4181178"><span id="translatedtitle">Suttur study: An epidemiological study of psychiatric disorders in <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> rural population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Darshan, M. S.; Tandon, Abhinav; Raman, Rajesh; Karthik, K. N.; Saraswathi, N.; Das, Keya; Harsha, G. T.; Krishna, V. S. T.; Ashok, N. C.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background: Based on review of literature World Health Organization (WHO) Global Burden of Disease Study has estimated that psychiatric disorders are among the most burdensome, around the globe and has suggested general population surveys for future research. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and study their association with various socioeconomic variables. Materials and Methods: This was an exploratory study where a door-to-door survey of the entire population residing in a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> village was done (n = 3033). Mini international neuropsychiatric interview kid (MINI) or MINI plus were administered to all the subjects according to the age group. Results: It was found that 24.40% of the subjects were suffering from one or more diagnosable psychiatric disorder. Prevalence of depressive disorders was found to be 14.82% and of anxiety disorders was 4%. Alcohol dependence syndrome was diagnosed in 3.95% of the population. Prevalence of dementia in subjects above 60 years was found to be 10%. Conclusion: Our study is among the very few epidemiological studies with respect to methodological design which does not use screening questionnaires and evaluates each subject with detailed administration of MINI. It concluded that one among four were suffering from a psychiatric disorder. Improving the training of undergraduate medical and nursing students is likely to play a significant role in addressing the increasing psychiatric morbidities. PMID:25316934</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2856369','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2856369"><span id="translatedtitle">CTLA-4 A49G GENE POLYMORPHISM IS NOT ASSOCIATED WITH VITILIGO IN <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span> <span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> POPULATION</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Deeba, Farha; Syed, Rabbani; Quareen, Jariya; Waheed, MA; Jamil, Kaiser; Rao, Hanmanth</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background: Vitiligo or leukoderma is a chronic skin condition that causes loss of pigment due to destruction of melanocytes, resulting in irregular pale patches of skin. Vitiligo is a polygenic disease and is associated with autoimmunity with an unknown etiology. Aims: One of the candidate genes which has a strong association with several autoimmune diseases is CTLA-4 gene located in chromosome 2q33 region. We investigated the possible association between CTLA-4 gene polymorphism in exon 1 (A49G) and vitiligo in patients from <span class="hlt">South</span> India and compared the distribution of this polymorphism to matched control groups. Patients and Methods: The polymorphism was detected by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method in 175 patients and 180 normal, age/ethnicity matched individuals. Consistency of genotype frequencies with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was tested using a χ2 test. Results: There was no significant difference between the genotype (P = 0.93) and allele (P = 0.615) frequencies of CTLA-4 A49G polymorphism in patients and normal healthy individuals. However there was significant association of the CTLA-4 genotype (P = 0.02) and allelic frequency (P = 0.008) between the segmental and non-segmental sub groups within vitiligo. Conclusion: Our results indicate that there is no association between CTLA-4 A49G gene polymorphism and vitiligo in southern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. PMID:20418973</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25893123','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25893123"><span id="translatedtitle">Idiopathic generalized epilepsy and hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a family of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> descent.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Subramanian, Muthiah; Senthil, N; Sujatha, S</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Inherited channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from dysfunction of ion channels in cellular membranes. They may manifest as diseases affecting skeletal muscle contraction, the conduction system of the heart, nervous system function, and vision syndromes. We describe a family of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> descent with hypokalemic periodic paralysis in which four members also have idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a genetically heterogeneous channelopathy that has been linked to mutations in genes encoding three ion channels CACNIAS, SCN4A, and KCNJ2 predominantly. Although data on specific gene in idiopathic generalized epilepsy is relatively scarce, mutations of voltage gated sodium channel subunit genes (CACNB4) and nonsense mutations in voltage gated calcium channels (CACNA1A) have been linked to idiopathic generalized epilepsy in two families. We speculate that gene mutations altering the ability of the beta subunit to interact with the alpha subunit of the CaV1.1 channel and mutations in the pore-forming potassium channel subunit may be possible explanations for the combined manifestation of both diseases. Functional analysis of voltage gated calcium channel and other ion channels mutations may provide additional support and insight for the causal role of these mutations. The understanding of mutations in ion-channel genes will lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of such inherited channelopathies. PMID:25893123</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CliPa...7.1209D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CliPa...7.1209D"><span id="translatedtitle">Glacial-interglacial vegetation dynamics in <span class="hlt">South</span> Eastern Africa coupled to sea surface temperature variations in the Western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dupont, L. M.; Caley, T.; Kim, J.-H.; Castaeda, I.; Malaiz, B.; Giraudeau, J.</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>Glacial-interglacial fluctuations in the vegetation of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa might elucidate the climate system at the edge of the tropics between the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Atlantic Oceans. However, vegetation records covering a full glacial cycle have only been published from the eastern <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic. We present a pollen record of the marine core MD96-2048 retrieved by the Marion Dufresne from the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean ∼120 km <span class="hlt">south</span> of the Limpopo River mouth. The sedimentation at the site is slow and continuous. The upper 6 m (spanning the past 342 Ka) have been analysed for pollen and spores at millennial resolution. The terrestrial pollen assemblages indicate that during interglacials, the vegetation of eastern <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa and southern Mozambique largely consisted of evergreen and deciduous forests. During glacials open mountainous scrubland dominated. Montane forest with Podocarpus extended during humid periods was favoured by strong local insolation. Correlation with the sea surface temperature record of the same core indicates that the extension of mountainous scrubland primarily depends on sea surface temperatures of the Agulhas Current. Our record corroborates terrestrial evidence of the extension of open mountainous scrubland (including fynbos-like species of the high-altitude Grassland biome) for the last glacial as well as for other glacial periods of the past 300 Ka.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CliPD...7.2261D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011CliPD...7.2261D"><span id="translatedtitle">Glacial-interglacial vegetation dynamics in <span class="hlt">south</span> eastern Africa depend on sea surface temperature variations in the west <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dupont, L. M.; Caley, T.; Kim, J.-H.; Castaneda, I.; Malaiz, B.; Giraudeau, J.</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>Glacial-interglacial fluctuations in the vegetation of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa might elucidate the climate system at the edge of the tropics between <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Atlantic Ocean. However, vegetation records covering a full glacial cycle have only been published from the eastern <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic. We present a pollen record of the marine core MD96-2048 retrieved by the Marion Dufresne from the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean ~120 km <span class="hlt">south</span> of the Limpopo River mouth. The sedimentation at the site is slow and continuous. The upper 6 m (down till 342 ka) have been analysed for pollen and spores at millennial resolution. The terrestrial pollen assemblages indicate that during interglacials the vegetation of eastern <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa and southern Mozambique largely consisted of evergreen and deciduous forests. During glacials open mountainous scrubland dominated. Montane forest with Podocarpus extended during humid periods favoured by strong local insolation. Correlation with the sea surface temperature record of the same core indicates that the extension of mountainous scrubland primarily depends on sea surface temperatures of the Agulhas Current. Our record corroborates terrestrial evidence of the extension of open mountainous scrubland (including elements with affinity to the Cape Flora) for the last glacial as well as for other glacial periods of the past 300 ka.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4525538','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4525538"><span id="translatedtitle">Hypovitaminosis D and Other Risk Factors of Femoral Neck Fracture in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Postmenopausal Women: A Pilot Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Selvan, Sivan Arul; Asha, Hesarghatta Shyamasunder; Thomas, Nihal; Venkatesh,, Krishnan; Oommen, Anil Thomas; Mathai, Thomas; Seshadri, MandalamSubramanian</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Non-communicable diseases like hip fractures are a significant problem in a developing country like India. The risk factors for hip fractures vary according to local practices and the availability of preventive health care delivery systems. There is paucity of data on risk factors for hip fracture in the <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. Aim This study was undertaken to assess risk factors associated with femoral neck (FN) fracture in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> postmenopausal women along with subsequent one year mortality. Materials and Methods One hundred four postmenopausal women with FN fracture and 104 age and BMI matched controls were included. Sedative use, visual impairment and other relevant risk factors were assessed. Bone biochemistry and Bone Mineral Density (BMD) were evaluated. A telephonic interview was done at the end of one year to ascertain the well-being. Results Sedative use, visual impairment, low FN BMD and vitamin-D deficiency (<20 ng/ml) were seen more in fracture subjects compared to controls (p≤0.05). At the end of one year, 20% of the fracture subjects and 5% of the controls had died (p=0.001). Conclusion Risk factors identified in our study are potentially correctable, and needs special attention in an <span class="hlt">Indian</span> context to prevent hip fractures. PMID:26266149</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/825285','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/825285"><span id="translatedtitle">GREYBULL SANDSTONE PETROLEUM POTENTIAL ON THE CROW <span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> RESERVATION, <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span>-CENTRAL MONTANA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>David A. Lopez</p> <p>2000-12-14</p> <p>Evaluation of the Lower Cretaceous Greybull Sandstone on the Crow <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation for potential stratigraphic traps in the valley-fill sandstone was the focus of this project. The Crow Reservation area, located in <span class="hlt">south</span>-central Montana, is part of the Rocky Mountain Foreland structural province, which is characterized by Laramide uplifts and intervening structural basins. The Pryor and Bighorn mountains, like other foreland uplifts, are characterized by asymmetrical folds associated with basement-involved reverse faults. The reservation area east of the mountains is on the northwestern flank of the Powder River Basin. Therefore, regional dips are eastward and southeastward; however, several prominent structural features interrupt these regional dips. The nearly 4,000 mi{sup 2} reservation is under explored but has strong potential for increased oil and gas development. Oil and gas production is well established in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to the <span class="hlt">south</span> as well as in the areas north and west of the reservation. However, only limited petroleum production has been established within the reservation. Geologic relations and trends indicate strong potential for oil and gas accumulations, but drilling has been insufficient for their discovery. The Greybull Sandstone, which is part of the transgressive systems tract that includes the overlying Fall River Sandstone, was deposited on a major regional unconformity. The erosional surface at the base of the Greybull Sandstone is the +100 Ma, late Aptian-Early Albian regional unconformity of Weimer (1984). This lowstand erosional surface was controlled by a basin-wide drop in sea level. In areas where incised Greybull channels are absent, the lowstand erosional unconformity is at the base of the Fall River Sandstone and equivalent formations. During the pre-Greybull lowstand, sediment bypassed this region. In the subsequent marine transgression, streams began to aggrade and deposit sand of the lower Greybull Sandstone. With continued transgression, the Greybull fluvial sand graded upward into marginal marine (probably estuarine) sand (upper Greybull) and finally was capped by marine shale and the Fall River Sandstone. Subsurface mapping, incorporated with surface data, has revealed five major Greybull channels crossing the Crow Reservation. The Greybull Sandstone is a proven petroleum reservoir in the Crow Reservation region. Greybull combination traps require the presence of channel sandstone as well as structural closure. With sparse reservation well control, subsurface structural and isopach maps are highly interpretive. Three potential Greybull exploration leads were identified where possible structural closures are coincident with mapped Greybull channels: the Little Woody, Woody Dome, and Crow Agency prospects. Of these, the Crow Agency prospect was confirmed by a significant soil-gas anomaly and appears to have the greatest probability of having trapped a hydrocarbon accumulation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4493089','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4493089"><span id="translatedtitle">Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Families</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N.; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier. PMID:26147992</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26147992','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26147992"><span id="translatedtitle">Homozygosity Mapping in Leber Congenital Amaurosis and Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Families.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Srilekha, Sundaramurthy; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Srikrupa, Natarajan N; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Meenakshi, Swaminathan; Sen, Parveen; Kapur, Suman; Soumittra, Nagasamy</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are retinal degenerative diseases which cause severe retinal dystrophy affecting the photoreceptors. LCA is predominantly inherited as an autosomal recessive trait and contributes to 5% of all retinal dystrophies; whereas RP is inherited by all the Mendelian pattern of inheritance and both are leading causes of visual impairment in children and young adults. Homozygosity mapping is an efficient strategy for mapping both known and novel disease loci in recessive conditions, especially in a consanguineous mating, exploiting the fact that the regions adjacent to the disease locus will also be homozygous by descent in such inbred children. Here we have studied eleven consanguineous LCA and one autosomal recessive RP (arRP) <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> families to know the prevalence of mutations in known genes and also to know the involvement of novel loci, if any. Complete ophthalmic examination was done for all the affected individuals including electroretinogram, fundus photograph, fundus autofluorescence, and optical coherence tomography. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 250K HMA GeneChip on eleven LCA families followed by screening of candidate gene(s) in the homozygous block identified mutations in ten families; AIPL1 - 3 families, RPE65- 2 families, GUCY2D, CRB1, RDH12, IQCB1 and SPATA7 in one family each, respectively. Six of the ten (60%) mutations identified are novel. Homozygosity mapping using Affymetrix 10K HMA GeneChip on the arRP family identified a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK. The mutations segregated within the family and was absent in 200 control chromosomes screened. In one of the eleven LCA families, the causative gene/mutation was not identified but many homozygous blocks were noted indicating that a possible novel locus/gene might be involved. The genotype and phenotype features, especially the fundus changes for AIPL1, RPE65, CRB1, RDH12 genes were as reported earlier. PMID:26147992</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4606656','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4606656"><span id="translatedtitle">Association between chronic periodontitis and hypertension in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population: A cross-sectional study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Paddmanabhan, Preethe; Gita, Bagvad; Chandrasekaran, S. C.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Aim: The aim of this work was investigating if there is any association between chronic periodontitis and hypertension, to assess any individual relationship with Basal metabolic index (BMI) and any association with white blood cell count (WBC count) in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. Settings and Design: This study is a cross-sectional study. The study sample consisted of 77 patients between the age group of 3050 years, who were included after excluding risk factors for hypertension. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Sree Balaji Dental College in the Outpatient Department of Periodontology. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded in the sitting, standing, and lying positions. The three positions were examined to assess the mean value of BP. Other data collected include sociodemographic details, diet, education status, height, weight, BMI, and WBC. The periodontal status of the subjects was assessed by the bleeding index (Ainamo and Bay) and community periodontal index by community periodontal index and treatment needs. Statistical Data: The statistical data were assessed by SPSS software version 17. Results: There were 77 subjects participated in this study. However, there was an association between BMI sitting systolic BP is negative the P = 0.044, which is significant. Mean of generalized chronic periodontitis in sitting systolic BP is 118.0833 (95% confidence intervals 112.17 123.99). Conclusions: We did not find any statistical significance between these two variables. However, this study is a cross-sectional study further; longitudinal studies need to be done to establish the true phenomena. PMID:26538914</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRD..119.8231B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRD..119.8231B"><span id="translatedtitle">Lightning activity within tropical cyclones in the <span class="hlt">South</span> West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bovalo, C.; Barthe, C.; Yu, N.; Bègue, N.</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Lightning activity within 70 tropical cyclones in the <span class="hlt">South</span> West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean is studied using a large data set (2005-2013) provided by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). The radial and azimuthal distributions of lightning flashes are analyzed in three different regions of the basin: the open ocean, the Mozambique Channel, and the oceanic region up to 400 km off the eastern coast of Madagascar (ECM). Over the open ocean, lightning activity detected by the WWLLN is mainly found in the eyewall and decreases outward, regardless of storm intensity. Lightning activity in the eyewall of tropical cyclones is higher than in the eyewall of tropical storms. The front and the right quadrants (225° to 45°) relative to the storm motion are the regions where lightning flashes are preferentially detected. Near the ECM, lightning density in the eyewall, the inner rainbands, and the outer rainbands is quite similar, presumably owing to the proximity of land. When the system reaches tropical cyclone strength, lightning activity is mainly found in the left and rear quadrants relative to storm motion. In the Mozambique Channel, the radial and azimuthal distributions of lightning flashes are complex due to the geographical configuration of this subdomain. The relationships between lightning activity and intensity change have also been investigated for systems over the open ocean. The proportion of periods with lightning activity is higher during rapid intensity changes of tropical cyclones. During tropical storm stage, lightning activity in the outer rainbands starts increasing 18 h before a rapid intensification period. 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRC..120.5436V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JGRC..120.5436V"><span id="translatedtitle">Slow westward movement of salinity anomalies across the tropical <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vargas-Hernandez, J. Mauro; Wijffels, Susan; Meyers, Gary; Holbrook, Neil J.</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Decadal salinity variability is an important characteristic of the ocean. It characterizes differences in evaporative and precipitation fluxes at the surface, and in the subsurface it contributes to steric sea level change and freshwater/salt transports. In this paper, we identify and describe westward moving and decadally varying salinity anomalies within the thermocline of the tropical <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (SIO) based on ocean state estimates from the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation version 2.2.4 (SODA). This signature in the salinity anomalies is expressed at the depth of 20°C isotherm (D20). A two-dimensional radon transform quantifies the westward speeds as being between 0.4 and 1.7 cm s-1. These speeds are slower than those of first baroclinic-mode Rossby waves or mean advection speeds of the background flow in the same regions. The decadal salinity anomaly originates in the subtropical eastern SIO (˜ 39% of the variance explained) and merges with remote anomalies from the western tropical Pacific Ocean (WTPO) via the Indonesian Seas (˜ 11% of the variance explained). The eastern SIO displays both decadal (˜ 10-15 years) and interdecadal (˜ 15-30 years) variability influenced by the WTPO, whereas the decadal variability in the western SIO seems to be more influenced by signals originating in the subtropical eastern SIO. We conclude that these salinity anomalies are consistent with signatures of nonlinear baroclinic disturbances as explained in the recent literature, and possible interaction of higher order baroclinic-mode Rossby waves with the mean flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24444838','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24444838"><span id="translatedtitle">Political contexts and maternal health policy: insights from a comparison of <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> states.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Smith, Stephanie L</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Nearly 300,000 women die from pregnancy-related complications each year. One-fifth of these deaths occur in India. Maternal survival rose on India's national policy agenda in the mid-2000s, but responsibility for health policy and implementation in the federal system is largely devolved to the state level where priority for the issue and maternal health outcomes vary. This study investigates sources of variation in maternal health policy and implementation sub-nationally in India. The study is guided by four analytical categories drawn from policy process literature: constitutional, governing and social structures; political contexts; actors and ideas. The experiences of two <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> states-Tamil Nadu a leader and Karnataka a relatively slow mover-are examined. Process-tracing, a case study methodology that helps to identify roles of complex historical events in causal processes, was employed to investigate the research question in each state. The study is informed by interviews with public health policy experts and service delivery professionals, observation of implementation sites and archival document analysis. Historical legacies-Tamil Nadu's non-Brahmin social movement and Karnataka's developmental disparities combined with decentralization-shape the states' political contexts, affecting variation in maternal health policy and implementation. Competition to advance consistent political priorities across regimes in Tamil Nadu offers fertile ground for policy entrepreneurship and strong public health system administration facilitates progress. Inconsistent political priorities and relatively weak public health system administration frustrate progress in Karnataka. These variations offer insights to the ways in which sub-national political and administrative contexts shape health policy and implementation. PMID:24444838</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=silicone&id=EJ444034','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=silicone&id=EJ444034"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> Technology.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wright, Michael D.; And Others</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Three articles discuss (1) <span class="hlt">casting</span> technology as it relates to industry, with comparisons of shell <span class="hlt">casting</span>, shell molding, and die <span class="hlt">casting</span>; (2) evaporative pattern <span class="hlt">casting</span> for metals; and (3) high technological <span class="hlt">casting</span> with silicone rubber. (JOW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24634181','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24634181"><span id="translatedtitle">Cross-amplification and characterization of microsatellite loci in Acropora austera from the <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Montoya-Maya, P H; Macdonald, A H H; Schleyer, M H</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Here, we report the successful cross-species amplification of previously published acroporid microsatellite markers in the coral Acropora austera from the <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. This fast-growing species is a major reef-building coral on <span class="hlt">South</span> African reefs; however, it is the most damaged coral by scuba diving activity, and is known to be very susceptible to coral bleaching. Neither genetic information nor symbiont-free host tissue was available to develop novel microsatellite markers for this species. Cross-species amplification of previously published microsatellite markers was considered as an alternative to overcome these problems. Of the 21 microsatellite markers tested, 6 were reliably amplified, scored, and found to contain polymorphic loci (3-15 alleles). Although microsatellite sequences are believed to be scarce in the Acropora genome because of its small size, the results of this study and previous research indicate that the microsatellite sequences are well conserved across Acropora species. A detailed screening process identified and quantified the sources of error and bias in the application of these markers (e.g., allele scoring error, failure rates, frequency of null alleles), and may be accounted for in the study of the contemporary gene flow of A. austera in the <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. PMID:24634181</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ramu&id=EJ105548','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ramu&id=EJ105548"><span id="translatedtitle">Urban Kinship Ties in <span class="hlt">South</span> India: A Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ramu, G. N.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>This article is a sociological analysis of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Family organization in an urban setting; in particular, it describes the nature of urban kinship ties and attempts to find differences in kinship ties across class and <span class="hlt">caste</span> lines. (Author/HMV)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26796545','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26796545"><span id="translatedtitle">The HLA-C*06 allele as a possible genetic predisposing factor to psoriasis in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Tamils.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Indhumathi, S; Rajappa, Medha; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Ananthanarayanan, P H; Thappa, D M; Negi, V S</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Psoriasis is a multi-factorial heritable prototypical immune-mediated inflammatory disease, characterized by hyperproliferation of keratinocytes in the affected skin. There are no studies till date, to the best of our knowledge, about the association of HLA-C*06, the risk variant in the PSORS 1 susceptibility locus that confers the greatest risk for early onset of psoriasis, with the disease in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Tamil patients with psoriasis. The present study was performed to determine the association of HLA-C*06 with psoriasis in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Tamil ethnic population. Three hundred and fifty-five cases of psoriasis and 360 healthy controls were included in this case-control study. Severity grading according to psoriasis area severity index (PASI) scoring was done in patients with psoriasis. PCR assays with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) were used for specific detection of HLA-C*06. PCR with analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to distinguish between patients homozygous and heterozygous for HLA-C*06. We observed that those with the HLA-C*06-positive allele had a 3.5 times higher odds of having psoriasis compared to those without, [p < 0.0001, OR 3.5, 95 % CI (2.59-4.79)]. Among cases of psoriasis, it was noted that there was a significant association of HLA-C*06 positivity with female psoriatics [p = 0.006; OR 2.49 (1.28-4.87)] and early age of onset of psoriasis [p = 0.002; OR 2.04 (1.29-3.20)]. Our results suggest that the HLA-C*06 allele is positively associated with susceptibility to psoriasis, female gender and early onset of psoriasis in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Tamils. PMID:26796545</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25357267','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25357267"><span id="translatedtitle">Changing food habits in a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Hindu Brahmin community: a case of transitioning gender roles and family dynamics.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mahadevan, Meena; Blair, Dorothy; Raines, Emily Rose</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This study was conducted to explore the perceptions of 20 <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Hindu Brahmin women on the factors influencing their food habits upon immigrating to America. The competing demands of juggling a new career and managing their family's nutritional needs at the same time, all without the support of extended family members, played an important role in steering these women away from cooking traditional healthy meals, and resorting to fast foods instead. Intervention strategies should be directed toward improving the barriers to eating healthy that were specifically identified within the confines of shifting gender roles and limited family support networks. PMID:25357267</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009GML....29...61K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009GML....29...61K"><span id="translatedtitle">Latitudinal trends in morphological characteristics of Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (Ehrenberg) along a north-<span class="hlt">south</span> transect in the <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Khare, Neloy; Govil, Pawan; Mazumder, Abhijit</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>A total of 25 surficial sediment samples (Peterson grab, gravity and piston cores), collected during the Pilot Expedition to Southern Ocean (PESO) 2004 cruises 199C and 200 onboard the ORV Sagar Kanya along a N-S transect between 9.69 N and 55.01 S, and 80 and 40 E in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean (SW <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean), have been investigated for various morphological featurestest size, mean proloculus size and coiling direction (dextral/sinistral forms)of the planktic indicator species Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (Ehrenberg). The results show that the coiling directions co-vary with temperature and salinity, the abundances of sinistrally coiled forms increasing towards higher latitudes (<span class="hlt">south</span> of 40 S), whereas dextrally coiled forms show a reverse trend. Similarly, overall test and proloculus sizes depend largely on the physicochemical properties (salinity, temperature, nutrients, calcium saturation) of the ambient water masses. These observations suggest that, particularly at the boundaries between different water masses, variations in morphological features of N. pachyderma can meaningfully be used to reconstruct paleoceanographic conditions from <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean sediments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4403926','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4403926"><span id="translatedtitle">Hyperglycaemia Enhances Nitric Oxide Production in Diabetes: A Study from <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Adela, Ramu; Nethi, Susheel Kumar; Bagul, Pankaj K.; Barui, Ayan K.; Mattapally, Saidulu; Kuncha, Madhusudan; Patra, Chitta R.; Reddy, P. Naveen Chander; Banerjee, Sanjay K.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background We have previously reported that increased glucose levels were associated with higher serum nitric oxide (NO) levels in fructose-fed insulin resistant rats. However, the relationship between hyperglycemia and serum NO level was not clear. Therefore, the present study was designed to find the association between hyperglycemia and serum NO levels in Type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients and T2DM with cardiovascular complication. Methods Endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with of D-glucose (10-100mM), and NO levels and NOS gene expression was measured. Hyperglycaemia was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats, and serum NO levels were measured after 8 weeks. For clinical evaluation, five groups of patients were recruited: Control (CT, n=48), Type 2 diabetes (T2DM, n=26), T2DM with hypertension (DMHT, n=46), Coronary artery diseases (CAD, n=29) and T2DM with coronary artery diseases (DMCD, n=38). NO (nitrite + nitrate) levels were measured from human serum. Results We found a significant (p<0.05) and dose-dependent increase in NO levels in HUVEC cells after 4 hours of high glucose exposure. eNOS and iNOS gene expression was increased in HUVEC cells after different concentrations and time periods of glucose treatment. We also observed significant (149.1±25μM, p<0.01) increase in serum NO levels in hyperglycaemic rats compared to control (76.6±13.2μM). Serum NO level was significantly higher in T2DM (111.8 μM (81.7-122.4), p<0.001) and DMCD patients ((129.4 μM (121.2-143.5), p <0.001) but not in CAD patients (76.4 μM (70.5-87)), as compared to control (68.2 μM (56.4-82.3)). We found significantly lower NO levels (83.5 μM (60.5-122.9)) in subjects suffering from diabetes since more than 5 years, compared to subjects (115.3 μM (75.2-127.1), p<0.001) with less than 5 years. Conclusion In conclusion, high NO levels were observed in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> diabetic patients. Higher glucose levels in serum might be responsible for activation of endothelial cells to enhance NO levels. PMID:25894234</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4439648','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4439648"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of optimal condylar position with cone-beam computed tomography in <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> female population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Manjula, W. S.; Tajir, Faizal; Murali, R. V.; Kumar, S. Kishore; Nizam, Mohammed</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate, the condyle-fossa relationship, in clinically asymptomatic orthodontically untreated <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> female volunteers, by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 13 clinically symptom-free and orthodontically untreated angle's Class I female subjects with the mean age of 18 years (ranges from 17 years to 20 years). The normal disc position of the 13 subjects was confirmed by history, clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging scan. Then, the images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)of the subjects were taken using CBCT to evaluate the optimal condylar position. Posterior joint space (PS), superior joint space (SS) and anterior joint space (AS) were measured, and the values were subjected to statistical analysis. Mean PS, SS and AS of right and left side TMJ ' and AS of right sid 's were calculated. Paired samples t-test were used for each measurement to evaluate the average differences between the right and left side for each element of the sample. Results: The mean value of PS, SS and AS of right side TMJ 's were 2.1385, 2.2769 and 1.7615, respectively. The mean value of PS, SS and AS of left side TMJ 's were 2.1385, 2.5308 and 1.8538, respectively. Statistical analysis with the t-test indicated no significant differences in the AS, SS, or PS values between the right and left side. TMJ 's mean PS, SS, and AS measurements were2.1 mm (standard deviation [SD] 0.65 mm), 2.4 mm (SD 0.58 mm), and 1.8 mm (SD 0.52 mm), respectively. The ratios of SS and PS to AS, with AS set to 1.0, were 1.3 and 1.2, respectively. Conclusion: These data from optimal joints might serve as norms for the clinical assessment of condylar position obtained by CBCT. PMID:26015688</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19812698','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19812698"><span id="translatedtitle">Population structure of humpback whales from their breeding grounds in the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Oceans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rosenbaum, Howard C; Pomilla, Cristina; Mendez, Martin; Leslie, Matthew S; Best, Peter B; Findlay, Ken P; Minton, Gianna; Ersts, Peter J; Collins, Timothy; Engel, Marcia H; Bonatto, Sandro L; Kotze, Deon P G H; Meer, Mike; Barendse, Jaco; Thornton, Meredith; Razafindrakoto, Yvette; Ngouessono, Solange; Vely, Michel; Kiszka, Jeremy</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Although humpback whales are among the best-studied of the large whales, population boundaries in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) have remained largely untested. We assess population structure of SH humpback whales using 1,527 samples collected from whales at fourteen sampling sites within the Southwestern and Southeastern Atlantic, the Southwestern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, and Northern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (Breeding Stocks A, B, C and X, respectively). Evaluation of mtDNA population structure and migration rates was carried out under different statistical frameworks. Using all genetic evidence, the results suggest significant degrees of population structure between all ocean basins, with the Southwestern and Northern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean most differentiated from each other. Effective migration rates were highest between the Southeastern Atlantic and the Southwestern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, followed by rates within the Southeastern Atlantic, and the lowest between the Southwestern and Northern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. At finer scales, very low gene flow was detected between the two neighbouring sub-regions in the Southeastern Atlantic, compared to high gene flow for whales within the Southwestern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Our genetic results support the current management designations proposed by the International Whaling Commission of Breeding Stocks A, B, C, and X as four strongly structured populations. The population structure patterns found in this study are likely to have been influenced by a combination of long-term maternally directed fidelity of migratory destinations, along with other ecological and oceanographic features in the region. PMID:19812698</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2754530','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2754530"><span id="translatedtitle">Population Structure of Humpback Whales from Their Breeding Grounds in the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Oceans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rosenbaum, Howard C.; Pomilla, Cristina; Mendez, Martin; Leslie, Matthew S.; Best, Peter B.; Findlay, Ken P.; Minton, Gianna; Ersts, Peter J.; Collins, Timothy; Engel, Marcia H.; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Kotze, Deon P. G. H.; Meer, Mike; Barendse, Jaco; Thornton, Meredith; Razafindrakoto, Yvette; Ngouessono, Solange; Vely, Michel; Kiszka, Jeremy</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Although humpback whales are among the best-studied of the large whales, population boundaries in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) have remained largely untested. We assess population structure of SH humpback whales using 1,527 samples collected from whales at fourteen sampling sites within the Southwestern and Southeastern Atlantic, the Southwestern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, and Northern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (Breeding Stocks A, B, C and X, respectively). Evaluation of mtDNA population structure and migration rates was carried out under different statistical frameworks. Using all genetic evidence, the results suggest significant degrees of population structure between all ocean basins, with the Southwestern and Northern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean most differentiated from each other. Effective migration rates were highest between the Southeastern Atlantic and the Southwestern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, followed by rates within the Southeastern Atlantic, and the lowest between the Southwestern and Northern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. At finer scales, very low gene flow was detected between the two neighbouring sub-regions in the Southeastern Atlantic, compared to high gene flow for whales within the Southwestern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Our genetic results support the current management designations proposed by the International Whaling Commission of Breeding Stocks A, B, C, and X as four strongly structured populations. The population structure patterns found in this study are likely to have been influenced by a combination of long-term maternally directed fidelity of migratory destinations, along with other ecological and oceanographic features in the region. PMID:19812698</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25922310','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25922310"><span id="translatedtitle">MTNR1B gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes: A pilot study in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Salman, Mohammed; Dasgupta, Shruti; Cholendra, A; Venugopal, P N; Lakshmi, G L; Xaviour, D; Rao, Jayashankar; D'Souza, Cletus J M</p> <p>2015-07-25</p> <p>Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) is the major health concern in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent. A genome-wide association study carried out with non-diabetic <span class="hlt">Indians</span> showed association of MTNR1B variants with fasting glucose. MTNR1B mediates the effect of melatonin on insulin secretion. In light of the growing importance of MTNR1B in the etiology of T2D, we sought to test its association with the disease in the <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> type 2 diabetics. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms of MTNR1B (rs10830962, rs10830963, rs3847554, rs1387153 and rs2166706) were genotyped in 346 T2D patients and 341 non-diabetic controls. None of the SNPs differed significantly between patients and controls with respect to allele and genotype frequencies. Linear regression analysis after adjustment for age, sex and BMI showed a significant positive association of rs3847554 with fasting glucose under recessive model (?=14.98, p=0.012). Haplotypes constituted by minor alleles of rs3847554, rs1387153, rs2166706, rs10830963 and major allele of rs10830962 showed significant positive correlation with fasting glucose (p<0.05). Though the results obtained are suggestive of MTNR1B role in T2D etiology, they need to be confirmed with much larger sample sizes. PMID:25922310</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999ClDy...15..937T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999ClDy...15..937T"><span id="translatedtitle">Circulation anomalies associated with tropical-temperate troughs in southern Africa and the <span class="hlt">south</span> west <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Todd, M.; Washington, R.</p> <p></p> <p>Daily rainfall variability over southern Africa (SA) and the southwest <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (SWIO) during the austral summer months has recently been described objectively for the first time, using newly derived satellite products. The principle mode of variability in all months is a dipole structure with bands of rainfall orientated northwest to southeast across the region. These represent the location of cloud bands associated with tropical temperate troughs (TTT). This study objectively identifies major TTT events during November to February, and on the basis of composites off NCEP reanalysis data describes the associated atmospheric structure. The two phases of the rainfall dipole are associated with markedly contrasting circulation patterns. There are also pronounced intra-seasonal variations. In early summer the position of the temperate trough and TTT cloud band alternates between the SWIO and southwest Atlantic. In late summer the major TTT axis lies preferentially over the SWIO, associated with an eastward displacement in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean high. In all months, positive events, in which the TTT cloud band lies primarily over the SWIO, are associated with large-scale moisture flux anomalies, in which convergent fluxes form a pronounced poleward flux along the cloud band. This suggests that TTT events are a major mechanism of poleward transfer of energy and momentum. Moisture transport occurs along three principle paths: (1) the northern or central <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (where anomalous fluxes extend eastward to the Maritime Continent), (2) <span class="hlt">south</span> equatorial Africa and the equatorial Atlantic, (3) from the <span class="hlt">south</span> within a cyclonic flow around the tropical-temperate trough. The relative importance of (2) is greatest in late summer. Thus, synoptic scale TTT events over SA/SWIO often result from large-scale planetary circulation patterns. Hovmoeller plots show that TTT development coincides with enhanced tropical convection between 10-30E (itself exhibiting periodicity of around 5 days), and often with convergence of eastward and westward propagating convection around 40E. Harmonic analysis of 200 hPa geopotential anomalies show that TTT features are forced by a specific zonally asymmetric wave pattern, with wave 5 dominant or significant in all months except February when quasi-stationary waves 1, 2 and 3 dominate. These findings illustrate the importance of tropical and extratropical dynamics in understanding TTT events. Finally, it is suggested that in November-Januar TTT rainfall over SA/SWIO may be in phase with similar rainfall dipole structures observed in the <span class="hlt">South</span> Pacific and <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic convergence zones.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA03354&hterms=urban+flood+simulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Durban%2Bflood%2Bsimulation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA03354&hterms=urban+flood+simulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Durban%2Bflood%2Bsimulation"><span id="translatedtitle">Shaded Relief with Height as Color, Kerguelen Island, <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>These two images show exactly the same area, Kerguelen Island in the southern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. The image on the left was created using the best global topographic data set previously available, the U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30. In contrast, the much more detailed image on the right was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which collected enough measurements to map 80 percent of Earth's landmass at this level of precision.<p/>Discovered in 1772 by French navigator Chevalier Yves deKerguelen-Tremarac, Kerguelen is the largest of a group of 300 islands, islets and reefs that make up the Kerguelen Archipelago. The islands lie atop the Kerguelen-Gaussberg Ridge and are built up of a thick series of lava flows with deposits of fragmented volcanic rock and some granite. Ice covers about one-third of the island, with the large Cook Glacier visible as the tan-colored region at the center-left. The highest point at 1,850 meters (6,068 feet) is glacier-covered Mount Ross, located near the bottom center. The coastline of the main island is highly irregular with a large number of peninsulas linked to the island by narrow isthmuses. Remarkably, although the island is 120 by 140 kilometers (75 by 87 miles) in size no point is more than 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the sea.<p/>For some parts of the globe, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission measurements are 30 times more precise than previously available topographical information, according to NASA scientists. Mission data will be a welcome resource for national and local governments, scientists, commercial enterprises, and members of the public alike. The applications are as diverse as earthquake and volcano studies, flood control, transportation, urban and regional planning, aviation, recreation, and communications. The data's military applications include mission planning and rehearsal, modeling, and simulation.<p/>Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11,2000. The mission used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR)that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission was designed to collect 3-D measurements of Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, D.C.<p/>Size: 222 kilometers by 146 kilometers (138 miles by 91 miles) Location: 49.1 degrees <span class="hlt">South</span> latitude, 69.5 degrees East longitude Orientation: North is at the top Date Acquired: February 2000 (SRTM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004IJCli..24.1211B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004IJCli..24.1211B"><span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary climatology and improved modelling of <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean and Southern Ocean mid-latitude cyclones</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Buckley, Bruce W.; Leslie, Lance M.</p> <p>2004-08-01</p> <p>The intense mid-latitude cyclones that traverse the southern waters of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, between <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa and southwestern Western Australia, are among the strongest depressions found anywhere in the world, outside tropical waters. Near-surface winds that exceed storm force (i.e. 24 m/s or 48 knots), and central pressures of 960 hPa and lower, are relatively common for these systems. They pose a constant threat to both open ocean and coastal shipping, and regularly generate severe weather over the populated southwestern corner of Australia. Large ocean waves and swell produce extensive coastal inundation and erosion.There were two main aims in this study. The first aim was to develop a preliminary climatology of these intense mid-latitude cyclones, for the region 20-60 S, 30-130 E. The climatology, which is the first that we are aware of for this notoriously data-sparse region, is based largely upon satellite observations, particularly scatterometer data, and is supplemented by ship, buoy and all available land observations. The climatology revealed that, historically, the frequency and intensity of the mid-latitude cyclones in this domain have been significantly underestimated. This underestimation has resulted in analyses that have serious flaws, and the resultant operational forecasts provided to the duty forecasters in the regional forecast centre located in Perth, Western Australia, are of highly variable quality. A number of other climatological features of these storms are discussed in this article.The second aim was to identify the factors that can contribute to a significant improvement in model forecasts of these storms. So far, there have been very few studies of explosively developing cyclones over this part of the world. Results are presented here from a series of high-resolution numerical simulations of an intense cool season Southern Ocean cyclone that developed in 2003, using the HIRES numerical weather prediction model developed by L.M. Leslie. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the cyclone predictions to both model resolution and the initial analyses. The predicted variables of most interest are the central pressure, maximum sustained near-surface wind speeds, extent of storm-force winds, and the horizontal and vertical structure of the storm. Increased detail in the initial state is provided mainly by the assimilation into the archived global operational analyses of high-resolution satellite-derived data, including QuikSCAT scatterometer winds and sea-surface temperatures. The combination of increased horizontal and vertical model resolution, and improved initial model states, was found to produce numerical forecasts with significantly more accurate wind speeds than those obtained from the coarser resolution operational models, which also did not have the benefits of all the additional data. Finally, areas of future research are outlined, including coupling the HIRES atmospheric model with ocean and wave models, to improve forecasts of the sea state, including wind wave heights, swell and storm surges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED066281.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED066281.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Report of Annual Conference on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs (Pierre Boarding School, Pierre, <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota, October 29-30, 1969).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>South Dakota Univ., Vermillion. Inst. of Indian Studies.</p> <p></p> <p>The Institute of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Studies and the United Sioux Tribes jointly sponsored a conference on 29-30 October 1969. The needs of the American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> people were discussed by a large cross section of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> participants. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> concern about education and the malpreparation of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> youths in education stood out. The conference report is divided</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title25-vol1-sec217-6.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title25-vol1-sec217-6.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">25 CFR 217.6 - Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 25 <span class="hlt">Indians</span> 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes. 217.6 Section 217.6 <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.... 217.6 Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes. Within 30 days after an issue and any analysis provided for in 217.4... superintendent in writing of the number of votes <span class="hlt">cast</span> for and against the proposed or alternative solutions....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title25-vol1-sec217-6.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title25-vol1-sec217-6.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">25 CFR 217.6 - Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... 25 <span class="hlt">Indians</span> 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes. 217.6 Section 217.6 <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.... 217.6 Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes. Within 30 days after an issue and any analysis provided for in 217.4... superintendent in writing of the number of votes <span class="hlt">cast</span> for and against the proposed or alternative solutions....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title25-vol1-sec217-6.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title25-vol1-sec217-6.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">25 CFR 217.6 - Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 25 <span class="hlt">Indians</span> 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes. 217.6 Section 217.6 <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.... 217.6 Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes. Within 30 days after an issue and any analysis provided for in 217.4... superintendent in writing of the number of votes <span class="hlt">cast</span> for and against the proposed or alternative solutions....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title25-vol1-sec217-6.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title25-vol1-sec217-6.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">25 CFR 217.6 - Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... 25 <span class="hlt">Indians</span> 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes. 217.6 Section 217.6 <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.... 217.6 Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes. Within 30 days after an issue and any analysis provided for in 217.4... superintendent in writing of the number of votes <span class="hlt">cast</span> for and against the proposed or alternative solutions....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title25-vol1-sec217-6.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title25-vol1-sec217-6.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">25 CFR 217.6 - Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... 25 <span class="hlt">Indians</span> 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes. 217.6 Section 217.6 <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.... 217.6 Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> votes. Within 30 days after an issue and any analysis provided for in 217.4... superintendent in writing of the number of votes <span class="hlt">cast</span> for and against the proposed or alternative solutions....</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23231132','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23231132"><span id="translatedtitle">Whistle vocalizations of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) inhabiting the <span class="hlt">south</span>-west <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gridley, Tess; Berggren, Per; Cockcroft, Victor G; Janik, Vincent M</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Populations of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) are distributed along coastal regions of the <span class="hlt">south</span>-west <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (SWIO), from <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa to Kenya. An account of whistles from wild T. aduncus inhabiting the SWIO is provided here. Recordings were made at Plettenberg Bay (<span class="hlt">South</span> Africa) and Zanzibar Island (Tanzania) and the frequency trace of whistle contours (n = 1677) was extracted. Multiple parameters were measured from each whistle and compared between regions and encounters. Regional variation was significant in all parameters assessed except for start and middle frequency (frequency at half the duration). Whistles from Zanzibar Island ended on average 4 kHz higher than those from Plettenberg Bay, and had a steeper frequency gradient. However, mean frequencies differed by <1 kHz and population averages for the adopted frequency distribution showed similar patterns, with a peak between 5 and 7 kHz. Whistle parameters were strongly influenced by recording encounter, likely reflecting the presence of different individuals, group compositions and behavioral contexts during recording occasions. Comparisons within the genus showed that T. aduncus from the SWIO have amongst the lowest start and minimum frequency of whistles within Tursiops. PMID:23231132</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2708998','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2708998"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence and risk factors for refractive errors in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> adult population: The Andhra Pradesh Eye disease study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Krishnaiah, Sannapaneni; Srinivas, Marmamula; Khanna, Rohit C; Rao, Gullapalli N</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Aim: To report the prevalence, risk factors and associated population attributable risk percentage (PAR) for refractive errors in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> adult population. Methods: A population-based cross-sectional epidemiologic study was conducted in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> state of Andhra Pradesh. A multistage cluster, systematic, stratified random sampling method was used to obtain participants (n = 10293) for this study. Results: The age-gender-area-adjusted prevalence rates in those ?40 years of age were determined for myopia (spherical equivalent [SE] < ?0.5 D) 34.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.136.1), high-myopia (SE < ?5.0 D) 4.5% (95% CI: 3.85.2), hyperopia (SE > +0.5 D) 18.4% (95% CI: 17.119.7), astigmatism (cylinder < ?0.5 D) 37.6% (95% CI: 3639.2), and anisometropia (SE difference between right and left eyes >0.5 D) 13.0% (95% CI: 11.914.1). The prevalence of myopia, astigmatism, high-myopia, and anisometropia significantly increased with increasing age (all p < 0.0001). There was no gender difference in prevalence rates in any type of refractive error, though women had a significantly higher rate of hyperopia than men (p < 0.0001). Hyperopia was significantly higher among those with a higher educational level (odds ratio [OR] 2.49; 95% CI: 1.513.95) and significantly higher among the hypertensive group (OR 1.24; 95% CI: 1.031.49). The severity of lens nuclear opacity was positively associated with myopia and negatively associated with hyperopia. Conclusions: The prevalence of myopia in this adult <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population is much higher than in similarly aged white populations. These results confirm the previously reported association between myopia, hyperopia, and nuclear opacity. PMID:19668540</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2689554','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2689554"><span id="translatedtitle">Contribution of leaf growth on the disappearance of fungicides used on tea under <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> agroclimatic conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Karthika, Chinnachamy; Muraleedharan, Narayanan Nair</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The sprayed chemicals on tea leaves disappear over a period of time by the influence of rainfall elution, evaporation, growth dilution, and photodegradation. Influence of plant growth on the four fungicides (hexaconazole, propiconazole, tridemorph, and c) was studied to know the constructive loss of fungicides. The study shows that residues of fungicides sprayed on tea shoots got diluted by the growing process. The expansion of a leaf took 8 to 11 d and more than 50% of the fungicide residues were cleaned out during this leaf expansion period. Under <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> agroclimatic condition, the fungicides are sprayed at an interval of 10 d, so it is safe that the tea is harvested on the 10th day of the application of fungicides. PMID:19489107</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4097978','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4097978"><span id="translatedtitle">Genotype, allele and haplotype frequencies of four TCL1A gene polymorphisms associated with musculoskeletal toxicity in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> descent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Umamaheswaran, Gurusamy; Dkhar, Steven Aibor; Kumar, Annan Sudarsan Arun; Srinivasa, Rao Katiboina; Kadambari, Dharanipragada; Adithan, Chandrasekaran</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Introduction: Decline in circulating estrogen levels causes lessening of bone mass accompanied with musculoskeletal pain, which is the primary cause of treatment discontinuation in patients taking aromatase inhibitors. Evidence from recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggests that the genetic variability underlying TCL1A gene increases the risk of aromatase inhibitors (AIs) - induced musculoskeletal toxicity. Currently, no data is available on the frequency distribution of TCL1A gene polymorphisms in <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. Methods: In this pilot study, we used TaqMan fluorescent probes to assess the genotypes of four TCL1A gene polymorphisms associated with musculoskeletal toxicity in 247 healthy homogenous <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subjects on real time thermocycler. Haplotype estimation and pairwise linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis were executed by Haploview. Results: The incidence of polymorphic variant allele (G) frequencies of rs7158782, rs7159713, rs2369049 and rs11849538 were 22.1%, 23.5%, 18.2% and 22.9% in the study population, respectively. The polymorphisms were found to be in complete LD with each other. Four different haplotypes, each of which having a frequency of above 1% were inferred in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span> using an expectation-maximization algorithm. Notably, three haplotypes were found to be population specific viz H4 A-A-A-G (1.2%) for <span class="hlt">South</span> India, H5 G-G-A-C (1.3%) for JPT and H6 G-G-G-C (40.4%) for YRI. Further, H3 G-G-A-G (2.3-16.3%) haplotype occurs primarily in Asians and is virtually absent in Africans. Overall, the genetic variability and haplotype profile of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population revealed significant inter-racial variability compared with HapMap data. Conclusion: This documentation contributes for further investigations on the pharmacogenetics of AIs in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. PMID:25035853</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24449370','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24449370"><span id="translatedtitle">Adaptive developmental plasticity in methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism limits its frequency in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Krishnaprasad, Chintakindi; Devi, Akella Radha Rama</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism shows considerable heterogeneity in its distribution in humans worldwide. The current study was conducted to investigate whether this polymorphism exhibited adaptive developmental plasticity in the control of the TT-genotype frequency. We screened 1,818 <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subjects (895 males and 923 females) for MTHFR C677T polymorphism using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism approach. MTHFR 677T-allele frequency in males and females was 9.1 and 11.0%, respectively. Compared to females, males had lower frequency of TT-genotype [odds ratio 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-1.01]. The frequency of MTHFR 677T-allele was highest in the age group of 20-40 years and it gradually decreased from 40-60 to 60-80 years (P trend<0.0001). MTHFR 677TT-genotype was associated with 7.02-folds (95% CI: 2.12-25.63, P<0.0001) cumulative risk for recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), neural tube defects (NTDs) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Linear regression model suggested that male gender exhibited increased homocysteine levels by 9.35 ?mol/L while each MTHFR 677T-allele contributed to 4.63 ?mol/L increase in homocysteine. Plasma homocysteine showed inverse correlation with dietary folate (r=-0.17, P<0.0001), B2 (r=-0.14, P<0.0001) and B6 (r=-0.07, P=0.03). Examination of the spontaneously aborted fetuses (n=35) showed no significant association of fetal genotype on its in utero viability. From the current study, it was concluded that C677T seemed to have acquired adaptive developmental plasticity among <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span> due to environmental influences thus contributing to hyperhomocysteinemia and its associated complications such as RPL, NTDs, DVT, etc. PMID:24449370</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040013512&hterms=Air+pollution&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%2528Air%2Bpollution%2529','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040013512&hterms=Air+pollution&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%2528Air%2Bpollution%2529"><span id="translatedtitle">Convective Lofting Links <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Air Pollution to Paradoxical <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic Ozone Maxima</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chatfield, Robert B.; Guan, Hong; Thompson, Anne M.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>We describe a broad resolution of the "Atlantic Paradox" concerning the seasonal and geographic distribution of tropical tropospheric ozone. We describe periods of significant maximum tropospheric O3 for Jan.-April, 1999, exploiting satellite estimates and SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes). Trajectory analyses connecting sondes and Total Tropospheric Ozone (TTO)O3 maps suggest a complex influence from the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean: beginning with mixed combustion sources, then low level transport, cumulonimbus venting, and finally high-level transport to the west, with possible mixing over Africa. For the Jan.- March highest column-O3 periods in the Atlantic, distinct sounding peaks trace to specific NO sources, especially lightning, while in the same episodes, recurring every 30 or 60 days, more diffuse buildups of <span class="hlt">Indian</span>-to-Atlantic pollution make important contributions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060009189&hterms=Air+pollution&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2528Air%2Bpollution%2529','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20060009189&hterms=Air+pollution&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3D%2528Air%2Bpollution%2529"><span id="translatedtitle">Convective lofting links <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean air pollution to paradoxical <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic ozone maxima</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chatfield, R. B.; Guan, H.; Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J. C.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>We describe a broad resolution of the Atlantic Parado concerning the seasonal and geographic distribution, of tropical tropospheric ozone. We highlight periods of significant maximum tropospheric O3 for Jan.- April, 1999, exploiting satellite estimates and SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes). Trajectory analyses connecting sondes and Total Tropospheric Ozone (TTO) maps suggest a complex influence from the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean: beginning with mixed combustion sources, then low level transport, cumulonimbus venting, possible stratospheric input, and finally high-level transport to the west, with possible mixing over Africa. For the Jan.-March highest column-O3 periods in the Atlantic, distinct sounding peaks trace to specific NO sources, especially lightning, while in the same episodes, recurring every 20-50 days, more diffuse buildups of <span class="hlt">Indian</span>-to-Atlantic pollution make important contributions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2782559','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2782559"><span id="translatedtitle">Gender norms in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa: Implications for HIV and pregnancy prevention among African and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women students at a <span class="hlt">South</span> African tertiary institution</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mantell, Joanne E.; Needham, Sarah L.; Smit, Jennifer Ann; Hoffman, Susie; Cebekhulu, Queen; Adams-Skinner, Jessica; Exner, Theresa M.; Mabude, Zonke; Beksinska, Mags; Stein, Zena A.; Milford, Cecilia</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>In post-Apartheid <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa, women are constitutionally guaranteed protections and freedoms that were previously unknown to them. These freedoms may have positive implications for womens ability to negotiate sexual protection with partners and hence prevent unintended pregnancy and decrease their risk of HIV. Among tertiary institution students who are a relatively privileged group, there is little information on gender norms that might shape responses to HIV prevention programmes. To elicit gender norms regarding womens and mens roles, condom and contraceptive use, sexual communication, and sexual pleasure, we conducted 10 semi-structured focus group discussions with African and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> female tertiary institution students so as to understand how norms might be used to buttress HIV and pregnancy prevention. Participants reported dramatic changes in the structure of gender norms and relations with the formal recognition of womens rights in the post-Apartheid context. These generational shifts in norms are supported by other research in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa. At the same time, women recognized the co-existence of traditional constructions of gender that operate to constrain womens freedom. The perceived changes that have taken place provide an entry point for intervention, particularly for reinforcing emerging gender norms that promote womens protection against unintended pregnancy and HIV/STIs. PMID:19247859</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15642627','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15642627"><span id="translatedtitle">Immunohistochemical localization of CYP1A, vitellogenin and Zona radiata proteins in the liver of swordfish (Xiphias gladius L.) taken from the Mediterranean Sea, <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic, <span class="hlt">South</span> Western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Central North Pacific Oceans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Desantis, S; Corriero, A; Cirillo, F; Deflorio, M; Brill, R; Griffiths, M; Lopata, A L; de la Serna, J M; Bridges, C R; Kime, D E; De Metrio, G</p> <p>2005-01-18</p> <p>Cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) monoxygenase, vitellogenin (Vtg) and Zona radiata proteins (Zrp) are frequently used as biomarkers of fish exposure to organic contaminants. In this work, swordfish liver sections obtained from the Mediterranean Sea, the <span class="hlt">South</span> African coasts (<span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic and <span class="hlt">South</span> Western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Oceans) and the Central North Pacific Ocean were immunostained with antisera against CYP1A, Zrp, and Vtg. CYP1A induction was found in hepatocytes, epithelium of the biliary ductus and the endothelium of large blood vessels of fish from the Mediterranean Sea and <span class="hlt">South</span> African waters, but not from the Pacific Ocean. Zrp and Vtg were immunolocalized in hepatocytes of male swordfish from the Mediterranean Sea and from <span class="hlt">South</span> African waters. Plasma Dot-Blot analysis, performed in Mediterranean and Pacific specimens, revealed the presence of Zrp and Vtg in males from Mediterranean but not from Pacific. These results confirm previous findings about the potential exposure of Mediterranean swordfish to endocrine, disrupting chemicals and raise questions concerning the possible presence of xenobiotic contaminants off the Southern coasts of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa in both the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic and <span class="hlt">South</span> Western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Oceans. PMID:15642627</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18572198','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18572198"><span id="translatedtitle">Seabirds indicate changes in the composition of plastic litter in the Atlantic and <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Oceans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ryan, Peter G</p> <p>2008-08-01</p> <p>I compare plastic ingested by five species of seabirds sampled in the 1980s and again in 1999-2006. The numbers of ingested plastic particles have not changed significantly, but the proportion of virgin pellets has decreased 44-79% in all five species: great shearwater Puffinus gravis, white-chinned petrel Procellaria aequinoctialis, broad-billed prion Pachyptila vittata, white-faced storm petrel Pelagodroma marina and white-bellied storm petrel Fregetta grallaria. The populations sampled range widely in the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic and western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Oceans. The most marked reduction occurred in great shearwaters, where the average number of pellets per bird decreased from 10.5 to 1.6. This species migrates between the <span class="hlt">South</span> and North Atlantic each year. Similar decreases in virgin pellets have been recorded in short-tailed shearwaters Puffinus tenuirostris in the Pacific Ocean and northern fulmars Fulmarus glacialis in the North Sea. More data are needed on the relationship between plastic loads in seabirds and the density of plastic at sea in their foraging areas, but the consistent decrease in pellets in birds suggests there has been a global change in the composition of small plastic debris at sea over the last two decades. PMID:18572198</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3656523','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3656523"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetic significance of muscle segment homeo box1 gene in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population for cleft lip and palate</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Prasad, Venkanna S; Shivani, Venkatesh</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>BACKGROUND: Oral clefts having a prehistoric existence and the latest scientific technologies have shown new insights in identifying the cause and management. So this is a DNA/gene based study has been presented in this article which comprises the significance of MSX1 gene in cleft samples of major states of <span class="hlt">South</span> India. AIMS: To evaluate the significance of MSX1 gene in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population having cleft lip and palate. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Four states of native population were set for the study. From each state renowned cleft operating center was selected with the prior ethical and suitable permission and patient consent was taken. Blood samples were collected from each effected sibling were studied and their details were coded. The collected blood samples were used for DNA isolation, PCR amplification and sequencing. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty patients with non-syndromic CL/CLP/CP from various cleft operating centers in southern states (Karnataka, Tamilnadu, Kerala and Andhra Pradesh) with different ethnic/cultural background were taken. Twenty samples (families) were collected from each state and sequenced and compared with earlier data. RESULTS: Analysis of this study indicates that mutation of either G273A/C or C102G seems to cause cleft formation. In this analysis, we found a novel mutation (414G to T) which is submitted to NCBI Gene data bank (EF065625). CONCLUSION: This study supports MSX1 gene leading to cleft lip and palate in the samples studied. PMID:23716942</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26511767','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26511767"><span id="translatedtitle">Extraordinary capture of a Randall's snapper Randallichthys filamentosus in the temperate <span class="hlt">south</span>-eastern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean and its molecular phylogenetic relationship within the Etelinae.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wakefield, C B; Moore, G I; Bertram, A E; Snow, M; Newman, S J</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The capture of a rarely encountered Randall's snapper Randallichthys filamentosus (female, 587 mm fork length) from the upper continental slope (c. 350 m) off the <span class="hlt">south</span> coast of Western Australia (c. 34·5° S; 122·5° E) in January 2014 represents its first record from the temperate <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean and a southern range extension. This record suggests that spawning of this predominantly tropical species may probably be occurring in the eastern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, considering the extensive, and unlikely, distance the progeny would have otherwise travelled from its typical distribution in the western and central Pacific Ocean. PMID:26511767</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED013132.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED013132.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> EDUCATION, STATE OF <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span> DAKOTA, JOHNSON O'MALLEY PROGRAM, FISCAL 1966. ANNUAL REPORT.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>WADE, JON C.</p> <p></p> <p>THIS DOCUMENT PRESENTS THE FISCAL REPORT AND INFORMATION RELATED TO <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span> DAKOTA'S PARTICIPATION IN THE JOHNSON O'MALLEY PROGRAM, 1966. CHARTS RELATING THE FINANCIAL BREAKDOWN OF EXPENDITURES, INCOME, ENROLLMENT, AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE, AND THE NUMBER OF 8TH GRADE AND 12TH GRADE GRADUATES OF THE FORTY-THREE SCHOOL DISTRICTS ARE PRESENTED. COSTS</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+AND+applications&id=EJ1009361','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+AND+applications&id=EJ1009361"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> "Solkattu" and Western Music Pedagogy: Creating New Rhythmic Perspectives</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wood, Brandon Keith</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Part of the classical music tradition of <span class="hlt">South</span> India, "solkattu" reinforces the statement "If you can say it, you can play it." This system of percussive syllables can help young musicians approach rhythm training in a way not usually available to students in Western countries. This article offers applications for a music curriculum. The approach…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=can&pg=4&id=EJ1009361','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=can&pg=4&id=EJ1009361"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> "Solkattu" and Western Music Pedagogy: Creating New Rhythmic Perspectives</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wood, Brandon Keith</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Part of the classical music tradition of <span class="hlt">South</span> India, "solkattu" reinforces the statement "If you can say it, you can play it." This system of percussive syllables can help young musicians approach rhythm training in a way not usually available to students in Western countries. This article offers applications for a music curriculum. The approach</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMED21A1224C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AGUFMED21A1224C"><span id="translatedtitle">Rural Sprawl and the Impact of Human Land Use on the Pine Ridge <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Campbell, R.; Bennett, T.</p> <p>2005-12-01</p> <p>The most important impact on global land cover is human use and development. With the recent population growth occurring on the reservations in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota, specifically Pine Ridge <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, the towns and communities of the reservation are undergoing change. Although urban sprawl certainly is not a consideration on the reservations, the population explosion currently underway has seen a subsequent increase in rural sprawl. In this case, rural sprawl is defined as exponential population growth and geographic expansion of remote reservation communities. The capacity of satellite imagery to encompass large land tracts make the use of this technology a cost effective way to visualize and investigate population growth in rural communities. Likewise, integrating remotely sensed data into a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be a powerful tool to identify environmental and other land use issues that impact the people and communities in and around the Pine Ridge area. The objective of this research is to (1) observe and calculate land cover change around three communities on the Pine Ridge <span class="hlt">Indian</span> reservation using remotely sensed data (Landsat MSS, TM and ETM+) and Geographic Information Systems over a 20 year span, and (2) to discuss the potential impacts of rural sprawl on the Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Preliminary results indicate that land cover has changed in relationship to increased population growth within three communities on the reservation. New housing developments, roads and buildings have appeared and these changes were detectable using Landsat imagery. These results will be discussed along with the experiences and education through the NASA Goddard Internship sponsored by the North Dakota Association of Tribal Colleges.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4743383','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4743383"><span id="translatedtitle">Dietary fat intake and its association with risk of selected components of the metabolic syndrome among rural <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Narasimhan, Sowmya; Nagarajan, Lakshmipriya; Vaidya, Ruchi; Gunasekaran, Geetha; Rajagopal, Gayathri; Parthasarathy, Vijayalakshmi; Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan; Sudha, Vasudevan</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Context: There is limited literature on the dietary fat intake of rural <span class="hlt">Indian</span> populations, particularly in relation to the risk of metabolic syndrome (MS). Aim: This study aims to assess the dietary fat intake and analyze its association with the risk of selected components of the MS among rural population in the state of Tamil Nadu. Settings and Design: Adults (n = 27012) ≥20 years of age were recruited from the rural component of the Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiological Study, a cross-sectional study conducted in 42 villages in Kanchipuram District of Tamil Nadu. Subjects and Methods: Using a validated food frequency questionnaire, data were obtained on the fat intake among 6907 adults. Anthropometric and clinical measures were collected using standard methods. The components of the MS assessed were abdominal obesity, hypertension, and impaired fasting glucose. All analyses were performed using SPSS software (version 20). Results: Prevalence of abdominal obesity, hypertension, and impaired fasting glucose were significantly higher in the highest quintile of fat intake (33%, P < 0.001; 39%, P = 0.04, and 23.3%, P = 0.003, respectively). Highest intake of fat was also significantly associated with risk of abdominal obesity (P < 0.001), hypertension (P = 0.04), and impaired fasting glucose (P = 0.01). Sunflower oil as the main cooking oil was significantly associated with a higher risk of these components of the MS (P for trend <0.001) compared to traditional oils and palmolein. Conclusions: Higher dietary fat was significantly associated with risk of components of the MS and use of sunflower oil as main cooking oil increased metabolic risk in rural <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. PMID:26904468</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4625274','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4625274"><span id="translatedtitle">Early Menopause in Type 2 Diabetes A Study from a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Tertiary Care Centre</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sekhar, T.V.D. Sasi; Rahman, Arifa; Adapa, Satya Sahi</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Menopause marks the end of ovarian function and it is called early or premature if it occurs before 45 years. Very little is known about the menopause transition in Diabetic women. Metabolic disorders like diabetes will accelerate the reproductive ageing and determine premature ovarian failure by various mechanisms. Early menopause along with diabetes has a synergistic effect over the incidence of cardiovascular diseases and other illnesses. There is no data regarding menopausal age in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. Hence, present study was aimed at understanding the age of menopause in diabetic <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women. Materials and Methods This study was carried out at a tertiary care, teaching hospital in Southern India. Post-menopausal women who attended the Department of Medicine during August 2013 to August 2014, were included in the study. Six hundred patients were recruited by a systematic random sampling, 300 diabetic and 300 non-diabetic after obtaining their consents. They were all non-smokers, took mixed diet and other somatometric variables were similar in both the groups. Results Average age of menopause among diabetic women was 44.65 years which is much earlier than the menopause in non-diabetic women (48.2 years). Out of the 600 women, 212 women had an early menopause (<45 yrs.). Among them, 54 were non-diabetic and 158 were diabetic. Present study also revealed a higher BMI among the diabetics than the non-diabetic women. This may be due to the changes in body composition and increase in abdominal fat after menopause. This change is more in diabetics due to the disturbances in insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. Conclusion The present study confirms that Type 2 Diabetes increases the risk of early menopause. The study reinforces the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for a long term well being of a woman. PMID:26557555</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3920637','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3920637"><span id="translatedtitle">Diet patterns are associated with demographic factors and nutritional status in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kehoe, Sarah H; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Veena, Sargoor R; Guntupalli, Aravinda M; Margetts, Barrie M; Fall, Caroline HD; Robinson, Sian M</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The burden of non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) in India is increasing. Diet and body composition ‘track’ from childhood into adult life and contribute to the development of risk factors for NCD. Little is known about the diet patterns of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> children. We aimed to identify diet patterns and study associations with body composition and socio-demographic factors in the Mysore Parthenon Study cohort. We collected anthropometric and demographic data from children aged 9.5 years (n = 538). We also administered a food frequency questionnaire and measured fasting blood concentrations of folate and vitamin B12. Using principal component analysis, we identified two diet patterns. The ‘snack and fruit’ pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of snacks, fruit, sweetened drinks, rice and meat dishes and leavened breads. The ‘lacto-vegetarian’ pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of finger millet, vegetarian rice dishes, yoghurt, vegetable dishes and infrequent meat consumption. Adherence to the ‘snack and fruit’ pattern was associated with season, being Muslim and urban dwelling. Adherence to the lacto-vegetarian pattern was associated with being Hindu, rural dwelling and a lower maternal body mass index. The ‘snack and fruit’ pattern was negatively associated with the child's adiposity. The lacto-vegetarian pattern was positively associated with blood folate concentration and negatively with vitamin B12 concentration. This study provides new information on correlates of diet patterns in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> children and how diet relates to nutritional status. Follow-up of these children will be important to determine the role of these differences in diet in the development of risk factors for NCD including body composition. PMID:23819872</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23819872','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23819872"><span id="translatedtitle">Diet patterns are associated with demographic factors and nutritional status in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kehoe, Sarah H; Krishnaveni, Ghattu V; Veena, Sargoor R; Guntupalli, Aravinda M; Margetts, Barrie M; Fall, Caroline H D; Robinson, Sian M</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The burden of non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) in India is increasing. Diet and body composition 'track' from childhood into adult life and contribute to the development of risk factors for NCD. Little is known about the diet patterns of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> children. We aimed to identify diet patterns and study associations with body composition and socio-demographic factors in the Mysore Parthenon Study cohort. We collected anthropometric and demographic data from children aged 9.5 years (n = 538). We also administered a food frequency questionnaire and measured fasting blood concentrations of folate and vitamin B12. Using principal component analysis, we identified two diet patterns. The 'snack and fruit' pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of snacks, fruit, sweetened drinks, rice and meat dishes and leavened breads. The 'lacto-vegetarian' pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of finger millet, vegetarian rice dishes, yoghurt, vegetable dishes and infrequent meat consumption. Adherence to the 'snack and fruit' pattern was associated with season, being Muslim and urban dwelling. Adherence to the lacto-vegetarian pattern was associated with being Hindu, rural dwelling and a lower maternal body mass index. The 'snack and fruit' pattern was negatively associated with the child's adiposity. The lacto-vegetarian pattern was positively associated with blood folate concentration and negatively with vitamin B12 concentration. This study provides new information on correlates of diet patterns in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> children and how diet relates to nutritional status. Follow-up of these children will be important to determine the role of these differences in diet in the development of risk factors for NCD including body composition. PMID:23819872</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMPP41A1489S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AGUFMPP41A1489S"><span id="translatedtitle">Productivity response to the PETM in the North Atlantic and <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sime, T.; Kanamaru-Shinn, K.; Stoll, H. M.; Shimizu, N.</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>During the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), transient changes in climate and the ocean carbonate system resulted from a major release of isotopically light C into the ocean and atmosphere. We examine the productivity response of calcareous planktonic nannofossils to the dramatic climate and ecosystem changes at DSDP Site 401 in the Bay of Biscay, North Atlantic, and ODP Site 738, Southernmost <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. We use the productivity indicator based on Sr/Ca ratios of coccoliths, which is independent of changes in sediment accumulation rate. Sr/Ca is measured in individually picked coccoliths using secondary ion mass spectrometry. At site 401, Sr/Ca ratios in coccoliths of Toweius and Coccolithus pelagicus increase during the PETM, indicating an increase in coccolithophore productivity until the PETM isotope recovery. We are working to characterize the background pre-PETM variability at this site to establish if this increase is a unique response to PETM environmental changes. Bulk sediment Sr/Ca ratios from the same depths, measured by ICP-AES, do not covary with Sr/Ca Coccolithus or Toweius but instead increases monotonically towards shallower depths. One possible explanation is a change in proportion of Sr-poor type coccoliths, such as Discoaster sp. and Zygrhab sp. Stable oxygen and carbon isotopes at site 401 exhibit extremely similar values among three different coccolith size fractions dominated by different genera, consistent with limited vital effects as observed at other sites. At ODP 738, Sr/Ca ratios in Toweius increase during the later part of the PETM and decrease by the end of the recovery, indicating a brief productivity increase. This increase is clearly beyond the background variability before the PETM or during the first part of the CIE. We are assessing whether a similar pattern is observed in Coccolithus. We will also similarly characterize productivity response to ELMO in the Equatorial Pacific and Southernmost <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26304923','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26304923"><span id="translatedtitle">Successful Treatment of Chromobacterium violaceum Sepsis in a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Adult.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Madi, Deepak R; Vidyalakshmi, K; Ramapuram, John; Shetty, Avinash K</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Infection due to Chromobacterium violaceum is rare. Diagnosis may be delayed since Chromobacterium sepsis may mimic melioidosis, especially in melioidosis-endemic areas. Management of Chromobacterium infection is challenging given the propensity of this pathogen to cause visceral abscesses, drug resistance, and relapse. Mortality rates are high despite treatment. We report a case of C. violaceum septicemia in an immunocompetent adult from <span class="hlt">south</span> India, who was successfully treated with combination antibiotic therapy. Physicians in tropical and subtropical regions must be aware of C. violaceum infection as it can mimic melioidosis. PMID:26304923</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26555625','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26555625"><span id="translatedtitle">The Natural History and Conservation of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Humpback Dolphins (Sousa plumbea) in <span class="hlt">South</span> African Waters.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pln, Stephanie; Cockcroft, Victor G; Froneman, William P</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Although most knowledge on the biology of Sousa plumbea has primarily come from <span class="hlt">South</span> African waters, a number of research gaps remain on the natural history and status of the species in the region. Research on two populations in <span class="hlt">South</span> African waters for which some historical data exist may aid in highlighting long-term changes in the biology and natural history of this little known coastal delphinid. Recent studies on the age, growth and reproduction of animals incidentally caught in shark nets in Richards Bay, KwaZulu-Natal, yielded a lower maximum age estimate of 24 (previously 46) growth-layer-groups (GLGs), sexual maturity of 7.5 and 8 GLGs in males and females (previously 12-13 and 10 GLGs, respectively), an ovulation rate of 0.2 and a 5-year calving interval (previously 0.3 and 3-year calving interval) than previously reported. These differences may be due to a difference in the interpretation of GLGs between observers or a predominance of young males being caught in the shark nets. Stomach content analysis revealed a change in the relative proportions of the main prey items over the past 25 years, but no difference in species richness or diversity was found between the sexes. No change in trophic level was recorded between 1972 and 2009. Field studies in Algoa Bay, Eastern Cape, conducted 16 years apart indicated a decline in the mean group size (from 7 to 3 animals), a decline in the maximum group size (from 24 to 13 animals), an increase in solitary individuals (15.4-36%), and a change in behaviour from predominantly foraging (64-18%) to mainly travelling (24-49%). The observed changes are suggestive of a change in food availability, resulting in a range shift or a potential decline in numbers. These studies indicate the importance of long-term studies to monitor population changes and their possible causes. A number of threats, such as shark nets, pollution (noise and chemical), and coastal development and disturbance, to the humpback dolphin populations in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa have been identified. Urgent action is required to ensure continued existence of the species in <span class="hlt">South</span> African waters. PMID:26555625</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24072787','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24072787"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of barley flour on rheological characteristics of dough, organoleptic, nutritional and storage characteristics of <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> parotta.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maiya, G Koushika; Shwetha, B G; Indrani, D</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Barley (Hordeum sativum) is a good source of dietary fibre, particularly ?-glucan. Effect of 10, 20, 30 and 40% barley flour on the rheological characteristics of dough and quality characteristics of <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> parotta was studied. Use of increasing amount of barley flour from 0 to 40% increased farinograph water absorption and decreased stability, increased extensograph resistance to extension and decreased extensibility, decreased amylograph set back and increased peak viscosity values. Sensory analysis showed that use of barley flour above 30% brought about adverse effect on the quality of parotta. Addition of combination of 2% dry gluten powder and 0.001% xylanase enzyme, XY (combination of improvers) decreased elasticity, increased extensibility of the dough and quality of parotta with 30% BF. During 48?h of storage, parottas with 30% barley flour remained softer than control parotta. The total dietary fibre and ?-glucan contents of parotta with 30% BF were 2.0 and 10.5 times higher than the control parotta. PMID:24072787</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26669013','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26669013"><span id="translatedtitle">Association of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) haplotypes with risk for systemic lupus erythematosus among <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rupasree, Yedluri; Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Rajasekhar, Liza; Uma, Addepally; Kutala, Vijay Kumar</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disorder involving genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors and has higher incidence in women. In this study, we explored the association of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) rs2234693 (PvuII) and rs9340799 (XbaI) polymorphisms with susceptibility to SLE. PCR-RFLP and ELISA were used for genetic analysis and determination of specific autoantibodies, respectively. The univariate analysis showed no independent association of rs2234693 (OR: 1.14, 95% CI: 0.87 - 1.49, p = 0.36) and rs9340799 (OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.66-1.14, p = 0.34). The haplotype analysis using SHEsis platform revealed strong linkage disequilibrium between these two polymorphisms (D': 0.81, r2: 0.55). Among the four haplotype groups, the C-A haplotype (rs2234693-rs9340799) was strongly associated with the risk for SLE (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.32 - 3.34, p = 0.001). The homozygous variant genotype of rs2234693 exhibited elevated TNF-? and depleted IFN-?, while the effects of rs9340799 were contradictory. The wild genotype of rs2234693 exhibited lower levels of IL-12 with number of rs9340799 variant alleles pronouncing this effect. From this study, it is concluded that the ESR1 haplotypes may influence the Th2 cytokine profile and susceptibility to SLE among the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. PMID:26669013</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23962387','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23962387"><span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for genetic linkage between a polymorphism in the GNAS gene and malaria in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gupta, Himanshu; Sakharwade, Sanica C; Angural, Arshia; Kotambail, Ananthapadmanabha; Bhat, Gopal K; Hande, Manjunath H; D'Souza, Sydney C; Rao, Purnima; Kumari, Veena; Saadi, Abdul V; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>The complex imprinted GNAS locus which encodes G-alpha subunit (G?s) is involved in a number of G-protein coupled signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells. Erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites is significantly regulated by protein of GNAS gene. This study was designed to evaluate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present in GNAS locus and susceptibility to malaria. In this case control study, individuals affected by P. falciparum malaria (n=230), Plasmodium vivax malaria (n=230) and normal controls (n=230) were tested for the association of eighteen (18) known SNPs to evaluate their role in the onset of the disease. There was no significant difference in genotype frequencies of all the SNPs tested between P. falciparum and P. vivax affected individuals. However, when Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons were performed as a control, our results demonstrated alleles and genotypes of rs7121: C>T (NC_000020.10:g.57478807C>T), a silent polymorphism situated in the exon 5, were significantly (p<0.05) associated with susceptibility to malaria in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span> participants. Our results demonstrate that population specific polymorphisms that exist in GNAS gene may alter the risk of occurrence of malaria. PMID:23962387</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24854008','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24854008"><span id="translatedtitle">Fulvimarina manganoxydans sp. nov., isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal plume in the <span class="hlt">south</span>-west <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ren, Fei; Zhang, Limin; Song, Lei; Xu, Shiyao; Xi, Lijun; Huang, Li; Huang, Ying; Dai, Xin</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>An aerobic, Mn(II)-oxidizing, Gram-negative bacterium, strain 8047(T), was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent plume in the <span class="hlt">south</span>-west <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. The strain was rod-shaped and motile with a terminal flagellum, and formed yellowish colonies. It produced catalase and oxidase, hydrolysed gelatin and reduced nitrate. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain 8047(T) belonged to the order Rhizobiales of the class Alphaproteobacteria, and was phylogenetically most closely related to the genus Fulvimarina, sharing 94.4% sequence identity with the type strain of the type species. The taxonomic affiliation of strain 8047(T) was supported by phylogenetic analysis of four additional housekeeping genes, gyrB, recA, rpoC and rpoB. The predominant respiratory lipoquinone of strain 8047(T) was Q-10, the major fatty acid was C(18 : 1)ω7c and the DNA G+C content was 61.7 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics determined in this study, strain 8047(T) represents a novel species within the genus Fulvimarina, for which the name Fulvimarina manganoxydans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain 8047(T) ( = CGMCC1.10972(T) = JCM 18890(T)). PMID:24854008</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....3363G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....3363G"><span id="translatedtitle">The effect of hydrothermal circulation on subsidence on ocean basins : evidence from the <span class="hlt">South</span> East <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gli, L.; Francheteau, J.</p> <p>2003-04-01</p> <p>While it is generally accepted that off-axis hydrothermal circulation is responsible for the majority of the observed oceanic heat flow anomalies (e. g. for the "missing" conductive heatflow through oceanic lithosphere), the effect of water circulation on the subsidence of ocean basins at the scale of tens of millions years has not been thoroughly recognized. We present a very simple model (based on the half-space model) showing that, that in some particular circumstances, hydrothermal circulation may be held responsible for unexplained subsidence rate anomalies at the scale of ocean basins. An example is given for the poorly sedimented <span class="hlt">South</span>-East <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ridge flanks of age < 40 Ma, where very low subsidence rates (of 260 to 280 m/Ma1/2 ) can be more readily explained by the observed sedimentation pattern and the subsequent pattern in hydrothermal circulation than by ad hoc variations in the mantle thermal parameters. Our model assumes that in absence of sedimentation, hydrothermal circulation convectively maintains low temperatures within the upper crust at ages as old as 20 to 30 Ma. Agreement with re-assesed subsidence estimates supports the model hypothesis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1996/0495/report.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/1996/0495/report.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of water quality in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> River Water Control District, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1989-94</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Lietz, A.C.</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>A study was conducted to assess ground-water and surface-water quality in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> River Water Control District in northern Palm Beach County from 1989 to 1994. Contamination of the surficial aquifer system and availability of a potable water supply have become of increasing concern. The study consisted of sampling 11 ground-water wells and 14 surface- water sites for determination of major inorganic constituents and physical characteristics, trace metals, nitrogen and phosphorus species, and synthetic organic compounds. Sodium and chloride concentrations exceeded Florida drinking-water standards in ground water at two wells, dissolved- solids concentrations at five ground-water wells and one surface-water site, and color values at all 11 ground-water wells and all 14 surface-water sites. Other constituents also exhibited concentrations that exceeded drinking-water standards. Cadmium and zinc concentrations exceeded the standards in ground water at one well, and lead concentrations exceeded the standard in ground water at five wells. Nitrogen and phosphorus specie concentrations did not exceed respective drinking-water standards in any ground-water or surface-water samples. Several synthetic organic compounds were detected at or above 50 micrograms per liter in water samples collected from six ground-water wells and three surface-water sites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24723820','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24723820"><span id="translatedtitle">Screening of indigenous oxalate degrading lactic acid bacteria from human faeces and <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> fermented foods: assessment of probiotic potential.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gomathi, Sivasamy; Sasikumar, Ponnusamy; Anbazhagan, Kolandaswamy; Sasikumar, Sundaresan; Kavitha, Murugan; Selvi, M S; Selvam, Govindan Sadasivam</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have the potential to degrade intestinal oxalate and this is increasingly being studied as a promising probiotic solution to manage kidney stone disease. In this study, oxalate degrading LAB were isolated from human faeces and <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> fermented foods, subsequently assessed for potential probiotic property in vitro and in vivo. Based on preliminary characteristics, 251 out of 673 bacterial isolates were identified as LAB. A total of 17 strains were found to degrade oxalate significantly between 40.38% and 62.90% and were subjected to acid and bile tolerance test. Among them, nine strains exhibited considerable tolerance up to pH 3.0 and at 0.3% bile. These were identified as Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius using 16S rDNA sequencing. Three strains, Lactobacillus fermentum TY5, Lactobacillus fermentum AB1, and Lactobacillus salivarius AB11, exhibited good adhesion to HT-29 cells and strong antimicrobial activity. They also conferred resistance to kanamycin, rifampicin, and ampicillin, but were sensitive to chloramphenicol and erythromycin. The faecal recovery rate of these strains was observed as 15.16% (TY5), 6.71% (AB1), and 9.3% (AB11) which indicates the colonization ability. In conclusion, three efficient oxalate degrading LAB were identified and their safety assessments suggest that they may serve as good probiotic candidates for preventing hyperoxaluria. PMID:24723820</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015DSRI...95..131M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015DSRI...95..131M"><span id="translatedtitle">Temperature control of microbial respiration and growth efficiency in the mesopelagic zone of the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Oceans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mazuecos, Ignacio P.; Arístegui, Javier; Vázquez-Domínguez, Evaristo; Ortega-Retuerta, Eva; Gasol, Josep M.; Reche, Isabel</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We have measured both prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) and respiration (R), then providing direct estimates of prokaryotic growth efficiencies (PGE), in the upper mesopelagic zone (300-600 m) of the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Oceans. Our results show that in situ R ranged 3-fold, from 87 to 238 μmol C m-3 d-1. In situ PHP rates were much lower but also more variable than R (ranging from 0.3 to 9.1 μmol C m-3 d-1). The derived in situ PGE values were on average ~1.4% (from 0.3% to 3.7%), indicating that most of the organic substrates incorporated by prokaryotes were respired instead of being used for growth. Together with the few previous studies on PGE published before for the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea, our findings support the hypothesis that the global mesopelagic zone represents a key remineralization site for export production in the open ocean. We also found a strong correlation between R and PGE with temperature across a gradient ranging from 8.7 to 14.9 °C. The derived Q10 value of 3.7 suggests that temperature variability in the mesopelagic zone plays a significant role in the remineralization of organic matter.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25661205','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25661205"><span id="translatedtitle">Two new marine Gastrotricha from the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean coast of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Todaro, M Antonio; Perissinotto, Renzo; Bownes, Sarah J</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The study is part of a larger research programme aimed at shedding light on the gastrotrich communities of the subtropical east coast province of KwaZulu-Natal, <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa. In previous papers, faunistic and preliminary taxonomic data on marine and freshwater gastrotrichs found in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, were reported. Here two new interesting marine macrodasyidan species in the families Dactylopodolidae and Thaumastodermatidae are described based on observations carried out on living specimens and using differential interference contrast microscopy. The two novel species are named in honor of two great <span class="hlt">South</span> African icons recently deceased: Nadine Gordimer and Nelson Mandela. Dactylopodola nadine sp. n. is the third species in the genus to bear red eye-spots; it can easily be distinguished from the closely-related red-eyed D. baltica and D. roscovita by its smaller size (Total length = 230 μm vs 275 μm vs 450 μm, respectively) and the lower number of adhesive tubes of the anterior, lateral and posterior series (on each side: 3, 4 and 4 vs 5, 6 and 8 vs 2, 9 and 12-15). Pseudostomella mandela sp. n. is a fairly large species (up to 481 μm in length), with a cuticular covering made up of tetrancres and relatively long caudal pedicles (up to 44 μm in length ). The most evident autoapomorphic trait of the new species is the presence of 7 pairs of 'cirrata' tubes, two emerging in a lateral position along the pharyngeal region and five from the dorsolateral sides of the trunk. Additional relevant taxonomic characters include: 4 tubes of the anterior series, 11 tubes of the ventrolateral series and 3 tubes of the posterior series per side, 5 papillae on the dorsal margin and 6 papillae on the ventral margin of the oral palps. The high number of putative new species discovered among the <span class="hlt">South</span> African gastrotrich fauna during our relatively short survey, highlights the relevance of this region with regard to the diversity of this group and stresses once again the importance of investigating new geographic areas in order to improve our understanding of global gastrotrich biodiversity and species richness.  PMID:25661205</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3774716','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3774716"><span id="translatedtitle">Mutational Screening of LCA Genes Emphasizing RPE65 in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Cohort of Patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Verma, Anshuman; Perumalsamy, Vijayalakshmi; Shetty, Shashikant; Kulm, Maigi; Sundaresan, Periasamy</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe form of inherited retinal visual impairment in children. So far, mutations in more than 20 genes have been known to cause LCA and among them, RPE65 is a suitable candidate for gene therapy. The mutational screenings of RPE65 and other LCA genes are requisite in support of emerging gene specific therapy for LCA. Therefore, we have carried out a comprehensive LCA genes screening using a combined approach of direct sequencing and DNA microarray based Asper chip analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty clinically diagnosed index LCA cases from Southern India were screened for coding and flanking intronic regions of RPE65 through direct sequencing. Among thirty, 25 cases excluded from RPE65 mutations were subjected to Asper chip analysis, testing 784 known pathogenic variations in 15 major LCA genes. In RPE65 screening, four different pathogenic variations including two novel (c.361insT & c.939T>A) and two known (c.394G>A & c.361delT) mutations were identified in five index cases. In the chip analysis, seven known pathogenic mutations were identified in six index cases, involving genes GUCY2D, RPGRIP1, AIPL1, CRX and IQCB1. Overall, 11 out of 30 LCA cases (36.6%) revealed pathogenic variations with the involvement of RPE65 (16.6%), GUCY2D (10%), RPGRIP1 (3.3%), AIPL1 (3.3%) and CRX & IQCB1 (3.3%). Conclusions/Significance Our study suggests that such combined screening approach is productive and cost-effective for mutation detection and can be applied in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> LCA cohort for molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling. PMID:24066033</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4162011','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4162011"><span id="translatedtitle">Derangements in bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density in <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subjects on antiepileptic medications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Koshy, George; Varghese, Ron Thomas; Naik, Dukhabandhu; Asha, Hesargatta Shyamsunder; Thomas, Nihal; Seshadri, Mandalam Subramaniam; Alexander, Mathew; Thomas, Maya; Aaron, Sanjith; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background: Although there are reports describing the association of alternations of bone and mineral metabolism in epileptic patients with long-term anticonvulsant therapy, there are only limited <span class="hlt">Indian</span> studies which have looked at this aspect. Objectives: This study was done to compare the prevalence of changes in bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density (BMD) in ambulant individuals on long-term anticonvulsant therapy with age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Materials and Methods: There were 55 men (on medications for more than 6 months) and age- and BMI-matched 53 controls. Drug history, dietary calcium intake (DCI), and duration of sunlight exposure were recorded. Bone mineral parameters and BMD were measured. Results: The control group had a significantly higher daily DCI with mean SD of 396 91 mg versus 326 101 mg (P = 0.007) and more sunlight exposure of 234 81 vs 167 69 min (P = 0.05). BMD at the femoral neck was significantly lower in cases (0.783 0.105 g/cm2) when compared to controls (0.819 0.114 g/cm2). Majority of the patients (61%) had low femoral neck BMD (P = 0.04). There was no significant difference in the proportion of subjects with vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) between cases (n = 32) and controls (n = 37) (P = 0.234). Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency was seen in both the groups in equal proportions, highlighting the existence of a high prevalence of this problem in India. Low femoral neck BMD found in cases may stress the need for supplementing calcium and treating vitamin D deficiency in this specific group. However, the benefit of such intervention has to be studied in a larger proportion of epileptic patients. PMID:25221394</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2555638','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2555638"><span id="translatedtitle">Rate of inactivation of isoniazid in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Selkon, J. B.; Fox, Wallace; Gangadharam, P. R. J.; Ramachandran, K.; Ramakrishnan, C. V.; Velu, S.</p> <p>1961-01-01</p> <p>A series of studies on the rate of inactivation of isoniazid in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> patients with pulmonary tuberculosis undergoing domiciliary chemotherapy with isoniazid, alone or in combination with p-aminosalicylic acid, has recently been undertaken by the Tuberculosis Chemotherapy Centre, Madras. In the first study, the serum isoniazid levels of the patients were determined four-and-a-half hours after intramuscular administration of a standard dose of 3 mg/kg body-weight of isoniazid and, according to whether the serum level was 0.58 ?g/ml or above, or less than 0.58 ?g/ml, the patient was classified as a slow or as a rapid inactivator. The present paper describes the second of these studies, in which the response to treatment of the slow and the rapid inactivators was compared. The results of this investigation suggested that there might be an association between response to treatment and rate of inactivation of isoniazid, since the slow inactivators were more often culture-negative during treatment and showed a higher proportion of individuals with bacteriologically quiescent disease at 12 months and a lower proportion with radiographic deterioration at six months than the rapid inactivators, while the slow inactivators who deteriorated radiographically or clinically to an extent warranting a change of treatment during the two years did so later than the corresponding rapid inactivators. There was slight evidence that the slow and the rapid inactivators differed in the speed of conversion to bacteriological negativity of those patients whose disease was bacteriologically quiescent at 12 months, but no evidence that they differed in the degree of positivity of sputum specimens that were positive on culture at six, nine or 12 months, or in the frequency with which the patients showed moderate or greater radiographic improvement at six months. PMID:13910443</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24877788','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24877788"><span id="translatedtitle">Low level deltamethrin resistance in ticks from cattle of Kerala, a <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> state.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jyothimol, G; Ravindran, R; Juliet, S; Ajithkumar, K G; Suresh, N N; Vimalkumar, M B; Lenka, D R; Varghese, S; Ghosh, Srikanta</p> <p>2014-08-29</p> <p>The deltamethrin resistance status in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus and R. (B.) microplus ticks collected from cattle of five organized farms of Kerala, <span class="hlt">south</span> India was evaluated. Resistance was characterized using biological (larval packet test), biochemical (esterase enzyme activity assay) and molecular tools (PCR amplification and sequencing of deltamethrin resistance-associated genes). Characterization of field isolates revealed level I resistance in ticks collected from four out of five farms. Elevated level of ?/? esterase activity was not recorded in isolates showing level I resistance. Previously reported point mutations in the carboxyl esterase (G1120A) and sodium channel (T2134A and C190A) genes were not observed in any of the field isolates. The present study showed a low level (level I) resistance is developed in the most economically important ticks infesting cattle of this state and it cautions the development of large scale resistance in future. PMID:24877788</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23787104','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23787104"><span id="translatedtitle">Differences in prenatal exposure to mercury in <span class="hlt">South</span> African communities residing along the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Channa, Kalavati; Odland, Jon ; Kootbodien, Tahira; Theodorou, Penny; Naik, Inakshi; Sandanger, Torkjel M; Rllin, Halina B</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Mercury is a persistent environmental pollutant that has the potential to adversely affect human health, particularly, foetal neurodevelopment. The purpose of the study was to investigate prenatal mercury (Hg) exposure in the population in three sites along the <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa coast. Study subjects included women (n=350) who were admitted for delivery at the local hospitals. Maternal and cord blood samples were collected to measure total mercury and each participant was required to answer a questionnaire. The 90th percentile of mercury levels in maternal and cord blood of the total population was 1.15 ?g/l and 1.67 ?g/l, respectively. Site 1 (Manguzi) participants had the highest maternal geometric mean (GM) values of 0.93 ?g/l, which was significantly different from Site 2 (Port Shepstone) (0.49 ?g/l) and Site 3 (Empangeni) (0.56 ?g/l) (ANOVA test, p<0.001). Umbilical cord blood GM Hg level for Site 1 (1.45 ?g/l) was more than double the GM Hg level in Site 2 (0.70 ?g/l) and Site 3 (0.73 ?g/l). Univariate analysis indicated that the following maternal characteristics were positive predictors for elevated umbilical cord Hg levels: maternal blood Hg levels, living with a partner, residing in Site 1, living in informal housing, using wood and gas for cooking, borehole water as a drinking source, and a member of the household being involved in fishing. Maternal dietary predictors of elevated Hg levels in umbilical cord blood included consuming fresh fish, tinned fish, fruit or dairy products, daily. This study provides baseline data and reveals that 2% of the study population were above the EPA's reference value (5.8 ?g/l) suggesting low level exposure to mercury in pregnant women and the developing foetus in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa. Further research is required to explore the sources of elevated Hg levels in Site 1. PMID:23787104</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AtmEn..40.5435W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006AtmEn..40.5435W"><span id="translatedtitle">Atmospheric trace metals over the Atlantic and <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Oceans: Investigation of metal concentrations and lead isotope ratios in coastal and remote marine aerosols</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Witt, Melanie; Baker, Alex R.; Jickells, Tim D.</p> <p></p> <p>Atmospheric concentrations of trace metals over the oceans are investigated through analysis of aerosol samples collected during cruises from the UK to the Falkland Islands and from <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa to Australia. The readily soluble concentrations of Cu (4-256 pmol m -3), Ni (0.1-54 pmol m -3), Ba (0.2-60 pmol m -3), Zn (6-316 pmol m -3), Cd (0.01-0.29 pmol m -3) and Pb (0.4-22 pmol m -3) were measured in the aerosols, along with total concentrations of crustal elements (Fe, Al and Mn) to evaluate the crustal contributions. Air mass back trajectories suggested most of the aerosol samples had spent several days over the ocean prior to collection. The highest metal concentrations were observed in aerosols close to <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa, Australia and major cities in <span class="hlt">South</span> America, although these concentrations were lower than had been reported previously in the literature. Apart from Ba, which had a major crustal source, the trace metals were enriched relative to crustal sources in most samples, including some collected thousands of kilometers from emission sources. The mean trace metal concentrations in the remote <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean were lower than those measured in the Atlantic Ocean. Even lower concentrations are reported in the literature for the remote Pacific Ocean. In contrast to previous studies, no clear north-<span class="hlt">south</span> gradient is observed in the concentrations of the trace metals in the aerosols. Lead isotope measurements were also carried out on aerosol samples using a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer to assist in source apportionment. Clear differences were noted in the isotope ratios collected on either side of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean with Australian lead ore dominating over much of the eastern and mid-southern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Samples collected over the western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean and Atlantic Ocean under <span class="hlt">South</span> African influence had lead isotopes quite different from those seen in <span class="hlt">South</span> African cities in the past, and are closer in ratio to the coal signature of the region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19470535','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19470535"><span id="translatedtitle">Hospital waste management system - a case study of a <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> city.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hanumantha Rao, P</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>It is more than 5 years since the prescribed deadline, 30 December 2002, for all categories of towns covered by the Biomedical Waste Management (BMW) Rules 1998 elapsed. Various reports indicate that the implementation of the BMW Rules is not satisfactory even in the large towns and cities in India. Few studies have looked at the ;macro system' of the biomedical waste management in India. In this context the present study describes the role of the important stakeholders who comprise the 'macrosystem' namely the pollution control board, common waste management facilities, municipal corporation, state government (Directorate of Medical Education and Health Systems Development Project), professional agencies such as the India Medical Association and non-governmental organizations, in the implementation of BMW rules in a capital city of a state in <span class="hlt">south</span> India. Brief descriptions of the ;micro-system' (i.e. biomedical waste management practices within a hospital) of six hospitals of different types in the study city are also presented. PMID:19470535</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3614243','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3614243"><span id="translatedtitle">Studies on isozymic variation among the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> species of Sphaerostephanos</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Varaprasadham, Irudayaraj; Marimuthu, Johnson</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Objective To explore the identity and phylogenetic relationships among the three medicinally important species of Sphaerostephanos from <span class="hlt">South</span> India using isozymic profile. Methods The young fronds were homogenized with 3.5 mL of ice-cold homogenizing buffer in a pre-chilled pestle and mortar. The supernatant was subjected to electrophoresis as described by Anbalagan poly acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Staining solutions for isoperoxidase was prepared as per Smila method for the detection of isoenzymes. Results A total of six different bands in five different positions with different molecular weight/Rf values and four active zones have been observed in the isoperoxidase enzyme system of Sphaerostephanos. Only one band with MW/Rf 0.399 is common to two different species i.e. Sphaerostephanos arbuscula (S. arbuscula) and Sphaerostephanos unitus (S. unitus). Among the remaining four bands, two bands (Rf. 0.23, 0.47) are present in Sphaerostephanos subtruncatus (S. subtruncatus) and one distinct band has been observed individually in S. arbuscula (Rf. 0.507) and S. unitus (Rf. 0.56). Conclusions The present preliminary molecular study through isozymic analysis shows the identity of all the three species and the present results confirm distinctness of these three species based on macro-micromorphology, phytochemistry and cytology. PMID:23569778</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ClDy...36.1633J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ClDy...36.1633J"><span id="translatedtitle">Simulation of the anthropogenic aerosols over <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia and their effects on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> summer monsoon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ji, Zhenming; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Dongfeng; Zhu, Chunzi; Wu, Jia; Xu, Ying</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>A regional climate model coupled with a chemistry-aerosol model is employed to simulate the anthropogenic aerosols including sulfate, black carbon and organic carbon and their direct effect on climate over <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia. The model is driven by the NCAR/NCEP re-analysis data. Multi-year simulations with half, normal and double emission fluxes are conducted. Results show that the model performs well in reproducing present climate over the region. Simulations of the aerosol optical depth and surface concentration of aerosols are also reasonable although to a less extent. The negative radiative forcing is found at the top of atmosphere and largely depended on emission concentration. Surface air temperature decreases by 0.1-0.5C both in pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons. The range and intensity of cooling areas enlarge while aerosol emission increases. Changes in precipitation are between -25 and 25%. Different diversifications of rainfall are showed with three emission scenarios. The changes of precipitation are consistent with varieties of monsoon onset dates in pre-monsoon season. In the regions of increasing precipitation, monsoon onset is advanced and vice versa. In northeast India and Myanmar, aerosols lead the India summer monsoon onset advancing 1-2 pentads, and delaying by 1-2 pentads in central and southeast India. These changes are mainly caused by the anomaly of local Hadley circulations and enhancive precipitation. Tibetan Plateau played a crucial role in the circulation changes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2555295','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2555295"><span id="translatedtitle">A community-wide tuberculosis survey in a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> rural population, 1950-55</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Frimodt-Møller, J.</p> <p>1960-01-01</p> <p>An investigation carried out under WHO auspices in a small area of <span class="hlt">South</span> India in 1950-55, and which covered a population of approximately 60 000, has not only shed light on various aspects of tuberculosis epidemiology, but has also served as an exercise in the practical conduct of a control campaign in a less developed area. The programme was based essentially on systematic case-finding by mass miniature X-ray and tuberculin testing and the hospitalization of infectious cases. Its most dramatic effect on the community consisted in the great reduction of mortality—from 200 to 21 per 100 000 in less than four years—due no doubt to the advent of the newer antituberculosis drugs. This and other findings are discussed at length in the present report, which covers such topics as tuberculin sensitivity, infection rate, prevalence, incidence, and the results of a BCG control trial. One of the conclusions reached as a result of the campaign was that domiciliary drug therapy had much to recommend it in an area such as this, given the reluctance of patients to enter hospital and thus be deprived of their earning capacity. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 5 PMID:13825251</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4673806','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4673806"><span id="translatedtitle">Prevalence of thyroid dysfunction among young females in a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Velayutham, Kumaravel; Selvan, S. Sivan Arul; Unnikrishnan, A. G.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background: Thyroid disorders are common in India but scarce data exists on its prevalence in young women. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in female college students in seven colleges in Madurai District, Tamil Nadu. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was used as the screening test to diagnose thyroid dysfunction. The abnormal TSH values were classified as mild TSH elevation (TSH 4.510 mIU/ml), significant TSH elevation (TSH > 10 mIU/ml), and low TSH (TSH < 0.4 mIU/ml). Results: A total of 1292 subjects were screened of whom 161 subjects (12.5%) had abnormal TSH. The overall prevalence of elevated TSH was 11% out of which 9.7% had mild TSH elevation. A low TSH was seen in 1.3% of the study population. Conclusion: Thyroid dysfunction was common in young women in <span class="hlt">south</span> India. One out of every eight young women had thyroid dysfunction, and mild TSH elevation was the most common abnormality.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26503681','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26503681"><span id="translatedtitle">Skills, division of labour and economies of scale among Amazonian hunters and <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> honey collectors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hooper, Paul L; Demps, Kathryn; Gurven, Michael; Gerkey, Drew; Kaplan, Hillard S</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>In foraging and other productive activities, individuals make choices regarding whether and with whom to cooperate, and in what capacities. The size and composition of cooperative groups can be understood as a self-organized outcome of these choices, which are made under local ecological and social constraints. This article describes a theoretical framework for explaining the size and composition of foraging groups based on three principles: (i) the sexual division of labour; (ii) the intergenerational division of labour; and (iii) economies of scale in production. We test predictions from the theory with data from two field contexts: Tsimane' game hunters of lowland Bolivia, and Jenu Kuruba honey collectors of <span class="hlt">South</span> India. In each case, we estimate the impacts of group size and individual group members' effort on group success. We characterize differences in the skill requirements of different foraging activities and show that individuals participate more frequently in activities in which they are more efficient. We evaluate returns to scale across different resource types and observe higher returns at larger group sizes in foraging activities (such as hunting large game) that benefit from coordinated and complementary roles. These results inform us that the foraging group size and composition are guided by the motivated choice of individuals on the basis of relative efficiency, benefits of cooperation, opportunity costs and other social considerations. PMID:26503681</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2848202','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2848202"><span id="translatedtitle">Paniya Voices: A Participatory Poverty and Health Assessment among a marginalized <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> tribal population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background In India, indigenous populations, known as Adivasi or Scheduled Tribes (STs), are among the poorest and most marginalized groups. 'Deprived' ST groups tend to display high levels of resignation and to lack the capacity to aspire; consequently their health perceptions often do not adequately correspond to their real health needs. Moreover, similar to indigenous populations elsewhere, STs often have little opportunity to voice perspectives framed within their own cultural worldviews. We undertook a study to gather policy-relevant data on the views, experiences, and priorities of a marginalized and previously enslaved tribal group in <span class="hlt">South</span> India, the Paniyas, who have little 'voice' or power over their own situation. Methods/design We implemented a Participatory Poverty and Health Assessment (PPHA). We adopted guiding principles and an ethical code that promote respect for Paniya culture and values. The PPHA, informed by a vulnerability framework, addressed five key themes (health and illness, well-being, institutions, education, gender) using participatory approaches and qualitative methods. We implemented the PPHA in five Paniya colonies (clusters of houses in a small geographical area) in a gram panchayat (lowest level decentralized territorial unit) to generate data that can be quickly disseminated to decision-makers through interactive workshops and public forums. Preliminary findings Findings indicated that the Paniyas are caught in multiple 'vulnerability traps', that is, they view their situation as vicious cycles from which it is difficult to break free. Conclusion The PPHA is a potentially useful approach for global health researchers working with marginalized communities to implement research initiatives that will address those communities' health needs in an ethical and culturally appropriate manner. PMID:20307290</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4323408','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4323408"><span id="translatedtitle">Community perceptions of health and chronic disease in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> rural transitional communities: a qualitative study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hayter, Arabella K. M.; Jeffery, Roger; Sharma, Chitra; Prost, Audrey; Kinra, Sanjay</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background Chronic diseases are now the leading cause of death and disability worldwide; this epidemic has been linked to rapid economic growth and urbanisation in developing countries. Understanding how characteristics of the physical, social, and economic environment affect behaviour in the light of these changes is key to identifying successful interventions to mitigate chronic disease risk. Design We undertook a qualitative study consisting of nine focus group discussions (FGDs) (n=57) in five villages in rural Andhra Pradesh, <span class="hlt">South</span> India, to understand people's perceptions of community development and urbanisation in relation to chronic disease in rural transitional communities. Specifically, we sought to understand perceptions of change linked to diet, physical activity, and pollution (because these exposures are most relevant to chronic diseases), with the aim of defining future interventions. The transcripts were analysed thematically. Results Participants believed their communities were currently less healthy, more polluted, less physically active, and had poorer access to nutritious food and shorter life expectancies than previously. There were contradictory perceptions of the effects of urbanisation on health within and between individuals; several of the participants felt their quality of life had been reduced. Conclusions In the present study, residents viewed change and development within their villages as an inevitable and largely positive process but with some negative health consequences. Understanding how these changes are affecting populations in transitional rural areas and how people relate to their environment may be useful to guide community planning for health. Measures to educate and empower people to make healthy choices within their community may help reduce the spread of chronic disease risk factors in future years. PMID:25669238</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4428017','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4428017"><span id="translatedtitle">Age estimation using development of third molars in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population: A radiological study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Priyadharshini, K. Indra; Idiculla, Jose Joy; Sivapathasundaram, B.; Mohanbabu, V.; Augustine, Dominic; Patil, Shankargouda</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Aim: To assess the estimation of chronological age based on the stages of third molar development following the eight stages (A–H) method of Demirjian et al. in Chennai population of <span class="hlt">South</span> India. Materials and Methods: A sample consisting of 848 individuals (471 males and 377 females) aged between 14 and 30 years was randomly selected for the clinical evaluation and 323 orthopantomograms with clinically missing third molars were taken for radiological evaluation using Demirjian's method from a Chennai population of known chronological age and sex. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's Chi-square test and mean values were compared between the study groups using t-test or analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's highly significant difference (HSD). In the present study, P < 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: The results showed that the mean age of having clinically completely erupted maxillary third molars was 22.41 years in male subjects and 23.81 years in female subjects and that of mandibular third molars was 21.49 years in male subjects and 23.34 years in female subjects. Mandibular third molars were clinically missing more often in females than in males. Eruption of mandibular third molars was generally ahead of the emergence of maxillary third molars into the oral cavity. Third molar development between male and female subjects showed statistically significant differences at calcification stage F and stage G in maxillary third molars and stage F in mandibular third molars (P < 0.05). Conclusion: There are differences indicating that maxillary and mandibular third molar eruption reached Demirjian's formation stages earlier in males than in females. It is suggested that in future studies, to increase the accuracy of age determination, indications of sexual maturity and ossification should also be evaluated in addition to third molar mineralization. PMID:25984465</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4535115','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4535115"><span id="translatedtitle">Dietary calcium intake and physical activity levels among urban <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> postmenopausal women</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Raj, Jeffrey Pradeep; Oommen, Anu Mary; Paul, Thomas V.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction: Calcium is the most abundant mineral in our body with varied functions and its dietary deficiency leads to osteoporosis, besides playing a significant role in the pathogenesis of other diseases. The data regarding dietary calcium intake (DCI) among postmenopausal women in urban areas of <span class="hlt">South</span> India is limited. Objectives: This study was aimed to assess DCI and physical activity among postmenopausal women. The risk factors for a low intake of dietary calcium were also assessed. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was done among 106 postmenopausal women selected by systematic random sampling from the city of Erode, Tamil Nadu, India. DCI and physical activity were measured using validated questionnaires. Results: The mean DCI was 632.72 28.23 mg/day. The proportion of women consuming less than 800 mg/day of dietary calcium was 74.5%. Only 10.4% of the women studied (11 out of 106) were on calcium supplements while 55% had low physical activity. A low knowledge score [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 5.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.31-20.42] and a low socioeconomic status (SES) score of the family (adjusted OR: 4.00; 95% CI: 1.32-12.11) were significantly associated with low DCI after adjusting the age, dietary preferences, and educational and occupational statuses. Conclusions: DCI was below the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) and the majority of postmenopausal women were physically inactive, indicating the need for better education regarding DCI and the need for calcium supplements and physical activity, all of which can contribute to the prevention of the consequences of osteoporosis. PMID:26288793</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H34B..05B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.H34B..05B"><span id="translatedtitle">Spatiotemporal variability of rainfall extremes in monsoonal climates - examples from the <span class="hlt">South</span> American Monsoon and the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Monsoon Systems (Invited)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bookhagen, B.; Boers, N.; Marwan, N.; Malik, N.; Kurths, J.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Monsoonal rainfall is the crucial component for more than half of the world's population. Runoff associated with monsoon systems provide water resources for agriculture, hydropower, drinking-water generation, recreation, and social well-being and are thus a fundamental part of human society. However, monsoon systems are highly stochastic and show large variability on various timescales. Here, we use various rainfall datasets to characterize spatiotemporal rainfall patterns using traditional as well as new approaches emphasizing nonlinear spatial correlations from a complex networks perspective. Our analyses focus on the <span class="hlt">South</span> American (SAMS) and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> (ISM) Monsoon Systems on the basis of Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) using precipitation radar and passive-microwave products with horizontal spatial resolutions of ~5x5 km^2 (products 2A25, 2B31) and 25x25 km^2 (3B42) and interpolated rainfall-gauge data for the ISM (APHRODITE, 25x25 km^2). The eastern slopes of the Andes of <span class="hlt">South</span> America and the southern front of the Himalaya are characterized by significant orographic barriers that intersect with the moisture-bearing, monsoonal wind systems. We demonstrate that topography exerts a first-order control on peak rainfall amounts on annual timescales in both mountain belts. Flooding in the downstream regions is dominantly caused by heavy rainfall storms that propagate deep into the mountain range and reach regions that are arid and without vegetation cover promoting rapid runoff. These storms exert a significantly different spatial distribution than average-rainfall conditions and assessing their recurrence intervals and prediction is key in understanding flooding for these regions. An analysis of extreme-value distributions of our high-spatial resolution data reveal that semi-arid areas are characterized by low-frequency/high-magnitude events (i.e., are characterized by a ';heavy tail' distribution), whereas regions with high mean annual rainfall have a less skewed distribution. In a second step, an analysis of the spatial characteristics of extreme rainfall synchronicity by means of complex networks reveals patterns of the propagation of extreme rainfall events. These patterns differ substantially from those obtained from the mean annual rainfall distribution. In addition, we have developed a scheme to predict rainfall extreme events in the eastern Central Andes based on event synchronization and spatial patterns of complex networks. The presented methods and result will allow to critically evaluate data and models in space and time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18024917','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18024917"><span id="translatedtitle">Begomovirus 'melting pot' in the <span class="hlt">south</span>-west <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean islands: molecular diversity and evolution through recombination.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lefeuvre, P; Martin, D P; Hoareau, M; Naze, F; Delatte, H; Thierry, M; Varsani, A; Becker, N; Reynaud, B; Lett, J-M</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>During the last few decades, many virus species have emerged, often forming dynamic complexes within which viruses share common hosts and rampantly exchange genetic material through recombination. Begomovirus species complexes are common and represent serious agricultural threats. Characterization of species complex diversity has substantially contributed to our understanding of both begomovirus evolution, and the ecological and epidemiological processes involved in the emergence of new viral pathogens. To date, the only extensively studied emergent African begomovirus species complex is that responsible for cassava mosaic disease. Here we present a study of another emerging begomovirus species complex which is associated with serious disease outbreaks in bean, tobacco and tomato on the <span class="hlt">south</span>-west <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (SWIO) islands off the coast of Africa. On the basis of 14 new complete DNA-A sequences, we describe seven new island monopartite begomovirus species, suggesting the presence of an extraordinary diversity of begomovirus in the SWIO islands. Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences reveal a close relationship between monopartite and bipartite African begomoviruses, supporting the hypothesis that either bipartite African begomoviruses have captured B components from other bipartite viruses, or there have been multiple B-component losses amongst SWIO virus progenitors. Moreover, we present evidence that detectable recombination events amongst African, Mediterranean and SWIO begomoviruses, while substantially contributing to their diversity, have not occurred randomly throughout their genomes. We provide the first statistical support for three recombination hot-spots (V1/C3 interface, C1 centre and the entire IR) and two recombination cold-spots (the V2 and the third quarter of V1) in the genomes of begomoviruses. PMID:18024917</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4517325','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4517325"><span id="translatedtitle">Is Greulich and Pyle standards of skeletal maturation applicable for age estimation in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Andhra children?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mohammed, Rezwana Begum; Rao, Dola Srinivasa; Goud, Alampur Srinivas; Sailaja, S.; Thetay, Anshuj Ajay Rao; Gopalakrishnan, Meera</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction: Now-a-day age determination has gained importance for various forensic and legal reasons. Skeletal age (SA) of a test population can be estimated by comparing with established standards of Greulich and Pyle (G-P). As this atlas has been prepared using data from upper-class children born between 1917 and 1942 in the USA and the applicability of these standards to contemporary populations has yet to be tested on Andhra children living in India. Hence, this study was aimed to assess the reliability of bone age calculated by G-P atlas in estimation of age in selected population. Materials and Methods: A total of 660 children (330 girls, 330 boys) between ages 9 and 20 years were randomly selected from outpatient Department of Oral Medicine in GITAM Dental College, Andhra Pradesh. Digital hand-wrist radiographs were obtained and assessed for SA using G-P atlas and the difference between estimated SA and chronological age (CA) were compared with paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: G-P method underestimated the SA by 0.23 ± 1.53 years for boys and overestimated SA by 0.02 ± 2 years in girls and mild underestimation was noted in the total sample of about 0.1 ± 1.78 years. Spearman rank test showed significant correlation between SA and CA (r = 0.86; P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study concluded that G-P standards were reliable in assessing age in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Andhra children of age 9–20 years with unknown CA. PMID:26229357</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS53C1065K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMOS53C1065K"><span id="translatedtitle">Heat Flow on the <span class="hlt">South</span> West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ridge at 14°E and the Consequences for Microbiological Activity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kaul, N. E.; Molari, M.; Boetius, A.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>During RV POLARSTERN cruise PS81 to the <span class="hlt">South</span> West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ridge (SWIR) at 52°S, 14°E an integrated study was carried out in more than 4000 m water depth employing seismology, geology, microbiology, deep-sea ecology, heat flow and others. Heat flow is supposed to be an indicator for the varying depth of the magma chamber beneath the ridge axis. Bottom observations from previous work on the SWIR are scarce and visual information about geostructures, habitat landscapes, benthic faunal communities and their distribution in this area have so far been missing. Vigorous fluid flow in the form of black smokers or shimmering water could not be detected but enhanced heat flow due to upward pore water migration occurred. This leads to values of very high heat flow (up to 850 mW/m2) and advection rates up to 25 cm/a Darcy velocity. Enhanced biomass and a greater variation of megafauna along those sites of high heat flow could be inferred from reconnaissance observations with a camera sledge. A closer investigation of microbial activity in the material of gravity corers revealed favorable living conditions for microorganisms. We find the inorganic carbon fixation rates, here applied like a proxy of microbial metabolic activity, were significantly higher (up to 7 times higher) in surficial sediments in proximity of the station PS 81/640 compared to other stations along the ridge. Conversely the extracellular enzymatic activities did not show any significant difference in the potential organic matter degradation between the stations investigated. These results suggest an increase of chemosynthetic activities at St PS 81/649, possibly related to increase of availability of reduced compounds (i.e. sulphide, reduced metals) in presence of pore water flow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24772966','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24772966"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of gene mutations among <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> patients with maple syrup urine disease: identification of four novel mutations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Narayanan, M P; Menon, Krishnakumar N; Vasudevan, D M</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is predominantly caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes, which encode for the E1alpha, E1beta and E2 subunits of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex, respectively. Because disease causing mutations play a major role in the development of the disease, prenatal diagnosis at gestational level may have significance in making decisions by parents. Thus, this study was aimed to screen <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> MSUD patients for mutations and assess the genotype-phenotype correlation. Thirteen patients diagnosed with MSUD by conventional biochemical screening such as urine analysis by DNPH test, thin layer chromatography for amino acids and blood amino acid quantification by HPLC were selected for mutation analysis. The entire coding regions of the BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes were analyzed for mutations by PCR-based direct DNA sequencing. BCKDHA and BCKDHB mutations were seen in 43% of the total ten patients, while disease-causing DBT gene mutation was observed only in 14%. Three patients displayed no mutations. Novel mutations were c.130C>T in BCKDHA gene, c. 599C>T and c.121_122delAC in BCKDHB gene and c.190G>A in DBT gene. Notably, patients harbouring these mutations were non-responsive to thiamine supplementation and other treatment regimens and might have a worse prognosis as compared to the patients not having such mutations. Thus, identification of these mutations may have a crucial role in the treatment as well as understanding the molecular mechanisms in MSUD. PMID:24772966</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26775007','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26775007"><span id="translatedtitle">Contrasted accumulation patterns of persistent organic pollutants and mercury in sympatric tropical dolphins from the <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dirtu, Alin C; Malarvannan, Govindan; Das, Krishna; Dulau-Drouot, Violaine; Kiszka, Jeremy J; Lepoint, Gilles; Mongin, Philippe; Covaci, Adrian</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Due to their high trophic position and long life span, small cetaceans are considered as suitable bioindicators to monitor the presence of contaminants in marine ecosystems. Here, we document the contamination with persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and total mercury (T-Hg) of spinner (Stenella longirostris, n =21) and Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus, n=32) sampled from the coastal waters of La Réunion (<span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean). In addition, seven co-occurring teleost fish species were sampled and analyzed as well. Blubber samples from living dolphins and muscle from teleosts were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT and metabolites (DDTs), chlordanes (CHLs), hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs), reported as having a natural origin, were also analyzed. T-Hg levels were measured in blubber and skin biopsies of the two dolphin species. Stable isotopes δ(13)C and δ(15)N values were determined in skin of the dolphins and in the muscle of teleosts. For PCBs, HCHs and T-Hg, concentrations were significantly higher in T. aduncus than in S. longirostris. For other POP levels, intra-species variability was high. MeO-PBDEs were the dominant compounds (55% of the total POPs) in S. longirostris, while PCBs dominated (50% contribution) in T. aduncus. Other contaminants showed similar profiles between the two species. Given the different patterns of POPs and T-Hg contamination and the δ(15)N values observed among analyzed teleosts, dietary and foraging habitat preferences most likely explain the contrasted contaminant profiles observed in the two dolphin species. Levels of each class of contaminants were significantly higher in males than females. Despite their spatial and temporal overlap in the waters of La Réunion, S. longirostris and T. aduncus are differently exposed to contaminant accumulation. PMID:26775007</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25493453','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25493453"><span id="translatedtitle">NOTCH1 and FBXW7 mutations favor better outcome in pediatric <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Natarajan, Valliyammai; Bandapalli, Obul R; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Sagar, Tenali Gnana; Karunakaran, Nirmala</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The NOTCH1 signaling pathway is essential for hematopoiesis and a critical regulatory step for T-cell proliferation and maturation. The E3 ubiquitin ligase FBXW7 controls NOTCH1 protein stability. Mutations in NOTCH1/FBXW7 activate NOTCH signaling and are of prognostic significance in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). In this study we analyzed NOTCH1 and FBXW7 mutations in 50 <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> T-ALL patients treated by a modified ALL BFM 95 regimen. The hot spot exons (HD-N, HD-C, TAD, and PEST) of NOTCH1 and exons 9 of the 10 of FBXW7 were polymerase chain reaction amplified and sequenced. In total, 20 of the 50 (40%) T-ALL patients revealed heterozygous mutations in the NOTCH1 domains, and a predominance of missense mutations in HD-N (70%) and PEST (15%) domains. FBXW7 mutations were detected in 5 of the 50 (10%) T-ALL patients. T-ALL patients with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations expressed higher protein level of NOTCH1 compared with patients without NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. Six of the mutations detected in NOTCH1 were not reported previously. When tested in a Dual Luciferase Renilla reporter assay some of these conferred increased NOTCH activity, suggesting that these are activating mutations. Importantly, 13 of the 20 (65%) NOTCH1/FBXW7-mutated T-ALL patients showed a good prednisone response (P=0.01) and a better clinical outcome compared with NOTCH1/FBXW7 nonmutated patients (P=0.03). These data suggest that NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations are present in T-ALL patients from Southern India and may be useful biomarkers to predict prognosis in T-ALL. PMID:25493453</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24916119','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24916119"><span id="translatedtitle">Ingestion and defecation of marine debris by loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, from by-catches in the <span class="hlt">South</span>-West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hoarau, Ludovic; Ainley, Lara; Jean, Claire; Ciccione, Stphane</p> <p>2014-07-15</p> <p>Marine debris, caused by anthropogenic pollution, is a major problem impacting marine wildlife worldwide. This study documents and quantifies the ingestion and defecation of debris by 74 loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, in the <span class="hlt">South</span>-West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Debris was found in 51.4% of gut or fecal samples of loggerheads by-catch from Reunion Island long liners. Anthropogenic debris was ubiquitous in our samples with plastics accounting for 96.2% of the total debris collected. No significant relationship was detected between the characteristics of ingested debris and the biometric characteristics of loggerheads. The number, weight, volume and mean length of debris were higher in gut content of deceased loggerheads than in fecal samples of live turtles, but not significantly, except for the mean length. This is the first record of debris ingestion by sea turtles in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean and our results highlight the magnitude of this pollution of the marine environment. PMID:24916119</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1712816A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..1712816A"><span id="translatedtitle">A description of eddy-mean flow feedbacks in equatorial and boundary current systems of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aguiar-Gonzlez, Borja; Ponsoni, Leandro; Maas, Leo R. M.; Ridderinkhof, Herman; van Aken, Hendrik</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>While many observational and modeling efforts have addressed eddy-mean flow interactions acting over nearly idealized zonal jets, little is know about whether findings in those studies can be extended to current systems with different configurations in the real ocean. This topic is of special interest for ocean-climate models where eddy interactions with the mean flow may be unresolved, demanding further insight on the mechanism by which the eddy field and the mean circulation should feed back in a realistic representation of future climate change scenarios. Following this motivation, we investigate local exchange of momentum and kinetic energy operating in a variety of eddy-mean flow systems of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (SIO). To this aim we use 21 years (1993-2013) of newly processed satellite altimetry observations, and adopt a definition of the mean flow as a seasonally-dependent temporal mean where the eddy field encompasses the daily instantaneous deviation from the altimeter-derived velocities. This approach allows time-varying feedbacks to evolve throughout the year. We find that the eddy field feeds back on the mean circulation, contributing importantly to the overall seasonal strengthening and weakening of all current systems involved in the tropical and subtropical gyre of the SIO. Although significant contributions to the momentum and energy balances were also obtained along the Agulhas (Return) Current and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), they exhibit a weak/absent seasonal cycle, suggesting that the strength of these dynamical processes is mostly persistent throughout the year. Spatial distribution of the eddy kinetic energy conversion rates and the convergence of horizontal eddy momentum fluxes indicate that over regions where the eddy field draws energy from the mean flow through barotropic instabilities, the current is importantly decelerated by alongstream eddy forces on its upstream side, while further downstream the situation reverses with accelerating alongstream eddy forces and kinetic energy being transferred from the eddy field to the mean flow. This is the case for 1) the meandering Indonesian Throughflow, ITF (winter and spring); 2) the southward along-slope flow crossing the narrows of the Mozambique Channel and shedding anticyclonic eddies; 3) the southern <span class="hlt">South</span> East Madagascar Current shedding dipoles; and, 4) the Agulhas Retroflection, shedding Agulhas rings into the Atlantic Ocean. Additionally, we observe a well-known feature of the eastward-flowing Agulhas Return Current and the ACC, also along the <span class="hlt">South</span> Equatorial Countercurrent, the ITF and the North East Madagascar Current. In all cases (either eastward- or westward-flowing), these nearly zonal currents exhibit convergence (divergence) of the cross-stream eddy momentum forces acting over its left-hand (right-hand) side, looking downstream, pointing to a systematic drift of the mean flow towards its left-hand side by cross-stream eddy forces. Quantitative estimates and qualitative spatial patterns from this study provide a unique tool for testing the performance of eddy-resolving models on predicting realistically eddy-mean flow feedbacks in the SIO.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4632213','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4632213"><span id="translatedtitle">Association of Fc gamma-receptors IIa, IIIa, and IIIb genetic polymorphism with susceptibility to chronic periodontitis in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hans, Veenu Madaan; Mehta, Dhoom Singh; Hans, Mayank</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background and Objective: Fc gamma receptors (Fc?Rs) are the members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Genetic variation in these receptors and its link with various forms of periodontitis is being studied in different populations. The aim of the present study is to determine whether specific Fc?RIIa, Fc?RIIIa, and Fc?RIIIb alleles and/or genotypes are associated with risk for susceptibility to generalized chronic periodontitis (GCP) in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 120 <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subjects; 60 with GCP and 60 periodontally healthy. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was extracted from samples collected by scrapping buccal epithelium. Fc?RIIa and Fc?RIIIa genotyping were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA with allele-specific primers followed by allele-specific restriction digestion of the products. However, Fc?RIIIb genotyping was done by allele-specific PCR. Results: No significant difference in the distribution of Fc?RIIa H/R and Fc?RIIIa NA1/NA2 genotypes or their respective alleles was observed in GCP patients and healthy subjects. For Fc?RIIIa F/V genetic polymorphism, the homozygous V/V genotype and V allele were significantly overrepresented in GCP patients while F/F genotype and F allele in controls. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that Fc?RIIIa V/V genotype, as well as V allele, could be a possible risk factor for chronic periodontitis in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. PMID:26604564</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21749215','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21749215"><span id="translatedtitle">Sequence variation of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (677C>T and 1298?A>C) and traditional risk factors in a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dayakar, Seetha; Goud, Kalal Iravathy; Reddy, Thavanati Parvathi Kumara; Rao, Seshagiri P; Sesikeran, Shyamala B; Sadhnani, Muralidhar</p> <p>2011-11-01</p> <p>Methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) plays a significant role in the metabolism of methionine. MTHFR deficiency is an autosomal recessive trait that could be a significant risk factor for a number of defects, for example, vascular events, due to lower dietary folate intake among <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. To find the incidence of 677 C>T and 1298?A>C in MTHFR gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population, polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism were employed among 152 patients with myocardial infarction and 167 controls. The MTHFR 677CT genotype was found among 35 (22.4%) cases and 08 (4.8%) controls, the MTHFR 677CC allele was found among 115 (73.7%) cases and 159 (94.6%) controls. Also, the analysis of the MTHFR 1298A>C SNP identified the MTHFR 1298CC genotype among 16 (10.3%) cases and 01 (0.6%) control, the MTHFR 1298AC genotype was found in 56 (35.9%) cases and 27 (16.2%) controls, and the MTHFR 1298AA genotype was observed in 80 (51.3%) cases and 139 (82.6%) controls. The C vs. A allele also showed significantly higher frequency among the patients in comparison with the controls (p<0.0001). The results of this study indicate that the MTHFR A1298C SNP is more prevalent among <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span> compared with the MTHFR C677T SNP, suggesting a possible role of MTHFR A1298C in the pathogenesis of heart diseases. PMID:21749215</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24613098','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24613098"><span id="translatedtitle">Termites in the hominin diet: a meta-analysis of termite genera, species and <span class="hlt">castes</span> as a dietary supplement for <span class="hlt">South</span> African robust australopithecines.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lesnik, Julie J</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>Termite foraging by chimpanzees and present-day modern humans is a well-documented phenomenon, making it a plausible hypothesis that early hominins were also utilizing this resource. Hominin termite foraging has been credited by some to be the explanation for the unexpected carbon isotope signatures present in <span class="hlt">South</span> African hominin teeth, which suggest the diet was different from that of extant non-human great apes, consisting of a significant amount of resources that are not from woody-plants. Grass-eating termites are one potential resource that could contribute to the carbon signature. However, not all termites eat grasses, and in fact, the termites that are most widely consumed by chimpanzees and by many present-day human populations at best have a mixed diet that includes small amounts of grasses. Here I review the ecology of termites and how it affects their desirability as a food resource for hominins, and conduct a meta-analysis of nutritional values for various genera, species and <span class="hlt">castes</span> from the literature. Termites are very diverse, even within species, and this variability affects both their carbon signatures and nutritional value, hindering generalizations regarding the contribution of termites to the hominin diet. It is concluded here that a combination of soldiers and alates of the genus Macrotermes be used to model the insectivory component of the Plio-Pleistocene hominin diet due to their significant amounts of energy-yielding nutrients and potential role as a critical resource for supporting larger-brained hominins. PMID:24613098</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1689K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E1689K"><span id="translatedtitle">Surface ozone and NOx trends observed over Kannur, a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> coastal location of weak industrial activities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kumar, Satheesh Mk; T, Nishanth; M, Praseeed K.</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">South</span> India is a peninsular region surrounded by the three belts of Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Usually, coastal regions experience relatively high air quality compared to that of the interior land masses owing to the abundance of OH over ocean surface which acts as detergent in the atmosphere. Kannur (11.9 N, 75.4E, 5 m AMSL) is a coastal location along the Arabian Sea which is located in the northern district of Kerala State with fairly low industrial activities. A continuous observation of surface ozone (O3), NOx and OX (NO2+ O3) which has been initiated at this coastal site since 2009 reveals the enhancement in the concentrations of these trace species quite significantly. It is observed that surface O3 mixing ratio is increased at a rate of 1.51 0.5 ppbv/year during the four year period from 2009 at Kannur. The enhancement rate in the mixing ratios of NOx is 1.01 0.4 ppbv/year and OX is 1.490.42 ppbv/year respectively. The increase of O3 may be attributed due to the increase in methane and non-methane organic emissions from the wet lands and vehicles may enhance O3 production and fairly low rate of change of NO concentration at this site. This paper describes the rate of changes of O3, NOx and OX during the period of observation in detail. Likewise, the increase in nighttime concentrations of O3 and PM10 observed during the festival occasions in the summer month of April in all years is explained. Being a weak industrialized location, the main source of pollution is by vehicular emissions and the increase in these trace gases in the context of rapid enhancement in the number of vehicles is well correlated. These results may be helpful for improving government policies to control the photochemical formation of secondary air pollutants in the rural coastal sites that has a significant influence on the onset of monsoon and the outcome of this study have significant relevance for gradual transformation of pristine locations into polluted sites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4378809','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4378809"><span id="translatedtitle">An In-Vivo Correlation Analysis of the Distance Between Lingual Frenal Attachment and Mandibular Incisal Edge Position as an Aid in Establishing Mandibular Occlusal Plane in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Balasubramanian, R; Raj, Krishna</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Statement of problem: The aim of the study is to find the reliability in measuring the distance between the anterior attachment of the lingual frenum and the incisal edge of the mandibular central incisor on <span class="hlt">casts</span> to be used as a pre-extraction record. Purpose: The objective of this study is to give a range of numerical values from anterior attachment of lingual frenum to mandibular central incisors in a class I ridge relation in <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population, which may be used in establishing the vertical dimension of the edentulous patient and also to locate the mandibular incisors in teeth arrangement of complete denture fabrication. Materials and Methods: One hundred subjects (50 males and 50 females) under the age group of 21-28y, with class I dental relationship and who have never undergone orthodontic treatment were selected. Two models were made for each subject using irreversible hydrocolloid impression material and type III gypsum product to obtain an average value for each subject. The distance between the incisal edges of the lower central incisor and the anterior attachment of the lingual frenum is measured using a divider and digital vernier caliper. Statistical Analysis: Mean and Standard deviation using descriptive statistics tool using SPSS software version 18. Result: The distance between the anterior attachment of the lingual frenum and incisal edges of mandibular central incisors among the 100 subjects was 14.50mm 2.2245 mm. Conclusion: The value obtained aided in establishing the vertical dimension easier by making a pre-determined height of mandibular occlusal rim. PMID:25859527</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/ds102/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/ds102/"><span id="translatedtitle">Digital data to support development of a pesticide management plan for the Standing Rock <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, Sioux County, North Dakota, and Corson County, <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Schaap, Bryan D.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>As part of a program to support development of pesticide management plans for <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservations, the U.S. Geological Survey has been working in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to make selected information available to the Tribes or in a format easier for the Tribes to use. As a result of this program, four digital data sets related to the geology or hydrology of the Standing Rock <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation were produced as part of this report. The digital data sets are based on maps published in 1982 at the 1:250,000 scale in 'Geohydrology of the Standing Rock <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, North and <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota,' U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-644 by L.W. Howells. The digital data sets were created by 1) scanning the appropriate map to create an image file, 2) registering the image file to real-world coordinates, 3) creating a new image file rectified to real-world coordinates, and 4) digitizing of the features of interest using the rectified image as a guide. As digital data sets, the information can be used in a geographic information system in combination with other information to help develop a pesticide management plan.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JAESc..28..276G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JAESc..28..276G"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">South</span> Equatorial Current (SEC) driven changes at DSDP Site 237, Central <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, during the Plio-Pleistocene: Evidence from Benthic Foraminifera and Stable Isotopes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gupta, Anil K.; Das, Moumita; Bhaskar, K.</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>This study attempts to analyse paleoceanographic changes in the Central <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 237), linked to monsoon variability as well as deep-sea circulation during the Plio-Pleistocene. We used factor and cluster analyses of census data of the 34 most dominant species of benthic foraminifera that enabled us to identify five biofacies: Astrononion umbilicatulum- Uvigerina proboscidea (Au-Up), Pullenia bulloides- Bulimina striata (Pb-Bs), Globocassidulina tumida- Nuttallides umbonifera (Gt-Nu), Gyroidinoides nitidula- Cibicides wuellerstorfi (Gn-Cw) and Cassidulina carinata- Cassidulina laevigata (Cc-Cl) biofacies. Knowledge of the environmental preferences of modern deep-sea benthic foraminifera helped to interpret the results of factor and cluster analyses in combination with oxygen and carbon isotope values. The biofacies indicative of high surface productivity, resulting from a stronger <span class="hlt">South</span> Equatorial Current (Au-Up and Pb-Bs biofacies), dominate the early Pliocene interval (5.6-4.5 Ma) of global warmth. An intense Indo-Pacific 'biogenic bloom' and strong Oxygen Minimum Zone extended to intermediate depths (1000-2000 m) over large parts of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean in the early Pliocene. Since 4.5 Ma, the food supply in the Central <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean dropped and fluctuated while deep waters were corrosive (biofacies Gt-Nu, Gn-Cw). The Pleistocene interval is characterized by an intermediate flux of organic matter (Cc-Cl biofacies).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23936869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23936869"><span id="translatedtitle">Ethnic-Specific WRN Mutations in <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian Werner Syndrome Patients: Potential Founder Effect in Patients with <span class="hlt">Indian</span> or Pakistani Ancestry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Saha, Bidisha; Lessel, Davor; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Rao, Anuradha S; Hisama, Fuki M; Peter, Dincy; Bennett, Chris; Nrnberg, Gudrun; Nrnberg, Peter; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Werner syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple features consistent with accelerated aging. It is caused by mutations in the WRN gene, which encodes a RecQ type helicase. To date, more than 70 disease-causing mutations have been reported. While founder mutations and a corresponding relatively high incidence of WS have been reported in Japan and Sardinia, such mutations have not been previously described among patients of <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian descent. Here we report two novel WRN mutations in three pedigrees. A homozygous c.561A>G mutation in exon 6 was identified both in a pedigree from Kerala, India and in a British patient of Pakistani ancestry. Although c.561A>G does not alter the corresponding amino acid (p.K187K), it creates a cryptic splice site resulting in a 98bp deletion at the mRNA level (r.557-654del98) followed by a frameshift (p.K187fs). These two cases shared the same haplotype across the WRN gene, and were distinct from another <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Werner patient with a homozygous stop codon mutation, c.2855 C>A (p.S952*) in exon 24. As the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population increases and the awareness of Werner syndrome grows, we anticipate that more cases will be identified with these founder mutations among <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian Werner syndrome patients. PMID:23936869</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4244976','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4244976"><span id="translatedtitle">Osteoporosis in Healthy <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Males and the Influence of Life Style Factors and Vitamin D Status on Bone Mineral Density</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Shetty, Sahana; Kapoor, Nitin; Naik, Dukhabandhu; Asha, Hesarghatta Shyamasunder; Prabu, Suresh; Thomas, Nihal; Seshadri, Mandalam Subramaniam; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objective. To study the prevalence of osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency in healthy men and to explore the influence of various life style factors on bone mineral density (BMD) and also to look at number of subjects warranting treatment. Methods. Ambulatory <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> men aged above 50 were recruited by cluster random sampling. The physical activity, risk factors in the FRAX tool, BMD, vitamin D, and PTH were assessed. The number of people needing treatment was calculated, which included subjects with osteoporosis and osteopenia with 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fracture >20 percent and hip fracture >3 percent in FRAX India. Results. A total of 252 men with a mean age of 58 years were studied. The prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia at any one site was 20% (50/252) and 58%, respectively. Vitamin D deficiency (<20?ng/dL) was seen in 53%. On multiple logistic regression, BMI (OR 0.3; P value = 0.04) and physical activity (OR 0.4; P value < 0.001) had protective effect on BMD. Twenty-five percent warranted treatment. Conclusions. A significantly large proportion of <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> men had osteoporosis and vitamin D deficiency. Further interventional studies are needed to look at reduction in end points like fractures in these subjects. PMID:25478284</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012E%26PSL.327...29L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012E%26PSL.327...29L"><span id="translatedtitle">Nd isotope systematics on ODP Sites 756 and 762 sediments reveal major volcanic, oceanic and climatic changes in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean over the last 35 Ma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Le Houedec, Sandrine; Meynadier, Laure; Allgre, Claude J.</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>We have analyzed the Nd isotopic composition of both ancient seawater and detrital material from long sequences of carbonated oozes of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean which are ODP Site 756 (Ninety East Ridge (- 30S), 1518 m water depth) and ODP Site 762 (Northwest Australian margin, 1360 m water depth). The measurements indicate that the ?Nd changes in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> seawater over the last 35 Ma result from changes in the oceanic circulation, large volcanic and continental weathering Nd inputs. This highlights the diverse nature of those controls and their interconnections in a small area of the ocean. These new records combined with those previously obtained at the equatorial ODP Sites 757 and 707 in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (Gourlan et al., 2008) established that the distribution of intermediate seawater ?Nd was uniform over most of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean from 35 Ma to 10 Ma within a geographical area extending from 40S to the equator and from - 60E to 120E. However, the ?Nd value of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean seawater which kept an almost constant value (at about - 7 to - 8) from 35 to 15 Ma rose by 3 ?Nd units from 15 to 10 Ma. This sharp increase has been caused by a radiogenic Nd enrichment of the water mass originating from the Pacific flowing through the Indonesian Passage. Using a two end-members model we calculated that the Nd transported to the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean through the Indonesian Pathway was 1.7 times larger at 10 Ma than at 15 Ma. The Nd isotopic composition of ancient seawater and that of the sediment detrital component appear to be strongly correlated for some specific events. A first evidence occurs between 20 and 15 Ma with two positive spikes recorded in both ?Nd signals that are clearly induced by a volcanic crisis of, most likely, the St. Paul hot-spot. A second evidence is the very large ?Nd decrease recorded at ODP Sites 756 and 762 during the past 10 Ma which has never been previously observed. The synchronism between the ?Nd decrease in seawater from 10 to 5 Ma and evidences of desertification in the western part of the nearly Australian continent suggests enhanced weathering inputs in this ocean from this continent as a result of climatic changes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986DSRA...33..447B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986DSRA...33..447B"><span id="translatedtitle">The wind-driven circulation of the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> ocean II. Experiments using a multi-layer numerical model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Boudra, Douglas B.; De Ruijter, Wilhelmus P. M.</p> <p>1986-04-01</p> <p>A numerical modeling study of the circulation of the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean in a geometrically simplified domain is extended to include baroclinicity using the quasi-isopycnic coordinate model of BLECK and BOUDRA (1981, Journal of Physical Oceanography, 11, 755-770). Within this framework a number of model parameters are varied in an attempt to understand processes related to exchange of fluid between the two ocean basins. The importance of nonlinearity of the boundary currents is determined by varying mean upper layer depth among three experiments. Sensitivities of the model Agulhas retroflection to upper ocean stratification, lateral friction, presence of eastward drift and bottom drag are examined. The role of friction in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean western boundary layer is investigated and found to be important in separation from the boundary. Finally, horizontal resolution is doubled to resolve better the boundary layer and release of baroclinic instability. In advancing from the barotropic ( DE RUIJTER and BOUDRA, 1985, Dee-Sea Research, 32, 557-574), to the baroclinic model, an important new feature is development of an intense recirculation eddy just beyond the point where the Agulhas Current overshoots the tip of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa. The center of this recirculation becomes the pivoting axis of the model retroflection, and its intensity increases with increasing Rossby number. At the same time, less top layer water is exchanged between the basins. The retroflection region acts as a source-sink of available potential and kinetic energy for the Atlantic-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean in the low Rossby number case. This source-sink is essentially shut off in the high Rossby number case. Energy is pumped into the bottom layer underneath the recirculation, however, and radiates westward in weak anticyclonic eddies. Similar to the one-layer case, the mechanism of the modeled retroflection is adjustment to a change in the vorticity balance as the Agulhas leaves the coast of Africa. Along that coast, the ?-induced gain of relative vorticity is balanced by diffusion into the no-slip boundary. After separation, potential vorticity is essentially conserved and the gain of relative vorticity is manifested in an eastward turn. Agulhas ring formation in the model occurs only for certain parameter ranges, and is due to a closing of the retroflecting current onto itself. In the highly nonlinear case, interaction with the cold, low potential vorticity, eastward drift <span class="hlt">south</span> of the retroflection area is also required for ring formation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4228680','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4228680"><span id="translatedtitle">Hair <span class="hlt">casts</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Parmar, Sweta S.; Parmar, Kirti S.; Shah, Bela J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Hair <span class="hlt">casts</span> or pseudonits are circumferential concretions, which cover the hair shaft in such a way that, it could be easily removed. They are thin, cylindrical, and elongated in length. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old girl presenting with hair <span class="hlt">casts</span>. Occurrence of these is unusual, and they may have varied associations. This patient was suffering from developmental delay. It is commonly misdiagnosed as and very important to differentiate from pediculosis capitis. PMID:25396168</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3886603','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3886603"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Craniometric Variability and Affinities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within <span class="hlt">Indian</span> series, <span class="hlt">Indians</span>' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, index-based differences of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> males from other series, and <span class="hlt">Indians</span>' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern <span class="hlt">Indians</span> differ from southern <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. <span class="hlt">Indians</span> resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. <span class="hlt">Indians</span>' wider geographic affinities lie with “Caucasoid” populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern <span class="hlt">Indians</span> between southern <span class="hlt">Indians</span> and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. PMID:24455409</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26333139','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26333139"><span id="translatedtitle">Two deep evolutionary lineages in the circumtropical glasseye Heteropriacanthus cruentatus (Teleostei, Priacanthidae) with admixture in the <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gaither, M R; Bernal, M A; Fernandez-Silva, I; Mwale, M; Jones, S A; Rocha, C; Rocha, L A</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>A phylogeographic study of the circumtropical glasseye Heteropriacanthus cruentatus was conducted. Molecular analyses indicate two mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (coI) lineages that are 10·4% divergent: one in the western Atlantic (Caribbean) and another that was detected across the Indo-Pacific. A fixed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was detected at a nuclear locus (S7 ribosomal protein) and is consistent with this finding. There is evidence of recent dispersal from the Atlantic to the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean with individuals of mixed lineages detected in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa and the Mozambique Channel. Using coalescent analyses of the mitochondrial dataset, time of divergence between lineages was estimated to be c. 15·3 million years. The deep divergence between these two lineages indicates distinct evolutionary units, however, due to the lack of morphological differences and evidence of hybridization between lineages, taxonomic revision is not suggested at this time. PMID:26333139</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26000410','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26000410"><span id="translatedtitle">Review of the fish-parasitic genus Cymothoa Fabricius, 1793 (Isopoda, Cymothoidae, Crustacea) from the southwestern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, including a new species from <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hadfield, Kerry A; Bruce, Niel L; Smit, Nico J</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The genus Cymothoa Fabricius, 1793 is revised for southwestern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean waters. Cymothoa borbonica Schioedte & Meinert, 1884 and C. eremita Brnnich, 1783 are redescribed. Cymothoa rotundifrons Haller, 1880, from Mauritius lacks type material and the host is unknown, therefore it is here relegated to nomen dubium. Cymothoa sodwana sp. nov., from Trachinotus botla (Carangidae), collected from the Kwazulu-Natal coast of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa, is described and is distinguished by the large, ovoid, hunched body with rugose dorsal surfaces; the anterolateral angles of pereonite 1 are narrow and rounded reaching half the length of the cephalon; the ischium of pereopod 7 has a large protrusion and pereonite 7 which laterally overlaps the pleon margins, extending posteriorly to the pleotelson. PMID:26000410</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25607779','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25607779"><span id="translatedtitle">Coexistence of Digenic Mutations in Both Thin (TPM1) and Thick (MYH7) Filaments of Sarcomeric Genes Leads to Severe Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> FHCM.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Selvi Rani, Deepa; Nallari, Pratibha; Dhandapany, Perundurai S; Rani, Jhansi; Meraj, Khunza; Ganesan, Mala; Narasimhan, Calambur; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>Mutations in sarcomeric genes are the leading cause for cardiomyopathies. However, not many genetic studies have been carried out on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> cardiomyopathy patients. We performed sequence analyses of a thin filament sarcomeric gene, ?-tropomyosin (TPM1), in 101 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients and 147 dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients against 207 ethnically matched healthy controls, revealing 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Of these, one mutant, S215L, was identified in two unrelated HCM cases-patient #1, aged 44, and patient #2, aged 65-and was cosegregating with disease in these families as an autosomal dominant trait. In contrast, S215L was completely absent in 147 DCM and 207 controls. Patient #1 showed a more severe disease phenotype, with poor prognosis and a family history of sudden cardiac death, than patient #2. Therefore, these two patients and the family members positive for S215L were further screened for variations in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, MYL2, MYL3, and ACTC. Interestingly, two novel thick filaments, D896N (homozygous) and I524K (heterozygous) mutations, in the MYH7 gene were identified exclusively in patient #1 and his family members. Thus, we strongly suggest that the coexistence of these digenic mutations is rare, but leads to severe hypertrophy in a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHCM). PMID:25607779</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26173679','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26173679"><span id="translatedtitle">TGFB1 Functional Gene Polymorphisms (C-509T and T869C) in the Maternal Susceptibility to Pre-eclampsia in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Women.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Deepthi, Goske; Chaithri, Ponnaluri Kamakshi; Latha, Prasanna; Rani, Vital Usha; Rahman, Police Fazul; Jahan, Parveen</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Pre-eclampsia (PE), a pregnancy-specific vascular disorder characterized by hypertension and proteinuria, is hypothesized to be the result of inadequate placental angiogenesis with attendant systemic inflammation. The pleiotropic cytokine, Transforming Growth Factor-?1 (TGF-?1), is considered to be a key candidate gene in the molecular pathogenesis of PE by virtue of its ability to not only regulate angiogenesis and apoptosis of target cells, but also by acting as a master controller of Th1/Th2 cytokine balance and production of the anti-inflammatory peripheral regulatory T cells (FOXP3+ Tregs). Based on this presumption, we screened a total of 469 pregnant women from <span class="hlt">South</span> India that include 239 patients with PE and 230 healthy controls for the two functional polymorphisms of TGFB1 gene (C-509T and T869C). The genotype frequencies of these two polymorphisms differed significantly between the PE and control groups (P = 0.01 and P = 0.002, for the TGFB1 C-509T and T869C polymorphisms, respectively). Under the over-dominant model, the CT genotype of the TGFB1 C509T polymorphism showed a high protective effect (P = 3e-04), while the TT genotype of the same variant appeared to be the predisposing genotype (P = 0.003). The T-T and C-C haplotypes were found to be the risk haplotypes blocks towards PE (OR = 4.72; P = 0.031, OR = 5.39; P = 0.03), respectively. Strong linkage disequilibrium was seen between the two polymorphisms. Our investigations revealed a significant influence of TGFB1 C-509T and T869C polymorphisms on the PE risk in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women. The study represents one of the first of its kind from the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent. PMID:26173679</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015DSRI...96...49K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015DSRI...96...49K"><span id="translatedtitle">Plasticity of trophic interactions among sharks from the oceanic <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean revealed by stable isotope and mercury analyses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kiszka, Jeremy J.; Aubail, Aurore; Hussey, Nigel E.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Caurant, Florence; Bustamante, Paco</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Sharks are a major component of the top predator guild in oceanic ecosystems, but the trophic relationships of many populations remain poorly understood. We examined chemical tracers of diet and habitat (δ15N and δ13C, respectively) and total mercury (Hg) concentrations in muscle tissue of seven pelagic sharks: blue shark (Prionace glauca), short-fin mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus), oceanic whitetip shark (Carcharhinus longimanus), scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini), pelagic thresher shark (Alopias pelagicus), crocodile shark (Pseudocarcharias kamoharai) and silky shark (Carcharhinus falciformis), from the data poor <span class="hlt">south</span>-western tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Minimal interspecific variation in mean δ15N values and a large degree of isotopic niche overlap - driven by high intraspecific variation in δ15N values - was observed among pelagic sharks. Similarly, δ13C values of sharks overlapped considerably for all species with the exception of P. glauca, which had more 13C-depleted values indicating possibly longer residence times in purely pelagic waters. Geographic variation in δ13C, δ15N and Hg were observed for P. glauca and I. oxyrinchus. Mean Hg levels were similar among species with the exception of P. kamoharai which had significantly higher Hg concentrations likely related to mesopelagic feeding. Hg concentrations increased with body size in I. oxyrinchus, P. glauca and C. longimanus. Values of δ15N and δ13C varied with size only in P. glauca, suggesting ontogenetic shifts in diets or habitats. Together, isotopic data indicate that - with few exceptions - variance within species in trophic interactions or foraging habitats is greater than differentiation among pelagic sharks in the <span class="hlt">south</span>-western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Therefore, it is possible that this group exhibits some level of trophic redundancy, but further studies of diets and fine-scale habitat use are needed to fully test this hypothesis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MAP...128..131S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MAP...128..131S"><span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of daily modes of <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian monsoon variability and its association with <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Pacific Ocean SST in the NCEP CFS V2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shahi, Namendra Kumar; Rai, Shailendra; Pandey, D. K.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>The prediction capability of daily modes of variability for <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian monsoon from climate forecast system version 2 of national centers for environmental prediction with respect to observed precipitation has been assessed. The space-time structure of the daily modes for summer monsoon rainfall has been identified by using multi-channel singular spectrum analysis (MSSA). The MSSA is applied on daily anomalies of rainfall data over the <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian monsoon region (40°E-160°E, 30°S-35°N) for the period of 2001-2013 with a lag window of 61 days for June-July-August-September season. The broad spectrum around 45 and 50 days was obtained from the observed and model data during the time domain of our study. The space-time structure of the modes obtained from the model shows good resemblance with respect to the observation. The observed northeastward propagation of oscillatory mode is well simulated by the model. The significant improvement in the space-time structure, period of oscillation, and propagation of oscillatory modes was found in the model. The observed connectivity of oscillatory and persisting modes with the sea surface temperature of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Pacific Ocean has also been investigated and it was found that the model is able to predict it reasonably well.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ESRv..107..107C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ESRv..107..107C"><span id="translatedtitle">Expanding the proxy toolkit to help identify past events Lessons from the 2004 <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Tsunami and the 2009 <span class="hlt">South</span> Pacific Tsunami</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chagu-Goff, Catherine; Schneider, Jean-Luc; Goff, James R.; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Strotz, Luke</p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>Some of the proxies used to identify palaeotsunamis are reviewed in light of new findings following the 2004 <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Tsunami and the 2009 <span class="hlt">South</span> Pacific Tsunami, and a revised toolkit provided. The new application of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) to the study of tsunami deposits and its usefulness to determine the hydrodynamic conditions during the emplacement of tsunami sequences, together with data from grain size analysis, are presented. The value of chemical proxies as indicators of saltwater inundation, associated marine shell and/or coral, high-energy depositional environment, and possible contamination, is demonstrated and issues of preservation addressed. We also provide new findings from detailed studies of heavy minerals. New information gathered during the UNESCO International Oceanographic Commission (IOC) International Tsunami Survey of fine onshore sediments following the 2009 <span class="hlt">South</span> Pacific Tsunami is presented, and includes grain size, chemical, diatom and foraminifera data. The tsunami deposit varied, ranging from fining-upward sand layers to thin sand layers overlain by a thick layer of organic debris and/or a mud cap. Grain size characteristics, chemical data and microfossil assemblages provide evidence for marine inundation from near shore, and changes in flow dynamics during the tsunami.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/227809','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/227809"><span id="translatedtitle">Electromagnetic <span class="hlt">casting</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Evans, J.W.; Kageyama, R.; Deepak; Cook, D.P.; Prasso, D.C.; Nishioka, S.</p> <p>1995-12-31</p> <p>Electromagnetic <span class="hlt">casting</span> (EMC) is a technology that is used extensively in the aluminum industry to <span class="hlt">cast</span> ingots with good surface finish for subsequent rolling into consumer product. The paper reviews briefly some investigations from the eighties wherein models for EMC were developed. Then more recent work is examined wherein more realistic 3D models have been developed, the traditional studies of electromagnetic and magnetohydrodynamic phenomena have been supplemented with research on heat transport, and the stability of the metal free surface has been examined. The paper concludes with three generalizations concerning modeling that may have wider applicability than EMC.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26798241','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26798241"><span id="translatedtitle">Revision of the West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Wattius Kaszab (Tenebrionidae, Toxicini, Eudysantina) with lectotype designations for Pascoe's <span class="hlt">South</span> American species.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Smith, Aaron D; Sanchez, Lucio A</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The Wattius species occurring in the West Indies are revised for the first time. Wattius cucullatus (Pascoe), previously reported from Cuba, is diagnosed and restricted to Brazil. Wattius asperulus (Pascoe), currently a synonym of Wattius cucullatus, from Colombia is diagnosed and resurrected. All species found in the West Indies are endemic to the islands and form a single informal species-group. Three species are described: Wattius andersoni sp. n. from Cuba, Wattius emmabaconae sp. n. from Hispaniola (Dominican Republic), and Wattius viatorus sp. n. from Cuba and the Bahamas, and lectotypes are designated for Calymmus cucullatus Pascoe and Calymmus asperulus Pascoe. A key to the West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> species is provided. PMID:26798241</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED242142.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED242142.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Project <span class="hlt">CAST</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.</p> <p></p> <p>The document outlines procedures for implementing Project <span class="hlt">CAST</span> (Community and School Together), a community-based career education program for secondary special education students in Charles County, Maryland. Initial sections discuss the role of a learning coordinator, (including relevant travel reimbursement and mileage forms) and an overview of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rushton%2c+a&pg=5&id=EJ672398','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rushton%2c+a&pg=5&id=EJ672398"><span id="translatedtitle">Performance on Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices by African, East <span class="hlt">Indian</span>, and White Engineering Students in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rushton, J. Philippe; Skuy, Mervyn; Fridjhon, Peter</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Tested the hypothesis that the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices test has the same construct validity in African university students that it does in non-African university students. Differences in results for 294 engineering students in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa show that differences are not attributable to cultural peculiarities of the test, but are a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25323826','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25323826"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinical applications and implications of common and founder mutations in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subpopulations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ankala, Arunkanth; Tamhankar, Parag M; Valencia, C Alexander; Rayam, Krishna K; Kumar, Manisha M; Hegde, Madhuri R</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">South</span> Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span> represent a sixth of the world's population and are a racially, geographically, and genetically diverse people. Their unique anthropological structure, prevailing <span class="hlt">caste</span> system, and ancient religious practices have all impacted the genetic composition of most of the current-day <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. With the evolving socio-religious and economic activities of the subsects and <span class="hlt">castes</span>, endogamous and consanguineous marriages became a commonplace. Consequently, the frequency of founder mutations and the burden of heritable genetic disorders rose significantly. Specifically, the incidence of certain autosomal-recessive disorders is relatively high in select <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subpopulations and communities that share common recent ancestry. Although today clinical genetics and molecular diagnostic services are making inroads in India, the high costs associated with the technology and the tests often keep patients from an exact molecular diagnosis, making more customized and tailored tests, such as those interrogating the most common and founder mutations or those that cater to select sects within the population, highly attractive. These tests offer a quick first-hand affordable diagnostic and carrier screening tool. Here, we provide a comprehensive catalog of known common mutations and founder mutations in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population and discuss them from a molecular, clinical, and historical perspective. PMID:25323826</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4266598','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4266598"><span id="translatedtitle">Contribution of Food Sources to the Vitamin B12 Status of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Children from a Birth Cohort Recruited in the City of Mysore</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objective There is evidence that sub-clinical vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency is common in India. Vegetarianism is prevalent and therefore meat consumption is low. Our objective was to explore the contribution of B12 source-foods and maternal B12 status during pregnancy to plasma B12 concentrations. Design Maternal plasma B12 concentrations were measured during pregnancy. Childrens dietary intakes and plasma B12 concentrations were measured at age 9.5 years; B12 and total energy intakes were calculated using food composition databases. We used linear regression to examine associations between maternal B12 status and childrens intakes of B12 and B12 source-foods, and childrens plasma B12 concentrations. Setting <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> city of Mysore and surrounding rural areas. Subjects Children from the Mysore Parthenon Birth Cohort (n=512, 47.1% male). Results Three percent of children were B12 deficient (<150 pmol/l). A further 14% had marginal B12 concentrations (150-221 pmol/l). Childrens total daily B12 intake and consumption frequency of meat and fish, and micronutrient-enriched beverages were positively associated with plasma B12 concentrations (p=0.006, p=0.01 and p=0.04, adjusted for socio-economic indicators and maternal B12 status). Maternal pregnancy plasma B12 was associated with childrens plasma B12 concentrations, independent of current B12 intakes (p<0.001). Milk and curd (yoghurt) intakes were unrelated to B12 status. Conclusions Meat and fish are important B12 sources in this population. Micronutrient-enriched beverages appear to be important sources in our cohort, but their high sugar content necessitates care in their recommendation. Improving maternal B12 status in pregnancy may improve <span class="hlt">Indian</span> childrens status. PMID:24866058</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4287758','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4287758"><span id="translatedtitle">Association of depression with common carotid artery intima media thickness and augmentation index in a large Urban <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population- The Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES - 138)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Poongothai, Subramani; Pradeepa, Rajendra; Indulekha, Karunakaran; Surendar, Jayagopi; Mohan, Viswanathan</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Aim: The aim of the study was to assess the relationship of depression with carotid intima media thickness and augmentation index in Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. Research Design and Methods: For this study, 1505 subjects were randomly selected from a population based study conducted in Chennai, <span class="hlt">South</span> India. Right common carotid artery intima medial thickness [IMT] was determined using high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography. Augmentation index [AI] was measured using the Sphygmocor apparatus. Depressive symptoms were assessed using a previously validated instrument, the Patient Health Questionnaire -12 (PHQ -12). Results: Of the 1505 subjects included in this study, depressive symptoms were present in 16.6% (n = 250) of the subjects. The mean IMT and AI values among subjects with depression were significantly higher than those without depression [0.83 0.43 mm vs 0.73 0.12 mm, P < 0.001] and IMT was higher in females with depression while AI was higher in males with depression. However, both IMT and AI were higher among those with depression in both genders. In multiple logistic regression model, depressive symptoms were associated with IMT even after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, fasting plasma glucose, serum cholesterol and hypertension (Odds ratio [OR] =2.17, 95% Confidence intervals [CI]:1.01- 4.63, P = 0.047) but in the case of AI, the significance was lost in the adjusted model (OR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.991-1.02, P = 0.445). Conclusion: Among Asian <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, presence of depressive symptoms was associated with carotid intima media thickness and Augmentation index, even after adjusting for potential confounders. PMID:25593841</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3713478','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3713478"><span id="translatedtitle">Correlates of anaemia in pregnant urban <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women: a possible role of dietary intake of nutrients that inhibit iron absorption</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Samuel, Tinu Mary; Thomas, Tinku; Finkelstein, Julia; Bosch, Ronald; Rajendran, Ramya; Virtanen, Suvi M; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Kurpad, Anura V; Duggan, Christopher</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Objective To identify correlates of anaemia during the first trimester of pregnancy among 366 urban <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> pregnant women. Design Cross-sectional study evaluating demographic, socio-economic, anthropometric and dietary intake data on haematological outcomes. Setting A government maternity health-care centre catering predominantly to the needs of pregnant women from the lower socio-economic strata of urban Bangalore. Subjects Pregnant women (n 366) aged ≥18 and ≤40 years, who registered for antenatal screening at ≤14 weeks of gestation. Results Mean age was 22.6 (SD 3.4) years, mean BMI was 20.4 (SD 3.3) kg/m2 and 236 (64.5%) of the pregnant women were primiparous. The prevalence of anaemia (Hb <11.0g/dl) was 30.3% and of microcytic anaemia (anaemia with mean corpuscular volume <80fl) 20.2%. Mean dietary intakes of energy, Ca, Fe and folate were well below the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> RDA. In multivariable log-binomial regression analysis, anaemia was independently associated with high dietary intakes of Ca (relative risk; 95% CI: 1.79; 1.16, 2.76) and P (1.96; 1.31, 2.96) and high intake of meat, fish and poultry (1.94; 1.29, 2.91). Conclusions Low dietary intake of multiple micronutrients, but higher intakes of nutrients that inhibit Fe absorption such as Ca and P, may help explain high rates of maternal anaemia in India. PMID:22575487</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4714051','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4714051"><span id="translatedtitle">Revision of the West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Wattius Kaszab (Tenebrionidae, Toxicini, Eudysantina) with lectotype designations for Pascoe’s <span class="hlt">South</span> American species</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Smith, Aaron D.; Sanchez, Lucio A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Abstract The Wattius species occurring in the West Indies are revised for the first time. Wattius cucullatus (Pascoe), previously reported from Cuba, is diagnosed and restricted to Brazil. Wattius asperulus (Pascoe), currently a synonym of Wattius cucullatus, from Colombia is diagnosed and resurrected. All species found in the West Indies are endemic to the islands and form a single informal species-group. Three species are described: Wattius andersoni sp. n. from Cuba, Wattius emmabaconae sp. n. from Hispaniola (Dominican Republic), and Wattius viatorus sp. n. from Cuba and the Bahamas, and lectotypes are designated for Calymmus cucullatus Pascoe and Calymmus asperulus Pascoe. A key to the West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> species is provided. PMID:26798241</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.T51B1884W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AGUFM.T51B1884W"><span id="translatedtitle">R/V Sonne Cruise SO199 CHRISP: New Insights Into the Geodynamic History of northern Wharton Basin (<span class="hlt">South</span>-East <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Werner, R.; Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F.; Heydolph, K.; Barckhausen, U.; Scientific Party, S.</p> <p>2008-12-01</p> <p>The morphology of the northern Wharton Basin (<span class="hlt">South</span>-East <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean) is dominated by the Investigator Ridge, a ~1800 km long, N-S striking fracture zone and a huge (~1800 x 600 km) submarine volcanic province of unknown origin which includes Cocos/Keeling Islands, Muirfield Seamount, Vening Meinesz Seamounts, Christmas Island, and many unnamed seamounts further <span class="hlt">south</span> and east. From August 3 through September 22, 2008, RV Sonne cruise SO199 CHRISP (short for Christmas Island Seamount Province) conducted extensive multi-beam mapping and the first systematic hard rock sampling of these features. Age and geochemical data from samples obtained on cruise SO199 aim to contribute to the ongoing debates (1) on the origin of the enriched composition of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Mantle Domain and (2) on the origin of intraplate volcanism in the northern Wharton Basin. Mapping of ~1300 km of the Investigator Ridge revealed a steep west-facing scarp along most of the fracture zone, suggesting recent reactivation related to the presently diffuse but developing new plate boundary between the eastern (Australian) and the western (<span class="hlt">Indian</span>) parts of the Indo-Australian Plate. Faulted sediments and north-<span class="hlt">south</span> oriented ravines and asymmetric tops of seamounts adjacent to the ridge imply left-lateral reactivation of older seafloor fractures, consistent with the regional tectonic picture in which Australia is continuing to move northwards whereas India has been stuck since colliding with Asia. The multi- beam data also suggest that the largest intraplate earthquake ever recorded (on June 18, 2000 near the Cocos/Keeling Islands; mag. 7.8) may be related to a reactivated fracture zone just west of the Investigator Ridge. Sampling along the ridge at ~100km intervals yielded a spectacular array of rock types (e.g., lavas, sheeted dikes, mafic and felsic intrusives, layered cumulates, serpentinites), representing a full cross section through the ocean crust into the upper mantle. Particularly surprising is that a magnetic profile just east but subparallel to the southern half of the Investigator Ridge, over crust previously believed to be formed during the Cretaceous Magnetic Quiet Zone, showed anomalies suggesting that this crust was formed in the Jurassic, consistent with the 6000 m deep seafloor in this area. At time of submission of this abstract, surveys of the "Christmas Island Seamount Province" were still ongoing. First samples from about 15 seamounts comprise mafic and evolved lavas and a wide range of volcaniclastic rocks. Guyot-type seamounts, representing former island volcanoes, occur frequently. The present depth of their erosional platforms imply different ages of these volcanoes and non-uniform subsidence rates of ~2500 to 1200 m. Uneroded volcanic cones on the guyot platforms as well as uneroded seamounts being higher than the guyots indicate revival of volcanic activity after subsidence of the guyots below sea level, being inconsistent with a stationary plume source below a moving plate.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26249924','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26249924"><span id="translatedtitle">A new species of Simulium (Gomphostilbia) (Diptera: Simuliidae) from <span class="hlt">South</span> India, with keys to <span class="hlt">Indian</span> members of the subgenus Gomphostilbia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Anbalagan, Sankarappan; Balachandran, Chellapandian; Prasanna, Vimalanathan Arun; Kannan, Mani; Dinakaran, Sundaram; Krishnan, Muthukalingan</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>A new black fly species, Simulium (Gomphostilbia) cauveryense sp. n., is described based on adult female, adult male, pupal and larval specimens collected from Kushalanagar, Karnataka, <span class="hlt">South</span> India. This new species is placed in the decuplum subgroup of the batoense species-group within the subgenus Gomphostilbia. Keys to the species of the subgenus Gomphostilbia reported from India are provided for females, males, pupae and mature larvae. PMID:26249924</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4513186','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4513186"><span id="translatedtitle">Genotyping and meta-analysis of KIF6 Trp719Arg polymorphism in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Coronary Artery Disease patients: A case–control study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vishnuprabu, Durairajpandian; Geetha, Subramanian; Bhaskar, Lakkakula V.K.S.; Mahapatra, Nitish R.; Munirajan, Arasambattu K.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The KIF6 719Arg allele is an interesting genomic variant widely screened in various populations and is reported to be associated with the risk of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) and statin treatment outcome. Recent population based clinical studies and large-scale meta-analyses pondered over the role of 719Arg variant in CAD risk and treatment response. We screened the KIF6 Trp719Arg polymorphism (rs20455) in <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> CAD patients in a case–control approach. A total of 1042 samples (510 CAD patients and 532 controls) were screened for the KIF6 Trp719Arg SNP by TaqMan SNP genotyping assay, followed by meta-analysis of the genotype data of non-Europeans reports. The 719Arg risk genotype (GG) was observed in 29.6% of CAD cases and in 30.1% of controls with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.07 (95% CI: 0.76–1.50), p value = 0.709. No significant difference in the genotype frequency was observed between CAD and controls in both dominant model (AG + GG vs AA) and allelic model (719Arg vs 719Trp) with an OR of 1.11 (p = 0.491) and 1.03 (p = 0.767), respectively. The covariate analysis indicated that smoking & alcohol consumption increased the risk for MI among CAD patients. Meta-analysis showed that the KIF6 719Arg allele is not associated with CAD risk in both fixed effect (p = 0.515, OR = 1.023, 95% CI = 0.956–1.094) and random effect (p = 0.547, OR = 1.022, 95% CI = 0.953–1.096). The symmetrical shape of the Egger's funnel plots revealed that there is no publication bias. These results suggest that there is no association of KIF6 719Arg allele with CAD risk in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population and the meta-analysis confirms the same among non-European population. PMID:26236646</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMPP34A..07B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFMPP34A..07B"><span id="translatedtitle">Late Holocene <span class="hlt">South</span> American and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> summer monsoon variability: Assessing the regional significance of the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bird, B. W.; Rudloff, O. M.; Escobar, J.; Polissar, P. J.; Steinman, B. A.; Thompson, L. G.; Yao, T.</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>The response of Earth's major climate systems to natural forcings during the last 2000 years can provide valuable insight into the affect that ongoing climate change may have on these systems. Understanding the relationship between temperature, monsoonal hydroclimate and radiative forcing is of particular interest because hydrologic responses in these systems have the ability to impact over half of the global population. Here, late Holocene variability in the <span class="hlt">South</span> American and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> summer monsoon regions is examined using sedimentological, geochemical and isotopic proxies from high altitude lake sediment archives from the Colombian Andes and the southeastern Tibetan Plateau. New results from Laguna de Ubaque, a small moraine dammed lake at 2060 m ASL in the Eastern Cordillera of the Colombian Andes, suggest a reduction in Andean <span class="hlt">South</span> American summer monsoon (SASM) rainfall during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA; 900 to 1200 CE) that is consistent with other records from the Andes. During the Little Ice Age (LIA; 1450 to 1900 CE), Ubaque shows wet conditions between 1450 and 1600 CE and drier conditions from1600 to 1900 CE. This pattern is similar to accumulation at the Quelccaya Ice Cap, but differs from ice core, speleothem and lake sediment oxygen isotope records of synoptic-scale monsoonal precipitation, suggesting that Andean rainfall anomalies may have differed from upstream monsoonal trends over the Amazon. In contrast, results from Badi Namco and Paru Co on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau suggest that the MCA and LIA were relatively minor hydroclimate events superimposed on a larger millennial scale variation in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> summer monsoon precipitation (1200 to 200 cal yr B.P.) that was associated with changes in the position of the ITCZ, surface air temperature over the Tibetan Plateau and sea surface temperatures in the western tropical Pacific. The unique hydroclimate variations in the ISM and SASM regions supports the idea that while spatially extensive, the MCA and LIA had heterogeneous global expressions and that local factors played an important role in the regional expressions of these events. Analysis of Last Millennium simulations from the CMIP5 ensemble support inferences derived from proxy records and provide further insight into variability in global monsoonal systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/1082351','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/1082351"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.</p> <p>2012-12-18</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">casting</span> device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A <span class="hlt">casting</span> method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015HydJ..tmp....5B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015HydJ..tmp....5B"><span id="translatedtitle">Determining the vertical evolution of hydrodynamic parameters in weathered and fractured <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> crystalline-rock aquifers: insights from a study on an instrumented site</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Boisson, A.; Guihneuf, N.; Perrin, J.; Bour, O.; Dewandel, B.; Dausse, A.; Viossanges, M.; Ahmed, S.; Marchal, J. C.</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Due to extensive irrigation, most crystalline aquifers of <span class="hlt">south</span> India are overexploited. Aquifer structure consists of an upper weathered saprolite followed by a fractured zone whose fracture density decreases with depth. To achieve sustainable management, the evolution of hydrodynamic parameters (transmissivity and storage coefficient) by depth in the <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> context should be quantified. Falling-head borehole permeameter tests, injection tests, flowmeter profiles, single-packer tests and pumping tests were carried out in the unsaturated saprolite and saturated fractured granite. Results show that the saprolite is poorly transmissive (T fs = 3 10-7 to 8.5 10-8 m2 s-1) and that the most conductive part of the aquifer corresponds to the bottom of the saprolite and the upper part of the fractured rock (T = 1.0 10-3 to 7.0 10-4 m2 s-1). The transmissivity along the profile is mostly controlled by two distinct conductive zones without apparent vertical hydraulic connection. The transmissivity and storage coefficient both decrease with depth depending on the saturation of the main fracture zones, and boreholes are not exploitable after a certain depth (27.5 m on the investigated section). The numerous investigations performed allow a complete quantification with depth of the hydrodynamic parameters along the weathering profile, and a conceptual model is presented. Hydrograph observations (4 years) are shown to be relevant as a first-order characterization of the media and diffusivity evolution with depth. The evolution of these hydrodynamic parameters along the profile has a great impact on groundwater prospecting, exploitation and transport properties in such crystalline rock aquifers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4606378','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4606378"><span id="translatedtitle">A Common SNP of IL-10 (-1082A/G) is Associated With Increased Risk of Premenopausal Breast Cancer in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Women</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vinod, Cingeetham; Jyothy, Akka; Vijay kumar, Malladi; Raman, Ramaiyer Raghu; Nallari, Pratibha; Venkateshwari, Ananthapur</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background: Evading the immune destruction and angiogenesis has been the two hallmarks of cancer. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a cytokine with immune suppressing (pro-tumorigenic) and anti-angiogenic (anti-tumorigenic) properties, thus making the role of IL-10 in tumorigenesis enigmatic. Previous studies have suggested a critical role of IL10 altered expression in complex process of tumor-microenvironment, co-evolution and tumorigenesis. Objectives: Evaluating the role of IL10 (-1082A/G) gene promoter polymorphism in breast cancer patients from <span class="hlt">South</span> India. Patients and Methods: A case-control study was conducted with a total of 285 individuals, these include 125 histologically confirmed breast cancer patients and 160 age and sex matched controls. Genotypes were determined by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR), followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Statistical analysis was done to test the significance of results obtained. Results: Statistical analysis revealed that AA genotype of the Il-10 -1082A/G polymorphism is significantly associated with breast cancer (AA vs. AG: ?2 = 14.46, P = 0.0001432, OR = 2.854, 95% CI = 1.68 - 4.849). Up on stratifying subjects based on cancer stage, age at onset, menopausal status, AA genotype has associated with all the sub groups, except for post-menopausal women. There was no significant association which was observed with respected to hormonal status (ER, PR) and Her2/neu status. Conclusions: The present study suggests that IL-10 AA genotype as a risk factor in the etiology of breast cancer in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. PMID:26478792</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010TellB..62..660R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010TellB..62..660R"><span id="translatedtitle">Summer and winter distribution of ?13CDIC in surface waters of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean [20S-60S</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Racap, V.; Lo Monaco, C.; Metzl, N.; Pierre, C.</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT This paper describes for the first time the summer and winter distributions of sea surface ?13CDIC in the Southern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (20S-60S). For this we used ?13CDIC measurements from 10 cruises conducted between 1998 and 2005. For summer and winter, the highest ?13CDIC values (>2) are observed in sub-Antarctic waters (40S-50S) and attributed mainly to biological activity, enhanced in the vicinity of Crozet and Kerguelen Archipelagoes. The lowest ?13CDIC values are found in subtropical waters (25S-35S), with a minimum (<1) in the Agulhas Current region and in the Mozambique channel. On the seasonal scale, ?13CDIC is higher during summer than during winter in all regions. The largest seasonal amplitude of variation (~0.3), observed in the region 35S-40S, is attributed to biological activity during summer and to deep vertical mixing during winter. In subtropical oligotrophic waters, the mean seasonal amplitude of variation (~0.15) is mainly explained by air-sea CO2 fluxes. On the interannual scale, we also identified a large negative anomaly of ?13CDIC in the subtropical waters during austral summer 2002, associated to an anomalous ocean CO2 sink due to cold conditions during this period.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2990306','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2990306"><span id="translatedtitle">Guild structure, diversity and succession of dung beetles associated with <span class="hlt">Indian</span> elephant dung in <span class="hlt">South</span> Western Ghats forests</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sabu, Thomas K.; Vinod, K. V.; Vineesh, P. J.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The diversity, guild structure and succession of dung beetles associated with <span class="hlt">Indian</span> elephant dung is described in a deciduous forest site in Western Ghats, a hot spot of diversity in India. Dung beetles were collected using baited pitfall traps and from exposed dung pats in the forest at intervals of 1, 3, 5, 7, 15 and 21 days. Twenty-one dung beetle species belonging to the 3 major functional guilds were recorded. Abundance of dwellers was high compared to rollers deviating from earlier reports on the high abundance of rollers in the afrotropical regions. Dweller Drepanocerus setosus and tunneler Onthophagus bronzeus were the most abundant species. Dung pats aged 3–5 days attracted the highest abundance of dung beetles. Bray Curtis similarity index indicated low community similarity between different stages of succession. Species richness and abundance of tunnelers increased with dung age and decreasing moisture up to a threshold level, followed by a decrease. Rollers and dwellers did not show any significant relationship with dung moisture content. Further research is needed to estimate the dung beetle community associated with the dung pats of other mega herbivores as well as of elephant dung in other forests of the Western Ghats. PMID:19537983</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26867291','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26867291"><span id="translatedtitle">Seat Belt Usage Interventions for Motor Vehicle Crash Prevention on the Pine Ridge <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Amiotte, Joseph; Balanay, Jo Anne; Humphrey, Charles</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Motor vehicle crashes (MVC) are the leading cause of death from severe injuries on the Pine Ridge <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation (PRIR), averaging 16 MVC deaths per year from 2002 to 2011. The Sacred Cargo Coalition was established in PRIR in 2007 to implement intervention strategies to increase seat belt usage and reduce MVC fatalities, including seat belt law enforcement, creating a traffic court system, and educational campaigns on MVC prevention. The study described in this article examined the effectiveness of the interventions on increasing the seat belt usage rates and reducing MVC deaths. Secondary data were collected from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and other federal and local agencies. Seat belt usage rates increased an average of 6.8 percentage points from 2007 (10%) to 2012 (44%). MVC fatalities decreased by 46.7% from the preintervention to the intervention period. Maintenance and improvement of the intervention strategies may be achieved by seeking additional funding and including appropriate engineering activities in PRIR. PMID:26867291</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19537983','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19537983"><span id="translatedtitle">Guild structure, diversity and succession of dung beetles associated with <span class="hlt">Indian</span> elephant dung in <span class="hlt">South</span> Western Ghats forests.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sabu, Thomas K; Vinod, K V; Vineesh, P J</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>The diversity, guild structure and succession of dung beetles associated with <span class="hlt">Indian</span> elephant dung is described in a deciduous forest site in Western Ghats, a hot spot of diversity in India. Dung beetles were collected using baited pitfall traps and from exposed dung pats in the forest at intervals of 1, 3, 5, 7, 15 and 21 days. Twenty-one dung beetle species belonging to the 3 major functional guilds were recorded. Abundance of dwellers was high compared to rollers deviating from earlier reports on the high abundance of rollers in the afrotropical regions. Dweller Drepanocerus setosus and tunneler Onthophagus bronzeus were the most abundant species. Dung pats aged 3-5 days attracted the highest abundance of dung beetles. Bray Curtis similarity index indicated low community similarity between different stages of succession. Species richness and abundance of tunnelers increased with dung age and decreasing moisture up to a threshold level, followed by a decrease. Rollers and dwellers did not show any significant relationship with dung moisture content. Further research is needed to estimate the dung beetle community associated with the dung pats of other mega herbivores as well as of elephant dung in other forests of the Western Ghats. PMID:19537983</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17287626','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17287626"><span id="translatedtitle">Hyperhomocysteinemia and the compound heterozygous state for methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase are independent risk factors for deep vein thrombosis among <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Naushad, Sm; Jamal, Nurul Jain; Angalena, R; Prasad, C Krishna; Devi, A Radha Rama</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>To investigate the role of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) (677 C-->T and 1298 A-->C), factor V (1691 G-->A), factor II (20210 G-->A) genetic polymorphisms and hyperhomocysteinemia in the aetiology of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in 163 cases and 163 controls. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used for genotyping, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography for plasma homocysteine, and Student's t-test and Fisher exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Elevated mean plasma homocysteine levels were observed in DVT cases irrespective of gender differences. Homocysteine elevation above the 95th percentile of the control group associated with 9.4-fold and 7.6-fold increased risk for DVT in men and women, respectively. Genotyping showed the MTHFR 677CT/1298AC genotype (i.e. compound heterozygosity) is associated with 3.5-fold risk for thrombosis. The factor V Leiden mutation frequency was higher in DVT cases, but not statistically significant; however, genetic predisposition to this mutation was associated with early age of DVT onset. Factor II mutation was absent in cases and controls. Co-segregation of two or more risk factors was associated with 11.7-fold increased risk for thrombosis. This study projects that hyperhomocysteinemia and compound heterozygous state for MTHFR are independent risk factors for DVT among <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. PMID:17287626</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AtmEn..44.3597P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AtmEn..44.3597P"><span id="translatedtitle">Elevated nitrogen isotope ratios of tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> aerosols from Chennai: Implication for the origins of aerosol nitrogen in <span class="hlt">South</span> and Southeast Asia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Tachibana, Eri; Swaminathan, T.</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p>To better understand the origins of aerosol nitrogen, we measured concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) and its isotope ratios (? 15N) in tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> aerosols (PM 10) collected from Chennai (13.04N; 80.17E) on day- and night-time basis in winter and summer 2007. We found high ? 15N values (+15.7 to +31.2) of aerosol N (0.3-3.8 ?g m -3), in which NH 4+ is the major species (78%) with lesser contribution from NO 3- (6%). Based on the comparison of ? 15N in Chennai aerosols with those reported for atmospheric aerosols from mid-latitudes and for the particles emitted from point sources (including a laboratory study), as well as the ? 15N ratios of cow-dung samples (this study), we found that the atmospheric aerosol N in Chennai has two major sources; animal excreta and bio-fuel/biomass burning from <span class="hlt">South</span> and Southeast Asia. We demonstrate that a gas-to-particle conversion of NH 3 to NH 4HSO 4 and (NH 4) 2SO 4 and the subsequent exchange reaction between NH 3 and NH 4+ are responsible for the isotopic enrichment of 15N in aerosol nitrogen.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4157251','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4157251"><span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of prevalence and clinical features of multicystic ameloblastoma and its histological subtypes in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> sample population: A retrospective study over 13 years</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Selvamani, Manickam; Yamunadevi, Andamuthu; Basandi, Praveen S.; Madhushankari, G. S.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Objective: The study was designed to analyze the frequency and clinical features of multicystic ameloblastoma and its histological variants in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> sample population, as there is minute information available in the English literature. Methodology: The study source was the biopsy specimens retrieved from the archives of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, Karnataka, India, during the past 13 years, from 2001 to 2013. Clinical data for the study were obtained from the case records of patients and the analyzed clinical variables were age, gender and anatomical location. Histologically, hematoxylin and eosin stained sections fitting the World Health Organization (2005) criteria for diagnosis of multicystic ameloblastoma were selectively included. Results: Of the 3026 biopsy reports analyzed, 103 cases were odontogenic tumors (3.4%) and 58 cases were ameloblastoma. 31 cases of multicystic ameloblastoma, including follicular ameloblastoma (54.8%), acanthomatous ameloblastoma (29%), plexiform ameloblastoma (6.5%), granular cell ameloblastoma (6.5%) and desmoplastic ameloblastoma (3.2%) were recorded. The age of the patients during the presentation of the lesion was ranging from 21 to 73 years, with a mean of 39.5 years. The most frequent clinical manifestation was swelling, followed by a combination of pain and swelling. In our study, ameloblastoma showed distinct anatomic predilections for occurrence in mandible (96.8%) rather than maxilla (3.2%). This study result also indicated that there is geographical variation in the frequency and distribution of ameloblastoma. PMID:25210355</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25018680','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25018680"><span id="translatedtitle">Association of inflammatory sialoproteins, lipid peroxides and serum magnesium levels with cardiometabolic risk factors in obese children of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Niranjan, G; Anitha, D; Srinivasan, A R; Velu, V Kuzhandai; Venkatesh, C; Babu, M Sathish; Ramesh, R; Saha, S</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The Incidence of childhood obesity and metabolic syndrome is increasing even in rural and semi-urban regions of India. Adipose tissue mass secretes several inflammatory proteins, which could potentially alter the metabolic processes, leading to several complications at the later stages of life. With limited studies on protein bound sialic acid (PBSA) as a marker of oxidative stress mediated inflammation in obese children, this study was aimed to assess and correlate PBSA with lipid peroxidation and other cardiometabolic risk factors like Insulin Resistance (IR), serum magnesium, and high sensitive C reactive Protein (hsCRP) levels in order to provide an insight into the degree of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. This study included 62 obese children (?95% percentile of the CDC chart) and 60 non obese controls. This study documents significant higher levels of PBSA, IR, Malondialdehyde (MDA), hsCRP and uric acid in obese children (p<0.001). PBSA was associated with IR, hsCRP, uric acid, hypomagnesaemia. Higher degrees of oxidative stress, Insulin resistance and low serum magnesium levels were noted in obese children. PBSA and hsCRP levels were elevated and were associated with Insulin resistance in obese children of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. PMID:25018680</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4092079','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4092079"><span id="translatedtitle">Association of Inflammatory Sialoproteins, Lipid Peroxides and Serum Magnesium Levels with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Obese Children of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Niranjan, G.; Anitha, D.; Srinivasan, A. R.; Velu, V. Kuzhandai; Venkatesh, C.; Babu, M. Sathish; Ramesh, R.; Saha, S.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The Incidence of childhood obesity and metabolic syndrome is increasing even in rural and semi-urban regions of India. Adipose tissue mass secretes several inflammatory proteins, which could potentially alter the metabolic processes, leading to several complications at the later stages of life. With limited studies on protein bound sialic acid (PBSA) as a marker of oxidative stress mediated inflammation in obese children, this study was aimed to assess and correlate PBSA with lipid peroxidation and other cardiometabolic risk factors like Insulin Resistance (IR), serum magnesium, and high sensitive C reactive Protein (hsCRP) levels in order to provide an insight into the degree of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. This study included 62 obese children (?95% percentile of the CDC chart) and 60 non obese controls. This study documents significant higher levels of PBSA, IR, Malondialdehyde (MDA), hsCRP and uric acid in obese children (p<0.001). PBSA was associated with IR, hsCRP, uric acid, hypomagnesaemia. Higher degrees of oxidative stress, Insulin resistance and low serum magnesium levels were noted in obese children. PBSA and hsCRP levels were elevated and were associated with Insulin resistance in obese children of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population. PMID:25018680</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4419678','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4419678"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Risk in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Women Based on MTHFR (C677T) and FVL (G1691A) Mutations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Khan, Imran Ali; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Kamineni, Vasundhara; Jahan, Parveen; Hasan, Qurratulain; Rao, Pragna</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We aimed to scrutinize the extent to which single amino acid substitutions in the MTHFR and factor V Leiden (FVL) genes affect the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in pregnant women of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> descendant. This casecontrol study was implemented once the ethical approval has been obtained. Overall, 237 women were recruited in this study: 137 had been diagnosed with GDM and the remaining 100 women were used as normal controls or non-GDM. The diagnosis of GDM was confirmed with biochemical analysis, i.e., GCT and oral glucose tolerance tests. Five milliliters of peripheral blood was collected and used for biochemical and molecular analyses. DNA was isolated, and genotyping for MTHFR (C677T) and FVL (G1691A) mutations was performed using PCRRFLP. FVL (G1691A) locus was not polymorphic in the investigated sample. There was no significant difference in the allele and genotype frequencies of C677T polymorphism between GDM and non-GDM women (p?=?0.8892). PMID:26000264</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19469636','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19469636"><span id="translatedtitle">CYP17 (T34C), CYP19 (Trp39Arg), and FGFR2 (C906T) polymorphisms and the risk of breast cancer in <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Samson, Mani; Rama, Ranganathan; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Sridevi, Veluswami; Nancy, Karunakaran Nirmala; Rajkumar, Thangarajan</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Breast cancer is initiated by exposure to endogenous and exogenous estrogens. A case-control (n= 250-500) study was undertaken to investigate the role of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP's) in CYP17 (T34C), CYP19 (Trp39Arg) and FGFR2(C906T). Genotyping was done using the Taqman allelic discrimination assay for CYP17 (T34C) and FGFR2 (T906C) and PCR-CTPP for CYP19 (Trp39Arg). There was a significant protective association of the (TT/CC) genotype of the CYP17 gene against the risk of developing breast cancer (OR= 0.68, 95% CI: 0.49-0.96), which was more significant in postmenopausal women (OR= 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35-0.89) (p= 0.015). CYP19 (Trp39Arg) is a rare polymorphism and all the cases were homozygous for the wild type Trp allele (100%); this was also the case for 99.2% of the controls. We were unable to detect any variant form of the CYP19 gene in <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women. There was no significant association between the risk of breast cancer and FGFR2 (C906T). These results suggest that the CYP17 TT/CC genotype is associated with decreased risk for breast cancer, especially in post menopausal women. PMID:19469636</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/wri034043/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/wri034043/"><span id="translatedtitle">Simulated ground-water flow in the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers, Rosebud <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation Area, <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Long, Andrew J.; Putnam, Larry D.; Carter, Janet M.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>The Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers are important water resources in the Rosebud <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation area and are used extensively for irrigation, municipal, and domestic water supplies. Continued or increased withdrawals from the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers in the Rosebud <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation area have the potential to affect water levels in these aquifers. This report describes a conceptual model of ground-water flow in these aquifers and documents the development and calibration of a numerical model to simulate ground-water flow. Data for a twenty-year period (water years 1979 through 1998) were analyzed for the conceptual model and included in steady-state and transient numerical simulations of ground-water flow for the same 20-year period. A three-dimensional ground-water flow model, with two layers, was used to simulate ground-water flow in the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers. The upper layer represented the Ogallala aquifer, and the lower layer represented the Arikaree aquifer. The study area was divided into grid blocks 1,640 feet (500 meters) on a side, with 153 rows and 180 columns. Areal recharge to the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers occurs from precipitation on the outcrop areas. The recharge rate for the steady-state simulation was 3.3 inches per year for the Ogallala aquifer and 1.7 inches per year for the Arikaree aquifer for a total recharge rate of 266 cubic feet per second. Discharge from the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers occurs through evapotranspiration, discharge to streams, and well withdrawals. Discharge rates in cubic feet per second for the steady-state simulation were 184 for evapotranspiration, 46.8 and 19.7 for base flow to the Little White and Keya Paha Rivers, respectively, and 11.6 for well withdrawals from irrigation use. Estimated horizontal hydraulic conductivity used for the numerical model ranged from 0.2 to 120 feet per day in the Ogallala aquifer and 0.1 to 5.4 feet per day in the Arikaree aquifer. A uniform vertical hydraulic conductivity value of 6.6x10-4 feet per day was applied to the Ogallala aquifer. Vertical hydraulic conductivity was estimated for five zones in the Arikaree aquifer and ranged from 8.6x10-6 to 7.2x10-1 feet per day. Average rates of recharge, maximum evapotranspiration, and well withdrawals were included in the steady-state simulation, whereas the time-varying rates were included in the transient simulation. Model calibration was accomplished by varying parameters within plausible ranges to produce the best fit between simulated and observed hydraulic heads and base-flow discharges from the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers. For the steady-state simulation, the root mean square error for simulated hydraulic heads for all wells was 26.8 feet. Simulated hydraulic heads were within ?50 feet of observed values for 95 percent of the wells. For the transient simulation, the difference between the simulated and observed means for hydrographs was within ?40 feet for all observation wells. The potentiometric surfaces of the two aquifers calculated by the steady-state simulation established initial conditions for the transient simulation. A sensitivity analysis was used to examine the response of the calibrated steady-state model to changes in model parameters including horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity, evapotranspiration, recharge, and riverbed conductance. The model was most sensitive to recharge and horizontal hydraulic conductivity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/1021891','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/1021891"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)</p> <p>2011-06-14</p> <p>A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional <span class="hlt">casting</span> processes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4606263','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4606263"><span id="translatedtitle">Decreased Bone Mineral Density at the Femoral Neck and Lumbar Spine in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Patients with Type 2 Diabetes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mathen, Pratheesh George; Zachariah, Bobby; Das, Ashok Kumar</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background With prevalence of diabetes in India reaching epidemic proportions and increase in the population of geriatric age group and risks of falls, it is important to understand the effect that diabetes has on bone health. Aim The objective was to assess bone mineral density (BMD) of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to study factors contributing to BMD in patients with T2DM. Materials and Methods This was a prospective cross-sectional study on 150 patients with T2DM (diagnosed at age > 30 years) and an equal number (n=150) of age and sex matched healthy controls from September 2012 to July 2014 at a tertiary care center located in Southern India. BMD was measured at the femoral neck and lumbar spine (L2L4) by dual energy absorptiometry (DXA) in cases and controls. Serum total calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and 25-OH- vitamin D3 was measured in patient group. Results Mean age (SD) was 51.29 (8.05) and 51 (8.3) years in cases and controls, respectively. The femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD was significantly lower in T2DM cases compared to controls. Also the femoral neck and lumbar spine T-score was significantly lower in T2DM cases compared to controls. Femoral neck BMD among male patients with T2DM was significantly lower compared to controls (men). Among women, BMD at femoral neck as well as lumbar spine was significantly lower in cases when compared to controls. Ninety six out of 150 (64%) T2DM cases had Vitamin D values <20 ng/mL. There was weak negative correlation between age of patient, duration of diabetes and HbA1C with femoral neck BMD. There was weak negative correlation between HbA1C and lumbar spine BMD. Conclusion <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subjects with type 2 diabetes have significantly lower BMD at both femoral neck and lumbar spine compared to age and sex matched healthy controls. We conclude that osteopenia and osteoporosis are overlooked complications of diabetes. Longitudinal studies are needed to see for actual incidence of fractures among this high risk group. PMID:26500934</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.9114B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.9114B"><span id="translatedtitle">Deciphering post-Deccan weathering and erosion history of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Archean rocks from cryptomelane 40Ar-39Ar dating</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bonnet, Nicolas; Arnaud, Nicolas; Beauvais, Anicet; Chardon, Dominique</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>Since the extrusion of Deccan traps ~ 63 Ma ago, weathering and erosion processes have shaped the landscapes of this Peninsula India. This resulted in pervasive bauxitic weathering on traps and deep lateritic weathering of their basement on either side of the Western Ghats Escarpment, which separates a coastal lowland from an East-dipping highland plateau. Mn-rich lateritic profiles formed by supergene weathering of Late Archean manganiferous protores in the different greenstone belts are exposed on relict paleosurfaces, which are preserved at different elevations on the highland plateau and in the coastal lowland, allowing for direct comparison of paleosurfaces and geomorphological processes across one of the most prominent relief in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> peninsula. Detailed petrological and geochemical investigations of samples collected in the different Mn-rich lateritic profiles allowed for precise characterization of cryptomelane [Kx Mn8-xIV MnxIII O16, nH2O], a Mn-oxide suitable for 40Ar-39Ar dating. The ages obtained document major weathering periods at ~ 53-50 Ma, ~ 40-32 Ma, and ~ 30-23 Ma in the highland profiles, and ~ 47-45 Ma, ~ 24-19 Ma and a younger age at ~ 9 Ma in the coastal lowland profiles. The age clusters are in good agreement with major regional and global Cenozoic paleoclimatic events, e.g., the Eocene climatic optimum and the early beginnings of Asian monsoons at ~ 40 Ma. The old ages obtained both in the coastal lowland and high plateau indicate synchronous lateritic (mostly bauxitic) weathering on both sides of the escarpment. The ages also indicate that most of the incision and dissection of plateau landsurfaces must have taken place during successive periods after 45, 32 and 23 Ma, while the coastal lowland surface was only weakly incised after 19 Ma. Our results thus document post-Eocene divergent erosion and weathering histories across the escarpment since it was formed at least 47 Ma ago, suggesting installation of a dual climatic regime on either sides of this escarpment after the Eocene greenhouse peak.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25956585','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25956585"><span id="translatedtitle">Diversity and N-acyl-homoserine lactone production by Gammaproteobacteria associated with Avicennia marina rhizosphere of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> mangroves.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Viswanath, Ganga; Jegan, Sekar; Baskaran, Viswanathan; Kathiravan, Raju; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>The diversity of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing rhizosphere bacterial community associated with Avicennia marina in the mangrove ecosystems of <span class="hlt">South</span> India was investigated. Approximately 800 rhizobacteria were isolated from A. marina, and they were screened for the production of AHL using two biosensors, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4). Among the total isolates screened, 7% of the rhizobacteria showed positive induction for AHL signals. The BOX-PCR profile of 56 positive isolates represented 11 distinct genotypic groups. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA sequences of 16 representatives showed that the isolates belonged to the class Gammaproteobacteria, which represented six different genera: Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Photobacterium, Serratia and Halomonas. The study also identified three AHL-producing species, namely, Photobacterium halotolerans MSSRF QS48, Vibrio xiamenensis MSSRF QS47 and Pseudomonas sp. MSSRF QS1 that had not been reported previously. AHL profiling by TLC detected short chains C4, C6 and C8-HSL, and long chains C10 and C12-HSL with both unsubstituted and substituted side chains among the 16 representative AHL positives. This is the first report concerning the diversity of AHL-producing Gammaproteobacteria from mangrove ecosystems exhibiting diverse AHL profiles. PMID:25956585</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22stereotypes+in+literature%22&id=EJ106825','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22stereotypes+in+literature%22&id=EJ106825"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Writers and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Lives</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stensland, Anna Lee</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>A discussion of popular <span class="hlt">Indian</span> stereotypes and counter-stereotypes in literature, based on the thesis that the introduction of the literature of the American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>, traditional and modern, will help to increase the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> child's pride in his culture and add to the understanding of the non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> child. (EH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=5G&pg=5&id=EJ255295','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=5G&pg=5&id=EJ255295"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Government and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Starblanket, Noel V.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Accountability for <span class="hlt">Indian</span> education must be shared among the chiefs and their councils, the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> leaders at all levels, parents and students. This may be accomplished by <span class="hlt">Indian</span> control of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> education. Available from: Department of Educational Foundations, 5-109 Education North, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2G5. (ERB)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4628796','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4628796"><span id="translatedtitle">Panoramic radiographic study of mental foramen in selected dravidians of <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population: A hospital based study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gupta, Vaibhav; Pitti, Parag</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background This study aimed at documenting information on appearance, size, horizontal and vertical locations of Mental Foramen (MF) in Panoramic Radiograph. We also analyzed the age and gender differences with radiographic appearance and location of MF. We evaluated these findings in our population and co-relate with results of previous studies. Material and Methods 1662 panoramic radiographs were evaluated, of which 245 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each radiograph was traced to record the horizontal and vertical locations. The size of MF was recorded using digital caliper and its appearance was determined by visual examination. Chi-square and t-test were employed. Results The most common appearance of MF was continuous type and the tests showed significant difference with age and gender. The most frequent horizontal location of MF was location c with no statistical significant difference with age and gender. The MF was most commonly positioned mesially in relation to the apex of second premolar with no significant differences with gender. The vertical location of the foramen varied drastically with no statistical significant difference in both sides. The difference in dimensions on the left and right sides were not statistically significant. Conclusions Determining the morphological appearance and positional variation of MF is important for isolation of mental nerves and vessels when administering local anesthesia and performing surgeries. We therefore stress the importance of accurate radiographic identification of MF and interpretation. Our research findings can be used as reference material by the dental practitioners of <span class="hlt">South</span> India while performing clinical procedures that involve MF. Key words:Mental foramen, mental nerve, panoramic radiograph, mandible. PMID:26535088</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24973722','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24973722"><span id="translatedtitle">An early <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian dust storm during March 2012 and its impacts on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Himalayan foothills: a case study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Srivastava, A K; Soni, V K; Singh, Sachchidanand; Kanawade, V P; Singh, N; Tiwari, S; Attri, S D</p> <p>2014-09-15</p> <p>The impacts of an early <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian dust storm that originated over the western part of the Middle East and engulfed northwest parts of India during the third week of March 2012 have been studied at four different stations covering India and Pakistan. The impacts of this dust storm on aerosol optical properties were studied in detail at Delhi, Jodhpur, Lahore and Karachi. The impact could also be traced up to central Himalayan foothills at Manora Peak. During dust events, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm reached a peak value of 0.96, 1.02, 2.17 and 0.49 with a corresponding drop in Ångström exponent (AE for 440-870 nm) to 0.01, -0.02, 0.00 and 0.12 at Delhi, Jodhpur, Lahore and Karachi, respectively. The single scattering albedo (SSA) at 675 nm was relatively lower at Delhi (0.87) and Jodhpur (0.86), with absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) less than 1.0, but a large value of SSA was observed at Lahore (0.98) and Karachi (0.93), with AAE value greater than 1.0 during the event. The study of radiative impact of dust aerosols revealed a significant cooling at the surface and warming in the atmosphere (with corresponding large heating rate) at all the stations during dust event. The effect of this dust storm was also seen at Manora Peak in central Himalayas which showed an enhancement of ~28% in the AOD at 500 nm. The transport of dust during such events can have severe climatic implications over the affected plains and the Himalayas. PMID:24973722</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26586066','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26586066"><span id="translatedtitle">Cross-cultural adaptation, validation and reliability of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> (Kannada) version of the Kidney Disease and Quality of Life (KDQOL-36) instrument.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mateti, Uday Venkat; Nagappa, Anantha Naik; Attur, Ravindra Prabhu; Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Mayya, Shreemathi S; Balkrishnan, Rajesh</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>Health-related quality of life is an essential aspect concerned with the treatment outcomes. The main objective of the study is to evaluate the validity and reliability of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> (Kannada) version of the Kidney Disease and Quality of Life-36 (KDQOL-36) instrument for hemodialysis (HD) patients. The KDQOL-36 instrument was validated by the committee of experts consisting of healthcare providers such as nephrologists (three), senior HD staff nurse (one) and clinical pharmacist (one). The measurement properties such as variability, reliability and validity were determined by administering the questionnaire to 82 patients on HD who were randomly selected from the HD units of three hospitals. The test and retest methods were used for reliability. Test-re-test reliability was assessed with a subsample of 45 patients by two administrations of the KDQOL-36 seven days apart. Data were collected through a face-to-face interview. It was evaluated computing intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and internal consistency estimated by computing Cronbach's-alfa. Reliability of each Kannada version of the KDQOL-36 sub-scale (symptoms/problems, burden of kidney disease, effects of kidney disease, physical component score [PCS] and mental component score [MCS] was good (Cronbach's-alfa >0.7, ranging from 0.72 to 0.77). The ICC ranged from 0.83 to 0.99 and the 95% confidence interval was 0.76-0.99 for test-retest of the KDQOL-36. The reliability measured with Cronbach's alfa, which was more than 0.72 and ICC ranged from 0.83 to 0.99, indicating that the Kannada version of the KDQOL-36 is reliable and valid for evaluating the health-related quality of life in Kannada-speaking HD patients. PMID:26586066</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24772965','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24772965"><span id="translatedtitle">Impact of COMT H108L, MAOB int 13 A>G and DRD2 haplotype on the susceptibility to Parkinson's disease in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subjects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kumudini, Nadella; Umai, Addepally; Devi, Yalavarthy Prameela; Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Mridula, Rukmini; Borgohain, Rupam; Kutala, Vijay Kumar</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>In view of documented evidence demonstrating the association of dopaminergic metabolism and neurotransmission with Parkinson's disease (PD), a case-control study was conducted to investigate the impact of particular polymorphisms in the catechol O-methyl transferase (COMT) H108L, monoamine oxidase B (MAOB) int 13 A>G, dopamine transporter 1 (DAT1) A1215G, dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) Taq1A, DRD2 Taq1B and DRD2 Taq1D genes on the susceptibility to PD. PCR-RFLP method was used for the genetic analysis. The COMT H108L polymorphism increased PD risk by 1.4-fold (95%CI: 1.02-1.98), whereas reduced risk was observed with MAOB int 13 A>G polymorphism (OR: 0.77, 95%CI: 0.51-0.99). Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed gene-gene interactions between these two loci that resulted in loss of the protective role of MAOB G-allele in the presence of COMT L-allele. DAT1A1215G polymorphism in the exon 9 was not associated with PD. Individually, DRD2 polymorphisms showed null association. However, all-variant haplotype of DRD2 locus i.e. T-G-T haplotype showed 29.8-fold risk for PD compared to all-wild haplotype i.e., C-A-C haplotype (95%CI: 6.85-130.4). To conclude, genetic variants of COMT, MAOB and DRD2 loci modulate susceptibility to PD in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subjects. PMID:24772965</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3782901','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3782901"><span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Body Mass Index (BMI) Percentile cut-off Levels with Reference to Insulin Resistance: A Comparative Study on <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Obese and NonObese Adolescents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Gandhe, Mahendra Bhauraoji; M., Lenin; Srinivasan, A.R.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: To investigate the relationship of Body Mass Index (BMI) percentile cut off with Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), a surrogate marker for insulin resistance in obese, overweight and nonobese adolescents. Study Design: A cross-sectional analysis of 120 adolescents (divided into sixty overweight/obese and an equal number of nonobese) was performed on nondiabetic, nonpregnant (11 to 18 year old school going) adolescents in <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> (Puducherry) population. The main outcome measure of insulin resistance was calculated as HOMA-IR (greater than 3.16). Obesity was defined as per the BMI criteria, BMI greater than or equal to 95th percentile,overweight greater than or equal to 85th percentile and nonobese less than 84.9th percentile. All adolescents were subjected to analysis of anthropometric parameters that included weight, height and BMI (body mass index). Biochemical parameters, namely venous plasma glucose (fasting) and venous plasma insulin (fasting) were included for insulin resistance calculation by HOMA-IR. Results: Having a BMI of greater than or equal to 85th percentilewas associated with high HOMA-IR levels. As the BMI percentile increased, HOMA-IR levels also increased. Prevalence of insulin resistance for a BMI percentile of less than 84.9 was nil. Prevalence of insulin resistance for a BMI percentile of 85-94.9 was 26%.Prevalence of insulin resistance for BMI of greater than or equal to 95th percentile was 64%. Conclusion: Insulin resistance is highly prevalent in obese and overweight adolescents as compared to that in nonobese adolescents. The onset of Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG) is associated with the development of severe hyperinsulinaemia in obese adolescents and early primordial and primary prevention can thus alleviate the burden of future cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:24086844</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25209194','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25209194"><span id="translatedtitle">Synergistic association of PI4KA and GRM3 genetic polymorphisms with poor antipsychotic response in <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> schizophrenia patients with low severity of illness.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kaur, Harpreet; Jajodia, Ajay; Grover, Sandeep; Baghel, Ruchi; Jain, Sanjeev; Kukreti, Ritushree</p> <p>2014-12-01</p> <p>Literature indicates key role of glutamatergic pathway genes in antipsychotic response among schizophrenia patients. However, molecular basis of their underlying role in antipsychotic response remained unexplained. Thus, to unravel their molecular underpinnings, we sought to investigate interactions amongst GRM3, SLC1A1, SLC1A2, SLC1A3, SLC1A4 gene polymorphisms with drug response in <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> schizophrenia patients. We genotyped 48 SNPs from these genes in 423 schizophrenia patients stratified into low and high severity of illness groups. The SNPs and haplotypic combinations of associated SNPs were examined for their association with antipsychotic response. Multifactor-dimensionality-reduction was further used to explore gene-gene interaction among these SNPs and 53 SNPs from previously studied genes (BDNF, RGS4, SLC6A3, PI4KA, and PIP4K2A). Single SNP and haplotype analyses revealed no significant association with drug response irrespective of severity of illness. Gene-gene interaction analyses yielded promising leads, including an observed synergistic effect between PI4KA_rs165854 and GRM3_rs1468412 polymorphisms and incomplete antipsychotic response in schizophrenia patients with low severity of illness (OR = 12.4; 95%CI = 3.69-41.69). Further, this interaction was also observed in atypical monotherapy (n = 355) and risperidone (n = 260) treatment subgroups (OR = 11.21; 95%CI = 3.30-38.12 and OR = 13.5; 95%CI = 3.03-121.61 respectively). PI4KA is known to be involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylinositol-4, 5-bisphosphate which regulates exocytotic fusion of synaptic vesicles (glutamate, dopamine) with the plasma membrane and regulates duration of signal transduction of GPCRs. Whereas GRM3 regulates glutamate and dopamine transmission. Present findings indicate that PI4KA and GRM3 polymorphisms have potential to jointly modulate antipsychotic response. These results warrant additional replication studies to shed further light on these interactions. PMID:25209194</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3474829','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3474829"><span id="translatedtitle">Food Marketing towards Children: Brand Logo Recognition, Food-Related Behavior and BMI among 313-Year-Olds in a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Town</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ueda, Peter; Tong, Leilei; Viedma, Cristobal; Chandy, Sujith J.; Marrone, Gaetano; Simon, Anna; Stlsby Lundborg, Cecilia</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Objectives To assess exposure to marketing of unhealthy food products and its relation to food related behavior and BMI in children aged 313, from different socioeconomic backgrounds in a <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> town. Methods Child-parent pairs (n?=?306) were recruited at pediatric clinics. Exposure to food marketing was assessed by a digital logo recognition test. Children matched 18 logos of unhealthy food (high in fat/sugar/salt) featured in promotion material from the food industry to pictures of corresponding products. Children's nutritional knowledge, food preferences, purchase requests, eating behavior and socioeconomic characteristics were assessed by a digital game and parental questionnaires. Anthropometric measurements were recorded. Results Recognition rates for the brand logos ranged from 30% to 80%. Logo recognition ability increased with age (p<0.001) and socioeconomic level (p<0.001 comparing children in the highest and lowest of three socioeconomic groups). Adjusted for gender, age and socioeconomic group, logo recognition was associated with higher BMI (p?=?0.022) and nutritional knowledge (p<0.001) but not to unhealthy food preferences or purchase requests. Conclusions Children from higher socioeconomic groups in the region had higher brand logo recognition ability and are possibly exposed to more food marketing. The study did not lend support to a link between exposure to marketing and poor eating behavior, distorted nutritional knowledge or increased purchase requests. The correlation between logo recognition and BMI warrants further investigation on food marketing towards children and its potential role in the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases in this part of India. PMID:23082137</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ECSS...62..325N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ECSS...62..325N"><span id="translatedtitle">Seasonal dynamics of meiofauna in a <span class="hlt">South</span> African temporarily open/closed estuary (Mdloti Estuary, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nozais, Christian; Perissinotto, Renzo; Tita, Guglielmo</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>One hundred and eighty-four of the 250 estuaries in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa are currently classified as temporarily open/closed and close off from the sea during the dry season, under low river inflow. The subtropical Mdloti Estuary, on the KwaZulu-Natal north coast, is one of these systems and hardly any information is available on its meiofauna. The abundance, biomass, composition, and grazing impact of meiofauna, as well as the key environmental factors that affect these variables, were investigated with emphasis on the contrast between open and closed phases of the estuary. Microphytobenthic chlorophyll a concentrations varied between 1.4 to 480 mg m -2. Meiofauna were composed of nematodes, harpacticoid copepods, crustacean nauplii, mites, turbellarians, polychaetes, oligochaetes, ostracods and chironomids. Total abundance of meiofauna showed large variability both spatially and temporally and ranged from 0.4 to 8810 4 ind. m -2. Nematodes, mites and harpacticoid copepods occurred more often than other groups in the sediment. Total meiofauna carbon biomass exhibited similar temporal as well as spatial patterns as abundance and varied from 0.5 to 440 mg C m -2. A carbon-based grazing model, applied to the total meiofauna, provided estimates of potential daily ingestion rates ranging from 1.8 to 857 mg C m -2. Nematodes, mites and harpacticoid copepods contributed the most to the total potential daily ingestion rate of meiofauna in the Mdloti Estuary. Potential ingestion rates, determined using allometric equations, showed that meiofauna consumed from 0.1 to 254% of the microphytobenthic standing stock. Overall, meiofauna were likely not food limited and grazing on microphytobenthos was low, averaging 11% for the whole survey. A principal component analysis, applied to the whole study area and sampling period, indicated that major variations in meiofaunal community are mainly controlled by temperature and the state of the estuary's mouth (i.e. open/closed). Typically, meiofauna abundance in the estuary peaked after periods of prolonged mouth closure and decreased dramatically after the breaching of the estuary at the mouth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny1382.photos.116456p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny1382.photos.116456p/"><span id="translatedtitle">5. DETAIL, STATUE OF MALE <span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> IN NICHE AT SECOND ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>5. DETAIL, STATUE OF MALE <span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> IN NICHE AT SECOND FLOOR LEVEL, <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span> (FRONT) ELEVATION - Thomas Asylum for Orphan & Destitute <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, Administration Building, Route 438, Cattaraugas Reservation, Irving, Chautauqua County, NY</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED062082.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED062082.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">[Rebus Reading Book Series: A Product of a Project to Create Stories and Beginning Reading Material for Pre-School <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Children in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Webster, Loraine; Schleif, Mabel</p> <p></p> <p>The "Rebus Reading Book Series" in this document consists of 10 booklets, each containing an illustrated story adopted from an <span class="hlt">Indian</span> folk tale. The booklets, intended for use as supplementary readers, are designed to introduce readers in grades 1.7 to 2.2 to <span class="hlt">Indian</span> cultural history as well as to improve use of English by building larger speaking…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED046551.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED046551.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Tribes of North America. Part I: The Sioux Tribes of <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota. Occasional Publications in Anthropology, Ethnology Series, No. 1.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fay, George E., Comp.</p> <p></p> <p>To facilitate the study and understanding of present-day <span class="hlt">Indian</span> tribal organization and governmental procedures, the Museum of Anthropology of the University of Northern Colorado (formerly known as Colorado State College) has assembled a large number of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> tribal charters, constitutions, and by-laws to be reproduced as a series of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/792702','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/792702"><span id="translatedtitle">Thin Wall Iron <span class="hlt">Castings</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka</p> <p>2001-10-31</p> <p>Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron <span class="hlt">castings</span> having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron <span class="hlt">castings</span> can be made and have properties consistent with heavier <span class="hlt">castings</span>. Green sand molding variables that affect <span class="hlt">casting</span> dimensions were also identified.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Mississippi+AND+River&pg=6&id=ED224668','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Mississippi+AND+River&pg=6&id=ED224668"><span id="translatedtitle">Wisconsin <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lurie, Nancy Oestreich</p> <p></p> <p>Wisconsin encompasses an astonishingly representative illustration of the total historical development of federal <span class="hlt">Indian</span> policy and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> reactions to it. Wisconsin's <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population (at least 25,000 people) is the third largest east of the Mississippi River and offers great diversity (3 major linguistic stocks, 6 broad tribal affiliations, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3941566','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3941566"><span id="translatedtitle">Awareness of chronic disease related health benefits of physical activity among residents of a rural <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> region: a cross-sectional study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Background Physical activity trends for a lower-middle income country like India suggest a gradual decline in work related physical activity and no concomitant increase in leisure time physical activity. Perceived health benefits of physical activity and intention to increase physical activity have been established as independent correlates of physical activity status. In India, not much is known about peoples perceptions of health benefits of physical activity and their intention to increase physical activity levels. This study was performed to understand peoples perceptions and awareness about health benefits of physical activity in a rural <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> region. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted using a multistage cluster sampling design. A content validated, field tested questionnaire was administered in person by a trained interviewer in the participants native language. The questionnaire assessed the participants perceptions about their lifestyle (active or sedentary), health benefits of physical activity and need for increasing their physical activity. In addition, the participants physical activity was assessed using version 2 of global physical activity questionnaire. Frequencies and percentages were used to summarise perceived health benefits of physical activity and other categorical variables. Age and body mass index were summarised using mean??SD, whereas physical activity (MET.min.wk ?1) was summarised using median and interquartile range. Results Four hundred fifty members from 125 randomly selected households were included in the study, of which 409 members participated. 89% (364) of participants felt they lead an active lifestyle and 83.1% (340) of participants did not feel a need to increase their physical activity level. 86.1%, (352) of the participants were physically active. Though 92.4% (378) of participants felt there were health benefits of physical activity, majority of them (75.1%) did not report any benefit related to chronic diseases. None mentioned health benefits related to heart disease or stroke. Conclusion There is low awareness of chronic disease related benefits of physical activity and participants do not see a need to increase their physical activity level. Public health awareness programs on importance and health benefits of physical activity would be useful to counter the anticipated decline in physical activity. PMID:24575767</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015QSRv..122..142V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015QSRv..122..142V"><span id="translatedtitle">The Last Termination in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean: A unique terrestrial record from Kerguelen Islands (49°S) situated within the Southern Hemisphere westerly belt</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Van der Putten, Nathalie; Verbruggen, Cyriel; Björck, Svante; Michel, Elisabeth; Disnar, Jean-Robert; Chapron, Emmanuel; Moine, Bertrand N.; de Beaulieu, Jacques-Louis</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>The awareness of the significance of the Southern Ocean in the Earth's climate system has become increasingly obvious. The deglacial atmospheric CO2 rise during warming periods in Antarctica has been attributed to CO2 ventilation from the deep ocean caused by enhanced upwelling around the Antarctic Divergence. It has been hypothesized that, more intense Southern Hemisphere westerly winds aligned with the Antarctic Circumpolar Current due to a southward shift of the wind belt from its Last Glacial Maximum equator-ward position, are the main drivers. Reconstructions of past changes in atmospheric circulation in the Southern Hemisphere are still scarce and the overall picture is patchy with sometimes contradictory results. For obvious reasons, most terrestrial records originate from southern <span class="hlt">South</span> America and New Zealand. Here we present a terrestrial record from the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> sector of the Southern Ocean, from Kerguelen Islands located at 49°S. A peat record is investigated using a multi-proxy approach (pollen and plant macrofossils, magnetic susceptibility, XRF analyses, biogenic silica content, Rock-Eval6 analysis and humification degree). Peat accumulation starts at about 16,000 cal yr BP with relatively warm and dry conditions. The most prominent change in our proxy data occurs at 13,600 cal yr BP, when peat ponds were established on the peat surface, resulting in lacustrine-type deposits, as a result of very high humidity, and with proxies implying very windy conditions. Within chronological uncertainties, this onset coincides with the onset of the so-called Oceanic Cold Reversal, based on the deuterium excess data in the EPICA Dome C ice core record. Kerguelen Islands are located in the moisture source area of Dome C and a change in atmospheric circulation at that time could explain both records. Around 12,900 cal yr BP, at the end of the Antarctic Cold Reversal, pond/lake sediments give way to more peaty deposits, with proxies suggesting slightly drier, less windy and probably warmer conditions. Kerguelen Islands became less influenced by the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds and these conditions were amplified during the early Holocene climate optimum as found in Antarctic ice core records.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMOS42B..01A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AGUFMOS42B..01A"><span id="translatedtitle">The Role of Sediment Supply in the Formation of Tsunami Deposits: A Comparison of the 2004 <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean and 2009 <span class="hlt">South</span> Pacific Tsunamis (Invited)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Apotsos, A. A.; Jaffe, B. E.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.; Buckley, M. L.; Watt, S. G.</p> <p>2010-12-01</p> <p>An integral part of tsunami preparedness is an understanding of how often large tsunamis occur, an understanding that is often constrained by a lack of knowledge concerning tsunamis that occurred prior to written history. Recent efforts have sought to use information preserved in paleo-tsunami sediment deposits to lengthen the pre-written history tsunami record. This requires a detailed understanding of the processes that control sediment transport during tsunami inundation and thus the patterns of deposition. Unfortunately, deposition during a tsunami depends upon site-specific conditions, such as sediment availability, which may vary substantially among different environments. Field observations and a numerical model are used to investigate tsunami-induced sediment transport near Kuala Meurisi, Sumatra during the 2004 <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean tsunami and around Fagafue Bay on the north side of Tutuila, American Samoa during the 2009 <span class="hlt">South</span> Pacific tsunami. Detailed measurements of the bathymetry, topography, tsunami flow depth and direction, and sediment deposition were collected after both the 2004 and the 2009 tsunamis. Kuala Meurisi is characterized by an abundant sediment supply in the near- and offshore fronting a low-lying progradational coastal plain. The resulting deposit at Kuala Meurisi, where the wave height relative to the sea level exceeded 18 m, was a continuous sheet of sediment up to 0.3 m thick that extended for more than 1800 m onshore. Conversely, on American Samoa erodable sandy sediments occur primarily as pocket beaches fronting steep alluvial valleys between volcanic rock headlands. The resulting onshore deposit here was thin (typically less than 0.04 m thick), patchy, and limited in extent (the deposit only extended 250 onshore), even though the wave height exceeded 13 m and a number of large coral boulders (diameter > 2.5 m) were transported onshore by the tsunami. The extent to which the supply of sediment and the topographic slopes played in producing the observed patterns of deposition at the two field sites are discussed, and the processes that created these patterns examined using a three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamic/sediment transport/morphological change model (Delft3D). Similarities and differences between the depositional patterns are identified and related to current efforts to estimate tsunami magnitude and flow velocity from historical tsunamis. The preservation potential of tsunami deposits on low-lying coastal plains and steep alluvial valleys, the recovery of the sandy beaches, and the effects of onshore vegetation and offshore reefs are also discussed. It is concluded that the supply of sediment and topographic slope, as well as vegetation and offshore reefs, can affect deposition, indicating the importance of knowing the pre-tsunami environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016DSRI..110...20B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016DSRI..110...20B"><span id="translatedtitle">Acoustic micronektonic distribution is structured by macroscale oceanographic processes across 20-50°S latitudes in the <span class="hlt">South</span>-Western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Béhagle, Nolwenn; Cotté, Cédric; Ryan, Tim E.; Gauthier, Olivier; Roudaut, Gildas; Brehmer, Patrice; Josse, Erwan; Cherel, Yves</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>Micronekton constitutes the largest unexploited marine biomass worldwide. It is one of the most conspicuous and ecologically important components of the still poorly known mesopelagic ecosystem. Acoustic data were collected from both fishing and research vessels along 18 transects for a total of 47 682 linear kilometers to investigate large-scale distribution of micronekton over a long latitudinal gradient (20-50°S) and two contrasted seasons (summer and winter) in the <span class="hlt">South</span>-Western <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Acoustic backscatter at 38 kHz was used as a proxy of mid-water organisms' abundance (0-800 m depth). Two consistent features were diel vertical migration of backscatters and vertical distribution of micronekton in three distinct layers, namely the surface (SL), intermediate (IL) and deep (DL) layers. Satellite remote sensing data was used to position oceanic fronts, and hence define water masses, from the tropical to low Antarctic zones. A key finding of this study was the significant correlation observed between abundance and distribution of acoustic backscatter and position relative to these front and water masses. Total backscatter peaked in the subtropical zone, with low abundances in the colder Polar Frontal Zone. The high overall abundances in subtropical waters resulted mainly from high backscatters in the IL and DL that contrasted with low SL values, especially during the day (2-11%). The warmer the waters, the higher SL backscatter was, with the highest absolute and relative (38-51% of the total abundance) values observed at night in the Tropical Zone and the lowest abundance in the Antarctic Zone. No significant seasonal pattern was found, but SL backscatters were very low in winter compared to summer in the Polar Frontal Zone. Moreover, the Northern winter shift of the fronts induced a Northern latitudinal shift of the peak in abundance from summer to winter. The present study highlights the value of building large acoustic databases collected from both research and fishing vessels. The method provides unique opportunities to gather basic information on micronekton and is an essential step to describe oceanic zones of relevant biological interest in terms of trophic ecology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFMPP33A0907F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004AGUFMPP33A0907F"><span id="translatedtitle">Glacial - Interglacial Changes in the Provenance and Flux of Sediment to the Cape Basin, <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic: Implications for <span class="hlt">Indian</span>-Atlantic Ocean Exchange</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Franzese, A. M.; Hemming, S. R.; Goldstein, S. L.; Anderson, R. F.; Broecker, W. S.</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>Deep sea sediment cores have been widely used to study changes in sea surface conditions and ocean circulation on glacial-interglacial timescales, using faunal and floral analyses, stable isotope and trace element contents of carbonate shells, and more recently subtle compositional variations in organic compounds. Radiogenic isotope ratios can be sensitive tracers of sediment provenance, and have been interpreted in terms of changes in circulation patterns. Another tool that has seen growing application for studying the past oceans is 230Thxs . The excess 230Th measured in the sediment is useful as a constant-flux proxy, and puts additional constraints on the lateral transport and redistribution of sediments. Until now provenance and flux measures have been applied to separate problems, and this study is unique in using the combination of these two tracers. The combined measurements of sediment provenance and flux has great potential for determining sediment transport patterns, and how they have changed through time. The southeast Atlantic is an important study site because it is a region where thermocline and intermediate waters are exchanged with the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean by the "Agulhas Leakage". This leakage is thought to be an important source of heat and salt to the Atlantic Ocean, possibly acting as a positive feedback for the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). Changes in the strength of NADW formation and the intensity of global thermohaline circulation (THC) have been called upon as major amplifiers for climate change during the Pleistocene glacial cycles, with the hypothesis that NADW formation was weaker during the cold periods of the glacial cycles, particularly during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), approximately 18,000 years ago. 87Sr/86Sr, \\epsilon Nd and 230Th- normalized terrigenous flux measurements from Holocene and LGM sediment samples support the Agulhas Current as a major source of sediment to the Cape Basin drift deposit. The results are consistent with 3 end- member mixing between sediment carried by the Agulhas Current, the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic or Antarctic Circumpolar Current (SAC or ACC) and a local source. A comparison of the two time- slices implies that a smaller proportion of sediment deposited in the Cape Basin is derived from the Agulhas Current during the LGM. The results are consistent with a strengthened and more sediment-laden ACC during the LGM, and possibly a reduced Agulhas leakage, and hence less interocean exchange. Further investigation is needed to constrain whether the Agulhas Current was different during the LGM.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/mi0639.photos.196601p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/mi0639.photos.196601p/"><span id="translatedtitle">41. <span class="hlt">Casting</span> floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>41. <span class="hlt">Casting</span> floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is to right of furnace; photo taken from furnace operator's booth. Looking <span class="hlt">south</span>/southwest - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, Wayne County, MI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/mi0639.photos.196602p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/mi0639.photos.196602p/"><span id="translatedtitle">42. <span class="hlt">Casting</span> floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>42. <span class="hlt">Casting</span> floor, "B" furnace, pour in progress; mudgun is to right of furnace; operator takes temperature of iron in trough during pout. Looking <span class="hlt">south</span> - Rouge Steel Company, 3001 Miller Road, Dearborn, Wayne County, MI</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046439p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046439p/"><span id="translatedtitle">INTERIOR VIEW WITH <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE AND <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>INTERIOR VIEW WITH <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE AND <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION TO ENSURE MAXIMUM PRODUCTION AND QUALITY. - McWane <span class="hlt">Cast</span> Iron Pipe Company, Pipe <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7077196','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7077196"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Triple Junction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Tapscott, C.R.; Patriat, P.; Fisher, R.L.; Sclater, J.G.; Hoskins, H.; Parsons, B.</p> <p>1980-09-10</p> <p>The boundaries of three major plates (Africa, India, and Antarctica) meet in a triple junction in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean near 25 /sup 0/S, 70 /sup 0/E. Using observed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, we locate the junction to within 5 km and show that it is a ridge-ridge-ridge type. Relative plate motion is N60 /sup 0/E at 50 mm/yr (full rate) across the Central <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ridge, N47 /sup 0/E at 60 mm/yr across the Southeast <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ridge, and N3 /sup 0/W at 15 mm/yr across te Southwest <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ridge; the observed velocity triangle is closed. Poles of instantaneous relative plate motion are determined for all plate pairs. The data in the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> oceans are consistent with a rigid African plate without significant internal deformation. Two of the ridges at the triple junction are normal midocean spreading centers with well-defined median valleys. The Southwest <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ridge, however, has a peculiar morphology near the triple junction, that of an elongate triangular deep, with the triple junction at its apex. The floor of the deep represents crust formed at the Southwest <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ridge, and the morphology is a consequence of the evolution of the triple junction and is similar to that at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Though one cannot determine with precision the stability conditions at the triple junction, the development of the junction over the last 10 m.y. can be mapped, and the topographic expressions of the triple junction traces may be detected on the three plates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21511853','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21511853"><span id="translatedtitle">The peripatetic cultural psychiatrist: reflections on a forty-five year longitudinal study of a <span class="hlt">South</span> India village.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ullrich, Helen E</p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>This article presents one woman's odyssey, which began with a career in linguistics and later incorporated cultural psychiatry. While engaged in fieldwork as a linguist, studying the syntactic structure of Havyaka Kannada and dialectal accommodation among the <span class="hlt">castes</span> in a <span class="hlt">South</span> India village, I developed language skills and rapport with the village residents. Then I transferred my community-wide rapport to research on depression as a cultural psychiatrist. The articles I wrote on depression and its relationship to socialized passivity and endorsed assertiveness in progressive generations of <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women, illustrate the impact of change on mental health. The cultural background from my community-based longitudinal study of more than forty-five years has contributed to my understanding disorders in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> patients living in a globalized world. PMID:21511853</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://kidshealth.org/en/kids/casts.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://kidshealth.org/en/kids/casts.html"><span id="translatedtitle">Cool <span class="hlt">Cast</span> Facts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... outer layer is usually made of plaster or fiberglass. Fiberglass <span class="hlt">casts</span> are made of fiberglass, which is a plastic that can be shaped. Fiberglass <span class="hlt">casts</span> come in many different colors — if you' ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10133336','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10133336"><span id="translatedtitle">LLNL <span class="hlt">casting</span> technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Shapiro, A.B.; Comfort, W.J. III</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Competition to produce <span class="hlt">cast</span> parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US <span class="hlt">casting</span> industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. <span class="hlt">Casting</span> research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US compentiveness in the <span class="hlt">casting</span> arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art <span class="hlt">casting</span>. LLNL <span class="hlt">casting</span> expertise and technology include: <span class="hlt">casting</span> modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to <span class="hlt">cast</span> toxic material; extensive experience <span class="hlt">casting</span> metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced <span class="hlt">casting</span> expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into <span class="hlt">casting</span> industry issues, <span class="hlt">casting</span> process data, and the collective, experience of industry experts. <span class="hlt">Casting</span> R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for <span class="hlt">casting</span> projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal <span class="hlt">casting</span> accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component <span class="hlt">casting</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994STIN...9432839S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994STIN...9432839S"><span id="translatedtitle">LLNL <span class="hlt">casting</span> technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shapiro, A. B.; Comfort, W. J., III</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Competition to produce <span class="hlt">cast</span> parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US <span class="hlt">casting</span> industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. <span class="hlt">Casting</span> research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US competiveness in the <span class="hlt">casting</span> arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art <span class="hlt">casting</span>. LLNL <span class="hlt">casting</span> expertise and technology include: <span class="hlt">casting</span> modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to <span class="hlt">cast</span> toxic material; extensive experience <span class="hlt">casting</span> metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced <span class="hlt">casting</span> expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into <span class="hlt">casting</span> industry issues, <span class="hlt">casting</span> process data, and the collective experience of industry experts. <span class="hlt">Casting</span> R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for <span class="hlt">casting</span> projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal <span class="hlt">casting</span> accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component <span class="hlt">casting</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4152827','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4152827"><span id="translatedtitle">First description of the worker <span class="hlt">caste</span> of Nylanderia smythiesii (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bharti, Himender</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Abstract The hitherto unknown worker <span class="hlt">caste</span> of Nylanderia smythiesii (Forel, 1894) is described for the first time. Sexuals are redescribed and photomontage images of all <span class="hlt">castes</span> are provided. A key is presented to separate the six <span class="hlt">Indian</span> species of Nylanderia. Previously described Nylanderia assimilis (Jerdon, 1851) is considered a species inquirenda. PMID:25197237</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=congress+AND+theses+AND+dissertations&pg=2&id=ED383509','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=congress+AND+theses+AND+dissertations&pg=2&id=ED383509"><span id="translatedtitle">American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Studies: A Bibliographic Guide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>White, Phillip M.</p> <p></p> <p>This book lists sources of information available on Native Americans in the United States, Canada, and Alaska. Some sources also include information on native Hawaiians, <span class="hlt">Indians</span> of Mexico, and <span class="hlt">Indians</span> of Central and <span class="hlt">South</span> America. The purpose of the guide is to provide researchers with direction and organization for selecting and using the best</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sovereignty&pg=5&id=EJ978225','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sovereignty&pg=5&id=EJ978225"><span id="translatedtitle">A Comparative Analysis of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Gaming in the United States</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ackerman, William V.; Bunch, Rick L.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Previous research on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> gaming in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota discovered very restrictive and unfavorable tribal-state compacts that appear to border on economic racism. This article expands this previous research by exploring the influence of tribal-state <span class="hlt">Indian</span> gaming compacts for the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> casinos located in the contiguous United States. The purpose is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=quarries&id=ED160268','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=quarries&id=ED160268"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Legends.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>Presenting American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> legends, this material provides insight into the cultural background of the Dakota, Ojibwa, and Winnebago people. Written in a straightforward manner, each of the eight legends is associated with an <span class="hlt">Indian</span> group. The legends included here are titled as follows: Minnesota is Minabozho's Land (Ojibwa); How We Got the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=assam&id=ED121701','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=assam&id=ED121701"><span id="translatedtitle">Political Stability and Continuity in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> States During the Nehru Era, 1947-1964: A Statistical Analysis. <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia Series, Occasional Paper No. 19.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Singh, Baljit; Vajpeyi, Dhirendra K.</p> <p></p> <p>The period of Nehru's administration of India, 1974-1964, is statistically analyzed for political continuity and stability by examining the office terms of chief ministers for the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> states during that time. After a brief introduction, the document mainly consists of statistical tables. A summary table of percentage turnover of ministers and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gujarat&pg=3&id=ED121701','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gujarat&pg=3&id=ED121701"><span id="translatedtitle">Political Stability and Continuity in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> States During the Nehru Era, 1947-1964: A Statistical Analysis. <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia Series, Occasional Paper No. 19.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Singh, Baljit; Vajpeyi, Dhirendra K.</p> <p></p> <p>The period of Nehru's administration of India, 1974-1964, is statistically analyzed for political continuity and stability by examining the office terms of chief ministers for the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> states during that time. After a brief introduction, the document mainly consists of statistical tables. A summary table of percentage turnover of ministers and</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25203143','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25203143"><span id="translatedtitle">A systematic health assessment of <span class="hlt">indian</span> ocean bottlenose (Tursiops aduncus) and indo-pacific humpback (Sousa plumbea) dolphins incidentally caught in shark nets off the KwaZulu-Natal Coast, <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lane, Emily P; de Wet, Morné; Thompson, Peter; Siebert, Ursula; Wohlsein, Peter; Plön, Stephanie</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Coastal dolphins are regarded as indicators of changes in coastal marine ecosystem health that could impact humans utilizing the marine environment for food or recreation. Necropsy and histology examinations were performed on 35 <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) and five Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa plumbea) incidentally caught in shark nets off the KwaZulu-Natal coast, <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa, between 2010 and 2012. Parasitic lesions included pneumonia (85%), abdominal and thoracic serositis (75%), gastroenteritis (70%), hepatitis (62%), and endometritis (42%). Parasitic species identified were Halocercus sp. (lung), Crassicauda sp. (skeletal muscle) and Xenobalanus globicipitis (skin). Additional findings included bronchiolar epithelial mineralisation (83%), splenic filamentous tags (45%), non-suppurative meningoencephalitis (39%), and myocardial fibrosis (26%). No immunohistochemically positive reaction was present in lesions suggestive of dolphin morbillivirus, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp. The first confirmed cases of lobomycosis and sarcocystosis in <span class="hlt">South</span> African dolphins were documented. Most lesions were mild, and all animals were considered to be in good nutritional condition, based on blubber thickness and muscle mass. Apparent temporal changes in parasitic disease prevalence may indicate a change in the host/parasite interface. This study provided valuable baseline information on conditions affecting coastal dolphin populations in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa and, to our knowledge, constitutes the first reported systematic health assessment in incidentally caught dolphins in the Southern Hemisphere. Further research on temporal disease trends as well as disease pathophysiology and anthropogenic factors affecting these populations is needed. PMID:25203143</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4159300','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4159300"><span id="translatedtitle">A Systematic Health Assessment of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Bottlenose (Tursiops aduncus) and Indo-Pacific Humpback (Sousa plumbea) Dolphins Incidentally Caught in Shark Nets off the KwaZulu-Natal Coast, <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lane, Emily P.; de Wet, Morné; Thompson, Peter; Siebert, Ursula; Wohlsein, Peter; Plön, Stephanie</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Coastal dolphins are regarded as indicators of changes in coastal marine ecosystem health that could impact humans utilizing the marine environment for food or recreation. Necropsy and histology examinations were performed on 35 <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) and five Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa plumbea) incidentally caught in shark nets off the KwaZulu-Natal coast, <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa, between 2010 and 2012. Parasitic lesions included pneumonia (85%), abdominal and thoracic serositis (75%), gastroenteritis (70%), hepatitis (62%), and endometritis (42%). Parasitic species identified were Halocercus sp. (lung), Crassicauda sp. (skeletal muscle) and Xenobalanus globicipitis (skin). Additional findings included bronchiolar epithelial mineralisation (83%), splenic filamentous tags (45%), non-suppurative meningoencephalitis (39%), and myocardial fibrosis (26%). No immunohistochemically positive reaction was present in lesions suggestive of dolphin morbillivirus, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp. The first confirmed cases of lobomycosis and sarcocystosis in <span class="hlt">South</span> African dolphins were documented. Most lesions were mild, and all animals were considered to be in good nutritional condition, based on blubber thickness and muscle mass. Apparent temporal changes in parasitic disease prevalence may indicate a change in the host/parasite interface. This study provided valuable baseline information on conditions affecting coastal dolphin populations in <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa and, to our knowledge, constitutes the first reported systematic health assessment in incidentally caught dolphins in the Southern Hemisphere. Further research on temporal disease trends as well as disease pathophysiology and anthropogenic factors affecting these populations is needed. PMID:25203143</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=south+AND+dakota+AND+articles&pg=4&id=ED167306','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=south+AND+dakota+AND+articles&pg=4&id=ED167306"><span id="translatedtitle">American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Student Counselor Handbook.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Evans, Wayne H.</p> <p></p> <p>The handbook, a first in the attempt to collect information about counseling <span class="hlt">Indian</span> students, represents the results of 1976-77 couselor training workshops in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota. The handbook contains article reprints, ideas, and suggestions from many counselors and non-counselors, and is intended not as expertise but as a resource primarily for</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dog+AND+training&pg=7&id=ED388473','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dog+AND+training&pg=7&id=ED388473"><span id="translatedtitle">An <span class="hlt">Indian</span> in White America.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Monroe, Mark; Reyer, Carolyn, Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>In his autobiography, Mark Monroe relates his life experiences as a Lakota Sioux <span class="hlt">Indian</span> in White America. The book begins with Monroe reminiscing about his happy childhood on the Rosebud Reservation in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota. In 1941 his family moved to Alliance, Nebraska, and his father Dakota. In 1941 his family moved to Alliance, Nebraska, and his father…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=training+AND+dogs&pg=7&id=ED388473','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=training+AND+dogs&pg=7&id=ED388473"><span id="translatedtitle">An <span class="hlt">Indian</span> in White America.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Monroe, Mark; Reyer, Carolyn, Ed.</p> <p></p> <p>In his autobiography, Mark Monroe relates his life experiences as a Lakota Sioux <span class="hlt">Indian</span> in White America. The book begins with Monroe reminiscing about his happy childhood on the Rosebud Reservation in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota. In 1941 his family moved to Alliance, Nebraska, and his father Dakota. In 1941 his family moved to Alliance, Nebraska, and his father</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995JGeo...20..255C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995JGeo...20..255C"><span id="translatedtitle">Significance of the block rotation model in tectonics and mineralization in Precambrian terrainsAn example from the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> shield</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chetty, T. R. K.</p> <p>1995-11-01</p> <p>Examination of LANDSAT TM-data, for the Archean granite-greenstone-gneiss terrain west of the Proterozoic Cuddapah basin in the southern part of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> shield, and of the aerial photographs for a part thereof, provides significant additional information for the region. The emerging structure could best be described as the result of a generation of a mosaic of blocks in the early stages of evolution of the greenstone belts and of rotation of these blocks through subsequent geological time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9804328&hterms=ford+motor+company&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dford%2Bmotor%2Bcompany','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=MSFC-9804328&hterms=ford+motor+company&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dford%2Bmotor%2Bcompany"><span id="translatedtitle">Improving Metal <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Process</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Don Sirois, an Auburn University research associate, and Bruce Strom, a mechanical engineering Co-Op Student, are evaluating the dimensional characteristics of an aluminum automobile engine <span class="hlt">casting</span>. More accurate metal <span class="hlt">casting</span> processes may reduce the weight of some <span class="hlt">cast</span> metal products used in automobiles, such as engines. Research in low gravity has taken an important first step toward making metal products used in homes, automobiles, and aircraft less expensive, safer, and more durable. Auburn University and industry are partnering with NASA to develop one of the first accurate computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials used in a manufacturing process called <span class="hlt">casting</span>. Ford Motor Company's <span class="hlt">casting</span> plant in Cleveland, Ohio is using NASA-sponsored computer modeling information to improve the <span class="hlt">casting</span> process of automobile and light-truck engine blocks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4207509','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4207509"><span id="translatedtitle">SLIP <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> METHOD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Allison, A.G.</p> <p>1959-09-01</p> <p>S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip <span class="hlt">casting</span> slurry which when used in conjunction with standard <span class="hlt">casting</span> techniques results in a very strong "green" slip <span class="hlt">casting</span> and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980NW.....67..133K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980NW.....67..133K"><span id="translatedtitle">Evolution of halictine <span class="hlt">castes</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Knerer, Gerd</p> <p>1980-03-01</p> <p>Social halictine bees have female <span class="hlt">castes</span> that range from species with no size differences to those with a discrete bimodality. Female <span class="hlt">caste</span> differences are inversely correlated with the number of males produced in the first brood. It is proposed that the sexual dimorphism of solitary forms is being usurped by the female <span class="hlt">caste</span> system of species in the process of turning social. Thus, <span class="hlt">caste</span> differences and summer male suppression are greatest in the social species originating from solitary precursors with distinct sexual dimorphism, and are least in species evolving from solitary ancestors with a continuous sexual polymorphism.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=516768','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=516768"><span id="translatedtitle">Most of the extant mtDNA boundaries in <span class="hlt">South</span> and Southwest Asia were likely shaped during the initial settlement of Eurasia by anatomically modern humans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Metspalu, Mait; Kivisild, Toomas; Metspalu, Ene; Parik, Jri; Hudjashov, Georgi; Kaldma, Katrin; Serk, Piia; Karmin, Monika; Behar, Doron M; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Endicott, Phillip; Mastana, Sarabjit; Papiha, Surinder S; Skorecki, Karl; Torroni, Antonio; Villems, Richard</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Background Recent advances in the understanding of the maternal and paternal heritage of <span class="hlt">south</span> and southwest Asian populations have highlighted their role in the colonization of Eurasia by anatomically modern humans. Further understanding requires a deeper insight into the topology of the branches of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> mtDNA phylogenetic tree, which should be contextualized within the phylogeography of the neighboring regional mtDNA variation. Accordingly, we have analyzed mtDNA control and coding region variation in 796 <span class="hlt">Indian</span> (including both tribal and <span class="hlt">caste</span> populations from different parts of India) and 436 Iranian mtDNAs. The results were integrated and analyzed together with published data from <span class="hlt">South</span>, Southeast Asia and West Eurasia. Results Four new <span class="hlt">Indian</span>-specific haplogroup M sub-clades were defined. These, in combination with two previously described haplogroups, encompass approximately one third of the haplogroup M mtDNAs in India. Their phylogeography and spread among different linguistic phyla and social strata was investigated in detail. Furthermore, the analysis of the Iranian mtDNA pool revealed patterns of limited reciprocal gene flow between Iran and the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> sub-continent and allowed the identification of different assemblies of shared mtDNA sub-clades. Conclusions Since the initial peopling of <span class="hlt">South</span> and West Asia by anatomically modern humans, when this region may well have provided the initial settlers who colonized much of the rest of Eurasia, the gene flow in and out of India of the maternally transmitted mtDNA has been surprisingly limited. Specifically, our analysis of the mtDNA haplogroups, which are shared between <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Iranian populations and exhibit coalescence ages corresponding to around the early Upper Paleolithic, indicates that they are present in India largely as <span class="hlt">Indian</span>-specific sub-lineages. In contrast, other ancient <span class="hlt">Indian</span>-specific variants of M and R are very rare outside the sub-continent. PMID:15339343</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1142.photos.046527p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1142.photos.046527p/"><span id="translatedtitle">INTERIOR VIEW WITH PIPE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> A 24' PIPE ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>INTERIOR VIEW WITH PIPE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> A 24' PIPE AND OPERATOR JOHNNY NIXON. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe <span class="hlt">Casting</span> & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1142.photos.046529p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1142.photos.046529p/"><span id="translatedtitle">INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> A 48' ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> A 48' PIPE. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe <span class="hlt">Casting</span> & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930015736','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19930015736"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean analyses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Meyers, Gary</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The background and goals of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean thermal sampling are discussed from the perspective of a national project which has research goals relevant to variation of climate in Australia. The critical areas of SST variation are identified. The first goal of thermal sampling at this stage is to develop a climatology of thermal structure in the areas and a description of the annual variation of major currents. The sampling strategy is reviewed. Dense XBT sampling is required to achieve accurate, monthly maps of isotherm-depth because of the high level of noise in the measurements caused by aliasing of small scale variation. In the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean ship routes dictate where adequate sampling can be achieved. An efficient sampling rate on available routes is determined based on objective analysis. The statistical structure required for objective analysis is described and compared at 95 locations in the tropical Pacific and 107 in the tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Oceans. XBT data management and quality control methods at CSIRO are reviewed. Results on the mean and annual variation of temperature and baroclinic structure in the <span class="hlt">South</span> Equatorial Current and Pacific/<span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Throughflow are presented for the region between northwest Australia and Java-Timor. The mean relative geostrophic transport (0/400 db) of Throughflow is approximately 5 x 106 m3/sec. A nearly equal volume transport is associated with the reference velocity at 400 db. The Throughflow feeds the <span class="hlt">South</span> Equatorial Current, which has maximum westward flow in August/September, at the end of the southeasterly Monsoon season. A strong semiannual oscillation in the <span class="hlt">South</span> Java Current is documented. The results are in good agreement with the Semtner and Chervin (1988) ocean general circulation model. The talk concludes with comments on data inadequacies (insufficient coverage, timeliness) particular to the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean and suggestions on the future role that can be played by Data Centers, particularly with regard to quality control of data as research bodies are replaced by operational bodies in the Global Ocean Observing System.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/541825','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/541825"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Summer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Galindo, E.</p> <p>1997-08-01</p> <p>This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future <span class="hlt">Indian</span> fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5014169','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5014169"><span id="translatedtitle">New K-Ar age dates, geochemistry, and stratigraphic data for the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Heaven quaternary volcanic field, <span class="hlt">South</span> Cascade Range, Washington</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Korosec, M.A.</p> <p>1989-12-01</p> <p>As part of the Washington geothermal exploration program, the Division of Geology and Earth Resources has been involved with studies of the state's major volcanoes and volcanic fields. The first major geothermal project by the Division involved geologic mapping and the drilling of 5 temperature gradient/heat flow holes in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Heaven area in 1975. Funding was provided by the National Science Foundation. From 1980 to 1983, US Department of Energy contracts funded the geochemical analysis of over 100 samples from <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Heaven and surrounding volcanic fields, and lead to the dating of several of the flows. Uncertainties about the existing age date determinations discouraged attempts to formulate a meaningful time-space-composition-volume model for the southern Cascade Range volcanic fields. With the promise of better age dating techniques and laboratories, the Division set out to improve the understanding of these rocks, with the hope of developing a new, more detailed and accurate model. This project was part of a larger program of temperature gradient and heat flow drilling in the southern Cascades Range. Funding for the age dates was provided through an existing US Department of Energy grant to the University of Arizona.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1142.photos.046531p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1142.photos.046531p/"><span id="translatedtitle">INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> A 48' ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>INTERIOR VIEW WITH LARGE PIPE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> A 48' PIPE OPERATOR SPRAYING A POWDER TO HELP SOLIDIFY THE PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY <span class="hlt">CAST</span>. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Pipe <span class="hlt">Casting</span> & Testing Area, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1317757','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1317757"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> in Sport</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>DeCarlo, Mark; Malone, Kathy; Darmelio, John; Rettig, Arthur</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>Attempts by sports medicine professionals to return high school athletes with hand and wrist injuries to competition quickly and safely have been the source of confusion and debate on many playing fields around the country. In addition to the differing views regarding the appropriateness of playing <span class="hlt">cast</span> usage in high school football, a debate exists among sports medicine professionals as to which material is best suited for playing <span class="hlt">cast</span> construction. Materials used in playing <span class="hlt">cast</span> construction should be hard enough to provide sufficient stabilization to the injured area and include adequate padding to absorb blunt impact forces. The purpose of the biomechanical portion of this investigation was to attempt to determine the most appropriate materials for use in constructing playing <span class="hlt">casts</span> for the hand and wrist by assessing different materials for: 1) hardness using a Shore durometer, and 2) ability to absorb impact using a force platform. Results revealed that RTV11 and Scotchcast were the least hard of the underlying <span class="hlt">casting</span> materials and that Temper Stick foam greatly increased the ability of RTV11 to absorb impact. Assessment of the mechanical properties of playing <span class="hlt">cast</span> materials and review of current developments in high school football rules are used to aid practitioners in choosing the most appropriate materials for playing <span class="hlt">cast</span> construction. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2.Fig 3. PMID:16558257</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/793152','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/793152"><span id="translatedtitle">Clean Metal <span class="hlt">Casting</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian</p> <p>2002-02-05</p> <p>The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as <span class="hlt">cast</span> mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand <span class="hlt">casting</span> foundry, a permanent mold <span class="hlt">casting</span> foundry, and a die <span class="hlt">casting</span> foundry, to the <span class="hlt">casting</span> process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular <span class="hlt">casting</span> process and the desired properties of <span class="hlt">cast</span> components.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2257457','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2257457"><span id="translatedtitle">The lack of relationship between acetylator phenotype and idiopathic systemic lupus erythematosus in a <span class="hlt">South</span>-east Asian population: a study of <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, Malays and Malaysian Chinese.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ong, M L; Mant, T G; Veerapen, K; Fitzgerald, D; Wang, F; Manivasagar, M; Bosco, J J</p> <p>1990-12-01</p> <p>An association of idiopathic systemic lupus erythematosus (ISLE) with genetically determined N-acetylation polymorphism has been suspected from previous studies, mainly on Caucasian populations in which there is an approximate incidence of 50% of slow and rapid acetylators. The present study is of the incidence of ISLE and acetylator status in a mixed population of Malaysia. The results did not support an association between ISLE and acetylator status: the frequencies of slow acetylators in the ISLE patients who were Malaysian Chinese and Malay were 13 and 38% respectively. This did not differ significantly from the respective healthy groups (20 and 29%). The small number of <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in the survey did not allow a valid comparison, but the figures did suggest a lack of association between ISLE and acetylator status. PMID:2257457</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=acculturation+AND+issues+AND+schools&pg=4&id=ED461456','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=acculturation+AND+issues+AND+schools&pg=4&id=ED461456"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Orphanages.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Holt, Marilyn Irvin</p> <p></p> <p>With their traditional tribal and kinship ties, Native Americans had lived for centuries without the concept of an unwanted child. But besieged by reservation life and boarding school acculturation, many tribes, with the encouragement of whites, came to accept the need for orphanages. This book tells the story of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> orphanages within the</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4743390','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4743390"><span id="translatedtitle">Chronic sub-clinical inflammation in the abdominal adipose tissue – Evaluation of inflammatory cytokines and their link with insulin resistance in metabolically obese <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>: A cross-sectional observational study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Premanath, M.; Basavanagowdappa, H.; Mahesh, M.; Babu, M. Suresh; Devananda, D.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To measure the levels of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6(IL-6), and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine adiponectin (AN) in obese <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subjects and to ascertain whether or not a causal role could be ascribed to these cytokines in the development of insulin resistance (IR). Materials and Methods: Forty obese and forty nonobese volunteers of both genders were recruited. Parameters such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and blood pressure were evaluated. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin level, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1C), lipid profile, TNF-α, IL-6, hs-CRP, and AN levels were measured. IR was evaluated by homeostatic model assessment-IR method. Abdominal adiposity was measured by ultrasonography. The results were statistically evaluated by appropriate tests. Results: BMI, WC, and visceral fat were high in the obese group. Females had higher subcutaneous fat in both groups. HbA1C was marginally high in the obese group (P = 0.014). IR was high in all the groups, obese males showing higher values (not significant[NS]). Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein were high in the obese group (P = 0.028, P = 0.003). TNF-α was high in obese males (NS), IL-6 was high in both groups, higher in nonobese females (NS), hs-CRP was high in both groups, higher in females of both groups (NS). AN was high in females of both groups (P = 0.002). Conclusions: In this study on <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subjects, proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 and hs-CRP, despite being high, did not show any causal correlation either with abdominal obesity or with IR. TNF-α being normal showed some correlation which was inconsistent. Even the anti-inflammatory adipokine, AN did not show any correlation with IR. Cytokines had an inconsistent correlation with the components of metabolic syndrome hence were not useful. PMID:26904474</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/de0514.photos.384117p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/de0514.photos.384117p/"><span id="translatedtitle">4. DETAIL, CASTIRON BASE, <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span> CORNER Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>4. DETAIL, <span class="hlt">CAST</span>-IRON BASE, <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span> CORNER - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, <span class="hlt">South</span> bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/868910','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/868910"><span id="translatedtitle">Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> aerogels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA)</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>The invention describes a method for making monolithic <span class="hlt">castings</span> of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are <span class="hlt">cast</span> in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/5446374','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/5446374"><span id="translatedtitle">Method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> aerogels</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Poco, J.F.</p> <p>1993-09-07</p> <p>The invention describes a method for making monolithic <span class="hlt">castings</span> of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are <span class="hlt">cast</span> in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/792701','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/792701"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> Characteristics of Aluminum Die <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Alloys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian</p> <p>2002-02-05</p> <p>The research program investigates the <span class="hlt">casting</span> characteristics of selected aluminum die <span class="hlt">casting</span> alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020062202','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020062202"><span id="translatedtitle">A Winning <span class="hlt">Cast</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Howmet Research Corporation was the first to commercialize an innovative <span class="hlt">cast</span> metal technology developed at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama. With funding assistance from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Auburn University's Solidification Design Center (a NASA Commercial Space Center), developed accurate nickel-based superalloy data for <span class="hlt">casting</span> molten metals. Through a contract agreement, Howmet used the data to develop computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials in <span class="hlt">cast</span> metal manufacturing. Howmet Metal Mold (HMM), part of Howmet Corporation Specialty Products, of Whitehall, Michigan, utilizes metal molds to manufacture net shape <span class="hlt">castings</span> in various alloys and amorphous metal (metallic glass). By implementing the thermophysical property data from by Auburn researchers, Howmet employs its newly developed computer model predictions to offer customers high-quality, low-cost, products with significantly improved mechanical properties. Components fabricated with this new process replace components originally made from forgings or billet. Compared with products manufactured through traditional <span class="hlt">casting</span> methods, Howmet's computer-modeled <span class="hlt">castings</span> come out on top.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/874624','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/874624"><span id="translatedtitle">Salvaged <span class="hlt">castings</span> and methods of salvaging <span class="hlt">castings</span> with defective <span class="hlt">cast</span> cooling bumps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Schaeffer, Jon Conrad (Greenville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT)</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Castings</span> for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have <span class="hlt">cast</span>-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively <span class="hlt">cast</span> bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during <span class="hlt">casting</span>, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26396305','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26396305"><span id="translatedtitle">Retort process modelling for <span class="hlt">Indian</span> traditional foods.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gokhale, S V; Lele, S S</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Indian</span> traditional staple and snack food is typically a heterogeneous recipe that incorporates varieties of vegetables, lentils and other ingredients. Modelling the retorting process of multilayer pouch packed <span class="hlt">Indian</span> food was achieved using lumped-parameter approach. A unified model is proposed to estimate cold point temperature. Initial process conditions, retort temperature and % solid content were the significantly affecting independent variables. A model was developed using combination of vegetable solids and water, which was then validated using four traditional <span class="hlt">Indian</span> vegetarian products: Pulav (steamed rice with vegetables), Sambar (<span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> style curry containing mixed vegetables and lentils), Gajar Halawa (carrot based sweet product) and Upama (wheat based snack product). The predicted and experimental values of temperature profile matched with ±10 % error which is a good match considering the food was a multi component system. Thus the model will be useful as a tool to reduce number of trials required to optimize retorting of various <span class="hlt">Indian</span> traditional vegetarian foods. PMID:26396305</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED382428.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED382428.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Performance of Bureau of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs Off-Reservation Boarding Schools. Oversight Hearing To Review the Performance of Bureau of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs Off-Reservation Boarding Schools. Hearing before the Committee on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session (June 10, 1994).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.</p> <p></p> <p>A Senate committee hearing received testimony about high dropout rates and other problems at seven off-reservation boarding schools operated by the Bureau of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs (BIA) or by tribal groups under BIA contract. The schools are Pierre <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Learning Center (<span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota), Sequoyah <span class="hlt">Indian</span> High School (Oklahoma), Wahpeton <span class="hlt">Indian</span> School</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Last+AND+resort&pg=6&id=EJ567899','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Last+AND+resort&pg=6&id=EJ567899"><span id="translatedtitle">"I Like the School so I Want To Come back": The Enrollment of American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Students at the Rapid City <span class="hlt">Indian</span> School.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Riney, Scott</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>Examines the history of student recruitment and parental choice among Bureau of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs schools, focusing on Rapid City <span class="hlt">Indian</span> School (<span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota), 1898-1933. Discusses attitudes of American-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> parents toward various schools, strategies to keep siblings together, parental influence on schools' competition for students, and the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4732819','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4732819"><span id="translatedtitle">DNA Repair Gene (XRCC1) Polymorphism (Arg399Gln) Associated with Schizophrenia in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Population: A Genotypic and Molecular Dynamics Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sujitha, S. P.; Kumar, D. Thirumal; Doss, C. George Priya; Aavula, K.; Ramesh, R.; Lakshmanan, S.; Gunasekaran, S.; Anilkumar, G.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper depicts the first report from an <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population on the association between the variant Arg399Gln of XRCC1 locus in the DNA repair system and schizophrenia, the debilitating disease that affects 1% of the world population. Genotypic analysis of a total of 523 subjects (260 patients and 263 controls) revealed an overwhelming presence of Gln399Gln in the case subjects against the controls (P < 0.0068), indicating significant level of association of this nsSNP with schizophrenia; the Gln399 allele frequency was also perceptibly more in cases than in controls (p < 0.003; OR = 1.448). The results of the genotypic studies were further validated using pathogenicity and stability prediction analysis employing computational tools [I-Mutant Suite, iStable, PolyPhen2, SNAP, and PROVEAN], with a view toassess the magnitude of deleteriousness of the mutation. The pathogenicity analysis reveals that the nsSNP could be deleterious inasmuch as it could affect the functionality of the gene, and interfere with protein function. Molecular dynamics simulation of 60ns was performed using GROMACS to analyse structural change due to a mutation (Arg399Gln) that was never examined before. RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds, radius of gyration and SASA analysis showedthe existence of asignificant difference between the native and the mutant protein. The present study gives astrong indication that the XRCC1 locus deserves serious attention, as it could be a potential candidatecontributing to the etio-pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26824244</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3499829','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3499829"><span id="translatedtitle">Diversity of Dicotyledenous-Infecting Geminiviruses and Their Associated DNA Molecules in Southern Africa, Including the <span class="hlt">South</span>-West <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean Islands</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rey, Marie E. C.; Ndunguru, Joseph; Berrie, Leigh C.; Paximadis, Maria; Berry, Shaun; Cossa, Nurbibi; Nuaila, Valter N.; Mabasa, Ken G.; Abraham, Natasha; Rybicki, Edward P.; Martin, Darren; Pietersen, Gerhard; Esterhuizen, Lindy L.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The family Geminiviridae comprises a group of plant-infecting circular ssDNA viruses that severely constrain agricultural production throughout the temperate regions of the world, and are a particularly serious threat to food security in sub-Saharan Africa. While geminiviruses exhibit considerable diversity in terms of their nucleotide sequences, genome structures, host ranges and insect vectors, the best characterised and economically most important of these viruses are those in the genus Begomovirus. Whereas begomoviruses are generally considered to be either monopartite (one ssDNA component) or bipartite (two circular ssDNA components called DNA-A and DNA-B), many apparently monopartite begomoviruses are associated with additional subviral ssDNA satellite components, called alpha- (DNA-αs) or betasatellites (DNA-βs). Additionally, subgenomic molecules, also known as defective interfering (DIs) DNAs that are usually derived from the parent helper virus through deletions of parts of its genome, are also associated with bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses. The past three decades have witnessed the emergence and diversification of various new begomoviral species and associated DI DNAs, in southern Africa, East Africa, and proximal <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean islands, which today threaten important vegetable and commercial crops such as, tobacco, cassava, tomato, sweet potato, and beans. This review aims to describe what is known about these viruses and their impacts on sustainable production in this sensitive region of the world. PMID:23170182</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26824244','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26824244"><span id="translatedtitle">DNA Repair Gene (XRCC1) Polymorphism (Arg399Gln) Associated with Schizophrenia in <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Population: A Genotypic and Molecular Dynamics Study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sujitha, S P; Kumar, D Thirumal; Doss, C George Priya; Aavula, K; Ramesh, R; Lakshmanan, S; Gunasekaran, S; Anilkumar, G</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper depicts the first report from an <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population on the association between the variant Arg399Gln of XRCC1 locus in the DNA repair system and schizophrenia, the debilitating disease that affects 1% of the world population. Genotypic analysis of a total of 523 subjects (260 patients and 263 controls) revealed an overwhelming presence of Gln399Gln in the case subjects against the controls (P < 0.0068), indicating significant level of association of this nsSNP with schizophrenia; the Gln399 allele frequency was also perceptibly more in cases than in controls (p < 0.003; OR = 1.448). The results of the genotypic studies were further validated using pathogenicity and stability prediction analysis employing computational tools [I-Mutant Suite, iStable, PolyPhen2, SNAP, and PROVEAN], with a view toassess the magnitude of deleteriousness of the mutation. The pathogenicity analysis reveals that the nsSNP could be deleterious inasmuch as it could affect the functionality of the gene, and interfere with protein function. Molecular dynamics simulation of 60ns was performed using GROMACS to analyse structural change due to a mutation (Arg399Gln) that was never examined before. RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds, radius of gyration and SASA analysis showedthe existence of asignificant difference between the native and the mutant protein. The present study gives astrong indication that the XRCC1 locus deserves serious attention, as it could be a potential candidatecontributing to the etio-pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:26824244</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23170182','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23170182"><span id="translatedtitle">Diversity of dicotyledenous-infecting geminiviruses and their associated DNA molecules in southern Africa, including the <span class="hlt">South</span>-west <span class="hlt">Indian</span> ocean islands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rey, Marie E C; Ndunguru, Joseph; Berrie, Leigh C; Paximadis, Maria; Berry, Shaun; Cossa, Nurbibi; Nuaila, Valter N; Mabasa, Ken G; Abraham, Natasha; Rybicki, Edward P; Martin, Darren; Pietersen, Gerhard; Esterhuizen, Lindy L</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>The family Geminiviridae comprises a group of plant-infecting circular ssDNA viruses that severely constrain agricultural production throughout the temperate regions of the world, and are a particularly serious threat to food security in sub-Saharan Africa. While geminiviruses exhibit considerable diversity in terms of their nucleotide sequences, genome structures, host ranges and insect vectors, the best characterised and economically most important of these viruses are those in the genus Begomovirus. Whereas begomoviruses are generally considered to be either monopartite (one ssDNA component) or bipartite (two circular ssDNA components called DNA-A and DNA-B), many apparently monopartite begomoviruses are associated with additional subviral ssDNA satellite components, called alpha- (DNA-αs) or betasatellites (DNA-βs). Additionally, subgenomic molecules, also known as defective interfering (DIs) DNAs that are usually derived from the parent helper virus through deletions of parts of its genome, are also associated with bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses. The past three decades have witnessed the emergence and diversification of various new begomoviral species and associated DI DNAs, in southern Africa, East Africa, and proximal <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean islands, which today threaten important vegetable and commercial crops such as, tobacco, cassava, tomato, sweet potato, and beans. This review aims to describe what is known about these viruses and their impacts on sustainable production in this sensitive region of the world. PMID:23170182</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23982910','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23982910"><span id="translatedtitle">Bioanalysis of tolvaptan, a novel AVP-V2 receptor antagonist in human plasma by a novel LC-ESI-MS/MS method: a pharmacokinetic application in healthy <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> male subjects.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Derangula, Venkata Ramu; Pilli, Nageswara Rao; Bhukya, Babu Rao; Pulipati, Chalapathi Rao; Adireddy, Vinayender; Ponneri, Venkateswarlu</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>A simple, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) assay method is proposed for the determination of tolvaptan in human plasma samples using tolvaptan d7 as internal standard (IS). Analyte and the IS were extracted from 100??L of human plasma via simple liquid-liquid extraction. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 column using a mixture of methanol and 0.1% formic acid buffer (80:20, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0?mL/min. The calibration curve obtained was linear (r(2) ? 0.99) over the concentration range of 0.05-501?ng/mL. Method validation was performed as per US Food and Drug Administration guidelines and the results met the acceptance criteria. The intra-day and inter-day precision (coefficient of variation) and accuracy results in three validation batches across five concentration levels were well within the acceptance limits. A run time of 2.0?min for each sample made it possible to analyze more samples in a short time, thus increasing the productivity. The proposed method was successfully applied to a pharmacokinetic study of 15?mg and 60?mg tolvaptan tablet formulation in healthy <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> male subjects under fasting condition. PMID:23982910</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED080269.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED080269.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Urban <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Project.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Greymountain, Gus; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>The second of a 2 phase study, this project provided information for the non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> population about problems and needs of urban American <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. Phase I (1971) discussed urban <span class="hlt">Indian</span> experiences and trends; compared differences and highlighted issues of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> urbanization. Phase II focused entirely on the urban <span class="hlt">Indian</span> community. The thrust was</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gourd&id=ED202742','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=gourd&id=ED202742"><span id="translatedtitle">Wyoming <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, Unit II.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Robinson, Terry</p> <p></p> <p>This unit on Wyoming <span class="hlt">Indians</span> provides concepts, activities, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> stories, and resources for elementary school students. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "<span class="hlt">Indian</span>," the <span class="hlt">Indians</span>' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the land.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26754573','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26754573"><span id="translatedtitle">Dissecting the influence of Neolithic demic diffusion on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Y-chromosome pool through J2-M172 haplogroup.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Singh, Sakshi; Singh, Ashish; Rajkumar, Raja; Sampath Kumar, Katakam; Kadarkarai Samy, Subburaj; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Singh, Amita; Ahmed Sheikh, Shahnawaz; Peddada, Vidya; Khanna, Vinee; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Pandit, Aridaman; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The global distribution of J2-M172 sub-haplogroups has been associated with Neolithic demic diffusion. Two branches of J2-M172, J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 make a considerable part of Y chromosome gene pool of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent. We investigated the Neolithic contribution of demic dispersal from West to <span class="hlt">Indian</span> paternal lineages, which majorly consists of haplogroups of Late Pleistocene ancestry. To accomplish this, we have analysed 3023 Y-chromosomes from different ethnic populations, of which 355 belonged to J2-M172. Comparison of our data with worldwide data, including Y-STRs of 1157 individuals and haplogroup frequencies of 6966 individuals, suggested a complex scenario that cannot be explained by a single wave of agricultural expansion from Near East to <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia. Contrary to the widely accepted elite dominance model, we found a substantial presence of J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 haplogroups in both <span class="hlt">caste</span> and tribal populations of India. Unlike demic spread in Eurasia, our results advocate a unique, complex and ancient arrival of J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 haplogroups into <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent. PMID:26754573</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4709632','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4709632"><span id="translatedtitle">Dissecting the influence of Neolithic demic diffusion on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Y-chromosome pool through J2-M172 haplogroup</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Singh, Sakshi; Singh, Ashish; Rajkumar, Raja; Sampath Kumar, Katakam; Kadarkarai Samy, Subburaj; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Singh, Amita; Ahmed Sheikh, Shahnawaz; Peddada, Vidya; Khanna, Vinee; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Pandit, Aridaman; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The global distribution of J2-M172 sub-haplogroups has been associated with Neolithic demic diffusion. Two branches of J2-M172, J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 make a considerable part of Y chromosome gene pool of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent. We investigated the Neolithic contribution of demic dispersal from West to <span class="hlt">Indian</span> paternal lineages, which majorly consists of haplogroups of Late Pleistocene ancestry. To accomplish this, we have analysed 3023 Y-chromosomes from different ethnic populations, of which 355 belonged to J2-M172. Comparison of our data with worldwide data, including Y-STRs of 1157 individuals and haplogroup frequencies of 6966 individuals, suggested a complex scenario that cannot be explained by a single wave of agricultural expansion from Near East to <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia. Contrary to the widely accepted elite dominance model, we found a substantial presence of J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 haplogroups in both <span class="hlt">caste</span> and tribal populations of India. Unlike demic spread in Eurasia, our results advocate a unique, complex and ancient arrival of J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 haplogroups into <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent. PMID:26754573</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED018425.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED018425.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THE AMERICAN <span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>OSBORN, LYNN R.</p> <p></p> <p>A 5-DAY CONFERENCE, COSPONSORED BY KANSAS UNIVERSITY'S COMMUNICATION RESEARCH CENTER AND <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span> DAKOTA UNIVERSITY'S INSTITUTE FOR <span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> STUDIES, WAS HELD IN MAY 1967 TO DISCUSS THE TEACHING OF SPEECH COMMUNICATION TO AMERICAN <span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. THIS REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE CONTAINS THREE POSITION STATEMENTS, DRAFTED BY THE CONFEREES,</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/nm0190.photos.217229p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/nm0190.photos.217229p/"><span id="translatedtitle">16 Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>16 Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 first floor mechanical plan - heating - Taos <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Center, 0.3 mile <span class="hlt">south</span>-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/nm0190.photos.217227p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/nm0190.photos.217227p/"><span id="translatedtitle">14. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>14. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, N&, 1934 Foundation Plan - Taos <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Center, 0.3 mile <span class="hlt">south</span>-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/nm0190.photos.217228p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/nm0190.photos.217228p/"><span id="translatedtitle">15. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>15. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 First Floor - plumbing - Taos <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Center, 0.3 mile <span class="hlt">south</span>-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/nm0190.photos.217230p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/nm0190.photos.217230p/"><span id="translatedtitle">17. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>17. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 Elevations - Taos <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Center, 0.3 mile <span class="hlt">south</span>-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/nm0190.photos.217231p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/nm0190.photos.217231p/"><span id="translatedtitle">18. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>18. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from Albuquerque Area <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Service, Division of Health Facilities, Albuquerque, New Mexico) Mayers, Murray, and Phillip, Architects, New York, NY, 1934 Detail sheet - Taos <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Center, 0.3 mile <span class="hlt">south</span>-southwest of Pueblos Plaza, Taos Pueblo, Taos County, NM</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/az0379.photos.321636p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/az0379.photos.321636p/"><span id="translatedtitle">1. Photographic copy of map. Map of Gila River <span class="hlt">Indian</span> ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>1. Photographic copy of map. Map of Gila River <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, Arizona, Showing Allotted And Irrigated Land. Department of the Interior. U.S. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Irrigation Service. July, 1916 (Source: National Archives, Washington, DC) - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Lands North & <span class="hlt">South</span> of Gila River, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1170.photos.046978p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1170.photos.046978p/"><span id="translatedtitle">NORTH END OF DOUBLE FURNACE AND <span class="hlt">CAST</span> AND ENGINE SHED, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>NORTH END OF DOUBLE FURNACE AND <span class="hlt">CAST</span> AND ENGINE SHED, WITH BLOWER HOUSE TO THE EAST AND CHARGING BRIDGE AND TRESSLE TO THE WEST, LOOKING <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span>-SOUTHEAST. - Tannehill Furnace, 12632 Confederate Parkway, Tannehill Historical State Park, Bucksville, Tuscaloosa County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/oh0125.photos.125995p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/oh0125.photos.125995p/"><span id="translatedtitle">15. TAKING A <span class="hlt">CAST</span> AT FURNACE NO. 1 HOT SLAG, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>15. TAKING A <span class="hlt">CAST</span> AT FURNACE NO. 1 HOT SLAG, BY-PRODUCT IN SMELTING OF PIG IRON, CAN BE SEEN FLOWING INTO THE SLAG YARD. VIEW IS LOOKING <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span>. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/pa3387.photos.359740p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/pa3387.photos.359740p/"><span id="translatedtitle">View of foundrymen <span class="hlt">casting</span> ingot molds; The flames from the ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>View of foundrymen <span class="hlt">casting</span> ingot molds; The flames from the mold in the center-right of the photo are present immediately after the pour has been completed - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, <span class="hlt">South</span> Bethlehem Works, Iron Foundry, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/pa2053.photos.356173p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/pa2053.photos.356173p/"><span id="translatedtitle">16. DETAIL OF WICKET AND <span class="hlt">CAST</span> IRON BALL JOINT (off ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>16. DETAIL OF WICKET AND <span class="hlt">CAST</span> IRON BALL JOINT (off site) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River <span class="hlt">South</span> bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1152.photos.046553p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1152.photos.046553p/"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CAST</span> FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH <span class="hlt">CAST</span> FLOOR) ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">CAST</span> FLOOR WITH VIEW OF TORPEDO LADLE (BENEATH <span class="hlt">CAST</span> FLOOR) AND KEEPERS OF THE <span class="hlt">CAST</span> HOUSE FLOOR, S.L. KIMBROUGH AND DAVID HOLMES. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Blast Furnace No. 8, North of Valley Road, West of Ensley-Pleasant Grove Road, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3128549','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3128549"><span id="translatedtitle">Safety, Tolerability, and efficacy of second-line generic protease inhibitor containing HAART after first-line failure among <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> HIV-infected patients</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kumarasamy, N; Venkatesh, Kartik K; Devaleenal, Bella; Poongulali, S; Yepthomi, Tokugha; Solomon, Suniti; Flanigan, Timothy P; Mayer, Kenneth H</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Introduction We describe the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of protease inhibitor (PI) containing HAART among patients switching from non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) from a clinical setting in <span class="hlt">South</span> India. Methods We assessed a prospective cohort of 91 HIV-infected patients with at least 12 months of clinical follow-up on second line ritonvair boosted PI-based therapy between August 2003 and December 2008. Results Over three-fourths of patients met the WHO criteria for immunological failure at the time of switch. The median time to switch was 758 days. Patients demonstrated consistent increases in their CD4 cell counts during the first 12 months, by which time the median CD4 cell count was 322 cells/ul. The most common adverse events within the first year after switch were nausea (14.8%), lipodystrophy (10.4%), and peripheral neuropathy (7.0%). Patients switching to ATV-based regimens compared to those switching to IDV-based regimens had similar immunological and clinical outcomes. Conclusions Given the therapeutic success of utilizing second-line PI-containing HAART after experiencing treatment failure, further efforts must be taken to expand access to second-line HAART so that more patients can benefit from these drugs. PMID:21266320</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730000032','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19730000032"><span id="translatedtitle">Method for <span class="hlt">casting</span> polyethylene pipe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Elam, R. M., Jr.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>Short lengths of 7-cm ID polyethylene pipe are <span class="hlt">cast</span> in a mold which has a core made of room-temperature-vulcanizable (RTV) silicone. Core expands during <span class="hlt">casting</span> and shrinks on cooling to allow for contraction of the polyethylene.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800000428&hterms=investment+casting&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dinvestment%2Bcasting','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19800000428&hterms=investment+casting&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dinvestment%2Bcasting"><span id="translatedtitle">Sealing micropores in thin <span class="hlt">castings</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mersereau, G. A.; Nitzschke, G. O.; Ochs, H. L.; Sutch, F. S.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>Microscopic pores in thin-walled aluminum <span class="hlt">castings</span> are sealed by impregnation pretreatment. Technique was developed for investment <span class="hlt">castings</span> used in hermetically sealed chassic for electronic circuitry. Excessively high leakage rates were previously measured in some chassis.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny1572.photos.349885p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/ny1572.photos.349885p/"><span id="translatedtitle">2. View <span class="hlt">south</span>, pier 2 and connecting bridge, showing tracks ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>2. View <span class="hlt">south</span>, pier 2 and connecting bridge, showing tracks and administration building, with piers 3 and 4 in background - Wood's Grist Mill, <span class="hlt">South</span> bank of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> River, 1 mile east of Breached Mill Dam, Antwerp, Jefferson County, NY</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910000278&hterms=tape+casting&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dtape%2Bcasting','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910000278&hterms=tape+casting&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dtape%2Bcasting"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> Of Multilayer Ceramic Tapes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Collins, Earl R., Jr.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Procedure for <span class="hlt">casting</span> thin, multilayer ceramic membranes, commonly called tapes, involves centrifugal <span class="hlt">casting</span> at accelerations of 1,800 to 2,000 times normal gravitational acceleration. Layers of tape <span class="hlt">cast</span> one at a time on top of any previous layer or layers. Each layer <span class="hlt">cast</span> from slurry of ground ceramic suspended in mixture of solvents, binders, and other components. Used in capacitors, fuel cells, and electrolytic separation of oxygen from air.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2910676','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2910676"><span id="translatedtitle">Predictors of mortality among elderly people living in a <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> urban community; a 10/66 Dementia Research Group prospective population-based cohort study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background Eighty percent of deaths occur in low and middle income countries (LMIC), where chronic diseases are the leading cause. Most of these deaths are of older people, but there is little information on the extent, pattern and predictors of their mortality. We studied these among people aged 65 years and over living in urban catchment areas in Chennai, <span class="hlt">south</span> India. Methods In a prospective population cohort study, 1005 participants were followed-up after three years. Baseline assessment included sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health behaviours, physical, mental and cognitive disorders, disability and subjective global health. Results At follow-up, 257 (25.6%) were not traced. Baseline characteristics were similar to the 748 whose vital status was ascertained; 154 (20.6%) had died. The mortality rate was 92.5/1000 per annum for men and 51.0/1000 per annum for women. Adjusting for age and sex, mortality was associated with older age, male sex, having no friends, physical inactivity, smaller arm circumference, dementia, depression, poor self-rated health and disability. A parsimonious model included, in order of aetiologic force, male sex, smaller arm circumference, age, disability, and dementia. The total population attributable risk fraction was 0.90. Conclusion A balanced approach to prevention of chronic disease deaths requires some attention to proximal risk factors in older people. Smoking and obesity seem much less relevant than in younger people. Undernutrition is preventable. While dementia makes the largest contribution to disability and dependency, comorbidity is the rule, and more attention should be given to the chronic care needs of those affected, and their carers. PMID:20573243</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9331946','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9331946"><span id="translatedtitle">Dissimilar evolution of B-locus versus A-locus and class II loci of the HLA region in <span class="hlt">South</span> American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> tribes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fernndez-Via, M A; Lzaro, A M; Marcos, C Y; Nulf, C; Raimondi, E; Haas, E J; Stastny, P</p> <p>1997-09-01</p> <p>Native American populations have a limited HLA polymorphism compared with other ethnic groups. In spite of this, many novel HLA-B locus alleles, not observed in other populations, have been identified in <span class="hlt">South</span> American tribes, and rapid evolution of this locus has been suggested. We have studied unrelated subjects of the Toba (TOB n = 116), Wichi (WIC n = 46) and Pilaga (PIL n = 14) tribes from northeastern Argentina to investigate the extent of the HLA polymorphism and obtain clues of selective forces that may have acted in these populations. In these tribes the number of HLA alleles is small at all loci except HLA-B, which presents 22 alleles. Seven novel alleles were characterized including 5 of HLA-B (B*35092, B*3518, B*3519, B*4009, B*4803) 1 at HLA-A (A*0219) and 1 at DRB1 (DRB1*0417). All these variants may have arisen by gene conversion events. Some of the novel variants represent the most frequent alleles of these populations (B*4803 in TOB and PIL; B*3519 in WIC) or are the most frequent subtypes in their lineages. HLA-A, B, DRB1,DQA1 and DQB1, but not DPB1, display relatively similar gene frequencies. This results in high heterozygosity in all the tribes for all the loci studied except HLA-DPB1. The larger polymorphism and the generation and maintenance of novel alleles at the HLA-B locus suggests a more specialized response of this locus to evolutionary forces. These effects may be related to the nature of the polymorphism, to the number of founder alleles and to the functional characteristics of the individual alleles. PMID:9331946</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.9954L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..16.9954L"><span id="translatedtitle">The Western Ghat as the water tower of the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Rivers : a stable isotope investigation on the origin of water and factors affecting the water cycle.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lambs, Luc; Tripti, Muguli; Balakrishna, Keshava</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The long stretch (1600 km) of Ghats on the western side (Western Ghats) of Peninsular India separates relatively wetter west coast from drier eastern coast. The western and eastern sides of the Ghats are having distinct isotopic signatures indicating unequal distribution of the moisture sources. <span class="hlt">South</span> India is characterized by having moisture source for southwest monsoon from Arabian Sea and northeast monsoon from Bay of Bengal. The wetter side of Peninsular region is covered by combination of evergreen tropical forest and grass lands, termed as Shola Forests which support higher vapor recycling process. Very few isotopic studies have been undertaken in these areas, except few places, mainly along the coast lines. This study presents the stable isotope results on rivers and groundwater of the Western Ghats covering Agumbe (Karnataka) to Ooty (Tamil Nadu) and its west coast river basins as observed for the three year period. The stable isotope results on the surface, subsurface and deep water pools show that the mean d18O value range from -4 o to -2 o on the west slope, and from -5 o to -4 o on the east slope, with quite no altitude or amount effect up to 2000 m asl. The more depleted values are found only in higher elevation, like the Doddabeta in the Nilgiri (2637m), with d18O close to -9 o which is exceptional for a tropical area. The hills on the west slope of the Western Ghats as well as in the mountainous Shola forest exhibit strong water vapor recycling as evidenced by high d-excess values. On the contrary on the eastern slope, the drier condition and the numerous impoundments and river damming support strong evaporation process. Thus, the study identifies the profound effect of tropical vegetation and anthropogenic factors on the recharge functioning of river and groundwater pools in Southern India.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050226973','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20050226973"><span id="translatedtitle">Mix/<span class="hlt">Cast</span> Contamination Control</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wallentine, M.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Presented is a training handbook for Mix/<span class="hlt">Cast</span> Contamination Control; a part of a series of training courses to qualify access to Mix/<span class="hlt">Cast</span> facilities. Contents: List Contamination Control Requirements; Identify foreign objects debris (FOD), Control Areas and their guidelines; Describe environmental monitoring; List Contamination Control Initiatives; Describe concern for Controlled Materials; Identify FOD Controlled Areas in Mix/<span class="hlt">Cast</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=surf&pg=7&id=ED243617','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=surf&pg=7&id=ED243617"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> and Angling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Little, Mildred J.; Bunting, Camille</p> <p></p> <p>The self-contained packet contains background information, lesson plans, 15 transparency and student handout masters, drills and games, 2 objective examinations, and references for teaching a 15-day unit on <span class="hlt">casting</span> and angling to junior high and senior high school students, either as part of a regular physical education program or as a club</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/865681','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/865681"><span id="translatedtitle">Extrusion <span class="hlt">cast</span> explosive</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Scribner, Kenneth J. (Livermore, CA)</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion <span class="hlt">cast</span> explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED091135.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED091135.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> and Angling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Smith, Julian W.</p> <p></p> <p>As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with <span class="hlt">casting</span> and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title14-vol1-sec25-621.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title14-vol1-sec25-621.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">14 CFR 25.621 - <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... except <span class="hlt">castings</span> that are pressure tested as parts of hydraulic or other fluid systems and do not support... bearing factor is larger than the applicable <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor. (c) Critical <span class="hlt">castings</span>. For each <span class="hlt">casting</span> whose... occupants, the following apply: (1) Each critical <span class="hlt">casting</span> must (i) Have a <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor of not less than...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=white+AND+house+AND+history&pg=3&id=EJ639832','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=white+AND+house+AND+history&pg=3&id=EJ639832"><span id="translatedtitle">The Institute of American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Studies: A Tradition of Scholarly Pursuit.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bruguier, Leonard R.; White, Scott E.</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Traces the development of the Institute of American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Studies at the University of <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota, which was founded in 1955 and which houses the <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota Oral History Center. Discusses the Institute's leadership, faculty members, research, publications, and conferences, and the impact of increasing numbers of American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> students and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3586081','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3586081"><span id="translatedtitle">Design and baseline characteristics of the PODOSA (Prevention of Diabetes & Obesity in <span class="hlt">South</span> Asians) trial: a cluster, randomised lifestyle intervention in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Pakistani adults with impaired glycaemia at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Douglas, Anne; Bhopal, Raj S; Bhopal, Ruby; Forbes, John F; Gill, Jason M R; McKnight, John; Murray, Gordon; Sattar, Naveed; Sharma, Anu; Wallia, Sunita; Wild, Sarah; Sheikh, Aziz</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Objectives To describe the design and baseline population characteristics of an adapted lifestyle intervention trial aimed at reducing weight and increasing physical activity in people of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Pakistani origin at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Design Cluster, randomised controlled trial. Setting Community-based in Edinburgh and Glasgow, Scotland, UK. Participants 156 families, comprising 171 people with impaired glycaemia, and waist sizes ≥90 cm (men) and ≥80 cm (women), plus 124 family volunteers. Interventions Families were randomised into either an intensive intervention of 15 dietitian visits providing lifestyle advice, or a light (control) intervention of four visits, over a period of 3 years. Outcome measures The primary outcome is a change in mean weight between baseline and 3 years. Secondary outcomes are changes in waist, hip, body mass index, plasma blood glucose and physical activity. The cost of the intervention will be measured. Qualitative work will seek to understand factors that motivated participation and retention in the trial and families’ experience of adhering to the interventions. Results Between July 2007 and October 2009, 171 people with impaired glycaemia, along with 124 family volunteers, were randomised. In total, 95% (171/196) of eligible participants agreed to proceed to the 3-year trial. Only 13 of the 156 families contained more than one recruit with impaired glycaemia. We have recruited sufficient participants to undertake an adequately powered trial to detect a mean difference in weight of 2.5 kg between the intensive and light intervention groups at the 5% significance level. Over half the families include family volunteers. The main participants have a mean age of 52 years and 64% are women. Conclusions Prevention of Diabetes & Obesity in <span class="hlt">South</span> Asians (PODOSA) is one of the first community-based, randomised lifestyle intervention trials in a UK <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian population. The main trial results will be submitted for publication during 2013. Trial registration Current controlled trials ISRCTN25729565 (http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/). PMID:23435795</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRD..11911743B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRD..11911743B"><span id="translatedtitle">Source-diagnostic dual-isotope composition and optical properties of water-soluble organic carbon and elemental carbon in the <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian outflow intercepted over the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bosch, Carme; Andersson, August; Kirillova, Elena N.; Budhavant, Krishnakant; Tiwari, Suresh; Praveen, P. S.; Russell, Lynn M.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Ramanathan, Veerabhadran; Gustafsson, rjan</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The dual carbon isotope signatures and optical properties of carbonaceous aerosols have been investigated simultaneously for the first time in the <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian outflow during an intensive campaign at the Maldives Climate Observatory on Hanimaadhoo (MCOH) (February and March 2012). As one component of the Cloud Aerosol Radiative Forcing Dynamics Experiment, this paper reports on the sources and the atmospheric processing of elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as examined by a dual carbon isotope approach. The radiocarbon (?14C) data show that WSOC has a significantly higher biomass/biogenic contribution (86 5%) compared to EC (59 4%). The more 13C-enriched signature of MCOH-WSOC (-20.8 0.7) compared to MCOH-EC (-25.8 0.3) and megacity Delhi WSOC (-24.1 0.9) suggests that WSOC is significantly more affected by aging during long-range transport than EC. The ?13C-?14C signal suggests that the wintertime WSOC intercepted over the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean largely represents aged primary biomass burning aerosols. Since light-absorbing organic carbon aerosols (Brown Carbon (BrC)) have recently been identified as potential contributors to positive radiative forcing, optical properties of WSOC were also investigated. The mass absorption cross section of WSOC (MAC365) was 0.5 0.2 m2 g-1 which is lower than what has been observed at near-source sites, indicating a net decrease of WSOC light-absorption character during long-range transport. Near-surface WSOC at MCOH accounted for ~1% of the total direct solar absorbance relative to EC, which is lower than the BrC absorption inferred from solar spectral observations of ambient aerosols, suggesting that a significant portion of BrC might be included in the water-insoluble portion of organic aerosols.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24686188','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24686188"><span id="translatedtitle">Association of seven functional polymorphisms of one-carbon metabolic pathway with total plasma homocysteine levels and susceptibility to Parkinson's disease among <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kumudini, Nadella; Uma, Addepally; Naushad, Shaik Mohammad; Mridula, Rukmini; Borgohain, Rupam; Kutala, Vijay Kumar</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>This study from <span class="hlt">South</span> India was performed to ascertain the impact of seven functional polymorphisms of one-carbon metabolic pathway on total plasma homocysteine levels and susceptibility to PD. A total of 151 cases of Parkinson's disease and 416 healthy controls were analyzed for fasting plasma homocysteine levels by reverse phase HPLC. PCR-RFLP approaches were used to analyze glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) 1561 C>T, reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) 80 G>A, cytosolic serine hydroxymethyl transferase (cSHMT) 1420 C>T, methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677 C>T, methionine synthase (MTR) 2756 A>G and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) 66 A>G polymorphisms. PCR-AFLP was used for the analysis of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) 5'-UTR 28bp tandem repeat. PD cases exhibited elevated plasma homocysteine levels compared to controls (men: 28.8 6.9 vs. 16.4 8.8 ?mol/L; women: 25.4 5.3 vs. 11.2 5.1?mol/L). Homocysteine levels showed positive correlation with male gender (r=0.39, p<0.0001) and MTRR 66 A>G (r=0.31, p<0.0001) whereas an inverse correlation was observed with cSHMT 1420 C>T polymorphism. MTRR 66 A>G polymorphism showed independent risk for PD (OR: 3.42, 95% CI: 2.35-4.98) whereas cSHMT 1420 C>T conferred protection against PD (OR: 0.11, 95% CI: 0.07-0.17). Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed synergistic interactions between MTHFR 677 C>T and MTRR 66 A>G, whereas cSHMT 1420 C>T exhibited counteracting interactions in altering susceptibility to PD. To conclude, PD cases exhibited hyperhomocysteinemia and MTRR 66 A>G and cSHMT 1420 C>T gene variants were shown to modulate PD risk by altering the homocysteine levels. PMID:24686188</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3720942','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3720942"><span id="translatedtitle">Visual Impairment in the <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> State of Andhra Pradesh: Andhra Pradesh - Rapid Assessment of Visual Impairment (AP-RAVI) Project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Marmamula, Srinivas; Narsaiah, Saggam; Shekhar, Konegari; Khanna, Rohit C.; Rao, Gullapalli N.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Purpose To assess the prevalence and causes of visual impairment in urban and rural population aged ?40 years in the <span class="hlt">South</span> India state of Andhra Pradesh. Methods A population based cross-sectional study was conducted in which 7800 subjects were sampled from two rural and an urban locations. Visual Acuity (VA) was assessed using a tumbling E chart and eye examinations were performed by trained vision technicians. A questionnaire was used to collect personal and demographic information and previous consultation to eye care providers. Blindness and moderate Visual Impairment (VI) was defined as presenting VA <6/60 and <6/18 to 6/60 in the better eye respectively. VI included blindness and moderate VI. Results Of the 7800 subjects enumerated, 7378 (94.6%) were examined. Among those examined, 46.4% were male and 61.8% of them had no education. The mean age of those examined (51.7 years; standard deviation 10.9 years) was similar to those not examined (52.8 years; standard deviation 9.9 years) (p?=?0.048). Age and gender adjusted prevalence of VI was 14.3% (95% CI: 13.515.0). Refractive errors were the leading cause of VI accounting for 47.6% of all VI followed by cataract (43.7%). Together, they contributed to over 91.3% of the total VI. With multiple logistic regression, the odds of having VI increased significantly with increasing age. Those respondents who had no education were twice (95% CI: 1.72.5) more likely to have VI compared to those who were educated. VI was associated with rural residence (OR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.11.6). The association between VI and gender was not statistically significant. Conclusions The visual impairment remains a public health challenge in Andhra Pradesh, most of which can be addressed with relatively straight forward interventions like cataract surgery and spectacles. The eye care services need to be streamlined to address this challenge. PMID:23894601</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2920866','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2920866"><span id="translatedtitle">A case-control analysis of common variants in GIP with type 2 diabetes and related biochemical parameters in a <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> population</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is one of the incretins, which plays a crucial role in the secretion of insulin upon food stimulus and in the regulation of postprandial glucose level. It also exerts an effect on the synthesis and secretion of lipoprotein lipase, from adipocytes, important for lipid metabolism. The aim of our study was to do a case-control association analysis of common variants in GIP in association with type 2 diabetes and related biochemical parameters. Method A total of 2000 subjects which includes 1000 (584M/416F) cases with type 2 diabetes and 1000 (470M/530F) normoglycemic control subjects belonging to Dravidian ethnicity from <span class="hlt">South</span> India were recruited to assess the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GIP (rs2291725, rs2291726, rs937301) on type 2 diabetes in a case-control manner. The SNPs were genotyped by using tetra primer amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (ARMS PCR). For statistical analysis, our study population was divided into sub-groups based on gender (male and female). Association analysis was carried out using chi-squared test and the comparison of biochemical parameters among the three genotypes were performed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Result Initial analysis revealed that, out of the total three SNPs selected for the present study, two SNPs namely rs2291726 and rs937301 were in complete linkage disequilibrium (LD) with each other. Therefore, only two SNPs, rs2291725 and rs2291726, were genotyped for the association studies. No significant difference in the allele frequency and genotype distribution of any of the SNPs in GIP were observed between cases and controls (P > 0.05). Analysis of biochemical parameters among the three genotypes showed a significant association of total cholesterol (P = 0.042) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) with the G allele of the SNP rs2291726 in GIP (P = 0.004), but this was observed only in the case of female subjects. However this association does not remain significant after correction for multiple testing by Bonferroni's inequality method. Conclusion No statistically significant association was observed between any of the SNPs analysed and type 2 diabetes in our population. But the analysis of biochemical parameters indicates that the G allele in rs2291726 may be a putative risk allele for increased LDL cholesterol and further studies in other population needs to be carried out for ascertaining its role in cholesterol metabolism and subsequent cardiovascular risk. PMID:20673334</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=area-51&id=ED268987','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=area-51&id=ED268987"><span id="translatedtitle">Project DISC: Developing <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Software Curriculum.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jacobi, Carolyn</p> <p></p> <p>Project DISC (Developing <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Software Curriculum) was initiated in the Rapid City (<span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota) school district to improve Native American children's reading and language arts ability and to provide them with microcomputer skills. During the summer of 1982, introductory computer activities were planned, a computer specialist was hired, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_8','SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS'); return false;" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_8"><span id="translatedtitle">Miller Pond, Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, SD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>View of inundated dugout berms at Miller Pond wetland area. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe using ground surveys and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_11','SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS'); return false;" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_11"><span id="translatedtitle">Wetland Survey, Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, SD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Lower Brule Sioux Tribe staff surveying wetland area of West Brule Community. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe using ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_10','SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS'); return false;" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_10"><span id="translatedtitle">Unnamed Slough, Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, SD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>View of unnamed slough wetland area. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe using ground surveys and water-quality analyses...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ak+AND+47&id=ED141008','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ak+AND+47&id=ED141008"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Studies Program.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Peck, Cy, Sr.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>A product of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Studies Curriculum Committee and the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Studies Staff, this manual on the <span class="hlt">Indians</span> of Southeast Alaska constitutes a useable classroom tool designed for the cross-cultural program in the Juneau School District. Objectives of this <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Studies Program are identified as: to increase knowledge, awareness, and positive…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=earthworks&id=ED346014','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=earthworks&id=ED346014"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indians</span> of Iowa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>This issue of "The Goldfinch" examines the history of American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in Iowa. This volume's featured articles include: "Encounter"; "Iowa Earthworks"; "The Long Way Home"; "How One Learns, a Mesquakie Woman's Life Story"; "<span class="hlt">Indians</span> of Iowa"; "Little Brother Snares the Sun"; "Being <span class="hlt">Indian</span> in an Urban World"; and "<span class="hlt">Indian</span> Wars Myth." (DB)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED011219.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED011219.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">KNOW YOUR NEVADA <span class="hlt">INDIANS</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>POEHLMAN, CHARLES H.; AND OTHERS</p> <p></p> <p>THIS PUBLICATION PRESENTS THE RESULTS OF A STUDY OF THE SOCIOCULTURAL BACKGROUNDS OF THE PAIUTE, WASHOE, AND SHOSHONE <span class="hlt">INDIANS</span> OF NEVADA. INCLUDED ARE AN OUTLINE OF GENERAL PROBLEMS PERTAINING TO <span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> EDUCATION, SOME DISTINCT CULTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE DOMINANT NON-<span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> SOCIETY AND THE <span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> SOCIETY, AND THE PREHISTORIC ASPECTS OF THE</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950019648','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950019648"><span id="translatedtitle">AMCC <span class="hlt">casting</span> development, volume 2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>PCC successfully <span class="hlt">cast</span> and performed nondestructive testing, FPI and x-ray, on seventeen AMCC <span class="hlt">castings</span>. Destructive testing, lab analysis and chemical milling, was performed on eleven of the <span class="hlt">castings</span> and the remaining six <span class="hlt">castings</span> were shipped to NASA or Aerojet. Two of the six <span class="hlt">castings</span> shipped, lots 015 and 016, were fully processed per blueprint requirements. PCC has fully developed the gating and processing parameters of this part and feels the part could be implemented into production, after four more <span class="hlt">castings</span> have been completed to ensure the repeatability of the process. The AMCC <span class="hlt">casting</span> has been a technically challenging part due to its size, configuration, and alloy type. The height and weight of the wax pattern assembly necessitated the development of a hollow gating system to ensure structural integrity of the shell throughout the investment process. The complexity in the jacket area of the <span class="hlt">casting</span> required the development of an innovative <span class="hlt">casting</span> technology that PCC has termed 'TGC' or thermal gradient control. This method of setting up thermal gradients in the <span class="hlt">casting</span> during solidification represents a significant process improvement for PCC and has been successfully implemented on other programs. The alloy, JBK75, is a relatively new alloy in the investment <span class="hlt">casting</span> arena and required our engineering staff to learn the gating, processing, and dimensional characteristics of the material.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Aztecs&pg=7&id=ED063981','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Aztecs&pg=7&id=ED063981"><span id="translatedtitle">Modern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Psychology. Revised Edition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bryde, John F.</p> <p></p> <p>Written on the basis of senior <span class="hlt">Indian</span> verbal relatings collected over a 23-year span, this revised edition on modern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> psychology incorporates suggestions from <span class="hlt">Indian</span> students and their teachers, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> social studies experts, and other <span class="hlt">Indian</span> people. The book contains 6 major divisions: (1) "Culture and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Values" relates</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/672206','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/672206"><span id="translatedtitle">Melting and <span class="hlt">casting</span> of FeAl-based <span class="hlt">cast</span> alloy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sikka, V.K.; Wilkening, D.; Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B.</p> <p>1998-11-01</p> <p>The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and <span class="hlt">cast</span> these alloys into complex-shaped <span class="hlt">castings</span> and centrifugal <span class="hlt">cast</span> tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of <span class="hlt">castings</span>. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free <span class="hlt">castings</span>. The FeAl alloys can be melted and <span class="hlt">cast</span> from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of <span class="hlt">castings</span>. A range of complex sand <span class="hlt">castings</span> and two different sizes of centrifugal <span class="hlt">cast</span> tubes of the alloy have already been <span class="hlt">cast</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3509117','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3509117"><span id="translatedtitle">The Phylogeography of Y-Chromosome Haplogroup H1a1a-M82 Reveals the Likely <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Origin of the European Romani Populations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pathak, Ajai Kumar; Singh, Vipin Kumar; Karmin, Monika; Singh, Manvendra; Rani, Deepa Selvi; Anugula, Sharath; Yadav, Brijesh Kumar; Singh, Ashish; Srinivasagan, Ramkumar; Yadav, Anita; Kashyap, Manju; Narvariya, Sapna; Reddy, Alla G.; Underhill, Peter A.; Villems, Richard; Kivisild, Toomas; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Linguistic and genetic studies on Roma populations inhabited in Europe have unequivocally traced these populations to the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent. However, the exact parental population group and time of the out-of-India dispersal have remained disputed. In the absence of archaeological records and with only scanty historical documentation of the Roma, comparative linguistic studies were the first to identify their <span class="hlt">Indian</span> origin. Recently, molecular studies on the basis of disease-causing mutations and haploid DNA markers (i.e. mtDNA and Y-chromosome) supported the linguistic view. The presence of <span class="hlt">Indian</span>-specific Y-chromosome haplogroup H1a1a-M82 and mtDNA haplogroups M5a1, M18 and M35b among Roma has corroborated that their <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian origins and later admixture with Near Eastern and European populations. However, previous studies have left unanswered questions about the exact parental population groups in <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia. Here we present a detailed phylogeographical study of Y-chromosomal haplogroup H1a1a-M82 in a data set of more than 10,000 global samples to discern a more precise ancestral source of European Romani populations. The phylogeographical patterns and diversity estimates indicate an early origin of this haplogroup in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent and its further expansion to other regions. Tellingly, the short tandem repeat (STR) based network of H1a1a-M82 lineages displayed the closest connection of Romani haplotypes with the traditional scheduled <span class="hlt">caste</span> and scheduled tribe population groups of northwestern India. PMID:23209554</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5381405','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5381405"><span id="translatedtitle">Extrusion <span class="hlt">cast</span> explosive</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Scribner, K.J.</p> <p>1985-01-29</p> <p>Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion <span class="hlt">cast</span> explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7146119','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7146119"><span id="translatedtitle">Extrusion <span class="hlt">cast</span> explosive</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Scribner, K.J.</p> <p>1985-11-26</p> <p>Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion <span class="hlt">cast</span> explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20001845','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20001845"><span id="translatedtitle">Metal <span class="hlt">casting</span> extended assessments</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ambs, L.; Kosanovic, D.; Muller, M.; Kasten, D.</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p>In 1997, the Industrial Assessment Center program of the US Department of Energy initiated Extended Assessments as an option for some of their in-plant assessments. Intended for larger, more complex manufacturing facilities, the multi-day Extended Assessment allows the plant assessment team to explore more complex recommendations with the intent of encouraging major process and equipment changes. In this paper the authors describe the results of Extended Assessments at plants in the Metal <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Industry, one of the DOE Industries of the Future. They visited five plants, two foundries and three die <span class="hlt">casting</span> plants, with combined annual sales of $134 million and a combined annual production volume of 35,300 tons. The recommendations offered potential savings to each plant of an average $417,000 or 1.5% of average gross sales. A number of generalizations can be observed based on the assessments in the <span class="hlt">cast</span> metals industry. First is that many of the smaller firms in this industry have been slow to adopt innovative technology. Off the shelf technologies are available that will help these firms reach the 21st Century. The concept of remelt of metal or scrap in the plant is an operation that can be improved. They found approximately two pounds of metal melted for every pound shipped. Finally, many opportunities exist outside of the core plant operations to reduce operating costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900010109','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900010109"><span id="translatedtitle">High density tape <span class="hlt">casting</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Collins, Earl R., Jr. (inventor)</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>A system is provided for <span class="hlt">casting</span> thin sheets (or tapes) of particles bound together, that are used for oxygen membranes and other applications, which enables the particles to be <span class="hlt">cast</span> at a high packing density in a tape of uniform thickness. A slurry contains the particles, a binder, and a solvent, and is <span class="hlt">cast</span> against the inside walls of a rotating chamber. Prior to spraying the slurry against the chamber walls, a solvent is applied to a container. The solvent evaporates to saturate the chamber with solvent vapor. Only then is the slurry <span class="hlt">cast</span>. As a result, the slurry remains fluid long enough to spread evenly over the <span class="hlt">casting</span> surface formed by the chamber, and for the slurry particles to become densely packed. Only then is the chamber vented to remove solvent, so the slurry can dry. The major novel feature is applying solvent vapor to a rotating chamber before <span class="hlt">casting</span> slurry against the chamber walls.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1041060','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1041060"><span id="translatedtitle">LOST FOAM <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Han, Qingyou; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Sklad, Philip S; Currie, Kenneth; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Vondra, Fred; Walford, Graham; Nolan, Dennis J</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The lost foam <span class="hlt">casting</span> process has been successfully used for making aluminum and <span class="hlt">cast</span> iron thin walled <span class="hlt">castings</span> of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on <span class="hlt">cast</span> magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam <span class="hlt">casting</span> of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on <span class="hlt">castings</span> of simple geometries such as plate <span class="hlt">castings</span> and window <span class="hlt">castings</span>. The plate <span class="hlt">castings</span> were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate <span class="hlt">castings</span> were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window <span class="hlt">castings</span> were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum <span class="hlt">casting</span> and lost foam magnesium <span class="hlt">casting</span> have been observed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=flute&pg=3&id=EJ293972','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=flute&pg=3&id=EJ293972"><span id="translatedtitle">Improvising on an <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Flute.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Giles, Martha Mead</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Indian</span> flute can be used by teachers to supplement classroom study of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> culture. <span class="hlt">Indians</span> used it as a personal instrument. Describes how an <span class="hlt">Indian</span> flute can be made, and suggests improvising bird calls and melodies on it. (CS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1015159','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1015159"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Cast</span> dielectric composite linear accelerator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Sanders, David M.; Sampayan, Stephen; Slenes, Kirk; Stoller, H. M.</p> <p>2009-11-10</p> <p>A linear accelerator having <span class="hlt">cast</span> dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the <span class="hlt">cast</span> dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this <span class="hlt">cast</span> dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810000099&hterms=ceramic+slip&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dceramic%2Bslip','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19810000099&hterms=ceramic+slip&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dceramic%2Bslip"><span id="translatedtitle">Fiber-Reinforced Slip <span class="hlt">Castings</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Blome, J. C.; Drennan, D. N.; Keeser, H. M.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Addition of silica fibers greatly reduces shrinkage and cracking during <span class="hlt">casting</span> of ceramics. Fiber-reinforced slip-<span class="hlt">cast</span> silica ceramics are also tougher and have lower dielectric loss. Silica fibers are hyperpure material containing only 1 part per million total metal-ion impurities. Hyperpure fibers ensure high reflectance and allow <span class="hlt">casting</span> to be fired at temperature greater than 2,200 degrees F without loss of strength from devitrification.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title21-vol8-sec888-5940.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title21-vol8-sec888-5940.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 888.5940 - <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... the <span class="hlt">cast</span> heel, toe cap, <span class="hlt">cast</span> support, and walking iron. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices 888.5940 <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component. (a) Identification. A <span class="hlt">cast</span> component is...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7132473','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7132473"><span id="translatedtitle">Replacing London's <span class="hlt">cast</span> iron mains</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Thorne, A. ); Mathews, P. )</p> <p>1992-07-01</p> <p>This paper discusses the <span class="hlt">cast</span> iron gas distribution systems that exist in many cities and contains considerable amounts of pipe that vary in age from 20 to 150 years. In many ways, <span class="hlt">cast</span> iron is an excellent material. It is inherently corrosion resistant, easy to install and cheap. However, it is also brittle and smaller diameter <span class="hlt">cast</span> iron pipe has a relatively low beam strength. This can lead, under some circumstances, to failure without external warning, with typically a full-circumferential failure. In congested areas this can lead to serious consequences. As a result, <span class="hlt">cast</span> iron replacement programs are a common feature in such urban gas distribution systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..420C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ClDy..tmp..420C"><span id="translatedtitle">Tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean response to the decay phase of El Niño in a coupled model and associated changes in <span class="hlt">south</span> and east-Asian summer monsoon circulation and rainfall</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chowdary, Jasti S.; Parekh, Anant; Kakatkar, Rashmi; Gnanaseelan, C.; Srinivas, G.; Singh, Prem; Roxy, M. K.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>This study investigates the response of tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (TIO) sea surface temperature (SST) to El Niño decay phase and its impacts on <span class="hlt">South</span> and East Asian summer monsoon in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System version 2 free run. The TIO basin-wide warming induced by El Niño at its peak phase (winter; DJF) and next spring (MAM + 1) are reasonably well captured by the model but with weak magnitude. This TIO basin-wide SST warming persists until summer (JJA + 1) and exert strong impact on summer monsoon rainfall and circulation as revealed in the observations. However, TIO SST anomalies are very weak in the model during the El Niño decaying summers. Though El Niño decay is delayed by 2 months in the model, decay of TIO SST warming is faster than the observations. Anomalous latent heat loss from ocean and a feeble southern TIO Rossby waves associated with weak wind response to El Niño are mainly accountable for rapid decay of TIO SST warming by mid-summer in the model. This suggests that JJA + 1 TIO SST response to El Niño decay phase in the model is poorly represented. The model is able to capture the SST anomalies associated with the northwest Pacific anticyclone at the peak phase of El Niño but fail to maintain that during the decay phase in MAM + 1 and JJA + 1. It is found that precipitation and circulation anomalies associated with TIO SST warming over the <span class="hlt">South</span> and East Asian regions are disorganized in the model during the decay phase of El Niño. Rainfall anomalies over the southwest TIO, west coast of India, northern flank of northwest Pacific anticyclone and over Japan in JJA + 1 are poorly represented by the model. Analysis of lower troposphere stream function and rotational wind component reveals that northwest Pacific anticyclone shifted far eastward to the date line in the model during JJA + 1 unlike in the observations. Anomalous divergence observed over the western TIO and convergence in the northwest Pacific are absent in the model during JJA + 1. Extension of anomalous tropospheric warming from TIO region to equatorial western Pacific is also very weak in the model due to poor representation of TIO SSTs and the subsequent absence of any Kelvin wave response. Anomalous Walker circulation persisted from DJF to JJA + 1 due to El Niño late decay in the model unlike in the observations. This is also found to be responsible for the redundant changes in SST, rainfall and circulation over the Indo-western Pacific in the model. This study demonstrates that it is essential to represent the decay phase of El Niño and the associated TIO response accurately to have realistic simulations of summer monsoon in the decaying year.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12285490','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12285490"><span id="translatedtitle">Ecological organization of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> society.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gadgil, M</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Some of the factors involved in securing the well being of an <span class="hlt">Indian</span> rural population in a sustainable and environmentally sound fashion are discussed. Population pressure on the land and declining productivity threaten the balance between man and nature. The options are to provide outside technological inputs and/or to empower the rural population who may be able to provide an intimate knowledge of the local environment and must be organized and motivated to value and protect their resource base. Attention in paid to the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> <span class="hlt">caste</span> system, resource use diversification, group size and range, group dynamics, elites and the ecosystem, the drain on rural resources, the iron triangle of beneficiaries of subsidies, of administrators of subsidies, and of politicians, and the growing strife. The <span class="hlt">Indian</span> <span class="hlt">caste</span> system is differentiated by its subgroups which maintain communication within the subgroup, and resource access is determined by an individual's affiliation with the subgroup. It is not a smooth continuum between subgroups. Inequalities in resource access can create social tensions and/or partitioning of resources. The example is given of the subgroups Gavlis and Kunbis, in the Western Ghats in Pune district of Maharashtra, where exchanges are made for livestock or surplus grain, and the multicaste system of 40 subgroups in Uttara Kannada, with occupations specific to each subgroup. In order to function effectively as a subgroup the numbers must be limited or splinter groups develop. Several estimates of possible ranges are given, i.e., an upper limit of 10,000 or the equivalent of a subcaste and 10-20 endogenous groups/larger village with an area of 1000 km. Mergers and group splits are described among the Gavlis in Western Ghat and Tirumal Nadivallas and settlers of the Andaman Islands. Historically, communities were self-sufficient and surrounded elite communities; they had their own self-government and organized local resources for sustainable use, even though this was sometimes inequitable but not overexploited. Elites formed on the surplus of resources, but there was little outflow to other regions. British colonial rule made tremendous changes which led to the lack of security within depressed subgroups. The resources were controlled by the elite in the iron triangle at the expense of the small landholder, landless agricultural workers, village artisans, tribals and nomads, and urban slum dwellers. There was no reason for efficient resource use, and development was wasteful and benefited the elites. Regionalism is growing as well as tension between the elites and the poorer members of minorities. PMID:12285490</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-11/pdf/E9-31374.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-11/pdf/E9-31374.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 1384 - <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Professions Preparatory, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Professions Pregraduate and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-11</p> <p>... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Service <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Professions Preparatory, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Professions Pregraduate and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Numbers:...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-03-18/pdf/2013-06101.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-03-18/pdf/2013-06101.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 16685 - <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Professions Preparatory, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Professions Pre-graduate, and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-03-18</p> <p>... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Service <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Professions Preparatory, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Professions Pre-graduate, and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. ]...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Boa&pg=2&id=EJ013646','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Boa&pg=2&id=EJ013646"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Languages</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Strong, Augusta</p> <p>1969-01-01</p> <p>Appraisal of Boas'"Introduction to Handbook of American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Languages (1911), and Powell's "<span class="hlt">Indian</span> Linguistic Famlies of America North of Mexico (1891), as reissued by University of Nebraska, Lincoln. (AF)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001470&hterms=tropic+capricorn&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dtropic%2Bcapricorn','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-001470&hterms=tropic+capricorn&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dtropic%2Bcapricorn"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">South</span> Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>This true-color image of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa was acquired on May 14, 2000, by NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. The image was produced using a combination of the sensor's 250-m and 500-m resolution visible wavelength bands. As part of the opening ceremony to begin the joint U.S.-<span class="hlt">South</span> Africa SAFARI Field Experiment, NASA presented print copies of this image as GIFts to Dr. Ben Ngubane, Minister of Arts, Science and Technology, and Honorable Advocate Ngoaka Ramathlodi, Premier of the Northern Province, <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa. The area shown in this image encompasses seven capital cities and a number of the region's distinctive geological features can be seen clearly. Toward the northern (top) central part of the image, the browns and tans comprise the Kalahari Desert of southern Botswana. The Tropic of Capricorn runs right through the heart of the Kalahari and the Botswanan capital city of Gaborone sits on the Limpopo River, southeast of the Kalahari. Along the western coastline of the continent is the country of Namibia, where the Namib Desert is framed against the sea by the Kaokoveld Mountains. The Namibian capital of Windhoek is obscured by clouds. Looking closely in the center of the image, the Orange River can be seen running from east to west, demarcating the boundary between Namibia and <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa. On the southwestern corner of the continent is the hook-like Cape of Good Hope peninsula and Cape Town, the parliamentary capital of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa. Running west to east away from Cape Town are the Great Karroo Mountains. The shadow in this image conveys a sense of the very steep grade of the cliffs along the southern coast of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa. Port Elizabeth sits on the southeasternmost point of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa, and a large phytoplankton bloom can be seen in the water about 100 miles east of there. Moving northward along the east coast, the Drakensberg Mountains are visible. The two small nations of Lesotho and Swaziland are in this region, completely contained within <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa's boundaries. In the upper righthand corner of the image is the Bay of Maputo, where sits Maputo, the capital of Mozambique. Fires are visible in the northeast corner of the image, near Maputo. Just north of Maputo is where the Limpopo River empties into the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Tracing the Limpopo inland back toward the west, this river defines the northern boundary of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa with both Zimbabwe and Botswana. Johannesburg, the commercial capital of <span class="hlt">South</span> Africa, can be seen as the greyish pixels in the northeastern region of the country. The country's legislative capital, Pretoria, is about 50 miles north of Johannesburg and 250 miles west of Maputo, in the heart of the Northern Province (formerly known as Transvaal). (Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Group, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/casts.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/casts.html"><span id="translatedtitle">When Your Child Needs a <span class="hlt">Cast</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... hard bandage that's usually made of material like fiberglass or plaster. <span class="hlt">Casts</span> keep bones in place while ... water. Plaster of Paris <span class="hlt">casts</span> are heavier than fiberglass <span class="hlt">casts</span> and don't hold up as well ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED326813.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED326813.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Urban American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Aging.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kramer, Josea</p> <p></p> <p>This document begins by dispelling several misperceptions about American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> that are especially pernicious to older American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> living in cities, and then goes on to discuss what is known about urban American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> elders and the implications for planning and service delivery for Area Agencies on Aging and contractor agencies. It notes</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED368516.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED368516.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Digest.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Russell, George</p> <p></p> <p>This guide provides a basic source of historical and contemporary <span class="hlt">Indian</span> information from an American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> perspective and includes study questions at the end of each section. The primary function of this guide is to be a quick-study reference handbook. Basic questions essential to understanding current problems and issues of American <span class="hlt">Indians</span></p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED500396.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED500396.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">National <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Harvey, Karen Kay</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This report includes information from the National <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education Study of American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>/Alaska Native students in grades 4 and 8 on the 2005 National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) in reading and mathematics. The national sample includes both public and private schools (i.e. Bureau of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs, Department of Defense Education…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED033816.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED033816.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Handbook on Wisconsin <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Erdman, Joyce M.</p> <p></p> <p>Due to the changing status of <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in Wisconsin, the 1966 handbook provides a new study of their present day situation. Leadership from among the <span class="hlt">Indians</span> has generated new interest in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> conditions. Although their economic position has not improved significantly, their psychological climate is now characterized by optimism. Questions of the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=James+AND+Fenimore+AND+Cooper&id=ED232809','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=James+AND+Fenimore+AND+Cooper&id=ED232809"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Children's Books.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gilliland, Hap</p> <p></p> <p>A bibliography of books about American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> provides annotations and evaluations by <span class="hlt">Indian</span> educators and others for each book, and indicates grade level, and whether the book would be recommended for <span class="hlt">Indian</span> children. Chapter 1 discusses organization of material and lists the evaluators. Chapter 2 addresses problems (inaccuracies, omission of</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21869467','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21869467"><span id="translatedtitle">Genetic admixture studies on four in situ evolved, two migrant and twenty-one ethnic populations of Tamil Nadu, <span class="hlt">south</span> India.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Suhasini, G; Sonaa, E; Shila, S; Srikumari, C R; Jayaraman, G; Ramesh, A</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>We analysed the genetic structure of ≈ 1000 samples representing 27 ethnic groups settled in Tamil Nadu, <span class="hlt">south</span> India, derived from two linguistic families (Dravidians and Indo-Europeans) representing four religious groups (Hinduism, Islam, Christianity and Jainism) using 11 mtDNA markers. Out of 27 ethnic groups, four are in situ populations (Anglo-<span class="hlt">Indian</span>, Labbai Muslim, Nadar Christian and <span class="hlt">south</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Jain) and two are migrants (Gypsy and north <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Jain) from north India to Tamil Nadu, and 21 are native ethnic groups. Six of the markers we used were monomorphic (HaeIII663, HpaI3592, AluI5176, AluI7025, AluI13262, 9-bp deletion) and five markers were polymorphic (DdeI10394, AluI10397, HinfI12308, HincII13259 and HaeIII16517). Haplogroup frequencies, genetic affinities and admixture analysis are based on the genotype data of polymorphic markers observed in these populations. Haplogroup frequencies indicate that various ethnic groups entered Tamil Nadu during different time periods. Genetic affinities and admixture estimates revealed that the ethnic groups possessing advanced knowledge of farming cluster in a branch (C), and could be the late arrived settlers as agriculture, was introduced to this region at about 5 to 3 thousand years ago. In situ ethnic groups appear to have arisen at various times as a result of the prevailing dominant socio-cultural forces. Hierarchical Hindu <span class="hlt">caste</span> system created many ethnic groups in the history of its existence; some of them became isolated for considerable period of time. Over all, among Tamil ethnic groups, in spite of <span class="hlt">caste</span> systems' rigidity, built in flexibility in the system in the form of hypergamy and hypogamy had allowed maternal gene flow between them. PMID:21869467</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=211445&keyword=%28%28%28%28%28+%22innovation+using+big+data+analysis%22+OR+%22data+mining%22+%29+OR+%22online+data+use+opportunities%22+%29+OR+%22online+user+data+trends%22+%29+OR+%22big+data+analysis%22+%29+OR+%22using+online+data+for+business%22+%29&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=61623469&CFTOKEN=71432039','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=211445&keyword=%28%28%28%28%28+%22innovation+using+big+data+analysis%22+OR+%22data+mining%22+%29+OR+%22online+data+use+opportunities%22+%29+OR+%22online+user+data+trends%22+%29+OR+%22big+data+analysis%22+%29+OR+%22using+online+data+for+business%22+%29&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=61623469&CFTOKEN=71432039"><span id="translatedtitle">Biotransformation and Tox<span class="hlt">Cast</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A major focus in toxicology research is the development of in vitro methods to predict in vivo chemical toxicity. Within the EPA Tox<span class="hlt">Cast</span> program, a broad range of in vitro biochemical and cellular assays have been deployed to profile the biological activity of 320 Tox<span class="hlt">Cast</span> Phase I...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Aluminum&pg=7&id=EJ226812','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Aluminum&pg=7&id=EJ226812"><span id="translatedtitle">Lost-Soap Aluminum <span class="hlt">Casting</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mihalow, Paula</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Lost-wax <span class="hlt">casting</span> in sterling silver is a costly experience for the average high school student. However, this jewelry process can be learned at no cost if scrap aluminum is used instead of silver, and soap bars are used instead of wax. This lost-soap aluminum <span class="hlt">casting</span> process is described. (Author/KC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Zinc&pg=3&id=EJ727927','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Zinc&pg=3&id=EJ727927"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> Freedom, 1860-1862</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Social Education, 2005</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Thomas Crawford, an American Sculptor, created the full-size figure of Freedom in clay. Molds were made, from which a full-size positive plaster model was <span class="hlt">cast</span> in five main sections. This model is on view today in the basement rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building. Clark Mills was a self-taught American sculptor with experience in <span class="hlt">casting</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7778250','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7778250"><span id="translatedtitle">An evaluation of fiberglass <span class="hlt">cast</span> application techniques.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wilson, D G; Vanderby, R</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Cylindrical <span class="hlt">casts</span> constructed from 2, 3, 4, and 5 inch widths of fiberglass <span class="hlt">casting</span> material were evaluated for strength in bending using an unstable fracture model. Five-inch <span class="hlt">casting</span> material produced the strongest <span class="hlt">casts</span>. The effect of longitudinal splinting with 2-inch fiberglass tape was evaluated in cylindrical <span class="hlt">casts</span> constructed from 4-inch tape. <span class="hlt">Casts</span> with splints on the compression side or with splints on both the tension and compression sides were stronger in bending than <span class="hlt">casts</span> with a single splint on the tension side or <span class="hlt">casts</span> without splints. PMID:7778250</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al0249.photos.002866p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al0249.photos.002866p/"><span id="translatedtitle">VIEW FROM THE <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span> OF THE #2 BLAST FURNACE AND ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>VIEW FROM THE <span class="hlt">SOUTH</span> OF THE #2 BLAST FURNACE AND <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> SEED ON THE LEFT, THE #1 BLAST FURNACE AND <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> SHED ON THE RIGHT, AND THE STOVES, BOILERS, AND AUXILIARY EQUIPMENT IN THE CENTER. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/pa3398.photos.359854p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/pa3398.photos.359854p/"><span id="translatedtitle">Slewing drive motor house on left; view <span class="hlt">south</span> base ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Slewing drive motor house on left; view <span class="hlt">south</span> - base <span class="hlt">casting</span> on right with structural details above portal level. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, 350-Ton Hammerhead Crane, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=prizes+AND+field&pg=3&id=EJ847848','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=prizes+AND+field&pg=3&id=EJ847848"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">South</span> Korea Powers Ahead with Globalization Plans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McNeill, David</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>For government officials in <span class="hlt">South</span> Korea, it's a vision worth savoring: Within the next decade, <span class="hlt">South</span> Korea becomes Southeast Asia's top higher-education destination, poaching thousands of Chinese, <span class="hlt">Indian</span>, and Japanese students from American universities and overtaking rivals Singapore, Malaysia, and Hong Kong. The higher-education system's…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=poaching&id=EJ847848','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=poaching&id=EJ847848"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">South</span> Korea Powers Ahead with Globalization Plans</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McNeill, David</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>For government officials in <span class="hlt">South</span> Korea, it's a vision worth savoring: Within the next decade, <span class="hlt">South</span> Korea becomes Southeast Asia's top higher-education destination, poaching thousands of Chinese, <span class="hlt">Indian</span>, and Japanese students from American universities and overtaking rivals Singapore, Malaysia, and Hong Kong. The higher-education system's</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24180757','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24180757"><span id="translatedtitle">Decadal trends in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean ambient sound.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L; Bradley, David L; Niu, Xiaoyue Maggie</p> <p>2013-11-01</p> <p>The increase of ocean noise documented in the North Pacific has sparked concern on whether the observed increases are a global or regional phenomenon. This work provides evidence of low frequency sound increases in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. A decade (2002-2012) of recordings made off the island of Diego Garcia, UK in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean was parsed into time series according to frequency band and sound level. Quarterly sound level comparisons between the first and last years were also performed. The combination of time series and temporal comparison analyses over multiple measurement parameters produced results beyond those obtainable from a single parameter analysis. The ocean sound floor has increased over the past decade in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Increases were most prominent in recordings made <span class="hlt">south</span> of Diego Garcia in the 85-105 Hz band. The highest sound level trends differed between the two sides of the island; the highest sound levels decreased in the north and increased in the <span class="hlt">south</span>. Rate, direction, and magnitude of changes among the multiple parameters supported interpretation of source functions driving the trends. The observed sound floor increases are consistent with concurrent increases in shipping, wind speed, wave height, and blue whale abundance in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. PMID:24180757</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MMTA...46.4848C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015MMTA...46.4848C"><span id="translatedtitle">Sixty Years of <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Research</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Campbell, John</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of <span class="hlt">casting</span> research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than <span class="hlt">casting</span> advances. It is suggested that true <span class="hlt">casting</span> advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of <span class="hlt">castings</span> developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base <span class="hlt">casting</span> industries still in denial that <span class="hlt">casting</span> defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still <span class="hlt">cast</span> poorly, and shaped <span class="hlt">casting</span> operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and <span class="hlt">cast</span> materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/516923','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/516923"><span id="translatedtitle">Strip <span class="hlt">casting</span> with fluxing agent applied to <span class="hlt">casting</span> roll</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.</p> <p>1997-07-29</p> <p>A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled <span class="hlt">casting</span> rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the <span class="hlt">casting</span> rolls with a powder flux material. The <span class="hlt">casting</span> rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the <span class="hlt">casting</span> roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/871066','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/871066"><span id="translatedtitle">Strip <span class="hlt">casting</span> with fluxing agent applied to <span class="hlt">casting</span> roll</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH); O'Malley, Ronald J. (Miamisburg, OH); Sussman, Richard C. (West Chester, OH)</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled <span class="hlt">casting</span> rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the <span class="hlt">casting</span> rolls with a powder flux material (56). The <span class="hlt">casting</span> rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the <span class="hlt">casting</span> roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/866721','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/866721"><span id="translatedtitle">Strip <span class="hlt">casting</span> apparatus and method</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Williams, Robert S. (Plum, PA); Baker, Donald F. (Hempfield, PA)</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>Strip <span class="hlt">casting</span> apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly <span class="hlt">cast</span> continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip <span class="hlt">casting</span> minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JOM....65f.720P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JOM....65f.720P"><span id="translatedtitle">Biomimetic Materials by Freeze <span class="hlt">Casting</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Porter, Michael M.; Mckittrick, Joanna; Meyers, Marc A.</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Natural materials, such as bone and abalone nacre, exhibit exceptional mechanical properties, a product of their intricate microstructural organization. Freeze <span class="hlt">casting</span> is a relatively simple, inexpensive, and adaptable materials processing method to form porous ceramic scaffolds with controllable microstructural features. After infiltration of a second polymeric phase, hybrid ceramic-polymer composites can be fabricated that closely resemble the architecture and mechanical performance of natural bone and nacre. Inspired by the narwhal tusk, magnetic fields applied during freeze <span class="hlt">casting</span> can be used to further control architectural alignment, resulting in freeze-<span class="hlt">cast</span> materials with enhanced mechanical properties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000393&hterms=Mold+moisture&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DMold%2Bmoisture','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000393&hterms=Mold+moisture&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DMold%2Bmoisture"><span id="translatedtitle">Pressure Rig for Repetitive <span class="hlt">Casting</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vasquez, P.; Hutto, W. R.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Equipment life increased by improved insulation. New design cuts time of preparation for <span class="hlt">casting</span> from several days to about 1 hour. Savings due to elimination of lengthy heating and drying operations associated with preparation of ceramic mold. Quality of <span class="hlt">casting</span> improved because moisture in cavity eliminated by use of insulating material, and more uniform pressure applied to process. Commercial blanket insulator protects components from heat, increasing life of pressure rig and enabling repeated use. Improved heat protection allows <span class="hlt">casting</span> of brass and other alloys with higher melting temperatures in pressure rig.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000598&hterms=ceramic+slip&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dceramic%2Bslip','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000598&hterms=ceramic+slip&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dceramic%2Bslip"><span id="translatedtitle">Slip-<span class="hlt">Cast</span> Superconductive Parts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Vasquez, Peter; Buck, Gregory M.; Hicks, Lana P.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Taylor, Theodore D.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Complex shapes fabricated without machining. Nonaqueous slip-<span class="hlt">casting</span> technique used to form complexly shaped parts from high-temperature superconductive materials like YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta). Such parts useful in motors, vibration dampers, and bearings. In process, organic solvent used as liquid medium. Ceramic molds made by lost-wax process used instead of plaster-of-paris molds, used in aqueous slip-<span class="hlt">casting</span> but impervious to organic solvents and cannot drain away liquid medium. Organic-solvent-based <span class="hlt">castings</span> do not stick to ceramic molds as they do to plaster molds.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23858244','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23858244"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indianization</span> of psychiatry utilizing <span class="hlt">Indian</span> mental concepts.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient <span class="hlt">Indian</span> system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> traditions and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these <span class="hlt">Indian</span> concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3705672','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3705672"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indianization</span> of psychiatry utilizing <span class="hlt">Indian</span> mental concepts</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient <span class="hlt">Indian</span> system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> traditions and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these <span class="hlt">Indian</span> concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1610678M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1610678M"><span id="translatedtitle">Deep Structure of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Continent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maurya, Satish; Montagner, Jean-paul; Kumar, Ravi; Kumar, Prakash; Burgos, Gael</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Indian</span> sub-continent experienced remarkable tectonic and geological events. Breakup of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent from the Gondwana supercontinent possibly due to a large plume, about 130 Myr ago. Paleomagnetic data demonstrates that the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> continent moved northwards from 65Myr at exceptionally high speeds (18-20cm/year) and subsequently slowed down to 4-5cm/year after its collision with Asia approx 40Myr ago. This super mobility has been explained by an unusually thin <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lithosphere (~100 km; Kumar et al., 2007) in contradiction with the thick lithosphere that commonly underlies old cratonic nuclei. It is pertinent to note that the thermobarometric estimates on the ultramafic xenoliths from a 65Myr kimberlites of the Central India (Babu et al. 2009) suggest an approximately 175 km thick lithosphere. Also, analysis of heat flow data and P-T estimates on mantle xenoliths from the Dharwar craton reveal low mantle heat flow, 14-20 mW m-2, that indicate a thick lithosphere beneath <span class="hlt">south</span> India (Roy and Mareschal, 2011). Upper mantle heterogeneities and depth localization of anisotropy structures beneath India are poorly known. In order to solve these issues, we have to follow a multidisciplinary approach to investigate the lithospheric and asthenospheric structure underneath the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> cratons and the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> plate. Seismological studies (receiver functions, SKS splitting, anisotropic and surface waves studies of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> continent) in conjunction with heat flow, petrological and paleomagnetic data planning to be utilized to image and interpret the 3D-tomographic velocity and anisotropic structure of the whole continent and trace its evolution through time. In this work, we present the high resolution phase velocity maps with azimuthal anisotropy of fundamental and higher mode surface waves propagating across India.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title21-vol8-sec880-6185.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title21-vol8-sec880-6185.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 880.6185 - <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover. 880.6185 Section 880.6185 Food and....6185 <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover. (a) Identification. A <span class="hlt">cast</span> cover is a device intended for medical purposes that is made of waterproof material and placed over a <span class="hlt">cast</span> to protect it from getting wet during a shower or...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title21-vol8-sec880-6185.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title21-vol8-sec880-6185.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 880.6185 - <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover. 880.6185 Section 880.6185 Food and....6185 <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover. (a) Identification. A <span class="hlt">cast</span> cover is a device intended for medical purposes that is made of waterproof material and placed over a <span class="hlt">cast</span> to protect it from getting wet during a shower or...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol8-sec888-5940.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol8-sec888-5940.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 888.5940 - <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices 888.5940 <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component. (a) Identification. A <span class="hlt">cast</span> component is a device intended for medical purposes to protect or support a <span class="hlt">cast</span>. This generic type of device...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title21-vol8-sec888-5940.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2011-title21-vol8-sec888-5940.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 888.5940 - <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices 888.5940 <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component. (a) Identification. A <span class="hlt">cast</span> component is a device intended for medical purposes to protect or support a <span class="hlt">cast</span>. This generic type of device...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title21-vol8-sec880-6185.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2010-title21-vol8-sec880-6185.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 880.6185 - <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover. 880.6185 Section 880.6185 Food and....6185 <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover. (a) Identification. A <span class="hlt">cast</span> cover is a device intended for medical purposes that is made of waterproof material and placed over a <span class="hlt">cast</span> to protect it from getting wet during a shower or...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol8-sec880-6185.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol8-sec880-6185.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 880.6185 - <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover. 880.6185 Section 880.6185 Food and....6185 <span class="hlt">Cast</span> cover. (a) Identification. A <span class="hlt">cast</span> cover is a device intended for medical purposes that is made of waterproof material and placed over a <span class="hlt">cast</span> to protect it from getting wet during a shower or...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title21-vol8-sec888-5940.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2013-title21-vol8-sec888-5940.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 888.5940 - <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices 888.5940 <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component. (a) Identification. A <span class="hlt">cast</span> component is a device intended for medical purposes to protect or support a <span class="hlt">cast</span>. This generic type of device...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title21-vol8-sec888-5940.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title21-vol8/pdf/CFR-2012-title21-vol8-sec888-5940.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 888.5940 - <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component. 888.5940 Section 888.5940 Food and... ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices 888.5940 <span class="hlt">Cast</span> component. (a) Identification. A <span class="hlt">cast</span> component is a device intended for medical purposes to protect or support a <span class="hlt">cast</span>. This generic type of device...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title14-vol1-sec23-621.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title14-vol1-sec23-621.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">14 CFR 23.621 - <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... part whose bearing factor is larger than the applicable <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor. (c) Critical <span class="hlt">castings</span>. For each... <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor of not less than 1.25 and receive 100 percent inspection by visual, radiographic, and... (ii) Have a <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor of not less than 2.0 and receive 100 percent visual inspection and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol1-sec23-621.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol1-sec23-621.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">14 CFR 23.621 - <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... part whose bearing factor is larger than the applicable <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor. (c) Critical <span class="hlt">castings</span>. For each... <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor of not less than 1.25 and receive 100 percent inspection by visual, radiographic, and... (ii) Have a <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor of not less than 2.0 and receive 100 percent visual inspection and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title14-vol1-sec23-621.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title14-vol1-sec23-621.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">14 CFR 23.621 - <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... part whose bearing factor is larger than the applicable <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor. (c) Critical <span class="hlt">castings</span>. For each... <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor of not less than 1.25 and receive 100 percent inspection by visual, radiographic, and... (ii) Have a <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor of not less than 2.0 and receive 100 percent visual inspection and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title14-vol1-sec23-621.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title14-vol1-sec23-621.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">14 CFR 23.621 - <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... part whose bearing factor is larger than the applicable <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor. (c) Critical <span class="hlt">castings</span>. For each... <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor of not less than 1.25 and receive 100 percent inspection by visual, radiographic, and... (ii) Have a <span class="hlt">casting</span> factor of not less than 2.0 and receive 100 percent visual inspection and...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7375970','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7375970"><span id="translatedtitle">Clinical experience with a new <span class="hlt">casting</span> tape.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fleming, L L; Miller, K; Sinback, M</p> <p>1980-05-01</p> <p>Between October 1977 and 1978, 93 Cutter<span class="hlt">Cast</span> <span class="hlt">casts</span> were applied at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. The composition and application of this new <span class="hlt">casting</span> system are described, and the performance of the 93 <span class="hlt">casts</span> is evaluated in relation to ease of application, roentgenographic clarity, skin condition, patient comfort, and ease of removal. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:7375970</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/645532','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/645532"><span id="translatedtitle">Investment <span class="hlt">casting</span> design of experiment. Final report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Owens, R.</p> <p>1997-10-01</p> <p>Specific steps in the investment <span class="hlt">casting</span> process were analyzed in a designed experiment. The <span class="hlt">casting`s</span> sensitivity to changes in these process steps was experimentally determined Dimensional and radiographic inspection were used to judge the sensitivity of the <span class="hlt">casting</span>. Thirty-six <span class="hlt">castings</span> of different pedigrees were poured and measured. Some of the dimensional inspection was conducted during the processing. It was confirmed that wax fixturing, number of gates, gate location, pour and mold temperature, pour speed, and cooling profile all affected the radiographic quality of the <span class="hlt">casting</span>. Gate and runner assembly techniques, number of gates, and mold temperature affect the dimensional quality of the <span class="hlt">casting</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000597&hterms=polystyrene&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpolystyrene','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930000597&hterms=polystyrene&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpolystyrene"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> Using A Polystyrene Pattern</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vasquez, Peter; Guenther, Bengamin; Vranas, Thomas; Veneris, Peter; Joyner, Michael</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>New technique for making metal aircraft models saves significant amount of time and effort in comparison with conventional lost-wax method. Produces inexpensive, effective wind-tunnel models. Metal wind-tunnel model <span class="hlt">cast</span> by use of polystyrene pattern.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997SPIE.3102..131M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997SPIE.3102..131M"><span id="translatedtitle">Moldless <span class="hlt">casting</span> by laser</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>McLean, Marc A.; Shannon, G. J.; Steen, William M.</p> <p>1997-09-01</p> <p>The principle of laser cladding involves the use of high power carbon-dioxide lasers and powder deposition technology to provide wear and corrosion resistant surface coatings to engineering components. By injecting metal powder into a laser generated melt pool on a moving substrate a solidified metal track can be produced. Deposition of successive tracks produces a multi-layer build. Laser direct <span class="hlt">casting</span> (LDC) utilizes a coaxial nozzle enabling consistent omnidirectional deposition to produce 3D components from a selection of metal powders. The influence of the principal process parameters over the process features namely, powder catchment efficiency, beam shape and build rates are presented with several successfully generated 3D components. Nickel, stainless steel and satellite powders were deposited at laser powders of 0.4 to 1.4 kW and speeds of 500 to 1000 mm/min achieving build rates of 3 to 9 mm3/s. Fully dense metallurgical structures have been produced with no cracking or porosity and powder catchment efficiencies up to 85% have been achieved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Mythology+AND+Religion&pg=2&id=ED220446','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Mythology+AND+Religion&pg=2&id=ED220446"><span id="translatedtitle">Native Peoples: Department of Education Resources pertaining to <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, Inuit, and Metis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.</p> <p></p> <p>This revised edition of Native Peoples was prepared to provide information for teachers, librarians, and others interested in materials about North American <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, Inuit, and Metis. It also includes an appendix of resources relevant to Central and <span class="hlt">South</span> American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> cultures. Annotated citations of reading materials are provided as well as…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=alcohol+AND+culture&pg=7&id=EJ675295','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=alcohol+AND+culture&pg=7&id=EJ675295"><span id="translatedtitle">The Implications of Cultural Orientation for Substance Use among American <span class="hlt">Indians</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Herman-Stahl, Mindy; Spencer, Donna L.; Duncan, Jessica E.</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>A study examining the links between cultural orientation and substance use surveyed 2,449 American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> from 9 <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota reservations. After controlling for age, gender, education, and employment, biculturalism and low orientation to American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> culture were associated with higher levels of alcohol abuse but were not correlated with drug</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rapid+AND+city&id=EJ767439','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rapid+AND+city&id=EJ767439"><span id="translatedtitle">American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in the News: A Media Portrayal in Crime Articles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Freng, Adrienne</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this exploratory research is to investigate the identification of American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in crime articles in two <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota newspapers. This article seeks to expand the current literature by addressing the dearth of research regarding whether American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> are differentially identified by race/ethnicity in crime accounts. In</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rapid+AND+city&id=EJ654459','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=rapid+AND+city&id=EJ654459"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Culture Strives To Survive: Youth Workers Tie History, Language to Life Lessons for Urban Kids.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kelly, John</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Urban American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> lack access to tribal services and traditional cultures. Youth programs for urban American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in Rapid City, <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota; Phoenix, Arizona; Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Lincoln, Nebraska are described. Substance abuse, dropping out, physical fitness, health, and self-esteem issues are addressed through Native language,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cosmos&pg=4&id=EJ188189','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=cosmos&pg=4&id=EJ188189"><span id="translatedtitle">The American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>: A Natural Philosopher</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bunge, Robert P.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>Describes American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> philosophy, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> attitudes on man's place in the cosmos, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> socio-political practice, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> moral values and community philosophy, and the differences between "white" and <span class="hlt">Indian</span> culture. (RK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=asian+AND+women+AND+roles&id=EJ925145','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=asian+AND+women+AND+roles&id=EJ925145"><span id="translatedtitle">"Education Makes You Have More Say in the Way Your Life Goes": <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Women and Arranged Marriages in the United Kingdom</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bhopal, Kalwant</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women's views on arranged marriages in the United Kingdom. It is based on research carried out with 32 <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women studying at a university in the <span class="hlt">South</span> East of England, UK. The article draws on Wenger's social theory of learning to explore how <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women's participation in communities of practice in higher education</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004cxo..pres....9.','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004cxo..pres....9."><span id="translatedtitle">Titan <span class="hlt">Casts</span> Revealing Shadow</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow <span class="hlt">cast</span> by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow <span class="hlt">cast</span> by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow <span class="hlt">cast</span> by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in diameter, which corresponds to the size of a dime as viewed from about two and a half miles. Illustration of Crab, Titan's Shadow and Chandra Illustration of Crab, Titan's Shadow and Chandra Unlike almost all of Chandra's images which are made by focusing X-ray emission from cosmic sources, Titan's X-ray shadow image was produced in a manner similar to a medical X-ray. That is, an X-ray source (the Crab Nebula) is used to make a shadow image (Titan and its atmosphere) that is recorded on film (Chandra's ACIS detector). Titan's atmosphere, which is about 95% nitrogen and 5% methane, has a pressure near the surface that is one and a half times the Earth's sea level pressure. Voyager I spacecraft measured the structure of Titan's atmosphere at heights below about 300 miles (500 kilometers), and above 600 miles (1000 kilometers). Until the Chandra observations, however, no measurements existed at heights in the range between 300 and 600 miles. Understanding the extent of Titan's atmosphere is important for the planners of the Cassini-Huygens mission. The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft will reach Saturn in July of this year to begin a four-year tour of Saturn, its rings and its moons. The tour will include close flybys of Titan that will take Cassini as close as 600 miles, and the launching of the Huygens probe that will land on Titan's surface. Chandra's X-ray Shadow of Titan Chandra's X-ray Shadow of Titan "If Titan's atmosphere has really expanded, the trajectory may have to be changed." said Tsunemi. The paper on these results has been accepted and is expected to appear in a June 2004 issue of The Astrophysical Journal. Other members of the research team were Haroyoski Katayama (Osaka University), David Burrows and Gordon Garmine (Penn State University), and Albert Metzger (JPL). Chandra observed Titan from 9:04 to 18:46 UT on January 5, 2003, using its Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer instrument. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington. Northrop Grumman of Redondo Beach, Calif., formerly TRW, Inc., was the prime development contractor for the observatory. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass. Additional information and images are available at: http://chandra.harvard.edu and http://chandra.nasa.gov</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70013641','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70013641"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> HEAVEN ROADLESS AREA, WASHINGTON.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Church, S.E.; Barnes, D.J.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mining activity surveys the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Heaven Roadless Area, Washington offers little promise for the occurrence of metallic or nonmetallic mineral resources. Preliminary investigations of the geothermal potential of the area are inconclusive; however, a hot spring is located approximately 10 mi <span class="hlt">south</span> of the roadless area, and the data indicate an aquifer of unknown extent at a temperature of less than 212 degree F. Geothermal lease applications were filed on about 23. 5 sq mi of the roadless area indicating potential interest in the development of a geothermal resource. In addition, about 39 sq mi of the roadless area have been leased for oil and gas exploration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6968542','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6968542"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Heaven Roadless Area, Washington</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Church, S.E.; Barnes, D.J.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mining activity surveys in 1981, the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Heaven Roadless Area offers little promise for the occurrence of metallic or nonmetallic mineral resources. Preliminary investigations of the geothermal potential of the area are inconclusive; however, a hot spring is located approximately 10 mi <span class="hlt">south</span> of the roadless area, and the data indicate an aquifer of unknown extent at a temperature of less than 212/sup 0/F. Geothermal lease applications were filed on about 23.5 sq mi of the roadless area in 1982 indicating potential interest in the development of a geothermal resource. In addition, about 39 sq mi of the roadless area have been leased for oil and gas exploration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.1615K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015EGUGA..17.1615K"><span id="translatedtitle">Warm <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, Weak Asian Monsoon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Koll Roxy, Mathew; Ritika, Kapoor; Terray, Pascal; Murtugudde, Raghu; Ashok, Karumuri; Nath Goswami, Buphendra</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>There are large uncertainties looming over the status and fate of the <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian monsoon in a changing climate. Observations and climate models have suggested that anthropogenic warming in the past century has increased the moisture availability and the land-sea thermal contrast in the tropics, favoring an increase in monsoon rainfall. In contrast, we notice that <span class="hlt">South</span> Asian subcontinent experienced a relatively subdued warming during this period. At the same time, the tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean experienced a nearly monotonic warming, at a rate faster than the other tropical oceans. Using long-term observations and coupled model experiments, we suggest that the enhanced <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean warming along with the suppressed warming of the subcontinent weaken the land-sea thermal contrast throughout the troposphere, dampen the monsoon Hadley circulation, and reduce the rainfall over <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia. As a result, the summer monsoon rainfall during 1901-2012 shows a significant weakening trend over <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia, extending from Pakistan through central India to Bangladesh.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRD..116.1107C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JGRD..116.1107C"><span id="translatedtitle">The role of air-sea interaction over the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean in the in-phase transition from the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> summer monsoon to the Australian boreal winter monsoon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Eun-Chul; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Hong, Song-You; Wu, Renguang</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) can affect the regional climate in the surrounding regions, including the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> summer monsoon (ISM) and the Australian summer monsoon (ASM) variability. Recently, it was demonstrated that the in-phase ISM-to-ASM transition can be accomplished through monsoon-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean interaction solely. To investigate this issue, a long-term simulation of a hybrid coupled model (HCM) is conducted, in which the atmospheric general circulation model is coupled with a slab ocean model in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean only. Air-sea interactions are allowed only in the tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, and the climatological sea surface temperature is specified outside the tropical <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Results from the idealized simulation indicate that the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean SST itself can induce in-phase ISM-to-ASM transitions. A wet ISM is largely associated with cool SST in the tropical <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean in summer. A wet ASM is also associated with cool SST anomalies in summer. These cool SST anomalies persist until fall and lead to anomalous downward flows over the center of the tropical <span class="hlt">South</span> <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. Consequently, anomalous low-level convergences dominates over northern Australia until winter, which induces a wet ASM.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=success+AND+factors+AND+acculturation&pg=5&id=ED166334','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=success+AND+factors+AND+acculturation&pg=5&id=ED166334"><span id="translatedtitle">The (East) <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Woman.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Naidoo, Josephine</p> <p></p> <p>The focus of this paper is on the social, cultural, and psychological problems women of East <span class="hlt">Indian</span> origin share with other immigrant women in Canada. Also examined are problems that are unique to the East <span class="hlt">Indian</span> woman and the ways in which she deals with the challenges, conflicting cultural values, and expectations that confront her. The</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Pima+AND+Indians&id=ED059816','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Pima+AND+Indians&id=ED059816"><span id="translatedtitle">Pima <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Legends.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shaw, Anna Moore</p> <p></p> <p>The stated purpose of this book is to preserve in writing some of the Pima <span class="hlt">Indian</span> legends that had been verbally passed from generation to generation in the past. This collection of 23 legends, which were originally used to instruct the young people of the tribe, presents in story form various aspects of American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> life--including</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Phoenix+AND+AZ&pg=5&id=ED189764','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Phoenix+AND+AZ&pg=5&id=ED189764"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Child Welfare Program.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jewish Family and Children's Service, Phoenix, AZ.</p> <p></p> <p>The <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Child Welfare Program of the Jewish Family and Children's Service of Phoenix, Arizona is described. Section I provides a description of the program's organizational structure and purposes, which include adoption services, foster care and social work, a residential group home for adolescent <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women, and a training and consultation</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pottery&pg=5&id=EJ100001','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=pottery&pg=5&id=EJ100001"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Inuit Pottery '73</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tawow, 1974</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>A unique exhibit of Canadian Native Ceramics which began touring various art galleries in September 1973 is described both verbally and photographically. The <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Inuit Pottery '73 display, part of the 1973 International Ceramics Exhibition, includes 110 samples of craftsmanship from <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Inuit artists across Canada. (KM)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=american+AND+history&pg=5&id=EJ818465','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=american+AND+history&pg=5&id=EJ818465"><span id="translatedtitle">Writing American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> History</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Noley, Grayson B.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this paper is to critique the manner in which history about American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> has been written and propose a rationale for the rethinking of what we know about this subject. In particular, histories of education as regards the participation of American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> is a subject that has been given scant attention over the years and when</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED125812.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED125812.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indians</span> of Arizona.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.</p> <p></p> <p>Briefly describing each tribe within Arizona's four major American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> groups, this handbook presents information relative to the cultural background and socioeconomic development of the following tribes: (1) Athapascan Tribes (Navajos and Apaches); (2) Pueblo <span class="hlt">Indians</span> (Hopis); (3) Desert Rancheria Tribes (Pimas, Yumas, Papagos, Maricopas,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/801749','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/801749"><span id="translatedtitle">Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel <span class="hlt">Castings</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday</p> <p>2002-07-30</p> <p>The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or <span class="hlt">cast</span> iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall <span class="hlt">cast</span> steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall <span class="hlt">casting</span> techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall <span class="hlt">castings</span> from traditional gravity poured sand <span class="hlt">casting</span> processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel <span class="hlt">castings</span>. These variables include <span class="hlt">casting</span> design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on <span class="hlt">casting</span> fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the <span class="hlt">casting</span> increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting <span class="hlt">casting</span> fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production <span class="hlt">castings</span>. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall <span class="hlt">casting</span> fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker <span class="hlt">castings</span>, but they do not enhance thin-wall <span class="hlt">casting</span> fill.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14518627','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14518627"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Cast</span> adrift: Gortex <span class="hlt">cast</span> liners allow greater patient activity.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dubowitz, Gerald; Miller, Deborah M</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Extremity fractures are a common injury, with nearly 1.5 million cases reported in the United States in 1998. Treatment often involves lengthy periods of immobilization. This report outlines the use of a Gortex <span class="hlt">cast</span> liner by a subject who was able to engage in swimming and scuba diving during the healing process. We report that a Gortex <span class="hlt">cast</span> liner may be considered for an active patient who is keen to return to limited activities during fracture healing. Apparently because of a lack of knowledge of their existence, physicians currently are underutilizing this method of <span class="hlt">casting</span> in active patients. The use of Gortex liners elsewhere has been reported to have higher patient and physician satisfaction in both use and performance, with no reported detrimental effects on outcome. PMID:14518627</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IEITI..91.1135M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IEITI..91.1135M"><span id="translatedtitle">Instant <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Movie Theater: The Future <span class="hlt">Cast</span> System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Maejima, Akinobu; Wemler, Shuhei; Machida, Tamotsu; Takebayashi, Masao; Morishima, Shigeo</p> <p></p> <p>We have developed a visual entertainment system called “Future Cast” which enables anyone to easily participate in a pre-recorded or pre-created film as an instant CG movie star. This system provides audiences with the amazing opportunity to join the <span class="hlt">cast</span> of a movie in real-time. The Future <span class="hlt">Cast</span> System can automatically perform all the processes required to make this possible, from capturing participants' facial characteristics to rendering them into the movie. Our system can also be applied to any movie created using the same production process. We conducted our first experimental trial demonstration of the Future <span class="hlt">Cast</span> System at the Mitsui-Toshiba pavilion at the 2005 World Exposition in Aichi Japan.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol23/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol23-sec147-2101.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol23/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol23-sec147-2101.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 147.2101 - EPA-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells and all wells on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota 147.2101 EPA-administered programClass I, III, IV and V..., including those on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands, and for Class II wells on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands in the state of <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146,...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol24-sec147-2101.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol24-sec147-2101.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 147.2101 - EPA-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells and all wells on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota 147.2101 EPA-administered programClass I, III, IV and V..., including those on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands, and for Class II wells on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands in the state of <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol23/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol23-sec147-2101.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol23/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol23-sec147-2101.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 147.2101 - EPA-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells and all wells on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota 147.2101 EPA-administered programClass I, III, IV and V..., including those on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands, and for Class II wells on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands in the state of <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol24-sec147-2101.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol24/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol24-sec147-2101.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 147.2101 - EPA-administered program-Class I, III, IV and V wells and all wells on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota 147.2101 EPA-administered programClass I, III, IV and V..., including those on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands, and for Class II wells on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands in the state of <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota is administered by EPA. This program consists of the UIC program requirements of 40 CFR parts 124, 144, 146,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740019894&hterms=alloy+magnesium&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dalloy%2Bmagnesium','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740019894&hterms=alloy+magnesium&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dalloy%2Bmagnesium"><span id="translatedtitle">Magnesium-lithium <span class="hlt">casting</span> alloys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Latenko, V. P.; Silchenko, T. V.; Tikhonov, V. A.; Maltsev, V. P.; Korablin, V. P.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>The strength properties of magnesium-lithium alloys at room, low, and high temperatures are investigated. It is found that the alloys may have practical application at ambient temperatures up to 100 C, that negative temperatures have a favorable influence on the alloy strength, and that cyclic temperature variations have practically no effect on the strength characteristics. The influence of chemical coatings on corrosion resistance of the MgLi alloys is examined. Several facilities based on pressure <span class="hlt">casting</span> machines, low-pressure <span class="hlt">casting</span> machines, and magnetodynamic pumps were designed for producing MgLi alloy <span class="hlt">castings</span>. Results were obtained for MgLi alloys reinforced with fibers having a volumetric content of 15%.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/822409','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/822409"><span id="translatedtitle">Energy Consumption of Die <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Operations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley</p> <p>2004-03-15</p> <p>Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-<span class="hlt">cast</span> products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for <span class="hlt">casting</span>. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-<span class="hlt">casting</span> operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-<span class="hlt">casting</span> facility include geographic location, alloy(s) <span class="hlt">cast</span>, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, <span class="hlt">casting</span> yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-<span class="hlt">casting</span> form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, <span class="hlt">casting</span> yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-<span class="hlt">casting</span> machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the <span class="hlt">casting</span> quality and productivity of a die-<span class="hlt">casting</span> enterprise. In a die-<span class="hlt">casting</span> enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-<span class="hlt">casting</span> enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Wounded+AND+Knee&pg=3&id=ED123018','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Wounded+AND+Knee&pg=3&id=ED123018"><span id="translatedtitle">Sitting Bull, The Story of an American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Knoop, Faith Yingling</p> <p></p> <p>Sitting Bull was a complex man, living in complicated times. A Hunkpapa Sioux, he grew up on the Great Plains of <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota. His early years, as described in this biography, were taken up with the hunt, forays against Crow <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, and his development as a warrior and leader through the Vision Quest and Sun Dance. A man of considerable talents,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=burial&pg=5&id=ED427920','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=burial&pg=5&id=ED427920"><span id="translatedtitle">Boarding School Seasons: American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Families, 1900-1940.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Child, Brenda J.</p> <p></p> <p>This book draws on hundreds of letters by students, parents, and school officials to explore American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>, specifically Ojibwa, perspectives of the boarding school experience in the period from 1900-1940. The three institutions studied are Haskell Institute (Kansas), Flandreau School (<span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota), and Pipestone School (Minnesota). Chapter 1…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Woodland&pg=7&id=ED099149','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Woodland&pg=7&id=ED099149"><span id="translatedtitle">A Teacher's Guide To: <span class="hlt">Indians</span> and the Outdoor Classroom.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Schumacher, C. M.</p> <p></p> <p>As a basic teacher's guide to the study of plants in their environment, this document serves primarily as a starting point for outdoor education with an American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> emphasis in the State of <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota. The State is divided into three broad environmental categories or "biotic communities" (Prairie and Plains, Woodlands, and Wet Places); lists</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=white+AND+mountains&pg=7&id=ED123019','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=white+AND+mountains&pg=7&id=ED123019"><span id="translatedtitle">Crazy Horse, The Story of an American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Milton, John R.</p> <p></p> <p>A great monument is being blasted out of Thunderhead Mountain near Mount Rushmore in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota. Slowly, Chief Crazy Horse emerges from the stone. One day he will sit on his <span class="hlt">Indian</span> pony pointing over the Black Hills as though saying, "My lands are where my dead lie buried." This biography of Crazy Horse begins with sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski's…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Mount+AND+Rushmore&id=ED123019','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Mount+AND+Rushmore&id=ED123019"><span id="translatedtitle">Crazy Horse, The Story of an American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Milton, John R.</p> <p></p> <p>A great monument is being blasted out of Thunderhead Mountain near Mount Rushmore in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota. Slowly, Chief Crazy Horse emerges from the stone. One day he will sit on his <span class="hlt">Indian</span> pony pointing over the Black Hills as though saying, "My lands are where my dead lie buried." This biography of Crazy Horse begins with sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski's</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Season+AND+Report&pg=7&id=ED427920','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Season+AND+Report&pg=7&id=ED427920"><span id="translatedtitle">Boarding School Seasons: American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Families, 1900-1940.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Child, Brenda J.</p> <p></p> <p>This book draws on hundreds of letters by students, parents, and school officials to explore American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>, specifically Ojibwa, perspectives of the boarding school experience in the period from 1900-1940. The three institutions studied are Haskell Institute (Kansas), Flandreau School (<span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota), and Pipestone School (Minnesota). Chapter 1</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED165945.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED165945.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Career Education and the American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>. Fall 1976.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>South Dakota Univ., Vermillion. School of Education.</p> <p></p> <p>These materials are for use in the instruction on current occupations existing on the Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Sisseton, Lower Brule, Crow Creek, Flandreau, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, and Yankton Sioux <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservations in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota. Objectives of the materials are to help learners identify the geographical locations of each of the nine Sioux</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_2','SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS'); return false;" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_2"><span id="translatedtitle">Wetland Vegetation at Dorman Slough, Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, SD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>View of wetland vegetation (distant) and food plot (right) at Dorman Slough. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe using g...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_6','SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS'); return false;" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_6"><span id="translatedtitle">Vegetation at Dorman Slough, Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, SD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>View of wetland vegetation (right) and food plot (left) at Dorman Slough. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe using grou...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_12','SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS'); return false;" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_12"><span id="translatedtitle">North Potter Slough, Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, SD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>View of North Potter Slough showing dense stand of curly dock, with muskrat huts and cattail stand in the background. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Rocky+AND+River&id=ED249016','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Rocky+AND+River&id=ED249016"><span id="translatedtitle">Little Blaze and the Buffalo Jump. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Culture Series.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Roop, Peter</p> <p></p> <p>The reader is one in a series of stories of the Blackfeet <span class="hlt">Indians</span> which take place when the people were at the height of their power, hunting buffalo north to the North Saskatchewan River, <span class="hlt">south</span> to the Yellowstone River, east to the Montana-North Dakota border, and west to the Rocky Mountains. The story is about Little Blaze, a young Blackfeet</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.A31F0158F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AGUFM.A31F0158F"><span id="translatedtitle">Potential Change in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Monsoon Circulation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Funk, C. C.; Williams, A. P.; Mishra, V.; Barlow, M. A.; Hoerling, M. P.; Hoell, A.</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>In India and East Africa more than 350 million people face chronic undernourishment; population growth alone could bring this number to 500 million by 2030. Below normal rains have become more frequent as falling water tables, land degradation, warmer air temperatures, and rising fuel and fertilizer costs limit crop production growth. The <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and East African boreal summer monsoons rely on large moisture transports from the southern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (SIO, 55-90E, 0-15S) and a low pressure cell over the north <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean (NIO, 55-90E, 0-15N). The relatively cloud free NIO warm pool receives a large excess of solar radiation, which the ocean transports <span class="hlt">south</span> across the equator. While many factors influence this system, we present here observations and climate simulations linking preferential SIO-versus-NIO warming, evaporation and precipitation changes to weaker monsoon winds, weaker northward moisture transports, and warmer and drier weather in India and East Africa. Observations show that increasing SIO sea surface temperatures (SSTs) below rapid surface winds provide an 'evaporative window' (Fig. 1) that transfers energy and moisture to the atmosphere, increasing SIO rainfall. Climate simulations driven with i) observed SSTs and ii) mid-tropospheric SIO heating associate increased SIO rainfall with lower NIO rainfall. Given the empirical relationships between increasing SIO rainfall and reduced summer monsoon rains, continued warming in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean could lead to more frequent droughts in India, and perhaps, East Africa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=revenge&pg=6&id=EJ402979','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=revenge&pg=6&id=EJ402979"><span id="translatedtitle">Storytelling the American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Way.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Trafzer, Clifford E.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Describes the storytelling program at the Department of American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Studies, San Diego State University, which has involved <span class="hlt">Indian</span> elders and storytellers, students, and both <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> children and adults from the local community. Includes a Wyandot tale that warns against jealousy, bitterness, and revenge. (SV)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED129509.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED129509.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">An <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education Resources Center.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Benham, William J.</p> <p></p> <p>An <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education Resources Center has been established in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to improve educational opportunities for American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> students. Part of the Bureau of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs' Central Office of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education Program, the center was established after a thorough review of the Bureau's Central Office education operations revealed a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=loon&pg=4&id=ED113089','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=loon&pg=4&id=ED113089"><span id="translatedtitle">Federal Financing of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Loon, Eric Van</p> <p></p> <p>Since over 200 million Federal dollars are disbursed annually for American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> education under Bureau of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs (BIA), Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I, <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education Act Title IV, and Johnson O'Malley programs, it is difficult to understand the dismal state of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> education. However, factors contributing to abuse of</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770003271','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770003271"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> propellant in rocket engine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Roach, J. E.; Froehling, S. C. (Inventor)</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>A method is described for <span class="hlt">casting</span> a solid propellant in the casing of a rocket engine having a continuous wall with a single opening which is formed by leaves of a material which melt at a temperature of the propellant and with curved edges concentric to the curvature of the spherical casing. The leaves are inserted into the spherical casing through the opening forming a core having a greater width than the width of the single opening and with curved peripheral edges. The <span class="hlt">cast</span> propellant forms a solid mass and then heated to melt the leaves and provide a central opening with radial projecting flutes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046438p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046438p/"><span id="translatedtitle">INTERIOR VIEW WITH <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE COOLING A 20' IRON PIPE ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>INTERIOR VIEW WITH <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE COOLING A 20' IRON PIPE PRIOR TO EXTRACTION FROM <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE. - McWane <span class="hlt">Cast</span> Iron Pipe Company, Pipe <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046435p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046435p/"><span id="translatedtitle">INTERIOR VIEW WITH <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE AND A 4" DUCTILE IRON ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>INTERIOR VIEW WITH <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE AND A 4" DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING EXTRACTED FROM <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE - McWane <span class="hlt">Cast</span> Iron Pipe Company, Pipe <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046436p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046436p/"><span id="translatedtitle">INTERIOR VIEW OF <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE WITH 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>INTERIOR VIEW OF <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE WITH 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING WEIGHED ON SCALES AT <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE. - McWane <span class="hlt">Cast</span> Iron Pipe Company, Pipe <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046432p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046432p/"><span id="translatedtitle">INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, WITH <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> SUPERINTENDENT OVERSEEING TRANSFER OF ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING NORTH, WITH <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> SUPERINTENDENT OVERSEEING TRANSFER OF MOLTEN METAL TO A <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE. - McWane <span class="hlt">Cast</span> Iron Pipe Company, Pipe <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046434p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1093.photos.046434p/"><span id="translatedtitle">INTERIOR VIEW WITH <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>INTERIOR VIEW WITH <span class="hlt">CASTING</span> MACHINE AND A 4' DUCTILE IRON PIPE BEING CENTRIFUGALLY <span class="hlt">CAST</span>, AS OPERATOR WATCHES TO ENSURE QUALITY. - McWane <span class="hlt">Cast</span> Iron Pipe Company, Pipe <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3705691','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3705691"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> concepts on sexuality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique <span class="hlt">Indian</span> sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/bones/casts.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/bones/casts.html"><span id="translatedtitle">When Your Child Needs a <span class="hlt">Cast</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Questions About <span class="hlt">Casts</span> Growth Plate Injuries Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains Broken Bones Going to a Physical Therapist Word! <span class="hlt">Cast</span> Strains and Sprains Are a Pain The Facts About Broken Bones ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title25-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title25-vol2-sec502-12.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title25-vol2/pdf/CFR-2010-title25-vol2-sec502-12.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">25 CFR 502.12 - <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 25 <span class="hlt">Indians</span> 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 <span class="hlt">Indians</span> NATIONAL <span class="hlt">INDIAN</span> GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER 502.12 <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an <span class="hlt">Indian</span> reservation; or (b)...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/979766','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/979766"><span id="translatedtitle">New fibreglass <span class="hlt">casting</span> system in orthopaedic practice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Davis, B; Dooley, B</p> <p>1976-06-26</p> <p>The composition, manufacture and application of a new fibreglass <span class="hlt">casting</span> system for use in orthopaedic practice are described. The performance of the first 51 fibreglass <span class="hlt">casts</span> used in routine fracture work is reviewed. The advantages (the <span class="hlt">cast</span> is waterprof, extremely light and strong) and the disadvantages (an ultraviolet light source is required to cure the <span class="hlt">cast</span> and the fiberglass tape is rather expensive) are evaluated. PMID:979766</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol1-sec29-621.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol1-sec29-621.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">14 CFR 29.621 - <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors. 29.621 Section 29.621... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General 29.621 <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors. (a... approved specifications. Paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section apply to structural <span class="hlt">castings</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=casting&pg=3&id=EJ630252','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=casting&pg=3&id=EJ630252"><span id="translatedtitle">The Ins and Outs of Relief <span class="hlt">Casting</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Greene, Yvonne</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>Describes a unit on clay <span class="hlt">casting</span> that introduces students to relief sculpture. The unit takes three 45 to 50 minute class periods three weeks apart. Discusses each class session in detail: (1) creating the <span class="hlt">casting</span>; (2) turning out and rinsing the <span class="hlt">casting</span>; and (3) enriching the surface with color. (CMK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol1-sec27-621.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol1-sec27-621.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">14 CFR 27.621 - <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors. 27.621 Section 27.621... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction General 27.621 <span class="hlt">Casting</span> factors. (a) General... approved specifications. Paragraphs (c) and (d) of this section apply to structural <span class="hlt">castings</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/2137','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/2137"><span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of Microporosity in Shrouded Impeller <span class="hlt">Castings</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Viswanathan, S. Nelson, C.D.</p> <p>1998-09-01</p> <p>The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Morris Bean and Company was to link computer models of heat and fluid flow with previously developed quality criteria for the prediction of microporosity in a Al-4.5% Cu alloy shrouded impeller <span class="hlt">casting</span>. The results may be used to analyze the <span class="hlt">casting</span> process design for the commercial production of 206 o alloy shrouded impeller <span class="hlt">castings</span>. Test impeller <span class="hlt">castings</span> were poured in the laboratory for the purpose of obtaining thermal data and porosity distributions. Also, a simulation of the test impeller <span class="hlt">casting</span> was conducted and the results validated with porosity measurements on the test <span class="hlt">castings</span>. A comparison of the predicted and measured microporosity distributions indicated an excellent correlation between experiments and prediction. The results of the experimental and modeling studies undertaken in this project indicate that the quality criteria developed for the prediction of microporosity in Al-4.5% Cu alloy <span class="hlt">castings</span> can accurately predict regions of elevated microporosity even in complex <span class="hlt">castings</span> such as the shrouded impeller <span class="hlt">casting</span>. Accordingly, it should be possible to use quality criteria for porosity prediction in conjunction with computer models of heat and fluid flow to optimize the <span class="hlt">casting</span> process for the production of shrouded impeller <span class="hlt">castings</span>. Since high levels of microporosity may be expected to result in poor fatigue properties, <span class="hlt">casting</span> designs that are optimized for low levels of microporosity should exhibit superior fatigue life.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/946584','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/946584"><span id="translatedtitle">Tape <span class="hlt">casting</span> of magnesium oxide.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ayala, Alicia; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Reiterer, Markus; Shah, Raja A.</p> <p>2008-02-01</p> <p>A tape <span class="hlt">casting</span> procedure for fabricating ceramic magnesium oxide tapes has been developed as a method to produce flat sheets of sintered MgO that are thin and porous. Thickness of single layer tapes is in the range of 200-400 {micro}m with corresponding surface roughness values in the range of 10-20 {micro}m as measured by laser profilometry. Development of the tape <span class="hlt">casting</span> technique required optimization of pretreatment for the starting magnesium oxide (MgO) powder as well as a detailed study of the <span class="hlt">casting</span> slurry preparation and subsequent heat treatments for sintering and final tape flattening. Milling time of the ceramic powder, plasticizer, and binder mixture was identified as a primary factor affecting surface morphology of the tapes. In general, longer milling times resulted in green tapes with a noticeably smoother surface. This work demonstrates that meticulous control of the entire tape <span class="hlt">casting</span> operation is necessary to obtain high-quality MgO tapes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/790580','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/790580"><span id="translatedtitle">Advanced Lost Foam <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah</p> <p>2000-11-30</p> <p>This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: <span class="hlt">Casting</span> Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=48696&keyword=acid+AND+sludge&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58491309&CFTOKEN=91544103','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=48696&keyword=acid+AND+sludge&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=58491309&CFTOKEN=91544103"><span id="translatedtitle">ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF IRON <span class="hlt">CASTING</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Sampling of ductile iron <span class="hlt">casting</span> in green sand molds with phenolic isocyanate cores and in phenol-formaldehyde bound shell molds did not provide definitive proof that environmentally hazardous organic emission occur. Both molding systems produced the same type of major emissions,...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000633&hterms=cerium&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dcerium','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19860000633&hterms=cerium&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dcerium"><span id="translatedtitle">Graphite Formation in <span class="hlt">Cast</span> Iron</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stefanescu, D. M.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial <span class="hlt">cast</span> iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite <span class="hlt">cast</span> irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite <span class="hlt">cast</span> irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of <span class="hlt">cast</span> iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=198212&keyword=animal+AND+interaction&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=50580227&CFTOKEN=46773026','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=198212&keyword=animal+AND+interaction&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=50580227&CFTOKEN=46773026"><span id="translatedtitle">Overview of Tox<span class="hlt">Cast</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>In 2007, EPA launched Tox<span class="hlt">Cast</span> in order to develop a cost-effective approach for prioritizing the toxicity testing of large numbers of chemicals in a short period of time. Using data from state-of-the-art high throughput screening (HTS) bioassays developed in the pharmaceutical i...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6823430','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6823430"><span id="translatedtitle">The fractography of <span class="hlt">casting</span> alloys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Powell, G.W. )</p> <p>1994-10-01</p> <p>Several types of <span class="hlt">casting</span> alloys were fractured using various loading modes (uniaxial tension, bending, impact, and torsion, and cyclic stressing), and the corresponding mechanical properties were determined. The unetched and etched fracture surfaces and the microstructures were examined using conventional techniques. The types of <span class="hlt">casting</span> alloys that were the subjects f these investigations include gray iron, ductile iron, <span class="hlt">cast</span> steel, and aluminum-base alloys (A380, A356, and 319). The fractographic studies have yielded these generalizations regarding the topography of the fracture surfaces. In the case of low-ductility alloys such as gray iron and the aluminum-base alloys, the tensile edge of a fracture surface produced by a stress system with a strong bending-moment component has a highly irregular contour, whereas the compressive edge of the fracture surface is quite straight and parallel to the bend axis. On the other hand, the periphery of a fracture surface produced by uniaxial tension has a completely irregular contour. The fracture surface produced by cyclic loading of a gray iron does not display any macroscopic evidence (such as a thumb nail) of the loading mode. However, the fracture surface of each of the other <span class="hlt">casting</span> alloys displays clear, macroscopic evidence of failure induced by fatigue. The aluminum-base alloys fracture completely within the interdendritic region of the microstructure when subjected to monotonic loading by uniaxial tension or bending, whereas a fatigue crack propagates predominantly through the primary crystals of the microstructure.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=tin&pg=3&id=EJ727927','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=tin&pg=3&id=EJ727927"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Casting</span> Freedom, 1860-1862</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Social Education, 2005</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Thomas Crawford, an American Sculptor, created the full-size figure of Freedom in clay. Molds were made, from which a full-size positive plaster model was <span class="hlt">cast</span> in five main sections. This model is on view today in the basement rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building. Clark Mills was a self-taught American sculptor with experience in casting…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED242146.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED242146.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Math: Objectives Guide. Project <span class="hlt">CAST</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Charles County Board of Education, La Plata, MD. Office of Special Education.</p> <p></p> <p>The guide lists math objectives needed for independent living by secondary special education students. One of a series of Project <span class="hlt">CAST</span> (Community and School Together) life skills manuals, the guide outlines basic competencies in terms of goal statements, behavioral objectives, and specialized vocabulary for the following areas: money, making</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=archeology&pg=3&id=EJ168708','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=archeology&pg=3&id=EJ168708"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Summer for Wayfarers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kaltenbronn, Kyra</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>A recreational program involving hiking and camping emphasizes teaching young participants through archeology and adventure experiences about American <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, their technology, and their means of survival in the wilderness. (JD)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title25-vol1-sec31-3.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title25-vol1-sec31-3.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">25 CFR 31.3 - Non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> pupils in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> schools.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 25 <span class="hlt">Indians</span> 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> pupils in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> schools. 31.3 Section 31.3... Non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> pupils in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> schools. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> children who are not eligible for... of maintenance in the school attended, when their presence will not exclude <span class="hlt">Indian</span> pupils...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title25-vol1-sec31-3.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title25-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title25-vol1-sec31-3.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">25 CFR 31.3 - Non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> pupils in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> schools.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 25 <span class="hlt">Indians</span> 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> pupils in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> schools. 31.3 Section 31.3... Non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> pupils in <span class="hlt">Indian</span> schools. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and non-<span class="hlt">Indian</span> children who are not eligible for... of maintenance in the school attended, when their presence will not exclude <span class="hlt">Indian</span> pupils...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED480169.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED480169.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Ishi: A Yahi <span class="hlt">Indian</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>2003</p> <p></p> <p>The Yahi <span class="hlt">Indians</span> were part of a larger tribal group called the Yana. The Yahi way of life, along with the lives of many other California <span class="hlt">Indian</span> groups, changed when European and U.S. settlers came to California. In 1872 Ishi and his family were the last of the Yahi living in the Deer Creek (California) area. By 1911 Ishi was the last surviving</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_1','SCIGOVIMAGE-USGS'); return false;" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/photos/08_20_2015_n63Ul88KKf_08_20_2015_1"><span id="translatedtitle">Survey at West Brule Community wetlands, Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation, SD</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://gallery.usgs.gov/">USGS Multimedia Gallery</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>USGS hydrologist surveying distinct vegetation bands in wetland area <span class="hlt">south</span> of West Brule Community. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Br...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/218688','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/218688"><span id="translatedtitle">Land-based turbine <span class="hlt">casting</span> initiative</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Mueller, B.A.; Spicer, R.A.</p> <p>1995-12-31</p> <p>To meet goals for the ATS program, technical advances developed for aircraft gas turbine engines need to be applied to land-based gas turbines. These advances include directionally solidified and single crystal <span class="hlt">castings</span>, alloys tailored to exploit these microstructures, complex internal cooling schemes, and coatings. The proposed program to scale aircraft gas turbine <span class="hlt">casting</span> technology up to land based gas turbine size components is based on low sulfur alloys, <span class="hlt">casting</span> process development, post-<span class="hlt">cast</span> process development, and establishing <span class="hlt">casting</span> defect tolerance levels. The inspection side is also discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910041720&hterms=thermohaline+circulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%2528thermohaline%2Bcirculation%2529','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910041720&hterms=thermohaline+circulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3D%2528thermohaline%2Bcirculation%2529"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic interbasin exchange</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rintoul, Stephen Rich</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>The exchange of mass and heat between the <span class="hlt">South</span> Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins was estimated using hydrographic data and inverse methods, in order to gain information on the links between the deep-water formation processes occurring within the Atlantic and the global thermohaline circulation. Results demonstrate that the global thermohaline cell associated with the formation and export of North Atlantic deep water (NADW) is closed primarily by a 'cold water path' in which deep water leaving the Atlantic ultimately returns as intermediate water entering the basin through Drake Passage. This conclusion conflicts with the suggestion by Gordon (1986) that the global thermohaline circulation associated with the formation of NADW is closed primarily by a 'warm water path', in which the export of NADW is compensated by an inflow of warm <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean thermocline water <span class="hlt">south</span> of Africa.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6336681','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6336681"><span id="translatedtitle">Process development of thin strip steel <span class="hlt">casting</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.</p> <p>1990-12-01</p> <p>An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip <span class="hlt">casting</span>. <span class="hlt">Casting</span> steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip <span class="hlt">casting</span> of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip <span class="hlt">casting</span> in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow <span class="hlt">casting</span> on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow <span class="hlt">casting</span> processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow <span class="hlt">casting</span> nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow <span class="hlt">casting</span> process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of <span class="hlt">casting</span> substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow <span class="hlt">casting</span> process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel <span class="hlt">casting</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/838429','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/838429"><span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of Part Distortion in Die <span class="hlt">Casting</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>R. Allen Miller</p> <p>2005-03-30</p> <p>The die <span class="hlt">casting</span> process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production <span class="hlt">castings</span> with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die <span class="hlt">casting</span> will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die <span class="hlt">casting</span> process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die <span class="hlt">casting</span> at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die <span class="hlt">casting</span> process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the <span class="hlt">casting</span> and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the <span class="hlt">casting</span>. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the <span class="hlt">casting</span> material model, material properties and thermal interaction between <span class="hlt">casting</span> and dies. To verify the <span class="hlt">casting</span> distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20674573','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20674573"><span id="translatedtitle">Emulsion based <span class="hlt">cast</span> booster - a priming system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gupta, R.N.; Mishra, A.K.</p> <p>2005-07-01</p> <p>This paper explores the potential of emulsion based <span class="hlt">cast</span> booster to be used as primer to initiate bulk delivered emulsion explosives used in mines. An attempt has been made for comparative study between conventional <span class="hlt">cast</span> booster and emulsion based <span class="hlt">cast</span> booster in terms of the initiation process developed and their capability to develop and maintain the stable detonation process in the column explosives. The study has been conducted using a continuous velocity of detonation (VOD) measuring instrument. During this study three blasts have been monitored. In each blast two holes have been selected for study, the first hole being initiated with conventional <span class="hlt">cast</span> booster while the other one with emulsion based <span class="hlt">cast</span> booster. The findings of the study advocates that emulsion based <span class="hlt">cast</span> booster is capable of efficient priming of bulk delivered column explosive with stable detonation process in the column. Further, the booster had advantages over the conventional PETN/TNT based <span class="hlt">cast</span> booster. 5 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=silicon&pg=4&id=ED554273','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=silicon&pg=4&id=ED554273"><span id="translatedtitle">Navigating the Nation and Positioning the Other: Undergraduate Students' Experiences with <span class="hlt">Caste</span>, Class, Gender, and Communalism in Bangalore, India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aranha, Rima Marina</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This dissertation explores the idea of national belonging, held amongst <span class="hlt">Indian</span> youth in general, and male and female college students in an urban city in particular, to examine the multiple ways in which social and cultural dynamics (e.g., communalism, gender, class, and <span class="hlt">caste</span>) interact with their idea of nation. It analyses the data gathered…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Silicon&pg=4&id=ED554273','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Silicon&pg=4&id=ED554273"><span id="translatedtitle">Navigating the Nation and Positioning the Other: Undergraduate Students' Experiences with <span class="hlt">Caste</span>, Class, Gender, and Communalism in Bangalore, India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aranha, Rima Marina</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This dissertation explores the idea of national belonging, held amongst <span class="hlt">Indian</span> youth in general, and male and female college students in an urban city in particular, to examine the multiple ways in which social and cultural dynamics (e.g., communalism, gender, class, and <span class="hlt">caste</span>) interact with their idea of nation. It analyses the data gathered</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998JOM....50g..44S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998JOM....50g..44S"><span id="translatedtitle">The use of tin and bronze in prehistoric southern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> metallurgy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Srinivasan, Sharada</p> <p>1998-07-01</p> <p>Although the findings are from disparate contexts, they demonstrate a long familiarity of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> metal workers with the use of tin and with manipulating bronze alloys to exploit the functional properties of phases and intermetallic compounds. Thus, the copper-bronze tradition in southern <span class="hlt">Indian</span> antiquity and in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> subcontinent has more depth than suspected, with some evidence for the use of local tin sources in southern India. Some of the findings are reasonably peculiar to the region, such as the solid-<span class="hlt">cast</span> bronze images, ? bronze coinage, ? bronze mirrors, and ? bronze slags, while the high-tin ? bronzes and vessels from <span class="hlt">Indian</span> prehistory predate those known elsewhere and probably go back to the Indus Valley. All of this strengthens the case for indigenous copper-bronze traditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Aquino&pg=4&id=EJ136256','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Aquino&pg=4&id=EJ136256"><span id="translatedtitle">Indoamericanismos en la toponimia de Madrid (Traces of American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Languages in the Place Names of Madrid)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hernandez Aquino, Luis</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>Lists names of streets, squares, avenues and other places in Madrid that were borrowed from the American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Languages of <span class="hlt">South</span> America. The original meaning of some of the words is included. (Text is in Spanish.) (TL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=4&lvlid=30','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=4&lvlid=30"><span id="translatedtitle">Asthma and American <span class="hlt">Indians</span>/Alaska Natives</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... <span class="hlt">Indian</span>/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American <span class="hlt">Indians</span>/Alaska Natives In 2012, 147,000 American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>/Native ... reported that they currently have asthma. American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>/Alaska Native children are 80% more likely to have ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhLB..749..172A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhLB..749..172A"><span id="translatedtitle">Search for chameleons with <span class="hlt">CAST</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anastassopoulos, V.; Arik, M.; Aune, S.; Barth, K.; Belov, A.; Bruninger, H.; Cantatore, G.; Carmona, J. M.; Cetin, S. A.; Christensen, F.; Collar, J. I.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Desch, K.; Dermenev, A.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Friedrich, P.; Galn, J.; Garca, J. A.; Gardikiotis, A.; Garza, J. G.; Gazis, E. N.; Geralis, T.; Giomataris, I.; Hailey, C.; Haug, F.; Hasinoff, M. D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jacoby, J.; Jakobsen, A.; Jakov?i?, K.; Kaminski, J.; Karuza, M.; Kavuk, M.; Kr?mar, M.; Krieger, C.; Krger, A.; Laki?, B.; Laurent, J. M.; Liolios, A.; Ljubi?i?, A.; Luzn, G.; Neff, S.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Raffelt, G.; Riege, H.; Rosu, M.; Ruz, J.; Savvidis, I.; Solanki, S. K.; Vafeiadis, T.; Villar, J. A.; Vogel, J. K.; Yildiz, S. C.; Zioutas, K.; Brax, P.; Lavrentyev, I.; Upadhye, A.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>In this work we present a search for (solar) chameleons with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (<span class="hlt">CAST</span>). This novel experimental technique, in the field of dark energy research, exploits both the chameleon coupling to matter (?m) and to photons (??) via the Primakoff effect. By reducing the X-ray detection energy threshold used for axions from 1 keV to 400 eV <span class="hlt">CAST</span> became sensitive to the converted solar chameleon spectrum which peaks around 600 eV. Even though we have not observed any excess above background, we can provide a 95% C.L. limit for the coupling strength of chameleons to photons of ?? ?1011 for 1 <?m <106.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6106985','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6106985"><span id="translatedtitle">MHD technology in aluminum <span class="hlt">casting</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kalinichenko, I.</p> <p>1984-08-01</p> <p>The use of MHD technology in aluminum <span class="hlt">casting</span> is discussed. Associates of the Latvian Academy of Sciences Institute of Physics developed magnetohydrodynamic units for the Siberian plant. A MHD unit made it possible to free five persons from heavy work at the plant. Labor productivity doubled in this section. With the aid of the magnetic field, the alloy silumin is obtained in only three hours. Specialists of the Irkutsk affiliate of the All-Union Scientific Research and Design Institute of the Aluminum, Magnesium and Electrode Industry are convinced that MHD technology has a bright future. However, this will necessitate the development of new MHD technology for different types of <span class="hlt">casting</span> facilities, with their specific features taken into account.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8004911','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8004911"><span id="translatedtitle">Skin holes of titanium <span class="hlt">casting</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miyakawa, O; Watanabe, K; Okawa, S; Nakano, S; Honma, H; Kobayashi, M; Shiokawa, N</p> <p>1993-12-01</p> <p>The present study describes refractories which contribute to formation of skin holes of Ti <span class="hlt">casting</span>. Plates consisting of quartz (Qu) and cristobalite (Cr) powders and Qu- and Cr-MgO mixtures were fired at high temperatures and used as phosphate-free molds. The cross-section of the <span class="hlt">castings</span> was investigated using an optical microscope and an electron probe microanalyzer. Whereas the <span class="hlt">castings</span> into the Qu molds were almost complete, those into the Cr molds were incomplete. The surface reaction zone of the Qu molds formed a typical layered structure with fewer skin holes. That of the latter extended deeply into the interior with a net-shaped Ti-Si phase, cracks, and holes. Addition of MgO to Cr effectively improved the castability and changed the reaction zone to the typical layered structure. However, slender holes occurred along the mold wall. The overall area around the holes was contaminated by Si and Mg. Probably, this resulted from a reaction of forsterite with Ti. The reactivity difference between Qu and Cr was not related to the fired strength of mold. PMID:8004911</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22132508','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22132508"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Cast</span> shadows in wide perspective.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pont, Sylvia C; Wijntjes, Maarten W A; Oomes, Augustinus H J; van Doom, Andrea; van Nierop, Onno; de Ridder, Huib; Koenderink, Jan J</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>We investigated the apparent spatial layout of <span class="hlt">cast</span> shadows up to very wide fields of view. We presented up to 130 degrees wide images in which two 'flat poles' were standing on a green lawn under a cloudless blue sky on a sunny day. The poles threw sharp <span class="hlt">cast</span> shadows on the green, of which one was fixed. The observer's task was to adjust the azimuth of the shadow of the other pole such that it fitted the scene. The source elevation was kept constant. The two <span class="hlt">cast</span> shadows are, of course, parallel in physical space, but generically not in the picture plane because of the wide perspective. We found that observers made huge systematic errors, indicating that, generically, they fail to account for these perspective effects. The systematic deviations could be well described by a weighted linear combination of the directions in the picture plane and in the physical space, with weights that depended on the positions of, and distance between, the poles. PMID:22132508</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/455167','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/455167"><span id="translatedtitle">Tape <span class="hlt">casting</span> of lanthanum chromite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Murphy, M.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Smith, P.A.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are currently being developed for a variety of applications such as stationary on-site power plants and cogeneration. The effects of process additives, ball milling, and solids loading were evaluated for tape <span class="hlt">casting</span> suspensions of glycine-nitrate-synthesized La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.31}CrO{sub 3} powder. An optimized formulation was obtained based on rheological characterization, electrokinetic sonic amplitude measurements, qualitative examination of green tapes, and the sintered microstructure. The tape <span class="hlt">casting</span> formulation incorporated 66:34 methyl ethyl ketone/ethyl alcohol solvent, an aliphatic phosphate ester dispersant, and 80 wt% (35 vol%) solids. The best binder/plasticizer system was 12 wt% (15 vol%) poly(isobutyl methacrylate) and 5 wt% (6.3 vol%) benzyl butyl phthalate plasticizer (binder:plasticizer = 2.3). <span class="hlt">Cast</span> tapes were sintered at 1300 C for 2 h, producing a bulk density of 96.2% theoretical, with linear shrinkage of 22% and an approximate grain size of 1.3 {micro}m.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yellowtail&id=ED184788','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=yellowtail&id=ED184788"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Tales of the Northern Rockies. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Culture Series.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Old Coyote, Sally; Toineeta, Joy Yellowtail</p> <p></p> <p>Part of the Montana Council for <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education's <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Culture Series, the book contains six folk stories recorded on reservations and by headstart teachers. The stories are: "The Owl", a Gros Ventre tale; "How the Robin Got a Red Breast", from the Flathead Tribe; "Old Man Coyote and the Wild Geese", a Crow <span class="hlt">Indian</span> folk story; "How the Animals…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=economic+AND+self-government&pg=7&id=ED271277','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=economic+AND+self-government&pg=7&id=ED271277"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Control of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education: Authority and Responsibility for Progress.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kirkness, Verna J.</p> <p></p> <p>Officially recognized in 1973, the "<span class="hlt">Indian</span> Control of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education" policy articulated philosophy, goals, principles, and directions designed to create an effective educational climate for Canada Natives. The policy acknowledged the need to improve educational opportunities for <span class="hlt">Indians</span> as a preparation for total living, as a means of free</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=history+AND+horse&pg=3&id=ED184789','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=history+AND+horse&pg=3&id=ED184789"><span id="translatedtitle">The Horse and the Plains <span class="hlt">Indian</span>. <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Culture Series.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Schuessler, Raymond</p> <p></p> <p>Produced by the Montana Council for <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education as part of its <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Culture Series, the five short articles in the book explain how the Plains <span class="hlt">Indians</span> got horses in legend and in fact. The stories describe the behavior codes, rules, cultural and social significance, and eventual cessation of horse raids, and the ceremony and tradition</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=land+AND+patterns&pg=7&id=ED232815','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=land+AND+patterns&pg=7&id=ED232815"><span id="translatedtitle">Loss and Reconstitution of Sioux Tribal Lands in <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Weil, Richard H.</p> <p></p> <p>Inconsistent government policies towards American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> landholdings have created jurisdictional chaos on <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota's Sioux reservations. Although the Sioux had occupied the area of <span class="hlt">South</span> Dakota since the seventeenth century, white settlers began to move into the territory in the 1840's. Despite treaties, the federal government began</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-02-13/pdf/2013-03326.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-02-13/pdf/2013-03326.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 10203 - <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Gaming</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-02-13</p> <p>... III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Chippewa-Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Reservation... Chippewa-Cree <span class="hlt">Indians</span> of the Rocky Boy's Reservation and the State of Montana submitted a Class III...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Quechua&pg=4&id=EJ080888','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Quechua&pg=4&id=EJ080888"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education in Colonial Peru</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Martin, Luis</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>The Spaniards who dedicated themselves to the education of the American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> in colonial Peru were firm believers in intellectual capabilities of the <span class="hlt">Indians</span> and in the need to approach them through their own Quechua language. (FF)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.aaip.org/','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.aaip.org/"><span id="translatedtitle">Association of American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Physicians</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... building assistance and services to American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Alaska Native communities and students. Capacity Building Assistance Program ... shared pursuit of excellence in American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> and Alaska Native health care. Donate Now News RSS Feed ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4381312','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4381312"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indian</span> Womanhood: Some Psychological Concepts*</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>De Sousa, Dhanalakshmi; De Sousa, Avinash</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Indian</span> womanhood today is at crossroads. The present paper discusses the status of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> womanhood and its psychological underpinnings. It discusses how <span class="hlt">Indian</span> women have suffered at the hands of their families and society leaving no path but to succumb to psychiatric illness. The role of mental health professionals and family members in supporting and promoting growth and development of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> woman is outlined. PMID:25838719</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6724106','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6724106"><span id="translatedtitle">Interannual variability of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> monsoon and the Southern Oscillation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wu, M.; Hastenrath, S.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Years with abundant Southwest monsoon rainfall in India are characterized by anomalously low pressure over <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia and the adjacent waters, enhanced cross-equatorial flow in the western, and increased cloudiness over the northern portion of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean, continuing from the pre-monsoon through the post-monsoon season; positive temperature anomalies over land and in the Arabian Sea in the pre-monsoon season, changing to negative departures after the monsoon onset. The following causality chain is suggested: the anomalously warm surfaces of <span class="hlt">south</span> Asia and the adjacent ocean in the pre-monsoon season induce a thermal low, thus enhancing the northward directed pressure gradient, and favoring a vigorous cross-equatorial flow over the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean. After the monsoon onset the land surfaces are cooled by evaporation, and the Arabian Sea surface waters by various wind stress effects. However, latent heat release over <span class="hlt">South</span> Asia can now maintain the meridional topography gradients essential to the monsoon circulation. The positive phase of the Southern Oscillation (high pressure over the Eastern <span class="hlt">South</span> Pacific) is associated with circulation departures in the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Ocean sector similar to those characteristic of years with abundant India monsoon rainfall. Abundant rainfall over India during the northern summer monsoon leads the positive mode of the southern Oscillation, and this in turn leads Java rainfall, whose peak is timed about half a year after that of India. A rising Southern Oscillation tendency presages abundant India Southwest Monsoon rainfall but a late monsoon onset. 46 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED149886.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED149886.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The American <span class="hlt">Indian</span>: A Microcourse.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Glick, Norman; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>Designed for secondary students and dealing with the concept of ethnicity in an urban setting, this microcourse on the American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> presents general information on American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> and an in-depth study of <span class="hlt">Indians</span> within the Chicago, Illinois area. Included in this curriculum guide are: seven specific behavioral objectives; course content (some</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-26/pdf/2013-30915.pdf','FEDREG'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-26/pdf/2013-30915.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 78377 - <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Gaming</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-12-26</p> <p>... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED023520.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED023520.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Alcohol and American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Students.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boyce, George A.</p> <p></p> <p>The growing problem of teenage drinking and alcoholism in the United States, especially among <span class="hlt">Indian</span> segments of society, increases the necessity for adequate education concerning alcoholism. This document is prepared for the Bureau of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Affairs (BIA) schools to acquaint <span class="hlt">Indian</span> students with social concepts of alcohol outside their cultural</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=urban+AND+planning+AND+power&pg=5&id=ED221329','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=urban+AND+planning+AND+power&pg=5&id=ED221329"><span id="translatedtitle">Urban <span class="hlt">Indians</span>: Patterns and Transformations.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Higgins, Bryan</p> <p></p> <p>For centuries American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> have been an object of Western fascination. All too often this fascination has been an invented view of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> people. This is especially evident with the recent movement of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> people to urban areas within the United States and Canada. Not only has this movement been ignored by society in general, but it has also…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED067187.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED067187.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Scholarships for American <span class="hlt">Indians</span>, 1972.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Albuquerque, NM.</p> <p></p> <p>The 1972 scholarship booklet for American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> presents pertinent information on scholarship opportunities specifically designated for college-bound <span class="hlt">Indian</span> youth. The booklet is divided into 2 sections. Chapter 1 reflects American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> aid avenues. Chapter 2 is a compilation of available Federal and state student aid programs. Each chapter is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED420483.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED420483.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Standards for History.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. Office of Indian Education Programs.</p> <p></p> <p>This document presents American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> history standards that are closely aligned with the 1996 expanded edition of the U.S. national standards for history. The American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> standards should be used in conjunction with the national standards document itself and therefore, follow the same format, organization, and language. The <span class="hlt">Indian</span>-specific…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED527093.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED527093.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Facts about American <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>American Indian College Fund, 2010</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>As a result of living in remote rural areas, American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> living on reservations have limited access to higher education. One-third of American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> live on reservations, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the most recent U.S. government statistics, the overall poverty rate for American <span class="hlt">Indians</span>/Alaska Natives, including…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mineral+AND+mining&pg=3&id=EJ340486','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mineral+AND+mining&pg=3&id=EJ340486"><span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Mineral Development Act.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Houle, Antoinette</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Discusses the objectives of the <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Mineral Development Act of 1982 (IMDA) and the possible effects it may have on <span class="hlt">Indian</span> mineral development. Explains how the provisions of IMDA work to provide <span class="hlt">Indian</span> tribes with greater flexibility for the development and sale of their mineral resources. (ML)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=alien+AND+life&pg=4&id=ED321953','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=alien+AND+life&pg=4&id=ED321953"><span id="translatedtitle">A History of <span class="hlt">Indian</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reyhner, Jon; Eder, Jeanne</p> <p></p> <p>The goal of assimilating American <span class="hlt">Indians</span> into an alien culture seemed inevitable as superior weaponry and foreign diseases conquered the <span class="hlt">Indians</span>. Only in the 20th century has serious consideration been given to allowing <span class="hlt">Indians</span> to choose their own destiny. Using many excerpts from historical accounts, this book describes educational efforts by</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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